Science.gov

Sample records for reproductive life span

  1. Life span, reproductive output, and reproductive opportunity in captive Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii).

    PubMed

    Nuss, Kara; Warneke, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In the absence of long-term field studies, demographic and reproductive records from animals housed in zoos and research laboratories are a valuable tool for the study of life history variables relating to reproduction. In this study, we analyzed studbook records of more than 2,000 individuals born over a 40-year period (1965-2004) to describe life history patterns of captive Goeldi's monkeys (Callimico goeldii) housed in North America and Europe. Using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis methods, we found the mean life span to be 5.5 years. The rate of infant mortality, defined as death before 30 days, was approximately 30%, with European animals being more likely to survive infancy than North American animals. When individuals surviving at least 1.5 years are considered, lifetime reproductive output averaged 3.5 offspring, yet more than one-third of individuals did not produce any offspring. Using a smaller dataset of individuals with known pairing histories, we developed a measure of opportunity for reproduction (OFR), which represented the total time an individual was known to be housed with a potential mate. For both sexes, we found that the correlation between OFR and number of offspring produced was much higher than the correlation between life span and number of offspring produced. This result highlights the importance of taking into account an individual's OFR. As a whole, our findings help characterize the life histories of captive Goeldi's monkeys and emphasize the impact management practices may have on reproductive success. PMID:20131357

  2. Life span and reproductive cost explain interspecific variation in the optimal onset of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Mourocq, Emeline; Bize, Pierre; Bouwhuis, Sandra; Bradley, Russell; Charmantier, Anne; de la Cruz, Carlos; Drobniak, Szymon M; Espie, Richard H M; Herényi, Márton; Hötker, Hermann; Krüger, Oliver; Marzluff, John; Møller, Anders P; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Phillips, Richard A; Radford, Andrew N; Roulin, Alexandre; Török, János; Valencia, Juliana; van de Pol, Martijn; Warkentin, Ian G; Winney, Isabel S; Wood, Andrew G; Griesser, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Fitness can be profoundly influenced by the age at first reproduction (AFR), but to date the AFR-fitness relationship only has been investigated intraspecifically. Here, we investigated the relationship between AFR and average lifetime reproductive success (LRS) across 34 bird species. We assessed differences in the deviation of the Optimal AFR (i.e., the species-specific AFR associated with the highest LRS) from the age at sexual maturity, considering potential effects of life history as well as social and ecological factors. Most individuals adopted the species-specific Optimal AFR and both the mean and Optimal AFR of species correlated positively with life span. Interspecific deviations of the Optimal AFR were associated with indices reflecting a change in LRS or survival as a function of AFR: a delayed AFR was beneficial in species where early AFR was associated with a decrease in subsequent survival or reproductive output. Overall, our results suggest that a delayed onset of reproduction beyond maturity is an optimal strategy explained by a long life span and costs of early reproduction. By providing the first empirical confirmations of key predictions of life-history theory across species, this study contributes to a better understanding of life-history evolution. PMID:26763090

  3. Determination of the cost of worker reproduction via diminished life span in the ant Diacamma sp.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kazuki; Kikuta, Noritsugu; Kikuchi, Tomonori

    2012-05-01

    Workers of social Hymenoptera can usually produce male offspring, but rarely do so in the presence of a queen despite the potential individual fitness benefit. Various mechanisms have been hypothesized to regulate worker reproduction, including avoiding the colony-level cost of worker reproduction. However, firm quantitative evidence is lacking to support that hypothesis. Here, we accurately quantified this cost by studying an ant species (Diacamma sp.) in which worker reproduction is rare in the presence of the gamergate (the functional queen). A series of experiments to manipulate worker-gamergate contact revealed that short-term brood-production efficiency is not changed by the presence of worker reproduction. However, when workers reproduce, their average life span is reduced to between 74% and 88% of that in the absence of reproduction, indicating a long-term cost to the colony. In theory, this cost can explain the policing of worker reproduction under a queen-single mating system, but the cost does not appear to be high enough to stop worker reproduction. When contact with the gamergate is lost, it is only the nonreproductive workers whose life span was reduced; the reproductive workers lived as long as nonorphaned workers. We suggest that an increased workload can account for the reduction in life span better than a trade-off between reproduction and longevity. PMID:22519774

  4. Age at Menopause, Reproductive Life Span, and Type 2 Diabetes Risk

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Judith S.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Sharp, Stephen J.; Ong, Ken K.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Ardanaz, Eva; Amiano, Pilar; Boeing, Heiner; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Crowe, Francesca L.; de Lauzon-Guillain, Blandine; Duell, Eric J.; Fagherazzi, Guy; Franks, Paul W.; Grioni, Sara; Groop, Leif C.; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J.; Nilsson, Peter M.; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, J. Ramón; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Sánchez, María-José; Slimani, Nadia; Teucher, Birgit; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L.; Feskens, Edith J.M.; Langenberg, Claudia; Forouhi, Nita G.; Riboli, Elio; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Age at menopause is an important determinant of future health outcomes, but little is known about its relationship with type 2 diabetes. We examined the associations of menopausal age and reproductive life span (menopausal age minus menarcheal age) with diabetes risk. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Data were obtained from the InterAct study, a prospective case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. A total of 3,691 postmenopausal type 2 diabetic case subjects and 4,408 subcohort members were included in the analysis, with a median follow-up of 11 years. Prentice weighted Cox proportional hazards models were adjusted for age, known risk factors for diabetes, and reproductive factors, and effect modification by BMI, waist circumference, and smoking was studied. RESULTS Mean (SD) age of the subcohort was 59.2 (5.8) years. After multivariable adjustment, hazard ratios (HRs) of type 2 diabetes were 1.32 (95% CI 1.04–1.69), 1.09 (0.90–1.31), 0.97 (0.86–1.10), and 0.85 (0.70–1.03) for women with menopause at ages <40, 40–44, 45–49, and ≥55 years, respectively, relative to those with menopause at age 50–54 years. The HR per SD younger age at menopause was 1.08 (1.02–1.14). Similarly, a shorter reproductive life span was associated with a higher diabetes risk (HR per SD lower reproductive life span 1.06 [1.01–1.12]). No effect modification by BMI, waist circumference, or smoking was observed (P interaction all > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Early menopause is associated with a greater risk of type 2 diabetes. PMID:23230098

  5. Tissue signaling pathways in the regulation of life-span and reproduction in females of the linden bug, Pyrrhocoris apterus.

    PubMed

    Hodkova, Magdalena

    2008-02-01

    Molecular studies on Drosophila melanogaster do not provide consistent results with regard to the hormonal regulation of a trade-off between life-span and fecundity. To unravel the physiological basis of the cost of reproduction without affecting animal's genotype, a new insect model, Pyrrhocoris apterus, was employed. Reproduction was manipulated by surgical ablations of tissues implicated in reproductive endocrinology, namely the pars intercerebralis (PI) of the brain, the corpus allatum (CA) and the ovary, and the response of life-span to these interventions under diapause-promoting short days and reproduction-promoting long days was measured. Life-span of long-day females increased in the following order: control (high fecundity)=ovary-ablation (no egg production)reproduction)reproduction). These results show that: (1) PI-signaling (presumably insulin-like peptides) and CA-signaling (juvenile hormone) reduce life-span of long-day females in additive manner and (2) the ovary has no effect on life-span. Life-span of short-day females increased in the following order: PI-ablation (low fecundity)reproduction)reproduction). These results implicate factors from the PI that actively extend life-span of short-day females via down-regulation of CA-signaling and also via CA-independent pathway(s). Overall, the data indicate that life-span and reproduction are linked by signals from PI and CA, but, in contrast with the widely held view, neither production of eggs nor gonad-signaling are costly to female longevity. PMID:18206160

  6. Dietary restriction in two rotifer species: the effect of the length of food deprivation on life span and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Weithoff, Guntram

    2007-08-01

    According to resource allocation theory, animals face a trade off between the allocation of resources into reproduction and into individual growth/maintenance. This trade off is reinforced when food conditions decline. It is well established in biological research that many animals increase their life span when food is in suboptimal supply for growth and/or reproduction. Such a situation of reduced food availability is called dietary restriction. An increase in life span under dietary restricted conditions is seen as a strategy to tolerate periods of food shortage so that the animals can start reproduction again when food is in greater supply. In this study, the effect of dietary restriction on life span and reproduction in two rotifer species, Cephalodella sp. and Elosa worallii, was investigated using life table experiments. The food concentration under dietary restricted conditions was below the threshold for population growth. It was (1) tested whether the rotifers start reproduction again after food replenishment, and (2) estimated whether the time scale of dietary restricted conditions is relevant for the persistence of a population in the field. Only E. worallii responded to dietary restriction with an increase in life span at the expense of reproduction. After replenishment of food, E. worallii started to reproduce again within 1 day. With an increase in the duration of dietary restricted conditions of up to 15 days, which is longer than the median life span of E. worallii under food saturation, the life span increased and the life time reproduction decreased. These results suggest that in a temporally (or spatially) variable environment, some rotifer populations can persist even during long periods of severe food deprivation. PMID:17453249

  7. The effect of developmental nutrition on life span and fecundity depends on the adult reproductive environment in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    May, Christina M; Doroszuk, Agnieszka; Zwaan, Bas J

    2015-01-01

    Both developmental nutrition and adult nutrition affect life-history traits; however, little is known about whether the effect of developmental nutrition depends on the adult environment experienced. We used the fruit fly to determine whether life-history traits, particularly life span and fecundity, are affected by developmental nutrition, and whether this depends on the extent to which the adult environment allows females to realize their full reproductive potential. We raised flies on three different developmental food levels containing increasing amounts of yeast and sugar: poor, control, and rich. We found that development on poor or rich larval food resulted in several life-history phenotypes indicative of suboptimal conditions, including increased developmental time, and, for poor food, decreased adult weight. However, development on poor larval food actually increased adult virgin life span. In addition, we manipulated the reproductive potential of the adult environment by adding yeast or yeast and a male. This manipulation interacted with larval food to determine adult fecundity. Specifically, under two adult conditions, flies raised on poor larval food had higher reproduction at certain ages – when singly mated this occurred early in life and when continuously mated with yeast this occurred during midlife. We show that poor larval food is not necessarily detrimental to key adult life-history traits, but does exert an adult environment-dependent effect, especially by affecting virgin life span and altering adult patterns of reproductive investment. Our findings are relevant because (1) they may explain differences between published studies on nutritional effects on life-history traits; (2) they indicate that optimal nutritional conditions are likely to be different for larvae and adults, potentially reflecting evolutionary history; and (3) they urge for the incorporation of developmental nutritional conditions into the central life-history concept of resource acquisition and allocation. PMID:25859322

  8. Longevity for free? Increased reproduction with limited trade-offs in Drosophila melanogaster selected for increased life span.

    PubMed

    Wit, Janneke; Sarup, Pernille; Lupsa, Nikolett; Malte, Hans; Frydenberg, Jane; Loeschcke, Volker

    2013-03-01

    Selection for increased life span in Drosophila melanogaster has been shown to correlate with decreased early fecundity and increased fecundity later in life. This phenomenon has been ascribed to the existence of trade-offs in which limited resources can be invested in either somatic maintenance or reproduction. In our longevity selection lines, we did not find such a trade-off. Rather, we find that females have similar or higher fecundity throughout life compared to non-selected controls. To determine whether increased longevity affects responses in other traits, we looked at several stress resistance traits (chill coma recovery, heat knockdown, desiccation and starvation), geotactic behaviour, egg-to-adult viability, body size, developmental time as well as metabolic rate. Longevity selected flies were more starvation resistant. However, in females longevity and fecundity were not negatively correlated with the other traits assayed. Males from longevity selected lines were slower at recovering from a chill induced coma and resting metabolic rate increased with age, but did not correlate with life span. PMID:23353929

  9. Life-Span Extension by Caloric Restriction Is Determined by Type and Level of Food Reduction and by Reproductive Mode in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We measured life span and fecundity of three reproductive modes in a clone of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas subjected to chronic caloric restriction (CCR) over a range of food concentrations or to intermittent fasting (IF). IF increased life span 50%–70% for all three modes, whereas CCR increased life span of asexual females derived from sexually or asexually produced eggs, but not that of sexual females. The main effect of CR on both asexual modes was to delay death at young ages, rather than to prevent death at middle ages or to greatly extend maximum life span; in contrast CR in sexual females greatly increased the life span of a few long-lived individuals. Lifetime fecundity did not decrease with CCR, suggesting a lack of resource allocation trade-off between somatic maintenance and reproduction. Multiple outcomes for a clonal lineage indicate that different responses are established through epigenetic programming, whereas differences in life-span allocations suggest that multiple genetic mechanisms mediate life-span extension. PMID:22904096

  10. Delusional Disorder over the Reproductive Life Span: The Potential Influence of Menopause on the Clinical Course

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Alexandre; Molina-Andreu, Oriol; Penadés, Rafael; Garriga, Marina; Pons, Alexandre; Catalán, Rosa; Bernardo, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Recent evidence supports an association between estrogen levels and severity of psychopathology in schizophrenia women. Our main goal was to investigate whether delusional disorder (DD) women with premenopausal onset and those with postmenopausal onset differ in demographic and clinical features. Methods. Psychopathological symptoms were assessed in 80 DD women (DSM-IV-TR), at baseline and after six and 24 months. Scores in the PANSS, PSP for functionality, HRSD 17 items, C-SSRS for suicide, and the SUMD were considered outcome variables. For comparison purposes, t- and χ2-tests were performed and nonparametric tests when necessary. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) was conducted for multivariate comparisons. Results. 57 out of 80 DD women completed the study. When unadjusted, DD with premenopausal onset had a longer DUP, higher educational level, and a tendency toward higher rates of gynaecological disorders. Erotomanic type was most frequent in DD women premenopausal onset, and somatic and jealous types were most frequent in those with postmenopausal onset. After 24 months, DD women with premenopausal onset showed higher depressive symptoms and a tendency toward higher rates of psychotic relapses. Conclusions. Our results support that some aspects of psychopathology and insight may differ according to the onset of DD and the reproductive status. PMID:26600949

  11. Time scale matters: genetic analysis does not support adaptation-by-time as the mechanism for adaptive seasonal declines in kokanee reproductive life span

    PubMed Central

    Morbey, Yolanda E; Jensen, Evelyn L; Russello, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal declines of fitness-related traits are often attributed to environmental effects or individual-level decisions about reproductive timing and effort, but genetic variation may also play a role. In populations of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), seasonal declines in reproductive life span have been attributed to adaptation-by-time, in which divergent selection for different traits occurs among reproductively isolated temporal components of a population. We evaluated this hypothesis in kokanee (freshwater obligate Oncorhynchus nerka) by testing for temporal genetic structure in neutral and circadian-linked loci. We detected no genetic differences in presumably neutral loci among kokanee with different arrival and maturation dates within a spawning season. Similarly, we detected no temporal genetic structure in OtsClock1b, Omy1009uw, or OmyFbxw11, candidate loci associated with circadian function. The genetic evidence from this study and others indicates a lack of support for adaptation-by-time as an important evolutionary mechanism underlying seasonal declines in reproductive life span and a need for greater consideration of other mechanisms such as time-dependent, adaptive adjustment of reproductive effort. PMID:25478160

  12. Life Span Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    2005-01-01

    This chapter, rooted in life span developmental research and theory, examines domains of subjective well-being: emotional, social, and psychological. What is the impact of these domains on the learner's experience of education? It invites the reader to consider implications for learning through the use of learners' narratives.

  13. Subsistence-patterns, gender roles, effective temperature, and the evolutionary timing of a post reproductive life span.

    PubMed

    Loffler, German

    2016-04-01

    Evolutionary anthropologists explain menopause and the start of a post reproductive lifespan (PRLS), as beneficiary for older women who can now help contribute to their children/grandchildren's wellbeing. This paper presents a new model with the aim to elucidate when, where, and for whom, such benefits may have arisen. In foraging societies, women contribute nutrients to their social groups/family units to a greater degree as overall effective temperatures (ETs) rise. Where the ET is favorable for women's contributions (ETs between 15 and 20), selection does lengthen the PRLS of women because women contribute sufficiently to enhance their own inclusive fitness. Paleo-environment records suggest that the climate necessary to encourage an increase PRLS occurred shortly after the younger dryad in emerging subtropical settings. Subsistence patterns and gender roles may have played a role in the evolution of PRLS in human females. PMID:26968909

  14. Life-Span Learning: A Developmental Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, James E.

    2003-01-01

    The article discusses learning as embedded processes of development and aging, and as social activity over the life course. The concept of life-span learning is proposed and outlined to discuss these processes as aspects of and propositions in life-span development and aging theory. Life-span learning processes arise and continuously develop in a…

  15. Mating System Transitions Drive Life Span Evolution in Pristionchus Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Weadick, Cameron J; Sommer, Ralf J

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between the sexes influence evolution at many scales, but not all animal species conform to the familiar male-female (dioecious) mating system; such taxa are powerful tools for studying the evolutionary importance of sexual selection and conflict on all manner of life-history traits, including longevity. We tested for an effect of mating system on adult life span in Pristionchus nematodes, where self-fertile hermaphrodites have replaced females multiple times independently throughout the genus (androdioecy). By measuring adult life span for 11 species (6 dioecious, 5 androdioecious), we found that life span is considerably shorter in hermaphrodites relative to closely related females. This effect is not a cost of reproduction; brood size did not reliably trade off with life span in self-fertilizing hermaphrodites or in mated females. Furthermore, we found that sexual dimorphism in life span varied among dioecious species, with females generally outliving males. Finally, we documented intraspecific variation for life span and cuticular disease (blistering) prevalence in Pristionchus pacificus, a model system for evolutionary-developmental biology. This work demonstrates that mating system transitions and life span evolution are linked in Pristionchus nematodes and provides a foundation for future comparative and mechanistic studies of aging in this genus. PMID:27028079

  16. Adaptive prolonged postreproductive life span in killer whales.

    PubMed

    Foster, Emma A; Franks, Daniel W; Mazzi, Sonia; Darden, Safi K; Balcomb, Ken C; Ford, John K B; Croft, Darren P

    2012-09-14

    Prolonged life after reproduction is difficult to explain evolutionarily unless it arises as a physiological side effect of increased longevity or it benefits related individuals (i.e., increases inclusive fitness). There is little evidence that postreproductive life spans are adaptive in nonhuman animals. By using multigenerational records for two killer whale (Orcinus orca) populations in which females can live for decades after their final parturition, we show that postreproductive mothers increase the survival of offspring, particularly their older male offspring. This finding may explain why female killer whales have evolved the longest postreproductive life span of all nonhuman animals. PMID:22984064

  17. Families as Life Span Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Professionals dealing with challenging behavior frequently operate detached from the other relationships in the child's life. This narrow approach has been called the unilateral strategy based on the belief that the child's outside world can be ignored and behavior can be changed by administering specific corrective interventions. In contrast,…

  18. The Cost of Uncertain Life Span*

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Ryan D.

    2012-01-01

    A considerable amount of uncertainty surrounds the length of human life. The standard deviation in adult life span is about 15 years in the U.S., and theory and evidence suggest it is costly. I calibrate a utility-theoretic model of preferences over length of life and show that one fewer year in standard deviation is worth about half a mean life year. Differences in the standard deviation exacerbate cross-sectional differences in life expectancy between the U.S. and other industrialized countries, between rich and poor countries, and among poor countries. Accounting for the cost of life-span variance also appears to amplify recently discovered patterns of convergence in world average human well-being. This is partly for methodological reasons and partly because unconditional variance in human length of life, primarily the component due to infant mortality, has exhibited even more convergence than life expectancy. PMID:22368324

  19. Visual Search Across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hommel, Bernhard; Li, Karen Z. H.; Li, Shu-Chen

    2004-01-01

    Gains and losses in visual search were studied across the life span in a representative sample of 298 individuals from 6 to 89 years of age. Participants searched for single-feature and conjunction targets of high or low eccentricity. Search was substantially slowed early and late in life, age gradients were more pronounced in conjunction than in…

  20. Genetic (Co)Variation for Life Span in Rhabditid Nematodes: Role of Mutation, Selection, and History

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ambuj; Salomon, Matthew P.; Grigaltchik, Veronica; Baer, Charles F.

    2009-01-01

    The evolutionary mechanisms maintaining genetic variation in life span, particularly post-reproductive life span, are poorly understood. We characterized the effects of spontaneous mutations on life span in the rhabditid nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae and standing genetic variance for life span and correlation of life span with fitness in C. briggsae. Mutations decreased mean life span, a signature of directional selection. Mutational correlations between life span and fitness were consistently positive. The average selection coefficient against new mutations in C. briggsae was approximately 2% when homozygous. The pattern of phylogeographic variation in life span is inconsistent with global mutation–selection balance (MSB), but MSB appears to hold at the local level. Standing genetic correlations in C. briggsae reflect mutational correlations at a local scale but not at a broad phylogeographic level. At the local scale, results are broadly consistent with predictions of the “mutation accumulation” hypothesis for the evolution of aging. PMID:19671885

  1. Spatial Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates age-related effects across the adult life span on spatial abilities (testing subabilities based on a distinction between spatial visualization, mental rotation, and perspective taking) and spatial self-assessments. The sample consisted of 454 participants (223 women and 231 men) from 20 to 91 years of age. Results showed…

  2. Spatial Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates age-related effects across the adult life span on spatial abilities (testing subabilities based on a distinction between spatial visualization, mental rotation, and perspective taking) and spatial self-assessments. The sample consisted of 454 participants (223 women and 231 men) from 20 to 91 years of age. Results showed

  3. Sensorimotor Synchronization across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drewing, Knut; Aschersleben, Gisa; Li, Shu-Chen

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the contribution of general processing resources as well as other more specific factors to the life-span development of sensorimotor synchronization and its component processes. Within a synchronization tapping paradigm, a group of 286 participants, 6 to 88 years of age, were asked to synchronize finger taps with…

  4. [Microgravity, life span and biological age of animals].

    PubMed

    Serova, L V

    2002-01-01

    Summarized are author's and literary data about the microgravity effects on life span and biological age of animals obtained in experiments with laboratory rats flown in biosatellites Kosmos. Exposure of rats in the spaceflight microgravity as long as 3 wk. (up to 1/50th of the life period of this species) did not reduce the life span post flight. Alterations in biological age as judged by the reproductive function, general resistance and tissue regeneration rate were minor and in a number of parameters were significantly less as compared with the shifts resulting from simulation of the physiological effects of microgravity in laboratory (for a similar period). Prospects of investigations into this problem are considered. PMID:12442585

  5. Attitudes Toward Death Across the Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maiden, Robert; Walker, Gail

    To understand the change and development of people's attitudes toward death over the life span, a 62-item attitude questionnaire on death and dying was administered to 90 adults. Participants included five females and five males in each of nine age categories: 18-20, 20-24, 25-29, 30-34, 35-39, 40-49, 50-59, 60-64, and 65 or older. Participants…

  6. Physiological basis for long life span.

    PubMed

    Ma, Y X; Yue, Z; Wang, Z S; Chen, S Q; Liang, Z J; Zhang, J G; Qi, G; Lin, H

    1997-10-01

    A collection of clinical data is reported on nonagenarians in comparison to an 'average' population of younger age. The results of these clinical data indicated that a vital physiological basis for long life span probably existed. The basis include a better micro-blood-flow state, a better cardiac, immune (nature killer cell activity), adrenocortical, hepatic and renal function, and a higher level of high density lipoprotein cholesterol. It is suggested that the method, including Chinese traditional medicine, to improve the micro-blood-flow, nature killer cell activity, high density lipoprotein cholesterol and vital organ function may be beneficial for life preservation and aging retarding. PMID:9255757

  7. How The Genome Got a Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Lappé, Martine; Landecker, Hannah

    2015-01-01

    In the space of little more than a decade, ideas of the human genome have shifted significantly, with the emergence of the notion that the genome an individual changes with development, age, disease, environmental inputs, and time. This paper examines the emergence of the genome with a life span, one that experiences drift, instability and mutability, and a host of other temporal changes. We argue that developments in chromatin biology have provided the basis for this genomic embodiment of experience and exposure. We analyze how time has come to matter for the genome through chromatin, providing analysis of examples in which the human life course is being explored as a set of material changes to chromatin. A genome with a lifespan aligns the molecular and the experiential in new ways, shifting ideas of life stages, their interrelation, and the temporality of health and disease. PMID:26213491

  8. Ovarian hormone level alterations during rat post-reproductive life-span influence CD8 + T-cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Kosec, Duško; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Pilipović, Ivan; Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Djikić, Jasmina; Bufan, Biljana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2015-10-01

    The study examined the putative role of ovarian hormones in shaping of rat peripheral T-cell compartment during post-reproductive period. In 20-month-old rats ovariectomized (Ox) at the very end of reproductive period, thymic output, cellularity and composition of major TCRαβ + peripheral blood lymphocyte and splenocyte subsets were analyzed. Ovariectomy led to the enlargement of CD8 + peripheral blood lymphocyte and splenocyte subpopulations. This reflected: (i) a more efficient thymic generation of CD8 + cells as indicated by increased number of CD4+CD8 + double positive and the most mature CD4-CD8+TCRαβ(high) thymocytes and CD8 + recent thymic emigrants (RTEs) in peripheral blood, but not in the spleen of Ox rats, and (ii) the expansion of CD8 + memory/activated peripheral blood lymphocytes and splenocytes. The latter was consistent with a greater frequency of proliferating cells among freshly isolated memory/activated CD8 + peripheral blood lymphocytes and splenocytes and increased proliferative response of CD8 + splenocytes to stimulation with plate-bound anti-CD3 antibody. The former could be related to the rise in splenic IL-7 and IL-15 mRNA expression. Although ovariectomy affected the overall number of CD4 + T cells in none of the examined compartments, it increased CD4+FoxP3 + peripheral blood lymphocyte and splenocyte counts by enhancing their generation in periphery. Collectively, the results suggest that ovariectomy-induced long-lasting disturbances in ovarian hormone levels (mirrored in diminished progesterone serum level in 20-month-old rats) affects both thymic CD8 + cell generation and peripheral homeostasis and leads to the expansion of CD4+FoxP3 + cells in the periphery, thereby enhancing autoreactive cell control on account of immune system efficacy to combat infections and tumors. PMID:25716018

  9. Effects of anticonvulsant drugs on life span.

    PubMed

    Kornfeld, Kerry; Evason, Kimberley

    2006-04-01

    Aging is characterized by widespread degenerative changes in tissue morphology and function and an increase in the incidence of human diseases such as cancer, stroke, and Alzheimer disease. Findings from recent genetic studies suggest that molecular mechanisms that influence life span are evolutionarily conserved, and interventions that extend the life span of model organisms such as worms and flies are likely to have similar effects on vertebrates such as humans. However, little progress has been made in identifying drugs that delay aging. We identified 3 pharmacologic compounds, ethosuximide, trimethadione, and 3,3-diethyl-2-pyrrolidinone, that extend lifespan and delay age-related degenerative changes in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans. All 3 compounds are anticonvulsants that modulate neural activity in vertebrates, and ethosuximide and trimethadione are used to treat absence seizures in humans. We discuss existing evidence that these drugs might also delay vertebrate aging and suggest experiments that could test this hypothesis. Genetic and cell ablation studies conducted with model organisms have demonstrated connections between the nervous system and aging. Our studies provide additional support for the hypothesis that neural activity plays a role in lifespan determination, since ethosuximide and trimethadione regulated neuromuscular activity in nematodes. Our findings suggest that the lifespan extending activity of these compounds is related to the anticonvulsant activity, implicating neural activity in the regulation of aging. We also discuss models that explain how the nervous system influences lifespan. PMID:16606760

  10. Life span and life course approaches to dermatological disease.

    PubMed

    Ryff, Carol D

    2013-01-01

    Social and behavioral scientists have long been interested in cumulative, life course processes. This chapter reviews prototypical questions and methods from the life span approach in psychology as well as the life course approach in sociology. Their relevance for understanding the unfolding lives of those who suffer from skin disorders is then considered. Key themes extracted from these approaches are how skin disease impacts life course development, how skin disorders influence personal agency and social networks, whether the historical context surrounding dermatological disease is changing, how accumulation processes occur over time, and the need to consider multiple life pathways, involving both profiles of vulnerability and resilience. PMID:23796805

  11. Dietary and lifestyle predictors of age at natural menopause and reproductive span in the Shanghai Women's Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Dorjgochoo, Tsogzolmaa; Kallianpur, Asha; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Yang, Gong; Li, Honglan; Zheng, Wei; Shu, Xiao Ou

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Modifiable factors predicting the onset of menopause, a transition with important implications for women's health, have not been fully characterized. We evaluated the impact of dietary, lifestyle and reproductive factors on age at natural menopause and reproductive span in Chinese women. Design: Study participants were Chinese women aged 4070 who experienced natural menopause and participated in a population-based, prospective study, the Shanghai Women's Health Study (n=33,054). Dietary intakes at the baseline survey were assessed by food-frequency questionnaire. Regression (?) coefficients, calculated by multivariable linear regression, were used to estimate the effects of dietary, lifestyle, and reproductive patterns on age at menopause and the number of reproductive years, adjusting for potential confounding factors. Results: Early menarche, younger age at first-live birth, older age at last live-birth, longer duration of breastfeeding, and higher parity were associated with longer reproductive years (Ptrend<0.01 for all). Higher body-mass index at age 20, mid-life weight gain, and leisure-time physical activity during adolescence and adulthood predicted later menopause and longer reproductive span (Ptrend<0.01 for all). Total intakes of calories, fruits, protein, and possibly carbohydrates were positively associated with later menopause (Ptrend <0.05 for all) and longer reproductive span [Ptrend <0.05, except for carbohydrates (Ptrend =0.06)], and long-term tea consumption predicted longer reproductive span (Ptrend =0.03). Vegetable, fat, soy, and fiber intakes did not significantly affect reproductive span or age at menopause. Smoking was inversely related to both age at menopause and reproductive span (Ptrend <0.01). Conclusions: In addition to reproductive factors, intakes of fruit, protein, smoking, and tea consumption, lifetime patterns of physical activity, and weight gain influenced the onset of menopause and/or reproductive span in Chinese women. PMID:18600186

  12. Stress Proteins in Aging and Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Murshid, Ayesha; Eguchi, Takanori; Calderwood, Stuart K.

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are molecular chaperones and have been implicated in longevity and aging in many species. Their major functions include, chaperoning misfolded or newly synthesized polypeptides, protecting cells from proteotoxic stress, and processing of immunogenic agents. These proteins are expressed constitutively and can be induced by stresses such as heat, oxidative stress and many more. The induction of HSP in aging could potentially maintain protein homeostasis and longevity by refolding the damaged proteins which accumulate during aging and are toxic to cells. HSP are shown to increase life span in model organisms such as C. elegans and decrease aging related proteotoxicity. Thus, decrease in HSP in aging is associated with disruption of cellular homeostasis which causes diseases such as cancer, cell senescence and neurodegeneration. HSP levels are decreased with aging in most organs including neurons. Aging also causes attenuation or alteration of many signaling pathways as well as the expression of transcription factors such as heat shock factor (HSF). The alteration in regulation and synthesis of Forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) family of transcription factors as well as major antioxidant enzymes [manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase] are also seen in aging. Among many signaling mechanisms involved in altering longevity and aging, the insulin/IGF1 pathway and the Sir2 deacetylase are highly significant. This review inquires into the role of some of these pathways in longevity/aging along with HSP. PMID:23742046

  13. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzyński, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the “neutron discrepancy problem” – the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima – was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  14. 78. VIEW SHOWING PLACEMENT OF LIFE SPAN SHOE ON PIER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. VIEW SHOWING PLACEMENT OF LIFE SPAN SHOE ON PIER 6, LOOKING NORTH, March 5, 1935 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  15. Developmental Regulation across the Life Span: Toward a New Synthesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haase, Claudia M.; Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    How can individuals regulate their own development to live happy, healthy, and productive lives? Major theories of developmental regulation across the life span have been proposed (e.g., dual-process model of assimilation and accommodation; motivational theory of life-span development; model of selection, optimization, and compensation), but they…

  16. Teaching the Psychology of Aging: A Life-Span Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seltzer, Mildred M.

    There is a vast body of literature devoted to an examination of life-span development. Several authors have described the characteristics of the life-span approach and have distinguished it from more traditional forms of psychology. Emphasis has been placed on the multidirectional and multidimensional nature of development and change, as well as

  17. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the

  18. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the…

  19. Boundaries of life: estimating the life span of the biosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, S.; Bounama, C.; von Bloh, W.

    We present a minimal model for the global carbon cycle of the Earth containing the reservoirs mantle ocean floor continental crust continental biosphere and the Kerogen as well as the aggregated reservoir ocean and atmosphere and obtain reasonable values for the present distribution of carbon in the surface reservoirs of the Earth The Earth system model for the long-term carbon cycle is specified by introducing three different types of biosphere prokaryotes eucaryotes and complex multicellular life They are characterized by different global temperature tolerance windows prokaryotes 2oC 100oC eucaryotes 5oC 45oC complex multicellular life 0oC 30oC From the Archaean to the future there always exists a prokaryotic biosphere 2 Gyr ago eucaryotic life first appears because the global surface temperature reaches the tolerance window for eucaryotes The emergence of complex multicellular life is connected with an explosive increase in biomass and a strong decrease in Cambrian global surface temperature at about 0 54 Gyr ago In the long-term future the three types of biosphere will die out in reverse sequence of their appearance For realistic values of the biotic enhancement of weathering there is no bistability in the future solutions for complex life Therefore complex organisms will not extinct by an implosion in comparison to the Cambrian explosion Eucaryotes and complex life become extinct because of too high surface temperatures in the future The ultimate life span of the biosphere is defined by the extinction of procaryotes in about 1 6 Gyr

  20. Prosper and Live Long: Productive Life Span Tracks Increasing Overall Life Span Over Historical Time among Privileged Worker Groups.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Tomas; Solari, Catherine; Bains, William

    2015-06-01

    Life expectancy has increased continuously for at least 150 years, due at least in part to improving life conditions for the majority of the population. A substantial part of this historical increase is due to decreases in early life mortality. In this article, we analyze the longevity of four privileged sets of adults who have avoided childhood mortality and lived a life more similar to the modern middle class. Our analysis is focused on writers and musicians from the 17th through the 21st centuries. We show that their average age at death increased only slightly between 1600 and 1900, but in the 20th century increased at around 2 years/decade. We suggest that this confirms that modern life span extension is driven by delay of death in older life rather than avoidance of premature death. We also show that productive life span, as measured by writing and composition outputs, has increased in parallel with overall life span in these groups. Increase in age of death is confirmed in a group of the minor British aristocracy and in members of the US Congress from 1800 to 2010. We conclude that both life span and productive life span are increasing in the 20th and early 21st century, and that the modern prolongation of life is the extension of productive life and is not the addition of years of disabling illness to the end of life. PMID:25625915

  1. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    PubMed Central

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the action-phase model of developmental regulation with their original life-span theory of control to present a comprehensive theory of development. Third, they reviewed the relevant empirical literature testing key propositions of the Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. Finally, because the conceptual reach of their theory goes far beyond the current empirical base, they pointed out areas that deserve further and more focused empirical inquiry. PMID:20063963

  2. Understanding Aggressive Behavior Across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianghong; Lewis, Gary; Evans, Lois

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive behavior is the observable manifestation of aggression and is often associated with developmental transitions and a range of medical and psychiatric diagnoses across the lifespan. As healthcare professionals involved in the medical and psychosocial care of patients from birth through death, nurses frequently encounter—and may serve as—both victims and perpetrators of aggressive behavior in the workplace. While the nursing literature has continually reported research on prevention and treatment approaches, less emphasis has been given to understanding the etiology, including contextual precipitants of aggressive behavior. This paper provides a brief review of the biological, social, and environmental risk factors that purportedly give rise to aggressive behavior. Further, many researchers have focused specifically on aggressive behavior in adolescence and adulthood. Less attention has been given to understanding the etiology of such behavior in young children and older adults. This paper emphasizes the unique risk factors for aggressive behavior across the developmental spectrum, including childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and late life. Appreciation of the risk factors of aggressive behavior, and, in particular, how they relate to age-specific manifestations, can aid nurses in better design and implementation of prevention and treatment programs. PMID:22471771

  3. Nutrition in women across the life span.

    PubMed

    Gizis, F C

    1992-12-01

    Recent recommendations on nutrition, such as the Surgeon General's Report on Nutrition and Health, have emphasized the relationship between diet and disease. In the Surgeon General's report, Americans have been advised to limit their consumption of fat, cholesterol, sodium, and alcoholic beverages, and to increase their consumption of complex carbohydrates and fiber. Two of the recommendations in this report related to the consumption of iron and calcium are particularly important to women's health. Women are advised to increase their consumption of food high in calcium and to include foods containing iron, such as lean meats, fish, certain beans, iron-enriched cereals, and whole grain products. Iron is essential as a constituent of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and certain enzymes. Iron losses during menstruation and the increased need for iron during pregnancy place women at risk for iron deficiency. Bone mass continues to increase until the late twenties, and one method to prevent osteoporosis may be adequate calcium intake during these years of early adulthood. Food guides that list amounts and types of foods to be eaten are helpful for the individual or as an educational tool for the nurse or educator. A Daily Food Guide was recently designed to meet the nutritional needs of women throughout the life cycle, and the government has very recently released a Food Guide Pyramid. Although it is important for women to learn how to control certain dietary components, they should also be aware of the protective nature of certain nutrients, such as iron and calcium. PMID:1448370

  4. Family Caregivers of Older Adults: A Life Span Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberto, Karen A.; Jarrott, Shannon E.

    2008-01-01

    When faced with changes in physical health, cognition, and daily functioning, older adults most frequently rely on family members for instrumental support and more intense care activities. Using a life span perspective as our guiding framework, we identified several developmental themes across the late-life caregiving research including individual…

  5. Radiation effects on life span in Caenorhabditis elegans

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.E.; Hartman, P.S.

    1988-09-01

    Wild-type and radiation-sensitive (Rad) mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans were irradiated using a /sup 137/Cs source (2.7 krads/min.) at several developmental stages and subsequently monitored for life span. Acute doses of radiation ranged from 1 krad to 300 krads. All stages required doses above 100 krads to reduce mean life span. Dauers and third stage larvae were more sensitive, and 8-day-old adults were the most resistant. Occasional statistically significant but nonrepeatable increases in survival were observed after intermediate levels of irradiation (10-30 krads). Unirradiated rad-4 and rad-7 had life spans similar to wild-type; all others had a significant reduction in survival. The mutants were about as sensitive as wild-type to the effects of ionizing radiation including occasional moderate life span extensions at intermediate doses. We conclude that the moderate life span extensions sometimes observed after irradiation are likely to be mediated by a means other than the induction of DNA repair enzymes.

  6. Decision-making heuristics and biases across the life span

    PubMed Central

    Strough, JoNell; Karns, Tara E.; Schlosnagle, Leo

    2013-01-01

    We outline a contextual and motivational model of judgment and decision-making (JDM) biases across the life span. Our model focuses on abilities and skills that correspond to deliberative, experiential, and affective decision-making processes. We review research that addresses links between JDM biases and these processes as represented by individual differences in specific abilities and skills (e.g., fluid and crystallized intelligence, executive functioning, emotion regulation, personality traits). We focus on two JDM biases—the sunk-cost fallacy (SCF) and the framing effect. We trace the developmental trajectory of each bias from preschool through middle childhood, adolescence, early adulthood, and later adulthood. We conclude that life-span developmental trajectories differ depending on the bias investigated. Existing research suggests relative stability in the framing effect across the life span and decreases in the SCF with age, including in later life. We highlight directions for future research on JDM biases across the life span, emphasizing the need for process-oriented research and research that increases our understanding of JDM biases in people’s everyday lives. PMID:22023568

  7. Genetic Determinants of Human Health Span and Life Span: Progress and New Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Martin, George M; Bergman, Aviv; Barzilai, Nir

    2007-01-01

    We review three approaches to the genetic analysis of the biology and pathobiology of human aging. The first and so far the best-developed is the search for the biochemical genetic basis of varying susceptibilities to major geriatric disorders. These include a range of progeroid syndromes. Collectively, they tell us much about the genetics of health span. Given that the major risk factor for virtually all geriatric disorders is biological aging, they may also serve as markers for the study of intrinsic biological aging. The second approach seeks to identify allelic contributions to exceptionally long life spans. While linkage to a locus on Chromosome 4 has not been confirmed, association studies have revealed a number of significant polymorphisms that impact upon late-life diseases and life span. The third approach remains theoretical. It would require longitudinal studies of large numbers of middle-aged sib-pairs who are extremely discordant or concordant for their rates of decline in various physiological functions. We can conclude that there are great opportunities for research on the genetics of human aging, particularly given the huge fund of information on human biology and pathobiology, and the rapidly developing knowledge of the human genome. PMID:17677003

  8. Neuromodulation of Behavioral and Cognitive Development across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Among other mechanisms, behavioral and cognitive development entail, on the one hand, contextual scaffolding and, on the other hand, neuromodulation of adaptive neurocognitive representations across the life span. Key brain networks underlying cognition, emotion, and motivation are innervated by major transmitter systems (e.g., the catecholamines…

  9. Neuromodulation of Behavioral and Cognitive Development across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Among other mechanisms, behavioral and cognitive development entail, on the one hand, contextual scaffolding and, on the other hand, neuromodulation of adaptive neurocognitive representations across the life span. Key brain networks underlying cognition, emotion, and motivation are innervated by major transmitter systems (e.g., the catecholamines

  10. Exceptional Cognitive Development: A Life Span Developmental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flom, Peter

    The belief that gifted children are more likely to have personality problems than "normal" individuals is not supported by research, but the image of the disturbed gifted child persists. This paper reviews research from a life-span developmental perspective to examine why this image persists. The paper critically examines the research of L.…

  11. Redesign of a Life Span Development Course Using Fink's Taxonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.

    2008-01-01

    This study compared a traditional lecture-based life span development course to the same course redesigned using Fink's (2003) taxonomy of significant learning. The goals, activities, and feedback within the course corresponded to Fink's 6 taxa (knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, learning how to learn). Undergraduates in…

  12. Women's Spirituality across the Life Span: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Michele Kielty; Dixon, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Women's spirituality has unique characteristics that are often ignored within the spirituality literature. The authors review the literature on women's spirituality to reveal the major themes women have identified as relevant to their spiritual journeys across the life span. Implications for counseling and ideas for practice are included after…

  13. A single gene change can extend yeast life span: the role of Ras in cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Jazwinski, S M; Chen, J B; Sun, J

    1993-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited life span (reproductive capacity), which is measured by the number of times an individual cell divides. There is evidence for the involvement of a senescence factor that affects cell cycle traversal in older yeast cells. Distinct alterations in the abundance of a handful of transcripts have been identified during the life span of this organism, and the genes that specify these mRNAs have been cloned. This raises the question whether the activity of one or more genes can alter the yeast life span. Indeed, the controlled expression of the transforming gene of Harvey murine sarcoma virus (v-Ha-ras) was found to extend the life span nearly two-fold. The normal homologs of this oncogene, RAS1 and RAS2, play a central role in the integration of cell growth and the cell cycle in yeast. Expression of v-Ha-ras appears to impinge on this integration. We suggest that it is the relative levels of the senescence factor and the Ras protein that determine whether a cell ceases to divide and senesces. We liken the senescence factor to the product of an anti-oncogene or tumor suppressor gene that neutralizes Ras. PMID:8368142

  14. HSF-1-mediated cytoskeletal integrity determines thermotolerance and life span.

    PubMed

    Baird, Nathan A; Douglas, Peter M; Simic, Milos S; Grant, Ana R; Moresco, James J; Wolff, Suzanne C; Yates, John R; Manning, Gerard; Dillin, Andrew

    2014-10-17

    The conserved heat shock transcription factor-1 (HSF-1) is essential to cellular stress resistance and life-span determination. The canonical function of HSF-1 is to regulate a network of genes encoding molecular chaperones that protect proteins from damage caused by extrinsic environmental stress or intrinsic age-related deterioration. In Caenorhabditis elegans, we engineered a modified HSF-1 strain that increased stress resistance and longevity without enhanced chaperone induction. This health assurance acted through the regulation of the calcium-binding protein PAT-10. Loss of pat-10 caused a collapse of the actin cytoskeleton, stress resistance, and life span. Furthermore, overexpression of pat-10 increased actin filament stability, thermotolerance, and longevity, indicating that in addition to chaperone regulation, HSF-1 has a prominent role in cytoskeletal integrity, ensuring cellular function during stress and aging. PMID:25324391

  15. Essential role for autophagy in life span extension

    PubMed Central

    Madeo, Frank; Zimmermann, Andreas; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Kroemer, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Life and health span can be prolonged by calorie limitation or by pharmacologic agents that mimic the effects of caloric restriction. Both starvation and the genetic inactivation of nutrient signaling converge on the induction of autophagy, a cytoplasmic recycling process that counteracts the age-associated accumulation of damaged organelles and proteins as it improves the metabolic fitness of cells. Here we review experimental findings indicating that inhibition of the major nutrient and growth-related signaling pathways as well as the upregulation of anti-aging pathways mediate life span extension via the induction of autophagy. Furthermore, we discuss mounting evidence suggesting that autophagy is not only necessary but, at least in some cases, also sufficient for increasing longevity. PMID:25654554

  16. Suicide across the adult life-span: an archival study.

    PubMed

    Leenaars, A A

    1989-10-01

    This archival study, concerning the demographic variable of age, involved the assessment of 8 identified classifications (clusters) as possible predictors of suicide notes and, by implication, suicide. The possible predictors, derived from the theoretical work of 10 suicidologists, were as follows: unbearable psychological pain, interpersonal relations, rejection-aggression, inability to adjust, indirect expressions, identification-egression, ego, and cognitive constriction. Independent judges noted the incidence of contents corresponding to 36 specific protocol sentences, constituting the 8 clusters, in 60 suicide notes--20 notes written by individuals in Young, Middle, and Late Adulthood. An analysis was able to discriminate the age groups on a number of clusters, notably in regard to Young Adults, although considerable commonalities were noted across the adult life span. The results indicate that a life-span perspective is essential when one is constructing a model to interpret suicide of adults. PMID:2591249

  17. Studying the Replicative Life Span of Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful model for elucidating the pathways that control life span and the influence of environmental factors, such as calorie restriction (CR). For 75 years, CR has been studied for its ability to delay diseases of aging in mammals, from cancer to cardiovascular disease (McCay et al., Nutr Rev 33:241–243, 1975). In many other species, reducing calorie intake extends life span, including unicellular organisms (Jiang et al., FASEB J 14:2135–2137, 2000; Lin et al., Science 289:2126–2128, 2000), invertebrates (Rogina and Helfand, Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:15998–16003, 2004), and rodents (Martín-Montalvo et al., Oncogene 30:505–520, 2011). Here we describe how to calorically restrict yeast cells, the methods used to determine the replicative life span (RLS) of budding yeast cells, how to selectively kill daughter cells using the mother enrichment program (MEP), how to measure recombination frequency at the rDNA locus, how to isolate large quantities of old cells, and how to analyze the circular forms of DNA known as extrachromosomal rDNA circles (ERCs), a cause of aging in S. cerevisiae (Petes, Cell 19:765–774, 1980; Sinclair and Guarente, Cell 91:1033–1042, 1997; Defossez et al., Mol Cell 3:447–455, 1999). PMID:23929097

  18. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Carla J.; Bridier, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N = 12) also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual's passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations. PMID:24286010

  19. Effects of ginsenosides, active ingredients of Panax ginseng, on development, growth, and life span of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hye; Kwon, Oh-Seung; Shin, Tae-Joon; Lee, Jun-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hwan; Yoon, In-Soo; Pyo, Mi Kyung; Rhim, Hyewhon; Lim, Yoong-Ho; Shim, Yhong-Hee; Ahn, Ji-Yun; Kim, Hyoung-Choon; Chitwood, David Joseph; Lee, Sang-Mok; Nah, Seung-Yeol

    2007-11-01

    The backbone structure of ginsenosides, active ingredients of Panax ginseng, is similar with that of sterol, especially cholesterol. Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) is one of free living nematodes and is well-established animal model for biochemical and genetic studies. C. elegans cannot synthesize de novo cholesterol, although cholesterol is essential requirement for its growth and development. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ginseng total saponins (GTS) on the average brood size, growth, development, worm size, and life span of C. elegans in cholesterol-deprived and -fed medium. Cholesterol deprivation caused damages on normal growth, reproduction, and life span of worms throughout F1 to F3 generations. GTS supplement to cholesterol-deprived medium restored the growth, reproduction, and life span of worms as much as cholesterol alone-fed medium. GTS co-supplement to cholesterol-fed medium not only promoted worm reproduction but also induced bigger worms and faster growth than cholesterol-fed medium. In study to identify which ginsenosides are responsible for life span restoring effects of GTS, we found that ginsenoside Rc supplement not only restored life span of worms grown in cholesterol-deprived medium but also prolonged life span of worms grown in cholesterol-fed medium. Worms grown in medium supplemented with ginsenoside Rb(1) or Rc to cholesterol-deprived medium exhibited strong filipin staining, in which filipin forms tight and specific complexes with 3beta-hydroxy sterols. These results show a possibility that ginsenosides could be utilized by C. elegans as a sterol substitute and further indicate that ginsenoside Rc is the component of Panax ginseng that prolongs the life span of C. elegans. PMID:17978487

  20. Synchronizing Loss with Life Over a Life Span: A Dynamic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    Synchronizing loss with life is a dynamic journey. This article explores the myths, beliefs, and dynamics of loss and life. The purpose of the article is to help clinicians assist and support their clients with the difficulties of synchronizing loss with life as they progress on their life span journey.

  1. Life Span Exercise Among Elite Intercollegiate Student Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Azen, Stanley P.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Salem, George J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite prominent public attention, data on life span health and exercise outcomes among elite, competitive athletes are sparse and do not reflect the diversity of modern athletes. Hypothesis: Life span exercise behavior differs between National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) student athletes and a nonathlete control group. Sustained exercise is associated with improved cardiopulmonary health outcomes. Study Design: Cross-sectional, descriptive epidemiology study. Level of Evidence: Level 3. Methods: A total of 496 students and alumni (age range, 17-84 year) at a large, NCAA Division I university, including student athletes and an age- and sex-matched nonathlete control group, completed anonymous, self-report health and exercise questionnaires. Age-stratified, cross-sectional analysis evaluated previous week’s total exercise volume (ExVol), self-rated exercise importance (ExImp), and compliance with American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) exercise guidelines for healthy adults. The association of ACSM guideline compliance with lifetime cardiopulmonary health outcomes was also assessed. Results: Current student athletes reported significantly greater ExVol (P < 0.001. Cohen d = 0.99, probability of clinically important difference [pCID] >99.5%), ExImp (P < 0.001, d = 1.96, pCID = 96%), and likelihood of compliance with ACSM guidelines (odds ratio [OR], 95% confidence interval [CI] = 30.6, 11.0-84.6) compared with nonathletes. No significant differences were found between alumni student athletes and nonathletes. Alumni student athletes demonstrated substantially lower ExVol (P < 0.001, d = –0.94, pCID >99.5%) and guideline compliance (OR = 0.09, 95% CI = 0.05-0.19) compared with current student athletes, whereas nonathletes had similar exercise behavior across the life span. Among alumni, ACSM guideline compliance was associated with significant attenuation of cardiopulmonary health concerns (P = 0.02, d = –0.50, pCID = 14%) independent of intercollegiate athletic participation. Conclusion: Although current NCAA Division I student athletes demonstrated significant, clinically important differences in exercise behavior compared with nonathletes, no group differences were evident later in life. Irrespective of collegiate athletic status, healthy exercise behavior among alumni was associated with cardiopulmonary health benefits. Clinical Relevance: To realize life span health benefits, it is imperative that student athletes maintain consistent patterns of healthy exercise beyond retirement from competitive sports. PMID:25553217

  2. Environmental health and developmental disabilities: a life span approach.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Carl V; White-Scott, Sheryl; Ekvall, Shirley M; Abulafia, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal and childhood environmental exposures are an underrecognized primary cause of intellectual and other developmental disabilities. In addition, individuals with established disabilities are vulnerable to further harm from subsequent environmental exposures. In individuals with communicative impairment or limited ability to independently escape from hazards, these subsequent exposures, too, may occur undetected or untreated. This article introduces the subject of environmental health and developmental disabilities throughout the life span. In particular, we focus on ways that families, communities, and health professionals can prevent both primary and secondary disabilities through better awareness of common environmental health issues. PMID:18794636

  3. C. elegans VANG-1 Modulates Life Span via Insulin/IGF-1-Like Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Honnen, Sebastian J.; Büchter, Christian; Schröder, Verena; Hoffmann, Michael; Kohara, Yuji; Kampkötter, Andreas; Bossinger, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is highly conserved from Drosophila to humans and a PCP-like pathway has recently been described in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. The developmental function of this pathway is to coordinate the orientation of cells or structures within the plane of an epithelium or to organize cell-cell intercalation required for correct morphogenesis. Here, we describe a novel role of VANG-1, the only C. elegans ortholog of the conserved PCP component Strabismus/Van Gogh. We show that two alleles of vang-1 and depletion of the protein by RNAi cause an increase of mean life span up to 40%. Consistent with the longevity phenotype vang-1 animals also show enhanced resistance to thermal- and oxidative stress and decreased lipofuscin accumulation. In addition, vang-1 mutants show defects like reduced brood size, decreased ovulation rate and prolonged reproductive span, which are also related to gerontogenes. The germline, but not the intestine or neurons, seems to be the primary site of vang-1 function. Life span extension in vang-1 mutants depends on the insulin/IGF-1-like receptor DAF-2 and DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor. RNAi against the phase II detoxification transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2 also reduced vang-1 life span that might be explained by gradual inhibition of insulin/IGF-1-like signaling in vang-1. This is the first time that a key player of the PCP pathway is shown to be involved in the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling dependent modulation of life span in C. elegans. PMID:22359667

  4. Competitiveness across the Life Span: The Feisty Fifties

    PubMed Central

    Mayr, Ulrich; Wozniak, Dave; Davidson, Casey; Kuhns, David; Harbaugh, William T.

    2012-01-01

    Existing theories on life-span changes in confidence or motivation suggest that individuals’ preferences to enter competitive situations should gradually decline with age. We examined competitive preferences in a field experiment using real financial stakes in 25 to 75 year olds (N=543). The critical dependent variable was whether participants chose to perform a simple mental arithmetic task either under a piece-rate payment schedule (i.e., $.25 per solved item) or a competitive payment schedule ($.50 per solved item if the overall score is better than that of a randomly selected opponent, $0 otherwise). Results revealed that competitive preferences increased across the life span until they peaked around age 50, and dropped thereafter. We also found that throughout, men had a substantially larger preference for competing than women—extending previous findings on college-aged participants. The age/gender differences in preferences were neither accounted for by actual differences in performance nor individuals’ subjective confidence. This first systematic attempt to characterize age differences in competitive behavior suggests that a simple decline conception of competitiveness needs to be reconsidered. PMID:22059714

  5. SNEV overexpression extends the life span of human endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Voglauer, Regina; Chang, Martina Wei-Fen; Dampier, Brigitta; Wieser, Matthias; Baumann, Kristin; Sterovsky, Thomas; Schreiber, Martin; Katinger, Hermann; Grillari, Johannes . E-mail: j.grillari@iam.boku.ac.at

    2006-04-01

    In a recent screening for genes downregulated in replicatively senescent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we have isolated the novel protein SNEV. Since then SNEV has proven as a multifaceted protein playing a role in pre-mRNA splicing, DNA repair, and the ubiquitin/proteosome system. Here, we report that SNEV mRNA decreases in various cell types during replicative senescence, and that it is increased in various immortalized cell lines, as well as in breast tumors, where SNEV transcript levels also correlate with the survival of breast cancer patients. Since these mRNA profiles suggested a role of SNEV in the regulation of cell proliferation, the effect of its overexpression was tested. Thereby, a significant extension of the cellular life span was observed, which was not caused by altered telomerase activity or telomere dynamics but rather by enhanced stress resistance. When SNEV overexpressing cells were treated with bleomycin or bleomycin combined with BSO, inducing DNA damage as well as reactive oxygen species, a significantly lower fraction of apoptotic cells was found in comparison to vector control cells. These data suggest that high levels of SNEV might extend the cellular life span by increasing the resistance to stress or by improving the DNA repair capacity of the cells.

  6. Exercise, brain, and cognition across the life span

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Michelle W.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa

    2011-01-01

    This is a brief review of current evidence for the relationships between physical activity and exercise and the brain and cognition throughout the life span in non-pathological populations. We focus on the effects of both aerobic and resistance training and provide a brief overview of potential neurobiological mechanisms derived from non-human animal models. Whereas research has focused primarily on the benefits of aerobic exercise in youth and young adult populations, there is growing evidence that both aerobic and resistance training are important for maintaining cognitive and brain health in old age. Finally, in these contexts, we point out gaps in the literature and future directions that will help advance the field of exercise neuroscience, including more studies that explicitly examine the effect of exercise type and intensity on cognition, the brain, and clinically significant outcomes. There is also a need for human neuroimaging studies to adopt a more unified multi-modal framework and for greater interaction between human and animal models of exercise effects on brain and cognition across the life span. PMID:21527670

  7. Propensity for Risk Taking Across the Life Span and Around the Globe.

    PubMed

    Mata, Rui; Josef, Anika K; Hertwig, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Past empirical work suggests that aging is associated with decreases in risk taking. But are such effects universal? Life-history theory suggests that the link between age and risk taking is a function of specific reproductive strategies that can be more or less risky depending on the ecology. We assessed variation in the age-risk curve using World Values Survey data from 77 countries (N = 147,118). The results suggest that propensity for risk taking tends to decline across the life span in the vast majority of countries. In addition, there is systematic variation among countries: Countries in which hardship (e.g., high infant mortality) is higher are characterized by higher levels of risk taking and flatter age-risk curves. These findings suggest that hardship may function as a cue to guide life-history strategies. Age-risk relations thus cannot be understood without reference to the demands and affordances of the environment. PMID:26744068

  8. Emotional Egocentricity Bias Across the Life-Span

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Federica; Triscoli, Chantal; Lamm, Claus; Carnaghi, Andrea; Silani, Giorgia

    2016-01-01

    In our daily lives, we often have to quickly estimate the emotions of our conspecifics in order to have successful social interactions. While this estimation process seems quite easy when we are ourselves in a neutral or equivalent emotional state, it has recently been shown that in case of incongruent emotional states between ourselves and the others, our judgments can be biased. This phenomenon, introduced to the literature with the term Emotional Egocentricity Bias (EEB), has been found to occur in young adults and, to a greater extent, in children. However, how the EEB changes across the life-span from adolescence to old age has been largely unexplored. In this study, we recruited 114 female participants subdivided in four cohorts (adolescents, young adults, middle-aged adults, older adults) to examine EEB age-related changes. Participants were administered with a recently developed paradigm which, by making use of visuo-tactile stimulation that elicits conflicting feelings in paired participants, allows the valid and reliable exploration of the EEB. Results highlighted a U-shape relation between age and EEB, revealing enhanced emotional egocentricity in adolescents and older adults compared to young and middle-aged adults. These results are in line with the neuroscientific literature which has recently shown that overcoming the EEB is associated with a greater activation of a portion of the parietal lobe, namely the right Supramarginal Gyrus (rSMG). This is an area that reaches full maturation by the end of adolescence and goes through an early decay. Thus, the age-related changes of the EEB could be possibly due to the life-span development of the rSMG. This study is the first one to show the quadratic relation between age and the EEB and set a milestone for further research exploring the neural correlates of the life-span development of the EEB. Future studies are needed in order to generalize these results to the male population and to explore gender differences related to the aging of socio- emotional processes. PMID:27199731

  9. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  10. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  11. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  12. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... THIS PART General § 701.37 Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. In the event... during the practice life-span, if the person or legal entity acquiring control elects not to become...

  13. Oxidative stress and the evolution of sex differences in life span and ageing in the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus.

