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Sample records for reproductive synchrony predicts

  1. Female reproductive synchrony predicts skewed paternity across primates

    PubMed Central

    Nunn, Charles L.; Schülke, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have uncovered remarkable variation in paternity within primate groups. To date, however, we lack a general understanding of the factors that drive variation in paternity skew among primate groups and across species. Our study focused on hypotheses from reproductive skew theory involving limited control and the use of paternity “concessions” by investigating how paternity covaries with the number of males, female estrous synchrony, and rates of extragroup paternity. In multivariate and phylogenetically controlled analyses of data from 27 studies on 19 species, we found strong support for a limited control skew model, with reproductive skew within groups declining as female reproductive synchrony and the number of males per group increase. Of these 2 variables, female reproductive synchrony explained more of the variation in paternity distributions. To test whether dominant males provide incentives to subordinates to resist matings by extragroup males, that is, whether dominants make concessions of paternity, we derived a novel prediction that skew is lower within groups when threat from outside the group exists. This prediction was not supported as a primary factor underlying patterns of reproductive skew among primate species. However, our approach revealed that if concessions occur in primates, they are most likely when female synchrony is low, as these conditions provide alpha male control of paternity that is assumed by concessions models. Collectively, our analyses demonstrate that aspects of male reproductive competition are the primary drivers of reproductive skew in primates. PMID:19018288

  2. Detecting Generalized Synchrony Through Mutual Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven J.; So, Paul

    1996-03-01

    Detection of synchrony in the nervous system has traditionally relied on linear methods such as cross correlation and coherence. Neurons are floridly nonlinear, however, and neuronal interactions may be inadequately described if it is assumed that ensemble behavior is a linear combination of neuronal activities. We develop an approach to detecting generalized synchrony using mutual nonlinear prediction. Multivariate surrogate data will be employed to establish statistical confidence that synchrony is nonlinear. These results will be applied to an experimental preparation - the motoneuron pool from the spinal cord stretch reflex. The interrelationships between individual neurons, between single neurons and the population of neurons, and between intracellular synaptic currents and single neurons will be examined, and the case for the existence of generalized synchrony made.

  3. Effects of flowering phenology and synchrony on the reproductive success of a long-flowering shrub.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Traveset, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flowering phenology and synchrony with biotic and abiotic resources are crucial traits determining the reproductive success in insect-pollinated plants. In seasonal climates, plants flowering for long periods should assure reproductive success when resources are more predictable. In this work, we evaluated the relationship between flowering phenology and synchrony and reproductive success in Hypericum balearicum, a shrub flowering all year round but mainly during spring and summer. We studied two contrasting localities (differing mostly in rainfall) during 3 years, and at different biological scales spanning from localities to individual flowers and fruits. We first monitored (monthly) flowering phenology and reproductive success (fruit and seed set) of plants, and assessed whether in the locality with higher rainfall plants had longer flowering phenology and synchrony and relatively higher reproductive success within or outside the flowering peak. Secondly, we censused pollinators on H. balearicum individuals and measured reproductive success along the flowering peak of each locality to test for an association between (i) richness and abundance of pollinators and (ii) fruit and seed set, and seed weight. We found that most flowers (∼90 %) and the highest fruit set (∼70 %) were produced during the flowering peak of each locality. Contrary to expectations, plants in the locality with lower rainfall showed more relaxed flowering phenology and synchrony and set more fruits outside the flowering peak. During the flowering peak of each locality, the reproductive success of early-flowering individuals depended on a combination of both pollinator richness and abundance and rainfall; by contrast, reproductive success of late-flowering individuals was most dependent on rainfall. Plant species flowering for long periods in seasonal climates, thus, appear to be ideal organisms to understand how flowering phenology and synchrony match with biotic and abiotic resources, and

  4. Effects of flowering phenology and synchrony on the reproductive success of a long-flowering shrub

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Javier; Traveset, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Flowering phenology and synchrony with biotic and abiotic resources are crucial traits determining the reproductive success in insect-pollinated plants. In seasonal climates, plants flowering for long periods should assure reproductive success when resources are more predictable. In this work, we evaluated the relationship between flowering phenology and synchrony and reproductive success in Hypericum balearicum, a shrub flowering all year round but mainly during spring and summer. We studied two contrasting localities (differing mostly in rainfall) during 3 years, and at different biological scales spanning from localities to individual flowers and fruits. We first monitored (monthly) flowering phenology and reproductive success (fruit and seed set) of plants, and assessed whether in the locality with higher rainfall plants had longer flowering phenology and synchrony and relatively higher reproductive success within or outside the flowering peak. Secondly, we censused pollinators on H. balearicum individuals and measured reproductive success along the flowering peak of each locality to test for an association between (i) richness and abundance of pollinators and (ii) fruit and seed set, and seed weight. We found that most flowers (∼90 %) and the highest fruit set (∼70 %) were produced during the flowering peak of each locality. Contrary to expectations, plants in the locality with lower rainfall showed more relaxed flowering phenology and synchrony and set more fruits outside the flowering peak. During the flowering peak of each locality, the reproductive success of early-flowering individuals depended on a combination of both pollinator richness and abundance and rainfall; by contrast, reproductive success of late-flowering individuals was most dependent on rainfall. Plant species flowering for long periods in seasonal climates, thus, appear to be ideal organisms to understand how flowering phenology and synchrony match with biotic and abiotic resources, and

  5. Infanticide and within-clutch competition select for reproductive synchrony in a cooperative bird.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina

    2016-08-01

    Reproduction among members of social animal groups is often highly synchronized, but neither the selective advantages nor the proximate causes of synchrony are fully understood. Here I investigate the evolution of hatching synchrony in the Greater Ani (Crotophaga major), a communally nesting bird in which several unrelated females contribute eggs to a large, shared clutch. Hatching synchrony is variable, ranging from complete synchrony to moderate asynchrony, and is determined by the onset of incubation of the communal clutch. Data from a 10-year field study indicate that individual reproductive success is highest in synchronous groups, and that nestlings that hatch in the middle of the hatching sequence are most likely to survive. Nestling mortality is high in asynchronous clutches because early-hatching nestlings are more likely to be killed by adult group members, whereas late-hatching nestlings are more likely to starve due competition with their older nest-mates. Therefore, the timing of hatching appears to be under stabilizing selection from infanticide and resource competition acting in concert. These results provide empirical support for models predicting that synchrony may evolve as an adaptive counter-strategy to infanticide, and they highlight the importance of competition in shaping the timing of reproduction in social groups. PMID:27346386

  6. High reproductive synchrony of Acropora (Anthozoa: Scleractinia) in the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea

    PubMed Central

    Bouwmeester, Jessica; Berumen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    Coral spawning in the northern Gulf of Aqaba has been reported to be asynchronous, making it almost unique when compared to other regions in the world. Here, we document the reproductive condition of Acropora corals in early June 2014 in Dahab, in the Gulf of Aqaba, 125 km south of previous studies conducted in Eilat, Israel. Seventy-eight percent of Acropora colonies from 14 species had mature eggs, indicating that most colonies will spawn on or around the June full moon, with a very high probability of multi-species synchronous spawning. Given the proximity to Eilat, we predict that a comparable sampling protocol would detect similar levels of reproductive synchrony throughout the Gulf of Aqaba consistent with the hypothesis that high levels of spawning synchrony are a feature of all speciose coral assemblages. PMID:25653848

  7. Predicting synchrony in heterogeneous pulse coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talathi, Sachin S.; Hwang, Dong-Uk; Miliotis, Abraham; Carney, Paul R.; Ditto, William L.

    2009-08-01

    Pulse coupled oscillators (PCOs) represent an ubiquitous model for a number of physical and biological systems. Phase response curves (PRCs) provide a general mathematical framework to analyze patterns of synchrony generated within these models. A general theoretical approach to account for the nonlinear contributions from higher-order PRCs in the generation of synchronous patterns by the PCOs is still lacking. Here, by considering a prototypical example of a PCO network, i.e., two synaptically coupled neurons, we present a general theory that extends beyond the weak-coupling approximation, to account for higher-order PRC corrections in the derivation of an approximate discrete map, the stable fixed point of which can predict the domain of 1:1 phase locked synchronous states generated by the PCO network.

  8. Oscillations in joint synchrony of reproductive hormones in healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Keenan, Daniel M.; Pincus, Steven M.; Liu, Peter Y.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-feedback (inhibitory) and positive-feedforward (stimulatory) processes regulate physiological systems. Whether such processes are themselves rhythmic is not known. Here, we apply cross-approximate entropy (cross-ApEn), a noninvasive measurement of joint (pairwise) signal synchrony, to inferentially assess hypothesized circadian and ultradian variations in feedback coupling. The data comprised simultaneous measurements of three pituitary and one peripheral hormone (LH, FSH, prolactin, and testosterone) in 12 healthy men each sampled every 10 min for 4 days (5,760 min). Ergodicity, due to the time series stationarity of the measurements over the 4 days, allows for effective estimation of parameters based upon the 12 subjects. Cross-ApEn changes were quantified via moving-window estimates applied to 4-day time series pairs. The resultant ordered windowed cross-ApEn series (in time) were subjected to power spectrum analysis. Rhythmicity was assessed against the null hypothesis of randomness using 1,000 simulated periodograms derived by shuffling the interpulse-interval hormone-concentration segments and redoing cross-ApEn windows and spectral analysis. By forward cross-ApEn analysis, paired LH-testosterone, LH-prolactin, and LH-FSH synchrony maintained dominant rhythms with periodicities of 18–22.5, 18, and 22.5 h, respectively (each P < 0.001). By reverse (feedback) cross-ApEn analysis, testosterone-LH, testosterone-prolactin, and testosterone-FSH synchrony cycles were 30, 18, and 30–45 h, respectively (each P ≤ 0.001). Significant 8- or 24-h rhythms were also detected in most linkages, and maximal bihormonal synchrony occurred consistently at ∼0400–0500. Collectively, these analyses demonstrate significant ultradian (<24 h), circadian (∼24 h), and infradian (>24 h) oscillations in pituitary-testis synchrony, wherein maximal biglandular coordination is strongly constrained to the early morning hours. PMID:21900124

  9. Seasonality and synchrony of reproduction in three species of nectarivorous Philippines bats

    PubMed Central

    Heideman, Paul D; Utzurrum, Ruth CB

    2003-01-01

    Background Differences among species and among years in reproductive seasonality (the tendency for clusters of events to fall at approximately the same point in each year) and synchrony (amount of clustering of events within a year) have been intensively studied in bats, but are difficult to assess. Here, we use randomization methods with circular statistics to test for synchrony and seasonality of reproduction in three species of nectarivorous megachiropteran bats on Negros Island in the central Philippines. Results In Rousettus amplexicaudatus, estimated dates of birth were both highly synchronous and highly seasonal. In Macroglossus minimus, estimated births were seasonal and significantly clustered within years, but within each year births occurred over a broad period, indicating a low level of synchrony. In Eonycteris spelaea, estimated births were also seasonal and had statistically significant synchrony, with birth periods within years intermediate in synchrony between R. amplexicaudatus and M. minimus. All three species had a similar seasonal pattern, with two birth periods in each year, centered on March or April and August or September. In one species, R. amplexicaudatus, primigravid females (in their first pregnancy) produced their young in June and July, a birth period significantly different in timing from the two birth periods of older adult females. This more conservative pattern of young females may allow higher survival of parents and offspring at cost of a lost reproductive opportunity. There was weak evidence that in some years primigravid females of M. minimus might differ in timing from older adults. There were few significant differences in reproductive timing among different years, and those differences were generally less than two weeks, even during a severe drought in the severe el Niño of 1983. Conclusion The results suggest that these species follow an obligately seasonal pattern of reproductive timing with very little phenotypic

  10. Reproductive investment, synchrony and recruitment success in marine broadcast spawners: Effects of mating system and habitat (exposed shore versus estuary).

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Carla A; Serrão, Ester A; Pearson, Gareth A

    2015-12-01

    The timing and synchrony of gamete release in broadcast spawners have important implications for fertilization success, recruitment and to explain differences in reproductive success under distinct reproductive modes in sympatry. Our objective was to compare the reproductive timing and investment for sister species with contrasting mating systems; Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphroditic) and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious) in habitats with different wave exposures (exposed shore and estuary). Over two months, daily gamete release, recruitment and population structure were recorded. Our results show spawning synchrony between species and habitats, but release events in hermaphrodites occupied broader temporal windows in estuarine than exposed shore habitats. On the exposed shore both species increased the synchrony of release and amount of eggs. In the estuary, hermaphrodites relied on broader temporal spawning windows and a larger canopy, and the dioecious species had higher recruitment success, important factors determining persistence. PMID:26183537

  11. Comparative study of reproductive synchrony at various scales in deep-sea echinoderms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baillon, Sandrine; Hamel, Jean-François; Mercier, Annie

    2011-03-01

    This study examined the influence of temporal and spatial factors on the determination of reproductive cycles in selected deep-water echinoderms. The prevalence of inter-individual synchrony in the gametogenesis of three ubiquitous species, Phormosoma placenta (Echinoidea), Hippasteria phrygiana (Asteroidea) and Mesothuria lactea (Holothuroidea) collected off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador (eastern Canada), was determined. Analyses revealed diverse degrees of gametogenic asynchrony at the scales examined (within trawls, between trawls over similar or different periods, as well as among depths and locations over the same period). Taken as a whole, samples did not show any annual or seasonal patterns, whereas some sets of samples, taken over a particular time period in the same area and at the same depth, revealed well synchronized maturing and/or spawning periods in P. placenta and H. phrygiana. This study presents evidence that determination of reproductive cycles in many deep-sea species may be affected by low sampling resolution inherent to most deep-sea studies. More accurate assessments of reproductive patterns and periodicities may require much tighter collection designs as several species are likely to rely on long-term or transient pairing and aggregation to synchronize their breeding activities.

  12. Neuronal synchrony reveals working memory networks and predicts individual memory capacity

    PubMed Central

    Palva, J. Matias; Monto, Simo; Kulashekhar, Shrikanth; Palva, Satu

    2010-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) is used to maintain sensory information for cognitive operations, and its deficits are associated with several neuropsychological disorders. VWM is based on sustained neuronal activity in a complex cortical network of frontal, parietal, occipital, and temporal areas. The neuronal mechanisms that coordinate this distributed processing to sustain coherent mental images and the mechanisms that set the behavioral capacity limit have remained unknown. We mapped the anatomical and dynamic structures of network synchrony supporting VWM by using a neuro informatics approach and combined magnetoencephalography and electroencephalography. Interareal phase synchrony was sustained and stable during the VWM retention period among frontoparietal and visual areas in α- (10–13 Hz), β- (18–24 Hz), and γ- (30–40 Hz) frequency bands. Furthermore, synchrony was strengthened with increasing memory load among the frontoparietal regions known to underlie executive and attentional functions during memory maintenance. On the other hand, the subjects’ individual behavioral VWM capacity was predicted by synchrony in a network in which the intraparietal sulcus was the most central hub. These data suggest that interareal phase synchrony in the α-, β-, and γ-frequency bands among frontoparietal and visual regions could be a systems level mechanism for coordinating and regulating the maintenance of neuronal object representations in VWM. PMID:20368447

  13. Don't worry, be (moderately) happy: Mothers' anxiety and positivity during pregnancy independently predict lower mother-infant synchrony.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ginger A; Quigley, Kelsey M; Voegtline, Kristin M; DiPietro, Janet A

    2016-02-01

    Maternal positivity and mother-infant synchrony have been linked, independently, to beneficial infant outcomes; however, research that has examined relations between the two has found that higher positivity is associated with lower synchrony. Methodological issues may inform this counter-intuitive association and clinical theory supports its validity. This study examined the theory that heightened positivity associated with anxiety is a way of avoiding negative emotion and contributes to lower synchrony because it interferes with appropriate responding to infant cues. We examined mothers' (N=75) self-reported anxiety and verbal expression of positivity during pregnancy in relation to mother-infant synchrony at 6 months post-partum. Verbal positivity was assessed using linguistic analysis of interviews about pregnancy experiences. Mother and infant affect and gaze were coded during interaction and synchrony was computed as the correlation between mother and infant behaviors. Higher verbal positivity and anxiety during pregnancy independently predicted lower mother-infant synchrony, suggesting distinct pathways to the same degree of synchrony with potentially different consequences for infant development. PMID:26705933

  14. Whither menstrual synchrony?

    PubMed

    McClintock, M K

    1998-01-01

    The initial report of menstrual synchrony indicated that social interactions among groups of women could regulate their ovarian cycles. The initial focus on menstrual synchrony was just the beginning of a discovery process, not all facets of the whole phenomenon. Menstrual synchrony was similar to an archeologist finding a fossilized tooth, which demonstrated the existence of a prehistoric creature. Menstrual synchrony could have turned out to be like the chronodonts, prehistoric creatures for which we still have only their fossilized teeth as evidence for their existence. Fortunately, after almost 3 decades of work, we have excavated the site and been able to unearth more about the structure of this particular creature. It is social regulation of ovulation throughout the lifespan--a creature made up not only of menstrual synchrony, but various forms of the timing of spontaneous ovulatory cycles in adults. It also includes the social regulation of ovulation at other points during the reproductive lifespan: puberty, inter-birth intervals and reproductive senescence. Menstrual synchrony is but one indicator of the phenomenon; it is now clear that there is a great deal more to it than was seen at the time of the original report. PMID:10349026

  15. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  16. Reassessing the Determinants of Breeding Synchrony in Ungulates

    PubMed Central

    English, Annie K.; Chauvenet, Aliénor L. M.; Safi, Kamran; Pettorelli, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of climate change is a major challenge in ecology and wildlife management. While the impact of changes in climatic conditions on distribution ranges has been documented for many organisms, the consequences of changes in resource dynamics for species' overall performance have seldom been investigated. This study addresses this gap by identifying the factors shaping the reproductive synchrony of ungulates. In temporally-variable environments, reproductive phenology of individuals is a key determinant of fitness, with the timing of reproduction affecting their reproductive output and future performance. We used a satellite-based index of resource availability to explore how the level of seasonality and inter-annual variability in resource dynamics affect birth season length of ungulate populations. Contrary to what was previously thought, we found that both the degree of seasonal fluctuation in resource dynamics and inter-annual changes in resource availability influence the degree of birth synchrony within wild ungulate populations. Our results highlight how conclusions from previous interspecific analyses, which did not consider the existence of shared life-history among species, should be treated with caution. They also support the existence of a multi-faceted link between temporal variation in resource availability and breeding synchrony in terrestrial mammals, and increase our understanding of the mechanisms shaping reproductive synchrony in large herbivores, thus enhancing our ability to predict the potential impacts of climate change on biodiversity. PMID:22911793

  17. Correlation and prediction uncertainties in the CyberKnife Synchrony respiratory tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, Eric W.; Wu, Huanmei; Zhang, Yuenian; Lord, Bryce

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: The CyberKnife uses an online prediction model to improve radiation delivery when treating lung tumors. This study evaluates the prediction model used by the CyberKnife radiation therapy system in terms of treatment margins about the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: From the data log files produced by the CyberKnife synchrony model, the uncertainty in radiation delivery can be calculated. Modeler points indicate the tracked position of the tumor and Predictor points predict the position about 115 ms in the future. The discrepancy between Predictor points and their corresponding Modeler points was analyzed for 100 treatment model data sets from 23 de-identified lung patients. The treatment margins were determined in each anatomic direction to cover an arbitrary volume of the GTV, derived from the Modeler points, when the radiation is targeted at the Predictor points. Each treatment model had about 30 min of motion data, of which about 10 min constituted treatment time; only these 10 min were used in the analysis. The frequencies of margin sizes were analyzed and truncated Gaussian normal functions were fit to each direction's distribution. The standard deviation of each Gaussian distribution was then used to describe the necessary margin expansions in each signed dimension in order to achieve the desired coverage. In this study, 95% modeler point coverage was compared to 99% modeler coverage. Two other error sources were investigated: the correlation error and the targeting error. These were added to the prediction error to give an aggregate error for the CyberKnife during treatment of lung tumors. Results: Considering the magnitude of 2{sigma} from the mean of the Gaussian in each signed dimension, the margin expansions needed for 95% modeler point coverage were 1.2 mm in the lateral (LAT) direction and 1.7 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction. For the superior-inferior (SI) direction, the fit was poor; but empirically, the expansions were 3.5 mm

  18. Synchrony-Desynchrony in the Tripartite Model of Fear: Predicting Treatment Outcome in Clinically Phobic Children

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Kristy Benoit; Allen, Ben; Austin, Kristin E.; Waldron, Jonathan C.; Ollendick, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The tripartite model of fear posits that the fear response entails three loosely coupled components: subjective distress, behavioral avoidance, and physiological arousal. The concept of synchrony vs. desynchrony describes the degree to which changes in the activation of these components vary together (synchrony), independently, or inversely (both forms of desynchrony) over time. The present study assessed synchronony-desynchrony and its relationship to treatment outcome in a sample of 98 children with specific phobias both prior to and 1 week after receiving one-session treatment, a 3 hour cognitive-behavioral intervention. The results suggest an overall pattern of desynchronous change whereby youth improved on behavioral avoidance and subjective distress following treatment, but their level of cardiovascular reactivity remained stable. However, we found evidence that synchronous change on the behavioral avoidance and subjective distress components was related to better treatment outcome, whereas desynchronous change on these components was related to poorer treatment outcome. These findings suggest that a fuller understanding of the three response systems and their interrelations in phobic youth may assist us in the assessment and treatment of these disorders, potentially leading to a more person-centered approach and eventually to enhanced treatment outcomes. PMID:26073497

  19. Genetic divergence predicts reproductive isolation in damselflies.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guillén, R A; Córdoba-Aguilar, A; Cordero-Rivera, A; Wellenreuther, M

    2014-01-01

    Reproductive isolation is the defining characteristic of a biological species, and a common, but often untested prediction is a positive correlation between reproductive isolation and genetic divergence. Here, we test for this correlation in odonates, an order characterized by strong sexual selection. First, we measure reproductive isolation and genetic divergence in eight damselfly genera (30 species pairs) and test for a positive correlation. Second, we estimate the genetic threshold preventing hybrid formation and empirically test this threshold using wild populations of species within the Ischnura genus. Our results indicate a positive and strong correlation between reproductive isolation and genetic distance using both mitochondrial and nuclear genes cytochrome oxidase II (COII: r = 0.781 and 18S-28S: r = 0.658). Hybridization thresholds range from -0.43 to 1.78% for COII and -0.052-0.71% for 18S-28S, and both F1 -hybrids and backcrosses were detected in wild populations of two pairs of Ischnura species with overlapping thresholds. Our study suggests that threshold values are suitable to identify species prone to hybridization and that positive isolation-divergence relationships are taxonomically widespread. PMID:24192316

  20. Predicting bird phenology from space: satellite-derived vegetation green-up signal uncovers spatial variation in phenological synchrony between birds and their environment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ella F; Long, Peter R; Zelazowski, Przemyslaw; Szulkin, Marta; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-11-01

    Population-level studies of how tit species (Parus spp.) track the changing phenology of their caterpillar food source have provided a model system allowing inference into how populations can adjust to changing climates, but are often limited because they implicitly assume all individuals experience similar environments. Ecologists are increasingly using satellite-derived data to quantify aspects of animals' environments, but so far studies examining phenology have generally done so at large spatial scales. Considering the scale at which individuals experience their environment is likely to be key if we are to understand the ecological and evolutionary processes acting on reproductive phenology within populations. Here, we use time series of satellite images, with a resolution of 240 m, to quantify spatial variation in vegetation green-up for a 385-ha mixed-deciduous woodland. Using data spanning 13 years, we demonstrate that annual population-level measures of the timing of peak abundance of winter moth larvae (Operophtera brumata) and the timing of egg laying in great tits (Parus major) and blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) is related to satellite-derived spring vegetation phenology. We go on to show that timing of local vegetation green-up significantly explained individual differences in tit reproductive phenology within the population, and that the degree of synchrony between bird and vegetation phenology showed marked spatial variation across the woodland. Areas of high oak tree (Quercus robur) and hazel (Corylus avellana) density showed the strongest match between remote-sensed vegetation phenology and reproductive phenology in both species. Marked within-population variation in the extent to which phenology of different trophic levels match suggests that more attention should be given to small-scale processes when exploring the causes and consequences of phenological matching. We discuss how use of remotely sensed data to study within-population variation

  1. Seasonal ice loss in the Beaufort Sea: Toward synchrony and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Michael; Dickinson, Suzanne; Zhang, Jinlun; W. Lindsay, Ron

    2015-02-01

    The seasonal evolution of sea ice loss in the Beaufort Sea during 1979-2012 is examined, focusing on differences between eastern and western sectors. Two stages in ice loss are identified: the Day of Opening (DOO) is defined as the spring decrease in ice concentration from its winter maximum below a value of 0.8 areal concentration; the Day of Retreat (DOR) is the summer decrease below 0.15 concentration. We consider three aspects of the subject, i.e., (i) the long-term mean, (ii) long-term linear trends, and (iii) interannual variability. We find that in the mean, DOO occurs earliest in the eastern Beaufort Sea (EBS) owing to easterly winds which act to thin the ice there, relative to the western Beaufort Sea (WBS) where ice has been generally thicker. There is no significant long-term trend in EBS DOO, although WBS DOO is in fact trending toward earlier dates. This means that spatial differences in DOO across the Beaufort Sea have been shrinking over the past 33 years, i.e., these dates are becoming more synchronous, a situation which may impact human and marine mammal activity in the area. Retreat dates are also becoming more synchronous, although with no statistical significance over the studied time period. Finally, we find that in any given year, an increase in monthly mean easterly winds of ˜1 m/s during spring is associated with earlier summer DOR of 6-15 days, offering predictive capability with 2-4 months lead time.