    PubMed

    Archer, Catharine R; Sakaluk, Scott K; Selman, Colin; Royle, Nick J; Hunt, John

    2013-03-01

    The Free Radical Theory of Ageing (FRTA) predicts that oxidative stress, induced when levels of reactive oxygen species exceed the capacity of antioxidant defenses, causes ageing. Recently, it has also been argued that oxidative damage may mediate important life-history trade-offs. Here, we use inbred lines of the decorated cricket, Gryllodes sigillatus, to estimate the genetic (co)variance between age-dependent reproductive effort, life span, ageing, oxidative damage, and total antioxidant capacity within and between the sexes. The FRTA predicts that oxidative damage should accumulate with age and negatively correlate with life span. We find that protein oxidation is greater in the shorter lived sex (females) and negatively genetically correlated with life span in both sexes. However, oxidative damage did not accumulate with age in either sex. Previously we have shown antagonistic pleiotropy between the genes for early-life reproductive effort and ageing rate in both sexes, although this was stronger in females. In females, we find that elevated fecundity early in life is associated with greater protein oxidation later in life, which is in turn positively correlated with the rate of ageing. Our results provide mixed support for the FRTA but suggest that oxidative stress may mediate sex-specific life-history strategies in G. sigillatus. PMID:23461314

  14. Explanations of a magic trick across the life span.

    PubMed

    Olson, Jay A; Demacheva, Irina; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Studying how children and adults explain magic tricks can reveal developmental differences in cognition. We showed 167 children (aged 4-13 years) a video of a magician making a pen vanish and asked them to explain the trick. Although most tried to explain the secret, none of them correctly identified it. The younger children provided more supernatural interpretations and more often took the magician's actions at face value. Combined with a similar study of adults (N = 1008), we found that both young children and older adults were particularly overconfident in their explanations of the trick. Our methodology demonstrates the feasibility of using magic to study cognitive development across the life span. PMID:25798117

  15. Explanations of a magic trick across the life span

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Jay A.; Demacheva, Irina; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Studying how children and adults explain magic tricks can reveal developmental differences in cognition. We showed 167 children (aged 4–13 years) a video of a magician making a pen vanish and asked them to explain the trick. Although most tried to explain the secret, none of them correctly identified it. The younger children provided more supernatural interpretations and more often took the magician's actions at face value. Combined with a similar study of adults (N = 1008), we found that both young children and older adults were particularly overconfident in their explanations of the trick. Our methodology demonstrates the feasibility of using magic to study cognitive development across the life span. PMID:25798117

  16. Qualitative Changes in Creativity in the Second Half of Life: A Life-Span Developmental Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasser-Coen, Jennifer R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper proposes that, contrary to the idea that creativity declines during the second half of life, observed changes may actually reflect qualitative changes in the creative process. Life span developmental theory is used to examine empirical and theoretical ideas about mature forms of thinking in relation to creativity. (DB)

  17. Accessing Data Resources in the Mouse Phenome Database for Genetic Analysis of Murine Life Span and Health Span

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Luanne L.; Paigen, Beverly; Korstanje, Ron; Yuan, Rong; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Grubb, Stephen C.; Churchill, Gary A.; Chesler, Elissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the source of genetic variation in aging and using this variation to define the molecular mechanisms of healthy aging require deep and broad quantification of a host of physiological, morphological, and behavioral endpoints. The murine model is a powerful system in which to understand the relations across age-related phenotypes and to identify research models with variation in life span and health span. The Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging has performed broad characterization of aging in genetically diverse laboratory mice and has placed these data, along with data from several other major aging initiatives, into the interactive Mouse Phenome Database. The data may be accessed and analyzed by researchers interested in finding mouse models for specific aging processes, age-related health and disease states, and for genetic analysis of aging variation and trait covariation. We expect that by placing these data in the hands of the aging community that there will be (a) accelerated genetic analyses of aging processes, (b) discovery of genetic loci regulating life span, (c) identification of compelling correlations between life span and susceptibility for age-related disorders, and (d) discovery of concordant genomic loci influencing life span and aging phenotypes between mouse and humans. PMID:25533306

  18. Accessing Data Resources in the Mouse Phenome Database for Genetic Analysis of Murine Life Span and Health Span.

    PubMed

    Bogue, Molly A; Peters, Luanne L; Paigen, Beverly; Korstanje, Ron; Yuan, Rong; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Grubb, Stephen C; Churchill, Gary A; Chesler, Elissa J

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the source of genetic variation in aging and using this variation to define the molecular mechanisms of healthy aging require deep and broad quantification of a host of physiological, morphological, and behavioral endpoints. The murine model is a powerful system in which to understand the relations across age-related phenotypes and to identify research models with variation in life span and health span. The Jackson Laboratory Nathan Shock Center of Excellence in the Basic Biology of Aging has performed broad characterization of aging in genetically diverse laboratory mice and has placed these data, along with data from several other major aging initiatives, into the interactive Mouse Phenome Database. The data may be accessed and analyzed by researchers interested in finding mouse models for specific aging processes, age-related health and disease states, and for genetic analysis of aging variation and trait covariation. We expect that by placing these data in the hands of the aging community that there will be (a) accelerated genetic analyses of aging processes, (b) discovery of genetic loci regulating life span, (c) identification of compelling correlations between life span and susceptibility for age-related disorders, and (d) discovery of concordant genomic loci influencing life span and aging phenotypes between mouse and humans. PMID:25533306

  19. The progesterone antagonist mifepristone/RU486 blocks the negative effect on life span caused by mating in female Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Landis, Gary N; Salomon, Matthew P; Keroles, Daniel; Brookes, Nicholas; Sekimura, Troy; Tower, John

    2015-01-01

    Mating causes decreased life span in female Drosophila. Here we report that mifepristone blocked this effect, yielding life span increases up to +68%. Drug was fed to females after mating, in the absence of males, demonstrating function in females. Mifepristone did not increase life span of virgin females or males. Mifepristone reduced progeny production but did not reduce food intake. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to identify genes up-regulated or down-regulated upon mating, and where the change was reduced by mifepristone. Five candidate positive regulators of life span were identified, including dosage compensation regulator Unr and three X-linked genes: multi sex combs (PcG gene), Dopamine 2-like receptor and CG14215. The 37 candidate negative genes included neuropeptide CNMamide and several involved in protein mobilization and immune response. The results inform the interpretation of experiments involving mifepristone, and implicate steroid hormone signaling in regulating the trade-off between reproduction and life span. PMID:25614682

  20. The progesterone antagonist mifepristone/RU486 blocks the negative effect on life span caused by mating in female Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Landis, Gary N.; Salomon, Matthew P.; Keroles, Daniel; Brookes, Nicholas; Sekimura, Troy; Tower, John

    2015-01-01

    Mating causes decreased life span in female Drosophila. Here we report that mifepristone blocked this effect, yielding life span increases up to +68%. Drug was fed to females after mating, in the absence of males, demonstrating function in females. Mifepristone did not increase life span of virgin females or males. Mifepristone reduced progeny production but did not reduce food intake. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to identify genes up-regulated or down-regulated upon mating, and where the change was reduced by mifepristone. Five candidate positive regulators of life span were identified, including dosage compensation regulator Unr and three X-linked genes: multi sex combs (PcG gene), Dopamine 2-like receptor and CG14215. The 37 candidate negative genes included neuropeptide CNMamide and several involved in protein mobilization and immune response. The results inform the interpretation of experiments involving mifepristone, and implicate steroid hormone signaling in regulating the trade-off between reproduction and life span. PMID:25614682

  1. Coping strategies: gender differences and development throughout life span.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Mayordomo, Teresa; Sancho, Patricia; Tomás, José Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Development during life-span implies to cope with stressful events, and this coping may be done with several strategies. It could be useful to know if these coping strategies differ as a consequence of personal characteristics. This work uses the Coping with Stress Questionnaire with this aim using a sample of 400 participants. Specifically, the effects of gender and age group (young people, middle age and elderly), as well as its interaction on coping strategies is studied. With regard to age, on one hand, it is hypothesised a decrement in the use of coping strategies centred in problem solving and social support seeking as age increases. On the other hand, the use of emotional coping is hypothesised to increase with age. With respect to gender, it is hypothesised a larger use of emotional coping and social support seeking within women, and a larger use of problem solving within men. A MANOVA found significant effects for the two main effects (gender and age) as well as several interactions. Separate ANOVAs allowed us to test for potential differences in each of the coping strategies measured in the CAE. These results partially supported the hypotheses. Results are discussed in relation to scientific literature on coping, age and gender. PMID:23156917

  2. Sirtuin activators: designing molecules to extend life span.

    PubMed

    Camins, Antoni; Sureda, Francesc X; Junyent, Felix; Verdaguer, Ester; Folch, Jaume; Pelegri, Carme; Vilaplana, Jordi; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Pallàs, Mercè

    2010-01-01

    Resveratrol (RESV) exerts important pharmacological effects on human health: in addition to its beneficial effects on type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, it also modulates neuronal energy homeostasis and shows antiaging properties. Although it clearly has free radical scavenger properties, the mechanisms involved in these beneficial effects are not fully understood. In this regard, one area of major interest concerns the effects of RESV on the activity of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), an NAD(+)-dependent histone deacetylase that has been implicated in aging. Indeed, the role of SIRT1 is currently the subject of intense research due to the antiaging properties of RESV, which increases life span in various organisms ranging from yeast to rodents. In addition, when RESV is administered in experimental animal models of neurological disorders, it has similar beneficial effects to caloric restriction. SIRT1 activation could thus constitute a potential strategic target in neurodegenerative diseases and in disorders involving disturbances in glucose homeostasis, as well as in dyslipidaemias or cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, small SIRT1 activators such as SRT501, SRT2104, and SRT2379, which are currently undergoing clinical trials, could be potential drugs for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, among other disorders. This review summarises current knowledge about the biological functions of SIRT1 in aging and aging-associated diseases and discusses its potential as a pharmacological target. PMID:20601277

  3. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites. PMID:23667689

  4. Childhood Self-Control and Unemployment Throughout the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, Liam; Egan, Mark; Baumeister, Roy F.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for self-control may underlie successful labor-force entry and job retention, particularly in times of economic uncertainty. Analyzing unemployment data from two nationally representative British cohorts (N = 16,780), we found that low self-control in childhood was associated with the emergence and persistence of unemployment across four decades. On average, a 1-SD increase in self-control was associated with a reduction in the probability of unemployment of 1.4 percentage points after adjustment for intelligence, social class, and gender. From labor-market entry to middle age, individuals with low self-control experienced 1.6 times as many months of unemployment as those with high self-control. Analysis of monthly unemployment data before and during the 1980s recession showed that individuals with low self-control experienced the greatest increases in unemployment during the recession. Our results underscore the critical role of self-control in shaping life-span trajectories of occupational success and in affecting how macroeconomic conditions affect unemployment levels in the population. PMID:25870404

  5. Connecting Life Span Development with the Sociology of the Life Course: A New Direction

    PubMed Central

    Gilleard, Chris; Higgs, Paul

    2015-01-01

    The life course has become a topic of growing interest within the social sciences. Attempts to link this sub-discipline with life span developmental psychology have been called for but with little sign of success. In this paper, we seek to address three interlinked issues concerning the potential for a more productive interchange between life course sociology and life span psychology. The first is to try to account for the failure of these two sub-disciplines to achieve any deepening engagement with each other, despite the long-expressed desirability of that goal; the second is to draw attention to the scope for enriching the sociology of the life course through Erik Erikson’s model of life span development; and the last is the potential for linking Eriksonian theory with current debates within mainstream sociology about the processes involved in ‘individualisation’ and ‘self-reflexivity’ as an alternative entry point to bring together these two fields of work. PMID:27041774

  6. Mice generated by in vitro fertilization exhibit vascular dysfunction and shortened life span

    PubMed Central

    Rexhaj, Emrush; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Rimoldi, Stefano F.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Anderegg, Manuel; Somm, Emmanuel; Bouillet, Elisa; Allemann, Yves; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies (ART) display a level of vascular dysfunction similar to that seen in children of mothers with preeclamspia. The long-term consequences of ART-associated vascular disorders are unknown and difficult to investigate in healthy children. Here, we found that vasculature from mice generated by ART display endothelial dysfunction and increased stiffness, which translated into arterial hypertension in vivo. Progeny of male ART mice also exhibited vascular dysfunction, suggesting underlying epigenetic modifications. ART mice had altered methylation at the promoter of the gene encoding eNOS in the aorta, which correlated with decreased vascular eNOS expression and NO synthesis. Administration of a deacetylase inhibitor to ART mice normalized vascular gene methylation and function and resulted in progeny without vascular dysfunction. The induction of ART-associated vascular and epigenetic alterations appeared to be related to the embryo environment; these alterations were possibly facilitated by the hormonally stimulated ovulation accompanying ART. Finally, ART mice challenged with a high-fat diet had roughly a 25% shorter life span compared with control animals. This study highlights the potential of ART to induce vascular dysfunction and shorten life span and suggests that epigenetic alterations contribute to these problems. PMID:24270419

  7. Mice generated by in vitro fertilization exhibit vascular dysfunction and shortened life span.

    PubMed

    Rexhaj, Emrush; Paoloni-Giacobino, Ariane; Rimoldi, Stefano F; Fuster, Daniel G; Anderegg, Manuel; Somm, Emmanuel; Bouillet, Elisa; Allemann, Yves; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2013-12-01

    Children conceived by assisted reproductive technologies (ART) display a level of vascular dysfunction similar to that seen in children of mothers with preeclamspia. The long-term consequences of ART-associated vascular disorders are unknown and difficult to investigate in healthy children. Here, we found that vasculature from mice generated by ART display endothelial dysfunction and increased stiffness, which translated into arterial hypertension in vivo. Progeny of male ART mice also exhibited vascular dysfunction, suggesting underlying epigenetic modifications. ART mice had altered methylation at the promoter of the gene encoding eNOS in the aorta, which correlated with decreased vascular eNOS expression and NO synthesis. Administration of a deacetylase inhibitor to ART mice normalized vascular gene methylation and function and resulted in progeny without vascular dysfunction. The induction of ART-associated vascular and epigenetic alterations appeared to be related to the embryo environment; these alterations were possibly facilitated by the hormonally stimulated ovulation accompanying ART. Finally, ART mice challenged with a high-fat diet had roughly a 25% shorter life span compared with control animals. This study highlights the potential of ART to induce vascular dysfunction and shorten life span and suggests that epigenetic alterations contribute to these problems. PMID:24270419

  8. The evolution of prolonged life after reproduction.

    PubMed

    Croft, Darren P; Brent, Lauren J N; Franks, Daniel W; Cant, Michael A

    2015-07-01

    Why females of some species cease ovulation before the end of their natural lifespan is a longstanding evolutionary puzzle. For many species in captivity, post-reproductive life is simply an epiphenomenon of lengthened lifespan. Yet in natural populations of humans as well as some cetaceans and insects, reproductive senescence occurs much faster than somatic aging and females exhibit prolonged post-reproductive lifespans (PRLSs). Determining the mechanisms and functions that underpin PRLSs has proved a significant challenge. Here we bring together both classic and modern hypotheses proposed to explain PRLSs and discuss their application to both human and nonhuman animals. By taking an integrative and broad taxonomic approach we highlight the need to consider multiple interacting explanations for the evolution of PRLSs. PMID:25982154

  9. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new therapeutic strategies for addressing age-related degenerative changes. PMID:26918946

  10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabdtitis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new therapeutic strategies for addressing age-related degenerative changes. PMID:26918946

  11. The Rate of Source Memory Decline across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cansino, Selene; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Hernandez-Ramos, Evelia; Martinez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Torres-Trejo, Frine; Gomez-Fernandez, Tania; Ayala-Hernandez, Mariana; Osorio, David; Cedillo-Tinoco, Melisa; Garces-Flores, Lissete; Gomez-Melgarejo, Sandra; Beltran-Palacios, Karla; Guadalupe Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee; Garcia-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Cadena-Arenas, Yadira; Fernandez-Apan, Luisa; Bartschi, Andrea; Resendiz-Vera, Julieta; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Maria Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ability to remember contextual information related to specific episodic experiences declines with advancing age; however, the exact moment in the adult life span when this deficit begins is still controversial. Source memory for spatial information was tested in a life span sample of 1,500 adults between…

  12. The Time of Our Lives: Life Span Development of Timing and Event Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAuley, J. Devin; Jones, Mari Riess; Holub, Shayla; Johnston, Heather M.; Miller, Nathaniel S.

    2006-01-01

    Life span developmental profiles were constructed for 305 participants (ages 4-95) for a battery of paced and unpaced perceptual-motor timing tasks that included synchronize-continue tapping at a wide range of target event rates. Two life span hypotheses, derived from an entrainment theory of timing and event tracking, were tested. A preferred…

  13. Qualitative Exploration of Acculturation and Life-Span Issues of Elderly Asian Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jee Hyang; Heo, Nanseol; Lu, Junfei; Portman, Tarrell Awe Agahe

    2013-01-01

    Awareness of aging issues across diverse populations begins the journey toward counselors becoming culturally competent across client life spans. Understanding the life-span experiences of cultural groups is important for helping professionals. The purpose of this research was to gain insight into the qualitative experiences of Asian American…

  14. [Life span and longevity in representatives of creative professions].

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V N; Zharinov, G M

    2013-01-01

    The article presents data on mean age of death of 49 064 representatives of various creative professions: visual artists (painters, sculptors, architects, n = 8 458), musicians (composers, conductors, singers, pianists, violinists, etc. n = 7 883), writers and poets (n = 11 488), scientists (n = 21 235). The mean age of death among writers and poets was significantly (p < 0.001) less than that in visual artists, musicians and scientists whereas scientists lived longer than representatives of other categories (p < 0.001). Women lived longer than men of any studied categories (p < 0.02). It was shown that the mean age of death gradually but irregularly increased since the 1st century A. C. until the 20th century in any professional cohort. Visual artists-men in 20th century lived longer than in previous historical periods (p < 0.001). Scientists both females and males in 20th century lived longer then these in 19th century (p < 0.001). The first five places of long-livers among men belong to Nobel prize winners (78,8 yrs.), academicians (72,7 yrs.) and corresponding members of the Russian Academy of Sciences (71,7 yrs.), conductors (71,1 yrs.) and scientists (71,0 yrs.). Rock-musicians, author's song singer and poets lived less than other categories (43,6; 53,6 and 61,6 yrs. respectively). Among women leading long-livers were conductors (83,2 yrs.), harp-players (80,9 yrs.), academicians of the RAS (80,3 yrs.), clavesin-players (79,1 yrs.) and violinists (78,2 yrs.). Among women, less lived rock-musicians (37,6 yrs.), author's songs singers (51,4), horns and woodwinds instruments players (59,0 yrs.). Relative number of nonagenarians (90+) was much higher among women as compared to men. The values were as 43.75% of harp-players, 33.33% of conductors, 29.17% of architects, 20% of violinists and viola-players and 18.99% sculptors for women, and 16.67% of Nobel prize winners, 12.12% of conductors, 7.51% of academicians, 7.44% of violinists and 7.0% of scientists survived 90+ years among men. Centenarians were 8.33% of academicians and architects, 6.25% of harp-players and 4.22% of writers-poets among women, and only 0.76% of pianists, 0.45% of scientists and 0.42% of violinists were centenarians among men. Our data are in agreement with the opinion that high intellect and education directly correlate with longer life span and longevity. PMID:24640685

  15. Antiquity of postreproductive life: are there modern impacts on hunter-gatherer postreproductive life spans?

    PubMed

    Blurton Jones, Nicholas G; Hawkes, Kristen; O'Connell, James F

    2002-01-01

    Female postreproductive life is a striking feature of human life history and there have been several recent attempts to account for its evolution. But archaeologists estimate that in the past, few individuals lived many postreproductive years. Is postreproductive life a phenotypic outcome of modern conditions, needing no evolutionary account? This article assesses effects of the modern world on hunter-gatherer adult mortality, with special reference to the Hadza. Evidence suggests that such effects are not sufficient to deny the existence of substantial life expectancy at the end of the childbearing career. Data from contemporary hunter-gatherers (Ache, !Kung, Hadza) match longevity extrapolated from regressions of lifespan on body and brain weight. Twenty or so vigorous years between the end of reproduction and the onset of significant senescence does require an explanation. PMID:11891933

  16. Germ-cell loss extends C. elegans life span through regulation of DAF-16 by kri-1 and lipophilic-hormone signaling.

    PubMed

    Berman, Jennifer R; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2006-03-10

    In C. elegans, removing the germ cells extends life span by triggering the nuclear localization and activation of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor in the intestine. In this study, we identify and analyze genes required for germline removal to extend life span. We find that the reproductive system communicates with the intestine through lipophilic-hormone signaling and that a gene called kri-1 is likely to act in the intestine to promote DAF-16 nuclear localization in response to this signal. This lipophilic-signaling pathway and kri-1 are not required for DAF-16's nuclear localization and life-span extension in animals with decreased insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, this pathway specifically enables the integration of cues from the reproductive system with central DAF-16-activation pathways to influence the aging of the animal. PMID:16530050

  17. The basic reproductive ratio of life

    PubMed Central

    Manapat, Michael L.; Chen, Irene A.; Nowak, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    Template-directed polymerization of nucleotides is believed to be a pathway for the replication of genetic material in the earliest cells. We assume that activated monomers are produced by prebiotic chemistry. These monomers can undergo spontaneous polymerization, a system that we call “prelife.” Adding template-directed polymerization changes the equilibrium structure of prelife if the rate constants meet certain criteria. In particular, if the basic reproductive ratio of sequences of a certain length exceeds one, then those sequences can attain high abundance. Furthermore, if many sequences replicate, then the longest sequences can reach high abundance even if the basic reproductive ratios of all sequences are less than one. We call this phenomenon “subcritical life.” Subcritical life suggests that sequences long enough to be ribozymes can become abundant even if replication is relatively inefficient. Our work on the evolution of replication has interesting parallels to infection dynamics. Life (replication) can be seen as an infection of prelife. PMID:20034501

  18. Sex Role Orientation Across the Adult Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaks, Peggy M.; And Others

    It was hypothesized that four different "life lines" would affect sex role orientations, specifically intimacy, parenting, grandparenting, and work. Subjects were 74 men and 43 women, white, upper middle class with a mean education level of 14 years. Each participant completed a demographic questionnaire, the Bem Sex Role Inventory, a Life Events…

  19. Reproductive technology and the commodification of life.

    PubMed

    Rothman, B K

    1987-01-01

    This paper suggests that the key unifying concept in the development and application of new reproduction technology has been the increasing commodification of life--treating people and parts of people as marketable commodities. This commodification process is made most dramatically clear in (1) prenatal diagnosis, in which the fetus is treated as a product subject to quality control measures and women are treated as producers without emotional tie to their products and (2) in so-called "surrogacy" arrangements in which an actual price tag is placed on pregnancy, and women sell both their "labor" and their "product." PMID:3332837

  20. The Influence of Dietary Fat Source on Life Span in Calorie Restricted Mice.

    PubMed

    López-Domínguez, José A; Ramsey, Jon J; Tran, Dianna; Imai, Denise M; Koehne, Amanda; Laing, Steven T; Griffey, Stephen M; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Hagopian, Kevork; Villalba, José M; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; McDonald, Roger B

    2015-10-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends life span in several animal models. It has been proposed that a decrease in the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and especially n-3 fatty acids, in membrane phospholipids may contribute to life span extension with CR. Phospholipid PUFAs are sensitive to dietary fatty acid composition, and thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of dietary lipids on life span in CR mice. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to four groups (a 5% CR control group and three 40% CR groups) and fed diets with soybean oil (high in n-6 PUFAs), fish oil (high in n-3 PUFAs), or lard (high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids) as the primary lipid source. Life span was increased (p < .05) in all CR groups compared to the Control mice. Life span was also increased (p < .05) in the CR lard mice compared to animals consuming either the CR fish or soybean oil diets. These results indicate that dietary lipid composition can influence life span in mice on CR, and suggest that a diet containing a low proportion of PUFAs and high proportion of monounsaturated and saturated fats may maximize life span in animals maintained on CR. PMID:25313149

  1. Life Span Evolution in Eusocial Workers—A Theoretical Approach to Understanding the Effects of Extrinsic Mortality in a Hierarchical System

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Boris H.; Schaible, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    While the extraordinary life span of queens and division of labor in eusocial societies have been well studied, it is less clear which selective forces act on the short life span of workers. The disparity of life span between the queen and the workers is linked to a basic issue in sociobiology: How are the resources in a colony allocated between colony maintenance and reproduction? Resources for somatic maintenance of the colony can either be invested into quality or quantity of workers. Here, we present a theoretical optimization model that uses a hierarchical trade-off within insect colonies and extrinsic mortality to explain how different aging phenotypes could have evolved to keep resources secure in the colony. The model points to the significance of two factors. First, any investment that would generate a longer intrinsic life span for workers is lost if the individual dies from external causes while foraging. As a consequence, risky environments favor the evolution of workers with a shorter life span. Second, shorter-lived workers require less investment than long-lived ones, allowing the colony to allocate these resources to sexual reproduction or colony growth. PMID:23596527

  2. Female Career Commitment (A Life-Span Perspective). Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Rooyen, J.

    A study that examined the personality and environmental factors affecting South African female career interest and career commitment at different life phases resulted in development of a model of vocational behavior. Selected for the study sample were 111 graduated white women employed by the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The…

  3. The Household School as Life-Span Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warnat, Winifred I.

    A constructive, effective, and realistic national educational policy should be established which takes into account the contributions of the household school to individual learning in areas of life roles, feelings, values formation, and behavior development. The adversary relationship between formal educational institutions and the family will be

  4. Ballast users plug life span, cooling savings into paybacks

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, J.

    1983-03-21

    Energy-efficient ballasts are saving fluorescent lamp users energy expenses by reducing cooling as well as lighting costs and by extending bulb life. Retrofit calculations should include the cost of installing new ballasts with union labor. Three users describe their installations and their use of either simple payback or simple payback including replacement savings. (DCK)

  5. Ancestral telomere shortening: a countdown that will increase mean life span?

    PubMed

    Hertzog, Radu G

    2006-01-01

    Like cells, all mammals have a limited life span. Among cells there are a few exceptions (e.g., immortal cells), among mammals not, even if some of them live longer. Many in vitro and in vivo studies support the consensus that telomere length is strongly correlated with life span. At the somatic cellular level, long telomeres have been associated with longer life span. A different situation can be seen in immortal cells, such as cancer, germ and stem cells, where telomeres are maintained by telomerase, a specialized reverse transcriptase that is involved in synthesis of telomeres. Irrespective of telomere length, if telomerase is active, telomeres can be maintained at a sufficient length to ensure cell survival. To the contrary, telomeres shorten progressively with each cell division and when a critical telomere length (Hayflick limit) is reached, the cells undergo senescence and subsequently apoptosis. In mammals, those with the longest telomeres (e.g., mice) have the shortest life span. Furthermore, the shorter the mean telomere length, the longer the mean life span, as observed in humans (10-14 kpb) and bowhead-whales (undetermined telomere length), which have the longest mean life span among mammals. Over the past centuries, human average life span has increased. The hypothesis presented here suggests that this continual increase in the mean life span could be due to a decrease of mean telomere length over the last hundreds years. Actually, the life span is not directly influenced by length of telomeres, but rather by telomere length - dependent gene expression pattern. According to Greider, "rather than average telomere length, it is the shortest telomere length that makes the biggest difference to a cell". In the context of fast-growing global elderly population due to increase in life expectancy, it also seem to be an age related increase in cancer incidence. Nevertheless, extending healthy life span could depend on how good cells achieve, during the prenatal period and few years after birth, the equilibrium between telomere length and telomerase activity, as seen in germ cells. After all, I suggest that decrease in mean telomere length might result in, on the one hand, an increased life span and, on the other, a higher risk of tumorigenesis. PMID:16530337

  6. Disentangling environmental effects on adult life span in a butterfly across the metamorphic boundary.

    PubMed

    Bauerfeind, Stephanie S; Perlick, Jana E C; Fischer, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    Life span is a central life history trait often showing tremendous variation within populations. Much of this variation can be attributed to environmental factors. In holometabolous insects life stages differ strikingly in physiology and energetic demands, and environmental variation before and after metamorphosis may not necessarily yield identical responses. In this study, we adopted a full-factorial experimental design with two larval and two adult temperatures as well as two larval and three adult feeding treatments (n(total)=1151). Identical temperatures yielded qualitatively different results depending on the developmental stage. While the lower compared to the higher developmental temperature slightly reduced adult life span, a lower adult temperature substantially increased life span. Food stress in the larval stage slightly reduced life span, as did food stress during the adult stage. Females lived generally longer than males. All factors investigated were involved in interactions with other factors, both within and across life stages. For instance, the qualitative impact of larval food stress depended on adult feeding treatment and adult temperature. Our results suggest that much insight into the causes of variation in life span is to be gained by explicitly considering environmental impacts across developmental stages and potential interactions among different environmental factors. PMID:19836442

  7. Herbal Supplement Extends Life Span Under Some Environmental Conditions and Boosts Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Villeponteau, Bryant; Matsagas, Kennedy; Nobles, Amber C.; Rizza, Cristina; Horwitz, Marc; Benford, Gregory; Mockett, Robin J.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic studies indicate that aging is modulated by a great number of genetic pathways. We have used Drosophila longevity and stress assays to test a multipath intervention strategy. To carry out this strategy, we supplemented the flies with herbal extracts (SC100) that are predicted to modulate the expression of many genes involved in aging and stress resistance, such as mTOR, NOS, NF-KappaB, and VEGF. When flies were housed in large cages with SC100 added, daily mortality rates of both male and female flies were greatly diminished in mid to late life. Surprisingly, SC100 also stabilized midlife mortality rate increases so as to extend the maximum life span substantially beyond the limits previously reported for D. melanogaster. Under these conditions, SC100 also promoted robust resistance to partial starvation stress and to heat stress. Fertility was the same initially in both treated and control flies, but it became significantly higher in treated flies at older ages as the fertility of control flies declined. Mean and maximum life spans of flies in vials at the same test site were also extended by SC100, but the life spans were short in absolute terms. In contrast, at an independent test site where stress was minimized, the flies exhibited much longer mean life spans, but the survival curves became highly rectangular and the effects of SC100 on both mean and maximum life spans declined greatly or were abolished. The data indicate that SC100 is a novel herbal mix with striking effects on enhancing Drosophila stress resistance and life span in some environments, while minimizing mid to late life mortality rates. They also show that the environment and other factors can have transformative effects on both the length and distribution of survivorship, and on the ability of SC100 to extend the life span. PMID:25879540

  8. Life-Span Development of Brain Network Integration Assessed with Phase Lag Index Connectivity and Minimum Spanning Tree Graphs.

    PubMed

    Smit, Dirk J A; de Geus, Eco J C; Boersma, Maria; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stam, Cornelis J

    2016-05-01

    Graph analysis of electroencephalography (EEG) has previously revealed developmental increases in connectivity between distant brain areas and a decrease in randomness and increased integration in the brain network with concurrent increased modularity. Comparisons of graph parameters across age groups, however, may be confounded with network degree distributions. In this study, we analyzed graph parameters from minimum spanning tree (MST) graphs and compared their developmental trajectories to those of graph parameters based on full graphs published previously. MST graphs are constructed by selecting only the strongest available connections avoiding loops, resulting in a backbone graph that is thought to reflect the major qualitative properties of the network, while allowing a better comparison across age groups by avoiding the degree of distribution confound. EEG was recorded in a large (n = 1500) population-based sample aged 5-71 years. Connectivity was assessed using phase lag index to reduce effects of volume conduction. Connectivity in the MST graph increased significantly from childhood to adolescence, continuing to grow nonsignificantly into adulthood, and decreasing significantly about 57 years of age. Leaf number, degree, degree correlation, and maximum centrality from the MST graph indicated a pattern of increased integration and decreased randomness from childhood into early adulthood. The observed development in network topology suggested that maturation at the neuronal level is aimed to increase connectivity as well as increase integration of the brain network. We confirm that brain network connectivity shows quantitative changes across the life span and additionally demonstrate parallel qualitative changes in the connectivity pattern. PMID:26885699

  9. Influence of Steroid Hormone Signaling on Life Span Control by Caenorhabditis elegans Insulin-Like Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Kathleen J.; Guo, Chunfang; Shih, Hung-Jen; Hu, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol-sensing nuclear receptors and insulin-like growth factor signaling play evolutionarily conserved roles in the control of aging. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, bile acid-like steroid hormones known as dafachronic acids (DAs) influence longevity by binding to and regulating the activity of the conserved nuclear receptor DAF-12, and the insulin receptor (InsR) ortholog DAF-2 controls life span by inhibiting the FoxO transcription factor DAF-16. How the DA/DAF-12 pathway interacts with DAF-2/InsR signaling to control life span is poorly understood. Here we specifically investigated the roles of liganded and unliganded DAF-12 in life span control in the context of reduced DAF-2/InsR signaling. In animals with reduced daf-2/InsR activity, mutations that either reduce DA biosynthesis or fully abrogate DAF-12 activity shorten life span, suggesting that liganded DAF-12 promotes longevity. In animals with reduced DAF-2/InsR activity induced by daf-2/InsR RNAi, both liganded and unliganded DAF-12 promote longevity. However, in daf-2/InsR mutants, liganded and unliganded DAF-12 act in opposition to control life span. Thus, multiple DAF-12 activities influence life span in distinct ways in contexts of reduced DAF-2/InsR signaling. Our findings establish new roles for a conserved steroid signaling pathway in life span control and elucidate interactions among DA biosynthetic pathways, DAF-12, and DAF-2/InsR signaling in aging. PMID:23550118

  10. From yeast to human: exploring the comparative biology of methionine restriction in extending eukaryotic life span.

    PubMed

    McIsaac, R Scott; Lewis, Kaitlyn N; Gibney, Patrick A; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Methionine restriction is a widely reported intervention for increasing life span in several model organisms. Low circulating levels of methionine are evident in the long-lived naked mole-rat, suggesting that it naturally presents with a life-extending phenotype akin to that observed in methionine-restricted animals. Similarly, long-lived dwarf mice also appear to have altered methionine metabolism. The mechanisms underlying methionine-restriction effects on life-span extension, however, remain unknown, as do their potential connections with caloric restriction, another well-established intervention for prolonging life span. Paradoxically, methionine is enriched in proteins expressed in mitochondria and may itself serve an important role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species and may thereby contribute to delayed aging. Collectively, we highlight the evidence that modulation of the methionine metabolic network can extend life span-from yeast to humans-and explore the evidence that sulfur amino acids and the concomitant transsulfuration pathway play a privileged role in this regard. However, systematic studies in single organisms (particularly those that exhibit extreme longevity) are still required to distinguish the fundamental principles concerning the role of methionine and other amino acids in regulating life span. PMID:26995762

  11. Theoretical Propositions of Life-Span Developmental Psychology: On the Dynamics between Growth and Decline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Paul B.

    1987-01-01

    Defines life-span developmental psychology as the study of constancy and change in behavior throughout the life course. Advances metatheoretical view regarding development. Stresses focus on the dynamic and continuous interplay between growth (gain) and decline (loss). Examines structural contextual factors and study of range of plasticity in…

  12. Enhanced Energy Metabolism Contributes to the Extended Life Span of Calorie-restricted Caenorhabditis elegans*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Kadiyala, Chandra S.; Ching, Tsui-Ting; Hakimi, Parvin; Saha, Sudipto; Xu, Hua; Yuan, Chao; Mullangi, Vennela; Wang, Liwen; Fivenson, Elayne; Hanson, Richard W.; Ewing, Rob; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Miyagi, Masaru; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2012-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) markedly extends life span and improves the health of a broad number of species. Energy metabolism fundamentally contributes to the beneficial effects of CR, but the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for this effect remain enigmatic. A multidisciplinary approach that involves quantitative proteomics, immunochemistry, metabolic quantification, and life span analysis was used to determine how CR, which occurs in the Caenorhabditis elegans eat-2 mutants, modifies energy metabolism of the worm, and whether the observed modifications contribute to the CR-mediated physiological responses. A switch to fatty acid metabolism as an energy source and an enhanced rate of energy metabolism by eat-2 mutant nematodes were detected. Life span analyses validated the important role of these previously unknown alterations of energy metabolism in the CR-mediated longevity of nematodes. As observed in mice, the overexpression of the gene for the nematode analog of the cytosolic form of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase caused a marked extension of the life span in C. elegans, presumably by enhancing energy metabolism via an altered rate of cataplerosis of tricarboxylic acid cycle anions. We conclude that an increase, not a decrease in fuel consumption, via an accelerated oxidation of fuels in the TCA cycle is involved in life span regulation; this mechanism may be conserved across phylogeny. PMID:22810224

  13. Balance between macronutrients affects life span and functional senescence in fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Rovenko, Bohdana M; Glovyak, Andriy D; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Klyuba, Vira P; Shcherbij, Maria V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that as the ratio of protein to carbohydrate (P:C) in the diet declines, life span increases in Drosophila. Here we explored how extremely low dietary ratios of protein to carbohydrate affected longevity and a selection of variables associated with functional senescence. An increase in P:C ratio from 1:57 to 1:20 shortened life span by increasing age-dependent mortality; whereas a further decline in P:C from 1:57 to 1:95 caused a modest decrease in life span. Female flies consuming the 1:20 and 1:38 diets laid more eggs than those consuming the lower P:C diets. Flies fed diets with higher ratios were more resistant to heat stress. Flies consuming the diets with lowest P:C ratios needed more time to restore activity after paralysis. Our study has therefore extended to very low P:C ratios available data demonstrating that dietary P:C ratio affects life span, fecundity and heat stress resistance, with fecundity and heat stress responses showing the opposite trend to life span. PMID:22042724

  14. Longevity in space; experiment on the life span of Paramecium cell clone in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogami, Y.; Tokunaga, N.; Baba, S. A.

    1999-01-01

    Life span is the most interesting and also the most important biologically relevant time to be investigated on the space station. As a model experiment, we proposed an investigation to assess the life span of clone generation of the ciliate Paramecium. In space, clone generation will be artificially started by conjugation or autogamy, and the life span of the cell populations in different gravitational fields (microgravity and onboard 1 g control) will be precisely assessed in terms of fission age as compared with the clock time. In order to perform the space experiment including long-lasting culture and continuous measurement of cell division, we tested the methods of cell culture and of cell-density measurement, which will be available in closed environments under microgravity. The basic design of experimental hardware and a preliminary result of the cultivation procedure are described.

  15. Effect of carbon ions on life span shortening and tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakinuma, Shizuko; Kubo, Ayumi; Amasaki, Yoshiko; Nohima, Kumie; Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Nishimura, Mayumi; Shimada, Yoshiya

    2004-11-01

    One of the important concerns for astronauts in space is cancer risk associated with cosmic radiation, including heavy particle ions. But little information on cancer risk is available. We investigated the effect of carbon ions on life span shortening and tumor induction in B6C3F1 mice. The mice were exposed weekly to 0.4 and 2.0 Gy whole-body carbon-ion- or X-ray-irradiation for 4 consecutive weeks. The spectrum of induced tumors varied depending on the dose. The cause of death was thymic lymphomas and liver tumors at high and low dose, respectively. The life span shortening by X-rays was proportional to dose, while carbon ions produced a convex upward relationship. The relative biological effectiveness for the 50% life span shortening was about 1.4. The large effect of carbon ions encourages the study on tumor induction at low doses in the space. PMID:15900637

  16. Learning From Leaders: Life-span Trends in Olympians and Supercentenarians

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Geoffroy; Marck, Adrien; Noirez, Philippe; Latouche, Aurélien; Toussaint, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Life-span trends progression has worldwide practical implications as it may affect the sustainability of modern societies. We aimed to describe the secular life-span trends of populations with a propensity to live longer—Olympians and supercentenarians—under two hypotheses: an ongoing life-span extension versus a biologic “probabilistic barrier” limiting further progression. In a study of life-span densities (total number of life durations per birth date), we analyzed 19,012 Olympians and 1,205 supercentenarians deceased between 1900 and 2013. Among most Olympians, we observed a trend toward increased life duration. This trend, however, decelerates at advanced ages leveling off with the upper values with a perennial gap between Olympians and supercentenarians during the whole observation period. Similar tendencies are observed among supercentenarians, and over the last years, a plateau attests to a stable longevity pattern among the longest-lived humans. The common trends between Olympians and supercentenarians indicate similar mortality pressures over both populations that increase with age, scenario better explained by a biologic “barrier” forecast. PMID:25143003

  17. Polygenic Effects of Common Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms on Life Span: When Association Meets Causality

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deqing; Arbeev, Konstantin G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently we have shown that the human life span is influenced jointly by many common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), each with a small individual effect. Here we investigate further the polygenic influence on life span and discuss its possible biological mechanisms. First we identified six sets of prolongevity SNP alleles in the Framingham Heart Study 550K SNPs data, using six different statistical procedures (normal linear, Cox, and logistic regressions; generalized estimation equation; mixed model; gene frequency method). We then estimated joint effects of these SNPs on human survival. We found that alleles in each set show significant additive influence on life span. Twenty-seven SNPs comprised the overlapping set of SNPs that influenced life span, regardless of the statistical procedure. The majority of these SNPs (74%) were within genes, compared to 40% of SNPs in the original 550K set. We then performed a review of current literature on functions of genes closest to these 27 SNPs. The review showed that the respective genes are largely involved in aging, cancer, and brain disorders. We concluded that polygenic effects can explain a substantial portion of genetic influence on life span. Composition of the set of prolongevity alleles depends on the statistical procedure used for the allele selection. At the same time, there is a core set of longevity alleles that are selected with all statistical procedures. Functional relevance of respective genes to aging and major diseases supports causal relationships between the identified SNPs and life span. The fact that genes found in our and other genetic association studies of aging/longevity have similar functions indicates high chances of true positive associations for corresponding genetic variants. PMID:22533364

  18. Liver-Derived IGF-I Regulates Mean Life Span in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Johan; Sjögren, Klara; Fäldt, Jenny; Andersson, Niklas; Isaksson, Olle; Jansson, John-Olov; Ohlsson, Claes

    2011-01-01

    Background Transgenic mice with low levels of global insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) throughout their life span, including pre- and postnatal development, have increased longevity. This study investigated whether specific deficiency of liver-derived, endocrine IGF-I is of importance for life span. Methods and Findings Serum IGF-I was reduced by approximately 80% in mice with adult, liver-specific IGF-I inactivation (LI-IGF-I-/- mice), and body weight decreased due to reduced body fat. The mean life span of LI-IGF-I-/- mice (n = 84) increased 10% vs. control mice (n = 137) (Cox's test, p<0.01), mainly due to increased life span (16%) of female mice [LI-IGF-I-/- mice (n = 31): 26.7±1.1 vs. control (n = 67): 23.0±0.7 months, p<0.001]. Male LI-IGF-I-/- mice showed only a tendency for increased longevity (p = 0.10). Energy expenditure, measured as oxygen consumption during and after submaximal exercise, was increased in the LI-IGF-I-/- mice. Moreover, microarray and RT-PCR analyses showed consistent regulation of three genes (heat shock protein 1A and 1B and connective tissue growth factor) in several body organs in the LI-IGF-I-/- mice. Conclusions Adult inactivation of liver-derived, endocrine IGF-I resulted in moderately increased mean life span. Body weight and body fat decreased in LI-IGF-I-/- mice, possibly due to increased energy expenditure during exercise. Genes earlier reported to modulate stress response and collagen aging showed consistent regulation, providing mechanisms that could underlie the increased mean life span in the LI-IGF-I-/- mice. PMID:21799924

  19. Effects of lu-duo-wei capsule on prolonging life span of housefly and Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Cui, X; Dai, X G; Li, W B; Zhang, B L; Fang, Y Z

    1999-01-01

    Lu-Duo-Wei capsule is a product of Chinese medicine having high efficacy in scavenging superoxide and hydroxyl radicals. It contains antioxidants, which may increase longevity, but whether Lu-Duo-Wei capsule has such an effect is unknown. In this study, supplementing the basic diet with Lu-Duo-Wei resulted in prolonging the life span of houseflies and fruit flies. Moreover, the effect of prolonging the life span of houseflies by Lu-Duo-Wei was significantly higher than that of tea polyphenol. The result not only confirms our previous report but also supports the free radical theory of aging. PMID:10592850

  20. Regulation of life span by mitochondrial respiration: the HIF-1 and ROS connection

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Ara B.; Lee, Seung-Jae

    2011-01-01

    A mild reduction in mitochondrial respiration extends the life span of many species, including C. elegans. We recently showed that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) is required for the acquisition of a long life span by mutants with reduced respiration in C. elegans. We suggested that increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the respiration mutants increase HIF-1 activity and lead to this longevity. In this research perspective, we discuss our findings and recent advances regarding the roles of ROS and HIF-1 in aging, focusing on the longevity caused by reduced respiration. PMID:21389351

  1. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension and resistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chondrogianni, Niki; Georgila, Konstantina; Kourtis, Nikos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Gonos, Efstathios S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein homeostasis (proteostasis) is one of the nodal points that need to be preserved to retain physiologic cellular/organismal balance. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is responsible for the removal of both normal and damaged proteins, with the proteasome being the downstream effector. The proteasome is the major cellular protease with progressive impairment of function during aging and senescence. Despite the documented age-retarding properties of proteasome activation in various cellular models, simultaneous enhancement of the 20S core proteasome content, assembly, and function have never been reported in any multicellular organism. Consequently, the possible effects of the core proteasome modulation on organismal life span are elusive. In this study, we have achieved activation of the 20S proteasome at organismal level. We demonstrate enhancement of proteasome levels, assembly, and activity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, resulting in life span extension and increased resistance to stress. We also provide evidence that the observed life span extension is dependent on the transcriptional activity of Dauer formation abnormal/Forkhead box class O (DAF-16/FOXO), skinhead-1 (SKN-1), and heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1) factors through regulation of downstream longevity genes. We further show that the reported beneficial effects are not ubiquitous but they are dependent on the genetic context. Finally, we provide evidence that proteasome core activation might be a potential strategy to minimize protein homeostasis deficiencies underlying aggregation-related diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or Huntington’s disease (HD). In summary, this is the first report demonstrating that 20S core proteasome up-regulation in terms of both content and activity is feasible in a multicellular eukaryotic organism and that in turn this modulation promotes extension of organismal health span and life span.—Chondrogianni, N., Georgila, K., Kourtis, N., Tavernarakis, N., Gonos, E. S. 20S proteasome activation promotes life span extension andresistance to proteotoxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:25395451

  2. Effects of a Short Strategy Training on Metacognitive Monitoring across the Life-Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von der Linden, Nicole; Löffler, Elisabeth; Schneider, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to explore the potential positive influence of a short strategy training on metacognitive monitoring competencies covering a life-span approach. Participants of four age groups (3rd-grade children, adolescents, younger and older adults) concluded a paired-associate learning task. Additionally, they gave delayed…

  3. Like cognitive function, decision making across the life span shows profound age-related changes

    PubMed Central

    Tymula, Agnieszka; Rosenberg Belmaker, Lior A.; Ruderman, Lital; Glimcher, Paul W.; Levy, Ifat

    2013-01-01

    It has long been known that human cognitive function improves through young adulthood and then declines across the later life span. Here we examined how decision-making function changes across the life span by measuring risk and ambiguity attitudes in the gain and loss domains, as well as choice consistency, in an urban cohort ranging in age from 12 to 90 y. We identified several important age-related patterns in decision making under uncertainty: First, we found that healthy elders between the ages of 65 and 90 were strikingly inconsistent in their choices compared with younger subjects. Just as elders show profound declines in cognitive function, they also show profound declines in choice rationality compared with their younger peers. Second, we found that the widely documented phenomenon of ambiguity aversion is specific to the gain domain and does not occur in the loss domain, except for a slight effect in older adults. Finally, extending an earlier report by our group, we found that risk attitudes across the life span show an inverted U-shaped function; both elders and adolescents are more risk-averse than their midlife counterparts. Taken together, these characterizations of decision-making function across the life span in this urban cohort strengthen the conclusions of previous reports suggesting a profound impact of aging on cognitive function in this domain. PMID:24082105

  4. Life-Span Development of Visual Working Memory: When Is Feature Binding Difficult?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Nelson; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Saults, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    We asked whether the ability to keep in working memory the binding between a visual object and its spatial location changes with development across the life span more than memory for item information. Paired arrays of colored squares were identical or differed in the color of one square, and in the latter case, the changed color was unique on…

  5. Relationship between heat shock protein 70 expression and life span in Daphnia.

    PubMed

    Schumpert, Charles; Handy, Indhira; Dudycha, Jeffry L; Patel, Rekha C

    2014-07-01

    The longevity of an organism is directly related to its ability to effectively cope with cellular stress. Heat shock response (HSR) protects the cells against accumulation of damaged proteins after exposure to elevated temperatures and also in aging cells. To understand the role of Hsp70 in regulating life span of Daphnia, we examined the expression of Hsp70 in two ecotypes that exhibit strikingly different life spans. Daphnia pulicaria, the long lived ecotype, showed a robust Hsp70 induction as compared to the shorter lived Daphnia pulex. Interestingly, the short-lived D. pulex isolates showed no induction of Hsp70 at the mid point in their life span. In contrast to this, the long-lived D. pulicaria continued to induce Hsp70 expression at an equivalent age. We further show that the Hsp70 expression was induced at transcriptional level in response to heat shock. The transcription factor responsible for Hsp70 induction, heat shock factor-1 (HSF-1), although present in aged organisms did not exhibit DNA-binding capability. Thus, the decline of Hsp70 induction in old organisms could be attributed to a decline in HSF-1's DNA-binding activity. These results for the first time, present a molecular analysis of the relationship between HSR and life span in Daphnia. PMID:24814302

  6. Toward a Life Span Theory of Close Relationships: The Affective Relationships Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Keiko

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses how close relationships can be conceptualized so that they can be accurately understood over the life span. First, two typical clusters of theories of close relationships, the attachment theory and the social network theory, are compared and discussed with regard to their fundamental but controversial assumptions regarding…

  7. Life-Span Issues in the Fair and Non-Discriminatory Evaluation of Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Ralph A.; Barrett, Gerald V.

    Until recently, older workers have not been recognized as a group requiring special attention in the area of fair employment practices. Thus, progress has been slow towards the development of valid and reliable indices of performance which are applicable across the life span. Research shows that many measures of employee evaluation provide no…

  8. Theory and Method in Life-Span Development Psychology Implications for Child Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Aletha H.; Baltes, Paul B.

    This paper elucidates the implications of life-span developmental psychology for theory and method in the field of child development. Emphasis is given to three theoretical issues: (1) historical-evolutionary versus ontogenetic components of change, (2) the role of chronological age, and (3) continuity versus discontinuity in the description and…

  9. Body Image across the Life Span in Adult Women: The Role of Self-Objectification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiggemann, Marika; Lynch, Jessica E.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated body image across life span in cross-section of women ages 20-84 years. Found that although body dissatisfaction remained stable, self-objectification, habitual body monitoring, appearance anxiety, and disordered eating all significantly decreased with age. Self- objectification mediated the relationship between age and disordered…

  10. Skill Learning as a Concept in Life-Span Developmental Psychology: An Action Theoretic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frese, M.; Stewart, J.

    1984-01-01

    An action theoretic account of skill learning and skill use is offered as a useful heuristic for life-span developmental psychology. The version presented is one that is particularly prominent in industrial psychology in the German-speaking countries. (Author/RH)

  11. Yeast MRX deletions have short chronological life span and more triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Kanagavijayan, Dhanabalan; Rajasekharan, Ram; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism for lipid research. Here, we have used yeast haploid RAdiation Damage (RAD) deletion strains to study life span and lipid storage patterns. RAD genes are mainly involved in DNA repair mechanism and hence, their deletions have resulted in shorter life span. Viable RAD mutants were screened for non-polar lipid content, and some of the mutants showed significantly high amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG) and steryl ester, besides short chronological life span. Among these, RAD50, MRE11 and XRS2 form a complex, MRX that is involved in homologous recombination that showed an increase in the amount of TAG. Microarray data of single MRX deletions revealed that besides DNA damage signature genes, lipid metabolism genes are also differentially expressed. Lipid biosynthetic genes (LPP1, SLC1) were upregulated and lipid hydrolytic gene (TGL3) was downregulated. We observed that rad50Δ, mre11Δ, xrs2Δ and mrxΔ strains have high number of lipid droplets (LDs) with fragmented mitochondria. These mutants have a short chronological life span compared to wild type. Aged wild-type cells also accumulated TAG with LDs of ∼2.0 μm in diameter. These results suggest that TAG accumulation and big size LDs could be possible markers for premature or normal aging. PMID:26678749

  12. Extending the Human Life Span: An Exploratory Study of Pro- and Anti-Longevity Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Nathan; Tucker, Jennifer; Porter, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Successful efforts by biologists to substantially increase the life span of non-human animals has raised the possibility of extrapolation to humans, which in turn has given rise to bioethical argumentation, pro and con. The present study converts these arguments into pro- and anti-longevity items on a questionnaire and examines the structure and

  13. The Impact of Drug Use on Earnings: A Life-Span Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kandel, Denise; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Among a longitudinal cohort of 400 employed males, illicit drug use had a positive impact on wages up to age 28-29 and a negative impact by the mid-30s. A life-span perspective emphasizes differential short- and long-term impacts of education, training, and job changes on users' and nonusers' incomes. Contains 57 references. (Author/SV)

  14. Psychopathology in Williams Syndrome: The Effect of Individual Differences across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Helen F.; Porter, Melanie A.

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to comprehensively explore psychopathology in Williams syndrome (WS) across the life span and evaluate the relationship between psychopathology and age category (child or adult), gender, and cognitive ability. The parents of 50 participants with WS, ages 6-50 years, were interviewed using the Schedule for Affective Disorders…

  15. Toward a Life Span Theory of Close Relationships: The Affective Relationships Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takahashi, Keiko

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses how close relationships can be conceptualized so that they can be accurately understood over the life span. First, two typical clusters of theories of close relationships, the attachment theory and the social network theory, are compared and discussed with regard to their fundamental but controversial assumptions regarding

  16. Target of Rapamycin Signaling Regulates Metabolism, Growth, and Life Span in Arabidopsis[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Maozhi; Venglat, Prakash; Qiu, Shuqing; Feng, Li; Cao, Yongguo; Wang, Edwin; Xiang, Daoquan; Wang, Jinghe; Alexander, Danny; Chalivendra, Subbaiah; Logan, David; Mattoo, Autar; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2012-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and life span in yeast and animals. In plants, growth and life span are intertwined not only with nutrient acquisition from the soil and nutrition generation via photosynthesis but also with their unique modes of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these processes has not yet been determined. To gain further insights, rapamycin-sensitive transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines (BP12) expressing yeast FK506 Binding Protein12 were developed. Inhibition of TOR in BP12 plants by rapamycin resulted in slower overall root, leaf, and shoot growth and development leading to poor nutrient uptake and light energy utilization. Experimental limitation of nutrient availability and light energy supply in wild-type Arabidopsis produced phenotypes observed with TOR knockdown plants, indicating a link between TOR signaling and nutrition/light energy status. Genetic and physiological studies together with RNA sequencing and metabolite analysis of TOR-suppressed lines revealed that TOR regulates development and life span in Arabidopsis by restructuring cell growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, gene expression, and rRNA and protein synthesis. Gain- and loss-of-function Ribosomal Protein S6 (RPS6) mutants additionally show that TOR function involves RPS6-mediated nutrition and light-dependent growth and life span in Arabidopsis. PMID:23275579

  17. Developmental Change in Proactive Interference across the Life Span: Evidence from Two Working Memory Tasks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loosli, Sandra V.; Rahm, Benjamin; Unterrainer, Josef M.; Weiller, Cornelius; Kaller, Christoph P.

    2014-01-01

    Working memory (WM) as the ability to temporarily maintain and manipulate various kinds of information is known to be affected by proactive interference (PI) from previously relevant contents, but studies on developmental changes in the susceptibility to PI are scarce. In the present study, we investigated life span development of item-specific…

  18. The Use of Digital Technologies across the Adult Life Span in Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelfs, Anne; Richardson, John T. E.

    2013-01-01

    In June 2010, a survey was carried out to explore access to digital technology, attitudes to digital technology and approaches to studying across the adult life span in students taking courses with the UK Open University. In total, 7000 people were surveyed, of whom more than 4000 responded. Nearly all these students had access to a computer and…

  19. A Life-Span Analysis of Rural Kansas Children's Mental and Social Development: First Year Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poresky, Robert H.; And Others

    This first year report of a life span analysis of rural Kansas children's mental and social development focuses on the children's cognitive development and the effect of family attitudes and child caring patterns on the children's development. The subjects, 62 rural children aged 3, 6, and 9 years, are to be interviewed annually. Initial analysis…

  20. The Development of Attentional Networks: Cross-Sectional Findings from a Life Span Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waszak, Florian; Li, Shu-Chen; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a population-based sample of 263 individuals ranging from 6 to 89 years of age, we investigated the gains and losses in the abilities to (a) use exogenous cues to shift attention covertly and (b) ignore conflicting information across the life span. The participants' ability to shift visual attention was tested by a typical Posner-type…

  1. Asynchronous Vowel-Pair Identification across the Adult Life Span for Monaural and Dichotic Presentations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogerty, Daniel; Kewley-Port, Diane; Humes, Larry E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Temporal order abilities decrease with age. Declining temporal processing abilities may influence the identification of rapid vowel sequences. Identification patterns for asynchronous vowel pairs were explored across the life span. Method: Young, middle-aged, and older listeners completed temporal order tasks for pairs of 70-ms and 40-ms…

  2. Attachment and the Processing of Social Information across the Life Span: Theory and Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykas, Matthew J.; Cassidy, Jude

    2011-01-01

    Researchers have used J. Bowlby's (1969/1982, 1973, 1980, 1988) attachment theory frequently as a basis for examining whether experiences in close personal relationships relate to the processing of social information across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. We present an integrative life-span-encompassing theoretical model to explain the…

  3. Service Learning in Life-Span Developmental Psychology: Higher Exam Scores and Increased Empathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Brenda L.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes research conducted to evaluate the impact of service learning on exam scores and emotional empathy in a life-span development course. Service learning was 1 of 3 project options offered in the course; others included an interview project and a research paper. With the exception of the first exam, scores were significantly…

  4. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FARM SERVICE AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGRICULTURAL CONSERVATION PROGRAM EMERGENCY CONSERVATION PROGRAM AND CERTAIN RELATED...

  5. Life span of solutions to a nonlocal in time nonlinear fractional Schrödinger equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirane, M.; Nabti, A.

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we study the initial value problem for the nonlocal in time nonlinear Schrödinger equation Using the test function method, we derive a blow-up exponent. Then based on integral inequalities, we estimate the life span of blowing-up solutions.

  6. Religious Faith across the Life Span: Implications for Counseling and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthington, Everett L., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Contends that psychologists can benefit by understanding the religious development of religious clients. Reviews theories of religious development and research on a variety of issues involving religion over the life span. Investigates implications of theory and research on religious involvement in therapy and identifies important questions for

  7. Gains and Losses in Creative Personality as Perceived by Adults across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Anna N. N.; Yeung, Dannii Y.; Sue-Chan, Christina; Chan, Kara; Hui, Desmond C. K.; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a life span model to study the subjective perception of creative personality (CP) in emerging, young, middle-aged, and older Hong Kong Chinese adults. We also asked participants to estimate the approximate age by which people develop and lose CP across adulthood. We expected an interesting interplay between internalized age…

  8. Extending the Human Life Span: An Exploratory Study of Pro- and Anti-Longevity Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kogan, Nathan; Tucker, Jennifer; Porter, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Successful efforts by biologists to substantially increase the life span of non-human animals has raised the possibility of extrapolation to humans, which in turn has given rise to bioethical argumentation, pro and con. The present study converts these arguments into pro- and anti-longevity items on a questionnaire and examines the structure and…

  9. Gains and Losses in Creative Personality as Perceived by Adults across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hui, Anna N. N.; Yeung, Dannii Y.; Sue-Chan, Christina; Chan, Kara; Hui, Desmond C. K.; Cheng, Sheung-Tak

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we used a life span model to study the subjective perception of creative personality (CP) in emerging, young, middle-aged, and older Hong Kong Chinese adults. We also asked participants to estimate the approximate age by which people develop and lose CP across adulthood. We expected an interesting interplay between internalized age

  10. Specific dietary carbohydrates differentially influence the life span and fecundity of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Rovenko, Bohdana M; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Perkhulyn, Natalia V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    The fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster is a broadly used model for gerontological research. Many studies are dedicated to understanding nutritional effects on ageing; however, the influence of dietary carbohydrate type and dosage is still poorly understood. We show that among three carbohydrates tested, fructose, glucose, and sucrose, the latter decreased life span by 13%-27%, being present in concentrations of 2%-20% in the diet. Life-span shortening by sucrose was accompanied by an increase in age-independent mortality. Sucrose also dramatically decreased the fecundity of the flies. The differences in life span and fecundity were determined to be unrelated to differential carbohydrate ingestion. The highest mitochondrial protein density was observed in flies fed sucrose-containing diet. However, this parameter was not affected by carbohydrate amount in the diet. Fly sensitivity to oxidative stress, induced by menadione, was increased in aged flies and was slightly affected by type and concentration of carbohydrate. In general, it has been demonstrated that sucrose, commonly used in recipes of Drosophila laboratory food, may shorten life span and lower egg-laying capability on the diets with very low protein content. PMID:23723431

  11. The Development of Attentional Networks: Cross-Sectional Findings from a Life Span Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waszak, Florian; Li, Shu-Chen; Hommel, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Using a population-based sample of 263 individuals ranging from 6 to 89 years of age, we investigated the gains and losses in the abilities to (a) use exogenous cues to shift attention covertly and (b) ignore conflicting information across the life span. The participants' ability to shift visual attention was tested by a typical Posner-type

  12. Trade-offs between seed output and life span - a quantitative comparison of traits between annual and perennial congeneric species.

    PubMed

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Nkurunziza, Libère; Murphy, Kevin; Weih, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Perennial plants allocate more resources belowground, thus sustaining important ecosystem services. Hence, shifting from annual to perennial crops has been advocated towards a more sustainable agriculture. Nevertheless, wild perennial species have lower seed production than selected annuals, raising the questions of whether there is a fundamental trade-off between reproductive effort and life span, and whether such trade-off can be overcome through selection. In order to address these questions and to isolate life span from phylogenetic and environmental factors, we conducted a meta-analysis encompassing c. 3000 congeneric annual/perennial pairs from 28 genera. This meta-analysis is complemented with a minimalist model of long-term productivity in perennial species. Perennials allocate more resources belowground and less to seeds than congeneric annuals, independently of selection history. However, existing perennial wheat and rice could achieve yields similar to annuals if they survived three years and each year doubled their biomass, as other perennial grasses do. Selected perennial crops maintain the large belowground allocation of wild perennials, and thus can provide desired regulatory ecosystem services. To match the seed yield of annuals, biomass production of perennial grains must be increased to amounts attained by some perennial grasses - if this goal can be met, perennial crops can provide a more sustainable alternative to annuals. PMID:26214792

  13. [THE ANALYSIS OF LIFE SPAN AND MORTALITY OF PATIENTS WITH SPINOCEREBELLAR ATAXIA TYPE I].

    PubMed

    Tikhonov, D G; Goldfarb, L G; Neustroeva, T S; Yakovleva, N V; Timofeev, L F; Luckan, I P; Platonov, F A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents results of investigation of certain unclear aspects of mortality of patients with spinocerebellar ataxia type I including patients with the same number of CAG-repetitions. The analysis of mortality of patients observed from 1993 to nowadays was implemented. Sampling included 112 patients during that period 53 patients died. The comparative analysis was implemented concerning received data and results of analysis of mortality of patients died prior to 1980. According received data, average value of CAG-repetitions of normal allele was equal to 30.2, and ofpathologic allele--48.7. The average life span made up to 52.8 years, average age of disease onset--38 years and natural duration of disease--14.8 years. The analysis of life span of patients with equal length of repetitions demonstrated that range of life span of patients makes up to from 8 to 23 years. It is established that life of patients becomes shorter because of accidents, cancer and concomitant diseases of cardiovascular system. The presence of such concomitant disease as tuberculosis of lungs results in no shortening of life of patients. The comparative analysis of mortality during the period over 34 years demonstrated that age of disease onset turned out to be more conservative and stable indicator of morbidity. Despite of lacking of effective methods of treatment of disease, the natural duration of disease increased statistically reliable up to 1.8 times during period of observation. The analysis of life span ofpatients with spinocerebellar ataxia type I demonstrated that their life span except length of CAG-expansion depends on a number of factors accelerating and retarding development of disease. At that, life span of patients with the same number of CAG-repetitions can significantly differ The malignant neoplasms, diseases of cardiovascular system and external causes are to be referred to factors accelerating and retarding development of main disease. The addition oftuberculosis in our case resulted in no alteration of natural course of disease. The other factors exist prolonging life of patients, including factors of social economic and medical character They require additional specification and thorough investigation with the purpose of developing methods ofpreventive correction of neuro-degeneration processes. PMID:27116835

  14. Reproductive and post-reproductive life history of wild-caught Drosophila melanogaster under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Klepsatel, P; Glikov, M; De Maio, N; Ricci, S; Schltterer, C; Flatt, T

    2013-07-01

    The life history of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) is well understood, but fitness components are rarely measured by following single individuals over their lifetime, thereby limiting insights into lifetime reproductive success, reproductive senescence and post-reproductive lifespan. Moreover, most studies have examined long-established laboratory strains rather than freshly caught individuals and may thus be confounded by adaptation to laboratory culture, inbreeding or mutation accumulation. Here, we have followed the life histories of individual females from three recently caught, non-laboratory-adapted wild populations of D.melanogaster. Populations varied in a number of life-history traits, including ovariole number, fecundity, hatchability and lifespan. To describe individual patterns of age-specific fecundity, we developed a new model that allowed us to distinguish four phases during a female's life: a phase of reproductive maturation, followed by a period of linear and then exponential decline in fecundity and, finally, a post-ovipository period. Individual females exhibited clear-cut fecundity peaks, which contrasts with previous analyses, and post-peak levels of fecundity declined independently of how long females lived. Notably, females had a pronounced post-reproductive lifespan, which on average made up 40% of total lifespan. Post-reproductive lifespan did not differ among populations and was not correlated with reproductive fitness components, supporting the hypothesis that this period is a highly variable, random 'add-on' at the end of reproductive life rather than a correlate of selection on reproductive fitness. Most life-history traits were positively correlated, a pattern that might be due to genotype by environment interactions when wild flies are brought into a novel laboratory environment but that is unlikely explained by inbreeding or positive mutational covariance caused by mutation accumulation. PMID:23675912

  15. Effect of habitat preference on frond life span in three Cyathea tree ferns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Tzu Yun; Wang, Hsiang Hua; Lun Kuo, Yao; Kume, Tomonori

    2013-04-01

    It has been reported that plants living in various geographical areas had different physiological forms, as factors of microenvironment have strong impacts on physiological characters. However, the physiological characters of fronds have been scarcely reported in ferns. In this study, we investigated physiological differences in response to the habitat preference in the three tree ferns in northeast Taiwan, Cyathea lepifera, C. spinulosa, and C. podophylla, prefer to open site, edge of forest, and interior forest, respectively. The canopy openness above the individuals of C. lepifera, C. spinulosa and C. podophylla were 29.2 ± 14.10 , 7.0 ± 3.07 and 5.0 ± 2.24 %, respectively. Among three species, C. podophylla had the longest frond life span (13.0 ± 4.12 months) than the two others (C. lepifera (6.8 ± 1.29 months) and C. spinulosa (7.3 ±1.35 months). Our result supported the general patterns that shade intolerant species have a shorter leaf life span than shade tolerant species. The maximum net CO2 assimilation of C. lepifera, C. spinulosa and C. podophylla were 11.46 ± 1.34, 8.27 ± 0.69, and 6.34 ± 0.54 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, respectively. As well, C. lepifera had the highest photosynthetic light saturation point (LSP), while C. podophylla had the lowest LSP among these three tree ferns. These suggested that C. lepifera could be more efficient for capturing and utilizing light resources under the larger canopy openness condition than the other two species. We also found that frond C : N ratio were positively correlated with frond life span among species. C. podophylla, with the longest frond life span, had the highest frond C : N ratio (22.17 ± 1.95), which was followed by C. spinulosa (18.58 ± 1.37) and C. lepifera (18.68 ± 2.63) with shorter frond life span. The results were consistent to the theory that the fronds and leaves of shade intolerant species have high photosynthetic abilities with low C : N ratio. Key words: Canopy openness, frond life span, tree fern, Cyathea, frond C : N ratio

  16. Causes and consequences of variation in conifer leaf life-span

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, P.B.; Koike, T.; Gower, S.T.; Schoettle, A.W.

    1995-07-01

    Species with mutually supporting traits, such as high N{sub mass}, SLA, and A{sub mass}, and short leaf life-span, tend to inhabit either generally resource-rich environments or spatial and/or temporal microhabitats that are resource-rich in otherwise more limited habitats (e.g., {open_quotes}precipitation{close_quotes} ephemerals in warm deserts or spring ephemerals in the understory of temperate deciduous forests). In contrast, species with long leaf life-span often support foliage with low SLA, N{sub mass}, and A{sub mass}, and often grow in low-temperature limited, dry, and/or nutrient-poor environments. The contrast between evergreen and deciduous species, and the implications that emerge from such comparisons, can be considered a paradigm of modern ecological theory. However, based on the results of Reich et al. (1992) and Gower et al. (1993), coniferous species with foliage that persists for 9-10 years are likely to assimilate and allocate carbon and nutrients differently than other evergreen conifers that retain foliage for 2-3 years. Thus, attempts to contrast ecophysiological or ecosystem characteristics of evergreen versus deciduous life forms may be misleading, and pronounced differences among evergreen conifers may be ignored. Clearly, the deciduous-evergreen contrast, although useful in several ways, should be viewed from the broader perspective of a gradient in leaf life-span.