  2. Endogenous rhythms influence interpersonal synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zamm, Anna; Wellman, Chelsea; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-05-01

    Interpersonal synchrony, the temporal coordination of actions between individuals, is fundamental to social behaviors from conversational speech to dance and music-making. Animal models indicate constraints on synchrony that arise from endogenous rhythms: Intrinsic periodic behaviors or processes that continue in the absence of change in external stimulus conditions. We report evidence for a direct causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony in a music performance task, which places high demands on temporal coordination. We first establish that endogenous rhythms, measured by spontaneous rates of individual performance, are stable within individuals across stimulus materials, limb movements, and time points. We then test a causal link between endogenous rhythms and interpersonal synchrony by pairing each musician with a partner who is either matched or mismatched in spontaneous rate and by measuring their joint behavior up to 1 year later. Partners performed melodies together, using either the same or different hands. Partners who were matched for spontaneous rate showed greater interpersonal synchrony in joint performance than mismatched partners, regardless of hand used. Endogenous rhythms offer potential to predict optimal group membership in joint behaviors that require temporal coordination. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26820249

  3. Does energy availability predict gastropod reproductive strategies?

    PubMed Central

    McClain, Craig R.; Filler, Ryan; Auld, Josh R.

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of reproductive strategies in nature is shaped by a plethora of factors including energy availability. For example, both low temperatures and limited food availability could increase larval exposure to predation by slowing development, selecting against pelagic and/or feeding larvae. The frequency of hermaphroditism could increase under low food availability as population density (and hence mate availability) decreases. We examine the relationship between reproductive/life-history traits and energy availability for 189 marine gastropod families. Only larval type was related to energy availability with the odds of having planktotrophic larvae versus direct development decreasing by 1% with every one-unit increase in the square root of carbon flux. Simultaneous hermaphroditism also potentially increases with carbon flux, but this effect disappears when accounting for evolutionary relationships among taxa. Our findings are in contrast to some theory and empirical work demonstrating that hermaphroditism should increase and planktotrophic development should decrease with decreasing productivity. Instead, they suggest that some reproductive strategies are too energetically expensive at low food availabilities, or arise only when energy is available, and others serve to capitalize on opportunities for aggregation or increased energy availability. PMID:25009058

  4. Does energy availability predict gastropod reproductive strategies?

    PubMed

    McClain, Craig R; Filler, Ryan; Auld, Josh R

    2014-08-22

    The diversity of reproductive strategies in nature is shaped by a plethora of factors including energy availability. For example, both low temperatures and limited food availability could increase larval exposure to predation by slowing development, selecting against pelagic and/or feeding larvae. The frequency of hermaphroditism could increase under low food availability as population density (and hence mate availability) decreases. We examine the relationship between reproductive/life-history traits and energy availability for 189 marine gastropod families. Only larval type was related to energy availability with the odds of having planktotrophic larvae versus direct development decreasing by 1% with every one-unit increase in the square root of carbon flux. Simultaneous hermaphroditism also potentially increases with carbon flux, but this effect disappears when accounting for evolutionary relationships among taxa. Our findings are in contrast to some theory and empirical work demonstrating that hermaphroditism should increase and planktotrophic development should decrease with decreasing productivity. Instead, they suggest that some reproductive strategies are too energetically expensive at low food availabilities, or arise only when energy is available, and others serve to capitalize on opportunities for aggregation or increased energy availability. PMID:25009058

  5. Computing with Neural Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Brette, Romain

    2012-01-01

    Neurons communicate primarily with spikes, but most theories of neural computation are based on firing rates. Yet, many experimental observations suggest that the temporal coordination of spikes plays a role in sensory processing. Among potential spike-based codes, synchrony appears as a good candidate because neural firing and plasticity are sensitive to fine input correlations. However, it is unclear what role synchrony may play in neural computation, and what functional advantage it may provide. With a theoretical approach, I show that the computational interest of neural synchrony appears when neurons have heterogeneous properties. In this context, the relationship between stimuli and neural synchrony is captured by the concept of synchrony receptive field, the set of stimuli which induce synchronous responses in a group of neurons. In a heterogeneous neural population, it appears that synchrony patterns represent structure or sensory invariants in stimuli, which can then be detected by postsynaptic neurons. The required neural circuitry can spontaneously emerge with spike-timing-dependent plasticity. Using examples in different sensory modalities, I show that this allows simple neural circuits to extract relevant information from realistic sensory stimuli, for example to identify a fluctuating odor in the presence of distractors. This theory of synchrony-based computation shows that relative spike timing may indeed have computational relevance, and suggests new types of neural network models for sensory processing with appealing computational properties. PMID:22719243

  6. Synchrony and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Wiltermuth, Scott S; Heath, Chip

    2009-01-01

    Armies, churches, organizations, and communities often engage in activities-for example, marching, singing, and dancing-that lead group members to act in synchrony with each other. Anthropologists and sociologists have speculated that rituals involving synchronous activity may produce positive emotions that weaken the psychological boundaries between the self and the group. This article explores whether synchronous activity may serve as a partial solution to the free-rider problem facing groups that need to motivate their members to contribute toward the collective good. Across three experiments, people acting in synchrony with others cooperated more in subsequent group economic exercises, even in situations requiring personal sacrifice. Our results also showed that positive emotions need not be generated for synchrony to foster cooperation. In total, the results suggest that acting in synchrony with others can increase cooperation by strengthening social attachment among group members. PMID:19152536

  7. Long-term reproductive behaviour of woody plants across seven Bornean forest types in the Gunung Palung National Park (Indonesia): suprannual synchrony, temporal productivity and fruiting diversity.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Charles H; Curran, Lisa M; Marshall, Andrew J; Leighton, Mark

    2007-10-01

    For 68 months, we observed the reproductive behaviour of 7288 woody plants (172 figs, 1457 climbers and 5659 trees) spanning major soil and elevational gradients. Two 2-3 month community-wide supra-annual fruiting events were synchronized across five forest types, coinciding with ENSO events. At least 27 genera in 24 families restricted their reproduction to these events, which involved a substantial proportion of tree diversity (> 80% of phylogenetic diversity). During these events, mean reproductive levels (8.5%) represented an almost four-fold increase compared with other months. These patterns indicate a strong behavioural advantage to this unusual reproductive behaviour. Montane forest experienced a single, separate fruiting peak while the peat swamp forest did not participate. Excluding these events, no temporal reproductive pattern was detectable, at either the landscape or forest type. These phenological patterns have major implications for the conservation of frugivore communities, with montane and swamp forests acting as 'keystone' forests. PMID:17845296

  8. Monitoring spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Houghton, Conor; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Mormann, Florian

    2013-03-01

    Recently, the SPIKE-distance has been proposed as a parameter-free and timescale-independent measure of spike train synchrony. This measure is time resolved since it relies on instantaneous estimates of spike train dissimilarity. However, its original definition led to spuriously high instantaneous values for eventlike firing patterns. Here we present a substantial improvement of this measure that eliminates this shortcoming. The reliability gained allows us to track changes in instantaneous clustering, i.e., time-localized patterns of (dis)similarity among multiple spike trains. Additional new features include selective and triggered temporal averaging as well as the instantaneous comparison of spike train groups. In a second step, a causal SPIKE-distance is defined such that the instantaneous values of dissimilarity rely on past information only so that time-resolved spike train synchrony can be estimated in real time. We demonstrate that these methods are capable of extracting valuable information from field data by monitoring the synchrony between neuronal spike trains during an epileptic seizure. Finally, the applicability of both the regular and the real-time SPIKE-distance to continuous data is illustrated on model electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings. PMID:23221419

  9. Long-range neural synchrony in behavior.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander Z; Gordon, Joshua A

    2015-07-01

    Long-range synchrony between distant brain regions accompanies multiple forms of behavior. This review compares and contrasts the methods by which long-range synchrony is evaluated in both humans and model animals. Three examples of behaviorally relevant long-range synchrony are discussed in detail: gamma-frequency synchrony during visual perception, hippocampal-prefrontal synchrony during working memory, and prefrontal-amygdala synchrony during anxiety. Implications for circuit mechanism, translation, and clinical relevance are discussed. PMID:25897876

  10. Long-range neural synchrony in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Alexander Z.; Gordon, Joshua A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-range synchrony between distant brain regions accompanies multiple forms of behavior. This review compares and contrasts the methods by which long-range synchrony is evaluated in both humans and model animals. Three examples of behaviorally-relevant long-range synchrony are discussed in detail: gamma-frequency synchrony during visual perception; hippocampal-prefrontal synchrony during working memory; and prefrontal-amygdala synchrony during anxiety. Implications for circuit mechanism, translation, and clinical relevance are discussed. PMID:25897876

  11. Stabilizing synchrony by inhomogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Bolhasani, Ehsan; Valizadeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    We show that for two weakly coupled identical neuronal oscillators with strictly positive phase resetting curve, isochronous synchrony can only be seen in the absence of noise and an arbitrarily weak noise can destroy entrainment and generate intermittent phase slips. Small inhomogeneity–mismatch in the intrinsic firing rate of the neurons–can stabilize the phase locking and lead to more precise relative spike timing of the two neurons. The results can explain how for a class of neuronal models, including leaky integrate-fire model, inhomogeneity can increase correlation of spike trains when the neurons are synaptically connected. PMID:26338691

  12. Enhancing "theory of mind" through behavioral synchrony.

    PubMed

    Baimel, Adam; Severson, Rachel L; Baron, Andrew S; Birch, Susan A J

    2015-01-01

    Theory of mind refers to the abilities underlying the capacity to reason about one's own and others' mental states. This ability is critical for predicting and making sense of the actions of others, is essential for efficient communication, fosters social learning, and provides the foundation for empathic concern. Clearly, there is incredible value in fostering theory of mind. Unfortunately, despite being the focus of a wealth of research over the last 40 years relatively little is known about specific strategies for fostering social perspective taking abilities. We provide a discussion of the rationale for applying one specific strategy for fostering efficient theory of mind-that of engaging in "behavioral synchrony" (i.e., the act of keeping together in time with others). Culturally evolved collective rituals involving synchronous actions have long been held to act as social glue. Specifically, here we present how behavioral synchrony tunes our minds for reasoning about other minds in the process of fostering social coordination and cooperation, and propose that we can apply behavioral synchrony as a tool for enhancing theory of mind. PMID:26157415

  13. Discovery of a secular trend in Cayo Santiago macaque reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Delgado, Diana L; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-02-01

    Reproductive synchrony and the consequent clustering of births are hypothesized to be regulated by seasonal changes in rainfall and food availability. Such climate-related seasonality is, however, questionable in tropical populations occupying temporally invariant habitats year round. Using the long-term data of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques from 1973 to 2013, this study distinguishes synchrony (a greater than chance clustering of births) from seasonality (a cluster of births during a period of the year when abiotic conditions are favorable) and shows that females are highly synchronized (>72% of births in a 3-month period) but the effects of environmental zeitgebers on reproduction are overridden by biological factors. Specifically, biotic and abiotic factors including (i) loss of immature offspring; (ii) population density; (iii) age at delivery; (iv) rainfall; and (v) changes in colony management were modeled in relation to the annual onset of births and the median birth date. Females experiencing loss of immature offspring had an interbirth interval of <365 days in average and the proportion of these females increased up to 48% due to changes in colony management overtime, although reproductive synchrony increased with increasing population density. A secular trend in both the onset of births and the median date of birth is documented and the model predicts that the median birth date will advance across all calendar-based seasons by 2050. The secular trend in reproduction appears to be triggered by changes in the age at delivery of females, the absence of physiological constraints from maternal investment due to offspring loss, shorter interbirth interval, and a higher degree of coordination due to increasing population density. This study challenges the reproductive phenology previously described for rhesus macaques highlighting the importance of long-term studies in addressing the ultimate causes of reproductive synchrony. PMID:26540010

  14. Brief Report: A Pilot Study of Parent-Child Biobehavioral Synchrony in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Jason K.; Fenning, Rachel M.; Howland, Mariann A.; Baucom, Brian R.; Moffitt, Jacquelyn; Erath, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    The theory of biobehavioral synchrony proposes that the predictive power of parent-child attunement likely lies in the manner with which behaviors are aligned with relevant biological processes. Symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may challenge the formation of behavioral and physiological synchrony, but maintenance of such parent-child…

  15. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters.

    PubMed

    Lotzin, Annett; Romer, Georg; Schiborr, Julia; Noga, Berit; Schulte-Markwort, Michael; Ramsauer, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother's and infant's nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers' and infants' gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother's depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother's emotion dysregulation. PMID:26657941

  16. Gaze Synchrony between Mothers with Mood Disorders and Their Infants: Maternal Emotion Dysregulation Matters

    PubMed Central

    Lotzin, Annett; Romer, Georg; Schiborr, Julia; Noga, Berit; Schulte-Markwort, Michael; Ramsauer, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    A lowered and heightened synchrony between the mother’s and infant’s nonverbal behavior predicts adverse infant development. We know that maternal depressive symptoms predict lowered and heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony, but it is unclear whether maternal emotion dysregulation is related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. This cross-sectional study examined whether maternal emotion dysregulation in mothers with mood disorders is significantly related to mother-infant gaze synchrony. We also tested whether maternal emotion dysregulation is relatively more important than maternal depressive symptoms in predicting mother-infant gaze synchrony, and whether maternal emotion dysregulation mediates the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. We observed 68 mothers and their 4- to 9-month-old infants in the Still-Face paradigm during two play interactions, before and after social stress was induced. The mothers’ and infants’ gaze behaviors were coded using microanalysis with the Maternal Regulatory Scoring System and Infant Regulatory Scoring System, respectively. The degree of mother-infant gaze synchrony was computed using time-series analysis. Maternal emotion dysregulation was measured by the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory. Greater maternal emotion dysregulation was significantly related to heightened mother-infant gaze synchrony. The overall effect of maternal emotion dysregulation on mother-infant gaze synchrony was relatively more important than the effect of maternal depressive symptoms in the five tested models. Maternal emotion dysregulation fully mediated the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and mother-infant gaze synchrony. Our findings suggest that the effect of the mother’s depressive symptoms on the mother-infant gaze synchrony may be mediated by the mother’s emotion dysregulation. PMID:26657941

  17. Psychosocial effects of perceived emotional synchrony in collective gatherings.

    PubMed

    Páez, Dario; Rimé, Bernard; Basabe, Nekane; Wlodarczyk, Anna; Zumeta, Larraitz

    2015-05-01

    In a classic theory, Durkheim (1912) predicted that because of the social sharing of emotion they generate, collective gatherings bring participants to a stage of collective effervescence in which they experience a sense of union with others and a feeling of empowerment accompanied by positive affect. This would lead them to leave the collective situation with a renewed sense of confidence in life and in social institutions. A century after Durkheim's predictions of these effects, though, they remained untested as a whole. This article reports 4 studies, 2 correlational, 1 semilongitudinal, and 1 experimental, assessing the positive effects of participation in either positively valenced (folkloric marches) or negatively valenced (protest demonstrations) collective gatherings. Results confirmed that collective gatherings consistently strengthened collective identity, identity fusion, and social integration, as well as enhancing personal and collective self-esteem and efficacy, positive affect, and positive social beliefs among participants. In line with a central tenet of the theory, emotional communion, or perceived emotional synchrony with others mediated these effects. Higher perceived emotional synchrony was associated with stronger emotional reactions, stronger social support, and higher endorsement of social beliefs and values. Participation in symbolic collective gatherings also particularly reinforced identity fusion when perceived emotional synchrony was high. The respective contributions of perceived emotional synchrony and flow, or optimal experience, were also assessed. Whereas perceived emotional synchrony emerged as strongly related to the various social outcomes, flow was observed to be related first to collective efficacy and self-esteem, and thus, to encompass mainly empowerment effects. PMID:25822033

  18. Establishing a Statistical Link between Network Oscillations and Neural Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Burton, Shawn D; Snyder, Adam C; Smith, Matthew A; Urban, Nathaniel N; Kass, Robert E

    2015-10-01

    Pairs of active neurons frequently fire action potentials or "spikes" nearly synchronously (i.e., within 5 ms of each other). This spike synchrony may occur by chance, based solely on the neurons' fluctuating firing patterns, or it may occur too frequently to be explicable by chance alone. When spike synchrony above chances levels is present, it may subserve computation for a specific cognitive process, or it could be an irrelevant byproduct of such computation. Either way, spike synchrony is a feature of neural data that should be explained. A point process regression framework has been developed previously for this purpose, using generalized linear models (GLMs). In this framework, the observed number of synchronous spikes is compared to the number predicted by chance under varying assumptions about the factors that affect each of the individual neuron's firing-rate functions. An important possible source of spike synchrony is network-wide oscillations, which may provide an essential mechanism of network information flow. To establish the statistical link between spike synchrony and network-wide oscillations, we have integrated oscillatory field potentials into our point process regression framework. We first extended a previously-published model of spike-field association and showed that we could recover phase relationships between oscillatory field potentials and firing rates. We then used this new framework to demonstrate the statistical relationship between oscillatory field potentials and spike synchrony in: 1) simulated neurons, 2) in vitro recordings of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and 3) in vivo recordings of neocortical V4 neurons. Our results provide a rigorous method for establishing a statistical link between network oscillations and neural synchrony. PMID:26465621

  19. Establishing a Statistical Link between Network Oscillations and Neural Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Burton, Shawn D.; Snyder, Adam C.; Smith, Matthew A.; Urban, Nathaniel N.; Kass, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Pairs of active neurons frequently fire action potentials or “spikes” nearly synchronously (i.e., within 5 ms of each other). This spike synchrony may occur by chance, based solely on the neurons’ fluctuating firing patterns, or it may occur too frequently to be explicable by chance alone. When spike synchrony above chances levels is present, it may subserve computation for a specific cognitive process, or it could be an irrelevant byproduct of such computation. Either way, spike synchrony is a feature of neural data that should be explained. A point process regression framework has been developed previously for this purpose, using generalized linear models (GLMs). In this framework, the observed number of synchronous spikes is compared to the number predicted by chance under varying assumptions about the factors that affect each of the individual neuron’s firing-rate functions. An important possible source of spike synchrony is network-wide oscillations, which may provide an essential mechanism of network information flow. To establish the statistical link between spike synchrony and network-wide oscillations, we have integrated oscillatory field potentials into our point process regression framework. We first extended a previously-published model of spike-field association and showed that we could recover phase relationships between oscillatory field potentials and firing rates. We then used this new framework to demonstrate the statistical relationship between oscillatory field potentials and spike synchrony in: 1) simulated neurons, 2) in vitro recordings of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, and 3) in vivo recordings of neocortical V4 neurons. Our results provide a rigorous method for establishing a statistical link between network oscillations and neural synchrony. PMID:26465621

  20. Synchrony with shunting inhibition in a feedforward inhibitory network

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Dong-Uk; Carney, Paul R.; Ditto, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that GABAA receptor mediated inhibition in adult hippocampus is shunting rather than hyperpolarizing. Simulation studies of realistic interneuron networks with strong shunting inhibition have been demonstrated to exhibit robust gamma band (20–80 Hz) synchrony in the presence of heterogeneity in the intrinsic firing rates of individual neurons in the network. In order to begin to understand how shunting can contribute to network synchrony in the presence of heterogeneity, we develop a general theoretical framework using spike time response curves (STRC's) to study patterns of synchrony in a simple network of two unidirectionally coupled interneurons (UCI network) interacting through a shunting synapse in the presence of heterogeneity. We derive an approximate discrete map to analyze the dynamics of synchronous states in the UCI network by taking into account the nonlinear contributions of the higher order STRC terms. We show how the approximate discrete map can be used to successfully predict the domain of synchronous 1:1 phase locked state in the UCI network. The discrete map also allows us to determine the conditions under which the two interneurons can exhibit in-phase synchrony. We conclude by demonstrating how the information from the study of the discrete map for the dynamics of the UCI network can give us valuable insight into the degree of synchrony in a larger feedforward network of heterogeneous interneurons. PMID:20135213

  1. Unconscious errors enhance prefrontal-occipital oscillatory synchrony.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; van Gaal, Simon; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Lamme, Victor A F

    2009-01-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (MFC) is critical for our ability to learn from previous mistakes. Here we provide evidence that neurophysiological oscillatory long-range synchrony is a mechanism of post-error adaptation that occurs even without conscious awareness of the error. During a visually signaled Go/No-Go task in which half of the No-Go cues were masked and thus not consciously perceived, response errors enhanced tonic (i.e., over 1-2 s) oscillatory synchrony between MFC and occipital cortex (OCC) leading up to and during the subsequent trial. Spectral Granger causality analyses demonstrated that MFC --> OCC directional synchrony was enhanced during trials following both conscious and unconscious errors, whereas transient stimulus-induced occipital --> MFC directional synchrony was independent of errors in the previous trial. Further, the strength of pre-trial MFC-occipital synchrony predicted individual differences in task performance. Together, these findings suggest that synchronous neurophysiological oscillations are a plausible mechanism of MFC-driven cognitive control that is independent of conscious awareness. PMID:19956401

  2. The reproductive season of Acropora in Socotra, Yemen.

    PubMed

    Baird, Andrew H; Abrego, David; Howells, Emily J; Cumbo, Vivian R

    2014-01-01

    Determining when corals reproduce has clear management and economic implications. Here we document the reproductive condition of corals in the genus Acropora on the island of Socotra in Yemen during February 2014. Twenty percent of colonies (n = 143) contained mature gametes and 28% had immature gametes indicating that spawning will occur in both February and March in 2014, confirming previous anecdotal reports of coral spawning at this time in Socotra. Acropora typically reproduce in synchrony with many other broadcast spawning scleractinian corals, and we therefore predict that many other species are reproductively active at this time of year. PMID:25075295

  3. The reproductive season of Acropora in Socotra, Yemen

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Andrew H.; Abrego, David; Howells, Emily J.; Cumbo, Vivian R.

    2014-01-01

    Determining when corals reproduce has clear management and economic implications. Here we document the reproductive condition of corals in the genus Acropora on the island of Socotra in Yemen during February 2014. Twenty percent of colonies (n = 143) contained mature gametes and 28% had immature gametes indicating that spawning will occur in both February and March in 2014, confirming previous anecdotal reports of coral spawning at this time in Socotra. Acropora typically reproduce in synchrony with many other broadcast spawning scleractinian corals, and we therefore predict that many other species are reproductively active at this time of year. PMID:25075295

  4. The predicted influence of climate change on lesser prairie-chicken reproductive parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisham, Blake A.; Boal, Clint W.; Haukos, David A.; Davis, D.; Boydston, Kathy K.; Dixon, Charles; Heck, Willard R.

    2013-01-01

    The Southern High Plains is anticipated to experience significant changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change. These changes may influence the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) in positive or negative ways. We assessed the potential changes in clutch size, incubation start date, and nest survival for lesser prairie-chickens for the years 2050 and 2080 based on modeled predictions of climate change and reproductive data for lesser prairie-chickens from 2001-2011 on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. We developed 9 a priori models to assess the relationship between reproductive parameters and biologically relevant weather conditions. We selected weather variable(s) with the most model support and then obtained future predicted values from climatewizard.org. We conducted 1,000 simulations using each reproductive parameter's linear equation obtained from regression calculations, and the future predicted value for each weather variable to predict future reproductive parameter values for lesser prairie-chickens. There was a high degree of model uncertainty for each reproductive value. Winter temperature had the greatest effect size for all three parameters, suggesting a negative relationship between above-average winter temperature and reproductive output. The above-average winter temperatures are correlated to La Nina events, which negatively affect lesser prairie-chickens through resulting drought conditions. By 2050 and 2080, nest survival was predicted to be below levels considered viable for population persistence; however, our assessment did not consider annual survival of adults, chick survival, or the positive benefit of habitat management and conservation, which may ultimately offset the potentially negative effect of drought on nest survival.

  5. The predicted influence of climate change on lesser prairie-chicken reproductive parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grisham, Blake A.; Boal, Clint W.; Haukos, David A.; Davis, Dawn M.; Boydston, Kathy K.; Dixon, Charles; Heck, Willard R.

    2013-01-01

    The Southern High Plains is anticipated to experience significant changes in temperature and precipitation due to climate change. These changes may influence the lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus) in positive or negative ways. We assessed the potential changes in clutch size, incubation start date, and nest survival for lesser prairie-chickens for the years 2050 and 2080 based on modeled predictions of climate change and reproductive data for lesser prairie-chickens from 2001–2011 on the Southern High Plains of Texas and New Mexico. We developed 9 a priori models to assess the relationship between reproductive parameters and biologically relevant weather conditions. We selected weather variable(s) with the most model support and then obtained future predicted values from climatewizard.org. We conducted 1,000 simulations using each reproductive parameter’s linear equation obtained from regression calculations, and the future predicted value for each weather variable to predict future reproductive parameter values for lesser prairie-chickens. There was a high degree of model uncertainty for each reproductive value. Winter temperature had the greatest effect size for all three parameters, suggesting a negative relationship between above-average winter temperature and reproductive output. The above-average winter temperatures are correlated to La Niña events, which negatively affect lesser prairie-chickens through resulting drought conditions. By 2050 and 2080, nest survival was predicted to be below levels considered viable for population persistence; however, our assessment did not consider annual survival of adults, chick survival, or the positive benefit of habitat management and conservation, which may ultimately offset the potentially negative effect of drought on nest survival.

  6. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus).

    PubMed

    Hansen, Warren K; Bate, Lisa J; Landry, Devin W; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  7. Feather and faecal corticosterone concentrations predict future reproductive decisions in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Warren K.; Bate, Lisa J.; Landry, Devin W.; Chastel, Olivier; Parenteau, Charline; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding sources of reproductive variation can inform management and conservation decisions, population ecology and life-history theory. Annual reproductive variation can drive population growth rate and can be influenced by factors from across the annual cycle (known as carry-over effects). The majority of studies, however, focus solely on the role of current environmental events. Past events often influence future reproductive decisions and success but can be logistically difficult to collect and quantify, especially in migratory species. Recent work indicates that glucocorticoids may prove good indicators to evaluate carry-over effects across life-history transitions. Here, we evaluated three different measures of glucocorticoid physiology (feathers, faeces and plasma) to evaluate the predictability of future breeding decision in the harlequin duck (Histrionicus histrionicus). We collected tail and back feathers, plasma and faeces for glucocorticoid analysis, and fitted female harlequin ducks with very high-frequency transmitters to track their breeding decisions. Both back feathers (moulted immediately before the current season) and faecal glucocorticoid metabolites were identified as important predictive factors of reproductive decisions; high concentrations of glucocorticoid metabolites in back feathers and faeces predicted a higher likelihood of reproductive deferral for the year. Although back and tail feather corticosterone concentrations were correlated, tail feathers (moulted at the end of the previous breeding season) did not predict breeding decisions. Plasma corticosterone concentrations were collected over too broad a time range after capture to be useful in this study. This study demonstrates the utility of non-invasive corticosterone metrics in predicting breeding decisions and supports the use of feathers to measure carry-over effects in migratory birds. With this technique, we identified the prenuptial moult as an important life

  8. Group rhythmic synchrony and attention in children

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Alexander K.; Minces, Victor; McLoughlin, Grainne; Chiba, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Synchrony, or the coordinated processing of time, is an often-overlooked yet critical context for human interaction. This study tests the relationship between the ability to synchronize rhythmically in a group setting with the ability to attend in 102 elementary schoolchildren. Impairments in temporal processing have frequently been shown to exist in clinical populations with learning disorders, particularly those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Based on this evidence, we hypothesized that the ability to synchronize rhythmically in a group setting—an instance of the type of temporal processing necessary for successful interaction and learning—would be correlated with the ability to attend across the continuum of the population. A music class is an ideal setting for the study of interpersonal timing. In order to measure synchrony in this context, we constructed instruments that allowed the recording and measurement of individual rhythmic performance. The SWAN teacher questionnaire was used as a measurement of attentional behavior. We find that the ability to synchronize with others in a group music class can predict a child's attentional behavior. PMID:24032021

  9. Nonverbal synchrony of head- and body-movement in psychotherapy: different signals have different associations with outcome

    PubMed Central

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The coordination of patient’s and therapist’s bodily movement – nonverbal synchrony – has been empirically shown to be associated with psychotherapy outcome. This finding was based on dynamic movement patterns of the whole body. The present paper is a new analysis of an existing dataset (Ramseyer and Tschacher, 2011), which extends previous findings by differentiating movements pertaining to head and upper-body regions. Method: In a sample of 70 patients (37 female, 33 male) treated at an outpatient psychotherapy clinic, we quantified nonverbal synchrony with an automated objective video-analysis algorithm (motion energy analysis). Head- and body-synchrony was quantified during the initial 15 min of video-recorded therapy sessions. Micro-outcome was assessed with self-report post-session questionnaires provided by patients and their therapists. Macro-outcome was measured with questionnaires that quantified attainment of treatment goals and changes in experiencing and behavior at the end of therapy. Results: The differentiation of head- and body-synchrony showed that these two facets of motor coordination were differentially associated with outcome. Head-synchrony predicted global outcome of therapy, while body-synchrony did not, and body-synchrony predicted session outcome, while head-synchrony did not. Conclusion: The results pose an important amendment to previous findings, which showed that nonverbal synchrony embodied both outcome and interpersonal variables of psychotherapy dyads. The separation of head- and body-synchrony suggested that distinct mechanisms may operate in these two regions: Head-synchrony embodied phenomena with a long temporal extension (overall therapy success), while body-synchrony embodied phenomena of a more immediate nature (session-level success). More explorations with fine-grained analyses of synchronized phenomena in nonverbal behavior may shed additional light on the embodiment of psychotherapy process. PMID

  10. Optimal reproductive-skew models fail to predict aggression in wasps.

    PubMed

    Nonacs, Peter; Reeve, H Kern; Starks, Philip T

    2004-04-22

    Optimal-skew models (OSMs) predict that cooperative breeding occurs as a result of dominants conceding reproductive benefits to subordinates, and that division of reproduction within groups reflects each cooperator's willingness and ability to contest aggressively for dominance. Polistine paper wasps are a leading model system for testing OSMs, and data on reproduction and aggression appear to support OSMs. These studies, however, measure aggression as a single rate rather than by the activity patterns of individuals. This leads to a potential error: if individuals are more likely to receive aggression when active than when inactive, differences in aggression across samples can reflect changes in activity rather than hostility. This study replicates a field manipulation cited as strongly supporting OSMs. We show that fundamentally different conclusions arise when controlling for individual activity states. Our analyses strongly suggest that behaviours classified as 'aggression' in paper wasps are unlikely to function in establishing, maintaining or responding to changes in reproductive skew. This illustrates that OSM tests using aggression or other non-reproductive behaviour as a metric for reproductive partitioning must demonstrate those links rather than assume them. PMID:15255099

  11. Optimal reproductive-skew models fail to predict aggression in wasps.

    PubMed Central

    Nonacs, Peter; Reeve, H. Kern; Starks, Philip T.

    2004-01-01

    Optimal-skew models (OSMs) predict that cooperative breeding occurs as a result of dominants conceding reproductive benefits to subordinates, and that division of reproduction within groups reflects each cooperator's willingness and ability to contest aggressively for dominance. Polistine paper wasps are a leading model system for testing OSMs, and data on reproduction and aggression appear to support OSMs. These studies, however, measure aggression as a single rate rather than by the activity patterns of individuals. This leads to a potential error: if individuals are more likely to receive aggression when active than when inactive, differences in aggression across samples can reflect changes in activity rather than hostility. This study replicates a field manipulation cited as strongly supporting OSMs. We show that fundamentally different conclusions arise when controlling for individual activity states. Our analyses strongly suggest that behaviours classified as 'aggression' in paper wasps are unlikely to function in establishing, maintaining or responding to changes in reproductive skew. This illustrates that OSM tests using aggression or other non-reproductive behaviour as a metric for reproductive partitioning must demonstrate those links rather than assume them. PMID:15255099

  12. Elevated glucocorticoid concentrations during gestation predict reduced reproductive success in subordinate female banded mongooses.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, J L; Nichols, H J; Marshall, H H; Vitikainen, E I K; Thompson, F J; Walker, S L; Cant, M A; Young, A J

    2015-10-01

    Dominant females in social species have been hypothesized to reduce the reproductive success of their subordinates by inducing elevated circulating glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations. However, this 'stress-related suppression' hypothesis has received little support in cooperatively breeding species, despite evident reproductive skews among females. We tested this hypothesis in the banded mongoose (Mungos mungo), a cooperative mammal in which multiple females conceive and carry to term in each communal breeding attempt. As predicted, lower ranked females had lower reproductive success, even among females that carried to term. While there were no rank-related differences in faecal glucocorticoid (fGC) concentrations prior to gestation or in the first trimester, lower ranked females had significantly higher fGC concentrations than higher ranked females in the second and third trimesters. Finally, females with higher fGC concentrations during the third trimester lost a greater proportion of their gestated young prior to their emergence from the burrow. Together, our results are consistent with a role for rank-related maternal stress in generating reproductive skew among females in this cooperative breeder. While studies of reproductive skew frequently consider the possibility that rank-related stress reduces the conception rates of subordinates, our findings highlight the possibility of detrimental effects on reproductive outcomes even after pregnancies have become established. PMID:26510673

  13. Elevated glucocorticoid concentrations during gestation predict reduced reproductive success in subordinate female banded mongooses

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, J. L.; Nichols, H. J.; Marshall, H. H.; Vitikainen, E. I. K.; Thompson, F. J.; Walker, S. L.; Cant, M. A.; Young, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Dominant females in social species have been hypothesized to reduce the reproductive success of their subordinates by inducing elevated circulating glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations. However, this ‘stress-related suppression' hypothesis has received little support in cooperatively breeding species, despite evident reproductive skews among females. We tested this hypothesis in the banded mongoose (Mungos mungo), a cooperative mammal in which multiple females conceive and carry to term in each communal breeding attempt. As predicted, lower ranked females had lower reproductive success, even among females that carried to term. While there were no rank-related differences in faecal glucocorticoid (fGC) concentrations prior to gestation or in the first trimester, lower ranked females had significantly higher fGC concentrations than higher ranked females in the second and third trimesters. Finally, females with higher fGC concentrations during the third trimester lost a greater proportion of their gestated young prior to their emergence from the burrow. Together, our results are consistent with a role for rank-related maternal stress in generating reproductive skew among females in this cooperative breeder. While studies of reproductive skew frequently consider the possibility that rank-related stress reduces the conception rates of subordinates, our findings highlight the possibility of detrimental effects on reproductive outcomes even after pregnancies have become established. PMID:26510673

  14. Macroecology of Sexual Selection: A Predictive Conceptual Framework for Large-Scale Variation in Reproductive Traits.

    PubMed

    Machado, Glauco; Buzatto, Bruno A; García-Hernández, Solimary; Macías-Ordóñez, Rogelio

    2016-09-01

    Abiotic factors exert direct and indirect influences on behavioral, morphological, and life-history traits. Because some of these traits are related to reproduction, there is a causal link between climatic conditions and the expression of reproductive traits. This link allows us to generate predictions on how reproductive traits vary in large geographic scales. Here we formalize this macroecological framework, present some general predictions, and explore empirical examples using harvestmen as study organisms. Our results show that the length of breeding season in harvestmen is primarily influenced by the number of warm months and that precipitation plays a secondary role in modulating the period devoted to reproduction. Moreover, we show that the probability of resource defense polygyny increases with longer breeding seasons and that the presence of this type of mating system positively affects the magnitude of sexual dimorphism in harvestmen. Finally, the presence of postovipositional parental care is also influenced by the length of breeding season but not by actual evapotranspiration, which is our proxy for the intensity of biotic interactions. We argue that the macroecological framework proposed here may be a fruitful field of investigation, with important implications for our understanding of sexual selection and the evolution of reproductive traits in both animals and plants. PMID:27513913

  15. Predictive model of rat reproductive toxicity from ToxCast high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew T; Knudsen, Thomas B; Reif, David M; Houck, Keith A; Judson, Richard S; Kavlock, Robert J; Dix, David J

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening (HTS) for profiling bioactivity and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase I tested 309 well-characterized chemicals in more than 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular responses. Of the 309 environmental chemicals in Phase I, 256 were linked to high-quality rat multigeneration reproductive toxicity studies in the relational Toxicity Reference Database. Reproductive toxicants were defined here as having achieved a reproductive lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of less than 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Eight-six chemicals were identified as reproductive toxicants in the rat, and 68 of those had sufficient in vitro bioactivity to model. Each assay was assessed for univariate association with the identified reproductive toxicants. Significantly associated assays were linked to gene sets and used for the subsequent predictive modeling. Using linear discriminant analysis and fivefold cross-validation, a robust and stable predictive model was produced capable of identifying rodent reproductive toxicants with 77% ± 2% and 74% ± 5% (mean ± SEM) training and test cross-validation balanced accuracies, respectively. With a 21-chemical external validation set, the model was 76% accurate, further indicating the model's potential for prioritizing the many thousands of environmental chemicals with little to no hazard information. The biological features of the model include steroidal and nonsteroidal nuclear receptors, cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition, G protein-coupled receptors, and cell signaling pathway readouts-mechanistic information suggesting additional targeted, integrated testing strategies and potential applications of in vitro HTS to risk assessment. PMID:21565999

  16. Synchrony - Cyberknife Respiratory Compensation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ozhasoglu, Cihat Saw, Cheng B.; Chen Hungcheng; Burton, Steven; Komanduri, Krishna; Yue, Ning J.; Huq, Saiful M.; Heron, Dwight E.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of organs in the thorax and abdomen have shown that these organs can move as much as 40 mm due to respiratory motion. Without compensation for this motion during the course of external beam radiation therapy, the dose coverage to target may be compromised. On the other hand, if compensation of this motion is by expansion of the margin around the target, a significant volume of normal tissue may be unnecessarily irradiated. In hypofractionated regimens, the issue of respiratory compensation becomes an important factor and is critical in single-fraction extracranial radiosurgery applications. CyberKnife is an image-guided radiosurgery system that consists of a 6-MV LINAC mounted to a robotic arm coupled through a control loop to a digital diagnostic x-ray imaging system. The robotic arm can point the beam anywhere in space with 6 degrees of freedom, without being constrained to a conventional isocenter. The CyberKnife has been recently upgraded with a real-time respiratory tracking and compensation system called Synchrony. Using external markers in conjunction with diagnostic x-ray images, Synchrony helps guide the robotic arm to move the radiation beam in real time such that the beam always remains aligned with the target. With the aid of Synchrony, the tumor motion can be tracked in three-dimensional space, and the motion-induced dosimetric change to target can be minimized with a limited margin. The working principles, advantages, limitations, and our clinical experience with this new technology will be discussed.

  17. Temporal variation in the synchrony of weather and its consequences for spatiotemporal population dynamics.

    PubMed

    Allstadt, Andrew J; Liebhold, Andrew M; Johnson, Derek M; Davis, Robert E; Haynes, Kyle J

    2015-11-01

    Over large areas, synchronous fluctuations in population density are often attributed to environmental stochasticity (e.g., weather) shared among local populations. This concept was first advanced by Patrick Moran who showed, based on several assumptions, that long-term population synchrony will equal the synchrony of environmental stochasticity among locations. We examine the consequences of violating one of Moran's assumptions, namely that environmental synchrony is constant through time. We demonstrate that the synchrony of weather conditions from regions across the United States varied considerably from 1895 to 2010. Using a simulation model modified from Moran's original study, we show that temporal variation in environmental synchrony can cause changes in population synchrony, which in turn can temporarily increase or decrease the amplitude of regional-scale population fluctuations. A case study using the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) provides empirical support for these predictions. This study provides theoretical and empirical evidence that temporal variation in environmental synchrony can be used to identify factors that synchronize population fluctuations and highlights a previously underappreciated cause of variability in population dynamics. PMID:27070013

  18. Body Condition Indices Predict Reproductive Success but Not Survival in a Sedentary, Tropical Bird

    PubMed Central

    Milenkaya, Olga; Catlin, Daniel H.; Legge, Sarah; Walters, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Body condition may predict individual fitness because those in better condition have more resources to allocate towards improving their fitness. However, the hypothesis that condition indices are meaningful proxies for fitness has been questioned. Here, we ask if intraspecific variation in condition indices predicts annual reproductive success and survival. We monitored a population of Neochmia phaeton (crimson finch), a sedentary, tropical passerine, for reproductive success and survival over four breeding seasons, and sampled them for commonly used condition indices: mass adjusted for body size, muscle and fat scores, packed cell volume, hemoglobin concentration, total plasma protein, and heterophil to lymphocyte ratio. Our study population is well suited for this research because individuals forage in common areas and do not hold territories such that variation in condition between individuals is not confounded by differences in habitat quality. Furthermore, we controlled for factors that are known to impact condition indices in our study population (e.g., breeding stage) such that we assessed individual condition relative to others in the same context. Condition indices that reflect energy reserves predicted both the probability of an individual fledging young and the number of young produced that survived to independence, but only during some years. Those that were relatively heavy for their body size produced about three times more independent young compared to light individuals. That energy reserves are a meaningful predictor of reproductive success in a sedentary passerine supports the idea that energy reserves are at least sometimes predictors of fitness. However, hematological indices failed to predict reproductive success and none of the indices predicted survival. Therefore, some but not all condition indices may be informative, but because we found that most indices did not predict any component of fitness, we question the ubiquitous interpretation of

  19. Lead effects on the predictability of reproductive behavior in fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas): A mathematical model

    SciTech Connect

    Alados, C.L.; Weber, D.N.

    1999-10-01

    Lead (Pb) has been shown to affect the behavior of a wide variety of vertebrates, including fish, amphibians, and mammals. This article re-examines previous data on the effect of short-term, sublethal levels of waterborne Pb on the reproductive behavior of fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas). Previous research has found that Pb decreased the time spent in displaying specific reproductive behaviors in male minnows. Because each activity performed within a sequence depends upon previous parts of the sequence, the reproductive behavior of fish is not randomly distributed but is presented as a long-range self-similar correlation. By treating these data as a fractal dimension, it is now possible to determine changes in the long-term correlation of different behavioral sequences involved in nest maintenance owing to Pb exposure, both before and after adult males attain reproductive maturity. The authors hypothesized that the scaling exponent of this fluctuation varies in relation with environmental contaminants. Known Pb-induced changes in hormonal activity may account for changes in observed reproductive and nest maintenance behaviors. Pb-exposed fish exhibited higher levels of predictability in their behavioral sequences, i.e., they demonstrated an increase in the scaling parameter of the fluctuation {alpha}. However, if Pb was introduced after sexual maturity was observed, there was no significant difference in the scaling component {alpha}. Thus, the use of fractal dimension may provide a useful tool to analyze the effects of environmental contaminants and other stresses.

  20. Optimizing reproductive phenology in a two-resource world: a dynamic allocation model of plant growth predicts later reproduction in phosphorus-limited plants

    PubMed Central

    Nord, Eric A.; Shea, Katriona; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Timing of reproduction is a key life-history trait that is regulated by resource availability. Delayed reproduction in soils with low phosphorus availability is common among annuals, in contrast to the accelerated reproduction typical of other low-nutrient environments. It is hypothesized that this anomalous response arises from the high marginal value of additional allocation to root growth caused by the low mobility of phosphorus in soils. Methods To better understand the benefits and costs of such delayed reproduction, a two-resource dynamic allocation model of plant growth and reproduction is presented. The model incorporates growth, respiration, and carbon and phosphorus acquisition of both root and shoot tissue, and considers the reallocation of resources from senescent leaves. The model is parameterized with data from Arabidopsis and the optimal reproductive phenology is explored in a range of environments. Key Results The model predicts delayed reproduction in low-phosphorus environments. Reproductive timing in low-phosphorus environments is quite sensitive to phosphorus mobility, but is less sensitive to the temporal distribution of mortality risks. In low-phosphorus environments, the relative metabolic cost of roots was greater, and reproductive allocation reduced, compared with high-phosphorus conditions. The model suggests that delayed reproduction in response to low phosphorus availability may be reduced in plants adapted to environments where phosphorus mobility is greater. Conclusions Delayed reproduction in low-phosphorus soils can be a beneficial response allowing for increased acquisition and utilization of phosphorus. This finding has implications both for efforts to breed crops for low-phosphorus soils, and for efforts to understand how climate change may impact plant growth and productivity in low-phosphorus environments. PMID:21712299

  1. Nonverbal synchrony and affect in dyadic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tschacher, Wolfgang; Rees, Georg M.; Ramseyer, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    In an experiment on dyadic social interaction, we invited participants to verbal interactions in cooperative, competitive, and ‘fun task’ conditions. We focused on the link between interactants’ affectivity and their nonverbal synchrony, and explored which further variables contributed to affectivity: interactants’ personality traits, sex, and the prescribed interaction tasks. Nonverbal synchrony was quantified by the coordination of interactants’ body movement, using an automated video-analysis algorithm (motion energy analysis). Traits were assessed with standard questionnaires of personality, attachment, interactional style, psychopathology, and interpersonal reactivity. We included 168 previously unacquainted individuals who were randomly allocated to same-sex dyads (84 females, 84 males, mean age 27.8 years). Dyads discussed four topics of general interest drawn from an urn of eight topics, and finally engaged in a fun interaction. Each interaction lasted 5 min. In between interactions, participants repeatedly assessed their affect. Using hierarchical linear modeling, we found moderate to strong effect sizes for synchrony to occur, especially in competitive and fun task conditions. Positive affect was associated positively with synchrony, negative affect was associated negatively. As for causal direction, data supported the interpretation that synchrony entailed affect rather than vice versa. The link between nonverbal synchrony and affect was strongest in female dyads. The findings extend previous reports of synchrony and mimicry associated with emotion in relationships and suggest a possible mechanism of the synchrony-affect correlation. PMID:25505435

  2. Building trust: Heart rate synchrony and arousal during joint action increased by public goods game.

    PubMed

    Mitkidis, Panagiotis; McGraw, John J; Roepstorff, Andreas; Wallot, Sebastian

    2015-10-01

    The physiological processes underlying trust are subject of intense interest in the behavioral sciences. However, very little is known about how trust modulates the affective link between individuals. We show here that trust has an effect on heart rate arousal and synchrony, a result consistent with research on joint action and experimental economics. We engaged participants in a series of joint action tasks which, for one group of participants, was interleaved with a PGG, and measured their heart synchrony and arousal. We found that the introduction of the economic game shifted participants' attention to the dynamics of the interaction. This was followed by increased arousal and synchrony of heart rate profiles. Also, the degree of heart rate synchrony was predictive of participants' expectations regarding their partners in the economic game. We conclude that the above changes in physiology and behavior are shaped by the valuation of other people's social behavior, and ultimately indicate trust building process. PMID:26037635

  3. Economic benefits of using adaptive predictive models of reproductive toxicity in the context of a tiered testing program

    EPA Science Inventory

    A predictive model of reproductive toxicity, as observed in rat multigeneration reproductive (MGR) studies, was previously developed using high throughput screening (HTS) data from 36 in vitro assays mapped to 8 genes or gene-sets from Phase I of USEPA ToxCast research program, t...