  17. C. elegans miro-1 Mutation Reduces the Amount of Mitochondria and Extends Life Span.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yanqing; Ng, Li Fang; Low, Natarie Pei Wen; Hagen, Thilo; Gruber, Jan; Inoue, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in aging, however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. We found that a mutation disrupting the C. elegans homolog of Miro GTPase (miro-1) extends life span. This phenotype requires simultaneous loss of miro-1 from multiple tissues including muscles and neurons, and is dependent on daf-16/FOXO. Notably, the amount of mitochondria in the miro-1 mutant is reduced to approximately 50% of the wild-type. Despite this reduction, oxygen consumption is only weakly reduced, suggesting that mitochondria of miro-1 mutants are more active than wild-type mitochondria. The ROS damage is slightly reduced and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response pathway is weakly activated in miro-1 mutants. Unlike previously described long-lived mitochondrial electron transport chain mutants, miro-1 mutants have normal growth rate. These results suggest that the reduction in the amount of mitochondria can affect the life span of an organism through activation of stress pathways. PMID:27064409

  18. C. elegans miro-1 Mutation Reduces the Amount of Mitochondria and Extends Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yanqing; Ng, Li Fang; Low, Natarie Pei Wen; Hagen, Thilo; Gruber, Jan; Inoue, Takao

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria play a critical role in aging, however, the underlying mechanism is not well understood. We found that a mutation disrupting the C. elegans homolog of Miro GTPase (miro-1) extends life span. This phenotype requires simultaneous loss of miro-1 from multiple tissues including muscles and neurons, and is dependent on daf-16/FOXO. Notably, the amount of mitochondria in the miro-1 mutant is reduced to approximately 50% of the wild-type. Despite this reduction, oxygen consumption is only weakly reduced, suggesting that mitochondria of miro-1 mutants are more active than wild-type mitochondria. The ROS damage is slightly reduced and the mitochondrial unfolded protein response pathway is weakly activated in miro-1 mutants. Unlike previously described long-lived mitochondrial electron transport chain mutants, miro-1 mutants have normal growth rate. These results suggest that the reduction in the amount of mitochondria can affect the life span of an organism through activation of stress pathways. PMID:27064409

  19. Synthesis of nursing care across the life span using laboratory simulation: a senior-level course.

    PubMed

    Slager, Dianne; Feenstra, Cheryl; Ayoola, Adejoke; Flikkema, Mary; Bartels, Shelly

    2011-02-01

    The use of simulation activities in nursing education helps students develop critical thinking skills and also enhances student learning and confidence in the practicum setting. As students complete their education, they need to integrate all they have learned to design care for patients across the life span. This article describes a senior-level skills laboratory simulation course in a baccalaureate nursing program designed to foster the shift toward independent critical thinking. The primary goal of the course was synthesis and application of students' cumulative knowledge through teamwork, assessing, critical thinking, prioritizing, and decision making in care for diverse patients across the life span. Specifics of course development and design are included along with student responses and lessons learned. PMID:21053854

  20. Modulation of mammalian life span by the short isoform of p53

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Bernhard; Gluba, Wendy; Bernier, Brian; Turner, Terry; Mohammad, Khalid; Guise, Theresa; Sutherland, Ann; Thorner, Michael; Scrable, Heidi

    2004-01-01

    Overexpression of the short isoform of p53 (p44) has unexpectedly uncovered a role for p53 in the regulation of size and life span in the mouse. Hyperactivation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling axis by p44 sets in motion a kinase cascade that clamps potentially unimpeded growth through p21Cip1. This suggests that pathways of gene activity known to regulate longevity in lower organisms are linked in mammals via p53 to mechanisms for controlling cell proliferation. Thus, appropriate expression of the short and long p53 isoforms might maintain a balance between tumor suppression and tissue regeneration, a major requisite for long mammalian life span. PMID:14871929

  1. Demography of Genotypes: Failure of the Limited Life-Span Paradigm in Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtsinger, James W.; Fukui, Hidenori H.; Townsend, David R.; Vaupel, James W.

    1992-10-01

    Experimental systems that are amenable to genetic manipulation can be used to address fundamental questions about genetic and nongenetic determinants of longevity. Analysis of large cohorts of ten genotypes of Drosophila melanogaster raised under conditions that favored extended survival has revealed variation between genotypes in both the slope and location of age-specific mortality curves. More detailed examination of a single genotype showed that the mortality trajectory was best fit by a two-stage Gompertz model, with no age-specific increase in mortality rates beyond 30 days after emergence. These results are contrary to the limited life-span paradigm, which postulates well-defined, genotype-specific limits on life-span and brief periods of intense and rapidly accelerating mortality rates at the oldest ages.

  2. Blood volume and red cell life span (M113), part C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Prechamber, in-chamber, and postchamber blood samples taken from Skylab simulation crewmembers did not indicate significant shortening of the red cell life span during the mission. This does not suggest that the space simulation environment could not be associated with red cell enzyme changes. It does show that any changes in enzymes were not sufficiently great to significantly shorten red cell survival. There was no evidence of bone marrow erythropoetic suppression nor was there any evidence of increased red cell destruction.

  3. Mutant alleles of HD improve the life span of p53(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Amy; Scrable, Heidi

    2008-04-01

    Loss of function mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene predispose mice and humans to cancer, resulting in abbreviated life spans. A dominant mutation in the murine HD gene, similar to mutations that cause Huntington's disease in humans, reverses some of the effects of p53 mutations on longevity. We attribute this to the enhanced apoptotic effect of the expanded polyglutamine region in the HD protein on proliferating cells lacking p53. PMID:18242663

  4. The rate of source memory decline across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Cansino, Selene; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Hernández-Ramos, Evelia; Martínez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Torres-Trejo, Frine; Gómez-Fernández, Tania; Ayala-Hernández, Mariana; Osorio, David; Cedillo-Tinoco, Melisa; Garcés-Flores, Lissete; Gómez-Melgarejo, Sandra; Beltrán-Palacios, Karla; Guadalupe García-Lázaro, Haydée; García-Gutiérrez, Fabiola; Cadena-Arenas, Yadira; Fernández-Apan, Luisa; Bärtschi, Andrea; Resendiz-Vera, Julieta; Rodríguez-Ortiz, María Dolores

    2013-05-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ability to remember contextual information related to specific episodic experiences declines with advancing age; however, the exact moment in the adult life span when this deficit begins is still controversial. Source memory for spatial information was tested in a life span sample of 1,500 adults between the ages of 21 and 80. Initially, images of common objects were randomly presented on one quadrant of a screen while the participants judged whether they were natural or artificial. During the retrieval phase, these same images were mixed with new ones, and all images were displayed in the center of the screen. The participants were asked to judge whether each image was new or old, and whether it was old, to indicate in which quadrant of the screen it had originally been presented. Source accuracy decreased linearly with advancing age at a rate of 0.6% per year across all decades even after controlling for educational level; this decline was unaffected by sex. These results reveal that either spatial information becomes less efficiently bound to episodic representations over time or that the ability to retrieve this information decreases gradually throughout the adult life span. PMID:22686174

  5. Adaptive Physiological Response to Perceived Scarcity as a Mechanism of Sensory Modulation of Life Span.

    PubMed

    Waterson, Michael J; Chan, Tammy P; Pletcher, Scott D

    2015-09-01

    Chemosensation is a potent modulator of organismal physiology and longevity. In Drosophila, loss of recognition of diverse tastants has significant and bidirectional life-span effects. Recently published results revealed that when flies were unable to taste water, they increased its internal generation, which may have subsequently altered life span. To determine whether similar adaptive responses occur in other contexts, we explored the impact of sensory deficiency of other metabolically important molecules. Trehalose is a major circulating carbohydrate in the fly that is recognized by the gustatory receptor Gr5a. Gr5a mutant flies are short lived, and we found that they specifically increased whole-body and circulating levels of trehalose, but not other carbohydrates, likely through upregulation of de novo synthesis. dILP2 transcript levels were increased in Gr5a mutants, a possible response intended to reduce hypertrehalosemia, and likely a contributing factor to their reduced life span. Together, these data suggest that compensatory physiological responses to perceived environmental scarcity, which are designed to alleviate the ostensive shortage, may be a common outcome of sensory manipulation. We suggest that future investigations into the mechanisms underlying sensory modulation of aging may benefit by focusing on direct or indirect consequences of physiological changes that are designed to correct perceived disparity with the environment. PMID:25878032

  6. Implication of Ca2+ in the Regulation of Replicative Life Span of Budding Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Tsubakiyama, Ryohei; Mizunuma, Masaki; Gengyo, Anri; Yamamoto, Josuke; Kume, Kazunori; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Hirata, Dai

    2011-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca2+-triggered signaling pathways are used to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. Calcineurin, a highly conserved Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays key roles in the regulation of diverse biological processes in organisms ranging from yeast to humans. We isolated a mutant of the SIR3 gene, implicated in the regulation of life span, as a suppressor of the Ca2+ sensitivity of zds1Δ cells in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, we investigated a relationship between Ca2+ signaling and life span in yeast. Here we show that Ca2+ affected the replicative life span (RLS) of yeast. Increased external and intracellular Ca2+ levels caused a reduction in their RLS. Consistently, the increase in calcineurin activity by either the zds1 deletion or the constitutively activated calcineurin reduced RLS. Indeed, the shortened RLS of zds1Δ cells was suppressed by the calcineurin deletion. Further, the calcineurin deletion per se promoted aging without impairing the gene silencing typically observed in short-lived sir mutants, indicating that calcineurin plays an important role in a regulation of RLS even under normal growth condition. Thus, our results indicate that Ca2+ homeostasis/Ca2+ signaling are required to regulate longevity in budding yeast. PMID:21712379

  7. Leaf life span spectrum of tropical woody seedlings: effects of light and ontogeny and consequences for survival

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Kaoru; Cordero, Roberto A.; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf life span is widely recognized as a key life history trait associated with herbivory resistance, but rigorous comparative data are rare for seedlings. The goal of this study was to examine how light environment affects leaf life span, and how ontogenetic development during the first year may influence leaf fracture toughness, lamina density and stem density that are relevant for herbivory resistance, leaf life span and seedling survival. Methods Data from three experiments encompassing 104 neotropical woody species were combined. Leaf life span, lamina and vein fracture toughness, leaf and stem tissue density and seedling survival were quantified for the first-year seedlings at standardized ontogenetic stages in shade houses and common gardens established in gaps and shaded understorey in a moist tropical forest in Panama. Mortality of naturally recruited seedlings till 1 year later was quantified in 800 1-m2 plots from 1994 to 2011. Key Results Median leaf life span ranged widely among species, always greater in shade (ranging from 151 to >1790 d in the understorey and shade houses) than in gaps (115–867 d), but with strong correlation between gaps and shade. Leaf and stem tissue density increased with seedling age, whereas leaf fracture toughness showed only a weak increase. All these traits were positively correlated with leaf life span. Leaf life span and stem density were negatively correlated with seedling mortality in shade, while gap mortality showed no correlation with these traits. Conclusions The wide spectrum of leaf life span and associated functional traits reflects variation in shade tolerance of first-year seedlings among coexisting trees, shrubs and lianas in this neotropical forest. High leaf tissue density is important in enhancing leaf toughness, a known physical defence, and leaf life span. Both seedling leaf life span and stem density should be considered as key functional traits that contribute to seedling survival in tropical forest understoreys. PMID:23532047

  8. Life Satisfaction, Self-Esteem, and Subjective Age in Women across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borzumato-Gainey, Christine; Kennedy, Alison; McCabe, Beth; Degges-White, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    A study of 320 women, ages 21 to 69, explored the relations among relationship status, subjective age, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Women in married or partnered relationships had higher levels of life satisfaction than did single women. Women in their 30s and 40s had significantly lower levels of life satisfaction than did other age…

  9. Life span and tumor incidence in rats receiving postradiation treatment with ATP-AET-mexamine mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Benova, D.K.; Kiradzhiev, G.D.; Troitskaya, M.N.; Anisimov, V.N.

    1985-01-01

    Rat females were exposed to a single 4.0-Gy ..gamma..-ray dose and treated postradiation with a mixture of ATP-AET-mexamine at daily doses of 24, 12, and 3 mg/kg body wt, respectively, in drinking water throughout the period of their survival. With the radiation dose used, life shortening appeared primarily attributable to nonstochastic effects. The mixture of chemical protectors failed to show modification of long-term radiation effects with regard to either life span or tumor incidence.

  10. [Special mechanisms for reducing life span of cells and organisms, initiated by some weak external signals].

    PubMed

    Bychkovskaia, I B; Fedortseva, R F

    2014-01-01

    The study presents the results of many-years research conducted using biological objects of different organization level. It demonstrates special species-nonspecific form of weak external signals negative effect to cells life expectancy reduction caused by program damage of cells populations. This effect is detected after weak radiation, radio-chemical and thermal influences. It leads to faster extinction of postmitotic populations which can be a reason for life expectancy reduction of multicellular organisms. A possibility of such effect inheritance in the asexual and sexual reproduction is shown. Epigenetic mechanisms of this phenomenon are assumed. PMID:25826988

  11. Life span of C57 mice as influenced by radiation dose, dose rate, and age at exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Spalding, J.F.; Thomas, R.G.; Tietjen, G.L.

    1982-10-01

    This study was designed to measure the life shortening of C57BL/6J male mice as a result of exposure to five external doses from /sup 60/Co gamma radiation delivered at six different dose rates. Total doses ranged from 20 to 1620 rad at exposure rates ranging from 0.7 to 36,000 R/day. The ages of the mice at exposure were newborn, 2, 6, or 15 months. Two replications were completed. Although death was the primary endpoint, we did perform gross necropsies. The life span findings are variable, but we found no consistent shortening compared to control life spans. Therefore, we cannot logically extrapolate life shortening to lower doses, from the data we have obtained. In general, the younger the animals were at the beginning of exposure, the longer their life spans were compared to those of controls. This relationship weakened at the higher doses and dose rates, as mice in these categories tended not to have significantly different life spans from controls. Using life span as a criterion, we find this study suggests that some threshold dosage may exist beyond which effects of external irradiation may be manifested. Up to this threshold, there is no shortening effect on life span compared to that of control mice. Our results are in general agreement with the results of other researchers investigating human and other animal life span effects on irradiation.

  12. Shorter Life Span of Microorganisms and Plants as a Consequence of Shielded Magnetic Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, I. M.; Bathory, D.

    The geomagnetic field is an essential environmental factor for life and health on this planet. In order to survey how magnetic fields affect the life span and the nitrogenase (an iron-sulphur enzyme) activity of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as the life span, the main organic synthesis and the water balance of plants (22 species), the biological tests were incubated under shielded magnetic field and also in normal geo-magnetic environment. The shielding level was about 10-6 of the terrestrial magnetic field.Life cycles of all organisms require the co-ordinated control of a complex set of interlocked physiological processes and metabolic pathways. Such processes are likely to be regulated by a large number of genes. Our researches suggest that the main point in biological structures, which seems to be affected by the low magnetic environment, is the water molecule. Magnetic field induces a molecular alignment. Under shielded conditions, unstructured water molecules with fewer hydrogen bonds, which are producing a more reactive environment, are occurring. As compared to control, the life span of both microorganisms and plants was shorter in shielded environment. A higher nitrogenase affinity for the substrate was recorded in normal geo-magnetic field compared to low magnetic field. The synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes was modified under experimental conditions. The stomatal conductance was higher between 158 and 300% in shielded environment indicating an important water loss from the plant cells.Our results support the idea that the shielded magnetic environment induces different reactions depending on the time of exposure and on the main metabolic pathways of the cells.

  13. Dead or Alive: Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa destructor Reduce the Life Span of Winter Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jay D.; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Individual dead workers were collected daily and quantitatively analyzed for deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), N. ceranae, and expression levels of the vitellogenin gene as a biomarker for honeybee longevity. Workers from colonies that failed to survive winter had a reduced life span beginning in late fall, were more likely to be infected with DWV, and had higher DWV loads. Colony levels of infection with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and individual infections with DWV were also associated with reduced honeybee life expectancy. In sharp contrast, the level of N. ceranae infection was not correlated with longevity. In addition, vitellogenin gene expression was significantly positively correlated with ABPV and N. ceranae loads. The findings strongly suggest that V. destructor and DWV (but neither N. ceranae nor ABPV) reduce the life span of winter bees, thereby constituting a parsimonious possible mechanism for honeybee colony losses. PMID:22179240

  14. Dead or alive: deformed wing virus and Varroa destructor reduce the life span of winter honeybees.

    PubMed

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Elevated winter losses of managed honeybee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among the suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae, and associated viruses. Here we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expectancy of winter bees, thereby constituting a proximate mechanism for colony losses. A monitoring of colonies was performed over 6 months in Switzerland from summer 2007 to winter 2007/2008. Individual dead workers were collected daily and quantitatively analyzed for deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), N. ceranae, and expression levels of the vitellogenin gene as a biomarker for honeybee longevity. Workers from colonies that failed to survive winter had a reduced life span beginning in late fall, were more likely to be infected with DWV, and had higher DWV loads. Colony levels of infection with the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and individual infections with DWV were also associated with reduced honeybee life expectancy. In sharp contrast, the level of N. ceranae infection was not correlated with longevity. In addition, vitellogenin gene expression was significantly positively correlated with ABPV and N. ceranae loads. The findings strongly suggest that V. destructor and DWV (but neither N. ceranae nor ABPV) reduce the life span of winter bees, thereby constituting a parsimonious possible mechanism for honeybee colony losses. PMID:22179240

  15. The life span of Drosophila melanogaster is affected by melatonin and thioctic acid.

    PubMed

    Terán, Raikelin; Bonilla, Ernesto; Medina-Leendertz, Shirley; Mora, Marylú; Villalobos, Virginia; Paz, Milagros; Arcaya, José L

    2012-09-01

    Aging and reduced longevity are due in part to the action of free radicals (FR). Melatonin (Mel) and thioctic acid (TA) are effective in protecting against the damage caused by FR. In this study, the effect of Mel and TA on the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster was determined. We used a control group of flies, another group that was provided with Mel (0.43 mM) throughout their life cycle (Mel-c), a third group received Mel upon reaching adulthood (Mel-a) and two groups were fed with TA (2.15 mM) in the same manner (TA-c and TA-a). The number of eclosed, survival, phenotype changes, motor activity and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) was evaluated in each group. Mel-c increased the eclosion rate and the motor activity of the flies. Mel-c and Mel-a increased the life span and decreased the concentrations of MDA. By contrast, TA-c diminished the eclosion rate, produced phenotypic changes and increased MDA levels and motor activity of the flies. TA-a extended the life span of flies, and did not alter MDA levels and motor activity when compared with the control group. In conclusion, Mel mitigated the effects caused by FR generated during aging, while TA-c increased lipid peroxidation and altered the phenotype of flies. PMID:23248969

  16. Provenance, life span, and phylogeny do not affect grass species' responses to nitrogen and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Seabloom, Eric W; Benfield, Cara D; Borer, Elizabeth T; Stanley, Amanda G; Kaye, Thomas N; Dunwiddie, Peter W

    2011-09-01

    Successful conservation management requires an understanding of how species respond to intervention. Native and exotic species may respond differently to management interventions due to differences arising directly from their origin (i.e., provenance) or indirectly due to biased representations of different life history types (e.g., annual vs. perennial life span) or phylogenetic lineages among provenance (i.e., native or exotic origin) groups. Thus, selection of a successful management regime requires knowledge of the life history and provenance-bias in the local flora and an understanding of the interplay between species characteristics across existing environmental gradients in the landscape. Here we tested whether provenance, phylogeny, and life span interact to determine species distributions along natural gradients of soil chemistry (e.g., soil nitrogen and phosphorus) in 10 upland prairie sites along a 600-km latitudinal transect running from southern Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada, to the Willamette Valley in Oregon, USA. We found that soil nitrate, phosphorus, and pH exerted strong control over community composition. However, species distributions along environmental gradients were unrelated to provenance, life span, or phylogenetic groupings. We then used a greenhouse experiment to more precisely measure the response of common grass species to nitrogen and phosphorus supply. As with the field data, species responses to nutrient additions did not vary as a function of provenance, life span, or phylogeny. Native and exotic species differed strongly in the relationship between greenhouse-measured tolerance of low nutrients and field abundance. Native species with the greatest ability to maintain biomass production at low nutrient supply rates were most abundant in field surveys, as predicted by resource competition theory. In contrast, there was no relationship between exotic-species biomass at low nutrient levels and field abundance. The implications of these findings for management of invasive species are substantial in that they overturn a general belief that reduction of nutrient supplies favors native species. The idiosyncratic nature of species response to nutrients in this study suggests that manipulation of nutrient supplies is unlikely to alter the overall balance between native and exotic species, although it may well be useful to control specific exotic species. PMID:21939049

  17. Holistic Life-Span Health Outcomes Among Elite Intercollegiate Student–Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, Shawn C.; Romano, Russell; Scholefield, Robin M.; Martin, Brandon E.; Gordon, James E.; Azen, Stanley P.; Schroeder, E. Todd; Salem, George J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Competitive sports are recognized as having unique health benefits and risks, and the effect of sports on life-span health among elite athletes has received increasing attention. However, supporting scientific data are sparse and do not represent modern athletes. Objective: To assess holistic life-span health and health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) among current and former National Collegiate Athletic Association student–athletes (SAs). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A large Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: Population-based sample of 496 university students and alumni (age 17–84 years), including SAs and an age-matched and sex-matched nonathlete (NA) control group. Main Outcome Measure(s): Participants completed anonymous, self-report questionnaires. We measured the Short-Form 12 (SF-12) physical and mental component HRQL scores and cumulative lifetime experience and relative risk of treatment for joint, cardiopulmonary, and psychosocial health concerns. Results: Older alumni (age 43+ years) SAs reported greater joint health concerns than NAs (larger joint summary scores; P = .04; Cohen d = 0.69; probability of clinically important difference [pCID] = 77%; treatment odds ratio [OR] = 14.0, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.6, 126). Joint health for current and younger alumni SAs was similar to that for NAs. Older alumni reported greater cardiopulmonary health concerns than younger alumni (summary score P < .001; d = 1.05; pCID = 85%; OR = 5.8, 95% CI = 2.0, 16) and current students (P < .001; d = 2.25; pCID >99.5%; OR = 7.1, 95% CI = 3.3, 15), but the risk was similar for SAs and NAs. Current SAs demonstrated evidence of better psychosocial health (summary score P = .006; d = −0.52; pCID = 40%) and mental component HRQL (P = .008; d = 0.50; pCID = 48%) versus NAs but similar psychosocial treatment odds (OR = 0.87, 95% CI = 0.39, 1.9). Psychosocial health and mental component HRQL were similar between alumni SAs and NAs. No differences were observed between SAs and NAs in physical component HRQL. Conclusions: The SAs demonstrated significant, clinically meaningful evidence of greater joint health concerns later in life, comparable cardiopulmonary health, and differences in life-span psychosocial health and HRQL profiles compared with NAs. These data provide timely evidence regarding a compelling public issue and highlight the need for further study of life-span health among modern athletes. PMID:25117874

  18. Reproductive and early life stages pathology - Histopathology workshop report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bruno, D.W.; Nowak, B.; Elliott, D.G.

    2006-01-01

    Pathology occurring during reproduction and larval development represents an important part of the life cycle of fish, and the diseases that affect eggs and larvae often result in significant losses. However, mortality during this period is frequently ignored or poorly researched as the temptation is to replace the losses rather than investigate the causes. A histopathology workshop organised at the newly refurnished laboratory within the Danish Veterinary School was an opportunity to discuss the pathology of selected diseases associated with Reproductive and Early Life Stages Pathology. Several people also kindly provided reference slides.

  19. The Short Life: The Life-Span Construct of Visually Impaired Adults with Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeppsson-Grassman, E.

    1993-01-01

    In a long-term study of 14 adults with visual impairments, 11 of whom had diabetes, the concept of "the short life" emerged as a prevalent theme important for understanding the changing priorities, adaptive strategies, and general life planning of the participants, many of whose lives were marked by gradually deteriorating health and aggravated…

  20. Reproductive and Life History Parameters of Wild Female Macaca assamensis

    PubMed Central

    Schülke, Oliver; Heistermann, Michael; Ostner, Julia

    2010-01-01

    Information on basic reproductive parameters and life-history traits is crucial for the understanding of primate evolution, ecology, social behavior, and reproductive strategies. Here, we report 4 yr of data on reproductive and life-history traits for wild female Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis) at Phu Khieo Wildlife Sanctuary, northeastern Thailand. During 2 consecutive reproductive seasons, we investigated reproductive behavior and sexual swelling size in 16 females and collected 1832 fecal samples. Using enzyme immunoassays, we measured fecal estrogen and progesterone metabolites to assess ovarian activity and timing of ovulation and to ascertain conceptions and pregnancies. Timing of reproduction was strictly seasonal (births: April–July, 86% in April–June, 4 yr, n = 29; conceptions: October–February, 65% in December–January, 2 yr, n = 17). Females showed no cyclic ovarian activity outside the mating season and conceived in their first or second cycle (mean: 1.2 cycles to conception, n = 13). Gestation length was on average 164.2 d (range: 158–170, n = 10), and females had their first infant at an age of 5 yr (n = 4). Interbirth intervals were bimodally distributed, with females giving birth on average every 13.9 or 23.2 mo. Shorter interbirth intervals were linked to early parturition within the birth season. Most females displayed subcaudal sexual swellings which, however, did not reliably indicate female reproductive status or fertility. Overall, our results fall within the range of findings reported for other macaque species. These results thus add to the growing body of information available for wild macaques, facilitating comparative studies for a better understanding of interspecific differences in social and reproductive patterns. PMID:20651906

  1. The impact of ice microphysical processes on the life span of a midlatitude supercell storm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pao K.; Lin, Hsin-Mu; Su, Shih-Hao

    2010-09-01

    The impact of ice microphysical processes on the life span of a US Midwest supercell thunderstorm is studied using a cloud resolving model equipped with explicit cloud microphysical processes. The 2 August 1981 CCOPE supercell is chosen as the model storm to be tested. Three different runs are performed: a control run FPR with full physics (including ice physics), a normal liquid-only run NLR with all ice processes suppressed, and another liquid-only run ELR with artificially enhanced latent heat release to test the impact of thermodynamics versus ice microphysics on the storm's life cycle. The results show that the FPR storm evolves into a quasi-steady supercell whereas both NLR and ELR storms dissipate after 100 min. The ELR storm dissipates even earlier than the NLR storm, demonstrating that the enhanced latent heat release does not help lengthening the storm's life span. Analysis confirms our previous finding that the presence of lower density ice particles enables the storm to develop a circulation that can sustain the quasi-steady storm structure. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  2. From Children to Adults: Motor Performance across the Life-Span

    PubMed Central

    Leversen, Jonas S. R.; Haga, Monika; Sigmundsson, Hermundur

    2012-01-01

    The life-span approach to development provides a theoretical framework to examine the general principles of life-long development. This study aims to investigate motor performance across the life span. It also aims to investigate if the correlations between motor tasks increase with aging. A cross-sectional design was used to describe the effects of aging on motor performance across age groups representing individuals from childhood to young adult to old age. Five different motor tasks were used to study changes in motor performance within 338 participants (7–79 yrs). Results showed that motor performance increases from childhood (7–9) to young adulthood (19–25) and decreases from young adulthood (19–25) to old age (66–80). These results are mirroring results from cognitive research. Correlation increased with increasing age between two fine motor tasks and two gross motor tasks. We suggest that the findings might be explained, in part, by the structural changes that have been reported to occur in the developing and aging brain and that the theory of Neural Darwinism can be used as a framework to explain why these changes occur. PMID:22719958

  3. From children to adults: motor performance across the life-span.

    PubMed

    Leversen, Jonas S R; Haga, Monika; Sigmundsson, Hermundur

    2012-01-01

    The life-span approach to development provides a theoretical framework to examine the general principles of life-long development. This study aims to investigate motor performance across the life span. It also aims to investigate if the correlations between motor tasks increase with aging. A cross-sectional design was used to describe the effects of aging on motor performance across age groups representing individuals from childhood to young adult to old age. Five different motor tasks were used to study changes in motor performance within 338 participants (7-79 yrs). Results showed that motor performance increases from childhood (7-9) to young adulthood (19-25) and decreases from young adulthood (19-25) to old age (66-80). These results are mirroring results from cognitive research. Correlation increased with increasing age between two fine motor tasks and two gross motor tasks. We suggest that the findings might be explained, in part, by the structural changes that have been reported to occur in the developing and aging brain and that the theory of Neural Darwinism can be used as a framework to explain why these changes occur. PMID:22719958

  4. Photosynthetic thermotolerance of woody savanna species in China is correlated with leaf life span

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Poorter, L.; Hao, Guang-You; Cao, Kun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Photosynthetic thermotolerance (PT) is important for plant survival in tropical and sub-tropical savannas. However, little is known about thermotolerance of tropical and sub-tropical wild plants and its association with leaf phenology and persistence. Longer-lived leaves of savanna plants may experience a higher risk of heat stress. Foliar Ca is related to cell integrity of leaves under stresses. In this study it is hypothesized that (1) species with leaf flushing in the hot-dry season have greater PT than those with leaf flushing in the rainy season; and (2) PT correlates positively with leaf life span, leaf mass per unit area (LMA) and foliar Ca concentration ([Ca]) across woody savanna species. Methods The temperature-dependent increase in minimum fluorescence was measured to assess PT, together with leaf dynamics, LMA and [Ca] for a total of 24 woody species differing in leaf flushing time in a valley-type savanna in south-west China. Key Results The PT of the woody savanna species with leaf flushing in the hot-dry season was greater than that of those with leaf flushing in the rainy season. Thermotolerance was positively associated with leaf life span and [Ca] for all species irrespective of the time of flushing. The associations of PT with leaf life span and [Ca] were evolutionarily correlated. Thermotolerance was, however, independent of LMA. Conclusions Chinese savanna woody species are adapted to hot-dry habitats. However, the current maximum leaf temperature during extreme heat stress (443 C) is close to the critical temperature of photosystem II (452 C); future global warming may increase the risk of heat damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of Chinese savanna species. PMID:22875810

  5. Mutants in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAS2 gene influence life span, cytoskeleton, and regulation of mitosis.

    PubMed

    Pichová, A; Vondráková, D; Breitenbach, M

    1997-08-01

    We investigated the phenotypic consequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of a disruption allele (ras2::LEU2) and of a dominant mutant form (RAS2ala18,val19) of RAS2. In addition to the phenotypes described earlier for these mutants, we observed a small increase in the life span for the disruption allele and a drastic decrease of life span for the dominant mutant form, as compared with the isogenic wild type. This was found by analyzing these alleles in two different genetic backgrounds with nearly the same results. Life spans were determined by micromanipulating mother cells and counting generations until no further cell division occurred. A morphological analysis of the terminal phenotypes of very old mother cells was performed showing enlarged or rounded cells and in some cases elongated buds, some of which were difficult to separate from the mother cell. This was observed in wild-type cells, as well as mutant cells. However, the dominant RAS2 mutant (but not the wild-type or ras2::LEU2 mutant cells) after 2 days on complex media displayed phenotypes similar to the terminal phenotype of old mothers. A substantial fraction of the cells were enlarged and generated elongated buds, they lost Calcofluor staining of the bud scars, the cell surface appeared folded, the actin cytoskeleton was aberrant, and the mitotic spindle and the cytoplasmic microtubles were defective in their proper orientation, resulting in aberrant mitoses and empty buds. These phenotypic characteristics of the RAS2ala18,val19 mutation could be causative for the previously observed rapid loss of viability of these cells in stationary phase. PMID:9304788

  6. eRapa Restores A Normal Life Span in a FAP Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Hasty, Paul; Livi, Carolina B.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Jones, Diane; Strong, Randy; Javors, Martin; Fischer, Kathleen E.; Sloane, Lauren; Murthy, Kruthi; Hubbard, Gene; Sun, Lishi; Hurez, Vincent; Curiel, Tyler J.; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of a single copy of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene results in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), which confers an extremely high risk for colon cancer. ApcMin/+ mice exhibit multiple intestinal neoplasia (MIN) that causes anemia and death from bleeding by 6 months. Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) inhibitors were shown to improve ApcMin/+ mouse survival when administered by oral gavage or added directly to the chow, but these mice still died from neoplasia well short of a natural life span. The National Institute of Aging Intervention Testing Program showed that enterically targeted rapamycin (eRapa) extended life span for wild type genetically heterogeneous mice in part by inhibiting age-associated cancer. We hypothesized that eRapa would be effective in preventing neoplasia and extend survival of ApcMin/+ mice. We show that eRapa improved survival for ApcMin/+ mice in a dose-dependent manner. Remarkably, and in contrast to previous reports, most of the ApcMin/+ mice fed 42 ppm eRapa lived beyond the median life span reported for wild type syngeneic mice. Furthermore, chronic eRapa did not cause detrimental immune effects in mouse models of cancer, infection or autoimmunity; thus, assuaging concerns that chronic rapamycin treatment suppresses immunity. Our studies suggest that a novel formulation (enteric targeting) of a well-known and widely used drug (rapamycin) can dramatically improve its efficacy in targeted settings. eRapa or other mTORC1 inhibitors could serve as effective cancer preventatives for people with FAP without suppressing the immune system, thus reducing the dependency on surgery as standard therapy. PMID:24282255

  7. Gender, Race, and Age: The Content of Compound Stereotypes Across the Life Span.

    PubMed

    Andreoletti, Carrie; Leszczynski, Jennifer P; Disch, William B

    2015-07-01

    While stereotypes about gender, race, and age (particularly old age) have been studied independently, few have examined the content of compound stereotypes that consider the intersection of gender, race, and age. Using a within-subjects design, we examined stereotypes as a function of target gender (male, female), race (Black, White), and age across the life span (adolescent, young adult, middle-aged, young-old, and old-old). Participants rated 20 target groups on 10 attributes representative of either an agentic (e.g., ambitious) or communal (e.g., considerate) orientation. Participants were presented only with categorical information (e.g., Black, 85-year-old, males), and ordering of categorical information and target groups was counterbalanced across participants. We hypothesized differential effects of target gender and race as a function of age. Multivariate analyses of variance on each attribute revealed significant main effects that supported traditional stereotype research, but significant interactions revealed a more complicated picture. Overall, results showed that while gender stereotypes about agency and communion generally hold up across the life span, they are more applicable to White than Black targets. Results also supported the notion that we hold unique stereotypes based on multiple social categories rather than simply perceiving one social category as more salient than another, which was best exemplified in the case of Black female targets that were less likely to be perceived in gender stereotypic ways across the life span. We suggest stereotype research needs to shift to accommodate for the complexity and diversity of real people. PMID:26610722

  8. Resveratrol Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Extends Life Span in the Annual Fish Nothobranchius guentheri.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingting; Qi, He; Ma, Long; Liu, Zhaojun; Fu, Huiling; Zhu, Wenzhen; Song, Taiyu; Yang, Bingwu; Li, Guorong

    2015-06-01

    Resveratrol is a natural polyphenol derived mainly from the skin of grapes and from red wine. Resveratrol prolongs life span in several invertebrates, but this function is not found in mice. Our recently published paper demonstrated that resveratrol prolonged longevity of the annual fish Nothobranchius guentheri, a promising vertebrate model for anti-aging research. However, the anti-aging process by resveratrol remains largely unexplored, and little is known about its effects on oxidative stress. In this study, by long-term supplementation of resveratrol from sexual maturity onward in the annual fish, we detected survivorship and oxidative stress at three different developmental stages in vivo. A total of 112 fish were fed with resveratrol in the concentration of 200 μg/gram food and 111 fish without resveratrol from 16 weeks of age until to the end of their lives. The mean and maximum life spans of the fish treated with resveratrol were extended by 17.34% and 17.66%, respectively, compared to the fish in control group. The markers of oxidative stress, such as the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the activities of anti-oxidant enzymes, and the degree of oxidative damage, were detected at 6, 9, and 12 months, respectively. The results showed that levels of ROS and oxidative damage increased and activities of anti-oxidant enzymes appeared to decrease with age. Resveratrol treatment significantly attenuated the increase of ROS and oxidative damage and up-regulated the decrease of anti-oxidant enzyme activities induced by aging. Our results demonstrated that resveratrol decreased oxidative stress and extended life span in this short-lived fish. PMID:25569124

  9. Lynx reproduction--long-lasting life cycle of corpora lutea in a feline species.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, Katarina; Painer, Johanna; Amelkina, Olga; Dehnhard, Martin; Goeritz, Frank

    2014-04-01

    A review of lynxes' reproductive biology and comparison between the reproductive cycles of the domestic cat and lynxes is presented. Three of the four lynx species (the bobcat excluded) express quite similar reproductive pattern (age at sexual maturity, estrus and pregnancy length, litter size). Similarly to the domestic cat, the bobcat is polyestric and can have more than one litter per year. Domestic cats and many other felid species are known to express anovulatory, pregnant and pseudo-pregnant reproductive cycles in dependence on ovulation induction and fertilization. The formation of corpora lutea (CLs) occurs after ovulation. In pregnant animals, luteal function ends with parturition, whereas during pseudo-pregnancy a shorter life span and lower hormone secretion are observed. The life cycle of corpora lutea in Eurasian lynxes is different from the pattern described in domestic cats. Lynx CLs produce progestagens in distinctive amounts permanently for at least two years, regardless of their origin (pregnancy or pseudo-pregnancy). It is suggested that long-lasting CLs induce a negative feedback to inactivate folliculogenesis, turning a normally polyestric cycle observed in most felids into a monoestric cycle in lynxes. PMID:24856466

  10. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  11. Caffeine extends life span, improves healthspan, and delays age-associated pathology in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The longevity of an organism is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. With respect to genetic factors, a significant effort is being made to identify pharmacological agents that extend life span by targeting pathways with a defined role in the aging process. On the environmental side, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the positive influence of interventions such as dietary restriction are being explored. The environment experienced by humans in modern societies already contains countless compounds that may influence longevity. Understanding the role played by common compounds that substantially affect the aging process will be critical for predicting and interpreting the outcome of introducing new interventions. Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive drug worldwide. Prior studies in flies, worms, and mice indicate that caffeine may positively impact age-associated neurodegenerative pathology, such as that observed in Alzheimer’s disease. Results Here we report that caffeine is capable of extending life span and improving healthspan in Caenorhabditis elegans, a finding that is in agreement with a recently published screen looking for FDA-approved compounds capable of extending worm life span. Life span extension using caffeine displays epistatic interaction with two known longevity interventions: dietary restriction and reduced insulin signaling. Caffeine treatment also delays pathology in a nematode model of polyglutamine disease. Conclusions The identification of caffeine as a relevant factor in aging and healthspan in worms, combined with prior work in both humans and rodents linking caffeine consumption to reduced risk of age-associated disease, suggests that caffeine may target conserved longevity pathways. Further, it may be important to consider caffeine consumption when developing clinical interventions, particularly those designed to mimic dietary restriction or modulate insulin/IGF-1-like signaling. The positive impact of caffeine on a worm model of polyglutamine disease suggests that chronic caffeine consumption may generally enhance resistance to proteotoxic stress and may be relevant to assessing risk and developing treatments for human diseases like Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. Future work addressing the relevant targets of caffeine in models of aging and healthspan will help to clarify the underlying mechanisms and potentially identify new molecular targets for disease intervention. PMID:24764514

  12. Exposure To Harmful Workplace Practices Could Account For Inequality In Life Spans Across Different Demographic Groups.

    PubMed

    Goh, Joel; Pfeffer, Jeffrey; Zenios, Stefanos

    2015-10-01

    The existence of important socioeconomic disparities in health and mortality is a well-established fact. Many pathways have been adduced to explain inequality in life spans. In this article we examine one factor that has been somewhat neglected: People with different levels of education get sorted into jobs with different degrees of exposure to workplace attributes that contribute to poor health. We used General Social Survey data to estimate differential exposures to workplace conditions, results from a meta-analysis that estimated the effect of workplace conditions on mortality, and a model that permitted us to estimate the overall effects of workplace practices on health. We conclude that 10-38 percent of the difference in life expectancy across demographic groups can be explained by the different job conditions their members experience. PMID:26438754

  13. Transformations in the couplings among intellectual abilities and constituent cognitive processes across the life span.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Chen; Lindenberger, Ulman; Hommel, Bernhard; Aschersleben, Gisa; Prinz, Wolfgang; Baltes, Paul B

    2004-03-01

    Two-component theories of intellectual development over the life span postulate that fluid abilities develop earlier during child development and decline earlier during aging than crystallized abilities do, and that fluid abilities support or constrain the acquisition and expression of crystallized abilities. Thus, maturation and senescence compress the structure of intelligence by imposing age-specific constraints upon its constituent processes. Hence, the couplings among different intellectual abilities and cognitive processes are expected to be strong in childhood and old age. Findings from a population-based study of 291 individuals aged 6 to 89 years support these predictions. Furthermore, processing robustness, a frequently overlooked aspect of processing, predicted fluid intelligence beyond processing speed in old age but not in childhood, suggesting that the causes of more compressed functional organization of intelligence differ between maturation and senescence. Research on developmental changes in functional brain circuitry may profit from explicitly recognizing transformations in the organization of intellectual abilities and their underlying cognitive processes across the life span. PMID:15016286

  14. Life-Span Development of Visual Working Memory: When is Feature Binding Difficult?

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Nelson; Naveh-Benjamin, Moshe; Kilb, Angela; Saults, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    We asked whether the ability to keep in working memory the binding between a visual object and its spatial location changes with development across the life span more than memory for item information. Paired arrays of colored squares were identical or differed in the color of one square and, in the latter case, the changed color was unique on that trial (item change) or was duplicated elsewhere in the array (color-location binding change). Children (8–10 and 11–12 years old) and older adults (65–85 years old) showed deficits relative to young adults. These were only partly simulated by dividing attention in young adults. The older adults had an additional deficiency, specifically in binding information, which was evident only when item- and binding-change trials were mixed together. In that situation, the older adults often overlooked the more subtle, binding-type changes. Some working-memory processes related to binding undergo life-span development in an inverted U shape, whereas other, bias- and salience-related processes that influence the use of binding information seem to develop monotonically. PMID:17087544

  15. Prolongation of life span of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) ingesting persimmon tannin.

    PubMed

    Uchida, S; Ohta, H; Niwa, M; Mori, A; Nonaka, G; Nishioka, I; Ozaki, M

    1990-04-01

    The effects of persimmon tannin on pathophysiological changes in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP) were investigated. When the persimmon tannin was chronically ingested by SHRSP, the life span was significantly prolonged, yet the effect on blood pressure was slight. The incidences of brain hemorrhage and infarction were also significantly decreased by this treatment. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in these events, the effects of condensed tannins, including persimmon tannin, on free radicals and lipid peroxidation were examined in vitro. Using electron spin resonance analysis, we found that these tannins have a potent, concentration-dependent scavenging action toward active oxygen free radicals. These tannins strongly inhibited lipid peroxidation in rat brain homogenates, in a concentration-dependent manner. Persimmon tannin inhibited lipid peroxidation similarly to (-)-epigallocatechin. Persimmon tannin was 20 times more effective than alpha-tocopherol in terms of the 50%-inhibitory concentration. The radical scavenging action and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by persimmon tannin may explain, in part, the prolongation of the life span of the SHRSP ingesting persimmon tannin. PMID:2379279

  16. Linking Peroxiredoxin and Vacuolar-ATPase Functions in Calorie Restriction-Mediated Life Span Extension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) is an intervention extending the life spans of many organisms. The mechanisms underlying CR-dependent retardation of aging are still poorly understood. Despite mechanisms involving conserved nutrient signaling pathways proposed, few target processes that can account for CR-mediated longevity have so far been identified. Recently, both peroxiredoxins and vacuolar-ATPases were reported to control CR-mediated retardation of aging downstream of conserved nutrient signaling pathways. In this review, we focus on peroxiredoxin-mediated stress-defence and vacuolar-ATPase regulated acidification and pinpoint common denominators between the two mechanisms proposed for how CR extends life span. Both the activities of peroxiredoxins and vacuolar-ATPases are stimulated upon CR through reduced activities in conserved nutrient signaling pathways and both seem to stimulate cellular resistance to peroxide-stress. However, whereas vacuolar-ATPases have recently been suggested to control both Ras-cAMP-PKA- and TORC1-mediated nutrient signaling, neither the physiological benefits of a proposed role for peroxiredoxins in H2O2-signaling nor downstream targets regulated are known. Both peroxiredoxins and vacuolar-ATPases do, however, impinge on mitochondrial iron-metabolism and further characterization of their impact on iron homeostasis and peroxide-resistance might therefore increase our understanding of the beneficial effects of CR on aging and age-related diseases. PMID:24639875

  17. A Comprehensive Analysis of Connectivity and Aging Over the Adult Life Span.

    PubMed

    Archer, Jo A; Lee, Annie; Qiu, Anqi; Chen, Shen-Hsing Annabel

    2016-03-01

    Aging has been associated with decreased intra- and internetwork connectivity during rest and task. Recent work has shown the influential role of the salience network over the default mode network (DMN) and executive control network (ECN). This study comprehensively investigates age-related changes in intra- and internetwork connectivity and effective connectivity between the DMN, ECN, and salience network across the adult life span. Two hundred ten participants completed a working memory task, an inhibition task, and a resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. Networks were extracted using independent component analysis; then, regression analyses and t-tests between three age groups, 21-40 (younger), 41-60 (middle), and 61-80 (older), were conducted. Older age was associated with decreased intranetwork connectivity. Functional network connectivity analyses revealed older age was associated with increased internetwork connectivity between the salience network and the ECNs and DMNs. In both cases, the effects were more pronounced in the tasks compared to resting state. Granger causality analyses indicated the salience network was influenced by the DMN and ECN in all age groups during both tasks, but not rest. However, middle adults showed increased influence from the salience network to the right ECN compared to younger adults during the flanker task. Taking everything into account, these findings indicate the role of the salience network changes over the life span, which may have implications for the early detection of pathophysiology in older adults. PMID:26652914

  18. HuR Maintains a Replicative Life Span by Repressing the ARF Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L.

    2013-01-01

    p19ARF plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19ARF but not p16Ink4a levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19ARF expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19ARF is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  19. HuR maintains a replicative life span by repressing the ARF tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Sugimoto, Masataka

    2013-05-01

    p19(ARF) plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19(ARF) but not p16(Ink4a) levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19(ARF) expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19(ARF) is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  20. Life-Span Exposure to Low Doses of Aspartame Beginning during Prenatal Life Increases Cancer Effects in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Soffritti, Morando; Belpoggi, Fiorella; Tibaldi, Eva; Esposti, Davide Degli; Lauriola, Michelina

    2007-01-01

    Background In a previous study conducted at the Cesare Maltoni Cancer Research Center of the European Ramazzini Foundation (CMCRC/ERF), we demonstrated for the first time that aspartame (APM) is a multipotent carcinogenic agent when various doses are administered with feed to Sprague-Dawley rats from 8 weeks of age throughout the life span. Objective The aim of this second study is to better quantify the carcinogenic risk of APM, beginning treatment during fetal life. Methods We studied groups of 70–95 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats administered APM (2,000, 400, or 0 ppm) with feed from the 12th day of fetal life until natural death. Results Our results show a) a significant dose-related increase of malignant tumor–bearing animals in males (p < 0.01), particularly in the group treated with 2,000 ppm APM (p < 0.01); b) a significant increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in males treated with 2,000 ppm (p < 0.05) and a significant dose-related increase in incidence of lymphomas/leukemias in females (p < 0.01), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.01); and c) a significant dose-related increase in incidence of mammary cancer in females (p < 0.05), particularly in the 2,000-ppm group (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results of this carcinogenicity bioassay confirm and reinforce the first experimental demonstration of APM’s multipotential carcinogenicity at a dose level close to the acceptable daily intake for humans. Furthermore, the study demonstrates that when life-span exposure to APM begins during fetal life, its carcinogenic effects are increased. PMID:17805418

  1. Spermatozoid life-span of two brown seaweeds, Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, as measured by fertilization efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Pang, Shaojun; Liu, Feng; Shan, Tifeng; Gao, Suqin

    2013-07-01

    During sexual reproduction of seaweeds, spermatozoid (sperm) discharge is triggered by chemical messengers (pheromones) released by the female gametes. The chemotactic ability of the sperm ensures fertilization success. Using unialgal male and female gametophyte material under designated standard gametogenesis testing (SGT) conditions, the potential life-span of the sperm of two seaweeds, Saccharina japonica and Undaria pinnatifida, was assessed by their ability to fertilize eggs. Results show that within 20-30 min after being discharged, sperm of both species could complete fertilization without an apparent decline in fertilization rate. Although fertilization rate 60-120 min after sperm discharge dropped significantly in both species, some sperm were viable enough to fertilize the eggs. In S. japonica, at 12°C, some sperm were able to fertilize eggs up to 12 h after discharge. In both species, egg discharge rates (EDR) in the male and female mixed positive controls were significantly higher than those of all the sperm-testing groups. Doubling the seeded male gametophytes of S. japonica in the SGT tests significantly increased the EDR, further confirming the effect of the presence of the male on the female in terms of facilitating egg discharge from oogonia.

  2. The structure of late-life depressive symptoms across a 20 year span: A taxometric investigation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Jason M.; Schutte, Kathleen K.; Brennan, Penny L.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    2010-01-01

    Past studies of the underlying structure of depressive symptoms have yielded mixed results, with some studies supporting a continuous conceptualization and others supporting a categorical one. However, no study has examined this research question with an exclusively older adult sample, despite the potential uniqueness of late-life depressive symptoms. In the present study, the underlying structure of late-life depressive symptoms was examined among a sample of 1289 individuals across three waves of data collection spanning 20 years. A taxometric methodology was employed using indicators of depression derived from the Research Diagnostic Criteria. Maximum eigenvalue (MAXEIG) analyses and inchworm consistency tests generally supported a categorical conceptualization and identified a group that was primarily characterized by thoughts about death/suicide. However, compared to a categorical depression variable, depressive symptoms treated continuously were generally better predictors of relevant criterion variables. These findings suggest that thoughts of death and suicide may characterize a specific type of late-life depression, yet a continuous conceptualization still typically maximizes the predictive utility of late-life depressive symptoms. PMID:20230135

  3. Life-history theory, fertility and reproductive success in humans.

    PubMed

    Strassmann, Beverly I; Gillespie, Brenda

    2002-03-22

    According to life-history theory, any organism that maximizes fitness will face a trade-off between female fertility and offspring survivorship. This trade-off has been demonstrated in a variety of species, but explicit tests in humans have found a positive linear relationship between fitness and fertility. The failure to demonstrate a maximum beyond which additional births cease to enhance fitness is potentially at odds with the view that human fertility behaviour is currently adaptive. Here we report, to our knowledge, the first clear evidence for the predicted nonlinear relationship between female fertility and reproductive success in a human population, the Dogon of Mali, West Africa. The predicted maximum reproductive success of 4.1+/-0.3 surviving offspring was attained at a fertility of 10.5 births. Eighty-three per cent of the women achieved a lifetime fertility level (7-13 births) for which the predicted mean reproductive success was within the confidence limits (3.4 to 4.8) for reproductive success at the optimal fertility level. Child mortality, rather than fertility, was the primary determinant of fitness. Since the Dogon people are farmers, our results do not support the assumptions that: (i) contemporary foragers behave more adaptively than agriculturalists, and (ii) that adaptive fertility behaviour ceased with the Neolithic revolution some 9000 years ago. We also present a new method that avoids common biases in measures of reproductive success. PMID:11916470

  4. Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Huber, K; Dänicke, S; Rehage, J; Sauerwein, H; Otto, W; Rolle-Kampczyk, U; von Bergen, M

    2016-01-01

    The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life. PMID:27089826

  5. Metabotypes with properly functioning mitochondria and anti-inflammation predict extended productive life span in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Huber, K.; Dänicke, S.; Rehage, J.; Sauerwein, H.; Otto, W.; Rolle-Kampczyk, U.; von Bergen, M.

    2016-01-01

    The failure to adapt metabolism to the homeorhetic demands of lactation is considered as a main factor in reducing the productive life span of dairy cows. The so far defined markers of production performance and metabolic health in dairy cows do not predict the length of productive life span satisfyingly. This study aimed to identify novel pathways and biomarkers related to productive life in dairy cows by means of (targeted) metabolomics. In a longitudinal study from 42 days before up to 100 days after parturition, we identified metabolites such as long-chain acylcarnitines and biogenic amines associated with extended productive life spans. These metabolites are mainly secreted by the liver and depend on the functionality of hepatic mitochondria. The concentrations of biogenic amines and some acylcarnitines differed already before the onset of lactation thus indicating their predictive potential for continuation or early ending of productive life. PMID:27089826

  6. Artemisinin and curcumin inhibit Drosophila brain tumor, prolong life span, and restore locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Das, Sourajit Soumyaranjan; Nanda, Gargi Gouranga; Alone, Debasmita Pankaj

    2014-07-01

    Deletion of tumor suppressor gene, lethal(2)giant larvae [l(2)gl], leads to brain tumor in Drosophila melanogaster at larval stage of development and severe brain dysplasia in mice. We have studied the effect of two potential antitumor drugs artemisinin and curcumin in the perspective of inhibiting l(2)gl brain tumor. Efficacies of these drugs are characterized morphologically by measuring brain sizes of untreated and treated larvae on the basis of tumor inhibition and anatomically by looking at the cellular patterning via antibody staining of the third instar Drosophila larval brains. Behavioral experiments were done in form of locomotion to correlate tumor inhibition with the revival of brain function and longevity assays to assess general health span. It was observed that both drugs show antitumor properties individually and in combination when larvae were treated with these drugs. We also found evidence for reactive oxygen species-mediated action of these drugs. Both the drugs when treated individually or together show better median life span and locomotory response. Although the efficacies of various treatments varied, overall, the positive effects of artemisinin and curcumin demonstrate a potential applicability of these drugs against brain tumor in higher organisms. It also paves a way for a simpler model system for screening such natural products for antitumor property. PMID:24975030

  7. Sleep tight: exploring the relationship between sleep and attachment style across the life span.

    PubMed

    Adams, G Camelia; Stoops, Melissa A; Skomro, Robert P

    2014-12-01

    Based on early life experiences in which developmental, genetic, and environmental components interact, humans learn to trust themselves and others and connect emotionally in consistent ways that are broadly defined as "attachment styles." These relatively stable patterns of interpersonal interaction are associated with either vulnerability to various health risks or resilience. Similarly, the mechanisms involved in sleep regulation undergo developmental changes that overlap temporally with attachment formation and remain sensitive to a series of biological, environmental and psychological influences. Interestingly, while sleep has been conceptualized as a fundamental attachment behavior given its dyadic context, few studies have explored its relationship with attachment style in various ages. We present the first systematic review of the published literature examining the relationship between attachment style and sleep in humans across the life span. While levels of evidence and methods of assessment vary significantly, the results suggest a possible life-long relationship between individual attachment style and sleep. These findings are particularly useful in understanding relatively ingrained psychological mechanisms that can affect and be affected by sleep. Clinical and research implications are discussed. PMID:24721278

  8. Monitoring Newly Synthesized Proteins over the Adult Life Span of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vukoti, Krishna; Yu, Xiaokun; Sheng, Quanhu; Saha, Sudipto; Feng, Zhaoyang; Hsu, Ao-Lin; Miyagi, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    Little is known regarding how the synthesis and degradation of individual proteins changes during the life of an organism. Such knowledge is vital to understanding the aging process. To fill this knowledge gap, we monitored newly synthesized proteins on a proteome scale in Caenorhabditis elegans over time during adulthood using a SILAC-based label-chase approach. For most proteins, the rate of appearance of newly synthesized protein was high during the first 5 days of adulthood, slowed down between the fifth and the 11th days, and then increased again after the 11th day. However, the magnitude of appearance rate differed significantly from protein to protein. For example, the appearance of newly synthesized protein was fast for proteins involved in embryonic development, transcription regulation, and lipid binding/transport, with >70% of these proteins newly synthesized by day 5 of adulthood, whereas it was slow for proteins involved in cellular assembly and motility, such as actin and myosin, with <70% of these proteins newly synthesized even on day 16. The late-life increase of newly synthesized protein was especially high for ribosomal proteins and ATP synthases. We also investigated the effect of RNAi-mediated knockdown of the rpl-9 (ribosomal protein), atp-3 (ATP synthase), and ril-1 (RNAi-induced longevity-1 ) genes and found that inhibiting the expression of atp-3 and ril-1 beginning in late adulthood is still effective to extend the life span of C. elegans. PMID:25686393

  9. Biological impact of auditory expertise across the life span: musicians as a model of auditory learning.

    PubMed

    Strait, Dana L; Kraus, Nina

    2014-02-01

    Experience-dependent characteristics of auditory function, especially with regard to speech-evoked auditory neurophysiology, have garnered increasing attention in recent years. This interest stems from both pragmatic and theoretical concerns as it bears implications for the prevention and remediation of language-based learning impairment in addition to providing insight into mechanisms engendering experience-dependent changes in human sensory function. Musicians provide an attractive model for studying the experience-dependency of auditory processing in humans due to their distinctive neural enhancements compared to nonmusicians. We have only recently begun to address whether these enhancements are observable early in life, during the initial years of music training when the auditory system is under rapid development, as well as later in life, after the onset of the aging process. Here we review neural enhancements in musically trained individuals across the life span in the context of cellular mechanisms that underlie learning, identified in animal models. Musicians' subcortical physiologic enhancements are interpreted according to a cognitive framework for auditory learning, providing a model in which to study mechanisms of experience-dependent changes in human auditory function. PMID:23988583

  10. The Elderly Person With Multiple Sclerosis: Clinical Implications for the Increasing Life-Span.

    PubMed

    Buhse, Marijean

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, unpredictable, progressive, and disabling autoimmune disease with significant neurodegenerative and inflammatory components. To effectively treat and care for older persons with MS, it is essential to examine the factors associated with a decrease in their quality of life. Typically, MS is diagnosed between 20 and 50 years old. Although not a fatal disease, the natural history data of persons with MS reveal survival approximately 38 years after diagnosis. With the advent of disease-modifying therapies, life-span has increased substantially over the past 2 decades among people with MS. Approximately 90% of people with MS now in their 20s may live into their 70s. Their quality of life as an older adult will be impacted by what we learn today. Currently, approximately a quarter of people with MS are mature adults over 65 years old. Older adults with MS are more likely to have a decreased health-related quality of life (HRQOL). HRQOL is a multidimensional construct that refers to an individual's physical functioning, ability to perform activities of daily living, sense of well-being, satisfaction with life, perception of psychological status, and social functioning. This article focuses on the current literature in HRQOL in older persons with MS. A specific aim is to examine the factors associated with a decreased QOL in older persons with MS. Nursing screening and implementation of interventions that may reduce these factors and improve function of patients will be discussed. Although measures to improve HRQOL do not substitute for treatment of the disease, knowledge of factors that reduce HRQOL is essential to understand patient perceptions of their health and disease. PMID:26528951

  11. Life spans of a Bellman-Harris branching process with immigration

    SciTech Connect

    Badalbaev, I.S.; Mashrabbaev, A.

    1987-09-10

    One considers two schemes of the Bellman-Harris process with immigration when a) the lifetime of the particles is an integral-valued random variable and the immigration is defined by a sequence of independent random variables; b) the distribution of the lifetime of the particles is nonlattice and the immigration is a process with continuous time. One investigates the properties of the life spans of such processes. The results obtained here are a generalization to the case of Bellman-Harris processes of the results of A.M. Zubkov, obtained for Markov branching processes. For the proof one makes use in an essential manner of the known inequalities of Goldstein, estimating the generating function of the Bellman-Harris process in terms of the generating functions of the imbedded Galton-Watson process.

  12. The Verriest Lecture: Short-wave-sensitive cone pathways across the life span.

    PubMed

    Werner, John S

    2016-03-01

    Structurally and functionally, the short-wave-sensitive (S) cone pathways are thought to decline more rapidly with normal aging than the middle- and long-wave-sensitive cone pathways. This would explain the celebrated results by Verriest and others demonstrating that the largest age-related color discrimination losses occur for stimuli on a tritan axis. Here, we challenge convention, arguing from psychophysical data that selective S-cone pathway losses do not cause declines in color discrimination. We show substantial declines in chromatic detection and discrimination, as well as in temporal and spatial vision tasks, that are mediated by S-cone pathways. These functional losses are not, however, unique to S-cone pathways. Finally, despite reduced photon capture by S cones, their postreceptoral pathways provide robust signals for the visual system to renormalize itself to maintain nearly stable color perception across the life span. PMID:26974914

  13. Expectations about Memory Change Across the Life Span Are Impacted By Aging Stereotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lineweaver, Tara T.; Berger, Andrea K.; Hertzog, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This study examined whether expectations about memory change with age vary for different personality types. Four adjectives from each of Hummert’s age-stereotype trait sets were selected to create 11 adjective clusters varying in both valence (positive versus negative) and relevance to memory functioning. Three hundred and seventy three participants in three age groups rated the memory abilities of target adults, defined by the adjective clusters, across the adult life span. Consistent with past studies, participants believed in age-related memory decline. However, participants rated target adults with positive personality traits as having better memory ability and less age-related memory decline than target adults with negative personality traits. This effect was larger when the traits were relevant to memory than when they were not. Finally, older participants were more strongly influenced by both the valence and the relevance of the personality descriptions than younger participants. PMID:19290748

  14. Extension of cell life-span and telomere length in animals cloned from senescent somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Lanza, R P; Cibelli, J B; Blackwell, C; Cristofalo, V J; Francis, M K; Baerlocher, G M; Mak, J; Schertzer, M; Chavez, E A; Sawyer, N; Lansdorp, P M; West, M D

    2000-04-28

    The potential of cloning depends in part on whether the procedure can reverse cellular aging and restore somatic cells to a phenotypically youthful state. Here, we report the birth of six healthy cloned calves derived from populations of senescent donor somatic cells. Nuclear transfer extended the replicative life-span of senescent cells (zero to four population doublings remaining) to greater than 90 population doublings. Early population doubling level complementary DNA-1 (EPC-1, an age-dependent gene) expression in cells from the cloned animals was 3.5- to 5-fold higher than that in cells from age-matched (5 to 10 months old) controls. Southern blot and flow cytometric analyses indicated that the telomeres were also extended beyond those of newborn (<2 weeks old) and age-matched control animals. The ability to regenerate animals and cells may have important implications for medicine and the study of mammalian aging. PMID:10784448

  15. Invited commentary: missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Ozasa, K; Grant, E J; Cullings, H M; Shore, R E

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study is a long-term epidemiologic cohort study of survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. In this issue of the Journal, Richardson et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;177(6):562-568) suggest that those who died in the earliest years of follow-up were more likely to have a missing dose of radiation exposure assigned, leading to a bias in the radiation risk estimates. We show that nearly all members of the cohort had shielding information recorded before the beginning of follow-up and that much of the alleged bias that Richardson et al. describe simply reflects the geographic distribution of shielding conditions for which reliable dosimetry was impossible. PMID:23429724

  16. Life span changes: Performing a continuous 1:2 bimanual coordination task.

    PubMed

    Leinen, Peter; Vieluf, Solveig; Kennedy, Deanna; Aschersleben, Gisa; Shea, Charles H; Panzer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The experiment was conducted to determine the influence of mirror movements in bimanual coordination during life span. Children, young adults, and older adults were instructed to perform a continuous 1:2 bimanual coordination task by performing flexion-extension wrist movements over 30s where symmetrical and non-symmetrical coordination patterns alternate throughout the trial. The vision of the wrists was covered and Lissajous-feedback was provided online. All age groups had to perform 10 trials under three different load conditions (0kg, .5kg, 1.0kg: order counterbalanced). Load was manipulated to determine if increased load increases the likelihood of mirror movements. The data indicated that the performance of the young adults was superior compared to the children and older adults. Children and older adults showed a stronger tendency to develop mirror movements and had particular difficulty in performing the non-symmetrical mode. This type of influence may be attributed to neural crosstalk. PMID:26800250

  17. Gas and dust emission from comets and life spans of active areas on their rotating nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1990-01-01

    Outgassing and dust emission from discrete regions on the nuclei of comets are investigated with regard to the processes of activation, dormancy, reactivation, and extinction. With regard to P/Halley, P/Encke, P/Tempel 2, P/Machholz, P/Takamizawa, Bowell and some other new comets, the evolution of one active region of the nucleus surface appears to be independent of the evolution of another active region. The traditional concept of deactivation as a slow and monolithic process needs to be replaced with a more dynamic concept of intermittent periods of dormancy and reactivation of individual vents, varying in size. Life spans of discrete sources of activity are estimated to be at a few hundred revolutions about the sun for comets with perihelia at heliocentric distances of less than 2 AU, if the bulk density is very low.

  18. Stability and change: Stress responses and the shaping of behavioral phenotypes over the life span

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, maternal signals conveyed via influences on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity may shape behavior of the young to be better adapted for prevailing environmental conditions. However, the mother's influence extends beyond classic stress response systems. In guinea pigs, several hours (h) of separation from the mother activates not only the HPA axis, but also the innate immune system, which effects immediate behavioral change, as well as modifies behavioral responsiveness in the future. Moreover, the presence of the mother potently suppresses the behavioral consequences of this innate immune activation. These findings raise the possibility that long-term adaptive behavioral change can be mediated by the mother's influence on immune-related activity of her pups. Furthermore, the impact of social partners on physiological stress responses and their behavioral outcomes are not limited to the infantile period. A particularly crucial period for social development in male guinea pigs is that surrounding the attainment of sexual maturation. At this time, social interactions with adults can dramatically affect circulating cortisol concentrations and social behavior in ways that appear to prepare the male to best cope in its likely future social environment. Despite such multiple social influences on the behavior of guinea pigs at different ages, inter-individual differences in the magnitude of the cortisol response remain surprisingly stable over most of the life span. Together, it appears that throughout the life span, physiological stress responses may be regulated by social stimuli. These influences are hypothesized to adjust behavior for predicted environmental conditions. In addition, stable individual differences might provide a means of facilitating adaptation to less predictable conditions. PMID:26816517

  19. Niacin-bound chromium increases life span in Zucker Fatty Rats.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Harry G; Echard, Bobby; Clouatre, Dallas; Bagchi, Debasis; Perricone, Nicholas V

    2011-10-01

    Avoiding insulin resistance (IR) associated with aging might lengthen life span based on previous studies using caloric-restricted animals. We assessed whether consuming niacin-bound chromium (NBC) alone or in a formula containing other so-called "insulin sensitizers" would overcome various manifestations of aging and extend life span in Zucker Fatty Rats (ZFR). We compared many metabolic parameters of ZFR fed NBC alone (n=12) or NBC in a unique formula (n=10) to a control group (n=10). In addition to NBC, the formula contained Allium sativum, Momordica charantia, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Gymnema sylvestre. The formula group received roughly 1/2 as much NBC daily as the NBC group. At week 44, all rats still lived, and no abnormalities in blood count (CBC), renal, or liver functions were found. In the two treatment groups compared to control, circulating glucose levels were significantly lower, with a trend toward lower HbA1C. Relatively elevated cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations occurred in the formula group. Compared to control, the NBC group had increased average lifespan (21.8%), median lifespan (14.1%), 30th percentile survival (19.6%), and maximum lifespan (22%). Despite similar beneficial effects on the glucose and blood pressure systems, a difference in aging was also found when the NBC group was compared to the formula group. When all rats in the other two groups had died, four in the NBC group continued to live at least a month longer. We attribute lack of a similar aging effect in the formula group to either lower dosing of NBC and/or that various ingredients in the formula counteracted the antiaging effect(s) of NBC. PMID:21930012

  20. Knockdown of Indy/CeNac2 extends Caenorhabditis elegans life span by inducing AMPK/aak-2

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Franziska; Karadeniz, Zehra; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Willmes, Diana M.; Spranger, Joachim; Birkenfeld, Andreas L.

    2015-01-01

    Reducing the expression of the Indy (Acronym for ‘I'm Not Dead, Yet’) gene in lower organisms promotes longevity and leads to a phenotype that resembles various aspects of caloric restriction. In C. elegans, the available data on life span extension is controversial. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of the C. elegans INDY homolog CeNAC2 in life span regulation and to delineate possible molecular mechanisms. siRNA against Indy/CeNAC2 was used to reduce expression of Indy/CeNAC2. Mean life span was assessed in four independent experiments, as well as whole body fat content and AMPK activation. Moreover, the effect of Indy/CeNAC2 knockdown in C. elegans with inactivating variants of AMPK (TG38) was studied. Knockdown of Indy/CeNAC2 increased life span by 22 ± 3% compared to control siRNA treated C. elegans, together with a decrease in whole body fat content by ~50%. Indy/CeNAC2 reduction also increased the activation of the intracellular energy sensor AMPK/aak2. In worms without functional AMPK/aak2, life span was not extended when Indy/CeNAC2 was reduced. Inhibition of glycolysis with deoxyglucose, an intervention known to increase AMPK/aak2 activity and life span, did not promote longevity when Indy/CeNAC2 was knocked down. Together, these data indicate that reducing the expression of Indy/CeNAC2 increases life span in C. elegans, an effect mediated at least in part by AMPK/aak2. PMID:26318988

  1. Knockdown of Indy/CeNac2 extends Caenorhabditis elegans life span by inducing AMPK/aak-2.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Franziska; Karadeniz, Zehra; Fischer-Rosinsky, Antje; Willmes, Diana M; Spranger, Joachim; Birkenfeld, Andreas L

    2015-08-01

    Reducing the expression of the Indy (Acronym for 'I'm Not Dead, Yet') gene in lower organisms promotes longevity and leads to a phenotype that resembles various aspects of caloric restriction. In C. elegans, the available data on life span extension is controversial. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the role of the C. elegans INDY homolog CeNAC2 in life span regulation and to delineate possible molecular mechanisms. siRNA against Indy/CeNAC2 was used to reduce expression of Indy/CeNAC2. Mean life span was assessed in four independent experiments, as well as whole body fat content and AMPK activation. Moreover, the effect of Indy/CeNAC2 knockdown in C. elegans with inactivating variants of AMPK (TG38) was studied. Knockdown of Indy/CeNAC2 increased life span by 22±3 % compared to control siRNA treated C. elegans, together with a decrease in whole body fat content by ~50%. Indy/CeNAC2 reduction also increased the activation of the intracellular energy sensor AMPK/aak2. In worms without functional AMPK/aak2, life span was not extended when Indy/CeNAC2 was reduced. Inhibition of glycolysis with deoxyglucose, an intervention known to increase AMPK/aak2 activity and life span, did not promote longevity when Indy/CeNAC2 was knocked down. Together, these data indicate that reducing the expression of Indy/CeNAC2 increases life span in C. elegans, an effect mediated at least in part by AMPK/aak2. PMID:26318988

  2. Mice Producing Reduced Levels of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Type 1 Display an Increase in Maximum, but not Mean, Life Span

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Reduced signaling through the IGF type 1 (IGF-1) receptor increases life span in multiple invertebrate organisms. Studies on mammalian longevity suggest that reducing levels of IGF-1 may also increase life span. However, the data are conflicting and complicated by the physiology of the mammalian neuroendocrine system. We have performed life-span analysis on mice homozygous for an insertion in the Igf1 gene. These mice produce reduced levels of IGF-1 and display a phenotype consistent with a significant decrease in IGF-1. Life-span analysis was carried out at three independent locations. Although the life-span data varied between sites, the maximum life span of the IGF-1-deficient mice was significantly increased and age-specific mortality rates were reduced in the IGF-1-deficient mice; however, mean life span did not differ except at one site, where mean life span was increased in female IGF-1-deficient animals. Early life mortality was noted in one cohort of IGF-1-deficient mice. The results are consistent with a significant role for IGF-1 in the modulation of life span but contrast with the published life-span data for the hypopituitary Ames and Snell dwarf mice and growth hormone receptor null mice, indicating that a reduction in IGF-1 alone is insufficient to increase both mean and maximal life span in mice. PMID:23873963

  3. Dietary resveratrol prevents Alzheimer's markers and increases life span in SAMP8.

    PubMed

    Porquet, David; Casadesús, Gemma; Bayod, Sergi; Vicente, Alberto; Canudas, Anna M; Vilaplana, Jordi; Pelegrí, Carme; Sanfeliu, Coral; Camins, Antoni; Pallàs, Mercè; del Valle, Jaume

    2013-10-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that is mainly found in grapes and red wine and has been reported to be a caloric restriction (CR) mimetic driven by Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) activation. Resveratrol increases metabolic rate, insulin sensitivity, mitochondrial biogenesis and physical endurance, and reduces fat accumulation in mice. In addition, resveratrol may be a powerful agent to prevent age-associated neurodegeneration and to improve cognitive deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, different findings support the view that longevity in mice could be promoted by CR. In this study, we examined the role of dietary resveratrol in SAMP8 mice, a model of age-related AD. We found that resveratrol supplements increased mean life expectancy and maximal life span in SAMP8 and in their control, the related strain SAMR1. In addition, we examined the resveratrol-mediated neuroprotective effects on several specific hallmarks of AD. We found that long-term dietary resveratrol activates AMPK pathways and pro-survival routes such as SIRT1 in vivo. It also reduces cognitive impairment and has a neuroprotective role, decreasing the amyloid burden and reducing tau hyperphosphorylation. PMID:23129026

  4. Expressions of ecological identity across the life span of eight environmental exemplars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seydel, Jennifer

    While there is a substantial body of literature looking at various aspects of ecological identity and factors that influence it, there has been less work done on how an individual's ecological identity changes with time. Much of that work is limited to short segments of the life span (e.g. the impact of wilderness experiences). This dissertation attempts to address this perceived gap by investigating how the ecological identity of eight environmental exemplars changed during the course of his or her life. What has emerged from this qualitative grounded theory investigation of the lives and works of Charles Darwin, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Marjory Stoneman Douglas, Hazel Wolf, Rachel Carson, James Lovelock and E.O. Wilson are five sequential expressions of ecological identity. These 'stages' serve as a framework to explain ecological identity as a developmental process, both fluid and continuous, rather than at) end product. The development of an ecological identity is traced, through the development of five cognitive foundations and their alignment with five emotional foundations that reflect a progression from a sensory interaction and a kinship bond with nature into a deep understanding of the interconnectedness of all aspects of the planet. The findings reveal the evolution of an ecological identity and suggest the importance of looking beyond content knowledge in the nurturing of ecological attitudes, values, and lifestyles.

  5. Everyday problem solving across the adult life span: solution diversity and efficacy.

    PubMed

    Mienaltowski, Andrew

    2011-10-01

    Everyday problem solving involves examining the solutions that individuals generate when faced with problems that take place in their everyday experiences. Problems can range from medication adherence and meal preparation to disagreeing with a physician over a recommended medical procedure or compromising with extended family members over where to host Thanksgiving dinner. Across the life span, research has demonstrated divergent patterns of change in performance based on the type of everyday problems used as well as based on the way that problem-solving efficacy is operationally defined. Advancing age is associated with worsening performance when tasks involve single-solution or fluency-based definitions of effectiveness. However, when efficacy is defined in terms of the diversity of strategies used, as well as by the social and emotional impact of solution choice on the individual, performance is remarkably stable and sometimes even improves in the latter half of life. This article discusses how both of these approaches to everyday problem solving inform research on the influence that aging has on everyday functioning. PMID:22023569

  6. Control of protein life-span by N-terminal methionine excision.

    PubMed

    Giglione, Carmela; Vallon, Olivier; Meinnel, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) have been discovered recently in eukaryotic genomes, and it appears that N-terminal methionine excision (NME) is a conserved pathway in all compartments where protein synthesis occurs. This work aimed at uncovering the function(s) of NME in a whole proteome, using the chloroplast-encoded proteins of both Arabidopsis thaliana and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as model systems. Disruption of PDF1B in A.thaliana led to an albino phenotype, and an extreme sensitivity to the PDF- specific inhibitor actinonin. In contrast, a knockout line for PDF1A exhibited no apparent phenotype. Photosystem II activity in C.reinhardtii cells was substantially reduced by the presence of actinonin. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that PDF inhibition leads to destabilization of a crucial subset of chloroplast-encoded photosystem II components in C. reinhardtii. The same proteins were destabilized in pdf1b. Site-directed substitutions altering NME of the most sensitive target, subunit D2, resulted in similar effects. Thus, plastid NME is a critical mechanism specifically influencing the life-span of photosystem II polypeptides. A general role of NME in modulating the half-life of key subsets of proteins is suggested. PMID:12505980

  7. Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H. )

    1990-08-01

    This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual.

  8. Chips in black boxes? Convenience life span, parafood, brandwidth, families, and co-creation.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Marc

    2015-11-01

    Any consumer who opens a bag of potato or corn chips (or crisps in the UK) knows there is no time to waste to enjoy or share them. The convenience life span of chips is limited: it is the shelf or storage life and a very limited time once outside the bag. Many technologies converge to generate the desired effect as a black box, not only of the packaging but also of the chips themselves. The concept of paratext can be applied to printed messages on the package, including the brand name and other texts like advertising (epitexts), which can be expanded into the concept of parafood. These concepts help to discuss technological developments and interpret why this has recently become a negotiation zone for co-creation (see the Do us a flavor campaigns). They are symptoms of changing relations between production, research and development, marketing, and consumption. This paper pays special attention to back stories, underdog brand biographies and narratives about origin. The concept of brandwidth is introduced to sensitize about the limits of combining different stories about chips. A recent brand biography, a family history and a cookery book are used to discuss the phenomenon of cooking with Fritos. Together with the concepts of parafood, brandwidth and black boxes, more reflection and dialogue about the role of history and heritage in marketing put new challenging perspectives on the agenda. PMID:25791963

  9. Everyday problem solving across the adult life span: solution diversity and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Mienaltowski, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Everyday problem solving involves examining the solutions that individuals generate when faced with problems that take place in their everyday experiences. Problems can range from medication adherence and meal preparation to disagreeing with a physician over a recommended medical procedure or compromising with extended family members over where to host Thanksgiving dinner. Across the life span, research has demonstrated divergent patterns of change in performance based on the type of everyday problems used as well as based on the way that problem-solving efficacy is operationally defined. Advancing age is associated with worsening performance when tasks involve single-solution or fluency-based definitions of effectiveness. However, when efficacy is defined in terms of the diversity of strategies used, as well as by the social and emotional impact of solution choice on the individual, performance is remarkably stable and sometimes even improves in the latter half of life. This article discusses how both of these approaches to everyday problem solving inform research on the influence that aging has on everyday functioning. PMID:22023569

  10. Aging Theories for Establishing Safe Life Spans of Airborne Critical Structural Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.

    2003-01-01

    New aging theories have been developed to establish the safe life span of airborne critical structural components such as B-52B aircraft pylon hooks for carrying air-launch drop-test vehicles. The new aging theories use the equivalent-constant-amplitude loading spectrum to represent the actual random loading spectrum with the same damaging effect. The crack growth due to random loading cycling of the first flight is calculated using the half-cycle theory, and then extrapolated to all the crack growths of the subsequent flights. The predictions of the new aging theories (finite difference aging theory and closed-form aging theory) are compared with the classical flight-test life theory and the previously developed Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories. The new aging theories predict the number of safe flights as considerably lower than that predicted by the classical aging theory, and slightly lower than those predicted by the Ko first- and Ko second-order aging theories due to the inclusion of all the higher order terms.

  11. A structural-developmental psychodynamic approach to psychopathology: two polarities of experience across the life span.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Sidney J; Luyten, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Consistent with principles of developmental psychopathology, this paper presents a broad psychodynamic structural developmental perspective that establishes conceptual continuities between processes of normal personality development, personality organization, concepts of psychopathology, and processes of therapeutic change. The major assumption of this approach is that personality development proceeds in a dialectic synergistic interaction between the development of capacities for interpersonal relatedness and the development of self-definition or identity. Extensive research demonstrates that these two dimensions define two broad types of personality organization, each with a particular experiential mode; preferred forms of cognition, defense, and adaptation; unique qualities of interpersonal relatedness and specific types of object and self-representation. Severe disruptions of this normal dialectic developmental process result in various forms of psychopathology organized in two basic configurations in which there is distorted defensive preoccupation, at different developmental levels, with one of these polarities (relatedness or self-definition) at the expense of the development of the other dimension. This paper reviews empirical findings supporting this approach to normal and disrupted personality development throughout the life cycle and considers its relationship to the internalizing-externalizing distinction in childhood and adolescence, attachment theory, and research on the interaction between biological and psychosocial factors in development across the life span. Finally, we discuss the implications of this approach for intervention and prevention. PMID:19583884

  12. Reduced Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) signaling extends replicative life span by enhancing NAD+ homeostasis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Felicia; James, Christol; Kato, Michiko; Myers, Victoria; Ilyas, Irtqa; Tsang, Matthew; Lin, Su-Ju

    2015-05-15

    Attenuated nutrient signaling extends the life span in yeast and higher eukaryotes; however, the mechanisms are not completely understood. Here we identify the Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS) amino acid sensing pathway as a novel longevity factor. A null mutation of SSY5 (ssy5Δ) increases replicative life span (RLS) by ∼50%. Our results demonstrate that several NAD(+) homeostasis factors play key roles in this life span extension. First, expression of the putative malate-pyruvate NADH shuttle increases in ssy5Δ cells, and deleting components of this shuttle, MAE1 and OAC1, largely abolishes RLS extension. Next, we show that Stp1, a transcription factor of the SPS pathway, directly binds to the promoter of MAE1 and OAC1 to regulate their expression. Additionally, deletion of SSY5 increases nicotinamide riboside (NR) levels and phosphate-responsive (PHO) signaling activity, suggesting that ssy5Δ increases NR salvaging. This increase contributes to NAD(+) homeostasis, partially ameliorating the NAD(+) deficiency and rescuing the short life span of the npt1Δ mutant. Moreover, we observed that vacuolar phosphatase, Pho8, is partially required for ssy5Δ-mediated NR increase and RLS extension. Together, our studies present evidence that supports SPS signaling is a novel NAD(+) homeostasis factor and ssy5Δ-mediated life span extension is likely due to concomitantly increased mitochondrial and vacuolar function. Our findings may contribute to understanding the molecular basis of NAD(+) metabolism, cellular life span, and diseases associated with NAD(+) deficiency and aging. PMID:25825491

  13. The complex nature of family support across the life span: Implications for psychological well-being.

    PubMed

    Fuller-Iglesias, Heather R; Webster, Noah J; Antonucci, Toni C

    2015-03-01

    This study examines the complex role of family networks in shaping adult psychological well-being over time. We examine the unique and interactive longitudinal influences of family structure (i.e., composition and size) and negative family relationship quality on psychological well-being among young (ages 18-34), middle-aged (ages 35-49), and older adults (ages 50+). A sample of 881 adults (72% White; 26% Black) was drawn from the longitudinal Social Relations, Age, and Health Study. Structural equation modeling indicated that among young and middle-aged adults, increasing family negativity was associated with increases in depressive symptoms over time. In contrast, among older adults, lowered proportion of family in network and an increasing number of family members in the network (i.e., family size) were associated with decreases in depressive symptoms. These findings were moderated by family negativity. Among older adults with low family negativity, having a lower proportion of family and larger family size were associated with decreasing depressive symptoms, but there was no effect among those reporting high family negativity. Overall, these results contribute to an increased understanding of the complex, developmental nature of how family support influences well-being across the life span and highlights unique age differences. PMID:25602936

  14. Life-span differences in semantic integration of pictures and sentences in memory.

    PubMed

    Pezdek, K

    1980-09-01

    This study examined life-span developmental differences in spontaneous integration of semantically relevant material presented in pictures and sentences. 45 third graders, 45 sixth graders, 45 high school students, and 30 adults over 60 were presented a sequence of 24 pictures and sentences, followed by 24 intervening items. Each intervening item corresponded to, but was in the opposite modality from, one of the original items and was either semantically relevant or irrelevant to the corresponding original. In a "same-different" recognition test, data suggested that the sixth-grade and high school subjects semantically integrated original items with relevant intervening items that were in the opposite modality and made subsequent recognition responses on the basis of the integrated memory. Third graders and older adults, however, showed no evidence of spontaneous, cross-modality semantic integration. Further, increasing the temporal delay between presenting the to-be-integrated items, from 5 min to 1 day, decreased overall response sensitivity but did not alter the patterns of integration results. The findings are discussed in terms of age differences in the spontaneous use of strategies for effective memory processing, with the extreme age groups processing more formal characteristics of the stimuli in memory, and the middle 2 groups processing deeper, more semantic information. PMID:7418508

  15. Speech rate effects on the processing of conversational speech across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Koch, Xaver; Janse, Esther

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the effect of speech rate on spoken word recognition across the adult life span. Contrary to previous studies, conversational materials with a natural variation in speech rate were used rather than lab-recorded stimuli that are subsequently artificially time-compressed. It was investigated whether older adults' speech recognition is more adversely affected by increased speech rate compared to younger and middle-aged adults, and which individual listener characteristics (e.g., hearing, fluid cognitive processing ability) predict the size of the speech rate effect on recognition performance. In an eye-tracking experiment, participants indicated with a mouse-click which visually presented words they recognized in a conversational fragment. Click response times, gaze, and pupil size data were analyzed. As expected, click response times and gaze behavior were affected by speech rate, indicating that word recognition is more difficult if speech rate is faster. Contrary to earlier findings, increased speech rate affected the age groups to the same extent. Fluid cognitive processing ability predicted general recognition performance, but did not modulate the speech rate effect. These findings emphasize that earlier results of age by speech rate interactions mainly obtained with artificially speeded materials may not generalize to speech rate variation as encountered in conversational speech. PMID:27106310

  16. Effects of kaolin particle films on the life span of an orb-weaver spider.

    PubMed

    Benhadi-Marín, Jacinto; Pereira, José Alberto; Santos, Sónia A P

    2016-02-01

    Araniella cucurbitina (Araneae: Araneidae) is a widespread orb-weaver spider commonly found in agroecosystems. Mineral particle films such as kaolin, due to their protective or anti-feeding action, can represent an alternative to pesticides, especially in organic farming systems, but little is known about its effects on A. cucurbitina. Therefore, we tested the effect of kaolin sprays on the life span of A. cucurbitina under laboratory conditions. Four treatments were tested encompassing different exposure routes. Thus, kaolin sprays were applied on (i) the surface, (ii) the prey (fly), (iii) the spider and (iv) both spider & prey. A control group was tested with water in each treatment. Results showed that sprays of kaolin significantly affected the survival of A. curcubitina when applications were done on the surface and on both spider & prey registering a reduction of 48% and 56%, respectively. Spiders in control obtained higher probability of reaching alive at the end of the assay than those treated with kaolin. Differences observed can be explained by the feeding behavior of the species and may depend on the consumption of the web by the spider and the ratio spider/fly for body size. PMID:26432533

  17. Atrx deficiency induces telomere dysfunction, endocrine defects, and reduced life span

    PubMed Central

    Watson, L. Ashley; Solomon, Lauren A.; Li, Jennifer Ruizhe; Jiang, Yan; Edwards, Matthew; Shin-ya, Kazuo; Beier, Frank; Bérubé, Nathalie G.

    2013-01-01

    Human ATRX mutations are associated with cognitive deficits, developmental abnormalities, and cancer. We show that the Atrx-null embryonic mouse brain accumulates replicative damage at telomeres and pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is exacerbated by loss of p53 and linked to ATM activation. ATRX-deficient neuroprogenitors exhibited higher incidence of telomere fusions and increased sensitivity to replication stress–inducing drugs. Treatment of Atrx-null neuroprogenitors with the G-quadruplex (G4) ligand telomestatin increased DNA damage, indicating that ATRX likely aids in the replication of telomeric G4-DNA structures. Unexpectedly, mutant mice displayed reduced growth, shortened life span, lordokyphosis, cataracts, heart enlargement, and hypoglycemia, as well as reduction of mineral bone density, trabecular bone content, and subcutaneous fat. We show that a subset of these defects can be attributed to loss of ATRX in the embryonic anterior pituitary that resulted in low circulating levels of thyroxine and IGF-1. Our findings suggest that loss of ATRX increases DNA damage locally in the forebrain and anterior pituitary and causes tissue attrition and other systemic defects similar to those seen in aging. PMID:23563309

  18. Dietary Intake of Curcuma longa and Emblica officinalis Increases Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Rawal, Shilpa; Singh, Pavneet; Gupta, Ayush; Mohanty, Sujata

    2014-01-01

    Intake of food and nutrition plays a major role in affecting aging process and longevity. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the ageing process are still unclear. To this respect, diet has been considered to be a determinant of ageing process. In order to better illustrate this, we used Drosophila melanogaster as a model and fed them orally with different concentrations of two commonly used Indian medicinal plant products, Curcuma longa (rhizome) and Emblica officinalis (fruit). The results revealed significant increase in life span of Drosophila flies on exposure to both the plant products, more efficiently by C. Longa than by E. officinalis. In order to understand whether the increase in lifespan was due to high-antioxidant properties of these medicinal plants, we performed enzymatic assays to assess the SOD and catalase activities in case of both treated and control Drosophila flies. Interestingly, the results support the free radical theory of aging as both these plant derivatives show high reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities. PMID:24967413

  19. Atomic Bomb Survivors Life-Span Study: Insufficient Statistical Power to Select Radiation Carcinogenesis Model.

    PubMed

    Socol, Yehoshua; Dobrzy?ski, Ludwik

    2015-01-01

    The atomic bomb survivors life-span study (LSS) is often claimed to support the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) of radiation carcinogenesis. This paper shows that this claim is baseless. The LSS data are equally or better described by an s-shaped dependence on radiation exposure with a threshold of about 0.3 Sievert (Sv) and saturation level at about 1.5 Sv. A Monte-Carlo simulation of possible LSS outcomes demonstrates that, given the weak statistical power, LSS cannot provide support for LNTH. Even if the LNTH is used at low dose and dose rates, its estimation of excess cancer mortality should be communicated as 2.5% per Sv, i.e., an increase of cancer mortality from about 20% spontaneous mortality to about 22.5% per Sv, which is about half of the usually cited value. The impact of the "neutron discrepancy problem" - the apparent difference between the calculated and measured values of neutron flux in Hiroshima - was studied and found to be marginal. Major revision of the radiation risk assessment paradigm is required. PMID:26673526

  20. Childhood self-control and unemployment throughout the life span: evidence from two British cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Daly, Michael; Delaney, Liam; Egan, Mark; Baumeister, Roy F

    2015-06-01

    The capacity for self-control may underlie successful labor-force entry and job retention, particularly in times of economic uncertainty. Analyzing unemployment data from two nationally representative British cohorts (N = 16,780), we found that low self-control in childhood was associated with the emergence and persistence of unemployment across four decades. On average, a 1-SD increase in self-control was associated with a reduction in the probability of unemployment of 1.4 percentage points after adjustment for intelligence, social class, and gender. From labor-market entry to middle age, individuals with low self-control experienced 1.6 times as many months of unemployment as those with high self-control. Analysis of monthly unemployment data before and during the 1980s recession showed that individuals with low self-control experienced the greatest increases in unemployment during the recession. Our results underscore the critical role of self-control in shaping life-span trajectories of occupational success and in affecting how macroeconomic conditions affect unemployment levels in the population. PMID:25870404

  1. Life span extension by targeting a link between metabolism and histone acetylation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Shahaf; Feller, Christian; Forne, Ignasi; Schiller, Evelyn; Sévin, Daniel C; Schauer, Tamas; Regnard, Catherine; Straub, Tobias; Prestel, Matthias; Klima, Caroline; Schmitt Nogueira, Melanie; Becker, Lore; Klopstock, Thomas; Sauer, Uwe; Becker, Peter B; Imhof, Axel; Ladurner, Andreas G

    2016-03-01

    Old age is associated with a progressive decline of mitochondrial function and changes in nuclear chromatin. However, little is known about how metabolic activity and epigenetic modifications change as organisms reach their midlife. Here, we assessed how cellular metabolism and protein acetylation change during early aging in Drosophila melanogaster. Contrary to common assumptions, we find that flies increase oxygen consumption and become less sensitive to histone deacetylase inhibitors as they reach midlife. Further, midlife flies show changes in the metabolome, elevated acetyl-CoA levels, alterations in protein-notably histone-acetylation, as well as associated transcriptome changes. Based on these observations, we decreased the activity of the acetyl-CoA-synthesizing enzyme ATP citrate lyase (ATPCL) or the levels of the histone H4 K12-specific acetyltransferase Chameau. We find that these targeted interventions both alleviate the observed aging-associated changes and promote longevity. Our findings reveal a pathway that couples changes of intermediate metabolism during aging with the chromatin-mediated regulation of transcription and changes in the activity of associated enzymes that modulate organismal life span. PMID:26781291

  2. Cognitive control and language across the life span: does labeling improve reactive control?

    PubMed

    Lucenet, Joanna; Blaye, Agnès; Chevalier, Nicolas; Kray, Jutta

    2014-05-01

    How does cognitive control change with age, and what are the processes underlying these changes? This question has been extensively studied using versions of the task-switching paradigm, which allow participants to actively prepare for the upcoming task (Kray, Eber, & Karbach, 2008). Little is known, however, about age-related changes in this ability across the life span when there is no opportunity to anticipate task goals. We examined the effect of 2 kinds of verbal self-instruction-labeling either the task goal or the relevant feature of the stimulus-on 2 components of cognitive control, goal setting and switching, in children, young adults, and older adults. All participants performed single-task blocks and mixed-task blocks (involving unpredictable switching between 2 tasks) in silent and labeling conditions. Participants categorized bidimensional stimuli either by picture or by color, depending on their spatial position in a 2-cell vertical grid. Response times revealed an inverted U shape in performance with age. These age differences were more pronounced for goal setting than for switching, thus generalizing results obtained in situations taping proactive control to this new context forcing reactive control. Further, differential age-related effects of verbalization were also obtained. Verbalizations were detrimental for young adults, beneficial for older adults, and had mixed effects in children. These differences are interpreted in terms of qualitative developmental changes in reactive goal-setting strategies. PMID:24491213

  3. [Life Span of F1 Progeny of Female Drosophila Exposed to Low Intensity Terahertz Irradiation].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V I; Weisman, N Ya

    2015-01-01

    Virgin female fruit flies were stressed by placement into a confined space without food for 3 hours. Some flies were subjected to terahertz irradiation (0,1-2,2 THz) for the last 30 min. Irradiated and nonirradiated females were then copulated with males. We investigated the F1 progeny of fruit flies with mature and immature oocytes at the moment of irradiation (days of oviposition: 1-2 and 9-10 after irradiation). Life span of individual flies was evaluated. It was demonstrated that terahertz radiation does not influence the absolute and average lifespan of the F1 progeny in both sexes. In response to terahertz irradiation the sexual dimorphism was detected. Survival curves of males, developed from mature and immature oocytes at the time of irradiation, differ significantly from the appropriate control, whereas in the case of females the survival curves are similar to the control. It is concluded that terahertz radiation has a remote effect on a survival of the F1 male progeny. PMID:26591613

  4. Caenorhabditis elegans ATR checkpoint kinase ATL-1 influences life span through mitochondrial maintenance.

    PubMed

    Suetomi, Kazuhiro; Mereiter, Stefan; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    ATR is highly conserved in all eukaryotes and functions as a cell-cycle nuclear checkpoint kinase. In mammals, ATR is essential whose complete absence results in early embryonic lethality and its hypomorphic mutation causes a complex disease known as Seckel syndrome. However, molecular mechanisms that cause a wide variety of symptoms including accelerated aging have remained unclear. Similarly, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a deletion mutant of ATR ortholog atl-1 appears to develop into normal adults, but their eggs do not hatch and die at early embryogenesis. Here we show that the parental worms of atl-1 defective mutant achieved longevity. Transcription levels of certain superoxide dismutase genes, sod-3 and -5 and enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutases significantly increased in the mutant. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation such as a formation of malondialdehyde was attenuated. Expressions of other genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor were also altered. In contrast, the mutant became hypersensitive to rotenone and ethidium bromide. Compared with the wild type the mitochondrial DNA copy number in the mutant was lesser and its proliferation is more severely inhibited in the presence of rotenone. These results suggest that C. elegans ATL-1 is involved not only in the nuclear checkpoint control but also in the mitochondrial maintenance, and its dysfunction activates mild oxidative stress response, resulting in an alteration of life span. PMID:23434802

  5. Life-Span and Life-Space Literacy: Research and Policy in National and International Perspective. Occasional Paper OP92-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Daniel A.

    A more literate society cannot be created in the United States or elsewhere without a more comprehensive conceptual framework. This framework attempts explicitly to link children's acquisition of literacy with that of adults and assumes there is no single normative theory to literacy development. In a life-span and life-space approach, literacy…

  6. Improvement/Maintenance and Reorientation as Central Features of Coping with Major Life Change and Loss: Contributions of Three Life-Span Theories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boerner, Kathrin; Jopp, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the common and unique contributions of three major life-span theories in addressing improvement/maintenance and reorientation, which represent central processes of coping with major life change and loss. For this purpose, we review and compare the dual-process model of assimilative and accommodative coping, the model of…

  7. Osteopenia is present at an early age and worsens across the life span in girls and women with Rett syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Girls and women with Rett syndrome (RTT) are at increased risk for osteopenia and skeletal fractures. Our objective was to characterize the natural history of bone mineralization in RTT girls and women across their life span and to identify genetic, nutritional, physical, hormonal, or inflammatory ...

  8. Oxidative Stress Tolerance, Adenylate Cyclase, and Autophagy Are Key Players in the Chronological Life Span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Winemaking

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Most grape juice fermentation takes place when yeast cells are in a nondividing state called the stationary phase. Under such circumstances, we aimed to identify the genetic determinants controlling longevity, known as the chronological life span. We identified commercial strains with both short (EC1118) and long (CSM) life spans in laboratory growth medium and compared them under diverse conditions. Strain CSM shows better tolerance to stresses, including oxidative stress, in the stationary phase. This is reflected during winemaking, when this strain has an increased maximum life span. Compared to EC1118, CSM overexpresses a mitochondrial rhodanese gene-like gene, RDL2, whose deletion leads to increased reactive oxygen species production at the end of fermentation and a correlative loss of viability at this point. EC1118 shows faster growth and higher expression of glycolytic genes, and this is related to greater PKA activity due to the upregulation of the adenylate cyclase gene. This phenotype has been linked to the presence of a δ element in its promoter, whose removal increases the life span. Finally, EC1118 exhibits a higher level of protein degradation by autophagy, which might help achieve fast growth at the expense of cellular structures and may be relevant for long-term survival under winemaking conditions. PMID:22327582

  9. Changes in Acoustic Characteristics of the Voice across the Life Span: Measures from Individuals 4-93 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stathopoulos, Elaine T.; Huber, Jessica E.; Sussman, Joan E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine acoustic voice changes across the life span. Previous voice production investigations used small numbers of participants, had limited age ranges, and produced contradictory results. Method: Voice recordings were made from 192 male and female participants 4-93 years of age. Acoustic

  10. Self-Esteem Development across the Life Span: A Longitudinal Study with a Large Sample from Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Ulrich; Maes, Jürgen; Schmitt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the development of self-esteem across the life span. Data came from a German longitudinal study with 3 assessments across 4 years of a sample of 2,509 individuals ages 14 to 89 years. The self-esteem measure used showed strong measurement invariance across assessments and birth cohorts. Latent growth curve analyses indicated…

  11. Self-Esteem Development across the Life Span: A Longitudinal Study with a Large Sample from Germany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orth, Ulrich; Maes, Jrgen; Schmitt, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined the development of self-esteem across the life span. Data came from a German longitudinal study with 3 assessments across 4 years of a sample of 2,509 individuals ages 14 to 89 years. The self-esteem measure used showed strong measurement invariance across assessments and birth cohorts. Latent growth curve analyses indicated

  12. A Life-Span, Relational, Public Health Model of Self-Regulation: Impact on Individual and Community Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maniar, Swapnil; Zaff, Jonathan F.

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors extend the ideas around the development of self-regulation and its impact on development by proposing a life-span, relational, public health model. They propose that the role of self-regulation should be understood across transitions from childhood to adulthood and through an individual and community perspective,…

  13. Living the Dream? A Qualitative Retrospective Study Exploring the Role of Adolescent Aspirations across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, Julie S.; Schoon, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    There is a lack of longitudinal research linking adolescent career aspirations to adult outcomes other than career and income attainment. Drawing on Nurmi's (2004) and Salmela-Aro, Aunola, and Nurmi's (2007) life-span model of motivation and using quantitative survey data at ages 16, 23, 33, 42, and 50 years, combined with retrospective interview…

  14. Modeling Life-Span Growth Curves of Cognition Using Longitudinal Data with Multiple Samples and Changing Scales of Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McArdle, John J.; Grimm, Kevin J.; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Bowles, Ryan P.; Meredith, William

    2009-01-01

    The authors use multiple-sample longitudinal data from different test batteries to examine propositions about changes in constructs over the life span. The data come from 3 classic studies on intellectual abilities in which, in combination, 441 persons were repeatedly measured as many as 16 times over 70 years. They measured cognitive constructs…

  15. Changes in Acoustic Characteristics of the Voice across the Life Span: Measures from Individuals 4-93 Years of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stathopoulos, Elaine T.; Huber, Jessica E.; Sussman, Joan E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the present investigation was to examine acoustic voice changes across the life span. Previous voice production investigations used small numbers of participants, had limited age ranges, and produced contradictory results. Method: Voice recordings were made from 192 male and female participants 4-93 years of age. Acoustic…

  16. Effects of salinity on egg and fecal pellet production, development and survival, adult sex ratio and total life span in the calanoid copepod, Acartia tonsa: a laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan, Majid; Esmaeili Fereidouni, Abolghasem; Agh, Naser; Jani Khalili, Khosrow

    2016-01-01

    The effects of salinity on the copepod, Acartia tonsa in terms of daily egg production rate (EPR), hatching success, fecal pellet production rate (FPR), naupliar development time and survival, sex ratio, and total life span were determined in laboratory conditions through three experiments. In experiment 1, EPR, hatching success, and FPR of individual females were monitored at salinities of 13, 20, 35 and 45 during short-periods (seven consecutive days). Results show EPR was affected by salinity with the highest outputs recorded at 20 and 35, respectively, which were considerably higher than those at 13 and 45. Mean FPR was also higher in 35 and 20. In experiment 2, the same parameters were evaluated over total life span of females (long-term study). The best EPR and FPR were observed in 35, which was statistically higher than at 13 and 20. In experiment 3, survival rates of early nauplii until adult stage were lowest at a salinity of 13. The development time increased with increasing of salinity. Female percentage clearly decreased with increasing salinity. Higher female percentages (56.7% and 52.2%, respectively) were significantly observed at two salinities of 13 and 20 compared to that at 35 (25%). Total longevity of females was not affected by salinity increment. Based on our results, for mass culture we recommend that a salinity of 35 be adopted due to higher reproductive performances, better feeding, and faster development of A. tonsa.

  17. Implicit Motor Sequence Learning and Working Memory Performance Changes Across the Adult Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Sarah Nadine; Keitel, Ariane; Südmeyer, Martin; Pollok, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Although implicit motor sequence learning is rather well understood in young adults, effects of aging on this kind of learning are controversial. There is first evidence that working memory (WM) might play a role in implicit motor sequence learning in young adults as well as in adults above the age of 65. However, the knowledge about the development of these processes across the adult life span is rather limited. As the average age of our population continues to rise, a better understanding of age-related changes in motor sequence learning and potentially mediating cognitive processes takes on increasing significance. Therefore, we investigated aging effects on implicit motor sequence learning and WM. Sixty adults (18–71 years) completed verbal and visuospatial n-back tasks and were trained on a serial reaction time task (SRTT). Randomly varying trials served as control condition. To further assess consolidation indicated by off-line improvement and reduced susceptibility to interference, reaction times (RTs) were determined 1 h after initial learning. Young and older but not middle-aged adults showed motor sequence learning. Nine out of 20 older adults (compared to one young/one middle-aged) exhibited some evidence of sequence awareness. After 1 h, young and middle-aged adults showed off-line improvement. However, RT facilitation was not specific to sequence trials. Importantly, susceptibility to interference was reduced in young and older adults indicating the occurrence of consolidation. Although WM performance declined in older participants when load was high, it was not significantly related to sequence learning. The data reveal a decline in motor sequence learning in middle-aged but not in older adults. The use of explicit learning strategies in older adults might account for the latter result. PMID:27199736

  18. Derived Trail Making Test indices: demographics and cognitive background variables across the adult life span.

    PubMed

    Christidi, Foteini; Kararizou, Evangelia; Triantafyllou, Nikolaos; Anagnostouli, Maria; Zalonis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    We examined the contribution of demographics and cognitive background variables (processing speed, visuospatial skill, working memory, and interference control) on derived Trail Making Test (TMT) scores in a large sample of Greek healthy participants. We included 775 participants and administered the TMT (TMT-A and TMT-B) and the Wechsler Intelligence Adult Scale (WAIS). Direct (TMT-A & TMT-B time-to-completion) and derived [difference TMT-(B - A) & ratio TMT-(B/A)] scores were calculated. Demographics (age, age(2), education, and gender) and WAIS Full Intelligence Quotient significantly predicted the direct TMT-A (R(2) = 0.426) and TMT-B (R(2) = 0.593) scores and to a lesser extent, the derived TMT-(B - A) (R(2) = 0.343) and TMT-(B/A) (R(2) = 0.088) scores. In a subsample of 537 healthy participants who also completed the Stroop Neuropsychological Screening Test (SNST), demographics (age and education), WAIS Digit Symbol, Block Design, Arithmetic, and SNST accounted for 44.8% and 59.7% of the variance on TMT-A and TMT-B, and 32.5% and 9.6% of the variance on TMT-(B - A) and TMT-(B/A), respectively. We found minimal influence of Block Design and Arithmetic on TMT-(B - A) and an absence of significant influence of any cognitive variable on TMT-(B/A) score. Concluding, derived TMT scores are suggested as indices to detect impairment in cognitive flexibility across the adult life span, since they minimize the effect of demographics and other cognitive background variables. PMID:25798536

  19. Life span and tissue distribution of 111indium-labeled blood platelets in hypomagnesemic lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.D.; Miller, J.K.; White, P.K.; Ramsey, N.

    1983-05-01

    Circulating platelets may be activated by exposed triple-helical collagen in atherosclerotic lesions in Mg-deficient ruminants. Autologous platelets, labeled in vitro with 111In and determined to be active, were injected into 5 hypomagnesemic and 3 control lambs fed semipurified diets with 100 or 2,000 mg of Mg/kg of feed for 3 months. During the first 68 hours, 111In concentrations were 11 times higher in packed cells than in plasma. Packed-cell 111In increased 60% during the first 2 hours, probably due to initial tissue sequestration and later release of labeled platelets. Thereafter, platelet half-life span averaged 60 and 63 hours for hypomagnesemic and control lambs. After 68 hours, lambs were injected with native vascular collagen fibrils at 500 micrograms/kg of body weight to initiate reversible platelet aggregation. Within 1 minute, 83% of packed-cell 111In disappeared from circulation. Thirty minutes later, the lambs were euthanatized and necropsied and in the lungs, liver, and spleen, 111In averaged 24%, 19%, and 9%, respectively, of 111In injected 68 hours earlier. Organ deposits were not affected by Mg intake, but 111In in the lungs was somewhat lower in 2 lambs injected with inactivated collagen. Pathologic changes induced by reversible platelet aggregation were compatible with right ventricular failure complicated by pulmonary edema, similar to changes in hypomagnesemic lambs that died spontaneously. Platelets in blood exposed to vascular lesions in hypomagnesemic ruminants could be a major mortality risk factor in grass tetany disease.

  20. Implicit Motor Sequence Learning and Working Memory Performance Changes Across the Adult Life Span.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Sarah Nadine; Keitel, Ariane; Südmeyer, Martin; Pollok, Bettina

    2016-01-01

    Although implicit motor sequence learning is rather well understood in young adults, effects of aging on this kind of learning are controversial. There is first evidence that working memory (WM) might play a role in implicit motor sequence learning in young adults as well as in adults above the age of 65. However, the knowledge about the development of these processes across the adult life span is rather limited. As the average age of our population continues to rise, a better understanding of age-related changes in motor sequence learning and potentially mediating cognitive processes takes on increasing significance. Therefore, we investigated aging effects on implicit motor sequence learning and WM. Sixty adults (18-71 years) completed verbal and visuospatial n-back tasks and were trained on a serial reaction time task (SRTT). Randomly varying trials served as control condition. To further assess consolidation indicated by off-line improvement and reduced susceptibility to interference, reaction times (RTs) were determined 1 h after initial learning. Young and older but not middle-aged adults showed motor sequence learning. Nine out of 20 older adults (compared to one young/one middle-aged) exhibited some evidence of sequence awareness. After 1 h, young and middle-aged adults showed off-line improvement. However, RT facilitation was not specific to sequence trials. Importantly, susceptibility to interference was reduced in young and older adults indicating the occurrence of consolidation. Although WM performance declined in older participants when load was high, it was not significantly related to sequence learning. The data reveal a decline in motor sequence learning in middle-aged but not in older adults. The use of explicit learning strategies in older adults might account for the latter result. PMID:27199736

  1. Missing Doses in the Life Span Study of Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David B.; Wing, Steve; Cole, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    The Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors is an important source of risk estimates used to inform radiation protection and compensation. Interviews with survivors in the 1950s and 1960s provided information needed to estimate radiation doses for survivors proximal to ground zero. Because of a lack of interview or the complexity of shielding, doses are missing for 7,058 of the 68,119 proximal survivors. Recent analyses excluded people with missing doses, and despite the protracted collection of interview information necessary to estimate some survivors' doses, defined start of follow-up as October 1, 1950, for everyone. We describe the prevalence of missing doses and its association with mortality, distance from hypocenter, city, age, and sex. Missing doses were more common among Nagasaki residents than among Hiroshima residents (prevalence ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 2.14), among people who were closer to ground zero than among those who were far from it, among people who were younger at enrollment than among those who were older, and among males than among females (prevalence ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.28). Missing dose was associated with all-cancer and leukemia mortality, particularly during the first years of follow-up (all-cancer rate ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.08; and leukemia rate ratio = 4.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.67). Accounting for missing dose and late entry should reduce bias in estimated dose-mortality associations. PMID:23429722

  2. Missing doses in the life span study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David B; Wing, Steve; Cole, Stephen R

    2013-03-15

    The Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors is an important source of risk estimates used to inform radiation protection and compensation. Interviews with survivors in the 1950s and 1960s provided information needed to estimate radiation doses for survivors proximal to ground zero. Because of a lack of interview or the complexity of shielding, doses are missing for 7,058 of the 68,119 proximal survivors. Recent analyses excluded people with missing doses, and despite the protracted collection of interview information necessary to estimate some survivors' doses, defined start of follow-up as October 1, 1950, for everyone. We describe the prevalence of missing doses and its association with mortality, distance from hypocenter, city, age, and sex. Missing doses were more common among Nagasaki residents than among Hiroshima residents (prevalence ratio = 2.05; 95% confidence interval: 1.96, 2.14), among people who were closer to ground zero than among those who were far from it, among people who were younger at enrollment than among those who were older, and among males than among females (prevalence ratio = 1.22; 95% confidence interval: 1.17, 1.28). Missing dose was associated with all-cancer and leukemia mortality, particularly during the first years of follow-up (all-cancer rate ratio = 2.16, 95% confidence interval: 1.51, 3.08; and leukemia rate ratio = 4.28, 95% confidence interval: 1.72, 10.67). Accounting for missing dose and late entry should reduce bias in estimated dose-mortality associations. PMID:23429722

  3. Sex differences in aging, life span and spontaneous tumorigenesis in 129/Sv mice neonatally exposed to metformin.

    PubMed

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Semenchenko, Anna V; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Panchenko, Andrey V; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal (prenatal and early neonatal) period is a critical stage for hypothalamic programming of sexual differentiation as well as for the development of energy and metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that neonatal treatment with antidiabetic drug biguanide metformin would positively modify regulation of growth hormone--IGF-1--insulin signaling pathway slowing down aging and improving cancer preventive patterns in rodents. To test this hypothesis male and female 129/Sv mice were s.c. injected with metformin (100 mg/kg) at the 3rd, 5th and 7th days after birth. Metformin-treated males consumed less food and water and their body weight was decreased as compared with control mice practically over their entire lifespan. There were no significant differences in age-related dynamics of food and water consumption in females and they were heavier than controls. The fraction of mice with regular estrous cycles decreased with age and demonstrated a tendency to decrease in the females neonatally treated with metformin. Neonatal exposure to metformin practically failed to change the extent of hormonal and metabolic parameters in blood serum of male and female mice. In males, neonatal metformin treatment significantly increased the mean life span (+20%, P < 0.05) and slightly increased the maximum life span (+3.5%). In females, the mean life span and median in metformin-treated groups were slightly decreased (-9.1% and -13.8% respectively, P > 0.05) in comparison to controls, whereas mean life span of last 10% survivors and maximum life span were the same as in controls. Almost half (45%) of control male mice and 71.8% male mice neonatally exposed to metformin survived up to 800 d of age, the same age was achieved by 54.3% of mice in control female group and 30% of metformin-treated females (P < 0.03). Thus, neonatal metformin exposure slows down aging and prolongs lifespan in male but not in female mice. PMID:25483062

  4. The ontogeny of the human connectome: development and dynamic changes of brain connectivity across the life span.

    PubMed

    Collin, Guusje; van den Heuvel, Martijn P

    2013-12-01

    The human brain comprises distributed cortical regions that are structurally and functionally connected into a network that is known as the human connectome. Elaborate developmental processes starting in utero herald connectome genesis, with dynamic changes in its architecture continuing throughout life. Connectome changes during development, maturation, and aging may be governed by a set of biological rules or algorithms, forming and shaping the macroscopic architecture of the brain's wiring network. To explore the presence of developmental patterns indicative of such rules, this review considers insights from studies on the cellular and the systems level into macroscopic connectome genesis and dynamics across the life span. We observe that in parallel with synaptogenesis, macroscopic connectome formation and transformation is characterized by an initial overgrowth and subsequent elimination of cortico-cortical axonal projections. Furthermore, dynamic changes in connectome organization throughout the life span are suggested to follow an inverted U-shaped pattern, with an increasingly integrated topology during development, a plateau lasting for the majority of adulthood and an increasingly localized topology in late life. Elucidating developmental patterns in brain connectivity is crucial for our understanding of the human connectome and how it may give rise to brain function, including the occurrence of brain network disorders across the life span. PMID:24047610

  5. Herbivore-mediated ecological costs of reproduction shape the life history of an iteroparous plant.

    PubMed

    Miller, Tom E X; Tenhumberg, Brigitte; Louda, Svata M

    2008-02-01

    Plant reproduction yields immediate fitness benefits but can be costly in terms of survival, growth, and future fecundity. Life-history theory posits that reproductive strategies are shaped by trade-offs between current and future fitness that result from these direct costs of reproduction. Plant reproduction may also incur indirect ecological costs if it increases susceptibility to herbivores. Yet ecological costs of reproduction have received little empirical attention and remain poorly integrated into life-history theory. Here, we provide evidence for herbivore-mediated ecological costs of reproduction, and we develop theory to examine how these costs influence plant life-history strategies. Field experiments with an iteroparous cactus (Opuntia imbricata) indicated that greater reproductive effort (proportion of meristems allocated to reproduction) led to greater attack by a cactus-feeding insect (Narnia pallidicornis) and that damage by this herbivore reduced reproductive success. A dynamic programming model predicted strongly divergent optimal reproductive strategies when ecological costs were included, compared with when these costs were ignored. Meristem allocation by cacti in the field matched the optimal strategy expected under ecological costs of reproduction. The results indicate that plant reproductive allocation can strongly influence the intensity of interactions with herbivores and that associated ecological costs can play an important selective role in the evolution of plant life histories. PMID:18197767

  6. Life, self-reproduction and information: beyond the machine metaphor.

    PubMed

    Kampis, G; Csányi, V

    1991-01-01

    The problem of representing information in automation models of self-replication is considered. It is shown that, unlike in the natural reproduction process, in a computable model the reproduced entities do not contain all the information necessary for guiding the process. Current theoretical understanding of life and its replication, based on such models, is argued to be essentially inadequate. The solution to this problem is claimed to require recognition of the theoretical fact that information in living systems is different from that subsumed under the category of "knowledge", which is representable as computer programs or triggers of state transitions. A discussion of fundamentals of a new theory of information and its relationship to replication models is given and a new direction of further developments of biological theories is envisioned. PMID:2016883

  7. Tumorigenesis in high-dose total body irradiated rhesus monkeys--a life span study.

    PubMed

    Hollander, Carel F; Zurcher, Chris; Broerse, Johan J

    2003-01-01

    In the early sixties, studies have been performed at the TNO-Institutes for Health Research on acute effects of high dose total body irradiation (TBI) with X-rays and fission neutrons in Rhesus monkeys and the protective effect of autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The surviving animals of this study were kept to investigate late radiation effects, ie, tumorigenesis. TBI in combination with chemotherapy, followed by rescue with BMT is increasingly used for the treatment of hematological malignancies and refractory autoimmune disease. The risk of radiation carcinogenesis after this treatment is of growing concern in man. Studies on tumor induction in nonhuman primates are of relevance in this context since the response of this species to radiation does not differ much from that in man. The group of long-term surviving monkeys comprised nine neutron irradiated animals (average total body dose 3A Gy, range 2.3-4.4 Gy) and 20 X-irradiated monkeys (average total body dose 7.1 Gy, range 2.8-8.6 Gy). A number of 21 age-matched nonirradiated Rhesus monkeys served as a control-group. All animals wereregularly screened for the occurrence of tumors. Complete necropsies were performed after natural death or euthanasia. At postirradiation intervals of 4-21 years an appreciable number of malignant tumors was observed. In the neutron irradiated group eight out of nine animals died with 1 or more malignant tumors. In the X-irradiated group this fraction was 10 out of 20. The tumors in the control group, in seven out of 21 animals, appeared at much older age compared with those in the irradiated cohorts. The histogenesis of the malignant tumors was diverse, as was the case for benign tumors. The observed shortening of latency periods and life span, as well as, the increase of mean number of tumors per tumor bearing animal for benign neoplasms parallels the trend observed for malignant tumors. The results of this study were compared to other radiation late effects after TBI followed by different BMT treatment modalities in Rhesus monkeys. The observation that the carcinogenic risk of TBI in the Rhesus monkeys is similar to that derived from the studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and the increase of the risk by a factor of 8 emphasizes the need for regular screening for secondary radiation-induced tumors in long-term surviving patients after TBI followed by BMT. PMID:12696581

  8. When does cognitive functioning peak? The asynchronous rise and fall of different cognitive abilities across the life span.

    PubMed

    Hartshorne, Joshua K; Germine, Laura T

    2015-04-01

    Understanding how and when cognitive change occurs over the life span is a prerequisite for understanding normal and abnormal development and aging. Most studies of cognitive change are constrained, however, in their ability to detect subtle, but theoretically informative life-span changes, as they rely on either comparing broad age groups or sparse sampling across the age range. Here, we present convergent evidence from 48,537 online participants and a comprehensive analysis of normative data from standardized IQ and memory tests. Our results reveal considerable heterogeneity in when cognitive abilities peak: Some abilities peak and begin to decline around high school graduation; some abilities plateau in early adulthood, beginning to decline in subjects' 30s; and still others do not peak until subjects reach their 40s or later. These findings motivate a nuanced theory of maturation and age-related decline, in which multiple, dissociable factors differentially affect different domains of cognition. PMID:25770099

  9. Consilience and Life History Theory: From Genes to Brain to Reproductive Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Aurelio Jose; Vasquez, Geneva; Brumbach, Barbara H.; Schneider, Stephanie M. R.; Sefcek, Jon A.; Tal, Ilanit R.; Hill, Dawn; Wenner, Christopher J.; Jacobs, W. Jake

    2006-01-01

    We describe an integrated theory of individual differences that traces the behavioral development of life history from genes to brain to reproductive strategy. We provide evidence that a single common factor, the K-Factor, underpins a variety of life-history parameters, including an assortment of sexual, reproductive, parental, familial, and…

  10. Ageing in a eusocial insect: molecular and physiological characteristics of life span plasticity in the honey bee.

    PubMed

    Münch, D; Amdam, G V; Wolschin, F

    2008-01-01

    Commonly held views assume that ageing, or senescence, represents an inevitable, passive, and random decline in function that is strongly linked to chronological age. In recent years, genetic intervention of life span regulating pathways, for example, in Drosophila as well as case studies in non-classical animal models, have provided compelling evidence to challenge these views.Rather than comprehensively revisiting studies on the established genetic model systems of ageing, we here focus on an alternative model organism with a wild type (unselected genotype) characterized by a unique diversity in longevity - the honey bee.Honey bee (Apis mellifera) life span varies from a few weeks to more than 2 years. This plasticity is largely controlled by environmental factors. Thereby, although individuals are closely related genetically, distinct life histories can emerge as a function of social environmental change.Another remarkable feature of the honey bee is the occurrence of reverted behavioural ontogeny in the worker (female helper) caste. This behavioural peculiarity is associated with alterations in somatic maintenance functions that are indicative of reverted senescence. Thus, although intraspecific variation in organismal life span is not uncommon, the honey bee holds great promise for gaining insights into regulatory pathways that can shape the time-course of ageing by delaying, halting or even reversing processes of senescence. These aspects provide the setting of our review.We will highlight comparative findings from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans in particular, and focus on knowledge spanning from molecular- to behavioural-senescence to elucidate how the honey bee can contribute to novel insights into regulatory mechanisms that underlie plasticity and robustness or irreversibility in ageing. PMID:18728759

  11. Ageing in a eusocial insect: molecular and physiological characteristics of life span plasticity in the honey bee

    PubMed Central

    Münch, D.; Amdam, G. V.; Wolschin, F.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Commonly held views assume that ageing, or senescence, represents an inevitable, passive, and random decline in function that is strongly linked to chronological age. In recent years, genetic intervention of life span regulating pathways, for example, in Drosophila as well as case studies in non-classical animal models, have provided compelling evidence to challenge these views. Rather than comprehensively revisiting studies on the established genetic model systems of ageing, we here focus on an alternative model organism with a wild type (unselected genotype) characterized by a unique diversity in longevity – the honey bee. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) life span varies from a few weeks to more than 2 years. This plasticity is largely controlled by environmental factors. Thereby, although individuals are closely related genetically, distinct life histories can emerge as a function of social environmental change. Another remarkable feature of the honey bee is the occurrence of reverted behavioural ontogeny in the worker (female helper) caste. This behavioural peculiarity is associated with alterations in somatic maintenance functions that are indicative of reverted senescence. Thus, although intraspecific variation in organismal life span is not uncommon, the honey bee holds great promise for gaining insights into regulatory pathways that can shape the time-course of ageing by delaying, halting or even reversing processes of senescence. These aspects provide the setting of our review. We will highlight comparative findings from Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans in particular, and focus on knowledge spanning from molecular- to behavioural-senescence to elucidate how the honey bee can contribute to novel insights into regulatory mechanisms that underlie plasticity and robustness or irreversibility in ageing. PMID:18728759

  12. Dietary supplementation with Lovaza and krill oil shortens the life span of long-lived F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Stephen R; Mote, Patricia L; Flegal, James M

    2014-06-01

    Marine oils rich in ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids have been recommended as a preventive treatment for patients at risk for cardiovascular diseases. These oils also are the third most consumed dietary supplement in the USA. However, evidence for their health benefits is equivocal. We tested the daily, isocaloric administration of krill oil (1.17 g oil/kg diet) and Lovaza (Omacor; 4.40 g/kg diet), a pharmaceutical grade fish oil, beginning at 12 months of age, on the life span and mortality-related pathologies of long-lived, male, B6C3F1 mice. The oils were incorporated into the chemically defined American Institute of Nutrition (AIN)-93 M diet. An equivalent volume of soybean oil was removed. Krill oil was 3 % and Lovaza 11 % of the oil in the diets. When their effects were analyzed together, the marine oils significantly shortened life span by 6.6 % (P = 0.0321; log-rank test) relative to controls. Individually, Lovaza and krill oil non-significantly shortened median life span by 9.8 and 4.7 %, respectively. Lovaza increased the number of enlarged seminal vesicles (7.1-fold). Lovaza and krill oil significantly increased lung tumors (4.1- and 8.2-fold) and hemorrhagic diathesis (3.9- and 3.1-fold). Analysis of serum from treated mice found that Lovaza slightly increased blood urea nitrogen, while krill oil modestly increased bilirubin, triglycerides, and blood glucose levels. Taken together, the results do not support the idea that the consumption of isolated ω-3 fatty acid-rich oils will increase the life span or health of initially healthy individuals. PMID:24816553

  13. The Structure of Working Memory Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Sandra; Rose, Nathan S.; Myerson, Joel; Strube, Michael J; Sommers, Mitchell; Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spehar, Brent

    2010-01-01

    The present study addresses three questions regarding age differences in working memory: (1) whether performance on complex span tasks decreases as a function of age at a faster rate than performance on simple span tasks; (2) whether spatial working memory decreases at a faster rate than verbal working memory; and (3) whether the structure of working memory abilities is different for different age groups. Adults, ages 20–89 (n=388), performed three simple and three complex verbal span tasks and three simple and three complex spatial memory tasks. Performance on the spatial tasks decreased at faster rates as a function of age than performance on the verbal tasks, but within each domain, performance on complex and simple span tasks decreased at the same rates. Confirmatory factor analyses revealed that domain-differentiated models yielded better fits than models involving domain-general constructs, providing further evidence of the need to distinguish verbal and spatial working memory abilities. Regardless of which domain-differentiated model was examined, and despite the faster rates of decrease in the spatial domain, age group comparisons revealed that the factor structure of working memory abilities was highly similar in younger and older adults and showed no evidence of age-related dedifferentiation. PMID:21299306

  14. The Development of Memory Efficiency and Value-Directed Remembering across the Life Span: A Cross-Sectional Study of Memory and Selectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castel, Alan D.; Humphreys, Kathryn L.; Lee, Steve S.; Galvan, Adriana; Balota, David A.; McCabe, David P.

    2011-01-01

    Although attentional control and memory change considerably across the life span, no research has examined how the ability to strategically remember important information (i.e., value-directed remembering) changes from childhood to old age. The present study examined this in different age groups across the life span (N = 320, 5-96 years old). A…

  15. Self-esteem development across the life span: a longitudinal study with a large sample from Germany.

    PubMed

    Orth, Ulrich; Maes, Jürgen; Schmitt, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    The authors examined the development of self-esteem across the life span. Data came from a German longitudinal study with 3 assessments across 4 years of a sample of 2,509 individuals ages 14 to 89 years. The self-esteem measure used showed strong measurement invariance across assessments and birth cohorts. Latent growth curve analyses indicated that self-esteem follows a quadratic trajectory across the life span, increasing during adolescence, young adulthood, and middle adulthood, reaching a peak at age 60 years, and then declining in old age. No cohort effects on average levels of self-esteem or on the shape of the trajectory were found. Moreover, the trajectory did not differ across gender, level of education, or for individuals who had lived continuously in West versus East Germany (i.e., the 2 parts of Germany that had been separate states from 1949 to 1990). However, the results suggested that employment status, household income, and satisfaction in the domains of work, relationships, and health contribute to a more positive life span trajectory of self-esteem. The findings have significant implications, because they call attention to developmental stages in which individuals may be vulnerable because of low self-esteem (such as adolescence and old age) and to factors that predict successful versus problematic developmental trajectories. PMID:25485608

  16. The extended life span of Drosophila melanogaster eye-color (white and vermilion) mutants with impaired formation of kynurenine.

    PubMed

    Oxenkrug, Gregory F

    2010-01-01

    Animal and human studies suggest that aging is associated with increased formation of kynurenine (KYN) from tryptophan (TRY). The rate-limiting factors of TRY-KYN metabolism are transmembrane transport of TRY, and activity of enzyme, TRY 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO2). Eye-color mutants, white (w1118) (impaired TRY transport) and vermilion (v48a and v2) (deficient TDO activity), were compared with wild-type Oregon-R (Ore-R) strain of Drosophila melanogaster. Female 1-day-old adult flies maintained on a standard medium, and acclimatized to 12-h light:12-h dark cycle were collected, and then regularly transferred to fresh medium every 3-4 days. The number of dead flies was recorded at the time of transfer. Forty flies were studied in each experimental group. The life span of w1118 (mean = 45.5 days), and v48a (mean = 47.6 days) and v2 (mean = 43.8 days), were significantly longer than of wild-type Ore-R flies (27.1 days) (p < 0.001, Logrank test). There were no differences in life span between w1118 and v48a and v2 mutants. Present results suggest that prolongation of life span may be associated with slow rate of KYN formation from TRY. PMID:19941150

  17. Sex differences in aging, life span and spontaneous tumorigenesis in 129/Sv mice neonatally exposed to metformin

    PubMed Central

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Semenchenko, Anna V; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Panchenko, Andrey V; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V

    2015-01-01

    The perinatal (prenatal and early neonatal) period is a critical stage for hypothalamic programming of sexual differentiation as well as for the development of energy and metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that neonatal treatment with antidiabetic drug biguanide metformin would positively modify regulation of growth hormone – IGF-1 – insulin signaling pathway slowing down aging and improving cancer preventive patterns in rodents. To test this hypothesis male and female 129/Sv mice were s.c. injected with metformin (100 mg/kg) at the 3rd, 5th and 7th days after birth. Metformin-treated males consumed less food and water and their body weight was decreased as compared with control mice practically over their entire lifespan. There were no significant differences in age-related dynamics of food and water consumption in females and they were heavier than controls. The fraction of mice with regular estrous cycles decreased with age and demonstrated a tendency to decrease in the females neonatally treated with metformin. Neonatal exposure to metformin practically failed to change the extent of hormonal and metabolic parameters in blood serum of male and female mice. In males, neonatal metformin treatment significantly increased the mean life span (+20%, P < 0.05) and slightly increased the maximum life span (+3.5%). In females, the mean life span and median in metformin-treated groups were slightly decreased (−9.1% and −13.8% respectively, P > 0.05) in comparison to controls, whereas mean life span of last 10% survivors and maximum life span were the same as in controls. Almost half (45%) of control male mice and 71.8% male mice neonatally exposed to metformin survived up to 800 d of age, the same age was achieved by 54.3% of mice in control female group and 30% of metformin-treated females (P < 0.03). Thus, neonatal metformin exposure slows down aging and prolongs lifespan in male but not in female mice. PMID:25483062

  18. Extension of Life Span by Impaired Glucose Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans Is Accompanied by Structural Rearrangements of the Transcriptomic Network

    PubMed Central

    Priebe, Steffen; Menzel, Uwe; Zarse, Kim; Groth, Marco; Platzer, Matthias; Ristow, Michael; Guthke, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Glucose restriction mimicked by feeding the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans with 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) - a glucose molecule that lacks the ability to undergo glycolysis - has been found to increase the life span of the nematodes considerably. To facilitate understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind this life extension, we analyzed transcriptomes of DOG-treated and untreated roundworms obtained by RNA-seq at different ages. We found that, depending on age, DOG changes the magnitude of the expression values of about 2 to 24 percent of the genes significantly, although our results reveal that the gross changes introduced by DOG are small compared to the age-induced changes. We found that 27 genes are constantly either up- or down-regulated by DOG over the whole life span, among them several members of the cytochrome P450 family. The monotonic change with age of the temporal expression patterns of the genes was investigated, leading to the result that 21 genes reverse their monotonic behaviour under impaired glycolysis. Put simply, the DOG-treatment reduces the gross transcriptional activity but increases the interconnectedness of gene expression. However, a detailed analysis of network parameters discloses that the introduced changes differ remarkably between individual signalling pathways. We found a reorganization of the hubs of the mTOR pathway when standard diet is replaced by DOG feeding. By constructing correlation based difference networks, we identified those signalling pathways that are most vigorously changed by impaired glycolysis. Taken together, we have found a number of genes and pathways that are potentially involved in the DOG-driven extension of life span of C. elegans. Furthermore, our results demonstrate how the network structure of ageing-relevant signalling pathways is reorganised under impaired glycolysis. PMID:24204961

  19. Reproduction and longevity: secrets revealed by C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Arnab; Tissenbaum, Heidi A

    2007-02-01

    What is the relationship between reproduction and longevity? Evolutionary biology suggests that reproduction exacts a cost in somatic maintenance, a cost that reduces longevity. The frequent occurrence of this tradeoff between life span and fecundity, both due to experimental manipulations as well as natural variation, suggest that the mechanism might be conserved during evolution. Until recently, little was known about the mechanistic details of how reproduction might regulate life span. Here we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the regulation of life span by reproductive signaling, focusing on studies using Caenorhabditis elegans. PMID:17187981

  20. The relationship between P3 and neuropsychological function in an adult life span sample.

    PubMed

    Walhovd, Kristine B; Fjell, Anders M

    2003-01-01

    The relationship of P3 to age and neuropsychological performance was investigated in a sample of 71 well-functioning adults ranging in age from 21.8 to 94.7 years. ERPs were recorded while the participants performed an auditory two-stimuli oddball task in which the rare tones were to be counted. The Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI) and the digit span subtest from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-R (WAIS-R) were administered. Regression analyses showed significant, linear effects of age on P3 latency and amplitude. Significant relationships between P3 and neuropsychological measures were found, in that P3 latency correlated moderately in predictable ways with scores on matrices, block design, and digit span. Overall, these relationships are best characterized by a linear function, but a non-linear component is involved in the relationship between P3 latency and fluid tests. Finally, a linear relationship between ERP components and age was found, while a curvilinear relationship was found between age and block design and matrices, respectively. There appears to be either partially different functions or structures underlying performance on these tests, the P3 component and performance on neuropsychological tests, or one must assume some variant of a multiplicative, as opposed to an additive, model of cognition. PMID:12505768

  1. Social relationships and physiological determinants of longevity across the human life span.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang Claire; Boen, Courtney; Gerken, Karen; Li, Ting; Schorpp, Kristen; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2016-01-19

    Two decades of research indicate causal associations between social relationships and mortality, but important questions remain as to how social relationships affect health, when effects emerge, and how long they last. Drawing on data from four nationally representative longitudinal samples of the US population, we implemented an innovative life course design to assess the prospective association of both structural and functional dimensions of social relationships (social integration, social support, and social strain) with objectively measured biomarkers of physical health (C-reactive protein, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index) within each life stage, including adolescence and young, middle, and late adulthood, and compare such associations across life stages. We found that a higher degree of social integration was associated with lower risk of physiological dysregulation in a dose-response manner in both early and later life. Conversely, lack of social connections was associated with vastly elevated risk in specific life stages. For example, social isolation increased the risk of inflammation by the same magnitude as physical inactivity in adolescence, and the effect of social isolation on hypertension exceeded that of clinical risk factors such as diabetes in old age. Analyses of multiple dimensions of social relationships within multiple samples across the life course produced consistent and robust associations with health. Physiological impacts of structural and functional dimensions of social relationships emerge uniquely in adolescence and midlife and persist into old age. PMID:26729882

  2. Social relationships and physiological determinants of longevity across the human life span

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang Claire; Boen, Courtney; Gerken, Karen; Li, Ting; Schorpp, Kristen; Harris, Kathleen Mullan

    2016-01-01

    Two decades of research indicate causal associations between social relationships and mortality, but important questions remain as to how social relationships affect health, when effects emerge, and how long they last. Drawing on data from four nationally representative longitudinal samples of the US population, we implemented an innovative life course design to assess the prospective association of both structural and functional dimensions of social relationships (social integration, social support, and social strain) with objectively measured biomarkers of physical health (C-reactive protein, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, waist circumference, and body mass index) within each life stage, including adolescence and young, middle, and late adulthood, and compare such associations across life stages. We found that a higher degree of social integration was associated with lower risk of physiological dysregulation in a dose–response manner in both early and later life. Conversely, lack of social connections was associated with vastly elevated risk in specific life stages. For example, social isolation increased the risk of inflammation by the same magnitude as physical inactivity in adolescence, and the effect of social isolation on hypertension exceeded that of clinical risk factors such as diabetes in old age. Analyses of multiple dimensions of social relationships within multiple samples across the life course produced consistent and robust associations with health. Physiological impacts of structural and functional dimensions of social relationships emerge uniquely in adolescence and midlife and persist into old age. PMID:26729882

  3. Circadian clocks govern calorie restriction-mediated life span extension through BMAL1- and IGF-1-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonal A; Chaudhari, Amol; Gupta, Richa; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Kondratov, Roman V

    2016-04-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) increases longevity in many species by unknown mechanisms. The circadian clock was proposed as a potential mediator of CR. Deficiency of the core component of the circadian clock-transcriptional factor BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT [aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator]-like protein 1)-results in accelerated aging. Here we investigated the role of BMAL1 in mechanisms of CR. The 30% CR diet increased the life span of wild-type (WT) mice by 20% compared to mice on anad libitum(AL) diet but failed to increase life span ofBmal1(-/-)mice. BMAL1 deficiency impaired CR-mediated changes in the plasma levels of IGF-1 and insulin. We detected a statistically significantly reduction of IGF-1 in CRvs.AL by 50 to 70% in WT mice at several daily time points tested, while inBmal1(-/-)the reduction was not significant. Insulin levels in WT were reduced by 5 to 9%, whileBmal1(-/-)induced it by 10 to 35% at all time points tested. CR up-regulated the daily average expression ofBmal1(by 150%) and its downstream target genesPeriods(by 470% forPer1and by 130% forPer2). We propose that BMAL1 is an important mediator of CR, and activation of BMAL1 might link CR mechanisms with biologic clocks.-Patel, S. A., Chaudhari, A., Gupta, R., Velingkaar, N., Kondratov, R. V. Circadian clocks govern calorie restriction-mediated life span extension through BMAL1- and IGF-1-dependent mechanisms. PMID:26700733

  4. Fullness of Life as Minimal Unit: Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Learning across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Van Eijck, Michiel

    2010-01-01

    Challenged by a National Science Foundation-funded conference, 2020 Vision: The Next Generation of STEM Learning Research, in which participants were asked to recognize science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning as lifelong, life-wide, and life-deep, we draw upon 20 years of research across the lifespan to propose a new way…

  5. Plant Reproduction. Plant Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Plants are vital to all other life on this planet - without them, there would be no food, shelter or oxygen. Luckily, over millions of years plants have developed many different features in order to survive and reproduce. In Plant Reproduction, students will discover that primitive mosses and algae are dependent upon water for their reproduction.