  4. Month of birth predicted reproductive success and fitness in pre-modern Canadian women.

    PubMed Central

    Lummaa, Virpi; Tremblay, Marc

    2003-01-01

    Conditions experienced during early development affect human health and survival in adulthood, but whether such effects have consequences for fitness is not known. One surrogate for early conditions is month of birth, which is known to influence health and survival in many human populations. We show that in nineteenth century Canada, month of birth predicted a woman's fitness measured by the number of grandchildren produced, with the genetic contribution to the following generations by women born in different months differing by over seven grandchildren. This difference was mainly caused by differences in the reproductive rates of both mothers and their offspring, rather than differences in their survival. Women born in the best months of the year had longer reproductive lifespans, larger numbers of live births and raised more offspring to adulthood than those who were born in the worst months. Furthermore, the offspring of those women born in the best months also had greater reproductive rates, suggesting that month of birth also influenced a mother's ability to invest in her offspring. Our results suggest that early conditions may have important consequences for human lifetime reproductive performance within and between generations, and that timing of birth had large effects on fitness in this rural community. PMID:14667351

  5. Measuring multiple spike train synchrony.

    PubMed

    Kreuz, Thomas; Chicharro, Daniel; Andrzejak, Ralph G; Haas, Julie S; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    2009-10-15

    Measures of multiple spike train synchrony are essential in order to study issues such as spike timing reliability, network synchronization, and neuronal coding. These measures can broadly be divided in multivariate measures and averages over bivariate measures. One of the most recent bivariate approaches, the ISI-distance, employs the ratio of instantaneous interspike intervals (ISIs). In this study we propose two extensions of the ISI-distance, the straightforward averaged bivariate ISI-distance and the multivariate ISI-diversity based on the coefficient of variation. Like the original measure these extensions combine many properties desirable in applications to real data. In particular, they are parameter-free, time scale independent, and easy to visualize in a time-resolved manner, as we illustrate with in vitro recordings from a cortical neuron. Using a simulated network of Hindemarsh-Rose neurons as a controlled configuration we compare the performance of our methods in distinguishing different levels of multi-neuron spike train synchrony to the performance of six other previously published measures. We show and explain why the averaged bivariate measures perform better than the multivariate ones and why the multivariate ISI-diversity is the best performer among the multivariate methods. Finally, in a comparison against standard methods that rely on moving window estimates, we use single-unit monkey data to demonstrate the advantages of the instantaneous nature of our methods. PMID:19591867

  6. Tracking the changes in synchrony of the electrophysiological activity as the uterus approaches labor using magnetomyographic technique.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B; Siegel, Eric; Mckelvey, Samantha; Murphy, Pam; Lowery, Curtis L; Eswaran, Hari

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the study was to perform serial magnetomyographic examinations in order to detect changes in synchrony characteristics of myometrial electrophysiological activity as women approach labor. Of the total of 56 patients recruited, the results of 149 examinations from 29 patients were included in the analysis. The global synchrony across each sensor spread over the abdomen was computed and quantified as synchronization index. The mean and the median value of the global synchrony were computed and correlated with time to active labor from the last recording. Overall, synchrony increased as the patient approached active labor (P = .035). Furthermore, mean synchronization index increased twice as fast in the nonnulliparous group compared to the nulliparous group (P = .039). The changes in synchrony of uterine electrophysiological activity near term could aid in prediction of labor. PMID:25352329

  7. Tracking the Changes in Synchrony of the Electrophysiological Activity as the Uterus Approaches Labor Using Magnetomyographic Technique

    PubMed Central

    Govindan, Rathinaswamy B.; Siegel, Eric; Mckelvey, Samantha; Murphy, Pam; Lowery, Curtis L.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to perform serial magnetomyographic examinations in order to detect changes in synchrony characteristics of myometrial electrophysiological activity as women approach labor. Of the total of 56 patients recruited, the results of 149 examinations from 29 patients were included in the analysis. The global synchrony across each sensor spread over the abdomen was computed and quantified as synchronization index. The mean and the median value of the global synchrony were computed and correlated with time to active labor from the last recording. Overall, synchrony increased as the patient approached active labor (P = .035). Furthermore, mean synchronization index increased twice as fast in the nonnulliparous group compared to the nulliparous group (P = .039). The changes in synchrony of uterine electrophysiological activity near term could aid in prediction of labor. PMID:25352329

  8. Getting the right traits: reproductive and dispersal characteristics predict the invasiveness of herbaceous plant species.

    PubMed

    Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr; Jarošík, Vojtěch; Pergl, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the effect of species traits on plant invasion, we collected comparative data on 20 reproductive and dispersal traits of 93 herbaceous alien species in the Czech Republic, central Europe, introduced after 1500 A. D. We explain plant invasion success, expressed by two measures: invasiveness, i.e. whether the species is naturalized but non-invasive, or invasive; and dominance in plant communities expressed as the mean cover in vegetation plots. We also tested how important reproductive and dispersal traits are in models including other characteristics generally known to predict invasion outcome, such as plant height, life history and residence time. By using regression/classification trees we show that the biological traits affect invasion success at all life stages, from reproduction (seed production) to dispersal (propagule properties), and the ability to compete with resident species (height). By including species traits information not usually available in multispecies analyses, we provide evidence that traits do play important role in determining the outcome of invasion and can be used to distinguish between alien species that reach the final stage of the invasion process and dominate the local communities from those that do not. No effect of taxonomy ascertained in regression and classification trees indicates that the role of traits in invasiveness should be assessed primarily at the species level. PMID:25906399

  9. Getting the Right Traits: Reproductive and Dispersal Characteristics Predict the Invasiveness of Herbaceous Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Moravcová, Lenka; Pyšek, Petr; Pergl, Jan

    2015-01-01

    To better understand the effect of species traits on plant invasion, we collected comparative data on 20 reproductive and dispersal traits of 93 herbaceous alien species in the Czech Republic, central Europe, introduced after 1500 A. D. We explain plant invasion success, expressed by two measures: invasiveness, i.e. whether the species is naturalized but non-invasive, or invasive; and dominance in plant communities expressed as the mean cover in vegetation plots. We also tested how important reproductive and dispersal traits are in models including other characteristics generally known to predict invasion outcome, such as plant height, life history and residence time. By using regression/classification trees we show that the biological traits affect invasion success at all life stages, from reproduction (seed production) to dispersal (propagule properties), and the ability to compete with resident species (height). By including species traits information not usually available in multispecies analyses, we provide evidence that traits do play important role in determining the outcome of invasion and can be used to distinguish between alien species that reach the final stage of the invasion process and dominate the local communities from those that do not. No effect of taxonomy ascertained in regression and classification trees indicates that the role of traits in invasiveness should be assessed primarily at the species level. PMID:25906399

  10. Impacts of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Process Synchrony Transcend Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C.; Kokelj, S.; McCluskie, M.; Hedstrom, N.

    2015-12-01

    In portions of the circumpolar north, there are documented cases of increases in annual inorganic nitrogen loading. Confounding the explanation of this phenomenon is a lack of accompanying annual trends in streamflow, precipitation or atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Evidence from Canada's subarctic suggests this dichotomy could be due to three key non-linearities in the predominant biogeochemical and hydrological processes. Because snowfall changes to rainfall near the zero degree air temperature isotherm, there has been an increase in late autumn rainfall across the region due to earlier passage of precipitation generating cold fronts. Runoff generation in cold regions is often a storage threshold-mediated process, and the enhanced rainfall results in more common exceedance of these thresholds and higher winter streamflow. Finally, net mineralization rates in regional lakes peak in winter following the onset of ice cover. Subtle increases in monthly rainfall at specific times of the year can permit hydro-chemical process synchrony within watersheds that enhances annual inorganic nitrogen loading, implying that the impacts of process synchrony transcend scale. The presence of shifts in nitrogen export suggests that sustained regular process synchrony can modify system states. Sound understanding of system processes and interactions across scales will be needed to properly predict impacts and make sound decisions when managing watersheds and competing resource demands.

  11. Neuronal Ensemble Synchrony during Human Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Harrison, Matthew T.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Cosgrove, G. Rees; Madsen, Joseph R.; Blum, Andrew S.; Potter, N. Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are classically characterized as the expression of hypersynchronous neural activity, yet the true degree of synchrony in neuronal spiking (action potentials) during human seizures remains a fundamental question. We quantified the temporal precision of spike synchrony in ensembles of neocortical neurons during seizures in people with pharmacologically intractable epilepsy. Two seizure types were analyzed: those characterized by sustained gamma (∼40–60 Hz) local field potential (LFP) oscillations or by spike-wave complexes (SWCs; ∼3 Hz). Fine (<10 ms) temporal synchrony was rarely present during gamma-band seizures, where neuronal spiking remained highly irregular and asynchronous. In SWC seizures, phase locking of neuronal spiking to the SWC spike phase induced synchrony at a coarse 50–100 ms level. In addition, transient fine synchrony occurred primarily during the initial ∼20 ms period of the SWC spike phase and varied across subjects and seizures. Sporadic coherence events between neuronal population spike counts and LFPs were observed during SWC seizures in high (∼80 Hz) gamma-band and during high-frequency oscillations (∼130 Hz). Maximum entropy models of the joint neuronal spiking probability, constrained only on single neurons' nonstationary coarse spiking rates and local network activation, explained most of the fine synchrony in both seizure types. Our findings indicate that fine neuronal ensemble synchrony occurs mostly during SWC, not gamma-band, seizures, and primarily during the initial phase of SWC spikes. Furthermore, these fine synchrony events result mostly from transient increases in overall neuronal network spiking rates, rather than changes in precise spiking correlations between specific pairs of neurons. PMID:25057195

  12. Generalized reproduction numbers and the prediction of patterns in waterborne disease.

    PubMed

    Gatto, Marino; Mari, Lorenzo; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Casagrandi, Renato; Righetto, Lorenzo; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2012-11-27

    Understanding, predicting, and controlling outbreaks of waterborne diseases are crucial goals of public health policies, but pose challenging problems because infection patterns are influenced by spatial structure and temporal asynchrony. Although explicit spatial modeling is made possible by widespread data mapping of hydrology, transportation infrastructure, population distribution, and sanitation, the precise condition under which a waterborne disease epidemic can start in a spatially explicit setting is still lacking. Here we show that the requirement that all the local reproduction numbers R0 be larger than unity is neither necessary nor sufficient for outbreaks to occur when local settlements are connected by networks of primary and secondary infection mechanisms. To determine onset conditions, we derive general analytical expressions for a reproduction matrix G0, explicitly accounting for spatial distributions of human settlements and pathogen transmission via hydrological and human mobility networks. At disease onset, a generalized reproduction number Λ0 (the dominant eigenvalue of G0) must be larger than unity. We also show that geographical outbreak patterns in complex environments are linked to the dominant eigenvector and to spectral properties of G0. Tests against data and computations for the 2010 Haiti and 2000 KwaZulu-Natal cholera outbreaks, as well as against computations for metapopulation networks, demonstrate that eigenvectors of G0 provide a synthetic and effective tool for predicting the disease course in space and time. Networked connectivity models, describing the interplay between hydrology, epidemiology, and social behavior sustaining human mobility, thus prove to be key tools for emergency management of waterborne infections. PMID:23150538

  13. Gravid Spot Predicts Developmental Progress and Reproductive Output in a Livebearing Fish, Gambusia holbrooki

    PubMed Central

    Norazmi-Lokman, Nor Hakim; Purser, G. J.; Patil, Jawahar G.

    2016-01-01

    In most livebearing fish, the gravid spot is an excellent marker to identify brooding females, however its use to predict progress of embryonic development, brood size, timing of parturition and overall reproductive potential of populations remain unexplored. Therefore, to understand these relationships, this study quantified visual attributes (intensity and size) of the gravid spot in relation to key internal development in Gambusia holbrooki. Observations show that the colour of the gravid spot arises from progressive melanisation on the surface of the ovarian sac at its hind margin, rather than melanisation of the developing embryos or the skin of the brooding mother. More importantly, the gravid spot intensity and size were closely linked with both developmental stages and clutch size, suggesting their reliable use as external surrogates of key internal developmental in the species. Using predictive consistency of the gravid spot, we also determined the effect of rearing temperature (23°C and 25°C) on gestation period and parturition behaviour. The results show that gestation period was significantly reduced (F = 364.58; df = 1,48; P˃0.05) at 25°C. However there was no significant difference in average number of fry parturated in the two temperature groups (P<0.05), reaffirming that gravid spot intensity is a reliable predictor of reproductive output. The parturition in the species occurred predominantly in the morning and in contrast to earlier reports, tails of the fry emerged first with a few exceptions of head-first, twin and premature births. This study demonstrates utility of the gravid spot for downstream reproductive investigations in a live-bearing fish both in the field and laboratory. The reproducibility of the relationships (intensity with both developmental stage and clutch size), imply that they are also relevant to wild populations that experience varying temperature climes and stressors, significant deviations of which may serve as

  14. Gravid Spot Predicts Developmental Progress and Reproductive Output in a Livebearing Fish, Gambusia holbrooki.

    PubMed

    Norazmi-Lokman, Nor Hakim; Purser, G J; Patil, Jawahar G

    2016-01-01

    In most livebearing fish, the gravid spot is an excellent marker to identify brooding females, however its use to predict progress of embryonic development, brood size, timing of parturition and overall reproductive potential of populations remain unexplored. Therefore, to understand these relationships, this study quantified visual attributes (intensity and size) of the gravid spot in relation to key internal development in Gambusia holbrooki. Observations show that the colour of the gravid spot arises from progressive melanisation on the surface of the ovarian sac at its hind margin, rather than melanisation of the developing embryos or the skin of the brooding mother. More importantly, the gravid spot intensity and size were closely linked with both developmental stages and clutch size, suggesting their reliable use as external surrogates of key internal developmental in the species. Using predictive consistency of the gravid spot, we also determined the effect of rearing temperature (23 °C and 25 °C) on gestation period and parturition behaviour. The results show that gestation period was significantly reduced (F = 364.58; df = 1,48; P ˃ 0.05) at 25 °C. However there was no significant difference in average number of fry parturated in the two temperature groups (P<0.05), reaffirming that gravid spot intensity is a reliable predictor of reproductive output. The parturition in the species occurred predominantly in the morning and in contrast to earlier reports, tails of the fry emerged first with a few exceptions of head-first, twin and premature births. This study demonstrates utility of the gravid spot for downstream reproductive investigations in a live-bearing fish both in the field and laboratory. The reproducibility of the relationships (intensity with both developmental stage and clutch size), imply that they are also relevant to wild populations that experience varying temperature climes and stressors, significant deviations of which may serve as

  15. Optimizing patient-ventilator synchrony.

    PubMed

    Epstein, S K

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation assumes the work of breathing, improves gas exchange, and unloads the respiratory muscles, all of which require good synchronization between the patient and the ventilator. Causes for patient-ventilator dyssynchrony include both patient factors (abnormalities of respiratory drive and abnormal respiratory mechanics) and ventilator factors (triggering, flow delivery, breath termination criteria, the level and mode of ventilator support, and imposed work of breathing). Although patient-ventilator dyssynchrony can often be detected on physical exam, careful analysis of ventilator waveforms (pressure-time, flow-time) allows for more precise definition of the underlying cause. Patient-ventilator interaction can be improved by reversing patient factors that alter respiratory drive or elevate patient ventilatory requirements and by correcting factors that contribute to dynamic hyperinflation. Proper setting of the ventilator using sensitive triggering mechanisms, satisfactory flow rates, adequate delivered minute ventilation, matching machine T(I) to neural T(I), and applying modes that overcome the imposed work of breathing, further optimize patient-ventilator synchrony. PMID:16088669

  16. Can blood or follicular fluid levels of presepsin predict reproductive outcomes in ART; a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Ovayolu, Ali; Özdamar, Özkan; Gün, İsmet; Arslanbuga, Cansev Yılmaz; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Tunalı, Gülden; Topuz, Samet

    2015-01-01

    Many stages of COH protocols are considered to potentiate a state of systemic inflammation. The limit beyond which inflammation has negative impacts on the formation of conception and the reproductive outcomes are compromised still remains unclear. Presepsin is a novel biomarker for diagnosing systemic inflammation and sepsis. We aimed to investigate whether plasma and follicular fluid presepsin values on oocyte pick-up (OPU) day, embryo transfer (ET) day and pregnancy test (PT) days could predict reproductive outcomes during IVF treatment in women with UEI. Patients were assigned to two groups according to pregnancy test results; pregnant (Group 1) and non-pregnant (Group 2). From all patients included in the study, 2 cc of venous blood was sampled on the three days and follicular fluid (FF) was collected during oocyte retrieval. Plasma presepsin, CRP and WBC values and FF presepsin values were measured and compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference between FF and plasma presepsin levels on the OPU day (298±797.4 ve 352.9±657.1; P=0.701, respectively). Plasma WBC, CRP and presepsin levels on the OPU, ET and PT days and FF presepsin levels on OPU day were not different between the 2 groups. Plasma presepsin course on the separate 3 days were different between the groups. PMID:26221358

  17. Shy birds play it safe: personality in captivity predicts risk responsiveness during reproduction in the wild.

    PubMed

    Cole, Ella F; Quinn, John L

    2014-05-01

    Despite a growing body of evidence linking personality to life-history variation and fitness, the behavioural mechanisms underlying these relationships remain poorly understood. One mechanism thought to play a key role is how individuals respond to risk. Relatively reactive and proactive (or shy and bold) personality types are expected to differ in how they manage the inherent trade-off between productivity and survival, with bold individuals being more risk-prone with lower survival probability, and shy individuals adopting a more risk-averse strategy. In the great tit (Parus major), the shy-bold personality axis has been well characterized in captivity and linked to fitness. Here, we tested whether 'exploration behaviour', a captive assay of the shy-bold axis, can predict risk responsiveness during reproduction in wild great tits. Relatively slow-exploring (shy) females took longer than fast-exploring (bold) birds to resume incubation after a novel object, representing an unknown threat, was attached to their nest-box, with some shy individuals not returning within the 40 min trial period. Risk responsiveness was consistent within individuals over days. These findings provide rare, field-based experimental evidence that shy individuals prioritize survival over reproductive investment, supporting the hypothesis that personality reflects life-history variation through links with risk responsiveness. PMID:24829251

  18. Can blood or follicular fluid levels of presepsin predict reproductive outcomes in ART; a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Ovayolu, Ali; Özdamar, Özkan; Gün, İsmet; Arslanbuga, Cansev Yılmaz; Sofuoğlu, Kenan; Tunalı, Gülden; Topuz, Samet

    2015-01-01

    Many stages of COH protocols are considered to potentiate a state of systemic inflammation. The limit beyond which inflammation has negative impacts on the formation of conception and the reproductive outcomes are compromised still remains unclear. Presepsin is a novel biomarker for diagnosing systemic inflammation and sepsis. We aimed to investigate whether plasma and follicular fluid presepsin values on oocyte pick-up (OPU) day, embryo transfer (ET) day and pregnancy test (PT) days could predict reproductive outcomes during IVF treatment in women with UEI. Patients were assigned to two groups according to pregnancy test results; pregnant (Group 1) and non-pregnant (Group 2). From all patients included in the study, 2 cc of venous blood was sampled on the three days and follicular fluid (FF) was collected during oocyte retrieval. Plasma presepsin, CRP and WBC values and FF presepsin values were measured and compared between the 2 groups. There was no significant difference between FF and plasma presepsin levels on the OPU day (298±797.4 ve 352.9±657.1; P=0.701, respectively). Plasma WBC, CRP and presepsin levels on the OPU, ET and PT days and FF presepsin levels on OPU day were not different between the 2 groups. Plasma presepsin course on the separate 3 days were different between the groups. PMID:26221358

  19. Interpersonal synchrony increases prosocial behavior in infants.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Einarson, Kathleen M; Trainor, Laurel J

    2014-11-01

    Adults who move together to a shared musical beat synchronously as opposed to asynchronously are subsequently more likely to display prosocial behaviors toward each other. The development of musical behaviors during infancy has been described previously, but the social implications of such behaviors in infancy have been little studied. In Experiment 1, each of 48 14-month-old infants was held by an assistant and gently bounced to music while facing the experimenter, who bounced either in-synchrony or out-of-synchrony with the way the infant was bounced. The infants were then placed in a situation in which they had the opportunity to help the experimenter by handing objects to her that she had ‘accidently’ dropped. We found that 14-month-old infants were more likely to engage in altruistic behavior and help the experimenter after having been bounced to music in synchrony with her, compared to infants who were bounced to music asynchronously with her. The results of Experiment 2, using anti-phase bouncing, suggest that this is due to the contingency of the synchronous movements as opposed to movement symmetry. These findings support the hypothesis that interpersonal motor synchrony might be one key component of musical engagement that encourages social bonds among group members, and suggest that this motor synchrony to music may promote the very early development of altruistic behavior. PMID:25513669

  20. Synchrony in malaria infections: How intensifying within-host competition can be adaptive

    PubMed Central

    Greischar, Megan A.; Read, Andrew F.; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria parasites exhibit great diversity in the coordination of their asexual life cycle within the host, ranging from asynchronous growth to tightly synchronized cycles of invasion and emergence from red blood cells. Synchronized reproduction should come at a high cost— intensifying competition among offspring—so why would some Plasmodium species engage in such behavior and others not? We use a delayed differential equation model to show that synchronized infections can be favored when: (1) there is limited interference among parasites competing for red blood cells; (2) transmission success is an accelerating function of sexual parasite abundance; (3) the target of saturating immunity is short-lived; and (4) coinfections with asynchronous parasites are rare. As a consequence, synchrony may be beneficial or costly, in line with the diverse patterns of synchronization observed in natural and lab infections. By allowing us to characterize diverse temporal dynamics, the model framework provides a basis for making predictions about disease severity and for projecting evolutionary responses to interventions. PMID:24464205

  1. Oxidative stress predicts long-term resight probability and reproductive success in Scopoli's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea).