  6. Plant Reproduction. Plant Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Plants are vital to all other life on this planet - without them, there would be no food, shelter or oxygen. Luckily, over millions of years plants have developed many different features in order to survive and reproduce. In Plant Reproduction, students will discover that primitive mosses and algae are dependent upon water for their reproduction.…

  7. Life Span as the Measure of Performance and Learning in a Business Gaming Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the learning curve method of measuring learning to participants of a computer-assisted business gaming simulation that includes a multiple-life-cycle feature. The study involved 249 participants. It verified the workability of the feature and estimated the participants' rate of learning at 17.4% for every doubling of experience.

  8. Motives in American Men and Women across the Adult Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veroff, Joseph; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigates stability and change in four social motives (achievement, affiliation, fear of weakness, hope of power) over the adult life cycle. Motives were assessed in 1957 and 1976 by coding thematic apperceptive content in stories told about six pictures. Some age differences and cohort stability were evident for both sexes. (Author/CB)

  9. Life Span as the Measure of Performance and Learning in a Business Gaming Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thavikulwat, Precha

    2012-01-01

    This study applies the learning curve method of measuring learning to participants of a computer-assisted business gaming simulation that includes a multiple-life-cycle feature. The study involved 249 participants. It verified the workability of the feature and estimated the participants' rate of learning at 17.4% for every doubling of experience.…

  10. Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves health span in mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Life expectancy at birth in the first world has increased from 35 years at the beginning of the 20th century to more than 80 years now. The increase in life expectancy has resulted in an increase in age-related diseases and larger numbers of frail and dependent people. The aim of our study was to determine whether life-long spontaneous aerobic exercise affects lifespan and healthspan in mice. Results Male C57Bl/6J mice, individually caged, were randomly assigned to one of two groups: sedentary (n = 72) or spontaneous wheel-runners (n = 72). We evaluated longevity and several health parameters including grip strength, motor coordination, exercise capacity (VO2max) and skeletal muscle mitochondrial biogenesis. We also measured the cortical levels of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a neurotrophin associated with brain plasticity. In addition, we measured systemic oxidative stress (malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl plasma levels) and the expression and activity of two genes involved in antioxidant defense in the liver (that is, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD)). Genes that encode antioxidant enzymes are considered longevity genes because their over-expression may modulate lifespan. Aging was associated with an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers and in the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, GPx and Mn-SOD, in the liver in mice. Life-long spontaneous exercise did not prolong longevity but prevented several signs of frailty (that is, decrease in strength, endurance and motor coordination). This improvement was accompanied by a significant increase in the mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and in the cortical BDNF levels. Conclusion Life-long spontaneous exercise does not prolong lifespan but improves healthspan in mice. Exercise is an intervention that delays age-associated frailty, enhances function and can be translated into the clinic. PMID:24472376

  11. Repression of the mitochondrial peroxiredoxin antioxidant system does not shorten life span but causes reduced fitness in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Manickaratnam; Gruber, Jan; Ng, Li Fang; Halliwell, Barry

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging proposes that aging is a consequence of progressive mitochondrial dysfunction caused by lifelong accumulation of oxidative damage. Aging is therefore expected to accelerate if the rate of this oxidative damage accumulation increases. Studies attempting to test this prediction through modulation of oxidative damage by altering antioxidant defenses have reported conflicting results. Here we investigated the effects of repressing prdx-3, responsible for the detoxification of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, in developmentally normal wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans. We report that life span and levels of oxidative protein damage were not altered when prdx-3 was repressed in adult nematodes. We further found evidence that mitochondrial uncoupling increased in response to repression of prdx-3. Nevertheless repression of prdx-3 led to reductions in steady-state levels of ATP, motility, and brood size, indicating the importance of this enzyme to normal life in C. elegans. PMID:23722165

  12. Recent Progress in Metabolic Signaling Pathways Regulating Aging and Life Span

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The NIH Summit, Advances in Geroscience: Impact on Health Span and Chronic Disease, discusses several aspects of cellular degeneration that underlie susceptibility to chronic aging-associated diseases, morbidity, and mortality. In particular, the session on Metabolism focuses on the interrelationship between signal transduction, intermediary metabolism, and metabolic products and byproducts that contribute to pathophysiologic phenotypes and detrimental effects that occur during the aging process, thus leading to susceptibility to disease. Although it is well established that many metabolic pathways (ie, oxidative phosphorylation, insulin-stimulated glucose uptake) decline with age, it often remains uncertain if these are a cause or consequence of the aging process. Moreover, the mechanisms accounting for the decline in metabolic function remain enigmatic. Several novel and unexpected concepts are emerging that will help to define the roles of altered metabolic control in the degenerative mechanisms of aging. This brief review summarizes several of the topics to be discussed in the metabolism of aging session (http://www.geron.org/About%20Us/nih-geroscience-summit). PMID:24833582

  13. Telomerase-mediated life-span extension of human primary fibroblasts by human artificial chromosome (HAC) vector

    SciTech Connect

    Shitara, Shingo; Kakeda, Minoru; Nagata, Keiko; Hiratsuka, Masaharu; Sano, Akiko; Osawa, Kanako; Okazaki, Akiyo; Katoh, Motonobu; Kazuki, Yasuhiro; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Tomizuka, Kazuma

    2008-05-09

    Telomerase-mediated life-span extension enables the expansion of normal cells without malignant transformation, and thus has been thought to be useful in cell therapies. Currently, integrating vectors including the retrovirus are used for human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-mediated expansion of normal cells; however, the use of these vectors potentially causes unexpected insertional mutagenesis and/or activation of oncogenes. Here, we established normal human fibroblast (hPF) clones retaining non-integrating human artificial chromosome (HAC) vectors harboring the hTERT expression cassette. In hTERT-HAC/hPF clones, we observed the telomerase activity and the suppression of senescent-associated SA-{beta}-galactosidase activity. Furthermore, the hTERT-HAC/hPF clones continued growing beyond 120 days after cloning, whereas the hPF clones retaining the silent hTERT-HAC senesced within 70 days. Thus, hTERT-HAC-mediated episomal expression of hTERT allows the extension of the life-span of human primary cells, implying that gene delivery by non-integrating HAC vectors can be used to control cellular proliferative capacity of primary cultured cells.

  14. Assimilation of endogenous nicotinamide riboside is essential for calorie restriction-mediated life span extension in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Kato, Michiko; Lin, Su-Ju

    2009-06-19

    NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide) is an essential cofactor involved in various biological processes including calorie restriction-mediated life span extension. Administration of nicotinamide riboside (NmR) has been shown to ameliorate deficiencies related to aberrant NAD(+) metabolism in both yeast and mammalian cells. However, the biological role of endogenous NmR remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that salvaging endogenous NmR is an integral part of NAD(+) metabolism. A balanced NmR salvage cycle is essential for calorie restriction-induced life span extension and stress resistance in yeast. Our results also suggest that partitioning of the pyridine nucleotide flux between the classical salvage cycle and the NmR salvage branch might be modulated by the NAD(+)-dependent Sir2 deacetylase. Furthermore, two novel deamidation steps leading to nicotinic acid mononucleotide and nicotinic acid riboside production are also uncovered that further underscore the complexity and flexibility of NAD(+) metabolism. In addition, utilization of extracellular nicotinamide mononucleotide requires prior conversion to NmR mediated by a periplasmic phosphatase Pho5. Conversion to NmR may thus represent a strategy for the transport and assimilation of large nonpermeable NAD(+) precursors. Together, our studies provide a molecular basis for how NAD(+) homeostasis factors confer metabolic flexibility. PMID:19416965

  15. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Reuben H.; Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095; UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 ; Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun; Park, No-Hee; UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095; UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095; David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 ; Kang, Mo K.

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-{beta}-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15{sup INK4B}, and p57{sup KIP2}. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-{beta} receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-{beta} antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in NHOK.

  16. Inhibition of respiration extends C. elegans life span via reactive oxygen species that increase HIF-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Hwang, Ara B; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-12-01

    A mild inhibition of mitochondrial respiration extends the life span of many organisms, including yeast, worms, flies, and mice, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. One environmental condition that reduces rates of respiration is hypoxia (low oxygen). Thus, it is possible that mechanisms that sense oxygen play a role in the longevity response to reduced respiration. The hypoxia-inducible factor HIF-1 is a highly conserved transcription factor that activates genes that promote survival during hypoxia. In this study, we show that inhibition of respiration in C. elegans can promote longevity by activating HIF-1. Through genome-wide screening, we found that RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown of many genes encoding respiratory-chain components induced hif-1-dependent transcription. Moreover, HIF-1 was required for the extended life spans of clk-1 and isp-1 mutants, which have reduced rates of respiration. Inhibiting respiration appears to activate HIF-1 by elevating the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We found that ROS are increased in respiration mutants and that mild increases in ROS can stimulate HIF-1 to activate gene expression and promote longevity. In this way, HIF-1 appears to link respiratory stress in the mitochondria to a nuclear transcriptional response that promotes longevity. PMID:21093262

  17. DNA damage leads to progressive replicative decline but extends the life span of long-lived mutant animals

    PubMed Central

    Lans, H; Lindvall, J M; Thijssen, K; Karambelas, A E; Cupac, D; Fensgård, Ø; Jansen, G; Hoeijmakers, J H J; Nilsen, H; Vermeulen, W

    2013-01-01

    Human-nucleotide-excision repair (NER) deficiency leads to different developmental and segmental progeroid symptoms of which the pathogenesis is only partially understood. To understand the biological impact of accumulating spontaneous DNA damage, we studied the phenotypic consequences of DNA-repair deficiency in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that DNA damage accumulation does not decrease the adult life span of post-mitotic tissue. Surprisingly, loss of functional ERCC-1/XPF even further extends the life span of long-lived daf-2 mutants, likely through an adaptive activation of stress signaling. Contrariwise, NER deficiency leads to a striking transgenerational decline in replicative capacity and viability of proliferating cells. DNA damage accumulation induces severe, stochastic impairment of development and growth, which is most pronounced in NER mutants that are also impaired in their response to ionizing radiation and inter-strand crosslinks. These results suggest that multiple DNA-repair pathways can protect against replicative decline and indicate that there might be a direct link between the severity of symptoms and the level of DNA-repair deficiency in patients. PMID:24013725

  18. Effects of dietary composition on life span of Drosophila buzzatii and its short-lived sibling species D. koepferae.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Federico H; Sambucetti, Pablo; Norry, Fabian M

    2013-08-01

    Two sibling Drosophila species dramatically divergent in longevity, Drosophila buzzatii and D. koepferae, were examined for possible effects of both developmental culture medium and dietary composition (DC) on longevity. Longevity was greatly increased in the longer lived D. buzzatii when flies were reared and fed on a rich-in-nutrient and cactus-based culture (R-CBC) as compared to longevity in a poor nutrient culture (PNC). In D. buzzatii, life span was further increased by exposing flies to short periods of a poor-in-nutrient and cactus-based culture (P-CBC). In contrast, variation in the here used nutrient composition did not change life span in the shorter lived D. koepferae, as longevity in this species did not differ among R-CBC, P-CBC and PNC cultures. Hormesis is a plausible explanation for the beneficial biological effects against aging arising from brief exposure to a lowed calorie food source in D. buzzatii. This study shows that genetic variation between closely related species is substantial for dietary effects on longevity. PMID:23835870

  19. Visualizing Life Zone Boundary Sensitivities Across Climate Models and Temporal Spans

    SciTech Connect

    Sisneros, Roberto R; Huang, Jian; Ostrouchov, George; Hoffman, Forrest M

    2011-01-01

    Life zones are a convenient and quantifiable method for delineating areas with similar plant and animal communities based on bioclimatic conditions. Such ecoregionalization techniques have proved useful for defining habitats and for studying how these habitats may shift due to environmental change. The ecological impacts of climate change are of particular interest. Here we show that visualizations of the geographic projection of life zones may be applied to the investigation of potential ecological impacts of climate change using the results of global climate model simulations. Using a multi-factor classification scheme, we show how life zones change over time based on quantitative model results into the next century. Using two straightforward metrics, we identify regions of high sensitivity to climate changes from two global climate simulations under two different greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. Finally, we identify how preferred human habitats may shift under these scenarios. We apply visualization methods developed for the purpose of displaying multivariate relationships within data, especially for situations that involve a large number of concurrent relationships. Our method is based on the concept of multivariate classification, and is implemented directly in VisIt, a production quality visualization package.

  20. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  1. Cell specific radiation dosimetry in skeleton from life-span carcinogenesis studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, S.S.J.

    1993-04-05

    The osteogenic sarcoma is the dominant life-threatening pathology in lifespan studies of beagles exposed to alpha-emitting bone-seeking radionuclides. It was deduced from these studies that certain skeletal sites are more prone to develop tumors. This project sought to determine the bone cells at risk and their cell-specific radiation dose. The cell-specific radiation dose values are related to loss and high Ra-226 and Pu-239 induced osteogenic sarcoma sites, to test different dose response hypothesis and predict the extent of effects in humans.

  2. Seasonal life history trade-offs in two leafwing butterflies: Delaying reproductive development increases life expectancy.

    PubMed

    McElderry, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Surviving inhospitable periods or seasons may greatly affect fitness. Evidence of this exists in the prevalence of dormant stages in the life cycles of most insects. Here I focused on butterflies with distinct seasonal morphological types (not a genetic polymorphism) in which one morphological type, or form, delays reproduction until favorable conditions return, while the other form develops in an environment that favors direct reproduction. For two butterflies, Anaea aidea and A. andria, I tested the hypothesis that the development of each seasonal form involves a differential allocation of resources to survival at eclosion. I assayed differences in adult longevity among summer and winter forms in either a warm, active environment or a cool, calm environment. Winter form adults lived 40 times longer than summer form but only in calm, cool conditions. The magnitude of this difference provided compelling evidence that the winter form body plan and metabolic strategy (i.e. resource conservatism) favor long term survival. This research suggests that winter form adults maintain lowered metabolic rate, a common feature of diapause, to conserve resources and delay senescence while overwintering. PMID:26868721

  3. New strategies to prolong the in vivo life span of iron-based contrast agents for MRI.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Antonella; Sfara, Carla; Battistelli, Serafina; Canonico, Barbara; Arcangeletti, Marcella; Manuali, Elisabetta; Salamida, Sonia; Papa, Stefano; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles have been developed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Iron oxide nanoparticles, that become superparamagnetic if the core particle diameter is ~ 30 nm or less, present R1 and R2 relaxivities which are much higher than those of conventional paramagnetic gadolinium chelates. Generally, these magnetic particles are coated with biocompatible polymers that prevent the agglomeration of the colloidal suspension and improve their blood distribution profile. In spite of their potential as MRI blood contrast agents, the biomedical application of iron oxide nanoparticles is still limited because of their intravascular half-life of only few hours; such nanoparticles are rapidly cleared from the bloodstream by macrophages of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES). To increase the life span of these MRI contrast agents in the bloodstream we proposed the encapsulation of SPIO nanoparticles in red blood cells (RBCs) through the transient opening of cell membrane pores. We have recently reported results obtained by applying our loading procedure to several SPIO nanoparticles with different chemical physical characteristics such as size and coating agent. In the current investigation we showed that the life span of iron-based contrast agents in the mice bloodstream was prolonged to 12 days after the intravenous injection of murine SPIO-loaded RBCs. Furthermore, we developed an animal model that implicates the pretreatment of animals with clodronate to induce a transient suppression of tissue macrophages, followed by the injection of human SPIO-loaded RBCs which make it possible to encapsulate nanoparticle concentrations (5.3-16.7 mM Fe) higher than murine SPIO-loaded RBCs (1.4-3.55 mM Fe). The data showed that, when human RBCs are used as more capable SPIO nanoparticle containers combined with a depletion of tissue macrophages, Fe concentration in animal blood is 2-3 times higher than iron concentration obtained by the use of murine SPIO-loaded RBCs. PMID:24223101

  4. New Strategies to Prolong the In Vivo Life Span of Iron-Based Contrast Agents for MRI

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Antonella; Sfara, Carla; Battistelli, Serafina; Canonico, Barbara; Arcangeletti, Marcella; Manuali, Elisabetta; Salamida, Sonia; Papa, Stefano; Magnani, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) and ultra small superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) nanoparticles have been developed as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents. Iron oxide nanoparticles, that become superparamagnetic if the core particle diameter is ~ 30nm or less, present R1 and R2 relaxivities which are much higher than those of conventional paramagnetic gadolinium chelates. Generally, these magnetic particles are coated with biocompatible polymers that prevent the agglomeration of the colloidal suspension and improve their blood distribution profile. In spite of their potential as MRI blood contrast agents, the biomedical application of iron oxide nanoparticles is still limited because of their intravascular half-life of only few hours; such nanoparticles are rapidly cleared from the bloodstream by macrophages of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES). To increase the life span of these MRI contrast agents in the bloodstream we proposed the encapsulation of SPIO nanoparticles in red blood cells (RBCs) through the transient opening of cell membrane pores. We have recently reported results obtained by applying our loading procedure to several SPIO nanoparticles with different chemical physical characteristics such as size and coating agent. In the current investigation we showed that the life span of iron-based contrast agents in the mice bloodstream was prolonged to 12 days after the intravenous injection of murine SPIO-loaded RBCs. Furthermore, we developed an animal model that implicates the pretreatment of animals with clodronate to induce a transient suppression of tissue macrophages, followed by the injection of human SPIO-loaded RBCs which make it possible to encapsulate nanoparticle concentrations (5.3-16.7mM Fe) higher than murine SPIO-loaded RBCs (1.4-3.55mM Fe). The data showed that, when human RBCs are used as more capable SPIO nanoparticle containers combined with a depletion of tissue macrophages, Fe concentration in animal blood is 2-3 times higher than iron concentration obtained by the use of murine SPIO-loaded RBCs. PMID:24223101

  5. Early life expenditure in sexual competition is associated with increased reproductive senescence in male red deer

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Jean-François; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Pemberton, Josephine M.; Clutton-Brock, Tim H.; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary theories of senescence predict that investment in reproduction in early life should come at the cost of reduced somatic maintenance, and thus earlier or more rapid senescence. There is now growing support for such trade-offs in wild vertebrates, but these exclusively come from females. Here, we test this prediction in male red deer (Cervus elaphus) using detailed longitudinal data collected over a 40-year field study. We show that males which had larger harems and thereby allocated more resources to reproduction during early adulthood experienced higher rates of senescence in both harem size and rut duration. Males that carried antlers with more points during early life did not show more pronounced declines in reproductive traits in later life. Overall, we demonstrate that sexual competition shapes male reproductive senescence in wild red deer populations and provide rare empirical support for the disposable soma theory of ageing in males of polygynous vertebrate species. PMID:25122226

  6. ‘Willpower’ over the life span: decomposing self-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ayduk, Ozlem; Berman, Marc G.; Casey, B. J.; Gotlib, Ian H.; Jonides, John; Kross, Ethan; Teslovich, Theresa; Wilson, Nicole L.; Zayas, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    In the 1960s, Mischel and colleagues developed a simple ‘marshmallow test’ to measure preschoolers’ ability to delay gratification. In numerous follow-up studies over 40 years, this ‘test’ proved to have surprisingly significant predictive validity for consequential social, cognitive and mental health outcomes over the life course. In this article, we review key findings from the longitudinal work and from earlier delay-of-gratification experiments examining the cognitive appraisal and attention control strategies that underlie this ability. Further, we outline a set of hypotheses that emerge from the intersection of these findings with research on ‘cognitive control’ mechanisms and their neural bases. We discuss implications of these hypotheses for decomposing the phenomena of ‘willpower’ and the lifelong individual differences in self-regulatory ability that were identified in the earlier research and that are currently being pursued. PMID:20855294

  7. Sickle Cell Disease: An Opportunity for Palliative Care across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bonnye; Mack, A. Kyle; Labotka, Richard; Molokie, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a chronic illness that impacts patients physically and emotionally and can do so at an early age. An ecological model of palliative care that involves improved communication among the health care team, patients, and their families can be beneficial. Open and honest communication regarding advance care planning, disease management, relief of pain and other symptoms, and bereavement and grief are all important for the patient, family, and health care team. Given the multiple acute and chronic complications of sickle cell disease, an approach to care that is holistic and comprehensive may help to improve a patient’s biological function and the perceived health, functional status, and quality of life of the patient and family. PMID:20804884

  8. Switch hands! Mapping proactive and reactive cognitive control across the life span.

    PubMed

    Van Gerven, Pascal W M; Hurks, Petra P M; Bovend'Eerdt, Thamar J H; Adam, Jos J

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the effects of age on proactive and reactive cognitive control in a large population sample of 809 individuals, ranging in age between 5 and 97 years. For that purpose, we used an anticue paradigm, which required a consistent remapping of cue location and response hand: Left-sided cues required right-hand responses and vice versa. After a random preparation interval of 100-850 ms, these anticues were followed by a target stimulus, which prompted a response with the index or middle finger of 1 of 2 hands. A neutral control condition involved uninformative cues, indicating all 4 possible response locations. The primary outcome measure was the difference between neutral and anticue reaction time (RT). Negative values indicated RT costs of the anticue, relative to the neutral condition, reflecting reactive cognitive control. Positive values indicated RT benefits, reflecting proactive cognitive control. Results were twofold. First, the switch from RT costs to benefits took place at longer preparation intervals in the youngest and oldest age groups than in the intermediate age groups. Second, irrespective of preparation interval, anticue performance followed an inverted U-shaped trajectory as a function of age, with a relatively steep improvement during childhood and adolescence, relative stability between 26 and 60 years, and a slightly accelerating decline into old age. Both patterns of results suggest an age-related transition from a primarily reactive, to a primarily proactive mode of cognitive control in early life and back again from a primarily proactive, to a primarily reactive mode of control in later life. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27124653

  9. Differential effects of the extracellular microenvironment on human embryonic stem cell differentiation into keratinocytes and their subsequent replicative life span.

    PubMed

    Movahednia, Mohammad Mehdi; Kidwai, Fahad Karim; Zou, Yu; Tong, Huei Jinn; Liu, Xiaochen; Islam, Intekhab; Toh, Wei Seong; Raghunath, Michael; Cao, Tong

    2015-04-01

    Culture microenvironment plays a critical role in the propagation and differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and their differentiated progenies. Although high efficiency of hESC differentiation to keratinocytes (hESC-Kert) has been achieved, little is known regarding the effects of early culture microenvironment and pertinent extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions during epidermal commitment on subsequent proliferative capacity of hESC-Kert. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of the different ECM microenvironments during hESC differentiation on subsequent replicative life span of hESC-Kert. In doing so, H1-hESCs were differentiated to keratinocytes (H1-Kert) in two differentiation systems. The first system employed autologous fibroblast feeder support, in which keratinocytes (H1-Kert(ACC)) were derived by coculture of hESCs with hESC-derived fibroblasts (H1-ebFs). The second system employed a novel decellularized matrix from H1-ebFs to create a dermoepidermal junction-like (DEJ) matrix. H1-Kert(AFF) were derived by differentiation of hESCs on the feeder-free system employing the DEJ matrix. Our study indicated that the feeder-free system with the use of DEJ matrix was more efficient in differentiation of hESCs toward epidermal progenitors. However, the feeder-free system was not sufficient to support the subsequent replicative capacity of differentiated keratinocytes. Of note, H1-Kert(AFF) showed limited replicative capacity with reduced telomere length and early cellular senescence. We further showed that the lack of cell-cell interactions during epidermal commitment led to heightened production of TGF-β1 by hESC-Kert during extended culture, which in turn was responsible for resulting in the limited replicative life span with cellular senescence of hESC-Kert derived under the feeder-free culture system. This study highlights for the first time the importance of the culture microenvironment and cell-ECM interactions during differentiation of hESCs on subsequent replicative life span and cellular senescence of the differentiated keratinocytes, with implications for use of these cells for applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:25693643

  10. Language Development across the Life Span: A Neuropsychological/Neuroimaging Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli, Mónica; Ardila, Alfredo; Matute, Esmeralda; Vélez-Uribe, Idaly

    2014-01-01

    Language development has been correlated with specific changes in brain development. The aim of this paper is to analyze the linguistic-brain associations that occur from birth through senescence. Findings from the neuropsychological and neuroimaging literature are reviewed, and the relationship of language changes observable in human development and the corresponding brain maturation processes across age groups are examined. Two major dimensions of language development are highlighted: naming (considered a major measure of lexical knowledge) and verbal fluency (regarded as a major measure of language production ability). Developmental changes in the brain lateralization of language are discussed, emphasizing that in early life there is an increase in functional brain asymmetry for language, but that this asymmetry changes over time, and that changes in the volume of gray and white matter are age-sensitive. The effects of certain specific variables, such as gender, level of education, and bilingualism are also analyzed. General conclusions are presented and directions for future research are suggested. PMID:26317109

  11. Promoting sexuality across the life span for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Ailey, Sarah H; Marks, Beth A; Crisp, Cheryl; Hahn, Joan Earle

    2003-06-01

    Sexuality is a human right that is important to all individuals regardless of age, gender, orientation, or developmental level. Sexuality is closely related to a person's self-concept and self-esteem. Individuals with I/DD have a right to sexuality and sexual expression. Nevertheless, persons with I/DD have historically been denied this right, and many structural and attitudinal barriers exist to their healthy sexuality. Paradigms in sexuality education have shifted toward recognizing sexuality as a human right, a major life resource, and an integral part of one's makeup. To broadly address the development of healthy sexuality for individuals with I/DD, the issue needs to be normalized, not ignored or avoided; which means involving parents, staff, and professionals. Working with parents to overcome parental overprotection and social isolation is critical. Parents can provide opportunities for their sons and daughters to network and form meaningful personal relationships, with peers including encouraging association with peers outside of school or work hours. PMID:12914306

  12. Six-Year Change in Affect Optimization and Affect Complexity Across the Adult Life Span: A Further Examination

    PubMed Central

    Labouvie-Vief, Gisela; Diehl, Manfred; Jain, Elizabeth; Zhang, Fang

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the life course of 2 independent components of adult affective development, 1 aimed at differentiation and complexity, the other aimed at optimization and positive emotional balance. These 2 components are predicted to have different developmental trajectories over the adult life span and to become related in a compensatory fashion under conditions of resource restrictions, such as those related to late life. Using individual growth curve estimation, we modeled 6-year longitudinal changes in the 2 components in a total sample of 388 individuals ranging in age from 15 to 88 years. As predicted, initial level of affect optimization was positively associated with age up to late middle age with a subsequent leveling off; individual rates of change were found to decelerate with age up to age 60 years and accelerate again around age 80 years. For affect complexity, initial level of affect complexity was positively associated with age up to age 45 years and negatively associated with age from then on, whereas individual rates of change were negatively associated with age, and this association tended to get stronger with age. PMID:18179294

  13. Influence of early or late dietary restriction on life span and immunological parameters in MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, C; Day, N K; Good, R A

    1984-01-01

    Reduced food intake doubles and even triples the life span of (NZB X NZW)F1 (B/W) mice and greatly influences of food intake while keeping vitamin and mineral intake constant in mice of the MRL/Mp-lpr/lpr (MRL/l) strain. Restriction of food intake greatly prolongs life. This influence also was seen when dietary restriction was imposed later in life. Dietary restriction inhibited development of lymphoproliferative disease and greatly decreased the numbers of cells in thymus, lymph nodes, and spleen. It also delayed development of glomerulonephritis and maintained certain immunological responses. Proliferative responses to phytohemagglutinin, pokeweed mitogen, or allogeneic spleen cells were maintained in the mice fed a low-calorie diet from 6 wk. Imposing diet at 12 wk had a lesser influence than earlier restriction. These dietary influences did not depress formation of anti-DNA antibodies or circulating immunocomplexes. MRL/l mice show an apparently extremely low production of interleukin 2, and dietary restriction increased the capacity of lymph node cells but not spleen cells to produce this immunomodulator. PMID:6333026

  14. Modeling life-span growth curves of cognition using longitudinal data with multiple samples and changing scales of measurement.

    PubMed

    McArdle, John J; Grimm, Kevin J; Hamagami, Fumiaki; Bowles, Ryan P; Meredith, William

    2009-06-01

    The authors use multiple-sample longitudinal data from different test batteries to examine propositions about changes in constructs over the life span. The data come from 3 classic studies on intellectual abilities in which, in combination, 441 persons were repeatedly measured as many as 16 times over 70 years. They measured cognitive constructs of vocabulary and memory using 8 age-appropriate intelligence test batteries and explore possible linkage of these scales using item response theory (IRT). They simultaneously estimated the parameters of both IRT and latent curve models based on a joint model likelihood approach (i.e., NLMIXED and WINBUGS). They included group differences in the model to examine potential interindividual differences in levels and change. The resulting longitudinal invariant Rasch test analyses lead to a few new methodological suggestions for dealing with repeated constructs based on changing measurements in developmental studies. PMID:19485625

  15. Older age may offset genetic influence on affect: The COMT polymorphism and affective well-being across the life span.

    PubMed

    Turan, Bulent; Sims, Tamara; Best, Sasha E; Carstensen, Laura L

    2016-05-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT_Val158Met) genetic polymorphism has been linked to variation in affective well-being. Compared with Val carriers, Met carriers experience lower affective well-being. In parallel, research on aging and affective experience finds that younger adults experience poorer affective well-being than older adults. This study examined how COMT and age may interact to shape daily affective experience across the life span. Results suggest that Met (vs. Val) carriers experience lower levels of affective well-being in younger but not in older ages. These findings suggest that age-related improvements in emotional functioning may offset genetic vulnerabilities to negative affective experience. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27111524

  16. Human adipose tissue derived pericytes increase life span in Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice.

    PubMed

    Valadares, M C; Gomes, J P; Castello, G; Assoni, A; Pellati, M; Bueno, C; Corselli, M; Silva, H; Bartolini, P; Vainzof, M; Margarido, P F; Baracat, E; Péault, B; Zatz, M

    2014-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is still an untreatable lethal X-linked disorder, which affects 1 in 3500 male births. It is caused by the absence of muscle dystrophin due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. The potential regenerative capacity as well as immune privileged properties of mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) has been under investigation for many years in an attempt to treat DMD. One of the questions to be addressed is whether stem cells from distinct sources have comparable clinical effects when injected in murine or canine muscular dystrophy animal models. Many studies comparing different stem cells from various sources were reported but these cells were obtained from different donors and thus with different genetic backgrounds. Here we investigated whether human pericytes obtained from 4 different tissues (muscle, adipose tissue, fallopian tube and endometrium) from the same donor have a similar clinical impact when injected in double mutant Utrn (tm1Ked) Dmd (mdx) /J mice, a clinically relevant model for DMD. After a weekly regimen of intraperitoneal injections of 10(6) cells per 8 weeks we evaluated the motor ability as well as the life span of the treated mice as compared to controls. Our experiment showed that only adipose tissue derived pericytes are able to increase significantly (39 days on average) the life span of affected mice. Microarray analysis showed an inhibition of the interferon pathway by adipose derived pericytes. Our results suggest that the clinical benefit associated with intraperitoneal injections of these adult stem cells is related to immune modulation rather than tissue regeneration. PMID:24943487

  17. Human evolution, life history theory, and the end of biological reproduction.

    PubMed

    Last, Cadell

    2014-01-01

    Throughout primate history there have been three major life history transitions towards increasingly delayed sexual maturation and biological reproduction, as well as towards extended life expectancy. Monkeys reproduce later and live longer than do prosimians, apes reproduce later and live longer than do monkeys, and humans reproduce later and live longer than do apes. These life history transitions are connected to increased encephalization. During the last life history transition from apes to humans, increased encephalization co-evolved with increased dependence on cultural knowledge for energy acquisition. This led to a dramatic pressure for more energy investment in growth over current biological reproduction. Since the industrial revolution socioeconomic development has led to even more energy being devoted to growth over current biological reproduction. I propose that this is the beginning of an ongoing fourth major primate life history transition towards completely delayed biological reproduction and an extension of the evolved human life expectancy. I argue that the only fundamental difference between this primate life history transition and previous life history transitions is that this transition is being driven solely by cultural evolution, which may suggest some deeper evolutionary transition away from biological evolution is already in the process of occurring. PMID:24852016

  18. [The course of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) over the life span].

    PubMed

    Koumoula, A

    2012-06-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a neurodevelopmental disorder, associated with the maturation of the nervous system and appearing on a standard proceeding with special cognitive impairments. For many years ADHD was concerned as a typical childhood disorder. Long-term studies though, showed that an important percentage of children with ADHD grew as adults with ADHD. The clinical picture varies with the developmental stage. In pre-school years (3-5 years) the clinical picture is characterized by excessive physical activity, difficulty in cooperation with peers and non-compliance to the recommendations of adults. In school age (6-12 years), apart from the nuclear symptoms of the disorder, as described in the classification systems, i.e. inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity, oppositional behavior often occurs, conflicts with peers and academic problems. In adolescence hyperactivity lessens, conflicts with parents continue and high risk behaviors often appear. In adults physical activity usually decreases significantly, while inattention and impulsivity still remain. With the passing of time the number of symptoms are usually reduced, however the impact and impairment caused by the disorder remain. The diagnosis of ADHD in adults requires a retrospective diagnosis of ADHD in childhood. Since childhood, comorbid disorders are common, most times continuing until adult life. The Oppositional Defiant Disorder during childhood is related to the presenting of Antisocial Personality Disorder in adults. On the other hand, emotional disorders, which are also rather common in children, adolescents and adults with ADHD, can be due to either common biological mechanisms or the long-standing effect of psychosocial and environmental factors which follow people with ADHD. The relationship between ADHD and substance abuse has been a subject of research, with the view of the existence of Conduct Disorder being necessary for a person to present a Substance Use Disorder, currently prevailing. Smoking and alcohol drinking do not seem to require this mediation and ADHD can be itself a predictor for smoking and alcoholism. Stimulant treatment in childhood offers some protective effect against drug abuse and alcoholism in adolescence. The diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder is common in adults with ADHD and the most common reason is the overlap of symptoms between the two disorders. The question is whether the diagnosis of Borderline Personality Disorder in adults is appropriate and useful in the presence of ADHD, because when ADHD proceeds the symptoms and the impairment in functioning are due to this disorder. In general, when another diagnosis or several symptoms as a part of another disorder are also present, treatment of the primary disorder, i.e. ADHD, is beneficial and effective for all the presenting problems. PMID:22796973

  19. Similar causes of various reproductive disorders in early life

    PubMed Central

    Svechnikov, Konstantin; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Savchuck, Iuliia; Söder, Olle

    2014-01-01

    During the past few decades, scientific evidence has been accumulated concerning the possible adverse effects of the exposure to environmental chemicals on the well-being of wildlife and human populations. One large and growing group of such compounds of anthropogenic or natural origin is referred to as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), due to their deleterious action on the endocrine system. This concern was first focused on the control of reproductive function particularly in males, but has later been expanded to include all possible endocrine functions. The present review describes the underlying physiology behind the cascade of developmental events that occur during sexual differentiation of males and the specific role of androgen in the masculinization process and proper organogenesis of the external male genitalia. The impact of the genetic background, environmental exposures and lifestyle factors in the etiology of hypospadias, cryptorchidism and testicular cancer are reviewed and the possible role of EDCs in the development of these reproductive disorders is discussed critically. Finally, the possible direct and programming effects of exposures in utero to widely use therapeutic compounds, environmental estrogens and other chemicals on the incidence of reproductive abnormalities and poor semen quality in humans are also highlighted. PMID:24369133

  20. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside extends mouse life span via upregulating neural klotho and downregulating neural insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanxuan; Yang, Qian; Xie, Yanhua; Sun, Jiyuan; Hu, Jing; Qiu, Pengcheng; Cao, Wei; Wang, Siwang

    2015-03-01

    A Chinese herb, Polygonatum multiflorum, has been reported to prolong animal life span, but the relevant molecular mechanism remains unclear. Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG) is one main component of P. multiflorum and may contribute to extending life span of mammals. On the other hand, neuronal insulin signaling mediates the life span of mammals. Therefore, we investigated the effects of TSG on memory ability, life span, and the neural insulin signaling in the senescence-accelerated prone mouse (SAMP8). TSG improved the memory ability significantly (p < 0.01, compared with a control group). TSG prolonged the life span of SAMP8 by 17% at the most (p < 0.01, compared with a control group). TSG increased the protein level of neural klotho and reduced the levels of neural insulin, insulin-receptor, insulin-like growth factor-1, and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor in the brain of SAMP8 (p < 0.01, compared with a control group). All these proteins are key factors of the pathways related to neural insulin/IGF-1 signaling. These findings suggest that TSG has anti-aging effects on mammals. From these results, TSG from P. multiflorum should be developed as a potential anti-age drug. PMID:25595496

  1. ATM-dependent phosphorylation of SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 is involved in extending cellular life span and suppression of apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dellago, Hanna; Khan, Abdulhameed; Nussbacher, Monika; Gstraunthaler, Anna; Lämmermann, Ingo; Schosserer, Markus; Mück, Christoph; Anrather, Dorothea; Scheffold, Annika; Ammerer, Gustav; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard; Voglauer-Grillari, Regina; Grillari, Johannes

    2012-04-01

    Defective DNA repair is widely acknowledged to negatively impact on healthy aging, since mutations in DNA repair factors lead to accelerated and premature aging. However, the opposite, namely if improved DNA repair will also increase the life or health span is less clear, and only few studies have tested if overexpression of DNA repair factors modulates life and health span in cells or organisms. Recently, we identified and characterized SNEVhPrp19/hPso4, a protein that plays a role in DNA repair and pre-mRNA splicing, and observed a doubling of the replicative life span upon ectopic overexpression, accompanied by lower basal DNA damage and apoptosis levels as well as an increased resistance to oxidative stress. Here we find that SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 is phosphorylated at S149 in an ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM)-dependent manner in response to oxidative stress and DNA double strand break inducing agents. By overexpressing wild-type SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 and a phosphorylation-deficient point-mutant, we found that S149 phosphorylation is necessary for mediating the resistance to apoptosis upon oxidative stress and is partially necessary for elongating the cellular life span. Therefore, ATM dependent phosphorylation of SNEVhPrp19/hPso4 upon DNA damage or oxidative stress might represent a novel axis capable of modulating cellular life span. PMID:22529335

  2. Feeding into old age: long-term effects of dietary fatty acid supplementation on tissue composition and life span in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ruf, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Smaller mammals, such as mice, possess tissues containing more polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) than larger mammals, while at the same time live shorter lives. These relationships have been combined in the ‘membrane pacemaker hypothesis of aging’. It suggests that membrane PUFA content might determine an animal’s life span. PUFAs in general and certain long-chain PUFAs in particular, are highly prone to lipid peroxidation which brings about a high rate of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. We hypothesized that dietary supplementation of either n-3 or n-6 PUFAs might affect (1) membrane phospholipid composition of heart and liver tissues and (2) life span of the animals due to the altered membrane composition, and subsequent effects on lipid peroxidation. Therefore, we kept female laboratory mice from the C57BL/6 strain on three diets (n-3 PUFA rich, n-6 PUFA rich, control) and assessed body weights, life span, heart, and liver phospholipid composition after the animals had died. We found that while membrane phospholipid composition clearly differed between feeding groups, life span was not directly affected. However, we were able to observe a positive correlation between monounsaturated fatty acids in cardiac muscle and life span. PMID:20981551

  3. Older adults prescribed methadone: a review of the literature across the life span from opiate initiation to methadone maintenance treatment.

    PubMed

    Doukas, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Professionals currently working with methadone patients are facing challenges with the rise of polydrug use, HIV and Hepatitis epidemics, and treating a large volume of individuals who are older than ever before, presenting for the first time in their 50's, 60's and 70's. There have been two literature reviews conducted on this older population, but they can only provide a snap-shot view on the later stage of life of this unique group. A longitudinal literature review of the long-term opiate abuser who has transitioned into opiate replacement therapy will provide depth and illustrate the complexity of interrelated factors that have been affected throughout their life span. This paper reviews the literature conducted on opiate addicts from their earlier stages of substance use to older adulthood where many have chosen to enter into a methadone maintenance program. The paper will also take a biopsychosocial approach when reviewing the literature because of how these three domains are deeply affected and interrelated with this population. PMID:25563440

  4. Effects of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (green tea tannin) on the life span of stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Uchida, S; Ozaki, M; Akashi, T; Yamashita, K; Niwa, M; Taniyama, K

    1995-12-01

    1. Effect of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), a condensed tannin isolated from green tea leaves, on the life span and hypertensive lesions in the stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) was compared with that of persimmon tannin. 2. Long-term administration of either 0.5% EGCG or 0.5% persimmon tannin to SHRSP inhibited the incidence of stroke and prolonged the life span, but did not affect the blood pressure. 3. These results indicate that EGCG may prevent incidence of stroke due to the radical scavenging action and inhibition of lipid peroxidation, and may result in prolonging the life span of SHRSP, as in the case of persimmon tannin. PMID:9072402

  5. FLP Recombinase-Mediated Induction of Cu/Zn-Superoxide Dismutase Transgene Expression Can Extend the Life Span of Adult Drosophila melanogaster Flies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingtao; Tower, John

    1999-01-01

    Yeast FLP recombinase was used in a binary transgenic system (“FLP-OUT”) to allow induced overexpression of catalase and/or Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/ZnSOD) in adult Drosophila melanogaster. Expression of FLP recombinase was driven by the heat-inducible hsp70 promoter. Once expressed, FLP catalyzed the rearrangement and activation of a target construct in which expression of catalase or Cu/ZnSOD cDNAs was driven by the constitutive actin5C promoter. In this way a brief heat pulse (120 or 180 min, total) of young adult flies activated transgene expression for the rest of the life span. FLP-OUT allows the effects of induced transgene expression to be analyzed in control (no heat pulse) and experimental (heat pulse) populations with identical genetic backgrounds. Under the conditions used, the heat pulse itself always had neutral or slightly negative effects on the life span. Catalase overexpression significantly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide but had neutral or slightly negative effects on the mean life span. Cu/ZnSOD overexpression extended the mean life span up to 48%. Simultaneous overexpression of catalase with Cu/ZnSOD had no added benefit, presumably due to a preexisting excess of catalase. The data suggest that oxidative damage is one rate-limiting factor for the life span of adult Drosophila. Finally, experimental manipulation of the genetic background demonstrated that the life span is affected by epistatic interactions between the transgene and allele(s) at other loci. PMID:9858546

  6. Early-life stress and reproductive cost: A two-hit developmental model of accelerated aging?

    PubMed

    Shalev, Idan; Belsky, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Two seemingly independent bodies of research suggest a two-hit model of accelerated aging, one highlighting early-life stress and the other reproduction. The first, informed by developmental models of early-life stress, highlights reduced longevity effects of early adversity on telomere erosion, whereas the second, informed by evolutionary theories of aging, highlights such effects with regard to reproductive cost (in females). The fact that both early-life adversity and reproductive effort are associated with shorter telomeres and increased oxidative stress raises the prospect, consistent with life-history theory, that these two theoretical frameworks currently informing much research are tapping into the same evolutionary-developmental process of increased senescence and reduced longevity. Here we propose a mechanistic view of a two-hit model of accelerated aging in human females through (a) early-life adversity and (b) early reproduction, via a process of telomere erosion, while highlighting mediating biological embedding mechanisms that might link these two developmental aging processes. PMID:27063083

  7. Fast–slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R.; Jongejans, Eelke; Blomberg, Simon P.; Hodgson, David J.; Mbeau-Ache, Cyril; Zuidema, Pieter A.; de Kroon, Hans; Buckley, Yvonne M.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population performance. We show that 55% of the variation in plant life-history strategies is adequately characterized using two independent axes: the fast–slow continuum, including fast-growing, short-lived plant species at one end and slow-growing, long-lived species at the other, and a reproductive strategy axis, with highly reproductive, iteroparous species at one extreme and poorly reproductive, semelparous plants with frequent shrinkage at the other. Our findings remain consistent across major habitats and are minimally affected by plant growth form and phylogenetic ancestry, suggesting that the relative independence of the fast–slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments. PMID:26699477

  8. Fast-slow continuum and reproductive strategies structure plant life-history variation worldwide.

    PubMed

    Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Jones, Owen R; Jongejans, Eelke; Blomberg, Simon P; Hodgson, David J; Mbeau-Ache, Cyril; Zuidema, Pieter A; de Kroon, Hans; Buckley, Yvonne M

    2016-01-01

    The identification of patterns in life-history strategies across the tree of life is essential to our prediction of population persistence, extinction, and diversification. Plants exhibit a wide range of patterns of longevity, growth, and reproduction, but the general determinants of this enormous variation in life history are poorly understood. We use demographic data from 418 plant species in the wild, from annual herbs to supercentennial trees, to examine how growth form, habitat, and phylogenetic relationships structure plant life histories and to develop a framework to predict population performance. We show that 55% of the variation in plant life-history strategies is adequately characterized using two independent axes: the fast-slow continuum, including fast-growing, short-lived plant species at one end and slow-growing, long-lived species at the other, and a reproductive strategy axis, with highly reproductive, iteroparous species at one extreme and poorly reproductive, semelparous plants with frequent shrinkage at the other. Our findings remain consistent across major habitats and are minimally affected by plant growth form and phylogenetic ancestry, suggesting that the relative independence of the fast-slow and reproduction strategy axes is general in the plant kingdom. Our findings have similarities with how life-history strategies are structured in mammals, birds, and reptiles. The position of plant species populations in the 2D space produced by both axes predicts their rate of recovery from disturbances and population growth rate. This life-history framework may complement trait-based frameworks on leaf and wood economics; together these frameworks may allow prediction of responses of plants to anthropogenic disturbances and changing environments. PMID:26699477

  9. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Cédric; Spencer, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underlying the trade-off between self-maintenance and investment in reproduction, it is necessary to look at the consequences of early-life stress on oxidative status during reproduction. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to pre- and/or post-natal stress on oxidative balance during reproduction under benign or stressful environmental conditions in an avian model species, the Japanese quail. We determined total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and resistance to a free-radical attack in individual exposed to pre-natal stress, post-natal stress or both and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. TAS levels decreased over time in all females that reproduced under stressful conditions. TOS decreased between the beginning and the end of reproductive period in pre-natal control females. In all females, resistance to a free-radical attack decreased over the reproductive event but this decrease was more pronounced in females from a pre-natal stress development. Our results suggest that pre-natal stress may be associated with a higher cost of reproduction in terms of oxidative stress. These results also confirm that early-life stress can be associated with both benefits and costs depending of the life-history stage or environmental context. PMID:25542633

  10. Trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms over her child's life span: Relation to adrenocortical, cardiovascular, and emotional functioning in children

    PubMed Central

    Gump, Brooks B.; Reihman, Jacki; Stewart, Paul; Lonky, ED; Darvill, Tom; Granger, Douglas A.; Matthews, Karen A.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal depression has a number of adverse effects on children. In the present study, maternal depressive symptoms were assessed (using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) when their child was 3 months, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, 4.25 years, 6 years, 7 years, 8 years, and 10 years of age. At 9.5 years of age, children's (94 females, 82 males) depressive symptoms as well as cardiovascular and cortisol levels during baseline and two psychologically stressful tasks were measured. Using multilevel modeling, maternal depressive symptom trajectories were considered in relation to their child's adrenocortical and cardiovascular responses to acute stress. Our goal was to determine maternal depressive symptom trajectories for children with elevated cardiovascular and cortisol reactivity to acute stress and elevated depressive symptoms. In general, those mothers with chronically elevated depressive symptoms over their child's life span had children with lower initial cortisol, higher cardiac output and stroke volume in response to acute stress, lower vascular resistance during acute stress tasks, and significantly more depressive symptoms at 9.5 years of age. These results are discussed in the context of established associations among hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis dysregulation, depression, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:19144231

  11. Sodium Intake of Special Populations in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span (HANDLS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Cotugna, Nancy; Fanelli-Kuczmarksi, Marie; Clymer, Julie; Hotchkiss, Lawrence; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The sodium intake of participants of the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study who were in three of the special population groups identified by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 (those with hypertension, African Americans, and those ≥51 years) was analyzed to determine if they met sodium recommendations. Methods The sample included 2152 African American and White subjects, aged 30-64 years. Major dietary sources of sodium for each group were determined from two 24-hour dietary recalls, and dietary intakes were compared with sodium recommendations. Dietary potassium was also evaluated. Results The intakes of the groups studied exceeded 1500 mg sodium while their potassium intakes were lower than the Adequate Intake of 4700 mg. The major contributors of sodium included “cold cuts, sausage, and franks,” “protein foods”, and yeast breads. Conclusions Excessive sodium intake characterized the diet of an urban, socioeconomically diverse population who are hypertensive or at risk for having hypertension. These findings have implications for health professionals and the food industry. PMID:23769900

  12. Liver-specific γ-glutamyl carboxylase-deficient mice display bleeding diathesis and short life span.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Kotaro; Tsukui, Tohru; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Shiba, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Kimie; Okano, Toshio; Urano, Tomohiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Ikawa, Masahito; Inoue, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays important roles in blood coagulation and bone metabolism. One of its functions is as a co-factor for γ-glutamyl carboxylase (Ggcx). Conventional knockout of Ggcx causes death shortly after birth in homozygous mice. We created Ggcx-floxed mice by inserting loxP sequences at the sites flanking exon 6 of Ggcx. By mating these mice with albumin-Cre mice, we generated Ggcx-deficient mice specifically in hepatocytes (Ggcx(Δliver/Δliver) mice). In contrast to conventional Ggcx knockout mice, Ggcx(Δliver/Δliver) mice had very low activity of Ggcx in the liver and survived several weeks after birth. Furthermore, compared with heterozygous mice (Ggcx(+/Δliver) ), Ggcx(Δliver/Δliver) mice had shorter life spans. Ggcx(Δliver/Δliver) mice displayed bleeding diathesis, which was accompanied by decreased activity of coagulation factors II and IX. Ggcx-floxed mice can prove useful in examining Ggcx functions in vivo. PMID:24520408

  13. Reproductive Life Planning: A Cross-Sectional Study of What College Students Know and Believe.

    PubMed

    Kransdorf, Lisa N; Raghu, T S; Kling, Juliana M; David, Paru S; Vegunta, Suneela; Knatz, Jo; Markus, Allan; Frey, Keith A; Chang, Yu-Hui H; Mayer, Anita P; Files, Julia A

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends a reproductive life plan (RLP) to promote individual responsibility for preconception health. The objectives of this study were to determine existing awareness of RLPs in a cohort of reproductive-age adults and to evaluate their knowledge level and beliefs about reproductive life planning. Methods We performed a cross-sectional survey study of adults ages 18-40 years old seeking care at the student health center of a large public university. Participation was voluntary. Survey responses were analyzed by age and gender. Results A total of 559 surveys were collected and analyzed. Only 24 % of participants had heard of an RLP although a majority (62.9 %) agreed that it is important to develop an RLP. Most respondents (85.4 %) preferred to receive information about reproductive life planning from a primary care provider or obstetrician-gynecologist, while only 4.2 % of patients surveyed reported ever being actually asked about an RLP by their healthcare provider. Among those who agreed that an RLP was important, knowledge of specific aspects of an RLP was lacking. Conclusions In our cohort of reproductive-age adults, general health literacy regarding RLPs was poor. Most of the young adults who responded to our survey did not know what an RLP was and even fewer had ever discussed one with their health provider. PMID:26679707

  14. How Much Should We Weigh for a Long and Healthy Life Span? The Need to Reconcile Caloric Restriction versus Longevity with Body Mass Index versus Mortality Data

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzini, Antonello

    2014-01-01

    Total caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition is a well-established experimental approach to extend life span in laboratory animals. Although CR in humans is capable of shifting several endocrinological parameters, it is not clear where the minimum inflection point of the U-shaped curve linking body mass index (BMI) with all-cause mortality lies. The exact trend of this curve, when used for planning preventive strategies for public health is of extreme importance. Normal BMI ranges from 18.5 to 24.9; many epidemiological studies show an inverse relationship between mortality and BMI inside the normal BMI range. Other studies show that the lowest mortality in the entire range of BMI is obtained in the overweight range (25–29.9). Reconciling the extension of life span in laboratory animals by experimental CR with the BMI–mortality curve of human epidemiology is not trivial. In fact, one interpretation is that the CR data are identifying a known: “excess fat is deleterious for health”; although a second interpretation may be that: “additional leanness from a normal body weight may add health and life span delaying the process of aging.” This short review hope to start a discussion aimed at finding the widest consensus on which weight range should be considered the “healthiest” for our species, contributing in this way to the picture of what is the correct life style for a long and healthy life span. PMID:25126085

  15. COPEPOD REPRODUCTIVE STRATEGIES: LIFE-HISTORY THEORY, PHYLOGENETIC PATTERN AND INVASION OF INLAND WATERS. (R824771)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Life-history theory predicts that different reproductive strategies should evolve in environments that differ in resource availability, mortality, seasonality, and in spatial or temporal variation. Within a population, the predicted optimal strategy is driven ...

  16. Reproduction, social behavior, and aging trajectories in honeybee workers.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Luke; Kuster, Ryan; Rueppell, Olav

    2014-02-01

    While a negative correlation between reproduction and life span is commonly observed, specialized reproductive individuals outlive their non-reproductive nestmates in all eusocial species, including the honeybee, Apis mellifera (L). The consequences of reproduction for individual life expectancy can be studied directly by comparing reproductive and non-reproductive workers. We quantified the life span consequences of reproduction in honeybee workers by removal of the queen to trigger worker reproduction. Furthermore, we observed the social behavior of large cohorts of workers under experimental and control conditions to test for associations with individual life expectancy. Worker life expectancy was moderately increased by queen removal. Queenless colonies contained a few long-lived workers, and oviposition behavior was associated with a strong reduction in mortality risk, indicating that a reproductive role confers a significant survival advantage. This finding is further substantiated by an association between brood care behavior and worker longevity that depends on the social environment. In contrast, other in-hive activities, such as fanning, trophallaxis, and allogrooming did not consistently affect worker life expectancy. The influence of foraging varied among replicates. An earlier age of transitioning from in-hive tasks to outside foraging was always associated with shorter life spans, in accordance with previous studies. In sum, our studies quantify how individual mortality is affected by particular social roles and colony environments and demonstrate interactions between the two. The exceptional, positive association between reproduction and longevity in honeybees extends to within-caste plasticity, which may be exploited for mechanistic studies. PMID:23765046

  17. Expression of multiple copies of mitochondrially targeted catalase or genomic Mn superoxide dismutase transgenes does not extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mockett, Robin J.; Sohal, Barbara H.; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2010-01-01

    The simultaneous overexpression of multiple copies of Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ectopic catalase (mtCat) transgenes in the mitochondria of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, was shown previously to diminish the life span. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that this effect was due primarily to the presence of one or the other transgene. An alternative hypothesis was that both transgenes have additive, negative effects. Crosses were performed between five pairs of transgenic lines containing single-copy insertions of either mtCat, Mn SOD, or P element vector control transgenes at unique loci, and the life spans of progeny containing two mtCat, Mn SOD or vector insertions were determined. Increasing amounts of mitochondrial catalase activity tended to be associated with decreases in mean life span. Overexpression of two copies of the genomic Mn SOD transgene had no effect on life span. The results do not support the hypothesis that enhanced mitochondrial SOD or catalase activity promotes longevity in flies. PMID:20923705

  18. Physical Attractiveness and Self-Esteem in Middle Childhood: Do Recent Life-Span Developmental Texts Perpetuate or Challenge Gender Stereotypes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, Beth H.

    This document reports on an investigation focusing on how the content of introductory college psychology texts' content related to physical attractiveness and self-esteem. The primary objective of this study was to review how recently published life-span developmental texts present physical development in middle childhood as related to traditional…

  19. Expression of multiple copies of mitochondrially targeted catalase or genomic Mn superoxide dismutase transgenes does not extend the life span of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mockett, Robin J; Sohal, Barbara H; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2010-12-15

    The simultaneous overexpression of multiple copies of Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ectopic catalase (mtCat) transgenes in the mitochondria of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, was shown previously to diminish the life span. The hypothesis tested in this study was that this effect was due primarily to the presence of one or the other transgene. An alternative hypothesis was that both transgenes have additive, negative effects. Crosses were performed between five pairs of transgenic lines containing single-copy insertions of mtCat, Mn SOD, or P element vector control transgenes at unique loci, and the life spans of progeny containing two mtCat, Mn SOD, or vector insertions were determined. Increasing amounts of mitochondrial catalase activity tended to be associated with decreases in mean life span. Overexpression of two copies of the genomic Mn SOD transgene had no effect on life span. The results do not support the hypothesis that enhanced mitochondrial SOD or catalase activity promotes longevity in flies. PMID:20923705

  20. Life-Span Data on Continuous-Naming Speeds of Numbers, Letters, Colors, and Pictured Objects, and Word-Reading Speed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van den Bos, Kees P.; Zijlstra, Bonne J. H.; lutje Spelberg, Henk C.

    2002-01-01

    Addresses life-span developmental relations between naming and reading speed. Finds word-reading speed and naming speeds of colors and pictures increased into mature adulthood, but for letter and number naming, asymptotes were reached at around 16 years of age. Supports the theory that describes reading recognition development as a domain-specific…

  1. Reproductive conflict and the separation of reproductive generations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Michael A.; Johnstone, Rufus A.

    2008-01-01

    An enduring puzzle of human life history is why women cease reproduction midway through life. Selection can favor postreproductive survival because older females can help their offspring to reproduce. But the kin-selected fitness gains of helping appear insufficient to outweigh the potential benefits of continued reproduction. Why then do women cease reproduction in the first place? Here, we suggest that early reproductive cessation in humans is the outcome of reproductive competition between generations, and we present a simple candidate model of how this competition will be resolved. We show that among primates exhibiting a postreproductive life span, humans exhibit an extraordinarily low degree of reproductive overlap between generations. The rapid senescence of the human female reproductive system coincides with the age at which, in natural fertility populations, women are expected to encounter reproductive competition from breeding females of the next generation. Several lines of evidence suggest that in ancestral hominids, this younger generation typically comprised immigrant females. In these circumstances, relatedness asymmetries within families are predicted to give younger females a decisive advantage in reproductive conflict with older females. A model incorporating both the costs of reproductive competition and the benefits of grandmothering can account for the timing of reproductive cessation in humans and so offers an improved understanding of the evolution of menopause. PMID:18378891

  2. Body Size, Growth and Life Span: Implications for the Polewards Range Shift of Octopus tetricus in South-Eastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Jorge E.; Pecl, Gretta T.; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A.; Strugnell, Jan M.; León, Rafael I.; Semmens, Jayson M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters. PMID:25090250

  3. Body size, growth and life span: implications for the polewards range shift of Octopus tetricus in south-eastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Jorge E; Pecl, Gretta T; Moltschaniwskyj, Natalie A; Strugnell, Jan M; León, Rafael I; Semmens, Jayson M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the response of any species to climate change can be challenging. However, in short-lived species the faster turnover of generations may facilitate the examination of responses associated with longer-term environmental change. Octopus tetricus, a commercially important species, has undergone a recent polewards range shift in the coastal waters of south-eastern Australia, thought to be associated with the southerly extension of the warm East Australian Current. At the cooler temperatures of a polewards distribution limit, growth of a species could be slower, potentially leading to a bigger body size and resulting in a slower population turnover, affecting population viability at the extreme of the distribution. Growth rates, body size, and life span of O. tetricus were examined at the leading edge of a polewards range shift in Tasmanian waters (40°S and 147°E) throughout 2011. Octopus tetricus had a relatively small body size and short lifespan of approximately 11 months that, despite cooler temperatures, would allow a high rate of population turnover and may facilitate the population increase necessary for successful establishment in the new extended area of the range. Temperature, food availability and gender appear to influence growth rate. Individuals that hatched during cooler and more productive conditions, but grew during warming conditions, exhibited faster growth rates and reached smaller body sizes than individuals that hatched into warmer waters but grew during cooling conditions. This study suggests that fast growth, small body size and associated rapid population turnover may facilitate the range shift of O. tetricus into Tasmanian waters. PMID:25090250

  4. Deletion of Brca2 exon 27 causes hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinks, chromosomal instability, and reduced life span in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoho, Greg; Brenneman, Mark A.; Cui, Tracy X.; Donoviel, Dorit; Vogel, Hannes; Goodwin, Edwin H.; Chen, David J.; Hasty, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The Brca2 tumor-suppressor gene contributes to genomic stability, at least in part by a role in homologous recombinational repair. BRCA2 protein is presumed to function in homologous recombination through interactions with RAD51. Both exons 11 and 27 of Brca2 code for domains that interact with RAD51; exon 11 encodes eight BRC motifs, whereas exon 27 encodes a single, distinct interaction domain. Deletion of all RAD51-interacting domains causes embryonic lethality in mice. A less severe phenotype is seen with BRAC2 truncations that preserve some, but not all, of the BRC motifs. These mice can survive beyond weaning, but are runted and infertile, and die very young from cancer. Cells from such mice show hypersensitivity to some genotoxic agents and chromosomal instability. Here, we have analyzed mice and cells with a deletion of only the RAD51-interacting region encoded by exon 27. Mice homozygous for this mutation (called brca2(lex1)) have a shorter life span than that of control littermates, possibly because of early onsets of cancer and sepsis. No other phenotype was observed in these animals; therefore, the brca2(lex1) mutation is less severe than truncations that delete some BRC motifs. However, at the cellular level, the brca2(lex1) mutation causes reduced viability, hypersensitivity to the DNA interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C, and gross chromosomal instability, much like more severe truncations. Thus, the extreme carboxy-terminal region encoded by exon 27 is important for BRCA2 function, probably because it is required for a fully functional interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Trimethylation of Lys36 on H3 restricts gene expression change during aging and impacts life span

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Mintie; Ni, Zhuoyu; Wang, Minghui; Wang, Xiujuan; Wood, Jason G.; Helfand, Stephen L.; Yu, Haiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Functional data indicate that specific histone modification enzymes can be key to longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans, but the molecular basis of how chromatin structure modulates longevity is not well understood. In this study, we profiled the genome-wide pattern of trimethylation of Lys36 on histone 3 (H3K36me3) in the somatic cells of young and old Caenorhabditis elegans. We revealed a new role of H3K36me3 in maintaining gene expression stability through aging with important consequences on longevity. We found that genes with dramatic expression change during aging are marked with low or even undetectable levels of H3K36me3 in their gene bodies irrespective of their corresponding mRNA abundance. Interestingly, 3′ untranslated region (UTR) length strongly correlates with H3K36me3 levels and age-dependent mRNA expression stability. A similar negative correlation between H3K36me3 marking and mRNA expression change during aging was also observed in Drosophila melanogaster, suggesting a conserved mechanism for H3K36me3 in suppressing age-dependent mRNA expression change. Importantly, inactivation of the methyltransferase met-1 resulted in a decrease in global H3K36me3 marks, an increase in mRNA expression change with age, and a shortened life span, suggesting a causative role of the H3K36me3 marking in modulating age-dependent gene expression stability and longevity. PMID:25838541

  6. Effect of repetitive acute cold exposures during the last phase of broiler embryogenesis on cold resistance through the life span.

    PubMed

    Shinder, D; Rusal, M; Giloh, M; Yahav, S

    2009-03-01

    The time just before hatch is critical, because the embryo shifts toward internal and external pipping. This study aimed to determine the beneficial effect of repeated acute reductions of the incubation temperature during the last phase of broiler embryogenesis on posthatch cold tolerance and on the development of ascites syndrome. Fertile eggs were incubated at 37.8 degrees C and 56% RH. At 18 and 19 d of incubation, 3 treatments were conducted, comprising 2 or 3 exposures to 15 degrees C for 30 or 60 min each. During these cold exposures, egg temperature was measured by infrared thermography to determine sensible heat loss from the eggs. At hatch, BW and body temperature were measured. At 3 and 14 d of age, chicks were challenged by cold exposure to 10 degrees C for 3 h. From 14 d of age onward, three-quarters of the chicks were raised under ascites-inducing conditions (AIC) and the others were raised under regular conditions. The sensible heat loss from the eggs was 512 +/- 66 cal and 718 +/- 126 cal for 30 and 60 min of cold exposure, respectively. No effect of treatment on hatchability was observed, but body temperature and BW were greater to significantly greater in the treated chicks. Cold challenges at 3 and 14 d of age revealed a relative thermoregulatory advantage of embryos exposed to cold for 60 min. Under AIC, fewer treated chickens than controls developed ascites. At 38 d of age, BW and relative breast muscle weight were numerically to significantly greater in the treated chicks than in the control chicks when both were raised under regular conditions, whereas no differences were observed among the chicks raised under AIC. Repeated brief acute cold exposures during the last phase of embryogenesis appeared to improve the ability of growing broilers to withstand low ambient temperatures during their life span. Moreover, chickens treated during embryogenesis improved their performance under regular growth conditions. PMID:19211536

  7. Radiation exposure and the risk of mortality from noncancer respiratory diseases in the life span study, 1950-2005.

    PubMed

    Pham, Truong-Minh; Sakata, Ritsu; Grant, Eric J; Shimizu, Yukiko; Furukawa, Kyoji; Takahashi, Ikuno; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Soda, Midori; Suyama, Akihiko; Shore, Roy E; Ozasa, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    An apparent association between radiation exposure and noncancer respiratory diseases (NCRD) in the Life Span Study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors has been reported, but the biological validity of that observation is uncertain. This study investigated the possibility of radiation causation of noncancer respiratory diseases in detail by examining subtypes of noncancer respiratory diseases, temporal associations, and the potential for misdiagnosis and other confounding factors. A total of 5,515 NCRD diagnoses listed as the underlying cause of death on the death certificate were observed among the 86,611 LSS subjects with estimated weighted absorbed lung doses. Radiation dose-response analyses were conducted using Cox proportional hazard regression for pneumonia/influenza, other acute respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. The linear excess relative risks (ERR) per gray (Gy) were 0.17 (95% CI 0.08, 0.27) for all NCRD and 0.20 (CI 0.09, 0.34) for pneumonia/influenza, which accounted for 63% of noncancer respiratory disease deaths. Adjustments for lifestyle and sociodemographic variations had almost no impact on the risk estimates. However, adjustments for indications of cancer and/or cardiovascular disease decreased the risk estimates, with ERR for total noncancer respiratory diseases declined by 35% from 0.17 to 0.11. Although it was impossible to fully adjust for the misdiagnosis of other diseases as noncancer respiratory diseases deaths in this study because of limitations of available data, nevertheless, the associations were reduced or eliminated by the adjustment that could be made. This helps demonstrates that the association between noncancer respiratory diseases and radiation exposure in previous reports could be in part be attributed to coincident cancer and/or cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24148011

  8. Effects of PPP1R1B (DARPP-32) Polymorphism on Feedback-Related Brain Potentials Across the Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Hämmerer, Dorothea; Biele, Gudio; Müller, Viktor; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Heekeren, Hauke R.; Li, Shu-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Maximizing gains during probabilistic reinforcement learning requires the updating of choice – outcome expectations at the time when the feedback about a specific choice or action is given. Extant theories and evidence suggest that dopaminergic modulation plays a crucial role in reinforcement learning and the updating of choice – outcome expectations. Furthermore, recently a positive component of the event-related potential about 200 ms (P2) after feedback has been suggested to reflect such updating. The efficacy of dopaminergic modulation changes across the life span. However, to date investigations of age-related differences in feedback-related P2 during reinforcement learning are still scarce. The present study thus aims to investigate whether individual differences in the feedback-related P2 would be associated with polymorphic variations in a dopamine relevant gene PPP1R1B (also known as DARPP-32) and whether the genetic effect may differ between age groups. We observed larger P2 amplitudes in individuals carrying the genotype associated with higher dopamine receptor efficacy, i.e., a allele homozygotes of a single nucleotide polymorphism (rs907094) of the PPP1R1B gene. Moreover, this effect was more pronounced in children and older adults in comparison to adolescents and younger adults. Together, our findings indicate that polymorphic variations in a dopamine relevant gene are associated with individual differences in brain-evoked potentials of outcome updating and hint at the possibility that genotype effects on neurocognitive phenotypes may vary as a function of brain maturation and aging. PMID:23459765

  9. The adaptive value of morphological, behavioural and life-history traits in reproductive female wolves.

    PubMed

    Stahler, Daniel R; MacNulty, Daniel R; Wayne, Robert K; vonHoldt, Bridgett; Smith, Douglas W

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction in social organisms is shaped by numerous morphological, behavioural and life-history traits such as body size, cooperative breeding and age of reproduction, respectively. Little is known, however, about the relative influence of these different types of traits on reproduction, particularly in the context of environmental conditions that determine their adaptive value. Here, we use 14 years of data from a long-term study of wolves (Canis lupus) in Yellowstone National Park, USA, to evaluate the relative effects of different traits and ecological factors on the reproductive performance (litter size and survival) of breeding females. At the individual level, litter size and survival improved with body mass and declined with age (c. 4-5 years). Grey-coloured females had more surviving pups than black females, which likely contributed to the maintenance of coat colour polymorphism in this system. The effect of pack size on reproductive performance was nonlinear as litter size peaked at eight wolves and then declined, and litter survival increased rapidly up to three wolves, beyond which it increased more gradually. At the population level, litter size and survival decreased with increasing wolf population size and canine distemper outbreaks. The relative influence of these different-level factors on wolf reproductive success followed individual > group > population. Body mass was the primary determinant of litter size, followed by pack size and population size. Body mass was also the main driver of litter survival, followed by pack size and disease. Reproductive gains because of larger body size and cooperative breeding may mitigate reproductive losses because of negative density dependence and disease. These findings highlight the adaptive value of large body size and sociality in promoting individual fitness in stochastic and competitive environments. PMID:23043440

  10. Care and the self: biotechnology, reproduction, and the good life

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stuart J

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores a novel philosophy of ethical care in the face of burgeoning biomedical technologies. I respond to a serious challenge facing traditional bioethics with its roots in analytic philosophy. The hallmarks of these traditional approaches are reason and autonomy, founded on a belief in the liberal humanist subject. In recent years, however, there have been mounting challenges to this view of human subjectivity, emerging from poststructuralist critiques, such as Michel Foucault's, but increasingly also as a result of advances in biotechnology itself. In the face of these developments, I argue that the theoretical relevance and practical application of mainstream bioethics is increasingly under strain. Traditionalists will undoubtedly resist. Together, professional philosopher-bioethicists, public health policymakers, and the global commercial healthcare industry tend to respond conservatively by shoring up the liberal humanist subject as the foundation for medical ethics and consumer decision-making, appealing to the familiar tropes of reason, autonomy, and freedom. I argue for a different approach to bioethics, and work towards a new way to conceive of ethical relations in healthcare – one that does not presume a sovereign subject as the basis of dignity, personhood or democracy. Instead, I am critical of the narrow instantiations of reason, autonomy, and freedom, which, more recently, have been co-opted by a troubling neo-liberal politics of the self. Thus, I am critical of current trends in medical ethics, often running in tandem with corporate-governmental models of efficiency, accountability, and so-called evidence-based best practices. As an example of such market-driven conceptions of subjectivity, I discuss the paradigm of "self-care." Self-care shores up the traditional view of the self as a free agent. In this sense, self-care is looked upon favourably by mainstream bioethics in its focus on autonomy, while healthcare policy endorses this model for ideological and economic reasons. To contrast this, I propose a different model of care together with a different model of selfhood. Here I develop and apply Foucault's late work on the "care of the self." In this understanding of "care," I suggest that we might work towards an ethical self that is more commensurable both with recent theoretical views on subjectivity and – more pressingly – with the challenges of emergent biotechnologies. I end this paper with a discussion on ethical parenthood, which offers a practical reading of the "care of the self" in relation to new reproductive technologies (NRTs). PMID:17480234

  11. Care and the self: biotechnology, reproduction, and the good life.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stuart J

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores a novel philosophy of ethical care in the face of burgeoning biomedical technologies. I respond to a serious challenge facing traditional bioethics with its roots in analytic philosophy. The hallmarks of these traditional approaches are reason and autonomy, founded on a belief in the liberal humanist subject. In recent years, however, there have been mounting challenges to this view of human subjectivity, emerging from poststructuralist critiques, such as Michel Foucault's, but increasingly also as a result of advances in biotechnology itself. In the face of these developments, I argue that the theoretical relevance and practical application of mainstream bioethics is increasingly under strain. Traditionalists will undoubtedly resist. Together, professional philosopher-bioethicists, public health policymakers, and the global commercial healthcare industry tend to respond conservatively by shoring up the liberal humanist subject as the foundation for medical ethics and consumer decision-making, appealing to the familiar tropes of reason, autonomy, and freedom.I argue for a different approach to bioethics, and work towards a new way to conceive of ethical relations in healthcare--one that does not presume a sovereign subject as the basis of dignity, personhood or democracy. Instead, I am critical of the narrow instantiations of reason, autonomy, and freedom, which, more recently, have been co-opted by a troubling neo-liberal politics of the self. Thus, I am critical of current trends in medical ethics, often running in tandem with corporate-governmental models of efficiency, accountability, and so-called evidence-based best practices. As an example of such market-driven conceptions of subjectivity, I discuss the paradigm of "self-care." Self-care shores up the traditional view of the self as a free agent. In this sense, self-care is looked upon favourably by mainstream bioethics in its focus on autonomy, while healthcare policy endorses this model for ideological and economic reasons. To contrast this, I propose a different model of care together with a different model of selfhood. Here I develop and apply Foucault's late work on the "care of the self." In this understanding of "care," I suggest that we might work towards an ethical self that is more commensurable both with recent theoretical views on subjectivity and--more pressingly--with the challenges of emergent biotechnologies. I end this paper with a discussion on ethical parenthood, which offers a practical reading of the "care of the self" in relation to new reproductive technologies (NRTs). PMID:17480234

  12. Differential reproductive responses to stress reveal the role of life-history strategies within a species

    PubMed Central

    Schultner, J.; Kitaysky, A. S.; Gabrielsen, G. W.; Hatch, S. A.; Bech, C.

    2013-01-01

    Life-history strategies describe that ‘slow’- in contrast to ‘fast’-living species allocate resources cautiously towards reproduction to enhance survival. Recent evidence suggests that variation in strategies exists not only among species but also among populations of the same species. Here, we examined the effect of experimentally induced stress on resource allocation of breeding seabirds in two populations with contrasting life-history strategies: slow-living Pacific and fast-living Atlantic black-legged kittiwakes. We tested the hypothesis that reproductive responses in kittiwakes under stress reflect their life-history strategies. We predicted that in response to stress, Pacific kittiwakes reduce investment in reproduction compared with Atlantic kittiwakes. We exposed chick-rearing kittiwakes to a short-term (3-day) period of increased exogenous corticosterone (CORT), a hormone that is released during food shortages. We examined changes in baseline CORT levels, parental care and effects on offspring. We found that kittiwakes from the two populations invested differently in offspring when facing stress. In response to elevated CORT, Pacific kittiwakes reduced nest attendance and deserted offspring more readily than Atlantic kittiwakes. We observed lower chick growth, a higher stress response in offspring and lower reproductive success in response to CORT implantation in Pacific kittiwakes, whereas the opposite occurred in the Atlantic. Our findings support the hypothesis that life-history strategies predict short-term responses of individuals to stress within a species. We conclude that behaviour and physiology under stress are consistent with trade-off priorities as predicted by life-history theory. We encourage future studies to consider the pivotal role of life-history strategies when interpreting inter-population differences of animal responses to stressful environmental events. PMID:24089339

  13. Effects of polyploidy and reproductive mode on life history trait expression.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Katelyn; Tucci, Claire; Neiman, Maurine

    2016-02-01

    Ploidy elevation is increasingly recognized as a common and important source of genomic variation. Even so, the consequences and biological significance of polyploidy remain unclear, especially in animals. Here, our goal was to identify potential life history costs and benefits of polyploidy by conducting a large multiyear common garden experiment in Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand freshwater snail that is a model system for the study of ploidy variation, sexual reproduction, host-parasite coevolution, and invasion ecology. Sexual diploid and asexual triploid and tetraploid P. antipodarum frequently coexist, allowing for powerful direct comparisons across ploidy levels and reproductive modes. Asexual reproduction and polyploidy are very often associated in animals, allowing us to also use these comparisons to address the maintenance of sex, itself one of the most important unresolved questions in evolutionary biology. Our study revealed that sexual diploid P. antipodarum grow and mature substantially more slowly than their asexual polyploid counterparts. We detected a strong negative correlation between the rate of growth and age at reproductive maturity, suggesting that the relatively early maturation of asexual polyploid P. antipodarum is driven by relatively rapid growth. The absence of evidence for life history differences between triploid and tetraploid asexuals indicates that ploidy elevation is unlikely to underlie the differences in trait values that we detected between sexual and asexual snails. Finally, we found that sexual P. antipodarum did not experience discernable phenotypic variance-related benefits of sex and were more likely to die before achieving reproductive maturity than the asexuals. Taken together, these results suggest that under benign conditions, polyploidy does not impose obvious life history costs in P. antipodarum and that sexual P. antipodarum persist despite substantial life history disadvantages relative to their asexual counterparts. PMID:26865964

  14. Life History and Reproductive Timing of the Endangered Illinois Cave Amphipod, Gammarus acherondytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venarsky, M. P.; Wilhelm, F. M.; Anderson, F. A.; Taylor, S. J.

    2005-05-01

    To aid the recovery of endangered species requires an understanding of their basic biology. Armed with such knowledge, meaningful management plans with realistic objectives can be established. We examined the life history and reproductive biology of Gammarus acherondytes, a federally endangered cave amphipod, in Reverse Stream, Monroe Co., Illinois. The population was sampled non-destructively at monthly intervals from October 2003 to February 2005. The density of gravid females peaked twice annually, (November-December and June-July) indicating major reproductive events. Gravid females also occurred at other times of the year but at low densities. Two major peaks in the density of newborn young were also observed, which lagged the density of gravid females by approximately 1-2 months. We believe this reproductive pattern is related to the influx of organic matter from mid summer storm events and leaf abscission in autumn. Young grew at a rate of 0.034 mm/day and likely reach reproductive size in one year. Adults are iteroparous and may live for several years. Our results suggest that limiting cave access in highly visited caves during peak reproduction may be a simple strategy to increase the abundance of G. acherondytes.

  15. Environmental contingency in life history strategies: the influence of mortality and socioeconomic status on reproductive timing.

    PubMed

    Griskevicius, Vladas; Delton, Andrew W; Robertson, Theresa E; Tybur, Joshua M

    2011-02-01

    Why do some people have children early, whereas others delay reproduction? By considering the trade-offs between using one's resources for reproduction versus other tasks, the evolutionary framework of life history theory predicts that reproductive timing should be influenced by mortality and resource scarcity. A series of experiments examined how mortality cues influenced the desire to have children sooner rather than later. The effects of mortality depended critically on whether people grew up in a relatively resource-scarce or resource-plentiful environment. For individuals growing up relatively poor, mortality cues produced a desire to reproduce sooner--to want children now, even at the cost of furthering one's education or career. Conversely, for individuals growing up relatively wealthy, mortality cues produced a desire to delay reproduction--to further one's education or career before starting a family. Overall, mortality cues appear to shift individuals into different life history strategies as a function of childhood socioeconomic status, suggesting important implications for how environmental factors can influence fertility and family size. PMID:20873933

  16. Giant protist Nummulites and its Eocene environment: Life span and habitat insights from δ18O and δ13C data from Nummulites and Venericardia, Hampshire basin, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purton, Louise M. A.; Brasier, Martin D.

    1999-08-01

    Nummulites are virtually extinct, giant marine protists that reached up to 160 mm diameter during the warmest climatic phase of the Cenozoic. Until now, their life span and paleoenvironmental tolerance have remained enigmatic. Pioneering the use of high-resolution drilling techniques in Nummulites, we show that both N. laevigatus and coeval bivalve Venericardia planicosta from the Lutetian of Hampshire, United Kingdom (ca. 50 42.5 Ma), underwent strong, annual alternations in carbon and oxygen isotopes, possibly reflecting tolerance of broad environmental variation. Our data demonstrate a life span of at least 5 yr for N. laevigatus, and we estimate that the largest species may have lived for more than 100 yr.

  17. Variation in reproductive life history traits between two populations of Blackbanded Darters (Percina nigrofasciata)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hughey, Myra C.; Heins, David C.; Jelks, Howard L.; Ory, Bridget A.; Jordan, Frank

    2012-01-01

    We examined the life history of Blackbanded Darters (Percina nigrofasciata) from two streams in the Choctawhatchee River drainage, Florida, over a three-year study period. Blackbanded Darters from Turkey Creek were longer than fish from Ten Mile Creek; however, size-adjusted clutch and egg sizes were similar between populations. Larger females produced larger clutches, whereas egg size did not vary with female body size. Seasonally, clutch sizes were greater in May than in August. When contrasted with previous studies of Blackbanded Darters in Alabama and Louisiana, the reproductive season of Blackbanded Darters in Florida was unusually long, ceasing for only a few months in late fall. The reproductive season was longer in Turkey Creek than in Ten Mile Creek. Differences in thermal regime among streams may explain differences in life history traits among local and distant populations of Blackbanded Darters. This research, alone and in combination with previous studies of this species, emphasizes two main points. First, it reaffirms that life history studies based on a single locality or conducted at a single point in time may fail to capture the full range of variation in life history traits. Second, it highlights the extensive phenotypic variation found in species with broad geographic ranges. Such species lend themselves to comparative and experimental research on patterns and causes of life history variation.

  18. Maternal thermal environment induces plastic responses in the reproductive life history of oviparous lizards.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Sun, Bao-Jun; Li, Shu-Ran; Sha, Wei; Du, Wei-Guo

    2014-01-01

    Adaptive plasticity may shift phenotypic traits close to a new optimum for directional selection and probably facilitates adaptive evolution in new environments. However, such plasticity has rarely been reported in life-history evolution, despite overwhelming evidence of life-history variation both among and within species. In this study, the temperatures experienced by gravid females of Scincella modesta were manipulated to identify maternally induced plasticity in reproductive traits and the significance of such changes in the evolution of life history. Consistent with the geographic pattern of life history, the study demonstrated that low temperatures delayed egg oviposition, resulting in a more advanced embryonic developmental stage at oviposition and shorter incubation periods compared with warm temperatures. In addition, females maintained at low temperatures produced larger eggs and hence heavier hatchlings than those at warm temperatures. This study demonstrated that environmental temperatures can induce plastic responses in egg retention and offspring size, and these maternally mediated changes in reproductive life history seem to be adaptive in the light of latitudinal clines of these traits in natural populations. PMID:25244379

  19. [Are Nobel prize winners gettting older? Mathematical analysis of age and life span of the Nobel prize winners, 1901-2003].

    PubMed

    Anisimov, V N; Mikhal'ski?, A I

    2004-01-01

    Data on the distribution by the age of 647 Nobel prizewinner in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, economics and literature and time dynamics of the age during 1901-2003 are presented in the paper. The mean survival and the expected life span of the prizewinners was also calculated. The mean life span of the Nobelists in natural sciences steadily increases from the first to the fourth quartile of the 20th century. The rate of the prizewinners selected at the age of 61 and more years increases from the 23% at 1901-1925 to 53.1% at 1975-2003, whereas the rate of the winners selected before the age of 40 years decreases from 19% to 2.7% during the same period. Analysis of available data on the Nobel Prizes for chemistry or physiology or medicine has shown that the majority of the Prizes was awarded to researcher discovered his main results at the age of 31-40 (41.8% and 47.4%, correspondingly). The mean interval between a discovery and a selection for Nobel Prize in chemistry increases from 12.6 years in 1901-1925 to 23.7 years in 1975-2003, whereas corresponding parameters for prizewinners in physiology or medicine increases from to 16.9 to 20.1 years. The mean life span of deceased Nobelists is 77.8 years, varying from 76.0 years in chemists to 84.8 years in economists. The mean life span after the selection is 20.3 years (from 13.6 years in writers to 24.6 in physicists). The expected life span after the selection adjusted by the age and the year of the selection of the Nobelists in physics, chemistry, economics and literature in 1959-1999 failed to reveal any increase, whereas the life expectancy of the prizewinners in physiology or medicine is increased as compared with the male population of USA. PMID:15754950

  20. The development of memory efficiency and value-directed remembering across the life span: a cross-sectional study of memory and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Castel, Alan D; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Lee, Steve S; Galván, Adriana; Balota, David A; McCabe, David P

    2011-11-01

    Although attentional control and memory change considerably across the life span, no research has examined how the ability to strategically remember important information (i.e., value-directed remembering) changes from childhood to old age. The present study examined this in different age groups across the life span (N = 320, 5-96 years old). A selectivity task was used in which participants were asked to study and recall items worth different point values in order to maximize their point score. This procedure allowed for measures of memory quantity/capacity (number of words recalled) and memory efficiency/selectivity (the recall of high-value items relative to low-value items). Age-related differences were found for memory capacity, as young adults recalled more words than the other groups. However, in terms of selectivity, younger and older adults were more selective than adolescents and children. The dissociation between these measures across the life span illustrates important age-related differences in terms of memory capacity and the ability to selectively remember high-value information. PMID:21942664

  1. Loss of Ubp3 increases silencing, decreases unequal recombination in rDNA, and shortens the replicative life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oling, David; Masoom, Rehan; Kvint, Kristian

    2014-06-15

    Ubp3 is a conserved ubiquitin protease that acts as an antisilencing factor in MAT and telomeric regions. Here we show that ubp3∆ mutants also display increased silencing in ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Consistent with this, RNA polymerase II occupancy is lower in cells lacking Ubp3 than in wild-type cells in all heterochromatic regions. Moreover, in a ubp3∆ mutant, unequal recombination in rDNA is highly suppressed. We present genetic evidence that this effect on rDNA recombination, but not silencing, is entirely dependent on the silencing factor Sir2. Further, ubp3∆ sir2∆ mutants age prematurely at the same rate as sir2∆ mutants. Thus our data suggest that recombination negatively influences replicative life span more so than silencing. However, in ubp3∆ mutants, recombination is not a prerequisite for aging, since cells lacking Ubp3 have a shorter life span than isogenic wild-type cells. We discuss the data in view of different models on how silencing and unequal recombination affect replicative life span and the role of Ubp3 in these processes. PMID:24760971

  2. Critical and Distinct Roles of p16 and Telomerase in Regulating the Proliferative Life Span of Normal Human Prostate Epithelial Progenitor Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Bobby; Jiang, Ming; Suraneni, Mahipal; Patrawala, Lubna; Badeaux, Mark; Schneider-Broussard, Robin; Multani, Asha S.; Jeter, Collene R.; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Hu, Limei; Hu, Jianhua; Tsavachidis, Spiridon; Zhang, Wei; Chang, Sandy; Hayward, Simon W.; Tang, Dean G.

    2008-01-01

    Normal human prostate (NHP) epithelial cells undergo senescence in vitro and in vivo, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show that the senescence of primary NHP cells, which are immunophenotyped as intermediate basal-like cells expressing progenitor cell markers CD44, α2β1, p63, hTERT, and CK5/CK18, involves loss of telomerase expression, up-regulation of p16, and activation of p53. Using genetically defined manipulations of these three signaling pathways, we show that p16 is the primary determinant of the NHP cell proliferative capacity and that hTERT is required for unlimited proliferative life span. Hence, suppression of p16 significantly extends NHP cell life span, but both p16 inhibition and hTERT are required to immortalize NHP cells. Importantly, immortalized NHP cells retain expression of most progenitor markers, demonstrate gene expression profiles characteristic of proliferating progenitor cells, and possess multilineage differentiation potential generating functional prostatic glands. Our studies shed important light on the molecular mechanisms regulating the proliferative life span of NHP progenitor cells. PMID:18662989

  3. Life history and reproductive ecology of the endangered Itasenpara bitterling Acheilognathus longipinnis (Cyprinidae) in the Himi region, central Japan.

    PubMed

    Nishio, M; Kawamoto, T; Kawakami, R; Edo, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2015-09-01

    The life history, reproductive ecology and habitat utilization of the Itasenpara (deepbody) bitterling Acheilognathus longipinnis were investigated in a lowland segment of the Moo River in Toyama Prefecture, central Honshu, Japan. Analysis of 1285 individuals revealed that the study population comprised a single size class, an age at maturation of 3 months and a life span of 1 year. On the basis of the growth pattern, the life cycle was divided into two stages: the juvenile stage, characterized by rapid growth, and the adult stage at which growth ceased. Spawning by A. longipinnis was recorded between early September and late October. Female A. longipinnis in the 0+ year age class began to mature when they reached a standard length (LS ) of 56·4 mm. Mature females had a large clutch size (maximum 273 eggs) and deposited highly adhesive and relatively large eggs (2·55 mm(3) ; major axis, 3·12 mm; minor axis, 1·22 mm) via a short ovipositor (mean length, 21·5 mm) into freshwater mussels. The embryos remained in the gill cavities of the freshwater mussels (used as a spawning substratum) and emerged as juveniles (LS , 9 mm). Habitat utilization during spawning was analysed using a generalized linear model. The best-fit model showed that three environmental factors (freshwater mussel availability, water depth and vegetation cover) were important variables for habitat utilization by A. longipinnis. Shallow areas (water depth, 250-330 mm) created for rice paddy management and areas with an abundance of cover were particularly effective for predator avoidance. These results suggest that maintenance of water level fluctuations corresponding with rice cultivation and the abundance of vegetation on the river bank (particularly avoidance of concrete revetments) is essential for conservation of this species under current practices for rice cultivation in Japan. PMID:26255608

  4. Effects of radiation and lifestyle factors on risks of urothelial carcinoma in the Life Span Study of atomic bomb survivors.

    PubMed

    Grant, E J; Ozasa, K; Preston, D L; Suyama, A; Shimizu, Y; Sakata, R; Sugiyama, H; Pham, T-M; Cologne, J; Yamada, M; De Roos, A J; Kopecky, K J; Porter, M P; Seixas, N; Davis, S

    2012-07-01

    Among the Life Span Study (LSS) of Atomic-bomb survivors, recent estimates showed that unspecified bladder cancer had high radiation sensitivity with a notably high female-to-male excess relative risk (ERR) per radiation dose ratio and were the only sites for which the ERR did not decrease with attained age. These findings, however, did not consider lifestyle factors, which could potentially confound or modify the risk estimates. This study estimated the radiation risks of the most prevalent subtype of urinary tract cancer, urothelial carcinoma, while accounting for smoking, consumption of fruit, vegetables, alcohol and level of education (a surrogate for socioeconomic status). Eligible study subjects included 105,402 (males = 42,890) LSS members who were cancer-free in 1958 and had estimated radiation doses. Members were censored due to loss of follow-up, incident cancer of another type, death, or the end of calendar year 2001. Surveys (by mail or clinical interview) gathered lifestyle data periodically for 1963-1991. There were 63,827 participants in one or more survey. Five hundred seventy-three incident urothelial carcinoma cases occurred, of which 364 occurred after lifestyle information was available. Analyses were performed using Poisson regression methods. The excess relative risk per weighted gray unit (the gamma component plus 10 times the neutron component, Gy(w)) was 1.00 (95% CI: 0.43-1.78) but the risks were not dependent upon age at exposure or attained age. Lifestyle factors other than smoking were not associated with urothelial carcinoma risk. Neither the magnitude of the radiation ERR estimate (1.00 compared to 0.96), nor the female-to-male (F:M) ERR/Gy(w) ratio (3.2 compared to 3.4) were greatly changed after accounting for all lifestyle factors. A multiplicative model of gender-specific radiation and smoking effects was the most revealing though there was no evidence of significant departures from either the additive or multiplicative joint effect models. Among the LSS cohort members with doses greater than 0.005 Gy(w) (average dose 0.21 Gy(w)), the attributable fraction of urothelial carcinoma due to radiation was 7.1% in males and 19.7% in females. Among current smokers, the attributable fraction of urothelial carcinoma due to smoking was 61% in males and 52% in females. Relative risk estimates of smoking risk were approximately two for smokers compared to nonsmokers. After adjustment for lifestyle factors, gender-specific radiation risks and the F:M ERR/Gy(w), the ratios of excess urothelial carcinoma risk were similar to the estimates without adjusting for lifestyle factors. Smoking was the primary factor responsible for excess urothelial carcinoma in this cohort. These findings led us to conclude that the radiation risk estimates of urothelial carcinoma do not appear to be strongly confounded or modified by smoking, consumption of alcohol, fruits, or vegetables, or level of education. PMID:22631857

  5. Sleep apnea, reproductive hormones and quality of sexual life in severely obese men.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ahmad O; Walker, James M; Gibson, Mark; Cloward, Tom V; Hunt, Steven C; Kolotkin, Ronette L; Adams, Ted D; Meikle, A Wayne

    2011-06-01

    The effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive function of obese men is not entirely elucidated. The objective of this study was to define the effect of sleep apnea on the reproductive hormones and sexual function in obese men. This study included 89 severely obese men with BMI ≥35 kg/m2 considering gastric bypass surgery. Anthropometrics (weight, and BMI), reproductive hormones, and sleep studies were measured. The sexual quality of life was assessed using the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite questionnaire (IWQOL-Lite). The mean age of our patients was 46.9 ± 11.0 years, the mean BMI was 47.8 ± 8.7 kg/m2 and the mean weight was 337.7 ± 62.4 lb. After correction for age and BMI, means of free testosterone per severity group of sleep apnea were as follows: no or mild sleep apnea 74.4 ± 3.8 pg/ml, moderate sleep apnea 68.6 ± 4.2 pg/ml, and severe sleep apnea 60.2 ± 2.92 pg/ml, P = 0.014. All other parameters of sleep apnea including hypopnea index, percent time below a SpO2 of 90%, and percent time below a SpO2 of 80% were also negatively correlated with testosterone levels after correction for age and BMI. BMI and presence of coronary artery disease decreased the sexual quality of life. Sleep apnea was associated with reduced sexual quality of life. In summary, sleep apnea negatively affects testosterone levels independent of BMI. Severely obese men had decreased sexual quality of life. PMID:21273994

  6. Life Table Evaluation of Survival and Reproduction of the Aphid, Sitobion avenae, Exposed to Cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huan-Huan; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Du, Chao; Deng, Ming-Ming; Du, Er-Xia; Hu, Zu-Qing; Hu, Xiang-Shun

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) on the development, fecundity, and reproduction of the grain aphid, Sitobion avenae Fabricius (Hemiptera: Aphididae) were estimated by constructing a life table of S. avenae exposed to Cd. The concentrations of Cd in the soil were as follows: 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg/kg. The correlation analysis of the Cd concentration in soil and wheat revealed that the amount in the wheat increased with the increase of Cd concentrations in soil. The results indicated that, the latter part of the reproduction period was significantly affected by Cd, according to the curve of the total survival rate (lx). The net reproductive rate (R 0), innate capacity of increase (r), and finite rate of increase (λ) of S. avenae all decreased under the stress of Cd, and were lowest at a Cd concentration of 20 mg/kg. Cd also negatively affected fecundity and mx (the number of offspring produced by an individual female). At 20 mg/kg, the decline of them was most obvious. In conclusion, survival and reproduction of S. avenae were inhibited under the treatment of the heavy metal Cd. Sitobion avenae was more sensitive to Cd at concentration of 20 mg/kg compared to the other concentrations. This concentration can be used to examine the mechanisms behind population genetics and biological mutation of S. avenae when exposed to heavy metal. PMID:22958415

  7. Older Motherhood and the Changing Life Course in the Era of Assisted Reproductive Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Friese, Carrie; Becker, Gay; Nachtigall, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Midlife, once a focus of particular interest to gerontologists because of its implications for later life, has recently received little attention. But as new reproductive technologies have expanded in the United States, motherhood is occurring at older ages. While older motherhood is not a new social practice, what is unique is that an increasing number of women are becoming pregnant through technological means, often for the first time, at the end of their reproductive cycle. These women can be understood as part of a new middle age, engaging in new life course possibilities that respond to changing social, cultural, physical, and economic realities, and potentially extending much later in the life course. Drawing on interviews with 79 couples, we utilize symbolic interactionist conceptualizations of identity and stigma to consider how women negotiate the shifting social identities associated with older motherhood. We conclude that older motherhood will be one phenomenon contributing to an enduring change in views of what constitutes old age, and that it will be seen as occurring much later in the life course. PMID:18443646

  8. Rapid weight gain after birth predicts life history and reproductive strategy in Filipino males

    PubMed Central

    Kuzawa, Christopher W.; McDade, Thomas W.; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette

    2010-01-01

    Ecological cues during prenatal and postnatal development may allow organisms to adjust reproductive strategy. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is a prime candidate for adaptive plasticity as a result of its critical period of birth to 6 mo (B6M) in humans and the role of testosterone in the development and maintenance of costly sexually dimorphic somatic and behavioral traits. We hypothesized that weight velocity specific to B6M would predict male life history characteristics, including maturational timing, reproductive hormones, adult size, strength, and sexual activity. Data come from 770 Filipino men (age 20.5–22.5 y) followed since birth, with predictor variables including birth weight and weight velocities calculated at 6-mo intervals during the first 2 y of life. As expected, infants who were breastfed experienced less diarrhea, lived in wealthier households with better hygiene, and grew faster from B6M. Males with rapid B6M growth reached puberty earlier and, as young adults, had higher testosterone levels, were taller, more muscular, and had higher grip strength. They also had sex earlier and were more likely to report having had sex in the past month, resulting in more lifetime sex partners. Relationships between B6M weight gain and physical outcomes were generally not present or weaker in female subjects. We conclude that rapid weight gain specific to the brief postnatal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal critical period predicts early maturation and sexual activity, elevated hormone production, and more costly adult somatic characteristics among the male subjects in this sample. These findings provide evidence for early life developmental plasticity in male life history and reproductive strategy in humans. PMID:20837542

  9. Rapid weight gain after birth predicts life history and reproductive strategy in Filipino males.

    PubMed

    Kuzawa, Christopher W; McDade, Thomas W; Adair, Linda S; Lee, Nanette

    2010-09-28

    Ecological cues during prenatal and postnatal development may allow organisms to adjust reproductive strategy. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is a prime candidate for adaptive plasticity as a result of its critical period of birth to 6 mo (B6M) in humans and the role of testosterone in the development and maintenance of costly sexually dimorphic somatic and behavioral traits. We hypothesized that weight velocity specific to B6M would predict male life history characteristics, including maturational timing, reproductive hormones, adult size, strength, and sexual activity. Data come from 770 Filipino men (age 20.5-22.5 y) followed since birth, with predictor variables including birth weight and weight velocities calculated at 6-mo intervals during the first 2 y of life. As expected, infants who were breastfed experienced less diarrhea, lived in wealthier households with better hygiene, and grew faster from B6M. Males with rapid B6M growth reached puberty earlier and, as young adults, had higher testosterone levels, were taller, more muscular, and had higher grip strength. They also had sex earlier and were more likely to report having had sex in the past month, resulting in more lifetime sex partners. Relationships between B6M weight gain and physical outcomes were generally not present or weaker in female subjects. We conclude that rapid weight gain specific to the brief postnatal hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal critical period predicts early maturation and sexual activity, elevated hormone production, and more costly adult somatic characteristics among the male subjects in this sample. These findings provide evidence for early life developmental plasticity in male life history and reproductive strategy in humans. PMID:20837542

  10. Reproductive strategies and Islamic discourse: Malian migrants negotiate everyday life in Paris, France.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Carolyn F

    2006-03-01

    Approximately 37 thousand Malians currently reside in France as part of the West African diaspora. Primarily Muslim, both women and men confront challenges to their understandings of Islamic prohibitions and expectations, especially those addressing conjugal relations and reproduction. Biomedical policies generate marital conflicts and pose health dilemmas for women who face family and community pressures to reproduce but biomedical encouragement to limit childbearing. For many women, contraception represents a reprieve from repeated pregnancies and fatigue in spite of resistance from those who contest women's reproductive decisions as antithetical to Islam. French social workers play a particularly controversial role by introducing women to a discourse of women's rights that questions the authority of husbands and of religious doctrine. Women and men frame decisions and debate in diverse interpretations of Islam as they seek to manage the contradictions of everyday life and assert individual agency in the context of immigration and health politics. PMID:16612992

  11. Egg Cannibalism and its Life History Consequences Vary with Life Stage, Sex, and Reproductive Status in Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae).

    PubMed

    Bayoumy, Mohamed H; Michaud, J P

    2015-08-01

    Egg cannibalism is common in Coccinellidae, but its biological consequences have not been fully explored. We examined egg cannibalism by neonates, fourth instars, and adults of Hippodamia convergens Guerin-Meneville for effects on development, reproduction, and progeny fitness. We also tested female adults for ability to avoid cannibalizing their own eggs and first-instar larvae, and both sexes for changes in cannibalism propensity following mating, all in the presence of ad libitum food [larvae: eggs of Ephestia kuehniella Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), adults: Schizaphis graminum (Rondani)]. Cannibalism by neonates reduced developmental time and increased male body size. Cannibalism in the fourth instar accelerated pupation and led to the production of eggs that hatched faster, regardless of which parent cannibalized. However, egg fertility was improved only by maternal cannibalism in the fourth instar. Females recognized their own egg clusters, sometimes added eggs to them, and preferentially cannibalized nonfilial clusters. Most gravid females cannibalized a first-instar larva within 30 min, whether filial or not. Adult egg cannibalism was similar for virgin males and females, but declined after mating in males, and increased in females, although it had no effect on fecundity or fertility. Daughters of cannibal pairs were heavier than those of other mating combinations, but offspring of noncannibal parents had the fastest development. Reproductive females appeared to use egg cannibalism to reduce risk for their own eggs, increasing the number cannibalized with the number laid. Thus, egg cannibalism in coccinellids varies with life stage, sex, and reproductive condition, independent of food availability, and benefits are life stage specific. PMID:26470307

  12. The impact of reproductive investment and early-life environmental conditions on senescence: support for the disposable soma hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hammers, M; Richardson, D S; Burke, T; Komdeur, J

    2013-09-01

    Several hypotheses have been put forward to explain the evolution of senescence. One of the leading hypotheses, the disposable soma hypothesis, predicts a trade-off, whereby early-life investment in reproduction leads to late-life declines in survival (survival senescence). Testing this hypothesis in natural populations is challenging, but important for understanding the evolution of senescence. We used the long-term data set from a contained, predator-free population of individually marked Seychelles warblers (Acrocephalus sechellensis) to investigate how age-related declines in survival are affected by early-life investment in reproduction and early-life environmental conditions. The disposable soma hypothesis predicts that higher investment in reproduction, or experiencing harsh conditions during early life, will lead to an earlier onset, and an increased rate, of senescence. We found that both sexes showed similar age-related declines in late-life survival consistent with senescence. Individuals that started breeding at a later age showed a delay in survival senescence, but this later onset of breeding did not result in a less rapid decline in late-life survival. Although survival senescence was not directly related to early-life environmental conditions, age of first breeding increased with natal food availability. Therefore, early-life food availability may affect senescence by influencing age of first breeding. The disposable soma hypothesis of senescence is supported by delayed senescence in individuals that started breeding at a later age and therefore invested less in reproduction. PMID:23961923

  13. Antiretroviral Therapy and Reproductive Life Projects: Mitigating the Stigma of AIDS in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mbakwem, Benjamin C

    2010-01-01

    As millions of people infected with HIV in Africa are increasingly able to live longer and healthier lives because of access to antiretroviral therapy, concerns have emerged that people might eschew protective practices after their health improves. Extending beyond the notion of sexual “disinhibition,” researchers have begun to analyze the sexual behavior of people in treatment through the perspective of their marital and childbearing aspirations. This article explores the reproductive life projects of HIV-positive men and women in southeastern Nigeria, showing how actions that contradict medical advice are understandable in the context of patients’ socially normative desires for marriage and children. Based on in-depth interviews and observations (June–December 2004; June–July 2006; June–July 2007) of people enrolled in the region’s oldest treatment program, we argue that broadly held social expectations with regard to reproduction are experienced even more acutely by HIV-positive people. This is because in Nigeria the stigma associated with AIDS is closely tied to widespread perceptions of social and moral crisis, such that AIDS itself is seen as both a cause and a symptom of anxiety-producing forms of social change. Specifically, in an era of rapid societal transformation, Nigerians see sexual promiscuity and the alienation of young people from traditional obligations to kin and community as indicative of threatened social reproduction. For people who are HIV-positive, marrying and having children offer not only the opportunity to lead normal lives, but also a means to mitigate the stigma associated with the disease. Four ethnographic case studies are provided to exemplify how and why social and personal life projects can trump or complicate medical and public health priorities. These examples suggest that treatment programs must openly address and proactively support the life projects of people on antiretroviral therapy if the full benefits of expanded access to treatment are to be realized. PMID:20494501

  14. Musculoskeletal pain and the reproductive life stage in women: is there a relationship?

    PubMed

    Frange, C; Hirotsu, C; Hachul, H; Pires, J S; Bittencourt, L; Tufik, S; Andersen, M L

    2016-06-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between reproductive life stage, pain perception and musculoskeletal pain complaint in a representative sample of women from São Paulo, Brazil. Methods A population-based survey was carried out with 574 women who were classified as being in the premenopausal or postmenopausal stage. They answered questions about pain perception and musculoskeletal pain. Follicle stimulating hormone was collected to confirm menopausal condition along with clinical evaluation. Results In the whole sample, we found a prevalence of 56% for pain perception and 20.2% for complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Regarding the topography of musculoskeletal pain, the distributions were similar among the premenopausal and postmenopausal groups. No significant association was found between reproductive life stage and pain perception, as 58.1% of the premenopausal group and 52.0% of the postmenopausal group reported pain. Similarly, there was no significant association between menopausal stage and musculoskeletal pain, as 19.5% and 21.6% of the premenopausal and postmenopausal women, respectively, complained of musculoskeletal pain. There was no significant association of postmenopausal stage (early or late) with pain perception or musculoskeletal pain. The use of analgesics was significantly higher in postmenopausal compared to premenopausal women (p < 0.001). Conclusion A high prevalence of pain was found in women from the city of São Paulo. However, neither the presence of musculoskeletal pain nor pain perception were associated with the reproductive life stage, showing that both parameters was independent from the menopausal status in the studied women. PMID:27095066

  15. Use of a Modified Reproductive Life Plan to Improve Awareness of Preconception Health in Women with Chronic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Pooja; Dandekar, Aparna; Hessler, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Chronic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, and obesity pose unique reproductive challenges for women. Preconception health results in improved reproductive outcomes. We designed an interventional study testing the use of a reproductive life plan to improve knowledge of preconception and contraception health in women with chronic diseases. Methods: Primarily underserved, English-and Spanish-speaking women aged 18 to 40 years with active diabetes, hypertension, or obesity were recruited. We developed a revised reproductive life plan specific to these diseases. Two resident physicians performed reproductive plan counseling. Pre- and postcounseling surveys were administered to evaluate knowledge and attitudes about chronic disease and the effects on a potential pregnancy. Results: Twenty-seven women (average age = 31 years) were surveyed. Of the subjects, 85.2% were obese, 29.6% had hypertension, and 7.4% had diabetes. Significant increases were reported in understanding risks of pregnancy associated with diabetes (p < 0.001), hypertension (p < 0.001), and obesity (p < 0.01). After counseling, women increased their knowledge about a reproductive plan (p < 0.001) and increased support and information to make reproductive health choices (p = 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). The largest improvements in postcounseling variables occurred in women with the lowest precounseling test scores and in women without children. Conclusion: A reproductive life plan is a brief, cost-effective preconception and contraception counseling tool in the primary care setting for women with chronic diseases. This tool increases knowledge about reproductive health and enables women with chronic diseases to make informed decisions about their reproductive future. PMID:24867547

  16. Early-life reproduction is associated with increased mortality risk but enhanced lifetime fitness in pre-industrial humans

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, Adam D.; Nenko, Ilona; Lummaa, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    The physiology of reproductive senescence in women is well understood, but the drivers of variation in senescence rates are less so. Evolutionary theory predicts that early-life investment in reproduction should be favoured by selection at the cost of reduced survival and faster reproductive senescence. We tested this hypothesis using data collected from preindustrial Finnish church records. Reproductive success increased up to age 25 and was relatively stable until a decline from age 41. Women with higher early-life fecundity (ELF; producing more children before age 25) subsequently had higher mortality risk, but high ELF was not associated with accelerated senescence in annual breeding success. However, women with higher ELF experienced faster senescence in offspring survival. Despite these apparent costs, ELF was under positive selection: individuals with higher ELF had higher lifetime reproductive success. These results are consistent with previous observations in both humans and wild vertebrates that more births and earlier onset of reproduction are associated with reduced survival, and with evolutionary theory predicting trade-offs between early reproduction and later-life survival. The results are particularly significant given recent increases in maternal ages in many societies and the potential consequences for offspring health and fitness. PMID:25740893

  17. Early-life reproduction is associated with increased mortality risk but enhanced lifetime fitness in pre-industrial humans.

    PubMed

    Hayward, Adam D; Nenko, Ilona; Lummaa, Virpi

    2015-04-01

    The physiology of reproductive senescence in women is well understood, but the drivers of variation in senescence rates are less so. Evolutionary theory predicts that early-life investment in reproduction should be favoured by selection at the cost of reduced survival and faster reproductive senescence. We tested this hypothesis using data collected from preindustrial Finnish church records. Reproductive success increased up to age 25 and was relatively stable until a decline from age 41. Women with higher early-life fecundity (ELF; producing more children before age 25) subsequently had higher mortality risk, but high ELF was not associated with accelerated senescence in annual breeding success. However, women with higher ELF experienced faster senescence in offspring survival. Despite these apparent costs, ELF was under positive selection: individuals with higher ELF had higher lifetime reproductive success. These results are consistent with previous observations in both humans and wild vertebrates that more births and earlier onset of reproduction are associated with reduced survival, and with evolutionary theory predicting trade-offs between early reproduction and later-life survival. The results are particularly significant given recent increases in maternal ages in many societies and the potential consequences for offspring health and fitness. PMID:25740893

  18. Antioxidant capacity of "Mexican arnica" Heterotheca inuloides Cass natural products and some derivatives: their anti-inflammatory evaluation and effect on C. elegans life span.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Chávez, José Luis; Coballase-Urrutia, Elvia; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Delgado-Lamas, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the accumulation of biomolecular damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to aging. The antioxidant activity is related to the ability of certain compounds to protect against the potentially harmful effect of processes or reactions involving ROS. This ability is associated with the termination of free radical propagation in biological systems. From Heterotheca inuloides various compounds which have shown to possess antioxidant capacity and scavenging ROS. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant capacity of additional natural components isolated from H. inuloides and some semisynthetic derivatives, their anti-inflammatory activity and the effect on Caenorhabditis elegans nematode life span. Compounds showed ability to inhibit various biological processes such as lipid peroxidation, scavenge nonbiological important oxidants such as (1)O2, OH(∙), H2O2, and HOCl and scavenge non biological stable free radicals (DPPH). Some cadinane type compounds showed possess antioxidant, ROS scavenging capacity, anti-inflammatory activity, and effect on the C. elegans life span. Flavonoid type compounds increased the life of the nematode and quercetin was identified as the compound with the greatest activity. The modification of chemical structure led to a change in the antioxidant capacity, the anti-inflammatory activity, and the survival of the worm. PMID:25821555

  19. Antioxidant Capacity of “Mexican Arnica” Heterotheca inuloides Cass Natural Products and Some Derivatives: Their Anti-Inflammatory Evaluation and Effect on C. elegans Life Span

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Chávez, José Luis; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Delgado-Lamas, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that the accumulation of biomolecular damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) contributes to aging. The antioxidant activity is related to the ability of certain compounds to protect against the potentially harmful effect of processes or reactions involving ROS. This ability is associated with the termination of free radical propagation in biological systems. From Heterotheca inuloides various compounds which have shown to possess antioxidant capacity and scavenging ROS. The aim of this study was to determine the antioxidant capacity of additional natural components isolated from H. inuloides and some semisynthetic derivatives, their anti-inflammatory activity and the effect on Caenorhabditis elegans nematode life span. Compounds showed ability to inhibit various biological processes such as lipid peroxidation, scavenge nonbiological important oxidants such as 1O2, OH∙, H2O2, and HOCl and scavenge non biological stable free radicals (DPPH). Some cadinane type compounds showed possess antioxidant, ROS scavenging capacity, anti-inflammatory activity, and effect on the C. elegans life span. Flavonoid type compounds increased the life of the nematode and quercetin was identified as the compound with the greatest activity. The modification of chemical structure led to a change in the antioxidant capacity, the anti-inflammatory activity, and the survival of the worm. PMID:25821555

  20. Acute Exposure to Di(2-Ethylhexyl) Phthalate in Adulthood Causes Adverse Reproductive Outcomes Later in Life and Accelerates Reproductive Aging in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Hannon, Patrick R; Niermann, Sarah; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-03-01

    Humans are ubiquitously exposed to di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), which is an environmental toxicant incorporated in consumer products. Studies have shown that DEHP targets the ovary to disrupt essential processes required for reproductive and nonreproductive health. Specifically, 10-day exposure to DEHP accelerates primordial follicle recruitment and disrupts estrous cyclicity in adult mice. However, it is unknown if these effects on folliculogenesis and cyclicity following acute DEHP exposure can have permanent effects on reproductive outcomes. Further, the premature depletion of primordial follicles can cause early reproductive senescence, and it is unknown if acute DEHP exposure accelerates reproductive aging. This study tested the hypothesis that acute DEHP exposure causes infertility, disrupts estrous cyclicity, alters hormone levels, and depletes follicle numbers by inducing atresia later in life, leading to accelerated reproductive aging. Adult CD-1 mice were orally dosed with vehicle or DEHP (20 μg/kg/day-500 mg/kg/day) daily for 10 days, and reproductive outcomes were assessed at 6 and 9 months postdosing. Acute DEHP exposure significantly altered estrous cyclicity compared to controls at 6 and 9 months postdosing by increasing the percentage of days the mice were in estrus and metestrus/diestrus, respectively. DEHP also significantly decreased inhibin B levels compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Further, DEHP significantly increased the BAX/BCL2 ratio in primordial follicles leading to a significant decrease in primordial and total follicle numbers compared to controls at 9 months postdosing. Collectively, the adverse effects present following acute DEHP exposure persist later in life and are consistent with accelerated reproductive aging. PMID:26678702

  1. Genetic loci modulating fitness and life span in Caenorhabditis elegans: categorical trait interval mapping in CL2a x Bergerac-BO recombinant-inbred worms.

    PubMed Central

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Ayyadevara, Rajani; Vertino, Anthony; Galecki, Andrzej; Thaden, John J; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) can implicate an unbiased sampling of genes underlying a complex, polygenic phenotype. QTL affecting longevity in Caenorhabditis elegans were mapped using a CL2a x Bergerac-BO recombinant-inbred population. Genotypes were compared at 30 transposon-specific markers for two paired sample sets totaling 171 young controls and 172 longevity-selected worms (the last-surviving 1%) from a synchronously aged population. A third sample set, totaling 161 worms from an independent culture, was analyzed for confirmation of loci. At least six highly significant QTL affecting life span were detected both by single-marker (chi(2)) analysis and by two interval-mapping procedures--one intended for nonparametric traits and another developed specifically for mapping of categorical traits. These life-span QTL were located on chromosomes I (near the hP4 locus), III (near stP127), IV (near stP44), V (a cluster of three peaks, near stP192, stP23, and stP6), and X (two distinct peaks, near stP129 and stP2). Epistatic effects on longevity were also analyzed by Fisher's exact test, which indicated a significant life-span interaction between markers on chromosomes V (stP128) and III (stP127). Several further interactions were significant in the initial unselected population; two of these, between distal loci on chromosome V, were completely eliminated in the long-lived subset. Allelic longevity effects for two QTL, on chromosomes IV and V, were confirmed in backcrossed congenic lines and were highly significant in two very different environments-growth on solid agar medium and in liquid suspension culture. PMID:12618395

  2. A structured population model suggests that long life and post-reproductive lifespan promote the evolution of cooperation.

    PubMed

    Ross, Caitlin; Rychtář, Jan; Rueppell, Olav

    2015-03-21

    Social organization correlates with longevity across animal taxa. This correlation has been explained by selection for longevity by social evolution. The reverse causality is also conceivable but has not been sufficiently considered. We constructed a simple, spatially structured population model of asexually reproducing individuals to study the effect of temporal life history structuring on the evolution of cooperation. Individuals employed fixed strategies of cooperation or defection towards all neighbours in a basic Prisoner's Dilemma paradigm. Individuals aged and transitioned through different life history stages asynchronously without migration. An individual's death triggered a reproductive event by one immediate neighbour. The specific neighbour was chosen probabilistically according to the cumulative payoff from all local interactions. Varying the duration of pre-reproductive, reproductive, and post-reproductive life history stages, long-term simulations allowed a systematic evaluation of the influence of the duration of these specific life history stages. Our results revealed complex interactions among the effects of the three basic life history stages and the benefit to defect. Overall, a long post-reproductive stage promoted the evolution of cooperation, while a prolonged pre-reproductive stage has a negative effect. In general, the total length of life also increased the probability of the evolution of cooperation. Thus, our specific model suggests that the timing of life history transitions and total duration of life history stages may affect the evolution of cooperative behaviour. We conclude that the causation of the empirically observed association of life expectancy and sociality may be more complex than previously realized. PMID:25637763

  3. Much more than a gene: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, reproductive choices and family life.

    PubMed

    Dekeuwer, Catherine; Bateman, Simone

    2013-05-01

    This article presents the results of a study that investigates the way in which carriers of a mutation on the BRCA1 or the BRCA2 gene, associated with a high risk of breast and ovarian cancer, make their reproductive decisions. Using semi-structured interviews, the study explored the way in which these persons reflected on the acceptability of taking the risk of transmitting this mutation to the next generation, the arguments they used in favor or against taking that risk, and in the light of these arguments, their opinion on the acceptability of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) as a reproductive option. The findings suggest that when carriers are planning to have a(nother) child, they are mainly concerned by the risk of transmitting 'much more than a gene': essentially painful experiences not only with respect to health, such as undergoing cancer surveillance or combatting one's own illness, but also with regards to family life, such as witnessing the illness and death of a close relative, encountering difficulties in finding a partner or reconsidering one's plans to have a family. As for opinions concerning the acceptability of PGD as a reproductive option, opinions about personal recourse were varied but all expressed the understanding that PGD should be made available to those persons who consider it their best option. PMID:22048863

  4. Introducing reproductive life plan-based information in contraceptive counselling: an RCT

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J.; Larsson, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Tydén, T.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can reproductive life plan (RLP)-based information in contraceptive counselling before pregnancy increase women's knowledge of reproduction, and of the importance of folic acid intake in particular? SUMMARY ANSWER The RLP-based information increased women's knowledge of reproduction including knowledge of folic acid intake. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Many women have insufficient knowledge of reproduction, including a health-promoting lifestyle prior to conception, and highly educated women in particular postpone childbearing until an age when their fertile capacity has started to decrease. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study was an randomized controlled trial with one intervention group (IG) and two control groups (CG1, CG2). A sample size calculation indicated that 82 women per group would be adequate. Recruitment took place during 3 months in 2012 and 299 women were included. The women were randomized in blocks of three. All groups received standard care (contraceptive counselling, Chlamydia testing, cervical screening). In addition, women in the IG were given oral and written RLP-based information about reproduction. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS A total of 299 out of 338 (88%) Swedish-speaking women visiting a Student Health Centre were included (mean age 23 years); response rate was 88%. Before the counselling, women in the IG and the CG1 completed a baseline questionnaire, including questions about lifestyle changes in connection to pregnancy planning, family planning intentions and knowledge of reproduction (e.g. the fecundity of an ovum). At follow-up 2 months after inclusion, a structured telephone interview was performed in all groups (n = 262, 88% participation rate). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE There was no difference between the groups regarding the mean knowledge score at baseline. The IG scored higher at follow-up than at baseline (P < 0.001); the mean increased from 6.4 to 9.0 out of a maximum 20 points. The women in the CG1 scored no differently at follow-up than at baseline. The difference in the knowledge score between the IG and the two CGs was significant (P < 0.001), whereas no difference was shown between the two CGs. There was no difference between the groups at baseline regarding how many women could mention folic acid intake among the things to do when planning to get pregnant. At follow-up, 22% in the IG, 3% in CG1 and 1% in CG2 mentioned folic acid intake (P < 0.001). At follow-up, more women in the IG also wished to have their last child earlier in life (P < 0.001) than at baseline, while there was no difference in the CG1. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION As the study sample consisted of university students, it is possible that the effect of the intervention was connected to a high level of education and conclusions for all women of reproductive age should be drawn with caution. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The provision of RLP-based information seems to be a feasible tool for promoting reproductive health. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Study funding was received from the Faculty of Medicine, Uppsala University, Sweden. There are no conflicts of interest. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER ClinicalTrial.gov Identifier NCT01739101. PMID:23842564

  5. Predicting trait values and measuring selection in complex life histories: reproductive allocation decisions in Soay sheep.

    PubMed

    Childs, D Z; Coulson, T N; Pemberton, J M; Clutton-Brock, T H; Rees, M

    2011-10-01

    Accurate prediction of life history phenomena and characterisation of selection in free-living animal populations are fundamental goals in evolutionary ecology. In density regulated, structured populations, where individual state influences fate, simple and widely used approaches based on individual lifetime measures of fitness are difficult to justify. We combine recently developed structured population modelling tools with ideas from modern evolutionary game theory (adaptive dynamics) to understand selection on allocation of female reproductive effort to singletons or twins in a size-structured population of feral sheep. In marked contrast to the classical selection analyses, our model-based approach predicts that the female allocation strategy is under negligible directional selection. These differences arise because classical selection analysis ignores components of offspring fitness and fails to consider selection over the complete life cycle. PMID:21790931

  6. Dead or alive: Deformed Wing Virus and Varroa destructor reduce the life span of winter honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elevated winter losses of managed honey bee colonies are a major concern, but the underlying mechanisms remain controversial. Among suspects are the parasitic mite Varroa destructor, the microsporidian Nosema ceranae and associated viruses. Here, we hypothesize that pathogens reduce the life expecta...

  7. Flashbulb memories and posttraumatic stress reactions across the life span: age-related effects of the German occupation of Denmark during World War II.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C

    2006-03-01

    A representative sample of older Danes were interviewed about experiences from the German occupation of Denmark in World War II. The number of participants with flashbulb memories for the German invasion (1940) and capitulation (1945) increased with participants' age at the time of the events up to age 8. Among participants under 8 years at the time of their most traumatic event, age at the time correlated positively with the current level of posttraumatic stress reactions and the vividness of stressful memories and their centrality to life story and identity. These findings were replicated in Study 2 for self-nominated stressful events sampled from the entire life span using a representative sample of Danes born after 1945. The results are discussed in relation to posttraumatic stress disorder and childhood amnesia. PMID:16594798

  8. Transcriptional remodeling in response to transfer upon carbon-limited or metformin-supplemented media in S. cerevisiae and its effect on chronological life span.

    PubMed

    Borklu-Yucel, Esra; Eraslan, Serpil; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2015-08-01

    One of the factors affecting chronological life span (CLS) in budding yeast is nutrient, especially carbon limitation. Aside from metabolites in the growth medium such as glucose, amino acids, and acetic acid, many pharmaceuticals have also been proven to alter CLS. Besides their impact on life span, these drugs are also prospective chemicals to treat the age-associated diseases, so the identification of their action mechanism and their potential side effects is of crucial importance. In this study, the effects of caloric restriction and metformin, a dietary mimetic pharmaceutical, on yeast CLS are compared. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells grown in synthetic dextrose complete (SDC) up to mid-exponential phase were either treated with metformin or were subjected to glucose limitation. The impacts of these perturbations were analyzed via transcriptomics, and the common (stimulation of glucose uptake, induction of mitochondrial maintenance, and reduction of protein translation) and divergent (stimulation of aerobic respiration and reprogramming of respiratory electron transport chain (ETC)) cellular responses specific to each treatment were determined. These results revealed that both glucose limitation and metformin treatment stimulate CLS extension and involve the mitochondrial function, probably by creating an efficient mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling of either aerobic respiration or ETC signaling stimulation, respectively. PMID:26099330

  9. Genetic Modifiers of the Drosophila Blue Cheese Gene Link Defects in Lysosomal Transport With Decreased Life Span and Altered Ubiquitinated-Protein Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Simonsen, Anne; Cumming, Robert C.; Lindmo, Karine; Galaviz, Vanessa; Cheng, Susan; Rusten, Tor Erik; Finley, Kim D.

    2007-01-01

    Defects in lysosomal trafficking pathways lead to decreased cell viability and are associated with progressive disorders in humans. Previously we have found that loss-of-function (LOF) mutations in the Drosophila gene blue cheese (bchs) lead to reduced adult life span, increased neuronal death, and widespread CNS degeneration that is associated with the formation of ubiquitinated-protein aggregates. To identify potential genes that participate in the bchs functional pathway, we conducted a genetic modifier screen based on alterations of an eye phenotype that arises from high-level overexpression of Bchs. We found that mutations in select autophagic and endocytic trafficking genes, defects in cytoskeletal and motor proteins, as well as mutations in the SUMO and ubiquitin signaling pathways behave as modifiers of the Bchs gain-of-function (GOF) eye phenotype. Individual mutant alleles that produced viable adults were further examined for bchs-like phenotypes. Mutations in several lysosomal trafficking genes resulted in significantly decreased adult life spans and several mutants showed changes in ubiquitinated protein profiles as young adults. This work represents a novel approach to examine the role that lysosomal transport and function have on adult viability. The genes characterized in this study have direct human homologs, suggesting that similar defects in lysosomal transport may play a role in human health and age-related processes. PMID:17435236

  10. Vitamin C modulates the metabolic and cytokine profiles, alleviates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress, and increases the life span of Gulo−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Aumailley, Lucie; Warren, Alessandra; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Paquet, Eric R.; Le Couteur, David G.; Marette, André; Cogger, Victoria C.; Lebel, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Suboptimal intake of dietary vitamin C (ascorbate) increases the risk of several chronic diseases but the exact metabolic pathways affected are still unknown. In this study, we examined the metabolic profile of mice lacking the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo) required for the biosynthesis of ascorbate. Gulo−/− mice were supplemented with 0%, 0.01%, and 0.4% ascorbate (w/v) in drinking water and serum was collected for metabolite measurements by targeted mass spectrometry. We also quantified 42 serum cytokines and examined the levels of different stress markers in liver. The metabolic profiles of Gulo−/− mice treated with ascorbate were different from untreated Gulo−/− and normal wild type mice. The cytokine profiles of Gulo−/− mice, in return, overlapped the profile of wild type animals upon 0.01% or 0.4% vitamin C supplementation. The life span of Gulo−/− mice increased with the amount of ascorbate in drinking water. It also correlated significantly with the ratios of serum arginine/lysine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, and the ratio of specific species of saturated/unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. Finally, levels of hepatic phosphorylated endoplasmic reticulum associated stress markers IRE1α and eIF2α correlated inversely with serum ascorbate and life span suggesting that vitamin C modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress response and longevity in Gulo−/− mice. PMID:26922388

  11. Preserving Syntactic Processing across the Adult Life Span: The Modulation of the Frontotemporal Language System in the Context of Age-Related Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shafto, Meredith A.; Randall, Billi; Wright, Paul; Marslen-Wilson, William D.; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A.