    PubMed

    Costantini, David; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in conservation physiology is to find out biomarkers that reliably reflect individual variation in wear and tear. Recent work has suggested that biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide an additional tool to assess the health state of individuals and to predict fitness perspectives. In this study, we assessed whether three biomarkers of plasma oxidative status predicted the following factors: (i) the resight probability as breeder in the next seasons; and (ii) the cumulative reproductive output over multiple years in Scopoli's shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) using a 7 year individual-based data set. Our results show that shearwaters having higher levels of a marker of oxidative damage (reactive oxygen metabolites) in 2008 had a lower resight probability in the next years and a lower number of chicks raised from 2008 to 2014. In contrast, two biomarkers of antioxidant defences (non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma and thiols) did not have any predictive value. Increased concentrations of plasma reactive oxygen metabolites, together with the significant individual repeatability over time in this metric of oxidative stress found in numerous studies, suggest that this metric might serve as a blood-derived biomarker for health and fitness perspectives in birds and, possibly, also in other taxa. PMID:27293709

  2. Oxidative stress predicts long-term resight probability and reproductive success in Scopoli's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea)

    PubMed Central

    Costantini, David; Dell'Omo, Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in conservation physiology is to find out biomarkers that reliably reflect individual variation in wear and tear. Recent work has suggested that biomarkers of oxidative stress may provide an additional tool to assess the health state of individuals and to predict fitness perspectives. In this study, we assessed whether three biomarkers of plasma oxidative status predicted the following factors: (i) the resight probability as breeder in the next seasons; and (ii) the cumulative reproductive output over multiple years in Scopoli’s shearwaters (Calonectris diomedea) using a 7 year individual-based data set. Our results show that shearwaters having higher levels of a marker of oxidative damage (reactive oxygen metabolites) in 2008 had a lower resight probability in the next years and a lower number of chicks raised from 2008 to 2014. In contrast, two biomarkers of antioxidant defences (non-enzymatic antioxidant capacity of plasma and thiols) did not have any predictive value. Increased concentrations of plasma reactive oxygen metabolites, together with the significant individual repeatability over time in this metric of oxidative stress found in numerous studies, suggest that this metric might serve as a blood-derived biomarker for health and fitness perspectives in birds and, possibly, also in other taxa. PMID:27293709

  3. Emotion-elicited gamma synchrony in patients with first-episode schizophrenia: a neural correlate of social cognition outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Leanne M.; Whitford, Thomas J.; Nagy, Marie; Flynn, Gary; Harris, Anthony W.F.; Silverstein, Steven M.; Gordon, Evian

    2009-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia may be understood as a disorder of neural synchrony. There is also increasing evidence that emotional and social cognitive impairments are central to this disorder. In patients with first-episode schizophrenia, we examined whether emotion perception is associated with disruptions to high-frequency (40 Hz) gamma synchrony and whether these disruptions predict self-regulatory adaptive compensations reflected in social cognitive behaviours. Methods We obtained electroencephalography recordings from 28 patients with first-episode schizophrenia and matched healthy controls during perception of facial emotion under both conscious and nonconscious conditions. We extracted gamma-band synchrony from the electroencephalogram. We also used behavioural measures of emotion identification, emotional intelligence, negativity bias and social function, along with ratings of first-episode schizophrenia symptoms. We analyzed group differences and predicted social cognition to assess the potential contribution of medication. Results Within 200 ms poststimulus, patients with first-episode schizophrenia showed alterations in gamma synchrony during both conscious and nonconscious emotion perception. Stimulus-locked synchrony was reduced in patients, particularly over the temporal cortex, whereas complementary enhancements in absolute gamma synchrony (independent of stimuli) were more distributed over temporal and left parieto-occipital regions. This pattern of altered synchrony predicted poor performance on each measure of social cognition among these patients. Medication dosage did not correlate significantly with either gamma synchrony or behavioural measures in this group. Limitations Limitations to our study include the lack of comparison between medicated and unmedicated patients or between types of medication. Conclusion These findings suggest that disruptions in integrative processing of motivationally important stimuli show promise as a potential

  4. Phenological indices of avian reproduction: cryptic shifts and prediction across large spatial and temporal scales

    PubMed Central

    Gullett, Philippa; Hatchwell, Ben J; Robinson, Robert A; Evans, Karl L

    2013-01-01

    Climate change-induced shifts in phenology have important demographic consequences, and are frequently used to assess species' sensitivity to climate change. Therefore, developing accurate phenological predictions is an important step in modeling species' responses to climate change. The ability of such phenological models to predict effects at larger spatial and temporal scales has rarely been assessed. It is also not clear whether the most frequently used phenological index, namely the average date of a phenological event across a population, adequately captures phenological shifts in the distribution of events across the season. We use the long-tailed tit Aegithalos caudatus (Fig. 1) as a case study to explore these issues. We use an intensive 17-year local study to model mean breeding date and test the capacity of this local model to predict phenology at larger spatial and temporal scales. We assess whether local models of breeding initiation, termination, and renesting reveal phenological shifts and responses to climate not detected by a standard phenological index, that is, population average lay date. These models take predation timing/intensity into account. The locally-derived model performs well at predicting phenology at the national scale over several decades, at both high and low temperatures. In the local model, a trend toward warmer Aprils is associated with a significant advance in termination dates, probably in response to phenological shifts in food supply. This results in a 33% reduction in breeding season length over 17 years – a substantial loss of reproductive opportunity that is not detected by the index of population average lay date. We show that standard phenological indices can fail to detect patterns indicative of negative climatic effects, potentially biasing assessments of species' vulnerability to climate change. More positively, we demonstrate the potential of detailed local studies for developing broader-scale predictive models of

  5. A neuropeptide speeds circadian entrainment by reducing intercellular synchrony

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Harang, Rich; Meeker, Kirsten; Granados-Fuentes, Daniel; Tsai, Connie A.; Mazuski, Cristina; Kim, Jihee; Doyle, Francis J.; Petzold, Linda R.; Herzog, Erik D.

    2013-01-01

    Shift work or transmeridian travel can desynchronize the body's circadian rhythms from local light–dark cycles. The mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates and entrains daily rhythms in physiology and behavior. Paradoxically, we found that vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), a neuropeptide implicated in synchrony among SCN cells, can also desynchronize them. The degree and duration of desynchronization among SCN neurons depended on both the phase and the dose of VIP. A model of the SCN consisting of coupled stochastic cells predicted both the phase- and the dose-dependent response to VIP and that the transient phase desynchronization, or “phase tumbling”, could arise from intrinsic, stochastic noise in small populations of key molecules (notably, Period mRNA near its daily minimum). The model also predicted that phase tumbling following brief VIP treatment would accelerate entrainment to shifted environmental cycles. We tested this using a prepulse of VIP during the day before a shift in either a light cycle in vivo or a temperature cycle in vitro. Although VIP during the day does not shift circadian rhythms, the VIP pretreatment approximately halved the time required for mice to reentrain to an 8-h shifted light schedule and for SCN cultures to reentrain to a 10-h shifted temperature cycle. We conclude that VIP below 100 nM synchronizes SCN cells and above 100 nM reduces synchrony in the SCN. We show that exploiting these mechanisms that transiently reduce cellular synchrony before a large shift in the schedule of daily environmental cues has the potential to reduce jet lag. PMID:24167276

  6. The combined effects of inhibitory and electrical synapses in synchrony.

    PubMed

    Pfeuty, Benjamin; Mato, Germán; Golomb, David; Hansel, David

    2005-03-01

    Recent experimental results have shown that GABAergic interneurons in the central nervous system are frequently connected via electrical synapses. Hence, depending on the area or the subpopulation, interneurons interact via inhibitory synapses or electrical synapses alone or via both types of interactions. The theoretical work presented here addresses the significance of these different modes of interactions for the interneuron networks dynamics. We consider the simplest system in which this issue can be investigated in models or in experiments: a pair of neurons, interacting via electrical synapses, inhibitory synapses, or both, and activated by the injection of a noisy external current. Assuming that the couplings and the noise are weak, we derive an analytical expression relating the cross-correlation (CC) of the activity of the two neurons to the phase response function of the neurons. When electrical and inhibitory interactions are not too strong, they combine their effect in a linear manner. In this regime, the effect of electrical and inhibitory interactions when combined can be deduced knowing the effects of each of the interactions separately. As a consequence, depending on intrinsic neuronal properties, electrical and inhibitory synapses may cooperate, both promoting synchrony, or may compete, with one promoting synchrony while the other impedes it. In contrast, for sufficiently strong couplings, the two types of synapses combine in a nonlinear fashion. Remarkably, we find that in this regime, combining electrical synapses with inhibition amplifies synchrony, whereas electrical synapses alone would desynchronize the activity of the neurons. We apply our theory to predict how the shape of the CC of two neurons changes as a function of ionic channel conductances, focusing on the effect of persistent sodium conductance, of the firing rate of the neurons and the nature and the strength of their interactions. These predictions may be tested using dynamic clamp

  7. Predicting chronic copper and nickel reproductive toxicity to Daphnia pulex-pulicaria from whole-animal metabolic profiles.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nadine S; Kirwan, Jennifer A; Johnson, Craig; Yan, Norman D; Viant, Mark R; Gunn, John M; McGeer, James C

    2016-05-01

    The emergence of omics approaches in environmental research has enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms underlying toxicity; however, extrapolation from molecular effects to whole-organism and population level outcomes remains a considerable challenge. Using environmentally relevant, sublethal, concentrations of two metals (Cu and Ni), both singly and in binary mixtures, we integrated data from traditional chronic, partial life-cycle toxicity testing and metabolomics to generate a statistical model that was predictive of reproductive impairment in a Daphnia pulex-pulicaria hybrid that was isolated from an historically metal-stressed lake. Furthermore, we determined that the metabolic profiles of organisms exposed in a separate acute assay were also predictive of impaired reproduction following metal exposure. Thus we were able to directly associate molecular profiles to a key population response - reproduction, a key step towards improving environmental risk assessment and management. PMID:26854702

  8. More than reflections: empathy in motivational interviewing includes language style synchrony between therapist and client.

    PubMed

    Lord, Sarah Peregrine; Sheng, Elisa; Imel, Zac E; Baer, John; Atkins, David C

    2015-05-01

    Empathy is a basic psychological process that involves the development of synchrony in dyads. It is also a foundational ingredient in specific, evidence-based behavioral treatments like motivational interviewing (MI). Ratings of therapist empathy typically rely on a gestalt, "felt sense" of therapist understanding and the presence of specific verbal behaviors like reflective listening. These ratings do not provide a direct test of psychological processes like behavioral synchrony that are theorized to be an important component of empathy in psychotherapy. To explore a new objective indicator of empathy, we hypothesized that synchrony in language style (i.e., matching how statements are phrased) between client and therapists would predict gestalt ratings of empathy over and above the contribution of reflections. We analyzed 122 MI transcripts with high and low empathy ratings based on the Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity global rating scale. Linguistic inquiry and word count was used to estimate language style synchrony (LSS) of adjacent client and therapist talk turns. High-empathy sessions showed greater LSS across 11 language style categories compared with low-empathy sessions (p<.01), and overall, average LSS was notably higher in high-empathy versus low-empathy sessions (d=0.62). Regression analyses showed that LSS was predictive of empathy ratings over and above reflection counts; a 1 SD increase in LSS is associated with a 2.4 times increase in the odds of a high-empathy rating, controlling for therapist reflections (odds ratio=2.4; 95% CI: 1.36; 4.24, p<.01). These findings suggest empathy ratings are related to synchrony in language style, over and above synchrony of content as measured by therapist reflections. Novel indicators of therapist empathy may have implications for the study of MI process as well as the training of therapists. PMID:25892166

  9. Spatially explicit models, generalized reproduction numbers and the prediction of patterns of waterborne disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Gatto, M.; Mari, L.; Casagrandi, R.; Righetto, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2012-12-01

    still lacking. Here, we show that the requirement that all the local reproduction numbers R0 be larger than unity is neither necessary nor sufficient for outbreaks to occur when local settlements are connected by networks of primary and secondary infection mechanisms. To determine onset conditions, we derive general analytical expressions for a reproduction matrix G0 explicitly accounting for spatial distributions of human settlements and pathogen transmission via hydrological and human mobility networks. At disease onset, a generalized reproduction number Λ0 (the dominant eigenvalue of G0) must be larger than unity. We also show that geographical outbreak patterns in complex environments are linked to the dominant eigenvector and to spectral properties of G0. Tests against data and computations for the 2010 Haiti and 2000 KwaZulu-Natal cholera outbreaks, as well as against computations for metapopulation networks, demonstrate that eigenvectors of G0 provide a synthetic and effective tool for predicting the disease course in space and time. Networked connectivity models, describing the interplay between hydrology, epidemiology and social behavior sustaining human mobility, thus prove to be key tools for emergency management of waterborne infections.

  10. Developing Predictive Approaches to Characterize Adaptive Responses of the Reproductive Endocrine Axis to Aromatase Inhibition: Computational Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We developed a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predict dose-response and time-course (DRTC)...

  11. SEXUAL DEMOGRAPHICS OF RIPARIAN POPULATIONS OF POPULUS DELTOIDES: CAN MORTALITY BE PREDICTED FROM A CHANGE IN REPRODUCTIVE STATUS?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populus deltoides forests along the Rio Grande river drainage are predicted to disappear within this century. We evaluated stand health over three years by examining the sex ratio, size, and spatial distribution of male, female, and non-reproductive trees in six even-aged stands of Populus deltoide...

  12. Oscillatory synchrony as a mechanism of attentional processing.

    PubMed

    Gregoriou, Georgia G; Paneri, Sofia; Sapountzis, Panagiotis

    2015-11-11

    The question of how the brain selects which stimuli in our visual field will be given priority to enter into perception, to guide our actions and to form our memories has been a matter of intense research in studies of visual attention. Work in humans and animal models has revealed an extended network of areas involved in the control and maintenance of attention. For many years, imaging studies in humans constituted the main source of a systems level approach, while electrophysiological recordings in non-human primates provided insight into the cellular mechanisms of visual attention. Recent technological advances and the development of sophisticated analytical tools have allowed us to bridge the gap between the two approaches and assess how neuronal ensembles across a distributed network of areas interact in visual attention tasks. A growing body of evidence suggests that oscillatory synchrony plays a crucial role in the selective communication of neuronal populations that encode the attended stimuli. Here, we discuss data from theoretical and electrophysiological studies, with more emphasis on findings from humans and non-human primates that point to the relevance of oscillatory activity and synchrony for attentional processing and behavior. These findings suggest that oscillatory synchrony in specific frequencies reflects the biophysical properties of specific cell types and local circuits and allows the brain to dynamically switch between different spatio-temporal patterns of activity to achieve flexible integration and selective routing of information along selected neuronal populations according to behavioral demands. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Prediction and Attention. PMID:25712615

  13. Synchrony in Mother-Infant Interactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karger, Rex H.

    1979-01-01

    A measure of mother-infant synchrony was developed and used to compare the interactions of mothers with pre-term and mothers with full-term infants. Each mother-infant dyad was observed during a standard bottle feeding session on three separate occasions: once prior to discharge and at one and three months after discharge. (JMB)

  14. Let’s Dance Together: Synchrony, Shared Intentionality and Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Reddish, Paul; Fischer, Ronald; Bulbulia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that the matching of rhythmic behaviour between individuals (synchrony) increases cooperation. Such synchrony is most noticeable in music, dance and collective rituals. As well as the matching of behaviour, such collective performances typically involve shared intentionality: performers actively collaborate to produce joint actions. Over three experiments we examined the importance of shared intentionality in promoting cooperation from group synchrony. Experiment 1 compared a condition in which group synchrony was produced through shared intentionality to conditions in which synchrony or asynchrony were created as a by-product of hearing the same or different rhythmic beats. We found that synchrony combined with shared intentionality produced the greatest level of cooperation. To examinef the importance of synchrony when shared intentionality is present, Experiment 2 compared a condition in which participants deliberately worked together to produce synchrony with a condition in which participants deliberately worked together to produce asynchrony. We found that synchrony combined with shared intentionality produced the greatest level of cooperation. Experiment 3 manipulated both the presence of synchrony and shared intentionality and found significantly greater cooperation with synchrony and shared intentionality combined. Path analysis supported a reinforcement of cooperation model according to which perceiving synchrony when there is a shared goal to produce synchrony provides immediate feedback for successful cooperation so reinforcing the group’s cooperative tendencies. The reinforcement of cooperation model helps to explain the evolutionary conservation of traditional music and dance performances, and furthermore suggests that the collectivist values of such cultures may be an essential part of the mechanisms by which synchrony galvanises cooperative behaviours. PMID:23951106

  15. Predicting the reproduction strategies of several microalgae through their genome sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2014-10-01

    Documenting the sex and sexual reproduction of the microalgae is very difficult, as most of the results are based on the microscopic observation that can be heavily influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental conditions. Understanding the reproduction strategy of some microalgae is required to breed them in large scale culture industry. Instead of direct observation of sex and sexual reproduction under microscope, the whole set or the majority of core meiosis genes may evidence the sex and sexual reproduction in the unicellular algae, as the meiosis is necessary for maintaining the genomic stability and the advantages of genetic recombination. So far, the available genome sequences and bioinformatic tools (in this study, homolog searching and phylogenetic analysis) allow us to propose that at least 20 core meiosis genes (among them ≥6 must be meiosis specific) are enough for an alga to maintain its sexual reproduction. According to this assumption and the genome sequences, it is possible that sexual reproduction was carried out by Micromonas pusilla and Cyanidioschyzon merolae, while asexual reproduction was adopted by Bigelowiella natans, Guillardia theta, Nannochloropsis gaditana, N. oceanica, Chlorella variablis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. This understanding will facilitate the breeding trials of some economic microalgae (e.g., N. gaditana, N. oceanica, C. variablis and P. tricornutum). However, the reproduction strategies of these microalgae need to be proved by further biological experiments.

  16. Predicting the reproduction strategies of several microalgae through their genome sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Yang, Guanpin

    2015-06-01

    Documenting the sex and sexual reproduction of the microalgae is very difficult, as most of the results are based on the microscopic observation that can be heavily influenced by genetic, physiological and environmental conditions. Understanding the reproduction strategy of some microalgae is required to breed them in large scale culture industry. Instead of direct observation of sex and sexual reproduction under microscope, the whole set or the majority of core meiosis genes may evidence the sex and sexual reproduction in the unicellular algae, as the meiosis is necessary for maintaining the genomic stability and the advantages of genetic recombination. So far, the available genome sequences and bioinformatic tools (in this study, homolog searching and phylogenetic analysis) allow us to propose that at least 20 core meiosis genes (among them ≥6 must be meiosis specific) are enough for an alga to maintain its sexual reproduction. According to this assumption and the genome sequences, it is possible that sexual reproduction was carried out by Micromonas pusilla and Cyanidioschyzon merolae, while asexual reproduction was adopted by Bigelowiella natans, Guillardia theta, Nannochloropsis gaditana, N. oceanica, Chlorella variablis, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana. This understanding will facilitate the breeding trials of some economic microalgae ( e.g., N. gaditana, N. oceanica, C. variablis and P. tricornutum). However, the reproduction strategies of these microalgae need to be proved by further biological experiments.

  17. Economic benefits of using adaptive predictive models of reproductive toxicity in the context of a tiered testing program.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew T; Knudsen, Thomas B; Judson, Richard S; Kavlock, Robert J; Dix, David J

    2012-02-01

    A predictive model of reproductive toxicity, as observed in rat multigeneration reproductive (MGR) studies, was previously developed using high throughput screening (HTS) data from 36 in vitro assays mapped to 8 genes or gene-sets from Phase I of USEPA ToxCast research program, the proof-of-concept phase in which 309 toxicologically well characterized chemicals were testing in over 500 HTS assays. The model predicted the effects on male and female reproductive function with a balanced accuracy of 80%. In a theoretical examination of the potential impact of the model, two case studies were derived representing different tiered testing scenarios to: 1) screen-out chemicals with low predicted probability of effect; and 2) screen-in chemicals with a high probability of causing adverse reproductive effects. We define 'testing cost efficiency' as the total cost divided by the number of positive chemicals expected in the definitive guideline toxicity study. This would approach $2.11 M under the current practice. Under case study 1, 22% of the chemicals were screened-out due to low predicted probability of adverse reproductive effect and a misclassification rate of 12%, yielding a test cost efficiency of $1.87 M. Under case study 2, 13% of chemicals were screened-in yielding a testing cost efficiency of $1.13 M per test-positive chemical. Applying the model would also double the total number of positives identified. It should be noted that the intention of the case studies is not to provide a definitive mechanism for screening-in or screening-out chemicals or account for the indirect costs of misclassification. The case studies demonstrate the customizability of the model as a tool in chemical testing decision-making. The predictive model of reproductive toxicity will continue to evolve as new assays become available to fill recognized biological gaps and will be combined with other predictive models, particularly models of developmental toxicity, to form an initial tier

  18. Synchrony in stochastically driven neuronal networks with complex topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhall, Katherine A.; Shkarayev, Maxim S.; Kramer, Peter R.; Kovačič, Gregor; Cai, David

    2015-05-01

    We study the synchronization of a stochastically driven, current-based, integrate-and-fire neuronal model on a preferential-attachment network with scale-free characteristics and high clustering. The synchrony is induced by cascading total firing events where every neuron in the network fires at the same instant of time. We show that in the regime where the system remains in this highly synchronous state, the firing rate of the network is completely independent of the synaptic coupling, and depends solely on the external drive. On the other hand, the ability for the network to maintain synchrony depends on a balance between the fluctuations of the external input and the synaptic coupling strength. In order to accurately predict the probability of repeated cascading total firing events, we go beyond mean-field and treelike approximations and conduct a detailed second-order calculation taking into account local clustering. Our explicit analytical results are shown to give excellent agreement with direct numerical simulations for the particular preferential-attachment network model investigated.

  19. Enhancing “theory of mind” through behavioral synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Baimel, Adam; Severson, Rachel L.; Baron, Andrew S.; Birch, Susan A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Theory of mind refers to the abilities underlying the capacity to reason about one’s own and others’ mental states. This ability is critical for predicting and making sense of the actions of others, is essential for efficient communication, fosters social learning, and provides the foundation for empathic concern. Clearly, there is incredible value in fostering theory of mind. Unfortunately, despite being the focus of a wealth of research over the last 40 years relatively little is known about specific strategies for fostering social perspective taking abilities. We provide a discussion of the rationale for applying one specific strategy for fostering efficient theory of mind—that of engaging in “behavioral synchrony” (i.e., the act of keeping together in time with others). Culturally evolved collective rituals involving synchronous actions have long been held to act as social glue. Specifically, here we present how behavioral synchrony tunes our minds for reasoning about other minds in the process of fostering social coordination and cooperation, and propose that we can apply behavioral synchrony as a tool for enhancing theory of mind. PMID:26157415

  20. Short Conduction Delays Cause Inhibition Rather than Excitation to Favor Synchrony in Hybrid Neuronal Networks of the Entorhinal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Fernando R.; White, John A.; Canavier, Carmen C.

    2012-01-01

    How stable synchrony in neuronal networks is sustained in the presence of conduction delays is an open question. The Dynamic Clamp was used to measure phase resetting curves (PRCs) for entorhinal cortical cells, and then to construct networks of two such neurons. PRCs were in general Type I (all advances or all delays) or weakly type II with a small region at early phases with the opposite type of resetting. We used previously developed theoretical methods based on PRCs under the assumption of pulsatile coupling to predict the delays that synchronize these hybrid circuits. For excitatory coupling, synchrony was predicted and observed only with no delay and for delays greater than half a network period that cause each neuron to receive an input late in its firing cycle and almost immediately fire an action potential. Synchronization for these long delays was surprisingly tight and robust to the noise and heterogeneity inherent in a biological system. In contrast to excitatory coupling, inhibitory coupling led to antiphase for no delay, very short delays and delays close to a network period, but to near-synchrony for a wide range of relatively short delays. PRC-based methods show that conduction delays can stabilize synchrony in several ways, including neutralizing a discontinuity introduced by strong inhibition, favoring synchrony in the case of noisy bistability, and avoiding an initial destabilizing region of a weakly type II PRC. PRCs can identify optimal conduction delays favoring synchronization at a given frequency, and also predict robustness to noise and heterogeneity. PMID:22241969

  1. PCBs, organochlorine pesticides, and reproduction in river otters from Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Bunck, C.M.; Linscombe, G.; Kinler, N.; Stafford, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Reproductive tracts from 89 3-year-old female river otters (Lutra canadensis), from Louisiana were examined. Eighteen of these were in a reproductive phase out of synchrony with the expected population norms. Eight of 32 otters had fewer embryos than corpora lutea, indicating intrauterine mortality in 25% of the sample. Chemical analyses of liver tissue from 57 otters revealed a low prevalence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticide contamination. These low Ievels of organochlorine compounds were not associated with atypical reproductive synchrony or intrauterine mortality.