    2010-01-01

    Although widespread neural atrophy is an inevitable consequence of normal aging, not all cognitive abilities decline as we age. For example, spoken language comprehension tends to be preserved, despite atrophy in neural regions involved in language function. Here, we combined measures of behavior, functional activation, and gray matter (GM) change in a younger (19–34 years) and older group (49–86 years) of participants to identify the mechanisms leading to preserved language comprehension across the adult life span. We focussed primarily on syntactic functions because these are strongly left lateralized, providing the potential for contralateral recruitment. In an functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we used a word-monitoring task to minimize working memory demands, manipulating the availability of semantics and syntax to ask whether syntax is preserved in aging because of the functional recruitment of other brain regions, which successfully compensate for neural atrophy. Performance in the older group was preserved despite GM loss. This preservation was related to increased activity in right hemisphere frontotemporal regions, which was associated with age-related atrophy in the left hemisphere frontotemporal network activated in the young. We argue that preserved syntactic processing across the life span is due to the shift from a primarily left hemisphere frontotemporal system to a bilateral functional language network. PMID:19505991

  12. Vitamin C modulates the metabolic and cytokine profiles, alleviates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress, and increases the life span of Gulo-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Aumailley, Lucie; Warren, Alessandra; Garand, Chantal; Dubois, Marie Julie; Paquet, Eric R; Le Couteur, David G; Marette, André; Cogger, Victoria C; Lebel, Michel

    2016-03-01

    Suboptimal intake of dietary vitamin C (ascorbate) increases the risk of several chronic diseases but the exact metabolic pathways affected are still unknown. In this study, we examined the metabolic profile of mice lacking the enzyme gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo) required for the biosynthesis of ascorbate. Gulo-/- mice were supplemented with 0%, 0.01%, and 0.4% ascorbate (w/v) in drinking water and serum was collected for metabolite measurements by targeted mass spectrometry. We also quantified 42 serum cytokines and examined the levels of different stress markers in liver. The metabolic profiles of Gulo-/- mice treated with ascorbate were different from untreated Gulo-/- and normal wild type mice. The cytokine profiles of Gulo-/-mice, in return, overlapped the profile of wild type animals upon 0.01% or 0.4% vitamin C supplementation. The life span of Gulo-/- mice increased with the amount of ascorbate in drinking water. It also correlated significantly with the ratios of serum arginine/lysine, tyrosine/phenylalanine, and the ratio of specific species of saturated/unsaturated phosphatidylcholines. Finally, levels of hepatic phosphorylated endoplasmic reticulum associated stress markers IRE1α and eIF2α correlated inversely with serum ascorbate and life span suggesting that vitamin C modulates endoplasmic reticulum stress response and longevity in Gulo-/- mice. PMID:26922388

  13. Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown and polyphenol gallic acid increase life span and locomotor activity in a Drosophila Parkinson’s disease model

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-Arellano, Hector Flavio; Jimenez-Del-Rio, Marlene; Velez-Pardo, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) by which dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are eroded in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is critical for effective therapeutic strategies. By using the binary tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-Gal4/UAS-X RNAi Drosophila melanogaster system, we report that Dmp53, basket and drICE gene knockdown in dopaminergic neurons prolong life span (p < 0.05; log-rank test) and locomotor activity (p < 0.05; χ2 test) in D. melanogaster lines chronically exposed to (1 mM) paraquat (PQ, oxidative stress (OS) generator) compared to untreated transgenic fly lines. Likewise, knockdown flies displayed higher climbing performance than control flies. Amazingly, gallic acid (GA) significantly protected DAergic neurons, ameliorated life span, and climbing abilities in knockdown fly lines treated with PQ compared to flies treated with PQ only. Therefore, silencing specific gene(s) involved in neuronal death might constitute an excellent tool to study the response of DAergic neurons to OS stimuli. We propose that a therapy with antioxidants and selectively “switching off” death genes in DAergic neurons could provide a means for pre-clinical PD individuals to significantly ameliorate their disease condition. PMID:24385865

  14. Free Radical Production, Antioxidant Capacity, and Oxidative Stress Response Signatures in Fibroblasts From Lewis Dwarf Rats: Effects of Life Span-Extending Peripubertal GH Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sosnowska, Danuta; Podlutsky, Andrej; Koncz, Peter; Sonntag, William E.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery that in invertebrates, disruption of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 pathway extends life span and increases resistance to oxidative injury led to the hypothesis that IGF-1 signaling may play a role in regulating cellular reactive oxygen species production, oxidative stress resistance, and consequentially, organismal life span in mammals. However, previous studies testing this hypothesis in rodent models of IGF-1 deficiency yielded controversial results. The Lewis dwarf rat is a useful model of human growth hormone (GH)/IGF-1 deficiency as it mimics many of the pathophysiological alterations present in human GH/IGF-1–deficient patients as well as elderly individuals. Peripubertal treatment of Lewis dwarf rats with GH results in a significant extension of life span. The present study was designed to test the role of the GH/IGF-1 axis in regulating cellular oxidative stress and oxidative stress resistance, utilizing primary fibroblasts derived from control rats, Lewis dwarf rats and GH-replete dwarf rats. Measurements of cellular dihydroethidium and C-H2DCFDA fluorescence showed that cellular O2·− and peroxide production were similar in each group. Fibroblasts from control and Lewis dwarf rats exhibited similar antioxidant capacities and comparable sensitivity to H2O2, rotenone, high glucose, tunicamycin, thapsigargin, paraquat, and mitomycin, which cause apoptosis through increasing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, ATP depletion, and/or by damaging DNA, lipids and proteins. Fibroblasts from GH-replete rats exhibited significantly increased antioxidant capacities and superior resistance to H2O2, rotenone and bacterial lipopolysaccharide–induced cell death compared with cells from Lewis dwarf rats, whereas their sensitivity to the other stressors investigated was not statistically different. Thus, low circulating IGF-1 levels present in vivo in Lewis dwarf rats do not elicit long-lasting alterations in cellular reactive oxygen species generation and oxidative stress resistance, whereas life span–extending peripubertal GH treatment resulted in increased antioxidant capacity and increased resistance to cellular injury caused by some, but not all, oxidative stressors. PMID:21350246

  15. The Study of Life Review. An Approach to the Investigation of Intellectual Development across the Life Span. Studien und Berichte 47.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staudinger, Ursula M.

    A study looked for age differences in the quality of responses to the Life Review Task (LRT), studied the LRT itself as a tool for exploring wisdom and intellectual functioning in adulthood, and considered personality characteristics and life experience as alternative predictors of response quality. Sixty-three West German women of different ages…

  16. Growth, reproductive biology and life cycle of the vermicomposting earthworm, Perionyx ceylanensis Mich. (Oligochaeta: Megascolecidae).

    PubMed

    Karmegam, Natchimuthu; Daniel, Thilagavathy

    2009-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt has been made to study the growth, reproduction and life cycle of the earthworm, Perionyx ceylanensis Mich. in cowdung for the period of 340 days. Results showed that the overall mean growth rate was 1.79, 1.57 and 1.34 mg/worm/day respectively for the worms cultured singly, in batches of four and eight. Cocoon production rate was found between 0.85 and 0.94 cocoons/worm/day and the hatching success between 74.67% and 82.67%. The majority of the cocoons (95.16-96.77%) hatched only one hatchling. Worms raised singly also produced viable cocoons indicating that P. ceylanensis reproduce parthenogenetically. The life cycle of the worms cultured singly was +/-57 days and it was +/-50 days for the worms cultured in batches of four and eight. There is a vast scope to utilize P. ceylanensis for vermiculture practices due to short period of life cycle. PMID:19467590

  17. On the Life History of Planktonic Foraminifera: Lunar Reproduction Cycle in Globigerinoides Sacculifer (Brady)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Jonathan; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Avraham, Sophie

    1991-06-01

    Detailed plankton sampling in the Gulf of Elat, Red Sea, demonstrates a lunar periodicity in the abundance of the foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer in surface water as well as below the photic zone. Shell size distribution coupled with abundance changes and laboratory observations suggests the following scheme for the life cycle of this spinose foraminifer: Young individuals of roughly 200 µm (average diameter) are found in surface water 7-8 days after the full moon. During the course of 1 week they grow rapidly to an average size of 300-400 µm. The larger and mature individuals, many of which having a saclike chamber, start to sink down below the photic zone. They add a final chamber, shed their spines, thicken their shell, continue to sink well within the main thermocline, digest their symbionts, and eventually reproduce via gametogenesis at the full moon. We do not have information about the fusion of the gametes, the embryonic growth stages, and the vertical migration of the young foraminifera. However, 1 week after the full moon, small individuals appear again in surface waters and the cycle repeats itself. Although the mechanism by which the moon is synchronizing the reproduction cycle is not clear, it obviously offers better chances for the gametes to fuse. Sinking to deeper water may provide the following advantages: avoidance of predators at the crucial stage of their life cycle when they are without their spine protection; synchronization of reproduction by triggering gametogenesis due to the change from light/dark cycle to complete darkness; better chances for the gametes to concentrate and fuse on a narrow sigma-t surface at the zone where the pycnocline is steeper; and finally, better chances for survival for the young unprotected foraminifera who start their growth in an environment that contains fewer potential predators.

  18. Investigation of a free-tip rotor configuration for research on spanwise life distributions and wake velocity surveys of a semi-span wing with a discontinuous twist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortin, Paul; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    1989-01-01

    A wind tunnel test was conducted in the NASA Ames 7 x 10 Foot Wind Tunnel to investigate the lift distribution on a semi-span wing with a discontinuous change in spanwise twist. The semi-span wing had a tip with an adjustable pitch angle independent on the inboard section pitch angle simulating the free-tip rotor blade when its free-tip is at a deflected position. The spanwise lift distribution over the wing and the tip were measured and three component velocity surveys behind the wing were obtained with a three dimensional laser Doppler velocimeter (LV) with the wing at one angle of attack and the tip deflected at different pitch angles. A six component internal strain gage balance was also used to measure total forces and moments on the tip. The three dimensional lift was computed from the two dimensional life distributions obtained from the LV and from the strain gage balance. The results from both experimental methods are shown to be in agreement with predictions made by a steady, three dimensional panel code, VSAERO.

  19. A unifying perspective on personality pathology across the life span: Developmental considerations for the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    TACKETT, JENNIFER L.; BALSIS, STEVE; OLTMANNS, THOMAS F.; KRUEGER, ROBERT F.

    2010-01-01

    Proposed changes in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) include replacing current personality disorder (PD) categories on Axis II with a taxonomy of dimensional maladaptive personality traits. Most of the work on dimensional models of personality pathology, and on personality disorders per se, has been conducted on young and middle-aged adult populations. Numerous questions remain regarding the applicability and limitations of applying various PD models to early and later life. In the present paper, we provide an overview of such dimensional models and review current proposals for conceptualizing PDs in DSM-V. Next, we extensively review existing evidence on the development, measurement, and manifestation of personality pathology in early and later life focusing on those issues deemed most relevant for informing DSM-V. Finally, we present overall conclusions regarding the need to incorporate developmental issues in conceptualizing PDs in DSM-V and highlight the advantages of a dimensional model in unifying PD perspectives across the life span. PMID:19583880

  20. Midwives' adoption of the reproductive life plan in contraceptive counselling: a mixed methods study

    PubMed Central

    Stern, J.; Bodin, M.; Grandahl, M.; Segeblad, B.; Axén, L.; Larsson, M.; Tydén, T.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION How is the reproductive life plan (RLP) adopted in midwifery contraceptive counselling? SUMMARY ANSWER A majority of midwives adopted the RLP in their counselling, had predominantly positive experiences and considered it a feasible tool for promoting reproductive health. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The RLP is a health-promoting tool recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the USA for improving preconception health. It was recently used in a clinical setting in Sweden and was found to increase women's knowledge about fertility and to influence women's wishes to have their last child earlier in life. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION An exploratory mixed methods study among 68 midwives who provided contraceptive counselling in primary health care to at least 20 women each during the study period. Midwives received an introduction and materials for using the RLP in contraceptive counselling. Three months later, in the spring of 2014, they were invited to complete a questionnaire and participate in a focus group interview about their adoption of the RLP. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Data collection was through a questionnaire (n = 53 out of 68; participation rate 78%) and five focus group interviews (n = 22). Participants included both younger and older midwives with longer and shorter experiences of contraceptive counselling in public and private health care in one Swedish county. Quantitative data were analysed for differences between users and non-users, and qualitative data were analysed by qualitative content analysis to explore the midwives experiences and opinions of using the RLP. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Sixty-eight per cent of midwives had used the RLP in their contraceptive counselling. Four categories emerged through the focus group interviews: (i) A predominantly positive experience; (ii) The RLP—a health-promoting tool; (iii) individual and societal factors influence the RLP counselling; and (4) long-term implementation comprises opportunities, risks and needs. The most common reason for not using the RLP was lack of information. LIMITATIONS, REASONS FOR CAUTION There was general lack of experience of using the RLP with women from different cultural backgrounds, with non-Swedish speaking women and, when a partner was present. Due to the non-random sample, the limited knowledge about non-responders and a short follow-up period, results apply to short-term implementations and might not fully apply to long-term implementation. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS The use of RLP in contraceptive counselling appears a feasible way of promoting reproductive health. Results from the USA and Sweden indicate it is a promising tool for midwives and other health professionals involved in reproductive counselling, which deserves to be explored in other nations. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Grants were received from the Medical Faculty at Uppsala University and the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health. There are no competing interests. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER N/A. PMID:25771220

  1. Differential effects of IGF-1 deficiency during the life span on structural and biomechanical properties in the tibia of aged mice.

    PubMed

    Ashpole, Nicole M; Herron, Jacquelyn C; Estep, Patrick N; Logan, Sreemathi; Hodges, Erik L; Yabluchanskiy, Andriy; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Sonntag, William E

    2016-04-01

    Advanced aging is associated with the loss of structural and biomechanical properties in bones, which increases the risk for bone fracture. Aging is also associated with reductions in circulating levels of the anabolic signaling hormone, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1. While the role of IGF-1 in bone development has been well characterized, the impact of the age-related loss of IGF-1 on bone aging remains controversial. Here, we describe the effects of reducing IGF-1 at multiple time points in the mouse life span-early in postnatal development, early adulthood, or late adulthood on tibia bone aging in both male and female igf (f/f) mice. Bone structure was analyzed at 27 months of age using microCT. We find that age-related reductions in cortical bone fraction, cortical thickness, and tissue mineral density were more pronounced when IGF-1 was reduced early in life and not in late adulthood. Three-point bone bending assays revealed that IGF-1 deficiency early in life resulted in reduced maximum force, maximum bending moment, and bone stiffness in aged males and females. The effects of IGF-1 on bone aging are microenvironment specific, as early-life loss of IGF-1 resulted in decreased cortical bone structure and strength along the diaphysis while significantly increasing trabecular bone fraction and trabecular number at the proximal metaphysis. The increases in trabecular bone were limited to males, as early-life loss of IGF-1 did not alter bone fraction or number in females. Together, our data suggest that the age-related loss of IGF-1 influences tibia bone aging in a sex-specific, microenvironment-specific, and time-dependent manner. PMID:26968399

  2. Against the oxidative damage theory of aging: superoxide dismutases protect against oxidative stress but have little or no effect on life span in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Ryan; McElwee, Joshua J; Matthijssens, Filip; Walker, Glenda A; Houthoofd, Koen; Back, Patricia; Matscheski, Andrea; Vanfleteren, Jacques R; Gems, David

    2008-12-01

    The superoxide radical (O(2)(-)) has long been considered a major cause of aging. O(2)(-) in cytosolic, extracellular, and mitochondrial pools is detoxified by dedicated superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoforms. We tested the impact of each SOD isoform in Caenorhabditis elegans by manipulating its five sod genes and saw no major effects on life span. sod genes are not required for daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutant longevity. However, loss of the extracellular Cu/ZnSOD sod-4 enhances daf-2 longevity and constitutive diapause, suggesting a signaling role for sod-4. Overall, these findings imply that O(2)(-) is not a major determinant of aging in C. elegans. PMID:19056880

  3. The life span of silicone gel breast implants and a comparison of mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging in detecting implant rupture: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C M; Cohen, V; Thornby, J; Netscher, D

    1998-12-01

    Because of the growing concern surrounding the integrity and life span of silicone gel breast implants and the reported variations in the diagnostic accuracy of various imaging techniques in identifying ruptured implants, the authors undertook a meta-analysis of articles in the scientific literature to examine these concerns. They were able to include reports from the literature that detailed the condition and removal of 1,099 breast implants during the past 7 years. The median life span of a silicone gel implant was estimated to be 16.4 years. Of the implants, 79.1% were intact at 10 years, falling to 48.7% by 15 years. The sensitivities and specificities of three imaging modalities used in the diagnosis of implant rupture (mammography, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) were also evaluated and compared statistically in an effort to discover which of the three techniques might serve as the most reliable screening tool in the diagnosis of gel implant rupture. The sensitivity of mammography for finding a ruptured implant is 28.4% with a specificity of 92.9%. Ultrasonography has a sensitivity and specificity of 59.0% and 76.8% respectively compared with MRI, which was 78.1% and 80.0% respectively. For implants in place for 10 years, one would need to image 3.3 implants by ultrasound to identify a single possible rupture. However, because of the 76.8% specificity, 8.1 implants would need to be imaged to find a confirmed intraoperative rupture. This was similar to MRI, in which 3.1 implants would need to be imaged to detect one suspected rupture, and 6.1 implants would need to be imaged to find one intraoperatively confirmed rupture. The authors do not recommend either ultrasound or MRI as a screening tool based on their meta-analysis. PMID:9869129

  4. Character strengths and well-being across the life span: data from a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Martí, María L.; Ruch, Willibald

    2014-01-01

    Character strengths are positive, morally valued traits of personality. This study aims at assessing the relationship between character strengths and subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) in a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland (N = 945). We further test whether this relationship is consistent at different stages in life. Results showed that hope, zest, love, social intelligence and perseverance yielded the highest positive correlations with life satisfaction. Hope, zest, humor, gratitude and love presented the highest positive correlations with positive affect. Hope, humor, zest, honesty, and open-mindedness had the highest negative correlations with negative affect. When examining the relationship between strengths and well-being across age groups, in general, hope, zest and humor consistently yielded the highest correlations with well-being. Additionally, in the 27–36 years group, strengths that promote commitment and affiliation (i.e., kindness and honesty) were among the first five positions in the ranking of the relationship between strengths and well-being. In the 37–46 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that promote the maintenance of areas such as family and work (i.e., love, leadership) were among the first five positions in the ranking. Finally, in the 47–57 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that facilitate integration and a vital involvement with the environment (i.e., gratitude, love of learning) were among the first five positions in the ranking. This study partially supports previous findings with less representative samples on the association between character strengths and well-being, and sheds light on the relative importance of some strengths over others for well-being across the life span. PMID:25408678

  5. Character strengths and well-being across the life span: data from a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martí, María L; Ruch, Willibald

    2014-01-01

    Character strengths are positive, morally valued traits of personality. This study aims at assessing the relationship between character strengths and subjective well-being (i.e., life satisfaction, positive and negative affect) in a representative sample of German-speaking adults living in Switzerland (N = 945). We further test whether this relationship is consistent at different stages in life. Results showed that hope, zest, love, social intelligence and perseverance yielded the highest positive correlations with life satisfaction. Hope, zest, humor, gratitude and love presented the highest positive correlations with positive affect. Hope, humor, zest, honesty, and open-mindedness had the highest negative correlations with negative affect. When examining the relationship between strengths and well-being across age groups, in general, hope, zest and humor consistently yielded the highest correlations with well-being. Additionally, in the 27-36 years group, strengths that promote commitment and affiliation (i.e., kindness and honesty) were among the first five positions in the ranking of the relationship between strengths and well-being. In the 37-46 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that promote the maintenance of areas such as family and work (i.e., love, leadership) were among the first five positions in the ranking. Finally, in the 47-57 years group, in addition to hope, zest and humor, strengths that facilitate integration and a vital involvement with the environment (i.e., gratitude, love of learning) were among the first five positions in the ranking. This study partially supports previous findings with less representative samples on the association between character strengths and well-being, and sheds light on the relative importance of some strengths over others for well-being across the life span. PMID:25408678

  6. Effects of postpartum nutrition and once-daily suckling on reproductive efficiency and preweaning calf performance in fall-calvspan>ing Brahman (Bos indicus) cows.

    PubMed

    Browning, R; Robert, B S; Lewis, A W; Neuendorff, D A; Randel, R D

    1994-04-01

    Brahman cows were used to evaluate the effects of postpartum nutrition and suckling on reproductive and calf performance. Cows received high or low TDN and once-daily or unrestricted suckling. High TDN (H; 111% of NRC recommendation) cows received a 75% corn: 25% soybean meal diet. Low TDN (L; 93% of NRC recommendation) cows received no concentrates. Once-daily suckled (restricted, R) cows nursed calves for 30 min/d starting at d 21 after calving. In the unrestricted (U) suckling groups, calves had continuous access to cows. By 2 wk of suckling restriction, more (P < .01) R than U cows had progesterone concentrations of > or = .7 ng/mL (55 vs 0%) and more (P < .05) HR than LR cows had progesterone concentrations > or = .7 ng/mL (70 vs 40%). All groups had increases in progesterone and 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-prostaglandin F2 alpha before estrus. The interval to first estrus was shorter (P < .01) for R than for U cows (42 vs 65 d). By d 42 postpartum, more (P < .01) R than U cows exhibited estrus (67 vs 0%), and more (P < .05) HR than LR cows exhibited estrus (89 vs 44%). Calving interval was shorter (P < .01) for R than for U cows (361 vs 395 d). Initial ADG were lower (P < .01) for R than for U calves (.02 vs .69 kg), but weaning weights were similar. Once-daily suckling permitted ovarian activity, hastened return to estrus, and reduced calving interval without reducing weaning weights. Increased postpartum energy intake enhanced the response to restricted suckling. PMID:8014166

  7. Early life stress shapes female reproductive strategy through eggshell pigmentation in Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Duval, Camille; Zimmer, Cédric; Mikšík, Ivan; Cassey, Phillip; Spencer, Karen A

    2014-11-01

    Physiological constraints on colouration have been widely reported; especially in birds, which trade-off antioxidant responses against colourful costly signals. One female extended phenotypic trait, which might also highlight important physiological trade-offs, is the pigmentation of their eggshells. In ground-nesting species, producing eggs that are visually undetectable by predators is the best camouflage strategy. However, the condition-dependence of eggshell pigmentation, and the pigments role in oxidative stress, may constrain females to trade-off between their antioxidant capacity and maximising the camouflage of their eggs when they deposit eggshell pigments. Developmental stress is one factor that influences female antioxidant capacity, and could lead to variations in eggshell pigmentation that might have crucial consequences on individual fitness if egg crypsis is compromised especially under stressful conditions. We investigated the interaction between developmental and breeding conditions with respect to eggshell pigmentation in Japanese quail. We studied 30 females that bred under both control and stressful conditions, and were exposed to pre- and/or post-natal stress, or neither. Pre- and post-natal stress independently influenced eggshell pigmentation strategies under stressful breeding conditions. Under stressful reproduction, eggshell protoporphyrin concentration and maculation were affected by pre-natal stress, whereas eggshell reflectance and biliverdin concentration were influenced by post-natal stress. These changes may reflect potential adaptive strategies shaped by developmental stress, but additional data on the benefit of egg crypsis in quail, combined with studies on the role of both pigments on chick survival, will help to clarify whether early life stress can enhance fitness through eggshell pigmentation when developmental and reproductive environments match. PMID:25169834

  8. Increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and reduced adult life span in an insecticide-resistant strain of Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Otali, D; Novak, R J; Wan, W; Bu, S; Moellering, D R; De Luca, M

    2014-06-01

    Control of the malaria vector An. gambiae is still largely obtained through chemical intervention using pyrethroids, such as permethrin. However, strains of An. gambiae that are resistant to the toxic effects of pyrethroids have become widespread in several endemic areas over the last decade. The objective of this study was to assess differences in five life-history traits (larval developmental time and the body weight, fecundity, hatch rate, and longevity of adult females) and energy metabolism between a strain of An. gambiae that is resistant to permethrin (RSP), due to knockdown resistance and enhanced metabolic detoxification, and a permethrin susceptible strain reared under laboratory conditions. We also quantified the expression levels of five antioxidant enzyme genes: GSTe3, CAT, GPXH1, SOD1, and SOD2. We found that the RSP strain had a longer developmental time than the susceptible strain. Additionally, RSP adult females had higher wet body weight and increased water and glycogen levels. Compared to permethrin susceptible females, RSP females displayed reduced metabolic rate and mitochondrial coupling efficiency and higher mitochondrial ROS production. Furthermore, despite higher levels of GSTe3 and CAT transcripts, RSP females had a shorter adult life span than susceptible females. Collectively, these results suggest that permethrin resistance alleles might affect energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and adult survival of An. gambiae. However, because the strains used in this study differ in their genetic backgrounds, the results need to be interpreted with caution and replicated in other strains to have significant implications for malaria transmission and vector control. PMID:24555527

  9. Deletion of the cardiolipin-specific phospholipase Cld1 rescues growth and life span defects in the tafazzin mutant: implications for Barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cunqi; Lou, Wenjia; Li, Yiran; Chatzispyrou, Iliana A; Hüttemann, Maik; Lee, Icksoo; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Vaz, Frédéric M; Chen, Shuliang; Greenberg, Miriam L

    2014-02-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) that is synthesized de novo is deacylated to monolysocardiolipin (MLCL), which is reacylated by tafazzin. Remodeled CL contains mostly unsaturated fatty acids. In eukaryotes, loss of tafazzin leads to growth and respiration defects, and in humans, this results in the life-threatening disorder Barth syndrome. Tafazzin deficiency causes a decrease in the CL/MLCL ratio and decreased unsaturated CL species. Which of these biochemical outcomes contributes to the physiological defects is not known. Yeast cells have a single CL-specific phospholipase, Cld1, that can be exploited to distinguish between these outcomes. The cld1Δ mutant has decreased unsaturated CL, but the CL/MLCL ratio is similar to that of wild type cells. We show that cld1Δ rescues growth, life span, and respiratory defects of the taz1Δ mutant. This suggests that defective growth and respiration in tafazzin-deficient cells are caused by the decreased CL/MLCL ratio and not by a deficiency in unsaturated CL. CLD1 expression is increased during respiratory growth and regulated by the heme activator protein transcriptional activation complex. Overexpression of CLD1 leads to decreased mitochondrial respiration and growth and instability of mitochondrial DNA. However, ATP concentrations are maintained by increasing glycolysis. We conclude that transcriptional regulation of Cld1-mediated deacylation of CL influences energy metabolism by modulating the relative contribution of glycolysis and respiration. PMID:24318983

  10. Assessing the burden of sexual and reproductive ill-health: questions regarding the use of disability-adjusted life years.

    PubMed Central

    AbouZahr, C.; Vaughan, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    The use of the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) as the unit in which to calculate the burden of disease associated with reproductive ill-health has given rise to considerable debate. Criticisms include the failure to address the problem of missing and inadequate epidemiological data, inability to deal adequately with co-morbidities, and lack of transparency in the process of ascribing disability weights to sexual and reproductive health conditions. Many of these criticisms could be addressed within the current DALY framework and a number of suggestions to do so are made. These suggestions include: (1) developing an international research strategy to determine the incidence and prevalence of reproductive ill-health and diseases, including the risk of long-term complications; (2) undertaking a research strategy using case studies, population-based surveillance data and longitudinal studies to identify, evaluate and utilize more of the existing national data sources on sexual and reproductive health; (3) comprehensively mapping the natural history of sexual and reproductive health conditions--in males and in females--and their sequelae, whether physical or psychological; (4) developing valuation instruments that are adaptable for both chronic and acute health states, that reflect a range of severity for each health state and can be modified to reflect prognosis; (5) undertaking a full review of the DALY methodology to determine what changes may be made to reduce sources of methodological and gender bias. Despite the many criticisms of the DALY as a measurement unit, it represents a major conceptual advance since it permits the combination of life expectancy and levels of dysfunction into a single measure. Measuring reproductive ill-health by counting deaths alone is inadequate for a proper understanding of the dimensions of the problem because of the young age of many of the deaths associated with reproductive ill-health and the large component of years lived with disability from many of the associated conditions. PMID:10859859

  11. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; MacIver, Nancie J; Hale, Laura P

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 ("T/I" mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 ("T/I-het" dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for development of therapies to prevent reproductive complications and/or growth failure in humans with IBD. PMID:27045690

  12. Reproduction and Growth in a Murine Model of Early Life-Onset Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Eniko; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Wetsel, William C.; MacIver, Nancie J.; Hale, Laura P.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in transgenic murine models have provided insight into the complexity underlying inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a disease hypothesized to result from an injurious immune response against intestinal microbiota. We recently developed a mouse model of IBD that phenotypically and histologically resembles human childhood-onset ulcerative colitis (UC), using mice that are genetically modified to be deficient in the cytokines TNF and IL-10 (“T/I” mice). Here we report the effects of early life onset of colon inflammation on growth and reproductive performance of T/I mice. T/I dams with colitis often failed to get pregnant or had small litters with pups that failed to thrive. Production was optimized by breeding double homozygous mutant T/I males to females homozygous mutant for TNF deficiency and heterozygous for deficiency of IL-10 (“T/I-het” dams) that were not susceptible to spontaneous colon inflammation. When born to healthy (T/I-het) dams, T/I pups initially gained weight similarly to wild type (WT) pups and to their non-colitis-susceptible T/I-het littermates. However, their growth curves diverged between 8 and 13 weeks, when most T/I mice had developed moderate to severe colitis. The observed growth failure in T/I mice occurred despite a significant increase in their food consumption and in the absence of protein loss in the stool. This was not due to TNF-induced anorexia or altered food consumption due to elevated leptin levels. Metabolic studies demonstrated increased consumption of oxygen and water and increased production of heat and CO2 in T/I mice compared to their T/I-het littermates, without differences in motor activity. Based on the clinical similarities of this early life onset model of IBD in T/I mice to human IBD, these results suggest that mechanisms previously hypothesized to explain growth failure in children with IBD require re-evaluation. The T/I mouse model may be useful for further investigation of such mechanisms and for development of therapies to prevent reproductive complications and/or growth failure in humans with IBD. PMID:27045690

  13. Life span in online communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, A.; Kosiński, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Recently online communities have attracted great interest and have become an important medium of information exchange between users. The aim of this work is to introduce a simple model of the evolution of online communities. This model describes (a) the time evolution of users’ activity in a web service, e.g., the time evolution of the number of online friends or written posts, (b) the time evolution of the degree distribution of a social network, and (c) the time evolution of the number of active users of a web service. In the second part of the paper we investigate the influence of the users’ lifespan (i.e., the total time in which they are active in an online community) on the process of rumor propagation in evolving social networks. Viral marketing is an important application of such method of information propagation.

  14. Life span in online communities.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, A; Kosiński, R A

    2010-12-01

    Recently online communities have attracted great interest and have become an important medium of information exchange between users. The aim of this work is to introduce a simple model of the evolution of online communities. This model describes (a) the time evolution of users' activity in a web service, e.g., the time evolution of the number of online friends or written posts, (b) the time evolution of the degree distribution of a social network, and (c) the time evolution of the number of active users of a web service. In the second part of the paper we investigate the influence of the users' lifespan (i.e., the total time in which they are active in an online community) on the process of rumor propagation in evolving social networks. Viral marketing is an important application of such method of information propagation. PMID:21230706

  15. Suicide: Across the Life Span.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Jeffery

    2016-06-01

    Suicide remains a major public health issue. There have been more than 40,000 deaths by suicide in 2014. Understanding both the neuroscience and psychological development is key for nursing care so adequate interventions and treatment strategies are developed when working with people thinking about suicide. It is critical to assess and recognize risk and protective factors to ensure patient safety. The older adult, children, and adolescent populations remain vulnerable to suicide. A discussion regarding the psychiatric, psychosocial, and treatment considerations for these populations is included. An overview of communication, suicide assessment, and safety planning is discussed. PMID:27229281

  16. Changes in gas exchange characteristics during the life span of giant sequoia: implications for response to current and future concentrations of atmospheric ozone.

    PubMed

    Grulke, N. E.; Miller, P. R.

    1994-01-01

    Native stands of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum Bucholz) are being exposed to relatively high concentrations of atmospheric ozone produced in urban and agricultural areas upwind. The expected change in environmental conditions over the next 100 years is likely to be unprecedented in the life span (about 2,500 years) of giant sequoia. We determined changes in physiological responses of three age classes of giant sequoia (current-year, 12-, and 125-year-old) to differing concentrations of ozone, and assessed age-related differences in sensitivity to pollutants by examining physiological changes (gas exchange, water use efficiency) across the life span of giant sequoia (current-year, 2-, 5-, 20-, 125-, and > 2,000-year-old trees). The CO(2) exchange rate (CER) was greater in current-year (12.1 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (4.8 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (3.0 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1), averaged across the four older age classes). Dark respiration was highest for current-year seedlings (-6.5 +/- 0.7 micro mol CO(2) m(-2) s(-1)) and was increased twofold in symptomatic individuals exposed to elevated ozone concentrations. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was greater in current-year (355 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) and 2-year-old seedlings (200 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)) than in all older trees (50 mmol H(2)O m(-2) s(-1)), indicating that the ozone concentration in substomatal cavities is higher in young seedlings than in trees. Significant changes in water use efficiency, as indicated by C(i)/C(a), occurred in trees between ages 5 and 20 years. We conclude that giant sequoias seedlings are sensitive to atmospheric ozone until they are about 5 years old. Low conductance, high water use efficiency, and compact mesophyll all contribute to a natural ozone tolerance, or defense, or both, in foliage of older trees. PMID:14967638

  17. Phototoxic effect of UVR on wild type, ebony and yellow mutants of Drosophila melanogaster: life span, fertility, courtship and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZhePeng; Liu, RuiFang; Wang, AnRu; Du, LiLi; Deng, XueMei

    2008-10-01

    Melanin plays an important role in protecting organisms from ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Therefore, it is possible that differently colored strains can show different sensitivities to UVR. In the present work, life span, fertility and courtship behavior of wild type (w), ebony (e) and yellow (y) strains of Drosophila melanogaster were studied to evaluate their sensitivity to ultraviolet (UV). Because a range of phototoxic effects of UVR are mediated through generation of free radicals, levels of free radicals, lipid peroxide (malondialdehyde, MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity of three strains were examined to indicate their antioxidant defending ability and oxidative status. It was shown that w always had the highest lifespan and fertility not only in the control but also in UV-exposed groups. Moreover, lifespan and fertility of e were significantly higher (P<0.0001) than those of y in the UV-exposed groups, but not for the control. On the other hand, UV exposure had an adverse effect on courtship of flies. Stronger electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals could be detected in w, e and y exposed to 5 min UV. And there were more significant changes of EPR signals in y than in w and e. UVR had no significant (P=0.1782) effect on the SOD activities. After pooling data from the control and UV-exposed groups, we found that w had a significantly (P<0.05) higher level of SOD activity, but e and y were nearly at the same levels (P>0.05). MDA levels were increased in the UV dose-dependent manner (P=0.0495). In conclusion, our results suggested that UVR can decrease life span and fertility of flies and do harm to courtship, which may be due to oxidative damage to flies tissues (e.g. central nervous system) induced by free radicals. w had the highest tolerance to UVR, which may be ascribed to its advantage of survival under the natural condition and at high level of SOD activity. Then differences of pigment between e and y in absorbing UV, shielding against UV and scavenging free radicals produced by UVR should be responsible for their different sensitivity to UVR. PMID:18815752

  18. Events in Early Life are Associated with Female Reproductive Ageing: A UK Biobank Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S.; Perry, John R. B.; Henley, William E.; Melzer, David; Weedon, Michael N.; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The available oocyte pool is determined before birth, with the majority of oocytes lost before puberty. We hypothesised that events occurring before birth, in childhood or in adolescence (‘early-life risk factors’) could influence the size of the oocyte pool and thus the timing of menopause. We included cross-sectional data from 273,474 women from the UK Biobank, recruited in 2006–2010 from across the UK. We analysed the association of early menopause with events occurring before adulthood in 11,781 cases (menopause aged under 45) and 173,641 controls (menopause/pre-menopausal at ≥45 years), in models controlling for potential confounding variables. Being part of a multiple birth was strongly associated with early menopause (odds ratio = 1.42, confidence interval: 1.11, 1.82, P = 8.0 × 10−9, fully-adjusted model). Earlier age at menarche (odds ratio = 1.03, confidence interval: 1.01, 1.06, P = 2.5 × 10−6) and earlier year of birth were also associated with EM (odds ratio = 1.02, confidence interval: 1.00, 1.04, P = 8.0 × 10−6). We also confirmed previously reported associations with smoking, drinking alcohol, educational level and number of births. We identified an association between multiple births and early menopause, which connects events pre-birth, when the oocyte pool is formed, with reproductive ageing in later life. PMID:27094806

  19. Events in Early Life are Associated with Female Reproductive Ageing: A UK Biobank Study.

    PubMed

    Ruth, Katherine S; Perry, John R B; Henley, William E; Melzer, David; Weedon, Michael N; Murray, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The available oocyte pool is determined before birth, with the majority of oocytes lost before puberty. We hypothesised that events occurring before birth, in childhood or in adolescence ('early-life risk factors') could influence the size of the oocyte pool and thus the timing of menopause. We included cross-sectional data from 273,474 women from the UK Biobank, recruited in 2006-2010 from across the UK. We analysed the association of early menopause with events occurring before adulthood in 11,781 cases (menopause aged under 45) and 173,641 controls (menopause/pre-menopausal at ≥45 years), in models controlling for potential confounding variables. Being part of a multiple birth was strongly associated with early menopause (odds ratio = 1.42, confidence interval: 1.11, 1.82, P = 8.0 × 10(-9), fully-adjusted model). Earlier age at menarche (odds ratio = 1.03, confidence interval: 1.01, 1.06, P = 2.5 × 10(-6)) and earlier year of birth were also associated with EM (odds ratio = 1.02, confidence interval: 1.00, 1.04, P = 8.0 × 10(-6)). We also confirmed previously reported associations with smoking, drinking alcohol, educational level and number of births. We identified an association between multiple births and early menopause, which connects events pre-birth, when the oocyte pool is formed, with reproductive ageing in later life. PMID:27094806

  20. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Axelstad, Marta; Christiansen, Sofie; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Hass, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalates, pesticides, u.v.-filters, bisphenol A, parabens, and the drug paracetamol. The groups received vehicle (control), a mixture of all 13 chemicals at 150-times (TotalMix150) or 450-times (TotalMix450) high-end human exposure, or 450-times a mixture of nine predominantly anti-androgenic chemicals (AAMix450). Onset of puberty and estrous cyclicity at 9 and 12 months of age were assessed. Few female offspring showed significantly regular estrus cyclicity at 12 months of age in the TotalMix450 and AAMix450 groups compared with controls. In 19-month-old male offspring, epididymal sperm counts were lower than controls, and in ventral prostate an overrepresentation of findings related to hyperplasia was observed in exposed groups compared with controls, particularly in the group dosed with anti-androgens. A higher incidence of pituitary adenoma at 19 months of age was found in males and females in the AAMix450 group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence of pituitary tumors. These delayed effects highlight the need for further studies on the role of endocrine disrupters in hormone-related disorders in aging humans. PMID:24287426

  1. A Mouse Model for Studying Nutritional Programming: Effects of Early Life Exposure to Soy Isoflavones on Bone and Reproductive Health

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Wendy E.; Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Dinsdale, Elsa C.

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, our research group has characterized and used a mouse model to demonstrate that “nutritional programming” of bone development occurs when mice receive soy isoflavones (ISO) during the first days of life. Nutritional programming of bone development can be defined as the ability for diet during early life to set a trajectory for better or compromised bone health at adulthood. We have shown that CD-1 mice exposed to soy ISO during early neonatal life have higher bone mineral density (BMD) and greater trabecular inter-connectivity in long bones and lumbar spine at young adulthood. These skeletal sites also withstand greater forces before fracture. Because the chemical structure of ISO resembles that of 17-β-estradiol and can bind to estrogen receptors in reproductive tissues, it was prudent to expand analyses to include measures of reproductive health. This review highlights aspects of our studies in CD-1 mice to understand the early life programming effects of soy ISO on bone and reproductive health. Preclinical mouse models can provide useful data to help develop and guide the design of studies in human cohorts, which may, depending on findings and considerations of safety, lead to dietary interventions that optimize bone health. PMID:27187422

  2. A widespread chromosomal inversion polymorphism contributes to a major life-history transition, local adaptation, and reproductive isolation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, David B; Willis, John H

    2010-01-01

    The role of chromosomal inversions in adaptation and speciation is controversial. Historically, inversions were thought to contribute to these processes either by directly causing hybrid sterility or by facilitating the maintenance of co-adapted gene complexes. Because inversions suppress recombination when heterozygous, a recently proposed local adaptation mechanism predicts that they will spread if they capture alleles at multiple loci involved in divergent adaptation to contrasting environments. Many empirical studies have found inversion polymorphisms linked to putatively adaptive phenotypes or distributed along environmental clines. However, direct involvement of an inversion in local adaptation and consequent ecological reproductive isolation has not to our knowledge been demonstrated in nature. In this study, we discovered that a chromosomal inversion polymorphism is geographically widespread, and we test the extent to which it contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation under natural field conditions. Replicated crosses between the prezygotically reproductively isolated annual and perennial ecotypes of the yellow monkeyflower, Mimulus guttatus, revealed that alternative chromosomal inversion arrangements are associated with life-history divergence over thousands of kilometers across North America. The inversion polymorphism affected adaptive flowering time divergence and other morphological traits in all replicated crosses between four pairs of annual and perennial populations. To determine if the inversion contributes to adaptation and reproductive isolation in natural populations, we conducted a novel reciprocal transplant experiment involving outbred lines, where alternative arrangements of the inversion were reciprocally introgressed into the genetic backgrounds of each ecotype. Our results demonstrate for the first time in nature the contribution of an inversion to adaptation, an annual/perennial life-history shift, and multiple reproductive isolating barriers. These results are consistent with the local adaptation mechanism being responsible for the distribution of the two inversion arrangements across the geographic range of M. guttatus and that locally adaptive inversion effects contribute directly to reproductive isolation. Such a mechanism may be partially responsible for the observation that closely related species often differ by multiple chromosomal rearrangements. PMID:20927411

  3. Increased production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and reduced adult life span in an insecticide-resistant strain of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Otali, Dennis; Novak, Robert J.; Wan, Wen; Bu, Su; Moellering, Douglas R.; De Luca, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Control of the malaria vector An. gambiae is still largely obtained through chemical intervention using pyrethroids, such as permethrin. However, strains of An. gambiae that are resistant to the toxic effects of pyrethroids have become widespread in several endemic areas over the last decade. The objective of this study was to assess differences in five life-history traits (larval developmental time and the body weight, fecundity, hatch rate, and longevity of adult females) and energy metabolism between a strain of An. gambiae that is resistant to permethrin (RSP), due to knockdown resistance and enhanced metabolic detoxification, and a permethrin susceptible strain reared under laboratory conditions. We also quantified the expression levels of five antioxidant enzyme genes: GSTe3, CAT, GPXH1, SOD1, and SOD2. We found that the RSP strain had a longer developmental time than the susceptible strain. Additionally, RSP adult females had higher wet body weight and increased water and glycogen levels. Compared to permethrin susceptible females, RSP females displayed reduced metabolic rate and mitochondrial coupling efficiency and higher mitochondrial ROS production. Furthermore, despite higher levels of GSTe3 and CAT transcripts, RSP females had a shorter adult life span than susceptible females. Collectively, these results suggest that permethrin resistance alleles might affect energy metabolism, oxidative stress, and adult survival of An. gambiae. However, because the strains used in this study differ in their genetic backgrounds, the results need to be interpreted with caution and replicated in other strains in order to have significant implications for malaria transmission and vector control. PMID:24555527

  4. SIRT6 links histone H3 lysine 9 deacetylation to NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression and organismal life span.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Tiara L A; Michishita, Eriko; Adler, Adam S; Damian, Mara; Berber, Elisabeth; Lin, Meihong; McCord, Ron A; Ongaigui, Kristine C L; Boxer, Lisa D; Chang, Howard Y; Chua, Katrin F

    2009-01-01

    Members of the sirtuin (SIRT) family of NAD-dependent deacetylases promote longevity in multiple organisms. Deficiency of mammalian SIRT6 leads to shortened life span and an aging-like phenotype in mice, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here we show that SIRT6 functions at chromatin to attenuate NF-kappaB signaling. SIRT6 interacts with the NF-kappaB RELA subunit and deacetylates histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) at NF-kappaB target gene promoters. In SIRT6-deficient cells, hyperacetylation of H3K9 at these target promoters is associated with increased RELA promoter occupancy and enhanced NF-kappaB-dependent modulation of gene expression, apoptosis, and cellular senescence. Computational genomics analyses revealed increased activity of NF-kappaB-driven gene expression programs in multiple Sirt6-deficient tissues in vivo. Moreover, haploinsufficiency of RelA rescues the early lethality and degenerative syndrome of Sirt6-deficient mice. We propose that SIRT6 attenuates NF-kappaB signaling via H3K9 deacetylation at chromatin, and hyperactive NF-kappaB signaling may contribute to premature and normal aging. PMID:19135889

  5. Biomarkers of aging, life span and spontaneous carcinogenesis in the wild type and HER-2 transgenic FVB/N female mice.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Andrey V; Popovich, Irina G; Trashkov, Alexandr P; Egormin, Peter A; Yurova, Maria N; Tyndyk, Margarita L; Gubareva, Ekaterina A; Artyukin, Ilia N; Vasiliev, Andrey G; Khaitsev, Nikolai V; Zabezhinski, Mark A; Anisimov, Vladimir N

    2016-04-01

    FVB/N wild type and transgenic HER-2/neu FVB/N female mice breed at N.N. Petrov Research Institute of Oncology were under observation until natural death without any special treatment. Age-related dynamics of body weight, food consumption and parameters of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, level of nitric oxide, malonic dialdehyde, catalase, Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase, vascular endothelial growth factor were studied in both mice strains. The parameters of life span and tumor pathology were studied as well. Cancer-prone transgenic HER-2/neu mice developed in 100 % multiple mammary adenocarcinomas and died before the age of 1 year. Forty tree percent of long-lived wild type mice survived the age of 2 years and 19 %-800 days. The total tumor incidence in wild type mice was 34 %. The age-associated changes in the level of serum IGF-1, glucose and insulin started much earlier in transgene HER-2/neu mice as compared with wild type FVB/N mice. It was suggested that transgenic HER-2/neu involves in initiation of malignization of mammary epithelial cells but also in acceleration of age-related hormonal and metabolic changes in turn promoting mammary carcinogenesis. PMID:26423570

  6. Doxycycline-regulated over-expression of hsp22 has negative effects on stress resistance and life span in adult Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Bhole, Deepak; Allikian, Michael J; Tower, John

    2004-09-01

    Drosophila hsp22 is a member of the small heat shock proteins family (shsps). The hsp22 is expressed in a tissue-general pattern in response to heat stress and during normal aging, and localizes to the mitochondrial matrix, however, its exact function and targets are unknown. Hsp22 was found to be rapidly induced in response to oxidative stress, indicating that hsp22 is also an oxidative stress response gene. To assay for effects of hsp22, a ubiquitous pattern of hsp22 gene expression was generated in young flies using the "tet-on" doxycycline-regulated promoter system. The hsp22 over-expression made flies more sensitive to heat and oxidative stress, while resistance to coumarin poisoning was not affected. Life span was also reduced, particularly at higher culture temperatures. Members of other hsp families have been shown to feedback-inhibit their own expression by interacting with the heat shock transcription factor (HSF) and preventing binding to the HSEs. Induction of hsp22:lacZ and hsp70:lacZ reporter transgenes in response to acute stress was normal in the presence of hsp22 protein over-expression and in old flies, indicating that the negative effects of hsp22 are downstream of the HSF/HSE pathway and the transcriptional heat shock response. The data demonstrate a specific over-expression phenotype for hsp22 and suggest that hsp22 interacts with heat and oxidative stress resistance pathways. PMID:15491684

  7. Knockdown of the Drosophila FIG4 induces deficient locomotive behavior, shortening of motor neuron, axonal targeting aberration, reduction of life span and defects in eye development.

    PubMed

    Kyotani, Akane; Azuma, Yumiko; Yamamoto, Itaru; Yoshida, Hideki; Mizuta, Ikuko; Mizuno, Toshiki; Nakagawa, Masanori; Tokuda, Takahiko; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in Factor-Induced-Gene 4 (FIG4) gene have been identified in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 4J (CMT4J), Yunis-Varon syndrome and epilepsy with polymicrogyria. FIG4 protein regulates a cellular abundance of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PI(3,5)P2), a signaling lipid on the cytosolic surface of membranes of the late endosomal compartment. PI(3,5)P2 is required for retrograde membrane trafficking from lysosomal and late endosomal compartments to the Golgi. However, it is still unknown how the neurodegeneration that occurs in these diseases is related to the loss of FIG4 function. Drosophila has CG17840 (dFIG4) as a human FIG4 homolog. Here we specifically knocked down dFIG4 in various tissues, and investigated their phenotypes. Neuron-specific knockdown of dFIG4 resulted in axonal targeting aberrations of photoreceptor neurons, shortened presynaptic terminals of motor neurons in 3rd instar larvae and reduced climbing ability in adulthood and life span. Fat body-specific knockdown of dFIG4 resulted in enlarged lysosomes in cells that were detected by staining with LysoTracker. In addition, eye imaginal disk-specific knockdown of dFIG4 disrupted differentiation of pupal ommatidial cell types, such as cone cells and pigment cells, suggesting an additional role of dFIG4 during eye development. PMID:26708557

  8. Life-span studies in rats exposed to 239PuO2 aerosol. II. Nonpulmonary tumor formation in control and exposed groups.

    PubMed

    Sanders, C L

    1992-01-01

    Female young adult, SPF, Wistar rats, obtained from the same supplier over an 18-month period, were examined in a life-span study with inhaled 239PuO2. Nonpulmonary tumors were evaluated both in 1052 rats comprising 16 controls groups and in 2105 exposed rats. Tumors in the pituitary gland, mammary glands, uterus, and thyroid glands, in order of decreasing prevalence, accounted for 90% of all tumors. Uterine tumors comprised 55% of all nonpulmonary malignant tumors. A substantial variability in tumor incidence was seen in most organs and for most tumor types among the 16 cohort subgroups, which was not explained by husbandry conditions or mortality patterns. The incidence of thyroid tumors ranged from 0 to 21% and uterine tumors from 14 to 45% among control cohorts. Pulmonary metastases were seen in 12% of all rats irrespective of treatment, two thirds of which were uterine adenocarcinomas that appeared histologically similar to some primary lung adenocarcinomas. A tumor incidence of about 1.5% was associated with metal identification ear tags. Except in the lung, no significant difference was found in tumor location or type between control and exposed rats. A twofold or greater increase in tumors in exposed rats was found in Zymbal gland, bladder, brain, and liver; tumor incidence in each organ was < 1%. PMID:1464807

  9. Tackling Vision-Related Disability in Old Age: An Application of the Life-Span Theory of Control to Narrative Data

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Mark; Horowitz, Amy; Reinhardt, Joann P.

    2010-01-01

    This study used the life-span theory of control (Heckhausen, J., & Schulz, R.) to examine adaptation to disability in old age. A narrative approach to data collection was used to assess the strategies employed by 364 older adults with macular degeneration to deal with daily challenges. Findings revealed a rich array of strategies. Compensatory Primary Control was reported by nearly all respondents, Compensatory Secondary Control by a majority, and Selective Primary Control by half of the participants. Selective Secondary Control was the least reported. Differences in strategy use depending on level of vision impairment were the most pronounced within the category of Compensatory Primary Control for strategies that involved using help from others and alternative means. Within the category of Selective Secondary Control, effort to maintain a positive outlook was associated with higher impairment levels, whereas within the category of Compensatory Secondary Control, attempts not to dwell on problems related to vision were associated with lower impairment levels. Implications for conceptual development and future research are discussed. PMID:19965902

  10. Sirt1 extends life span and delays aging in mice through the regulation of Nk2 homeobox 1 in the DMH and LH.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Akiko; Brace, Cynthia S; Rensing, Nick; Cliften, Paul; Wozniak, David F; Herzog, Erik D; Yamada, Kelvin A; Imai, Shin-Ichiro

    2013-09-01

    The mammalian Sir2 ortholog Sirt1 plays an important role in metabolic regulation. However, the role of Sirt1 in the regulation of aging and longevity is still controversial. Here we demonstrate that brain-specific Sirt1-overexpressing (BRASTO) transgenic mice show significant life span extension in both males and females, and aged BRASTO mice exhibit phenotypes consistent with a delay in aging. These phenotypes are mediated by enhanced neural activity specifically in the dorsomedial and lateral hypothalamic nuclei (DMH and LH, respectively), through increased orexin type 2 receptor (Ox2r) expression. We identified Nk2 homeobox 1 (Nkx2-1) as a partner of Sirt1 that upregulates Ox2r transcription and colocalizes with Sirt1 in the DMH and LH. DMH/LH-specific knockdown of Sirt1, Nkx2-1, or Ox2r and DMH-specific Sirt1 overexpression further support the role of Sirt1/Nkx2-1/Ox2r-mediated signaling for longevity-associated phenotypes. Our findings indicate the importance of DMH/LH-predominant Sirt1 activity in the regulation of aging and longevity in mammals. PMID:24011076

  11. Assessing Planning Ability Across the Adult Life Span: Population-Representative and Age-Adjusted Reliability Estimates for the Tower of London (TOL-F).

    PubMed

    Kaller, Christoph P; Debelak, Rudolf; Köstering, Lena; Egle, Johanna; Rahm, Benjamin; Wild, Philipp S; Blettner, Maria; Beutel, Manfred E; Unterrainer, Josef M

    2016-03-01

    Planning ahead the consequences of future actions is a prototypical executive function. In clinical and experimental neuropsychology, disc-transfer tasks like the Tower of London (TOL) are commonly used for the assessment of planning ability. Previous psychometric evaluations have, however, yielded a poor reliability of measuring planning performance with the TOL. Based on theory-grounded task analyses and a systematic problem selection, the computerized TOL-Freiburg version (TOL-F) was developed to improve the task's psychometric properties for diagnostic applications. Here, we report reliability estimates for the TOL-F from two large samples collected in Mainz, Germany (n = 3,770; 40-80 years) and in Vienna, Austria (n = 830; 16-84 years). Results show that planning accuracy on the TOL-F possesses an adequate internal consistency and split-half reliability (>0.7) that are stable across the adult life span while the TOL-F covers a broad range of graded difficulty even in healthy adults, making it suitable for both research and clinical application. PMID:26715472

  12. The control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers: evidence of convergence with and divergence from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Wan-chi; Li, Yin; Sun, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huanu

    2014-01-01

    An analytical review of the motivational theory of life-span development reveals that this theory has undergone a series of elegant theoretical integrations. Its claim to universality nonetheless brings forth unresolved controversies. With the purpose of scrutinizing the key propositions of this theory, an empirical study was designed to examine the control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers (N = 637). The OPS-Scales (Optimization in Primary and Secondary Control Scales) for the Domain of Teaching were constructed to assess patterns of control processes. Three facets of subjective well-being were investigated with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Life Satisfaction Scale, and the Subjective Vitality Scale. The results revealed certain aspects of alignment with and certain divergences from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development. Neither “primacy of primary control” nor “primacy of secondary control” was clearly supported. Notably, using different criteria for subjective well-being yielded different subtypes of primary and secondary control as predictors. The hypothesized life-span trajectories of primary and secondary control received limited support. To advance the theory in this area, we recommend incorporating Lakatos' ideas about sophisticated falsification by specifying the hard core of the motivational theory of life-span development and articulating new auxiliary hypotheses. PMID:24904483

  13. The control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers: evidence of convergence with and divergence from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wan-Chi; Li, Yin; Sun, Xiaoyan; Xu, Huanu

    2014-01-01

    An analytical review of the motivational theory of life-span development reveals that this theory has undergone a series of elegant theoretical integrations. Its claim to universality nonetheless brings forth unresolved controversies. With the purpose of scrutinizing the key propositions of this theory, an empirical study was designed to examine the control processes and subjective well-being of Chinese teachers (N = 637). The OPS-Scales (Optimization in Primary and Secondary Control Scales) for the Domain of Teaching were constructed to assess patterns of control processes. Three facets of subjective well-being were investigated with the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Life Satisfaction Scale, and the Subjective Vitality Scale. The results revealed certain aspects of alignment with and certain divergences from the key propositions of the motivational theory of life-span development. Neither "primacy of primary control" nor "primacy of secondary control" was clearly supported. Notably, using different criteria for subjective well-being yielded different subtypes of primary and secondary control as predictors. The hypothesized life-span trajectories of primary and secondary control received limited support. To advance the theory in this area, we recommend incorporating Lakatos' ideas about sophisticated falsification by specifying the hard core of the motivational theory of life-span development and articulating new auxiliary hypotheses. PMID:24904483

  14. The male silkworm moth (Antheraea pernyi) is a key ingredient in hu-bao and sheng-bao for specific prolongation of the life-span of the male fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster).

    PubMed

    Hu, Kai; Wang, Qiongmei; Hu, Paul Q

    2002-01-01

    It is well established in Traditional Chinese Medicine that certain natural products, such as male silkworm moths, have different therapeutic effects on men than on women. These natural products have been used as dietary supplements specifically formulated for men or for women. However, this presumed sex-specific effect of certain natural products has not yet been confirmed experimentally with animal models or in human clinical trials. Here, using the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) as a longevity model, we examined the effect of hu-bao (HB) and seng-bao (SB), two marketed health products made from a mixture of natural ingredients. Our results convincingly demonstrate that the effect of HB and SB are indeed specific for the male fly. The life-span of the male was significantly increased when HB or SB was added to the culture medium. In contrast, neither HB nor SB had much effect on the female fly. Upon removal of the male silkworm moth ingredient from HB or SB, the life-span prolongation effect of HB and SB was drastically diminished. Only with the addition of the male silkworm moth did the culture medium show a statistically significant life-span prolongation effect. This result suggests that the male silkworm moth is a key ingredient, in combination with other components, for specific prolongation of the life-span of male flies. PMID:12230015

  15. Designing prospective cohort studies for assessing reproductive and developmental toxicity during sensitive windows of human reproduction and development – the LIFE Study

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Germaine M. Buck; Schisterman, Enrique F.; Sweeney, Anne M.; Wilcosky, Timothy C.; Gore-Langton, Robert E.; Lynch, Courtney D.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Schrader, Steven M.; Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Zhen; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2014-01-01

    Summary Buck Louis GM, Schisterman EF, Sweeney AM, Wilcosky TC, Gore-Langton RE, Lynch CD, Boyd Barr D, Schrader SM, Kim S, Chen Z, Sundaram R, on behalf of the LIFE Study. Designing prospective cohort studies for assessing reproductive and developmental toxicity during sensitive windows of human reproduction and development – the LIFE Study. Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology 2011; 25: 413–424. The relationship between the environment and human fecundity and fertility remains virtually unstudied from a couple-based perspective in which longitudinal exposure data and biospecimens are captured across sensitive windows. In response, we completed the LIFE Study with methodology that intended to empirically evaluate a priori purported methodological challenges: implementation of population-based sampling frameworks suitable for recruiting couples planning pregnancy;obtaining environmental data across sensitive windows of reproduction and development;home-based biospecimen collection; anddevelopment of a data management system for hierarchical exposome data. We used two sampling frameworks (i.e. fish/wildlife licence registry and a direct marketing database) for 16 targeted counties with presumed environmental exposures to persistent organochlorine chemicals to recruit 501 couples planning pregnancies for prospective longitudinal follow-up while trying to conceive and throughout pregnancy. Enrolment rates varied from <1% of the targeted population (n = 424 423) to 42% of eligible couples who were successfully screened; 84% of the targeted population could not be reached, while 36% refused screening. Among enrolled couples, ~85% completed daily journals while trying; 82% of pregnant women completed daily early pregnancy journals, and 80% completed monthly pregnancy journals. All couples provided baseline blood/urine samples; 94% of men provided one or more semen samples and 98% of women provided one or more saliva samples. Women successfully used urinary fertility monitors for identifying ovulation and home pregnancy test kits. Couples can be recruited for preconception cohorts and will comply with intensive data collection across sensitive windows. However, appropriately sized sampling frameworks are critical, given the small percentage of couples contacted found eligible and reportedly planning pregnancy at any point in time. PMID:21819423

  16. Recruitment and Retention Strategies for Minority or Poor Clinical Research Participants: Lessons From the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity Across the Life Span Study

    PubMed Central

    Ejiogu, Ngozi; Norbeck, Jennifer H.; Mason, Marc A.; Cromwell, Bridget C.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Investigating health disparities requires studies designed to recruit and retain racially and socioeconomically diverse cohorts. It is critical to address the barriers that disproportionately affect participation in clinical research by minorities and the socioeconomically disadvantaged. This study sought to identify and rectify these barriers to recruit and retain a biracial (African American and non-Hispanic White) and socioeconomically diverse cohort for a longitudinal study. Design and Method: The Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study is a 20-year longitudinal examination of how race and socioeconomic status influence the development of age-related health disparities. One goal was to create a multifactorial recruitment and retention strategy. The recruitment paradigm targeted known barriers and identified those unique to the study's urban environment. The retention paradigm mirrored the recruitment plan but was based on specifically developed approaches. Results: This cohort recruitment required attention to developing community partnerships, designing the research study to meet the study hypotheses and to provide benefit to participants, providing a safe community-based site for the research and creating didactics to develop staff cultural proficiency. These efforts facilitated study implementation and enhanced recruitment resulting in accrual of a biracial and socioeconomically diverse cohort of 3,722 participants. Implications: Recruiting and retaining minority or poor research participants is challenging but possible. The essential facets include clear communication of the research hypothesis, focus on providing a direct benefit for participants, and selection of a hypothesis that is directly relevant to the community studied PMID:21565817

  17. Temperature-related variation in growth rate, size, maturation and life span in a marine herbivorous fish over a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Trip, Elizabeth D L; Clements, Kendall D; Raubenheimer, David; Choat, J Howard

    2014-07-01

    In ectotherms, growth rate, body size and maturation rate covary with temperature, with the direction and magnitude of variation predicted by the Temperature-Size Rule (TSR). Nutritional quality or availability of food, however, may vary over latitudinal gradients, resulting in ambiguous effects on body size and maturation rate. The Temperature-Constraint Hypothesis (TCH) predicts that marine herbivorous ectotherms are nutritionally compromised at latitudes exceeding 30°. This provides an opportunity to resolve the contrasting demographic responses of ectotherms to variation in temperature and nutritional status over latitudinal gradients. This study uses analysis of demographic rates to evaluate the predictions of the TSR in a marine herbivorous ectotherm sampled over a significant latitudinal gradient. The direction and magnitude of demographic variation was established in the marine herbivorous fish, Odax pullus (the butterfish), and compared with that of a phylogenetically related but trophically distinct species, the carnivorous Notolabrus fucicola (the banded wrasse). Both species were sampled at three locations across the length of New Zealand covering latitudes between 35°S and 49°S. Growth rate, mean size-at-age, age- and size-at-maturity, life span and abundance were estimated for each species at each location. Demographic traits of both taxa varied with latitude. Both species showed slower initial growth rates, and matured later at a larger body size at higher latitudes than populations sampled at lower latitudes. In addition, abundances increased significantly at higher latitudes in both species. These results were consistent with the TSR but not with the TCH, confirming that nutritional ecology (herbivore vs. carnivory) did not determine demographic patterns over a biologically significant latitudinal gradient. Results from this study suggest that the absence of herbivorous reef fishes from the higher latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere may not reflect a general physiological mechanism as suggested by the TCH and highlights the need to clarify the evolutionary histories of the marine biota of each hemisphere. PMID:24252150

  18. Correlations of life-span variation parameters in 128 successive generations of Drosophila melanogaster with changes in atmospheric pressure and geomagnetic activity.

    PubMed

    Izmaylov, D M; Obukhova, L K; Konradov, A A

    2005-05-01

    Correlations between the parameters of life-span (LS) distribution of Drosophila melanogaster, including mean LS (MLS) and the time of 10 and 90% population mortality, and some geophysical parameters that are usually beyond the control of researchers dealing with laboratory cultures, including atmospheric pressure, solar activity indices (Wolf's sunspot numbers and 2,800-MHz radio flux), and geomagnetic activity (planetary index, K(p)), were studied. Geophysical data were obtained from free-access official web sites of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration of the US Department of Commerce and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism and Radiowave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences. The geophysical parameters were calculated only for the period corresponding to 10 days of preimaginal development of the flies from egg to imago. Canonical correlation analysis, calculation of the non-parametric Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients, and graphical data analysis were used. Highly significant correlations between parameters of LS distribution in males and females and environmental factors, such as the atmospheric pressure on the 4th and 5th day of development and geomagnetic activity indices (K(p)) on the 6th and 10th day of development were found, with correlation coefficients varying from 0.31 to 0.37 (P<0.02). Assuming a causal relationship between geophysical factors and LS, it may be hypothesized that energetically weak environmental factors determine the formation of LS oscillatory dynamics in laboratory populations. The possible mechanisms underlying the contribution of these environmental factors to the LS variation in successive generations are discussed. PMID:15864403

  19. Reproductive adaptation in Drosophila exposed to oxygen-enriched atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kloek, G.; Winkle, L.