  2. A faecal index of diet quality that predicts reproductive success in a marsupial folivore.

    PubMed

    Windley, Hannah R; Wallis, Ian R; DeGabriel, Jane L; Moore, Ben D; Johnson, Christopher N; Foley, William J

    2013-09-01

    Estimating the nutritional value of a herbivore's diet is difficult because it requires knowing what the animal eats, the relative quality of each component and how these components interact in relation to animal physiology. Current methods are cumbersome and rely on many assumptions that are hard to evaluate. We describe a new method for estimating relative diet quality directly from faeces that avoids the problems inherent in other methods. We combine this method with near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to analyse many samples and thus provide a technique with immense value in ecological studies. The method stems from the correlation between the concentrations of dietary and faecal nitrogen in herbivores eating a tannin-free diet, but a weaker relationship in browsers that ingest substantial amounts of tannins, which form complexes with proteins. These complexes reduce the availability of nitrogen and may increase faecal nitrogen concentrations. Using the tannin-binding compound, polyethylene glycol, we showed that tannin-bound nitrogen is a significant and variable part of faecal nitrogen in wild common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula). We developed a technique to measure faecal available nitrogen and found that it predicted the reproductive success of female brushtail possums in northern Australia. Faecal available nitrogen combined with NIRS provides a powerful tool for estimating the relative nutritional value of the diets of browsing herbivores in many ecological systems. It is a better indicator of diet quality than other commonly used single-nutrient measures such as faecal nitrogen and foliage analysis paired with observed feeding behaviour. PMID:23443356

  3. The ChemScreen project to design a pragmatic alternative approach to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals.

    PubMed

    van der Burg, Bart; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Dietrich, Daniel R; Jaworska, Joanna; Mangelsdorf, Inge; Paune, Eduard; Schwarz, Michael; Piersma, Aldert H; Kroese, E Dinant

    2015-08-01

    There is a great need for rapid testing strategies for reproductive toxicity testing, avoiding animal use. The EU Framework program 7 project ChemScreen aimed to fill this gap in a pragmatic manner preferably using validated existing tools and place them in an innovative alternative testing strategy. In our approach we combined knowledge on critical processes affected by reproductive toxicants with knowledge on the mechanistic basis of such effects. We used in silico methods for prescreening chemicals for relevant toxic effects aiming at reduced testing needs. For those chemicals that need testing we have set up an in vitro screening panel that includes mechanistic high throughput methods and lower throughput assays that measure more integrative endpoints. In silico pharmacokinetic modules were developed for rapid exposure predictions via diverse exposure routes. These modules to match in vitro and in vivo exposure levels greatly improved predictivity of the in vitro tests. As a further step, we have generated examples how to predict reproductive toxicity of chemicals using available data. We have executed formal validations of panel constituents and also used more innovative manners to validate the test panel using mechanistic approaches. We are actively engaged in promoting regulatory acceptance of the tools developed as an essential step towards practical application, including case studies for read-across purposes. With this approach, a significant saving in animal use and associated costs seems very feasible. PMID:25656794

  4. Pair bonds: arrival synchrony in migratory birds.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, T G; Gill, J A; Sigurbjörnsson, T; Sutherland, W J

    2004-10-01

    Synchronous arrival of pairs of migratory birds at their breeding grounds is important for maintaining pair bonds and is achieved by pairs that remain together all year round. Here we show that arrival is also synchronized in paired individuals of a migratory shorebird, the black-tailed godwit (Limosa limosa islandica), even though they winter hundreds of kilometres apart and do not migrate together. The mechanisms required to achieve this synchrony and prevent 'divorce' illustrate the complexity of migratory systems. PMID:15470417

  5. Low Reproductive Rate Predicts Species Sensitivity to Habitat Loss: A Meta-Analysis of Wetland Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Quesnelle, Pauline E.; Lindsay, Kathryn E.; Fahrig, Lenore

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypotheses that species with greater mobility and/or higher reproductive rates are less sensitive to habitat loss than species with lower mobility and/or reproductive rates by conducting a meta-analysis of wetland vertebrate responses to wetland habitat loss. We combined data from 90 studies conducted worldwide that quantified the relationship between wetland amount in a landscape and population abundance of at least one wetland species to determine if mobility (indexed as home range size and body length) and annual reproductive rate influence species responses to wetland loss. When analyzed across all taxa, animals with higher reproductive rates were less sensitive to wetland loss. Surprisingly, we did not find an effect of mobility on response to wetland loss. Overall, wetland mammals and birds were more sensitive to wetland loss than were reptiles and amphibians. Our results suggest that dispersal between habitat patches is less important than species’ reproductive rates for population persistence in fragmented landscapes. This implies that immigration and colonization rate is most strongly related to reproduction, which determines the total number of potential colonists. PMID:24651675

  6. Evolution of synchrony under combination of coupled cell networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, M. A. D.; Ruan, H.

    2012-11-01

    A natural way of modelling large coupled cell networks is to combine smaller networks through binary network operations. In this paper, we consider several non-product binary operations on networks such as join and coalescence, and examine the evolution of the lattice of synchrony subspaces under these operations. Classification results are obtained for synchrony subspaces of the combined network, which clarify the relation between the lattice of synchrony subspaces of the combined network and its components. Yet, in the case when the initial networks have the same edge type, this classification only applies to those synchrony subspaces that are compatible with respect to the considered operation. Based on the classification results, we give examples to show how the lattice of synchrony subspaces of the combined network can be reconstructed using the initial ones. Also, we show how the classification results can be applied to analyse the evolutionary fitness of synchrony patterns.

  7. Millisecond Timescale Synchrony among Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Amarasingham, Asohan; Mizuseki, Kenji; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons in cortical circuits play critical roles in composing spike timing and oscillatory patterns in neuronal activity. These roles in turn require coherent activation of interneurons at different timescales. To investigate how the local circuitry provides for these activities, we applied resampled cross-correlation analyses to large-scale recordings of neuronal populations in the cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of freely moving rats. Significant counts in the cross-correlation of cell pairs, relative to jittered surrogate spike-trains, allowed us to identify the effective couplings between neurons in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions on the timescale of milliseconds. In addition to putative excitatory and inhibitory monosynaptic connections, we uncovered prominent millisecond timescale synchrony between cell pairs, observed as peaks in the central 0 ms bin of cross-correlograms. This millisecond timescale synchrony appeared to be independent of network state, excitatory input, and γ oscillations. Moreover, it was frequently observed between cells of differing putative interneuronal type, arguing against gap junctions as the sole underlying source. Our observations corroborate recent in vitro findings suggesting that inhibition alone is sufficient to synchronize interneurons at such fast timescales. Moreover, we show that this synchronous spiking may cause stronger inhibition and rebound spiking in target neurons, pointing toward a potential function for millisecond synchrony of interneurons in shaping and affecting timing in pyramidal populations within and downstream from the circuit. PMID:25378164

  8. Spatial synchrony of local populations has increased in association with the recent Northern Hemisphere climate trend.

    PubMed

    Post, Eric; Forchhammer, Mads C

    2004-06-22

    According to ecological theory, populations whose dynamics are entrained by environmental correlation face increased extinction risk as environmental conditions become more synchronized spatially. This prediction is highly relevant to the study of ecological consequences of climate change. Recent empirical studies have indicated, for example, that large-scale climate synchronizes trophic interactions and population dynamics over broad spatial scales in freshwater and terrestrial systems. Here, we present an analysis of century-scale, spatially replicated data on local weather and the population dynamics of caribou in Greenland. Our results indicate that spatial autocorrelation in local weather has increased with large-scale climatic warming. This increase in spatial synchrony of environmental conditions has been matched, in turn, by an increase in the spatial synchrony of local caribou populations toward the end of the 20th century. Our results indicate that spatial synchrony in environmental conditions and the populations influenced by them are highly variable through time and can increase with climatic warming. We suggest that if future warming can increase population synchrony, it may also increase extinction risk. PMID:15197267

  9. Cortical Low-Frequency Power and Progressive Phase Synchrony Precede Successful Memory Encoding

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Rafi U.; Wittig, John H.; Damera, Srikanth R.; Inati, Sara K.

    2015-01-01

    Neural activity preceding an event can influence subsequent memory formation, yet the precise cortical dynamics underlying this activity and the associated cognitive states remain unknown. We investigate these questions here by examining intracranial EEG recordings as 28 participants with electrodes placed for seizure monitoring participated in a verbal paired-associates memory task. We found that, preceding successfully remembered word pairs, an orientation cue triggered a low-frequency 2–4 Hz phase reset in the right temporoparietal junction with concurrent increases in low-frequency power across cortical regions that included the prefrontal cortex and left temporal lobe. Regions that exhibited a significant increase in 2–4 Hz power were functionally bound together through progressive low-frequency 2–4 Hz phase synchrony. Our data suggest that the interaction between power and phase synchrony reflects the engagement of attentional networks that in large part determine the extent to which memories are successfully encoded. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here we investigate the spatiotemporal cortical dynamics that precede successful memory encoding. Using intracranial EEG, we observed significant changes in oscillatory power, intertrial phase consistency, and pairwise phase synchrony that predict successful encoding. Our data suggest that the interaction between power and phase synchrony reflects the engagement of attentional networks that in large part determine the extent to which memories are successfully encoded. PMID:26446212

  10. Effect of elevated temperature on fecundity and reproductive timing in the coral Acropora digitifera.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Camille W; Baria, Maria Vanessa B; Weis, Virginia M; Harii, Saki

    2016-08-01

    The synchrony of spawning is of paramount importance to successful coral reproduction. The precise timing of spawning is thought to be controlled by a set of interacting environmental factors, including regional wind field patterns, timing of the sunset, and sea surface temperatures (SST). Climate change is resulting in increased SST, which is causing physiological stress in corals and could also be altering spawning synchrony and timing. In this study, we examined the effect of increasing seawater temperature by 2°C for 1 month prior to the predicted spawning time on reproduction in the coral Acropora digitifera. This short period of elevated temperature caused spawning to advance by 1 day. In animals incubated at elevated temperature, egg number per egg bundle did not change, however, egg volume significantly decreased as did sperm number. Our results indicate that temperature is acting both as a proximate cue to accelerate timing and as a stressor on gametogenesis to reduce fecundity. This finding suggests that increasing SSTs could play a dramatic role in altering reproductive timing and the success of corals in an era of climate change. PMID:26349407

  11. Regular synchrony lattices for product coupled cell networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Manuela A. D.; Dias, Ana Paula S.

    2015-01-01

    There are several ways for constructing (bigger) networks from smaller networks. We consider here the cartesian and the Kronecker (tensor) product networks. Our main aim is to determine a relation between the lattices of synchrony subspaces for a product network and the component networks of the product. In this sense, we show how to obtain the lattice of regular synchrony subspaces for a product network from the lattices of synchrony subspaces for the component networks. Specifically, we prove that a tensor of subspaces is of synchrony for the product network if and only if the subspaces involved in the tensor are synchrony subspaces for the component networks of the product. We also show that, in general, there are (irregular) synchrony subspaces for the product network that are not described by the synchrony subspaces for the component networks, concluding that, in general, it is not possible to obtain the all synchrony lattice for the product network from the corresponding lattices for the component networks. We also make the following remark concerning the fact that the cartesian and Kronecker products, as graph operations, are quite different, implying that the associated coupled cell systems have distinct structures. Although, the kinds of dynamics expected to occur are difficult to compare, we establish an inclusion relation between the lattices of synchrony subspaces for the cartesian and Kronecker products.

  12. The reproductive health needs of refugees: emerging consensus attracts predictable controversy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S A

    1998-10-01

    According to the UN High Commissioner for Refugees, there are approximately 40 million refugees and other internally displaced people worldwide, with the overwhelming majority coming from and still living in developed countries. 80% of all refugees are estimated to be women and children. Many refugees spend months and even years in what are designed to be temporary settings where efforts are made to accommodate their basic needs such as food, clean water, shelter, security, and primary health care during emergency situations. Women refugees, however, have certain unique needs beyond what traditionally have been considered basic in relief programs. Many women in developing countries suffer considerable health risks during the best of times due to their poverty or low social status. When fleeing conflict or natural disaster, their health status is at even higher risk of being compromised by severe living conditions and the complete absence of reproductive health services. The recognition that women refugees often face serious and sometimes life-threatening reproductive health-related situations led to the development of a field manual on reproductive health for use at the local level. Planned for publication in late 1998 or early 1999, the guide will describe the goals of a minimum array of reproductive health services in the early phase of an emergency and provide direct guidance on care relating to sexual violence, STDs, family planning, adolescents' needs, and other reproductive health concerns such as female genital mutilation and treatment for septic and incomplete abortion. The manual has garnered worldwide attention and support, as well as scrutiny by abortion opponents in the US, in particular New Jersey Republican Representative Chris Smith. PMID:12348740

  13. Small-scale spatial distribution and oogenetic synchrony in brittlestars (Echinodermata: Ophiuroidea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, Gina M.; Hamel, Jean-François; Mercier, Annie

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that spatial factors modulate reproductive processes over large (>150 km) and medium (10-100 km) scales in marine taxa, but few studies have explicitly determined the degree of inter-individual synchrony in gamete development at smaller scales within benthic populations. Using a ubiquitous broadcast-spawning species, the brittlestar Ophiopholis aculeata, we assessed variations in gametogenic activity over the annual reproductive cycle at various scales. Quantitative indices of oogenic maturity were compared in females collected: (1) in two substrata at a given site (distant ˜200-300 m), (2) among clusters of individuals living in relatively close proximity (˜10-50 m), and (3) within each cluster of individuals collected under/inside a given substratum (˜2-20 cm). Gametogenic maturity was also examined in females collected from distant sites (˜50-150 km). At the main study site, oogenic cohesion was greater within and among clusters of a given substratum than between substrata, and differences in reproductive output and spawning periods occurred between individuals from the two substrata studied. At the finest scale (within clusters of individuals) oogenic synchrony was maximal just before spawning. Comparing samples from distant geographic locations (>50 km) showed significant asynchrony outside the pre-spawning period. The present study shows that relatively high levels of asynchrony in gamete maturation may exist among conspecifics of a seemingly homogeneous population, except at the closest scale (within clusters) at the culmination of the reproductive cycle (near spawning). This emphasizes the likely interplay of inter-individual exchanges and small-scale distribution on the fine coordination of reproductive events.

  14. Audiovisual Speech Synchrony Measure: Application to Biometrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredin, Hervé; Chollet, Gérard

    2007-12-01

    Speech is a means of communication which is intrinsically bimodal: the audio signal originates from the dynamics of the articulators. This paper reviews recent works in the field of audiovisual speech, and more specifically techniques developed to measure the level of correspondence between audio and visual speech. It overviews the most common audio and visual speech front-end processing, transformations performed on audio, visual, or joint audiovisual feature spaces, and the actual measure of correspondence between audio and visual speech. Finally, the use of synchrony measure for biometric identity verification based on talking faces is experimented on the BANCA database.

  15. Quantification of bursting and synchrony in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, Lawrence N; Emnett, Christine M; Mohan, Jayaram; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-01

    It is widely appreciated that neuronal networks exhibit patterns of bursting and synchrony that are not captured by simple measures such as average spike rate. These patterns can encode information or represent pathological behavior such as seizures. However, methods for quantifying bursting and synchrony are not agreed upon and can be confounded with spike rate measures. Previous validation has largely relied on in silico networks and single experimental conditions. How published measures of bursting and synchrony perform when applied to biological networks of varied average spike rate and subjected to varied experimental challenges is unclear. In multielectrode array recordings of network activity, we found that two mechanistically distinct drugs, cyclothiazide and bicuculline, produced equivalent increases in average spike rate but differed in bursting and synchrony. We applied several measures of bursting to the recordings (2 threshold interval methods and a surprise-based method) and found that a measure based on an average critical interval, adjusted for the array-wide spike rate, performed best in quantifying differential drug effects. To quantify synchrony, we compared a coefficient of variation-based measure, the recently proposed spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and a global synchrony index. The spike time tiling coefficient, the SPIKE-distance measure, and the global synchrony index all captured a difference between drugs with the best performance exhibited by the global synchrony index. In summary, our exploration should aid other investigators by highlighting strengths and limitations of current methods. PMID:26041823

  16. Sudden synchrony leaps accompanied by frequency multiplications in neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Vardi, Roni; Goldental, Amir; Guberman, Shoshana; Kalmanovich, Alexander; Marmari, Hagar; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    A classical view of neural coding relies on temporal firing synchrony among functional groups of neurons, however, the underlying mechanism remains an enigma. Here we experimentally demonstrate a mechanism where time-lags among neuronal spiking leap from several tens of milliseconds to nearly zero-lag synchrony. It also allows sudden leaps out of synchrony, hence forming short epochs of synchrony. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro and are corroborated by simulations of neuronal populations. The underlying biological mechanisms are the unavoidable increase of the neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations and temporal or spatial summation required to generate evoked spikes. These sudden leaps in and out of synchrony may be accompanied by multiplications of the neuronal firing frequency, hence offering reliable information-bearing indicators which may bridge between the two principal neuronal coding paradigms. PMID:24198764

  17. Stress and success: individual differences in the glucocorticoid stress response predict behavior and reproductive success under high predation risk.

    PubMed

    Vitousek, Maren N; Jenkins, Brittany R; Safran, Rebecca J

    2014-11-01

    A fundamental element of how vertebrates respond to stressors is by rapidly elevating circulating glucocorticoid hormones. Individual variation in the magnitude of the glucocorticoid stress response has been linked with reproductive success and survival. But while the adaptive value of this response is believed to stem in part from changes in the expression of hormone-mediated behaviors, it is not clear how the behavior of stronger and weaker glucocorticoid responders differs during reproduction, or during exposure to ecologically relevant stressors. Here we report that in a population of barn swallows (Hirundo rustica erythrogaster) experiencing high rates of nest predation, circulating levels of corticosterone (the primary avian glucocorticoid) during exposure to a standardized stressor predict aspects of subsequent behavior and fitness. Individuals that mounted a stronger corticosterone stress response during the early reproductive period did not differ in clutch size, but fledged fewer offspring. Parents with higher stress-induced corticosterone during the early reproductive period later provisioned their nestlings at lower rates. Additionally, in the presence of a model predator stress-induced corticosterone was positively associated with the latency to return to the nest, but only among birds that were observed to return. Model comparisons revealed that stress-induced hormones were better predictors of the behavioral and fitness effects of exposure to transient, ecologically relevant stressors than baseline corticosterone. These findings are consistent with functional links between individual variation in the hormonal and behavioral response to stressors. If such links occur, then selection on the heritable components of the corticosterone stress response could promote adaptation to novel environments or predation regimes. PMID:25461975

  18. Reproductive ambition predicts partnered, but not unpartnered, women's preferences for masculine men.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Christopher D

    2012-08-01

    Changing circumstances alter the costs and benefits of choosing different mates and are thought to be reflected in women's mate preferences. Indeed, several lines of reasoning, and some prior studies, suggest that individual differences in women's preferences for cues of men's underlying health will be more apparent among partnered women than among unpartnered women. The current study shows that preferences for male faces with masculine shape cues, characteristics that are thought to signal men's underlying health, are positively correlated with partnered, but not unpartnered, women's reported reproductive ambition (i.e., their desire to become pregnant). These findings (1) present new evidence for systematic variation in women's mating strategies, (2) suggest that partnership status may be important for potentially adaptive variation in women's mate preferences, and (3) suggest that reproductive ambition may influence women's mate preferences. Alternative explanations for these findings, focusing on the possible effects of a range of variables that may be correlated with reproductive ambition in partnered women and influence their masculinity preferences, are also discussed. PMID:22804699

  19. Propagating synchrony in feed-forward networks.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Sven; Memmesheimer, Raoul-Martin; Timme, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Coordinated patterns of precisely timed action potentials (spikes) emerge in a variety of neural circuits but their dynamical origin is still not well understood. One hypothesis states that synchronous activity propagating through feed-forward chains of groups of neurons (synfire chains) may dynamically generate such spike patterns. Additionally, synfire chains offer the possibility to enable reliable signal transmission. So far, mostly densely connected chains, often with all-to-all connectivity between groups, have been theoretically and computationally studied. Yet, such prominent feed-forward structures have not been observed experimentally. Here we analytically and numerically investigate under which conditions diluted feed-forward chains may exhibit synchrony propagation. In addition to conventional linear input summation, we study the impact of non-linear, non-additive summation accounting for the effect of fast dendritic spikes. The non-linearities promote synchronous inputs to generate precisely timed spikes. We identify how non-additive coupling relaxes the conditions on connectivity such that it enables synchrony propagation at connectivities substantially lower than required for linearly coupled chains. Although the analytical treatment is based on a simple leaky integrate-and-fire neuron model, we show how to generalize our methods to biologically more detailed neuron models and verify our results by numerical simulations with, e.g., Hodgkin Huxley type neurons. PMID:24298251

  20. Synchrony in Metapopulations with Sporadic Dispersal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeter, Russell; Belykh, Igor

    2015-06-01

    We study synchronization in ecological networks under the realistic assumption that the coupling among the patches is sporadic/stochastic and due to rare and short-term meteorological conditions. Each patch is described by a tritrophic food chain model, representing the producer, consumer, and predator. If all three species can migrate, we rigorously prove that the network can synchronize as long as the migration occurs frequently, i.e. fast compared to the period of the ecological cycle, even though the network is disconnected most of the time. In the case where only the top trophic level (i.e. the predator) can migrate, we reveal an unexpected range of intermediate switching frequencies where synchronization becomes stable in a network which switches between two nonsynchronous dynamics. As spatial synchrony increases the danger of extinction, this counterintuitive effect of synchrony emerging from slower switching dispersal can be destructive for overall metapopulation persistence, presumably expected from switching between two dynamics which are unfavorable to extinction.

  1. Unsupervised Synchrony Discovery in Human Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Wen-Sheng; Zeng, Jiabei; De la Torre, Fernando; Cohn, Jeffrey F.; Messinger, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    People are inherently social. Social interaction plays an important and natural role in human behavior. Most computational methods focus on individuals alone rather than in social context. They also require labelled training data. We present an unsupervised approach to discover interpersonal synchrony, referred as to two or more persons preforming common actions in overlapping video frames or segments. For computational efficiency, we develop a branch-and-bound (B&B) approach that affords exhaustive search while guaranteeing a globally optimal solution. The proposed method is entirely general. It takes from two or more videos any multi-dimensional signal that can be represented as a histogram. We derive three novel bounding functions and provide efficient extensions, including multi-synchrony detection and accelerated search, using a warm-start strategy and parallelism. We evaluate the effectiveness of our approach in multiple databases, including human actions using the CMU Mocap dataset [1], spontaneous facial behaviors using group-formation task dataset [37] and parent-infant interaction dataset [28]. PMID:27346988

  2. Intensity of Territorial Marking Predicts Wolf Reproduction: Implications for Wolf Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    García, Emilio J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The implementation of intensive and complex approaches to monitor large carnivores is resource demanding, restricted to endangered species, small populations, or small distribution ranges. Wolf monitoring over large spatial scales is difficult, but the management of such contentious species requires regular estimations of abundance to guide decision-makers. The integration of wolf marking behaviour with simple sign counts may offer a cost-effective alternative to monitor the status of wolf populations over large spatial scales. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a multi-sampling approach, based on the collection of visual and scent wolf marks (faeces and ground scratching) and the assessment of wolf reproduction using howling and observation points, to test whether the intensity of marking behaviour around the pup-rearing period (summer-autumn) could reflect wolf reproduction. Between 1994 and 2007 we collected 1,964 wolf marks in a total of 1,877 km surveyed and we searched for the pups' presence (1,497 howling and 307 observations points) in 42 sampling sites with a regular presence of wolves (120 sampling sites/year). The number of wolf marks was ca. 3 times higher in sites with a confirmed presence of pups (20.3 vs. 7.2 marks). We found a significant relationship between the number of wolf marks (mean and maximum relative abundance index) and the probability of wolf reproduction. Conclusions/Significance This research establishes a real-time relationship between the intensity of wolf marking behaviour and wolf reproduction. We suggest a conservative cutting point of 0.60 for the probability of wolf reproduction to monitor wolves on a regional scale combined with the use of the mean relative abundance index of wolf marks in a given area. We show how the integration of wolf behaviour with simple sampling procedures permit rapid, real-time, and cost-effective assessments of the breeding status of wolf packs with substantial implications to monitor

  3. Flowering synchrony and floral display size affect pollination success in a deceit-pollinated tropical orchid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Tabla, Victor; Vargas, Carlos F.