    1979-01-01

    Ten successive generations of a Drosophila melanogaster population were exposed to an atmospheric mix of 50% oxygen/50% nitrogen at standard pressure. This atmospheric mix has been shown to be toxic to this species and causes significantly shortened life span. By the fifth generation, survivorship and life span for the first 25-30 days were identical to control populations and total life span was shorter by only a few days. Egg-laying rates were stable in the experimental populations but below those of the controls. Hatching success was identical between experimental and control populations. Even though the egg-laying rates were lower in 50% oxygen, it was concluded that the population had adapted and could maintain a stable population in these conditions. The near-normal life spans, normal hatching rates, and overall population stability, exhibited following five generations of adaptation, were considered sufficient to allow continued reproduction in spite of a reduced egg-laying rate.

  20. Care for the beginning of life. The revised Ethical and Religious Directives discuss abortion, contraception, and assisted reproduction.

    PubMed

    deBlois, J; O'Rourke, K D

    1995-01-01

    Part 4 of the Ethical and Religious Directives for Catholic Health Care Services--which discusses such controversial issues as abortion, contraception, and assisted reproduction--is informed by a profound respect for human life and the institution of marriage. The controversies are familiar. But many in Catholic healthcare may be less familiar with the principles underlying Church teaching on these issues. Appropriate interpretation and application of these directives require that all concerned be educated in both the theological-ethical and the clinical dimensions of care giving. Directives 38 through 43 deal with reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization and surrogacy. Directives 52 and 53 express the Church's consistent teaching on contraceptive interventions. Directives 45 to 48, 50 to 51, and 54 reiterate the Church's firm stance on the inviolability of human life, including nascent human life. However, the directives also say that not all medical interventions resulting in fetal death are prohibited abortions. However, appropriate regard for human life, marriage, and the family require more than mere adherence to the directives' prescriptions and proscriptions. Ethics committees in Catholic healthcare should study clinical data as well as theological materials. PMID:10145132

  1. Reproduction and early life history of ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) on the St. Louis River, a Lake Superior tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, William P.; Selgeby, James H.; Collins, Hollie L.

    1998-01-01

    Reproduction and early life history of ruffe (Gymnocephalus ceriums) was investigated during April to July in 1993 and 1994 in the St. Louis River, a western Lake Superior tributary. This study was conducted to assist fishery managers in determining possible interactions among the early life stages of ruffe and other North American percids, and in obtaining information useful in developing control methods targeted at the early life stages of ruffe. Ruffe had a prolonged spawning period that extended from late April to late June with peak spawning in mid to late May when water temperatures were between 12 and 14°C. The majority of ruffe protolarva were captured 1 to 2 weeks after egg deposition between mid May and late June and most were captured in water 0.5-m deep. Onshore-offshore movements were not observed, but diel vertical movements of larval ruffe were observed on several occasions. The greatest chance of ballast water transport of pelagic larval ruffe is between mid May and July. Information on reproduction and early life history in this report will assist fishery mangers in development of ruffe control methods, and assist Great Lakes shipping in ballast water management to prevent the spread of ruffe.

  2. Early reproductive maturity among Pumé foragers: Implications of a pooled energy model to fast life histories.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Karen L; Greaves, Russell D; Ellison, Peter T

    2009-01-01

    Life history theory places central importance on relationships between ontogeny, reproduction, and mortality. Fast human life histories have been theoretically and empirically associated with high mortality regimes. This relationship, however, poses an unanswered question about energy allocation. In epidemiologically stressful environments, a greater proportion of energy is allocated to immune function. If growth and maintenance are competing energetic expenditures, less energy should be available for growth, and the mechanism to sustain rapid maturation remains unclear. The human pattern of extended juvenile provisioning and resource sharing may provide an important source of variation in energy availability not predicted by tradeoff models that assume independence at weaning. We consider a group of South American foragers to evaluate the effects that pooled energy budgets may have on early reproduction. Despite growing up in an environment with distinct seasonal under-nutrition, harsh epidemiological conditions, and no health care, Pumé girls mature quickly and initiate childbearing in their midteens. Pooled energy budgets compensate for the low productivity of girls not only through direct food transfers but importantly by reducing energy they would otherwise expend in foraging activities to meet metabolic requirements. We suggest that pooled energy budgets affect energy availability at both extrinsic and intrinsic levels. Because energy budgets are pooled, Pumé girls and young women are buffered from environmental downturns and can maximize energy allocated to growth completion and initiate reproduction earlier than a traditional bound-energy model would predict. PMID:19402033

  3. FERTILITY INTENTIONS AND EARLY LIFE HEALTH STRESS AMONG WOMEN IN EIGHT INDIAN CITIES: TESTING THE REPRODUCTIVE ACCELERATION HYPOTHESIS.

    PubMed

    Kulathinal, Sangita; Säävälä, Minna

    2015-09-01

    In life history theory, early life adversity is associated with an accelerated reproductive tempo. In harsh and unpredictable conditions in developing societies fertility is generally higher and the reproductive tempo faster than in more secure environments. This paper examines whether differences in female anthropometry, particularly adult height, are associated with fertility intentions of women in urban environments in India. The study population consists of women aged 15-29 (N=4485) in slums and non-slums of eight Indian cities in the National Family Health Survey (NFHS) of 2005-2006. Adult height is taken as a proxy for early childhood health and nutritional condition. Fertility intentions are examined by using two variables: the desire to have a child or another child, and to have it relatively soon, as indicative of accelerated reproductive scheduling. Evidence supporting the acceleration hypothesis is found in two urban frames out of 26 examined in a two-staged multinomial logistic model. In three cases, the relationship between fertility intentions and height is the opposite than expected by the acceleration hypothesis: taller women have a higher predictive probability of desiring a(nother) child and/or narrower birth spacing. Potential explanations for the partly contradictory relationship between the childhood health indicator and fertility intentions are discussed. PMID:25115228

  4. Effects of triclosan on the early life stages and reproduction of medaka Oryzias latipes and induction of hepatic vitellogenin.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Naomi; Hirano, Masashi; Matsuoka, Munekazu; Shiratsuchi, Hideki; Ishibashi, Yasuhiro; Takao, Yuji; Arizono, Koji

    2004-04-14

    Triclosan (2,4,4'-trichloro-2'-hydroxydiphenyl ether) is widely used as antibacterial agent in various industrial products, such as textile goods, soap, shampoo, liquid toothpaste and cosmetics, and often detected in wastewater effluent. In this study, the effects of TCS on the early life stages and reproduction of medaka (Oryzias latipes) were investigated. The 96-h median lethal concentration value of TCS for 24-h-old larvae was 602 microg/l. The hatchability and time to hatching in fertilized eggs exposed to 313 microg/l TCS for 14 days were significantly decreased and delayed, respectively. An assessment of the effects of a TCS 21-day exposure period on the reproduction of paired medaka showed no significant differences in the number of eggs produced and fertility among the control and 20, 100 and 200 microg/l TCS treatment groups. However, concentrations of hepatic vitellogenin were increased significantly in males treated with TCS at 20 and 100 microg/l. In the F(1) generations, although the hatching of embryos in the 20 microg/l treatment showed adverse effects, there was no dose-response relationship between hatchability and TCS treatment levels. These results suggest that TCS has high toxicity on the early life stages of medaka, and that the metabolite of TCS may be a weak estrogenic compound with the potential to induce vitellogenin in male medaka but with no adverse effect on reproductive success and offspring. PMID:15003701

  5. Reproductive Requirements and Life Cycle of Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), Potential Biological Control Agent of Matsucoccus feytaudi (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae).

    PubMed

    Tavares, C; Jactel, H; van Halder, I; Branco, M

    2015-06-01

    Several pine bast scales (Hemiptera: Matsucoccidae) are important pests of pine trees in the Northern Hemisphere. Some species are invasive and cause significant economic and environmental impacts. Such is the case with Matsucoccus feytaudi Ducasse, an invasive pest of maritime pine forests in Southeastern France, Italy, and Corsica. The ladybird Iberorhyzobius rondensis (Eizaguirre) is a recently described species that is endemic to the Iberian Peninsula and is a potential candidate for the biological control of M. feytaudi. However, little is known of the biology of I. rondensis. As part of the risk assessment study for a classical biological control program, the phenology and reproductive mechanisms of the beetle were analyzed. I. rondensis is univoltine and is seasonally synchronized with the phenology of the prey M. feytaudi, which is also univoltine. An obligatory reproductive diapause of 5-6 mo and the need to feed on the eggs of the prey to begin oviposition emerged as the two primary mechanisms that assure life cycle synchronization of the ladybird with its prey. Female fecundity was also higher when the ladybirds were fed M. feytaudi eggs. Life cycle synchronization with M. feytaudi and reproduction triggered by consumption of prey eggs indicate that I. rondensis is a promising biological control agent of the pine bast scale. PMID:26313991

  6. Sarconesiopsis magellanica (Diptera: Calliphoridae) life-cycle, reproductive and population parameters using different diets under laboratory conditions.

    PubMed

    Pinilla, Yudi T; Patarroyo, Manuel A; Bello, Felio J

    2013-12-10

    Sarconesiopsis magellanica is a forensically relevant necrophagous blowfly that can aid in determining the post-mortem interval (PMI) as it is the first to colonise decomposing corpses. The blowfly has been reported in several South-American countries including Colombia, in high-altitude regions ranging from 1200 to 3100 m above sea level. The present study reports this blowfly's life cycle and an analysis of its reproductive and population parameters under laboratory conditions for the first time. Six successive generations of flies were produced with an average of 65.38% adults emerging with respect to the total number of puparia. The shortest life cycle from egg to adult emergence was found in individuals fed on a lyophilised liver (LL) diet, while the longest one was found in individuals fed with an egg-powdered milk (E-PM) diet; intermediate values were found when the pig liver (PL) diet was tested. The greatest adult longevity was achieved when the PL diet was used, the LL diet giving the shortest. The population parameters based on the horizontal life table were: net reproductive rate (Ro)=447.752±9.9, mean generational time (Tc)=18.18±0.38, natural population increase rate (r(m))=0.145 and finite population increase rate (λ)=1.398. This blowfly colony represents a valuable asset for both basic and applied studies. Members of the S. magellanica colony so established were used for analysing the life-cycle, reproductive and population parameters, and further medical and forensic application studies are currently underway. PMID:24314544

  7. A blurring of life-history lines: Immune function, molt and reproduction in a highly stable environment.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Loren; González-Gómez, Paulina L; Ellis, Vincenzo A; Levin, Iris I; Vásquez, Rodrigo A; Wingfield, John C

    2015-03-01

    Rufous-collared sparrows (Zonotrichia capensis peruviensis) from valleys in the Atacama Desert of Chile, live in an extremely stable environment, and exhibit overlap in molt and reproduction, with valley-specific differences in the proportion of birds engaged in both. To better understand the mechanistic pathways underlying the timing of life-history transitions, we examined the relationships among baseline and stress-induced levels of corticosterone (CORT), testosterone, and bacteria-killing ability of the blood plasma (BKA), as well as haemosporidian parasite infections and the genetic structure of two groups of sparrows from separate valleys over the course of a year. Birds neither molting nor breeding had the lowest BKA, but there were no differences among the other three categories of molt-reproductive stage. BKA varied over the year, with birds in May/June exhibiting significantly lower levels of BKA than the rest of the year. We also documented differences in the direction of the relationship between CORT and BKA at different times during the year. The direction of these relationships coincides with some trends in molt and reproductive stage, but differs enough to indicate that these birds exhibit individual-level plasticity, or population-level variability, in coordinating hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis activity with life-history stage. We found weak preliminary evidence for genetic differentiation between the two populations, but not enough to indicate genetic isolation. No birds were infected with haemosporidia, which may be indicative of reduced parasite pressure in deserts. The data suggest that these birds may not trade off among different life-history components, but rather are able to invest in multiple life-history components based on their condition. PMID:25712433

  8. Reproductive History and Later-Life Comorbidity Trajectories: A Medicare-Linked Cohort Study From the Utah Population Database.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Heidi A; Smith, Ken R; Zimmer, Zachary

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive lives of men and women may provide significant insight into later-life morbidity and mortality. Sociological, biological, and evolutionary theories predict a relationship between reproductive history and later-life health; however, current research is lacking consensus on the direction of the relationship. Parity, early age at first birth and last birth, birth weight of offspring, having a child die as an infant, and having a preterm birth may have long-term effects on health for both men and women. In this study, the relationship between these measures of reproductive history and later-life health is examined using the Utah Population Database (a rich source of longitudinal data), and Medicare claims data from 1992-2009. Later-life health is measured using annual Charlson comorbidity index scores, a construct that summarizes most serious illnesses afflicting older individuals. Group-based trajectory modeling that accounts for nonrandom attrition due to death is used to identify the number and types of morbidity trajectories by sex and age for 52,924 individuals aged 65-84 in 1992. For females, early age at first birth, high parity, and having a preterm or high-birth-weight baby are associated with increased risks of comorbidity; later age at last birth is associated with a decreased risk of comorbidity. For males, early age at first birth and having a child with an abnormal birth weight leads to increased risk of comorbidity. The results suggest that both biological and social factors play important roles in the relationships between fertility and morbidity profiles at older ages. PMID:26527471

  9. Gene pathways that delay Caenorhabditis elegans reproductive senescence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng C; Oakley, Holly D; Carr, Christopher E; Sowa, Jessica N; Ruvkun, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Reproductive senescence is a hallmark of aging. The molecular mechanisms regulating reproductive senescence and its association with the aging of somatic cells remain poorly understood. From a full genome RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified 32 Caenorhabditis elegans gene inactivations that delay reproductive senescence and extend reproductive lifespan. We found that many of these gene inactivations interact with insulin/IGF-1 and/or TGF-β endocrine signaling pathways to regulate reproductive senescence, except nhx-2 and sgk-1 that modulate sodium reabsorption. Of these 32 gene inactivations, we also found that 19 increase reproductive lifespan through their effects on oocyte activities, 8 of them coordinate oocyte and sperm functions to extend reproductive lifespan, and 5 of them can induce sperm humoral response to promote reproductive longevity. Furthermore, we examined the effects of these reproductive aging regulators on somatic aging. We found that 5 of these gene inactivations prolong organismal lifespan, and 20 of them increase healthy life expectancy of an organism without altering total life span. These studies provide a systemic view on the genetic regulation of reproductive senescence and its intersection with organism longevity. The majority of these newly identified genes are conserved, and may provide new insights into age-associated reproductive senescence during human aging. PMID:25474471

  10. Perceived risk of predation affects reproductive life-history traits in Gambusia holbrooki, but not in Heterandria formosa.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shomen; Heithaus, Michael R; Trexler, Joel C; Ray-Mukherjee, Jayanti; Vaudo, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Key to predicting impacts of predation is understanding the mechanisms through which predators impact prey populations. While consumptive effects are well-known, non-consumptive predator effects (risk effects) are increasingly being recognized as important. Studies of risk effects, however, have focused largely on how trade-offs between food and safety affect fitness. Less documented, and appreciated, is the potential for predator presence to directly suppress prey reproduction and affect life-history characteristics. For the first time, we tested the effects of visual predator cues on reproduction of two prey species with different reproductive modes, lecithotrophy (i.e. embryonic development primarily fueled by yolk) and matrotrophy (i.e. energy for embryonic development directly supplied by the mother to the embryo through a vascular connection). Predation risk suppressed reproduction in the lecithotrophic prey (Gambusia holbrokii) but not the matrotroph (Heterandria formosa). Predator stress caused G. holbrooki to reduce clutch size by 43%, and to produce larger and heavier offspring compared to control females. H. formosa, however, did not show any such difference. In G. holbrooki we also found a significantly high percentage (14%) of stillbirths in predator-exposed treatments compared to controls (2%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct empirical evidence of predation stress affecting stillbirths in prey. Our results suggest that matrotrophy, superfetation (clutch overlap), or both decrease the sensitivity of mothers to environmental fluctuation in resource (food) and stress (predation risk) levels compared to lecithotrophy. These mechanisms should be considered both when modeling consequences of perceived risk of predation on prey-predator population dynamics and when seeking to understand the evolution of reproductive modes. PMID:24551171

  11. Perceived Risk of Predation Affects Reproductive Life-History Traits in Gambusia holbrooki, but Not in Heterandria formosa

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Shomen; Heithaus, Michael R.; Trexler, Joel C.; Ray-Mukherjee, Jayanti; Vaudo, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Key to predicting impacts of predation is understanding the mechanisms through which predators impact prey populations. While consumptive effects are well-known, non-consumptive predator effects (risk effects) are increasingly being recognized as important. Studies of risk effects, however, have focused largely on how trade-offs between food and safety affect fitness. Less documented, and appreciated, is the potential for predator presence to directly suppress prey reproduction and affect life-history characteristics. For the first time, we tested the effects of visual predator cues on reproduction of two prey species with different reproductive modes, lecithotrophy (i.e. embryonic development primarily fueled by yolk) and matrotrophy (i.e. energy for embryonic development directly supplied by the mother to the embryo through a vascular connection). Predation risk suppressed reproduction in the lecithotrophic prey (Gambusia holbrokii) but not the matrotroph (Heterandria formosa). Predator stress caused G. holbrooki to reduce clutch size by 43%, and to produce larger and heavier offspring compared to control females. H. formosa, however, did not show any such difference. In G. holbrooki we also found a significantly high percentage (14%) of stillbirths in predator-exposed treatments compared to controls (2%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first direct empirical evidence of predation stress affecting stillbirths in prey. Our results suggest that matrotrophy, superfetation (clutch overlap), or both decrease the sensitivity of mothers to environmental fluctuation in resource (food) and stress (predation risk) levels compared to lecithotrophy. These mechanisms should be considered both when modeling consequences of perceived risk of predation on prey-predator population dynamics and when seeking to understand the evolution of reproductive modes. PMID:24551171

  12. Developmental exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals programs for reproductive tract alterations and obesity later in life1234

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Many chemicals in the environment, especially those with estrogenic activity, are able to disrupt the programming of endocrine signaling pathways established during development; these chemicals are referred to as endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Altered programming can result in numerous adverse consequences in estrogen-target tissues, some of which may not be apparent until later in life. For example, a wide variety of structural, functional, and cellular effects have been identified in reproductive tract tissues. In addition to well-documented reproductive changes, obesity and diabetes have joined the list of adverse effects that have been associated with developmental exposure to environmental estrogens and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals. Obesity is a significant public health problem reaching epidemic proportions worldwide. Experimental animal studies document an association of developmental exposure to environmental estrogens and obesity. For example, a murine model of perinatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol has proven useful in studying mechanisms involved in abnormal programming of differentiating estrogen-target tissues, including reproductive tract tissues and adipocytes. Other environmental estrogens, including the environmental contaminant bisphenol A, have also been linked to reproductive problems and obesity later in life. Epidemiology studies support similar findings in humans, as do studies of cells in culture. Together, these findings suggest new targets for abnormal programming by estrogenic chemicals and provide evidence supporting the scientific concept termed the developmental origins of adult disease. Furthermore, the association of environmental estrogens with obesity and diabetes expands the focus on these diseases from intervention or treatment to include prevention or avoidance of chemical modifiers, especially during critical windows of development. PMID:22089436

  13. Life as a bachelor: quantifying the success of an alternative reproductive tactic in male blue monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Cords, Marina

    2015-01-01

    In species that live in one-male groups, resident males monopolize access to a group of females and are assumed to have higher reproductive success than bachelors. We tested this assumption using genetic, demographic, and behavioral data from 8 groups of wild blue monkeys observed over 10 years to quantify reproduction by residents and bachelors and compare the success of the two tactics. We used maximum-likelihood methods to assign sires to 104 offspring born in the study groups, 36 of which were sired by extra-group males, i.e., residents of neighboring groups and bachelors. Among these extra-group males, high-ranking males (many of whom were neighboring residents) were more likely to sire offspring than low-ranking males, but the time these visiting males spent in the mother’s group when she conceived (male presence) did not predict their relative success. When bachelors competed for reproduction with other bachelors, neither rank nor male presence during the mother’s conceptive period affected the probability of siring an offspring, suggesting that highly opportunistic mating with conceptive females is important in bachelor reproduction. In a second analysis, we used long-term data to estimate resident and bachelor reproductive success over the long term, and particularly to determine if there are any circumstances in which a typical bachelor may sire as many offspring as a typical resident during one or two periods of residency. Our findings generally support the assumption of a resident reproductive advantage because in most circumstances, a lifelong bachelor would be unable to sire as many offspring as a resident. However, a bachelor who performs at the average rate in the average number of groups for several years may have similar lifetime reproductive success as a male whose reproduction is limited to one short period of residency, especially in a small group. Our findings suggest that one should not assume a resident reproductive advantage for males in one-male groups in all circumstances. PMID:26131380

  14. The perfume of reproduction in birds: Chemosignalling in avian social life

    PubMed Central

    Caro, Samuel P.; Balthazart, Jacques; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Chemical cues were probably the first cues ever used to communicate and are still ubiquitous among living organisms. Birds have long been considered an exception: it was believed that birds were anosmic and relied on their acute visual and acoustic capabilities. Birds are however excellent smellers and use odors in various contexts including food searching, orientation, but also breeding. Successful reproduction in most vertebrates involves the exchange of complex social signals between partners. The first evidence for a role of olfaction in reproductive contexts in birds only dates back to the seventies, when ducks were shown to require a functional sense of smell to express normal sexual behaviors. Nowadays, even if the interest for olfaction in birds has largely increased, the role that bodily odors play in reproduction still remains largely understudied. The few available studies however suggest that olfaction is involved in many reproductive stages. Odors have been shown to influence the choice and synchronization of partners, the choice of nest-building material or the care for the eggs and offspring. How this chemical information is translated at the physiological level mostly remain to be described, although available evidence suggests that, as in mammals, key reproductive brain areas like the medial preoptic nucleus are activated by relevant olfactory signals. Olfaction in birds receives increasing attention and novel findings are continuously published, but many exciting discoveries are still ahead of us, and could make birds one of the animal classes with the largest panel of developed senses ever described. PMID:24928570

  15. The perfume of reproduction in birds: chemosignaling in avian social life.

    PubMed

    Caro, Samuel P; Balthazart, Jacques; Bonadonna, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". Chemical cues were probably the first cues ever used to communicate and are still ubiquitous among living organisms. Birds have long been considered an exception: it was believed that birds were anosmic and relied on their acute visual and acoustic capabilities. Birds are however excellent smellers and use odors in various contexts including food searching, orientation, and also breeding. Successful reproduction in most vertebrates involves the exchange of complex social signals between partners. The first evidence for a role of olfaction in reproductive contexts in birds only dates back to the seventies, when ducks were shown to require a functional sense of smell to express normal sexual behaviors. Nowadays, even if the interest for olfaction in birds has largely increased, the role that bodily odors play in reproduction still remains largely understudied. The few available studies suggest that olfaction is involved in many reproductive stages. Odors have been shown to influence the choice and synchronization of partners, the choice of nest-building material or the care for the eggs and offspring. How this chemical information is translated at the physiological level mostly remains to be described, although available evidence suggests that, as in mammals, key reproductive brain areas like the medial preoptic nucleus are activated by relevant olfactory signals. Olfaction in birds receives increasing attention and novel findings are continuously published, but many exciting discoveries are still ahead of us, and could make birds one of the animal classes with the largest panel of developed senses ever described. PMID:24928570

  16. Life-cycle exposure to microcystin-LR interferes with the reproductive endocrine system of male zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Su, Yujing; Li, Li; Hou, Jie; Wu, Ning; Lin, Wang; Li, Guangyu

    2016-06-01

    Recently, MC-LR reproductive toxicity drew great attention. Limited information was available on endocrine-disrupting effects of MC-LR on the reproduction system in fish. In the present study, zebrafish hatchlings (5 d post-fertilization) were exposed to 0, 0.3, 3 and 30μg/L MC-LR for 90 d until they reached sexual maturity. Male zebrafish were selected, and changes in growth and developmental parameters, testicular histological structure as well as the levels of gonadal steroid hormones were studied along with the related-gene transcriptional responses in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPG-axis). The results, for the first time, show a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes growth inhibition, testicular damage and delayed sperm maturation. A significant decrease in T/E2 ratio indicated that MC-LR disrupted sex steroid hormones balance. The changes in transcriptional responses of HPG-axis related genes revealed that MC-LR promoted the conversion of T to E2 in circulating blood. It was also noted that vtg1 mRNA expression in the liver was up-regulated, which implied that MC-LR could induce estrogenic-like effects at environmentally relevant concentrations and long-term exposure. Our findings indicated that a life cycle exposure to MC-LR causes endocrine disruption with organic and functional damage of the testis, which might compromise the quality of life for the survivors and pose a potent threat on fish reproduction and thus population dynamics in MCs-contaminated aquatic environments. PMID:27060240

  17. Potential Gains in Reproductive-Aged Life Expectancy by Eliminating Maternal Mortality: A Demographic Bonus of Achieving MDG 5

    PubMed Central

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Liu, Li; Zimmerman, Linnea; Ahmed, Saifuddin; Tsui, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Objective We assessed the change over time in the contribution of maternal mortality to a life expectancy calculated between ages 15 and 49, or Reproductive-Aged Life Expectancy (RALE). Our goal was to estimate the increase in RALE in developed countries over the twentieth century and the hypothetical gains in African countries today by eliminating maternal mortality. Methods Analogous to life expectancy, RALE is calculated from a life table of ages 15 to 49. Specifically, RALE is the average number of years that women at age 15 would be expected to live between 15 and 49 with current mortality rates. Associated single decrement life tables of causes of death other than maternal mortality are explored to assess the possible gains in RALE by reducing or eliminating maternal mortality. We used population-based data from the Human Mortality Database and the Demographic and Health Surveys. Findings In developed countries, five years in RALE were gained over the twentieth century, of which approximately 10%, or half a year, was attributable to reductions in maternal mortality. In sub-Saharan African countries, the possible achievable gains fluctuate between 0.24 and 1.47 years, or 6% and 44% of potential gains in RALE. Conclusions Maternal mortality is a rare event, yet it is still a very important component of RALE. Averting the burden of maternal deaths could return a significant increase in the most productive ages of human life. PMID:24551040

  18. EFFECTS OF SUSPENDED SOLIDS AND SEDIMENT ON REPRODUCTION AND EARLY LIFE OF WARMWATER FISHES: A REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    The review of published literature and research reports revealed limited data for a few warmwater fish species concerning the impacts of suspended solids and sediments on reproductive success. Laboratory and field studies during the 1930-50s examined direct mortality as the resul...

  19. Reproductive characteristics and life-history relationships of starry smooth-hound Mustelus asterias in British waters.

    PubMed

    McCully Phillips, S R; Ellis, J R

    2015-12-01

    The reproductive biology and other life-history parameters were investigated for Mustelus asterias in British waters, with specimens caught from both commercial fisheries and research-vessel surveys. In total, 504 specimens [238 males, 24-99 cm total length (LT ) and 266 females, 28-124 cm LT ] were examined, with further information collected from 238 uterine pups. The lengths at 50% maturity were estimated as 704 and 819 cm LT for males and females, respectively. Ovarian fecundity ranged from one to 28, and uterine fecundity from four to 20. The number, mass and LT of pups were positively correlated with maternal LT . Full-term pups ranged from 205 to 329 mm LT , and the smallest free-living fish caught was 24 cm LT . Parturition occurred in February in the western English Channel and during June to July in the eastern English Channel and southern North Sea, indicating either protracted spawning or asynchronous parturition for the stock as a whole. The reproductive cycle is thought to extend beyond 1 year. Developmental abnormalities observed included atresia in oocytes, uterine eggs that failed to develop, a partly developed pup and an abnormal male with a single aberrant clasper. Data relating to conversion factors, oocyte numbers and diameter and gonado-somatic and hepato-somatic indices are presented, and the seasonality of the reproductive cycle is discussed. PMID:26709214

  20. Reproductive seasonality in captive wild ruminants: implications for biogeographical adaptation, photoperiodic control, and life history.

    PubMed

    Zerbe, Philipp; Clauss, Marcus; Codron, Daryl; Bingaman Lackey, Laurie; Rensch, Eberhard; Streich, Jürgen W; Hatt, Jean-Michel; Müller, Dennis W H

    2012-11-01

    Many ruminant species show seasonal patterns of reproduction. Causes for this are widely debated, and include adaptations to seasonal availability of resources (with cues either from body condition in more tropical, or from photoperiodism in higher latitude habitats) and/or defence strategies against predators. Conclusions so far are limited to datasets with less than 30 species. Here, we use a dataset on 110 wild ruminant species kept in captivity in temperate-zone zoos to describe their reproductive patterns quantitatively [determining the birth peak breadth (BPB) as the number of days in which 80% of all births occur]; then we link this pattern to various biological characteristics [latitude of origin, mother-young-relationship (hider/follower), proportion of grass in the natural diet (grazer/browser), sexual size dimorphism/mating system], and compare it with reports for free-ranging animals. When comparing taxonomic subgroups, variance in BPB is highly correlated to the minimum, but not the maximum BPB, suggesting that a high BPB (i.e. an aseasonal reproductive pattern) is the plesiomorphic character in ruminants. Globally, latitude of natural origin is highly correlated to the BPB observed in captivity, supporting an overruling impact of photoperiodism on ruminant reproduction. Feeding type has no additional influence; the hider/follower dichotomy, associated with the anti-predator strategy of 'swamping', has additional influence in the subset of African species only. Sexual size dimorphism and mating system are marginally associated with the BPB, potentially indicating a facilitation of polygamy under seasonal conditions. The difference in the calculated Julian date of conception between captive populations and that reported for free-ranging ones corresponds to the one expected if absolute day length was the main trigger in highly seasonal species: calculated day length at the time of conception between free-ranging and captive populations followed a y = x relationship. Only 11 species (all originating from lower latitudes) were considered to change their reproductive pattern distinctively between the wild and captivity, with 10 becoming less seasonal (but not aseasonal) in human care, indicating that seasonality observed in the wild was partly resource-associated. Only one species (Antidorcas marsupialis) became more seasonal in captivity, presumably because resource availability in the wild overrules the innate photoperiodic response. Reproductive seasonality explains additional variance in the body mass-gestation period relationship, with more seasonal species having shorter gestation periods for their body size. We conclude that photoperiodism, and in particular absolute day length, are genetically fixed triggers for reproduction that may be malleable to some extent by body condition, and that plasticity in gestation length is an important facilitator that may partly explain the success of ruminant radiation to high latitudes. Evidence for an anti-predator strategy involving seasonal reproduction is limited to African species. Reproductive seasonality following rainfall patterns may not be an adaptation to give birth in periods of high resource availability but an adaptation to allow conception only at times of good body condition. PMID:22780447

  1. A Dwarf Mouse Model With Decreased GH/IGF-1 Activity That Does Not Experience Life-Span Extension: Potential Impact of Increased Adiposity, Leptin, and Insulin With Advancing Age

    PubMed Central

    Lubbers, Ellen R.; Magon, Vishakha; List, Edward O.; Kopchick, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced growth hormone (GH) action is associated with extended longevity in many vertebrate species. GH receptor (GHR) null (GHR−/−) mice, which have a disruption in the GHR gene, are a well-studied example of mice that are insulin sensitive and long lived yet obese. However, unlike other mouse lines with reduced GH action, GH receptor antagonist (GHA) transgenic mice have reduced GH action yet exhibit a normal, not extended, life span. Understanding why GHA mice do not have extended life span though they share many physiological attributes with GHR−/− mice will help provide clues about how GH influences aging. For this study, we examined age- and sex-related changes in body composition, glucose homeostasis, circulating adipokines, and tissue weights in GHA mice and littermate controls. Compared with previous studies with GHR−/− mice, GHA mice had more significant increases in fat mass with advancing age. The increased obesity resulted in significant adipokine changes. Euglycemia was maintained in GHA mice; however, hyperinsulinemia developed in older male GHA mice. Overall, GHA mice experience a more substantial, generalized obesity accompanied by altered adipokine levels and glucose homeostasis than GHR−/− mice, which becomes more exaggerated with advancing age and which likely contributes to the lack of life-span extension in these mice. PMID:23695394

  2. TSG (2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside) from the Chinese Herb Polygonum multiflorum Increases Life Span and Stress Resistance of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Büchter, Christian; Zhao, Liang; Fritz, Gerhard; Proksch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    2,3,5,4′-Tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (TSG) was isolated from Polygonum multiflorum, a plant which is traditionally used as an anti-ageing drug. We have analysed ageing-related effects of TSG in the model organism C. elegans in comparison to resveratrol. TSG exerted a high antioxidative capacity both in a cell-free assay and in the nematode. The antioxidative capacity was even higher compared to resveratrol. Presumably due to its antioxidative effects, treatment with TSG decreased the juglone-mediated induction of the antioxidative enzyme SOD-3; the induction of the GST-4 by juglone was diminished slightly. TSG increased the resistance of C. elegans against lethal thermal stress more prominently than resveratrol (50 μM TSG increased mean survival by 22.2%). The level of the ageing pigment lipofuscin was decreased after incubation with the compound. TSG prolongs the mean, median, and maximum adult life span of C. elegans by 23.5%, 29.4%, and 7.2%, respectively, comparable to the effects of resveratrol. TSG-mediated extension of life span was not abolished in a DAF-16 loss-of-function mutant strain showing that this ageing-related transcription factor is not involved in the effects of TSG. Our data show that TSG possesses a potent antioxidative capacity, enhances the stress resistance, and increases the life span of the nematode C. elegans. PMID:26075030

  3. Life histories, blood revenge, and reproductive success among the Waorani of Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Beckerman, Stephen; Erickson, Pamela I; Yost, James; Regalado, Jhanira; Jaramillo, Lilia; Sparks, Corey; Iromenga, Moises; Long, Kathryn

    2009-05-19

    The Waorani may have the highest rate of homicide of any society known to anthropology. We interviewed 121 Waorani elders of both sexes to obtain genealogical information and recollections of raids in which they and their relatives participated. We also obtained complete raiding histories of 95 warriors. An analysis of the raiding histories, marital trajectories, and reproductive histories of these men reveals that more aggressive warriors have lower indices of reproductive success than their milder brethren. This result contrasts the findings of Chagnon [Chagnon N (1988) Science 239:985-992] for the Yanomamo. We suggest that the spacing of revenge raids may be involved in the explanation of why the consequences of aggressiveness differ between these 2 warlike lowland South American peoples. PMID:19433797

  4. Ranunculus glacialis L.: successful reproduction at the altitudinal limits of higher plant life.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Johanna; Steinacher, Gerlinde; Ladinig, Ursula

    2010-07-01

    Biodiversity decreases with increasing altitude, mainly because of the increasingly adverse climate. In the European Alps, only a few plant species occur above 4,000 m a.s.l., among these is Ranunculus glacialis L. Current studies have shown that R. glacialis has a highly conservative growth strategy and low developmental plasticity in response to different dates of snowmelt. Therefore, it was of particular interest to observe whether this strategy is maintained at higher altitudes and to reveal the reproductive limits. We examined the effect of the date of snowmelt on reproductive development and reproductive success in R. glacialis over several years at two subnival sites (2,650 and 2,880 m a.s.l.) and at a nival site (3,440 m a.s.l.) in the Austrian Alps. At the subnival sites, reproductive performance was relatively stable (prefloration period, i.e. snowmelt to onset of anthesis, 2-3 weeks; postfloration period, i.e. onset of anthesis until fruit maturity, 4-5 weeks). Depending on the date of flowering, the mean seed/ovule (S/O) ratio was 0.5-0.8. The temporal safety margin between seed maturation and the onset of winter conditions was at least 1 month. The situation was quite different in the nival zone: the prefloration period usually lasted 1 month, anthesis up to 2 weeks, and seed development 6-7 weeks; when seeds matured in time, the S/O ratio was 0.4-0.6. Overall, R. glacialis shows a high developmental plasticity. At higher altitudes, R. glacialis can double the time taken for seed development but runs a high risk of seeds not maturing in time. PMID:20140466

  5. Physiologic Course of Female Reproductive Function: A Molecular Look into the Prologue of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Joselyn; Chávez-Castillo, Mervin; Olivar, Luis Carlos; Calvo, María; Mejías, José; Rojas, Milagros; Morillo, Jessenia; Bermúdez, Valmore

    2015-01-01

    The genetic, endocrine, and metabolic mechanisms underlying female reproduction are numerous and sophisticated, displaying complex functional evolution throughout a woman's lifetime. This vital course may be systematized in three subsequent stages: prenatal development of ovaries and germ cells up until in utero arrest of follicular growth and the ensuing interim suspension of gonadal function; onset of reproductive maturity through puberty, with reinitiation of both gonadal and adrenal activity; and adult functionality of the ovarian cycle which permits ovulation, a key event in female fertility, and dictates concurrent modifications in the endometrium and other ovarian hormone-sensitive tissues. Indeed, the ultimate goal of this physiologic progression is to achieve ovulation and offer an adequate environment for the installation of gestation, the consummation of female fertility. Strict regulation of these processes is important, as disruptions at any point in this evolution may equate a myriad of endocrine-metabolic disturbances for women and adverse consequences on offspring both during pregnancy and postpartum. This review offers a summary of pivotal aspects concerning the physiologic course of female reproductive function. PMID:26697222

  6. Span of control matters.

    PubMed

    Cathcart, Deb; Jeska, Susan; Karnas, Joan; Miller, Sue E; Pechacek, Judy; Rheault, Lolita

    2004-09-01

    Prompted by manager concerns about span of control, a large, integrated health system set out to determine if span of control really mattered. Was there something to it, or was it just an excuse for poor performance? A team of middle managers studied the problem and ultimately demonstrated a strong relationship between span of control and employee engagement. Consequently, it was decided to add 4 management positions to note the effect. One year later, positive changes were observed in employee engagement scores in all 4 areas. This study suggests careful review of manager spans of control to address the untoward effects of large spans of control on employee engagement. PMID:15367902

  7. SPAN: Ocean science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Koblinsky, Chester J.; Webster, Ferris; Zlotnicki, Victor; Green, James L.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links space and Earth science research and data analysis computers. It provides a common working environment for sharing computer resources, sharing computer peripherals, solving proprietary problems, and providing the potential for significant time and cost savings for correlative data analysis. This is one of a series of discipline-specific SPAN documents which are intended to complement the SPAN primer and SPAN Management documents. Their purpose is to provide the discipline scientists with a comprehensive set of documents to assist in the use of SPAN for discipline specific scientific research.

  8. Seasonal trends in Ceratitis capitata reproductive potential derived from live-caught females in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Kouloussis, Nikos A.; Papadopoulos, Nikos T.; Katsoyannos, Byron I.; Müller, Hans-Georg; Wang, Jane-Ling; Su, Yu-Ru; Molleman, Freerk; Carey, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Reproductive data of individual insects are extremely hard to collect under natural conditions, thus the study of research questions related to oviposition has not advanced. Patterns of oviposition are often inferred only indirectly, through monitoring of host infestation, whereas the influence of age structure and several other factors on oviposition remains unknown. Using a new approach, in this article, we live-trapped wild Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Tephritidae) females on the Greek island of Chios during two field seasons. For their remaining lifetime, these females were placed individually in small cages and their daily oviposition was monitored. Reproduction rates between cohorts from different collection dates were then compared. The results showed that in the different captive cohorts the average remaining lifetime and reproduction were highly variable within and between seasons. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the month of capture had a significant effect on captive life span, average daily reproduction, and patterns of egg laying. The effect of year was significant on reproduction, but not on captive life span. These differences between sampling periods probably reflect differences in the availability of hosts and other factors that vary during the season and affect age structure and reproduction. Using a non-parametric generalized additive model, we found a statistically significant correlation between the captive life span and the average daily reproduction. These findings and the experimental approach have several important implications. PMID:22791908

  9. Life expectancy, economic inequality, homicide, and reproductive timing in Chicago neighbourhoods.

    PubMed

    Wilson, M; Daly, M

    1997-04-26

    In comparisons among Chicago neighbourhoods, homicide rates in 1988-93 varied more than 100-fold, while male life expectancy at birth ranged from 54 to 77 years, even with effects of homicide mortality removed. This "cause deleted" life expectancy was highly correlated with homicide rates; a measure of economic inequality added significant additional prediction, whereas median household income did not. Deaths from internal causes (diseases) show similar age patterns, despite different absolute levels, in the best and worst neighbourhoods, whereas deaths from external causes (homicide, accident, suicide) do not. As life expectancy declines across neighbourhoods, women reproduce earlier; by age 30, however, neighbourhood no longer affects age specific fertility. These results support the hypothesis that life expectancy itself may be a psychologically salient determinant of risk taking and the timing of life transitions. PMID:9154035

  10. Membership Has Its Privileges? Life, Personhood, and Potential in Discussions about Reproductive Choice.

    PubMed

    Will, Jonathan F

    2015-01-01

    As Professor Dov Fox points out in his essay, reference to "potential life" in American abortion jurisprudence is both indeterminate and underspecified. This commentary highlights that use of the phrase "potential life" by courts also obscures the fact that a position has been taken that biological life is not the equivalent of legal personhood. Worse, the position has been imposed on those who do not share it without offering reasons to justify its imposition in terms that those who oppose it can reasonably be expected to endorse. PMID:26242958

  11. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Reproductive System » Male Reproductive System Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  12. Designing prospective cohort studies for assessing reproductive and developmental toxicity during sensitive windows of human reproduction and development--the LIFE Study.

    PubMed

    Buck Louis, Germaine M; Schisterman, Enrique F; Sweeney, Anne M; Wilcosky, Timothy C; Gore-Langton, Robert E; Lynch, Courtney D; Boyd Barr, Dana; Schrader, Steven M; Kim, Sungduk; Chen, Zhen; Sundaram, Rajeshwari

    2011-09-01

    The relationship between the environment and human fecundity and fertility remains virtually unstudied from a couple-based perspective in which longitudinal exposure data and biospecimens are captured across sensitive windows. In response, we completed the LIFE Study with methodology that intended to empirically evaluate a priori purported methodological challenges: implementation of population-based sampling frameworks suitable for recruiting couples planning pregnancy; obtaining environmental data across sensitive windows of reproduction and development; home-based biospecimen collection; and development of a data management system for hierarchical exposome data. We used two sampling frameworks (i.e., fish/wildlife licence registry and a direct marketing database) for 16 targeted counties with presumed environmental exposures to persistent organochlorine chemicals to recruit 501 couples planning pregnancies for prospective longitudinal follow-up while trying to conceive and throughout pregnancy. Enrolment rates varied from <1% of the targeted population (n = 424,423) to 42% of eligible couples who were successfully screened; 84% of the targeted population could not be reached, while 36% refused screening. Among enrolled couples, ∼ 85% completed daily journals while trying; 82% of pregnant women completed daily early pregnancy journals, and 80% completed monthly pregnancy journals. All couples provided baseline blood/urine samples; 94% of men provided one or more semen samples and 98% of women provided one or more saliva samples. Women successfully used urinary fertility monitors for identifying ovulation and home pregnancy test kits. Couples can be recruited for preconception cohorts and will comply with intensive data collection across sensitive windows. However, appropriately sized sampling frameworks are critical, given the small percentage of couples contacted found eligible and reportedly planning pregnancy at any point in time. PMID:21819423

  13. SPAN: Astronomy and astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Valerie L.; Green, James L.; Warren, Wayne H., Jr.; Lopez-Swafford, Brian

    1987-01-01

    The Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN) is a multi-mission, correlative data comparison network which links science research and data analysis computers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The purpose of this document is to provide Astronomy and Astrophysics scientists, currently reachable on SPAN, with basic information and contacts for access to correlative data bases, star catalogs, and other astrophysic facilities accessible over SPAN.

  14. Bioscience-bioethics and life factors affecting reproduction with special reference to the Indigenous Australian population.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Irina

    2005-04-01

    The demand for equality of recognition or respect is the dominant passion of modernity. The 20th century experienced a giant leap in technological inventiveness and ruthless use of technological power. In the 21st century, human welfare and environmental wellbeing demand fundamental political appraisal. We have the means, if we choose, to eradicate poverty and to responsibly protect the global environment. However, economic, political and cultural systems act to differentially allocate the benefits and risks for growth between socioeconomic groups. For example, it is a matter of pride that the neonatal mortality rate in affluent societies has dropped substantially since the late 1970s. However, the level of infant mortality (three times the national average) and low birthweight (13%) among the Indigenous Australian population is the highest in the country. With hindsight we now know that is the inevitable legacy of Australia's colonial history. Chronic physical and psychological stress is recognized as an important etiological factor in many lifestyle diseases of the cardiovascular, immune and reproductive systems. Diseases of adaptation are further advanced by non-adaptive lifestyle choices, depression, alcoholism and other drug dependencies. This review describes the principles of bioscience ethics and targets equity issues as they affect human reproduction across generations with particular reference to the Indigenous population of Australia. The review also considers ways we may advance global and cultural maturity from the Indigenous Australian perspective and proposes an ecologically based model of preventative care. If we are to embrace fundamental social change and protect future children without threatening parents' basic freedoms, then new beliefs and priorities--based on a compassionate understanding of biological systems--must evolve from the general public. Belief in human rights arising from a sense of human dignity is a collective outcome originating from individual commitment. The golden rule; that is, Nature's principle of reciprocity, is fundamental in bridging the gap between knowledge and effective action. PMID:15798014

  15. Reproductive bionomics and life history traits of three gammaridean amphipods, Cymadusa filosa Savigny, Ampithoe laxipodus Appadoo and Myers and Mallacoota schellenbergi Ledoyer from the tropical Indian Ocean (Mauritius)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appadoo, Chandani; Myers, Alan A.

    2004-12-01

    The reproductive bionomics and life history traits of two corophiid amphipods ( Ampithoe laxipodus, Cymadusa filosa) and one melitid ( Mallacoota schellenbergi) were studied in Mauritius (Indian Ocean) for the period March 1999 to February 2000. Results on the population structure, monthly size class variations, sex ratio, female reproductive states and fecundity are presented. The study demonstrates multivoltinism and continuous reproduction in the three species. Increase in number of juveniles was observed in warmer months for C. filosa and A. laxipodus. Sexual maturity was attained at smaller sizes in warmer months in the three species. Linear relationship on body length and number of eggs in brood pouch are presented. Size-independent analysis of egg number revealed a decrease in number of eggs in cooler months. Sex ratio is male skewed in M. schellenbergi and female skewed in C. filosa and A. laxipodus. Some of the plausible explanations for the reproductive strategies adopted by these three species in a tropical system are discussed.

  16. Prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Evans, Neil P; Bellingham, Michelle; Robinson, Jane E

    2016-07-01

    It is now well recognized that the gestational environment can have long-lasting effects not only on the life span and health span of an individual but also, through potential epigenetic changes, on future generations. This article reviews the "prenatal programming" of the neuroendocrine systems that regulate reproduction, with a specific focus on the lessons learned using ovine models. The review examines the critical roles played by steroids in normal reproductive development before considering the effects of prenatal exposure to exogenous steroid hormones including androgens and estrogens, the effects of maternal nutrition and stress during gestation, and the effects of exogenous chemicals such as alcohol and environment chemicals. In so doing, it becomes evident that, to maximize fitness, the regulation of reproduction has evolved to be responsive to many different internal and external cues and that the GnRH neurosecretory system expresses a degree of plasticity throughout life. During fetal life, however, the system is particularly sensitive to change and at this time, the GnRH neurosecretory system can be "shaped" both to achieve normal sexually differentiated function but also in ways that may adversely affect or even prevent "normal function". The exact mechanisms through which these programmed changes are brought about remain largely uncharacterized but are likely to differ depending on the factor, the timing of exposure to that factor, and the species. It would appear, however, that some afferent systems to the GnRH neurons such as kisspeptin, may be critical in this regard as it would appear to be sensitive to a wide variety of factors that can program reproductive function. Finally, it has been noted that the prenatal programming of neuroendocrine reproductive function can be associated with epigenetic changes, which would suggest that in addition to direct effects on the exposed offspring, prenatal programming could have transgenerational effects on reproductive potential. PMID:27142489

  17. 4. View northwest. South elevation Walpole span, link span, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. View northwest. South elevation - Walpole span, link span, and Westminster span. Structure on east pier is stream level gauge station. - Walpole-Westminster Bridge, Spanning Connecticut River between Walpole, NH & Westminster, VT, Walpole, Cheshire County, NH

  18. Japan turns pro-life: recent change in reproductive health policy and challenges by new technologies.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Etsuji

    2014-02-01

    Japan, known as a pro-choice country in terms of abortion, is currently facing the increase of "selective abortions" thanks to new prenatal screening. Efforts to restrict proliferation of new technology has not been successful and it is likely that Japan will turn pro-life by strictly enforcing the Maternity Protection Act (MPA), which prohibits abortions due to "fetal cause". PMID:24639978

  19. Impact of selection for increased daughter fertility on productive life and culling for reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection for increased daughter pregnancy rate (DPR) over 2 generations was examined to determine if such selection had affected cow fertility and productive life (PL). Holstein artificial-insemination bulls with a predicted transmitting ability (PTA) for DPR based on >=35 daughters were grouped by...

  20. View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of central lift span truss web of Tensaw River Bridge, showing support girders for life house, looking east - Tensaw River Lift Bridge, Spanning Tensaw River at U.S. Highway 90, Mobile, Mobile County, AL

  1. Effects of aerobic exercise on selected physiological parameters and quality of life in patients with type 2 <span class="hlt">diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bello, Ajediran I; Owusu-Boakye, Emmanuel; Adegoke, Babatunde OA; Adjei, David N

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of an 8-week aerobic exercise program on physiological parameters and quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods Patients attending a diabetes clinic participated in this randomized control trial. They were randomly assigned to an intervention or control group by ballot. The intervention group, in addition to regular conventional treatment, received individually prescribed aerobic exercise for 30 minutes, at 50%–75% of maximum heart rate three times weekly. Main outcome measures included fasting blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and a World Health Organization quality of life questionnaire (WHOQoL-BREF). Data analysis involved paired and unpaired t-tests and mixed-design two-way analysis of variance. Results Eighteen patients with type 2 diabetes and of mean age 46.22 ± 9.79 years participated in the study. Mean duration since onset of diabetes in the intervention and control groups was 4.44 ± 3.33 years and 3.92 ± 2.66 years, respectively. Both groups were similar for duration since onset, baseline physiological parameters, and quality of life. Within-group comparison did not show any significant differences (P > 0.05) for HbA1c, fasting blood sugar, low-density lipoprotein, or high-density lipoprotein. The intervention group improved significantly (P < 0.05) in their postexercise quality of life compared with baseline. Between-group comparison did not show any significant differences in physiological parameters or quality of life. Conclusion Patients with type 2 diabetes improved in fasting blood sugar, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and quality of life following 8 weeks of aerobic exercise training. These perceived improvements were not reflected by statistically significant differences in between-group comparison for any parameters. PMID:22114516

  2. Japan turns pro-life: recent change in reproductive health policy and challenges by new technologies

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Etsuji

    2014-01-01

    Japan, known as a pro-choice country in terms of abortion, is currently facing the increase of “selective abortions” thanks to new prenatal screening. Efforts to restrict proliferation of new technology has not been successful and it is likely that Japan will turn pro-life by strictly enforcing the Maternity Protection Act (MPA), which prohibits abortions due to “fetal cause”. PMID:24639978

  3. Association between the physical activity level and the quality of life of patients with type 2 <span class="hlt">diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Çolak, Tuğba Kuru; Acar, Gönül; Dereli, E. Elçin; Özgül, Bahar; Demirbüken, İlkşan; Alkaç, Çiğdem; Polat, M. Gülden

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Physical activity and regular exercise play an important role in glycemic control, which is considered an important part of the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study evaluated physical activity level and its relationship with quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. [Subjects and Methods] We evaluated 129 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus through a face-to-face interview using the short version of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Diabetes-39. Demographic data, diabetes symptoms, time of initial diagnosis, and treatment procedure/approaches were recorded. [Results] Of the study subjects, 51 (39.5%) had low, 67 had moderate (51.9%), and 11 (8.5%) had high activity levels. The mean weekly sitting duration was 302 minutes. The mean weekly walking time was 231.7 minutes. Except for the “diabetes control” domain, scores for all the subgroups and the total score in the quality-of-life assessment had a statistically significant negative correlation with physical activity level. [Discussion] Physical inactivity negatively affects the quality of life of diabetic patients. A planned exercise education program and incorporation of exercise into the lifestyle can improve the quality of life of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26957746

  4. The structure of a thermophilic archaeal virus shows a dsDNA viral capsid type that spans all domains of life

    SciTech Connect

    G. Rice; L. Tang; K. Stedman; F. Roberto; J. Spuhler; E. Gillitzer; J. E. Johnson; T. Douglas; M. Young

    2004-05-01

    Of the three domains of life (Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea), the least understood is Archaea and its associated viruses. Many Archaea are extremophiles, with species that are capable of growth at some of the highest temperatures and extremes of pH of all known organisms. Phylogenetic rRNA-encoding DNA analysis places many of the hyperthermophilic Archaea (species with an optimum growth >80°C) at the base of the universal tree of life, suggesting that thermophiles were among the first forms of life on earth. Very few viruses have been identified from Archaea as compared to Bacteria and Eukarya. We report here the structure of a hyperthermophilic virus isolated from an archaeal host found in hot springs in Yellowstone National Park. The sequence of the circular double-stranded DNA viral genome shows that it shares little similarity to other known genes in viruses or other organisms. By comparing the tertiary and quaternary structures of the coat protein of this virus with those of a bacterial and an animal virus, we find conformational relationships among all three, suggesting that some viruses may have a common ancestor that precedes the division into three domains of life >3 billion years ago.

  5. Communicating Employability Enhancement throughout the Life-Span: A National Intervention Program Aimed at Combating Age-Related Stereotypes at the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Selm, Martine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of lifelong employability of employees is one of today's challenges in all sectors of the Dutch society. In this article, we will outline the historical context of the life-long employability issue in the Netherlands, and provide an overview of current business responses to the issue. We will discuss key obstacles for improving…

  6. Communicating Employability Enhancement throughout the Life-Span: A National Intervention Program Aimed at Combating Age-Related Stereotypes at the Workplace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Selm, Martine; Van der Heijden, Beatrice I. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    The stimulation of lifelong employability of employees is one of today's challenges in all sectors of the Dutch society. In this article, we will outline the historical context of the life-long employability issue in the Netherlands, and provide an overview of current business responses to the issue. We will discuss key obstacles for improving

  7. Reproduction and early-life accommodations of landlocked alewives to a southern range extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nigro, A.A.; Ney, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Reproduction and first-year growth and food habits of landlocked alewives Alosa pseudoharengus in Claytor Lake, Virginia were examined and compared to descriptions for populations in the species' established New England-Great Lakes range. Alewives in mesothermal (2–27 C) Claytor Lake are shorter-lived (3 years) but grow faster, mature earlier (age 1), and have higher relative and absolute fecundities than have been reported for populations in colder northern waters. The 1979 spawning period extended from early May to early August, beginning at least 1 month earlier and lasting 4–9 weeks longer than in northern lakes. Changes in ovary condition during the spawning period suggest that alewives may be fractional spawners. Evidence of spawning was found in littoral areas throughout the lower 15 km of the reservoir. Growth in length of age-0 Claytor Lake alewives was linear through September and terminated in late autumn. Total first-year growth was reduced in 1979 (maximum of 130 mm total length, TL) from previous years (average of 160 mm TL), although it was substantially greater than recorded in the Great Lakes and the northeastern United States. The longer growing season, rather than accelerated in-season growth, appears to account for larger size achieved in Claytor Lake. High annual growth limits predation by Claytor Lake game fish on early spawned age-0 alewives by late summer. As elsewhere, larval and juvenile alewives (6–70 mm TL) fed primarily on copepods and cladocerans. Age-0 alewives longer than 35 mm TL demonstrated positive size-selection for cyclopoid copepods comparable to that shown by adults. Our findings suggest that self-sustaining alewife populations can be established in many inland waters but raise concerns regarding their forage value and community impacts.

  8. The influence of the hot water extract from shiitake medicinal mushroom, Lentinus edodes (higher Basidiomycetes) on the food intake, life span, and age-related locomotor activity of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Matjuskova, Natalya; Azena, Elena; Serstnova, Ksenija; Muiznieks, Indrikis

    2014-01-01

    Shiitake medicinal mushroom, Lentinus edodes, is among the most widely cultivated edible mushrooms in the world and is a well-studied source of nutrients and biologically active compounds. We have studied the influence of the dietary supplement of the polysaccharides containing a hot water extract of the mushroom L. edodes on the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster in terms of food intake, body weight, life span, and age-related locomotor activity. L. edodes extract, when added to the D. melanogaster feeding substrate at a 0.003-0.030% concentration (calculated for the dry weight of the polysaccharide fraction) did not influence food intake or body weight of the flies. It increased the life span and locomotor activities of male flies but was associated with early mortality and decreased locomotor activity of female flies. We conclude that the observed anti-aging effects of L. edodes extracts in the male D. melanogaster are not the result of dietary restriction. We propose that D. melanogaster is a suitable model organism for researching the molecular basis of the anti-aging effect of the shiitake mushroom extracts and sex linkage of these effects. PMID:25404225

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  10. Sexual dimorphism in sister species of Leucoraja skate and its relationship to reproductive strategy and life history.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Christopher M; Rohlf, F James; Frisk, Michael G

    2016-03-01

    Instances of sexual dimorphism occur in a great variety of forms and manifestations. Most skates (Batoidea: Rajoidei) display some level of body shape dimorphism in which the pectoral fins of mature males develop to create a distinct bell-shaped body not found in females. This particular form of dimorphism is present in each of the sister species Leucoraja erinacea and Leucoraja ocellata, but differences between sexes are much greater in the former. In order to understand the nature and potential causes of pectoral dimorphism, we used geometric morphometrics to investigate allometry of fin shape in L. erinacea and L. ocellata and its relationship to the development of reproductive organs, based on previous work on the bonnethead shark, Sphyrna tiburo. We found that allometric trajectories of overall pectoral shape were different in both species of skate, but only L. erinacea varied significantly with respect to endoskeleton development. Male maturation was characterized by a number of sex-specific morphological changes, which appeared concurrently in developmental timing with elongation of cartilage-supported claspers. We suggest that external sexual dimorphism of pectoral fins in skates is a byproduct of skeletal growth needed for clasper development. Further, the magnitude of male shape change appears to be linked to the differential life histories of species. This work reports for the first time that pectoral dimorphism is a persistent feature in rajoid fishes, occurring in varying degrees across several genera. Lastly, our results suggest that pectoral morphology may be useful as a relative indicator of reproductive strategy in some species. PMID:26771079

  11. Geographical variation in reproductive ageing patterns and life-history strategy of a short-lived passerine bird.

    PubMed

    Balbontín, Javier; Møller, A P; Hermosell, I G; Marzal, A; Reviriego, M; de Lope, F

    2012-11-01

    We investigated differences in ageing patterns in three measures of breeding performance in populations of barn swallows Hirundo rustica L. from Spain and Denmark differing in breeding latitude and hence migration distance and duration of the breeding season. We found differences in ageing patterns between populations. Generally, young (i.e. yearling) and old females (i.e. ≥ 5 years of age) laid their first eggs later and produced smaller clutches than middle-aged females (i.e. 2-4 years of age) in both populations. The southernmost population (i.e. Spanish) showing the shorter migratory distance experienced a greater within-individual increase in timing of breeding and clutch size in early life and a greater within-individual decrease in laying date but not in clutch size during senescence compared with the northernmost population (i.e. Danish). We also found that the number of fledglings produced annually was related to the age of the two members of the breeding pairs with pairs composed of young and old females performing less well than breeding pairs composed of middle-aged females. We did not find reproductive senescence for the age of the male while controlling for the age of the female on the number of fledglings produced annually by the breeding pair. Differential survival between individuals did not explain age effects on laying date or annual clutch size in neither population. However, the increase in the number of fledglings produced annually with age was partly explained by the disappearance of poor-quality members of the pairs, mainly poor-quality males. Age-related breeding success (i.e. number of fledglings) was similar for barn swallows from Spain and Denmark. Therefore, the study of ageing patterns and life-history strategies in free-ranging animals from more than a single population can throw new light on life-history theory, population dynamics and evolutionary studies of senescence. PMID:22994532

  12. REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Throughout history, humans have celebrated the beauty and fertility of flowering plants. In addition to their aesthetic appeal, flowers contain the reproductive organs of the plant and are therefore essential for sexual propagation of plant life. Our dependence on flowering is illustrated by the die...

  13. The reproduction of gender norms through downsizing in later life residential relocation.

    PubMed

    Addington, Aislinn; Ekerdt, David J

    2014-01-01

    Using data collected from qualitative interviews in 36 households, this article examines people's use of social relations based on gender to perform tasks associated with residential relocation in later life. Without prompting, our respondents addressed the social relations of gender in the meanings of things, in the persons of gift recipients, and in the persons of actors accomplishing the tasks. They matched gender-typed objects to same-sex recipients, reproducing circumstances of possession and passing on expectations for gender identity. The accounts of our respondents also depicted a gendered division of household labor between husbands and wives and a gendered division of care work by daughters and sons. These strategies economized a big task by shaping decisions about who should get what and who will do what. In turn, these practices affirmed the gendered nature of possession and care work into another generation. PMID:25651598

  14. Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section AA; Cantilever Truss Spans, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Bridge Types: Suspension Bridge Spans, Section A-A; Cantilever Truss Spans, Section B-B; Through Truss Spans, Section C-C; Deck Truss Spans, Section D-D - San Francisco Oakland Bay Bridge, Spanning San Francisco Bay, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  15. 'The brain is the organ of longevity': Introduction to G. A. Sacher's free-energy hypothesis of life-span enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Justesen, D.R.

    1981-10-01

    No experiment reported to date constitutes an adequate test in the sense of supplying comprehensive information on survival time, metabolic rate, food consumption and utilization, body mass, anatomical integrity (especially that of the skeletal and nervous systems), status of the immune and endocrine systems, and physiological and behavioral competence in the wake of chronic exposure to a moderately thermalizing radio field. Some reports do provide data on one or more of the important end points, usually in association with a single exposure or a limited number of brief exposures. One must distinguish between prolongation of life in senescence and enhancement of longevity based on actual retardation of the rate of aging. More, retardation of aging, if sorely taxed at the expense of quality of living, is no bargain. Some hibernators live relatively long lives, but the torpor of hibernation--a prolonged period of somnolence and greatly reduced metabolic activity--is hardly the stuff of a vibrant psychological existence.

  16. The Association between Endometriomas and Ovarian Cancer: Preventive Effect of Inhibiting Ovulation and Menstruation during Reproductive Life

    PubMed Central

    Grandi, Giovanni; Toss, Angela; Cortesi, Laura; Botticelli, Laura; Volpe, Annibale; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2015-01-01

    Although endometriosis frequently involves multiple sites in the pelvis, malignancies associated with this disease are mostly confined to the ovaries, evolving from an endometrioma. Endometriomas present a 2-3-fold increased risk of transformation in clear-cell, endometrioid, and possibly low-grade serous ovarian cancers, but not in mucinous ovarian cancers. These last cancers are, in some aspects, different from the other epithelial ovarian cancers, as they do not appear to be decreased by the inhibition of ovulation and menstruation. The step by step process of transformation from typical endometrioma, through atypical endometrioma, finally to ovarian cancer seems mainly related to oxidative stress, inflammation, hyperestrogenism, and specific molecular alterations. Particularly, activation of oncogenic KRAS and PI3K pathways and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes PTEN and ARID1A are suggested as major pathogenic mechanisms for endometriosis associated clear-cell and endometrioid ovarian cancer. Both the risk for endometriomas and their associated ovarian cancers seems to be highly and similarly decreased by the inhibition of ovulation and retrograde menstruation, suggesting a common pathogenetic mechanism and common possible preventive strategies during reproductive life. PMID:26413541

  17. Reproductive performance of the mite Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, 1939) on citrus and coffee, using life table parameters.

    PubMed

    Teodoro, A V; Reis, P R

    2006-08-01

    The flat-mite Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes, 1939) (Acari: Tenuipalpidae) is considered important in citrus (Citrus spp.) and coffee plants (Coffea spp.) in Brazil, and is known as the leprosis and coffee ring spot mite, as being a vector of the Citrus Leprosis Rhabdovirus - CitLV and Coffee Ring Spot Virus - CoRSV. The objective of this work is to find out about the reproductive success of B. phoenicis on citric fruits and coffee leaves by fertility life table parameters and its biology. The experiments were carried out in laboratory conditions at 25 +/- 2 degrees C, 70 +/- 10% of relative humidity and 14 h of photophase. The lengths of embryonic and post-embryonic periods were different due to the host where the mite was reared. B. phoenicis showed better development and higher survival and fecundity in citric fruits than coffee leaves. The intrinsic rate of the population increase (r(m)) was 0.128 and 0.090 - females/female/day on citric fruits and coffee leaves, respectively. The citric fruits were more appropriate for the development of B. phoenicis than coffee leaves. PMID:17119838

  18. Reproductive cooperation between queens and their mated workers: the complex life history of an ant with a valuable nest.

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, C; Hlldobler, B

    1995-01-01

    The life history of Harpegnathos saltator is exceptional among ants because both queens and workers reproduce sexually. Recently mated queens start new colonies alone, but later some of the offspring workers also become inseminated and take over the egg-laying role. This alternation seems associated with the existence of very complex underground nests, which are designed to survive floods. Longevity of ponerine queens is low (a consequence of limited caste dimorphism in this "primitive" subfamily), and upon the death of an H. saltator foundress, the nest represents a substantial investment. The queen's progeny should thus be strongly selected to retain the valuable nests. Unlike the flying queens, the workers copulate with males from their own colonies, and, thus, their offspring are expected to be highly related to the foundress. Colony fission appears not to occur because a daughter fragment would lack an adequate nest for protection. Thus, the annual production of queens in colonies with reproductive work