    2007-07-01

    ue to frequency-dependent negative selection, a strong relationship between reproductive phenology traits and pollination success is expected in deceit-pollinated species. This paper assesses the effects of floral display size on both female (fruit production) and male (pollen removal) pollination success in a population of the deceit-pollinated tropical orchid Myrmecophila christinae during two consecutive years (1998-1999). Low pollen removal (˜9% of total flowers) and fruit production values (˜3% of total flowers) were recorded during both years. As expected, binary logistic regressions showed a significant negative effect of floral synchrony, and a positive effect of floral display size on both male and female success, although these effects varied across years. Pollination rates in the field and in hand pollinations suggest a doubling in pollinator abundance between years. Results suggest that floral display size and flowering synchrony are of adaptive value for M. christinae. However, between-year fluctuations might indicate that reproductive phenology traits in deceit-pollinated species undergo fluctuating selection regimes among years and are probably linked to short-term changes in environmental (abiotic and biotic) conditions.

  4. Vitamin D status predicts reproductive fitness in a wild sheep population

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ian; Watt, Kathryn A.; Pilkington, Jill G.; Pemberton, Josephine M.; Macrae, Alastair; Scott, Philip; McNeilly, Tom N.; Berry, Jacqueline L.; Clements, Dylan N.; Nussey, Daniel H.; Mellanby, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with the development of many human diseases, and with poor reproductive performance in laboratory rodents. We currently have no idea how natural selection directly acts on variation in vitamin D metabolism due to a total lack of studies in wild animals. Here, we measured serum 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations in female Soay sheep that were part of a long-term field study on St Kilda. We found that total 25(OH)D was strongly influenced by age, and that light coloured sheep had higher 25(OH)D3 (but not 25(OH)D2) concentrations than dark sheep. The coat colour polymorphism in Soay sheep is controlled by a single locus, suggesting vitamin D status is heritable in this population. We also observed a very strong relationship between total 25(OH)D concentrations in summer and a ewe’s fecundity the following spring. This resulted in a positive association between total 25(OH)D and the number of lambs produced that survived their first year of life, an important component of female reproductive fitness. Our study provides the first insight into naturally-occurring variation in vitamin D metabolites, and offers the first evidence that vitamin D status is both heritable and under natural selection in the wild. PMID:26757805

  5. Synchrony and Control of Neuronal Networks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Steven

    2001-03-01

    Cooperative behavior in the brain stems from the nature and strength of the interactions between neurons within a networked ensemble. Normal network activity takes place in a state of partial synchrony between neurons, and some pathological behaviors, such as epilepsy and tremor, appear to share a common feature of increased interaction strength. We have focused on the parallel paths of both detecting and characterizing the nonlinear synchronization present within neuronal networks, and employing feedback control methodology using electrical fields to modulate that neuronal activity. From a theoretical perspective, we see evidence for nonlinear generalized synchrony in networks of neurons that linear techniques are incapable of detecting (PRE 54: 6708, 1996), and we have described a decoherence transition between asymmetric nonlinear systems that is experimentally observable (PRL 84: 1689, 2000). In addition, we have seen evidence for unstable dimension variability in real neuronal systems that indicates certain physical limits of modelability when observing such systems (PRL 85, 2490, 2000). From an experimental perspective, we have achieved success in modulating epileptic seizures in neuronal networks using electrical fields. Extracellular neuronal activity is continuously recorded during field application through differential extracellular recording techniques, and the applied electric field strength is continuously updated using a computer controlled proportional feedback algorithm. This approach appears capable of sustained amelioration of seizure events when used with negative feedback. In negative feedback mode, such findings may offer a novel technology for seizure control. In positive feedback mode, adaptively applied electric fields may offer a more physiological means for neural modulation for prosthetic purposes than previously possible (J. Neuroscience, 2001).

  6. Hippocampo-cerebellar theta band phase synchrony in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Wikgren, J; Nokia, M S; Penttonen, M

    2010-02-17

    Hippocampal functioning, in the form of theta band oscillation, has been shown to modulate and predict cerebellar learning of which rabbit eyeblink conditioning is perhaps the most well-known example. The contribution of hippocampal neural activity to cerebellar learning is only possible if there is a functional connection between the two structures. Here, in the context of trace eyeblink conditioning, we show (1) that, in addition to the hippocampus, prominent theta oscillation also occurs in the cerebellum, and (2) that cerebellar theta oscillation is synchronized with that in the hippocampus. Further, the degree of phase synchrony (PS) increased both as a response to the conditioning stimuli and as a function of the relative power of hippocampal theta oscillation. However, the degree of PS did not change as a function of either training or learning nor did it predict learning rate as the hippocampal theta ratio did. Nevertheless, theta band synchronization might reflect the formation of transient neural assemblies between the hippocampus and the cerebellum. These findings help us understand how hippocampal function can affect eyeblink conditioning, during which the critical plasticity occurs in the cerebellum. Future studies should examine cerebellar unit activity in relation to hippocampal theta oscillations in order to discover the detailed mechanisms of theta-paced neural activity. PMID:19945512

  7. Neural Dynamics of Audiovisual Synchrony and Asynchrony Perception in 6-Month-Old Infants

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Franziska; Dietrich, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Young infants are sensitive to multisensory temporal synchrony relations, but the neural dynamics of temporal interactions between vision and audition in infancy are not well understood. We investigated audiovisual synchrony and asynchrony perception in 6-month-old infants using event-related brain potentials (ERP). In a prior behavioral experiment (n = 45), infants were habituated to an audiovisual synchronous stimulus and tested for recovery of interest by presenting an asynchronous test stimulus in which the visual stream was delayed with respect to the auditory stream by 400 ms. Infants who behaviorally discriminated the change in temporal alignment were included in further analyses. In the EEG experiment (final sample: n = 15), synchronous and asynchronous stimuli (visual delay of 400 ms) were presented in random order. Results show latency shifts in the auditory ERP components N1 and P2 as well as the infant ERP component Nc. Latencies in the asynchronous condition were significantly longer than in the synchronous condition. After video onset but preceding the auditory onset, amplitude modulations propagating from posterior to anterior sites and related to the Pb component of infants’ ERP were observed. Results suggest temporal interactions between the two modalities. Specifically, they point to the significance of anticipatory visual motion for auditory processing, and indicate young infants’ predictive capacities for audiovisual temporal synchrony relations. PMID:23346071

  8. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Bettina C; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephan A; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2014-01-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a major role in modifying this synchrony, because they show functional plasticity under the influence of dopamine and after neural injury. In this study, confocal imaging was used to detect connexin-36, the major neural gap junction protein, in postmortem tissues of PD patients and control subjects in the putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and external and internal globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively). Moreover, we quantified how gap junctions affect synchrony in an existing computational model of the basal ganglia. We detected connexin-36 in the human putamen, GPe, and GPi, but not in the STN. Furthermore, we found that the number of connexin-36 spots in PD tissues increased by 50% in the putamen, 43% in the GPe, and 109% in the GPi compared with controls. In the computational model, gap junctions in the GPe and GPi strongly influenced synchrony. The basal ganglia became especially susceptible to synchronize with input from the cortex when gap junctions were numerous and high in conductance. In conclusion, connexin-36 expression in the human GPe and GPi suggests that gap junctional coupling exists within these nuclei. In PD, neural injury and dopamine depletion could increase this coupling. Therefore, we propose that gap junctions act as a powerful modulator of synchrony in the basal ganglia. PMID:25124148

  9. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Schwab, Bettina C; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephan A; van Wezel, Richard J A

    2014-10-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a major role in modifying this synchrony, because they show functional plasticity under the influence of dopamine and after neural injury. In this study, confocal imaging was used to detect connexin-36, the major neural gap junction protein, in postmortem tissues of PD patients and control subjects in the putamen, subthalamic nucleus (STN), and external and internal globus pallidus (GPe and GPi, respectively). Moreover, we quantified how gap junctions affect synchrony in an existing computational model of the basal ganglia. We detected connexin-36 in the human putamen, GPe, and GPi, but not in the STN. Furthermore, we found that the number of connexin-36 spots in PD tissues increased by 50% in the putamen, 43% in the GPe, and 109% in the GPi compared with controls. In the computational model, gap junctions in the GPe and GPi strongly influenced synchrony. The basal ganglia became especially susceptible to synchronize with input from the cortex when gap junctions were numerous and high in conductance. In conclusion, connexin-36 expression in the human GPe and GPi suggests that gap junctional coupling exists within these nuclei. In PD, neural injury and dopamine depletion could increase this coupling. Therefore, we propose that gap junctions act as a powerful modulator of synchrony in the basal ganglia. PMID:25124148

  10. Measurements of spatial population synchrony: influence of time series transformations.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Mathieu; Laffaille, Pascal; Ferdy, Jean-Baptiste; Grenouillet, Gaël

    2015-09-01

    Two mechanisms have been proposed to explain spatial population synchrony: dispersal among populations, and the spatial correlation of density-independent factors (the "Moran effect"). To identify which of these two mechanisms is driving spatial population synchrony, time series transformations (TSTs) of abundance data have been used to remove the signature of one mechanism, and highlight the effect of the other. However, several issues with TSTs remain, and to date no consensus has emerged about how population time series should be handled in synchrony studies. Here, by using 3131 time series involving 34 fish species found in French rivers, we computed several metrics commonly used in synchrony studies to determine whether a large-scale climatic factor (temperature) influenced fish population dynamics at the regional scale, and to test the effect of three commonly used TSTs (detrending, prewhitening and a combination of both) on these metrics. We also tested whether the influence of TSTs on time series and population synchrony levels was related to the features of the time series using both empirical and simulated time series. For several species, and regardless of the TST used, we evidenced a Moran effect on freshwater fish populations. However, these results were globally biased downward by TSTs which reduced our ability to detect significant signals. Depending on the species and the features of the time series, we found that TSTs could lead to contradictory results, regardless of the metric considered. Finally, we suggest guidelines on how population time series should be processed in synchrony studies. PMID:25953116

  11. Personality Traits in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Are Heritable but Do Not Predict Reproductive Output

    PubMed Central

    Brent, Lauren J. N.; Semple, Stuart; MacLarnon, Ann; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that behavioral tendencies, or “personalities,” in animals are an important aspect of their biology, yet their evolutionary basis is poorly understood. Specifically, how individual variation in personality arises and is subsequently maintained by selection remains unclear. To address this gap, studies of personality require explicit incorporation of genetic information. Here, we explored the genetic basis of personality in rhesus macaques by determining the heritability of personality components and by examining the fitness consequences of those components. We collected observational data for 108 adult females living in three social groups in a free-ranging population via focal animal sampling. We applied principal component analysis to nine spontaneously occurring behaviors and identified six putative personality components, which we named Meek, Bold, Aggressive, Passive, Loner, and Nervous. All components were repeatable and heritable, with heritability estimates ranging from 0.14 to 0.35. We found no evidence of an association with reproductive output, measured either by infant survival or by interbirth interval, for any of the personality components. This finding suggests either that personality does not have fitness-related consequences in this population or that selection has acted to reduce fitness-associated variation in personality. PMID:24659840

  12. Predictive Signatures from ToxCast Data for Chronic, Developmental and Reproductive Toxicity Endpoints

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast program is using in vitro assay data and chemical descriptors to build predictive models for in vivo toxicity endpoints. In vitro assays measure activity of chemicals against molecular targets such as enzymes and receptors (measured in cell-free and cell-based sys...

  13. Validation, acceptance, and extension of a predictive model of reproductive toxicity using ToxCast data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses a high-throughput screening (HTS) approach for predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. Phase-I tested 309 well-characterized chemicals (mostly pesticides) in over 500 assays of different molecular targets, cellular responses an...

  14. Predictive Model of Rat Reproductive Toxicity from ToxCast High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening for bioactivity profiling and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase‐I tested 309 well‐characterized chemicals in over 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular respo...

  15. Factors defining a pacemaker region for synchrony in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Wittner, Lucia; Miles, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Synchronous activities of neuronal populations are often initiated in a pacemaker region and spread to recruit other regions. Here we examine factors that define a pacemaker site. The CA3a region acts as the pacemaker for disinhibition induced synchrony in guinea pig hippocampal slices and CA3b is a follower region. We found CA3a pyramidal cells were more excitable and fired in bursts more frequently than CA3b cells. CA3a cells had more complex dendritic arbors than CA3b cells especially in zones targetted by recurrent synapses. The product of the density of pyramidal cell axon terminals and dendritic lengths in innervated zones predicted a higher recurrent synaptic connectivity in the CA3a than in the CA3b region. We show that some CA3a cells but few CA3b cells behave as pacemaker cells by firing early during population events and by recruiting follower cells to fire. With a greater excitability and enhanced synaptic connectivity these CA3a cells may also possess initiating functions for other hippocampal ensemble activities initiated in this region. PMID:17823211

  16. Higher Order Spike Synchrony in Prefrontal Cortex during Visual Memory

    PubMed Central

    Pipa, Gordon; Munk, Matthias H. J.

    2009-01-01

    Precise temporal synchrony of spike firing has been postulated as an important neuronal mechanism for signal integration and the induction of plasticity in neocortex. As prefrontal cortex plays an important role in organizing memory and executive functions, the convergence of multiple visual pathways onto PFC predicts that neurons should preferentially synchronize their spiking when stimulus information is processed. Furthermore, synchronous spike firing should intensify if memory processes require the induction of neuronal plasticity, even if this is only for short-term. Here we show with multiple simultaneously recorded units in ventral prefrontal cortex that neurons participate in 3 ms precise synchronous discharges distributed across multiple sites separated by at least 500 μm. The frequency of synchronous firing is modulated by behavioral performance and is specific for the memorized visual stimuli. In particular, during the memory period in which activity is not stimulus driven, larger groups of up to seven sites exhibit performance dependent modulation of their spike synchronization. PMID:21713065

  17. Recruitment synchrony of yellow perch (Perca flavescens, Percidae) in the Great Lakes region, 1966–2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Honsey, Andrew E.; Bunnell, David; Troy, Cary D.; Fielder, David G.; Thomas, Michael V.; Knight, Carey T.; Chong, Stephen; Hook, Tomas O.

    2016-01-01

    Population-level reproductive success (recruitment) of many fish populations is characterized by high inter-annual variation and related to annual variation in key environmental factors (e.g., climate). When such environmental factors are annually correlated across broad spatial scales, spatially separated populations may display recruitment synchrony (i.e., the Moran effect). We investigated inter-annual (1966–2008) variation in yellow perch (Perca flavescens, Percidae) recruitment using 16 datasets describing populations located in four of the five Laurentian Great Lakes (Erie, Huron, Michigan, and Ontario) and Lake St. Clair. We indexed relative year class strength using catch-curve residuals for each year-class across 2–4 years and compared relative year-class strength among sampling locations. Results indicate that perch recruitment is positively synchronized across the region. In addition, the spatial scale of this synchrony appears to be broader than previous estimates for both yellow perch and freshwater fish in general. To investigate potential factors influencing relative year-class strength, we related year-class strength to regional indices of annual climatic conditions (spring-summer air temperature, winter air temperature, and spring precipitation) using data from 14 weather stations across the Great Lakes region. We found that mean spring-summer temperature is significantly positively related to recruitment success among Great Lakes yellow perch populations.

  18. A synaptic mechanism for network synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Alford, Simon T.; Alpert, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    Within neural networks, synchronization of activity is dependent upon the synaptic connectivity of embedded microcircuits and the intrinsic membrane properties of their constituent neurons. Synaptic integration, dendritic Ca2+ signaling, and non-linear interactions are crucial cellular attributes that dictate single neuron computation, but their roles promoting synchrony and the generation of network oscillations are not well understood, especially within the context of a defined behavior. In this regard, the lamprey spinal central pattern generator (CPG) stands out as a well-characterized, conserved vertebrate model of a neural network (Smith et al., 2013a), which produces synchronized oscillations in which neural elements from the systems to cellular level that control rhythmic locomotion have been determined. We review the current evidence for the synaptic basis of oscillation generation with a particular emphasis on the linkage between synaptic communication and its cellular coupling to membrane processes that control oscillatory behavior of neurons within the locomotor network. We seek to relate dendritic function found in many vertebrate systems to the accessible lamprey central nervous system in which the relationship between neural network activity and behavior is well understood. This enables us to address how Ca2+ signaling in spinal neuron dendrites orchestrate oscillations that drive network behavior. PMID:25278839

  19. Synchrony in silicon: the gamma rhythm.

    PubMed

    Arthur, John V; Boahen, Kwabena A

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we present a network of silicon interneurons that synchronize in the gamma frequency range (20-80 Hz). The gamma rhythm strongly influences neuronal spike timing within many brain regions, potentially playing a crucial role in computation. Yet it has largely been ignored in neuromorphic systems, which use mixed analog and digital circuits to model neurobiology in silicon. Our neurons synchronize by using shunting inhibition (conductance based) with a synaptic rise time. Synaptic rise time promotes synchrony by delaying the effect of inhibition, providing an opportune period for interneurons to spike together. Shunting inhibition, through its voltage dependence, inhibits interneurons that spike out of phase more strongly (delaying the spike further), pushing them into phase (in the next cycle). We characterize the interneuron, which consists of soma (cell body) and synapse circuits, fabricated in a 0.25-microm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS). Further, we show that synchronized interneurons (population of 256) spike with a period that is proportional to the synaptic rise time. We use these interneurons to entrain model excitatory principal neurons and to implement a form of object binding. PMID:18051195

  20. What drives masting? The phenological synchrony hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Walter D; Knops, Johannes M H; Carmen, William J; Pearse, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    Annually variable and synchronous seed production, or masting behavior, is a widespread phenomenon with dramatic effects on wildlife populations and their associated communities. Proximally, masting is often correlated with environmental factors and most likely involves differential pollination success and resource allocation, but little is known about how these factors interact or how they influence seed production. We studied masting in the valley oak (Quercus lobata Née), a California endemic tree, and report evidence that phenological synchrony in flowering driven by microclimatic variability determines the size of the acorn crop through its effects on pollen availability and fertilization success. These findings integrate two of the major factors believed to influence seed production in wind-pollinated species-environmental conditions and pollen limitation-by means of a coherent mechanistic hypothesis for how highly variable and synchronized annual seed production is accomplished. We illustrate how, by means of a simulation based on the mechanism proposed here, climate change may influence masting patterns through its effects on environmental variability. PMID:26236903

  1. Evaluating Interpersonal Synchrony: Wavelet Transform Toward an Unstructured Conversation

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Ken; Daibo, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether interpersonal synchrony could be extracted using spectrum analysis (i.e., wavelet transform) in an unstructured conversation. Sixty-two female undergraduates were randomly paired and they engaged in a 6-min unstructured conversation. Interpersonal synchrony was evaluated by calculating the cross-wavelet coherence of the time-series movement data, extracted using a video-image analysis software. The existence of synchrony was tested using a pseudo-synchrony paradigm. In addition, the frequency at which the synchrony occurred and the distribution of the relative phase was explored. The results showed that the value of cross-wavelet coherence was higher in the experimental participant pairs than in the pseudo pairs. Further, the coherence value was higher in the frequency band under 0.5 Hz. These results support the validity of evaluating interpersonal synchron Behavioral mimicry and interpersonal syyby using wavelet transform even in an unstructured conversation. However, the role of relative phase was not clear; there was no significant difference between each relative-phase region. The theoretical contribution of these findings to the area of interpersonal coordination is discussed. PMID:27148125

  2. The Subjective Sensation of Synchrony: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Llobera, Joan; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Chagué, Sylvain; Preissmann, Delphine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Ansermet, François; Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2016-01-01

    People performing actions together have a natural tendency to synchronize their behavior. Consistently, people doing a task together build internal representations not only of their actions and goals, but also of the other people performing the task. However, little is known about which are the behavioral mechanisms and the psychological factors affecting the subjective sensation of synchrony, or “connecting” with someone else. In this work, we sought to find which factors induce the subjective sensation of synchrony, combining motion capture data and psychological measures. Our results show that the subjective sensation of synchrony is affected by performance quality together with task category, and time. Psychological factors such as empathy and negative subjective affects also correlate with the subjective sensation of synchrony. However, when people estimate synchrony as seen from a third person perspective, their psychological factors do not affect the accuracy of the estimation. We suggest that to feel this sensation it is necessary to, first, have a good joint performance and, second, to assume the existence of an attention monitoring mechanism that reports that the attention of both participants (self and other) is focused on the task. PMID:26870943

  3. Plant phenological synchrony increases under rapid within-spring warming.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Tang, Yanhong; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Phenological synchrony influences many ecological processes. Recent climate change has altered the synchrony of phenology, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here using in situ phenological records from Europe, we found that the standard deviation (SD, as a measure of synchrony) of first leafing day (FLD) and the SD of first flowering day (FFD) among local plants were significantly smaller in the years and/or in the regions with a more rapid within-spring warming speed (WWS, the linear slope of the daily mean temperature against the days during spring, in (o)C/day) with correlation coefficients of -0.75 and -0.48 for FLD and -0.55 and -0.23 for FFD. We further found that the SDs of temperature sensitivity of local plants were smaller under the rapid WWS conditions with correlation coefficients of -0.46 and -0.33 for FLD and FFD respectively. This study provides the first evidence that the within-season rate of change of the temperature but not the magnitude determines plant phenological synchrony. It implies that temporally, the asymmetric seasonal climatic warming may decrease the synchrony via increasing WWS, especially in arctic regions; spatially, plants in coastal and low latitude areas with low WWS would have more diverse spring phenological traits. PMID:27145698

  4. The Subjective Sensation of Synchrony: An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Llobera, Joan; Charbonnier, Caecilia; Chagué, Sylvain; Preissmann, Delphine; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Ansermet, François; Magistretti, Pierre J

    2016-01-01

    People performing actions together have a natural tendency to synchronize their behavior. Consistently, people doing a task together build internal representations not only of their actions and goals, but also of the other people performing the task. However, little is known about which are the behavioral mechanisms and the psychological factors affecting the subjective sensation of synchrony, or "connecting" with someone else. In this work, we sought to find which factors induce the subjective sensation of synchrony, combining motion capture data and psychological measures. Our results show that the subjective sensation of synchrony is affected by performance quality together with task category, and time. Psychological factors such as empathy and negative subjective affects also correlate with the subjective sensation of synchrony. However, when people estimate synchrony as seen from a third person perspective, their psychological factors do not affect the accuracy of the estimation. We suggest that to feel this sensation it is necessary to, first, have a good joint performance and, second, to assume the existence of an attention monitoring mechanism that reports that the attention of both participants (self and other) is focused on the task. PMID:26870943

  5. Plant phenological synchrony increases under rapid within-spring warming

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cong; Tang, Yanhong; Chen, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Phenological synchrony influences many ecological processes. Recent climate change has altered the synchrony of phenology, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Here using in situ phenological records from Europe, we found that the standard deviation (SD, as a measure of synchrony) of first leafing day (FLD) and the SD of first flowering day (FFD) among local plants were significantly smaller in the years and/or in the regions with a more rapid within-spring warming speed (WWS, the linear slope of the daily mean temperature against the days during spring, in oC/day) with correlation coefficients of −0.75 and −0.48 for FLD and −0.55 and −0.23 for FFD. We further found that the SDs of temperature sensitivity of local plants were smaller under the rapid WWS conditions with correlation coefficients of −0.46 and −0.33 for FLD and FFD respectively. This study provides the first evidence that the within-season rate of change of the temperature but not the magnitude determines plant phenological synchrony. It implies that temporally, the asymmetric seasonal climatic warming may decrease the synchrony via increasing WWS, especially in arctic regions; spatially, plants in coastal and low latitude areas with low WWS would have more diverse spring phenological traits. PMID:27145698

  6. POPULATION SYNCHRONY WITHIN AND AMONG LEPIDOPTERA SPECIES IN RELATION TO WEATHER, PHYLOGENY, AND LARVEL PHENOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    1. The population dynamics of native herbivore species in central Appalachian deciduous forests were studied by analysing patterns of synchrony among intra- and interspecific populations and weather. 2. Spatial synchrony of 10 Lepidoptera species and three weather variables (min...

  7. Multi-species spawning synchrony within scleractinian coral assemblages in the Red Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwmeester, J.; Baird, A. H.; Chen, C. J.; Guest, J. R.; Vicentuan, K. C.; Berumen, M. L.

    2015-03-01

    Early work on coral reproduction in the far northern Red Sea suggested that the spawning times of ecologically abundant species did not overlap, unlike on the Great Barrier Reef where many species spawn with high synchrony. In contrast, recent work in the northern and central Red Sea indicates a high degree of synchrony in the reproductive condition of Acropora species: over 90 % of species sampled in April/May contain mature gametes. However, it has yet to be determined when most Acropora release their gametes. In addition, there is a lack of data for other ecologically important scleractinian species such as merulinids and poritids. Here, we document the date and time of spawning for 51 species in the central Red Sea over three consecutive years, and the month of spawning for an additional 17 species inferred from the presence of mature gametes. Spawning occurs on nights around the full moon, the spawning season lasts at least 4 months from April until July, and observations are consistent with the few other records from the Red Sea. The number of Acropora species spawning was highest in April with 13 species spawning two nights before the full moon in 2011, 13 species spawning on the night of the full moon in 2012, and eight species spawning four nights after the full moon in 2013. The total number of species spawning was high in April, May, and June and involved 15-19 species per month in 2012. Only four species spawned in July 2012. Few regions worldwide have been similarly sampled and include the Philippines, Okinawa in Japan, and Palau, where spawning patterns are very similar to those in the central Red Sea and where corals spawn on nights around the full moon over a period of 3-4 months. In particular, in all four locations, Acropora are among the first species to spawn. Our results add to a growing body of evidence indicating that multi-species spawning synchrony is a feature of all speciose coral assemblages.

  8. Perceived interpersonal synchrony increases empathy: Insights from autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Koehne, Svenja; Hatri, Alexander; Cacioppo, John T; Dziobek, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of unilateral interpersonal synchrony on empathy in two simple leader-follower finger tapping communication tasks in individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In unilateral synchronization, one individual within a dyad (the follower) unilaterally adjusts his or her movements to entrain to the movements of the other (the leader). Perceived synchrony, i.e., being followed by a synchronous virtual partner when leading an interaction, increased subjective cognitive empathy (understanding other's mental states) towards the virtual follower in participants without, but not those with ASD. In the ASD group, the degree of produced synchrony, i.e., entrainment to the virtual leader when following in an interaction, was associated with higher cognitive empathy performance as measured with external objective tasks. These results point to a mediating role for interpersonal synchronization in cognitive empathy, a mechanism that seems attenuated, yet not absent, in ASD. PMID:26398860

  9. Impairments of Social Motor Synchrony Evident in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Paula; Frazier, Jean A.; Cochran, David M.; Mitchell, Teresa; Coleman, Caitlin; Schmidt, R. C.

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions typically involve movements of the body that become synchronized over time and both intentional and spontaneous interactional synchrony have been found to be an essential part of successful human interaction. However, our understanding of the importance of temporal dimensions of social motor synchrony in social dysfunction is limited. Here, we used a pendulum coordination paradigm to assess dynamic, process-oriented measures of social motor synchrony in adolescents with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Our data indicate that adolescents with ASD demonstrate less synchronization in both spontaneous and intentional interpersonal coordination. Coupled oscillator modeling suggests that ASD participants assembled a synchronization dynamic with a weaker coupling strength, which corresponds to a lower sensitivity and decreased attention to the movements of the other person, but do not demonstrate evidence of a delay in information transmission. The implication of these findings for isolating an ASD-specific social synchronization deficit that could serve as an objective, bio-behavioral marker is discussed.

  10. Auditory Neuropathy/Dys-synchrony and Its Perceptual Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony is a form of hearing impairment in which cochlear outer hair cell function is spared but neural transmission in the auditory pathway is disordered. This condition, or group of conditions with a common physiologic profile, accounts for approximately 7% of permanent childhood hearing loss and a significant (but as yet undetermined) proportion of adult impairment. This paper presents an overview of the mechanisms underlying auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony-type hearing loss and the clinical profile for affected patients. In particular it examines the perceptual consequences of auditory neuropathy/dys-synchrony, which are quite different from those associated with sensorineural hearing loss, and considers currently available, and future management options. PMID:15920648

  11. Maladaptive Neural Synchrony in Tinnitus: Origin and Restoration

    PubMed Central

    Eggermont, Jos J.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus is the conscious perception of sound heard in the absence of physical sound sources external or internal to the body, reflected in aberrant neural synchrony of spontaneous or resting-state brain activity. Neural synchrony is generated by the nearly simultaneous firing of individual neurons, of the synchronization of membrane-potential changes in local neural groups as reflected in the local field potentials, resulting in the presence of oscillatory brain waves in the EEG. Noise-induced hearing loss, often resulting in tinnitus, causes a reorganization of the tonotopic map in auditory cortex and increased spontaneous firing rates and neural synchrony. Spontaneous brain rhythms rely on neural synchrony. Abnormal neural synchrony in tinnitus appears to be confined to specific frequency bands of brain rhythms. Increases in delta-band activity are generated by deafferented/deprived neuronal networks resulting from hearing loss. Coordinated reset (CR) stimulation was developed in order to specifically counteract such abnormal neuronal synchrony by desynchronization. The goal of acoustic CR neuromodulation is to desynchronize tinnitus-related abnormal delta-band oscillations. CR neuromodulation does not require permanent stimulus delivery in order to achieve long-lasting desynchronization or even a full-blown anti-kindling but may have cumulative effects, i.e., the effect of different CR epochs separated by pauses may accumulate. Unlike other approaches, acoustic CR neuromodulation does not intend to reduce tinnitus-related neuronal activity by employing lateral inhibition. The potential efficacy of acoustic CR modulation was shown in a clinical proof of concept trial, where effects achieved in 12 weeks of treatment delivered 4–6 h/day persisted through a preplanned 4-week therapy pause and showed sustained long-term effects after 10 months of therapy, leading to 75% responders. PMID:25741316

  12. Maintenance of temporal synchrony between syrphid flies and floral resources despite differential phenological responses to climate.

    PubMed

    Iler, Amy M; Inouye, David W; Høye, Toke T; Miller-Rushing, Abraham J; Burkle, Laura A; Johnston, Eleanor B

    2013-08-01

    Variation in species' responses to abiotic phenological cues under climate change may cause changes in temporal overlap among interacting taxa, with potential demographic consequences. Here, we examine associations between the abiotic environment and plant-pollinator phenological synchrony using a long-term syrphid fly-flowering phenology dataset (1992-2011). Degree-days above freezing, precipitation, and timing of snow melt were investigated as predictors of phenology. Syrphids generally emerge after flowering onset and end their activity before the end of flowering. Neither flowering nor syrphid phenology has changed significantly over our 20-year record, consistent with a lack of directional change in climate variables over the same time frame. Instead we document interannual variability in the abiotic environment and phenology. Timing of snow melt was the best predictor of flowering onset and syrphid emergence. Snow melt and degree-days were the best predictors of the end of flowering, whereas degree-days and precipitation best predicted the end of the syrphid period. Flowering advanced at a faster rate than syrphids in response to both advancing snow melt and increasing temperature. Different rates of phenological advancements resulted in more days of temporal overlap between the flower-syrphid community in years of early snow melt because of extended activity periods. Phenological synchrony at the community level is therefore likely to be maintained for some time, even under advancing snow melt conditions that are evident over longer term records at our site. These results show that interacting taxa may respond to different phenological cues and to the same cues at different rates but still maintain phenological synchrony over a range of abiotic conditions. However, our results also indicate that some individual plant species may overlap with the syrphid community for fewer days under continued climate change. This highlights the role of interannual variation

  13. An assessment of anti-Müllerian hormone in predicting mating outcomes in female hamsters that have undergone natural and chemically-accelerated reproductive aging.

    PubMed

    Roosa, Kristen A; Zysling, Devin A; Place, Ned J

    2015-04-01

    In mammals, female fertility declines with age due in part to a progressive loss of ovarian follicles. The rate of follicle decline varies among individuals making it difficult to predict the age of onset of reproductive senescence. Serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) concentrations correlate with the numbers of ovarian follicles, and therefore, AMH could be a useful predictor of female fertility. In women and some production animals, AMH is used to identify which individuals will respond best to ovarian stimulation for assisted reproductive technologies. However, few studies have evaluated AMH's predictive value in unassisted reproduction, and they have yielded conflicting results. To assess the predictive value of AMH in the context of reproductive aging, we prospectively measured serum AMH in 9-month-old Siberian hamsters shortly before breeding them. Female Siberian hamsters experience substantial declines in fertility and fecundity by 9months of age. We also measured serum AMH in 5-month-old females treated with 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD), which selectively destroys ovarian follicles and functionally accelerates ovarian aging. Vehicle-treated 5-month-old females served as controls. AMH concentrations were significantly reduced in VCD-treated females yet many females with low AMH reproduced successfully. On average, both young and old hamsters that littered had higher AMH concentrations than females that did not. However, some females with relatively high AMH concentrations failed to litter, whereas several with low AMH succeeded. Our results suggest that mean AMH concentration can predict mating outcomes on a population or group level, but on an individual basis, a single AMH determination is less informative. PMID:25801548

  14. A new method for evaluating flowering synchrony to support the temporal isolation of genetically modified crops from their wild relatives.

    PubMed

    Ohigashi, Kentaro; Mizuguti, Aki; Yoshimura, Yasuyuki; Matsuo, Kazuhito; Miwa, Tetsuhisa

    2014-01-01

    Hybridization between crops and their wild relatives potentially threatens the genetic identity of the wild plants, particularly in the case of genetically modified crops. Only a few studies have examined the use of temporal isolation to prevent hybridization, and the indices used in those studies, (e.g., the days of flowering overlap), are not precise to evaluate the degree of synchrony in flowering. Here we propose a flowering similarity index that can compare the degree of flowering synchrony between two relevant species and measure the efficiency of temporal isolation. The results showed that the flowering similarity index predicts the likelihood of hybridization much better than the number of flowering-overlap days, regardless of different flowering patterns among cultivars. Thus, temporal isolation of flowering or flowering asynchrony is the most effective means in preventing hybridization between crops and their wild relatives. PMID:24122370

  15. Developing Predictive Approaches to Characterize Adaptive Responses of the Reproductive Endocrine Axis to Aromatase Inhibition II: Computational Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals can affect reproduction and development in both humans and wildlife. We developed a mechanistic mathematical model of the hypothalamic­ pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in female fathead minnows to predic...

  16. Phase synchrony reveals organization in human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Vidmar, David; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2015-12-15

    It remains unclear if human atrial fibrillation (AF) is spatially nonhierarchical or exhibits a hierarchy of organization sustained by sources. We utilize activation times obtained at discrete locations during AF to compute the phase synchrony between tissue regions, to examine underlying spatial dynamics throughout both atria. We construct a binary synchronization network and show that this network can accurately define regions of coherence in coarse-grained in silico data. Specifically, domains controlled by spiral waves exhibit regions of high phase synchrony. We then apply this analysis to clinical data from patients experiencing cardiac arrhythmias using multielectrode catheters to simultaneously record from a majority of both atria. We show that pharmaceutical intervention with ibutilide organizes activation by increasing the size of the synchronized domain in AF and quantify the increase in temporal organization when arrhythmia changes from fibrillation to tachycardia. Finally, in recordings from 24 patients in AF we show that the level of synchrony is spatially broad with some patients showing large spatially contiguous regions of synchronization, while in others synchrony is localized to small pockets. Using computer simulations, we show that this distribution is inconsistent with distributions obtained from simulations that mimic multiwavelet reentry but is consistent with mechanisms in which one or more spatially conserved spiral waves is surrounded by tissue in which activation is disorganized. PMID:26475585

  17. NUTRIENT SYNCHRONY: SOUND IN THEORY, ELUSIVE IN PRACTICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of improving animal performance through synchronizing ruminal availability of nutrients has been with us for at least 3 decades. Though theoretically appealing, research and field results have not supported this approach to diet formulation. Why? Essential to successful ruminal synchrony...

  18. The First Four Months: Development of Affect, Cognition, and Synchrony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Andrea; And Others

    The relationship between affective responsiveness, synchrony of mother/infant interaction, and developmental status was examined in 32 normal infants (eight infants each at the ages of 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks). Data were collected in infants' homes and included (1) naturalistic mother/infant play; (2) presentation of auditory, tactile, visual, and…

  19. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human

    PubMed Central

    Koolen, N.; Dereymaeker, A.; Räsänen, O.; Jansen, K.; Vervisch, J.; Matic, V.; Naulaers, G.; De Vos, M.; Van Huffel, S.; Vanhatalo, S.

    2016-01-01

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44 weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates. PMID:26876605

  20. Phenological changes and reduced seasonal synchrony in western Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, Tim H.; Górska-Zajączkowska, Maria; Wójtowicz, Wanda; Tryjanowski, Piotr

    2011-05-01

    Botanical gardens offer continuity for phenological recording in observers, protocols and plant specimens that may not be achievable from other sources. Here, we examine phenological change and synchrony from one such garden in western Poland. We analysed 66 botanical phenophases and 18 interphase intervals recorded between 1977 and 2007 from the Poznań Botanical Garden. These were examined for trends through time and responsiveness to temperature. Furthermore, we derived measures of synchrony for start of spring and end of autumn events to assess if these had changed over time. All 39 events with a mean date before mid-July demonstrated a significant negative relationship with temperature. Where autumn events were significantly related to temperature, they indicated a positive relationship. Typically, spring events showed an advance over time and autumn events a delay. Interphase intervals tended to lengthen over the study period. The measures of synchrony changed significantly over time suggesting less synchrony among spring events and also among autumn events. In combination, these results suggest increases in growing season length. However, responses to a changing climate were species-specific. Thus, the transitions from winter into spring and from autumn into winter are becoming less clearly defined.

  1. Early development of synchrony in cortical activations in the human.

    PubMed

    Koolen, N; Dereymaeker, A; Räsänen, O; Jansen, K; Vervisch, J; Matic, V; Naulaers, G; De Vos, M; Van Huffel, S; Vanhatalo, S

    2016-05-13

    Early intermittent cortical activity is thought to play a crucial role in the growth of neuronal network development, and large scale brain networks are known to provide the basis for higher brain functions. Yet, the early development of the large scale synchrony in cortical activations is unknown. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the early intermittent cortical activations seen in the human scalp EEG show a clear developmental course during the last trimester of pregnancy, the period of intensive growth of cortico-cortical connections. We recorded scalp EEG from altogether 22 premature infants at post-menstrual age between 30 and 44weeks, and the early cortical synchrony was quantified using recently introduced activation synchrony index (ASI). The developmental correlations of ASI were computed for individual EEG signals as well as anatomically and mathematically defined spatial subgroups. We report two main findings. First, we observed a robust and statistically significant increase in ASI in all cortical areas. Second, there were significant spatial gradients in the synchrony in fronto-occipital and left-to-right directions. These findings provide evidence that early cortical activity is increasingly synchronized across the neocortex. The ASI-based metrics introduced in our work allow direct translational comparison to in vivo animal models, as well as hold promise for implementation as a functional developmental biomarker in future research on human neonates. PMID:26876605

  2. Infant Perception of Audio-Visual Speech Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkowicz, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments investigated perception of audio-visual (A-V) speech synchrony in 4- to 10-month-old infants. Experiments 1 and 2 used a convergent-operations approach by habituating infants to an audiovisually synchronous syllable (Experiment 1) and then testing for detection of increasing degrees of A-V asynchrony (366, 500, and 666 ms) or by…

  3. Metaphors of Synchrony: Emergence and Differentiation of Online Chat Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latzko-Toth, Guillaume

    2010-01-01

    Through a detailed account of the history of online chat devices, this article shows the emergence, over time, of two distinct interactional formats underlying these social media. They may be captured by two generic metaphors of synchrony: "conference" (a gathering in a virtual place where unfocused interactions and group sociability occur) and…

  4. Changes in large-scale climate alter spatial synchrony of aphid pests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, Lawrence W.; Bell, James R.; Harrington, Richard; Reuman, Daniel C.

    2016-06-01

    Spatial synchrony, the tendency of distant populations to fluctuate similarly, is a major concern in ecology. Except in special circumstances, researchers historically had difficulty identifying drivers of synchrony in field systems. Perhaps for this reason, the possibility that changes in large-scale climatic drivers may modify synchrony, thereby impacting ecosystems and human concerns, has been little examined. Here, we use wavelets to determine environmental drivers of phenological synchrony across Britain for 20 aphid species, most major crop pests. Consistently across species, changes in drivers produced large changes in aphid synchrony. Different drivers acted on different timescales: using a new wavelet analogue of the Moran theorem, we show that on long timescales (>4 years), 80% of synchrony in aphid first flights is due to synchrony in winter climate; but this explanation accounts for less short-timescale (<=4 years) synchrony. Changes in aphid synchrony over time also differed by timescale: long-timescale synchrony fell from before 1993 to after, caused by similar changes in winter climate; whereas short-timescale synchrony increased. Shifts in winter climate are attributable to the North Atlantic Oscillation, an important climatic phenomenon, so effects described here may influence other taxa. This study documents a new way that climatic changes influence populations, through altered Moran effects.

  5. The Lattice of Synchrony Subspaces of a Coupled Cell Network: Characterization and Computation Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, Manuela A. D.; Dias, Ana Paula S.

    2014-12-01

    Coupled cell systems are networks of dynamical systems (the cells), where the links between the cells are described through the network structure, the coupled cell network. Synchrony subspaces are spaces defined in terms of equalities of certain cell coordinates that are flow-invariant for all coupled cell systems associated with a given network structure. The intersection of synchrony subspaces of a network is also a synchrony subspace of the network. It follows, then, that, given a coupled cell network, its set of synchrony subspaces, taking the inclusion partial order relation, forms a lattice. In this paper we show how to obtain the lattice of synchrony subspaces for a general network and present an algorithm that generates that lattice. We prove that this problem is reduced to obtain the lattice of synchrony subspaces for regular networks. For a regular network we obtain the lattice of synchrony subspaces based on the eigenvalue structure of the network adjacency matrix.

  6. The predictability of serum anti-Müllerian level in IVF/ICSI outcomes for patients of advanced reproductive age

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The role of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) as predictor of in-vitro fertilization outcomes has been much debated. The aim of the present study is to investigate the practicability of combining serum AMH level with biological age as a simple screening method for counseling IVF candidates of advanced reproductive age with potential poor outcomes prior to treatment initiation. Methods A total of 1,538 reference patients and 116 infertile patients aged greater than or equal to 40 years enrolled in IVF/ICSI cycles were recruited in this retrospective analysis. A reference chart of the age-related distribution of serum AMH level for Asian population was first created. IVF/ICSI patients aged greater than or equal to 40 years were then divided into three groups according to the low, middle and high tertiles the serum AMH tertiles derived from the reference population of matching age. The cycle outcomes were analyzed and compared among each individual group. Results For reference subjects aged greater than or equal to 40 years, the serum AMH of the low, middle and high tertiles were equal or lesser than 0.48, 0.49-1.22 and equal or greater than 1.23 ng/mL respectively. IVF/ICSI patients aged greater than or equal to 40 years with AMH levels in the low tertile had the highest cycle cancellation rate (47.6%) with zero clinical pregnancy. The nadir AMH level that has achieved live birth was 0.56 ng/mL, which was equivalent to the 36.4th percentile of AMH level from the age-matched reference group. The optimum cut-off levels of AMH for the prediction of nonpregnancy and cycle cancellation were 1.05 and 0.68 ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions Two criteria: (1) age greater than or equal to 40 years and (2) serum AMH level in the lowest tertile (equal or lesser than 33.3rd percentile) of the matching age group, may be used as markers of futility for counseling IVF/ICSI candidates. PMID:21843363

  7. Properties of precise firing synchrony between synaptically coupled cortical interneurons depend on their mode of coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Precise spike synchrony has been widely reported in the central nervous system, but its functional role in encoding, processing, and transmitting information is yet unresolved. Of particular interest is firing synchrony between inhibitory cortical interneurons, thought to drive various cortical rhythms such as gamma oscillations, the hallmark of cognitive states. Precise synchrony can arise between two interneurons connected electrically, through gap junctions, chemically, through fast inhibitory synapses, or dually, through both types of connections, but the properties of synchrony generated by these different modes of connectivity have never been compared in the same data set. In the present study we recorded in vitro from 152 homotypic pairs of two major subtypes of mouse neocortical interneurons: parvalbumin-containing, fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and somatostatin-containing (SOM) interneurons. We tested firing synchrony when the two neurons were driven to fire by long, depolarizing current steps and used a novel synchrony index to quantify the strength of synchrony, its temporal precision, and its dependence on firing rate. We found that SOM-SOM synchrony, driven solely by electrical coupling, was less precise than FS-FS synchrony, driven by inhibitory or dual coupling. Unlike SOM-SOM synchrony, FS-FS synchrony was strongly firing rate dependent and was not evident at the prototypical 40-Hz gamma frequency. Computer simulations reproduced these differences in synchrony without assuming any differences in intrinsic properties, suggesting that the mode of coupling is more important than the interneuron subtype. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms and properties of interneuron synchrony and point out important caveats in current models of cortical oscillations. PMID:25972585

  8. Genome-wide association and genomic prediction for host response to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Host genetics has been shown to play a role in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), which is the most economically important disease to the swine industry. A region on Sus scrofa chromosome (SSC) 4 has been previously reported to have a strong association with serum vire...

  9. Synchrony, Waves, and Spatial Hierarchies in the Spread of Influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viboud, Cécile; Bjørnstad, Ottar N.; Smith, David L.; Simonsen, Lone; Miller, Mark A.; Grenfell, Bryan T.

    2006-04-01

    Quantifying long-range dissemination of infectious diseases is a key issue in their dynamics and control. Here, we use influenza-related mortality data to analyze the between-state progression of interpandemic influenza in the United States over the past 30 years. Outbreaks show hierarchical spatial spread evidenced by higher pairwise synchrony between more populous states. Seasons with higher influenza mortality are associated with higher disease transmission and more rapid spread than are mild ones. The regional spread of infection correlates more closely with rates of movement of people to and from their workplaces (workflows) than with geographical distance. Workflows are described in turn by a gravity model, with a rapid decay of commuting up to around 100 km and a long tail of rare longer range flow. A simple epidemiological model, based on the gravity formulation, captures the observed increase of influenza spatial synchrony with transmissibility; high transmission allows influenza to spread rapidly beyond local spatial constraints.

  10. Emotional lability and affective synchrony in borderline personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berghoff, Christopher R; Tull, Matthew T; DiLillo, David; Messman-Moore, Terri; Gratz, Kim L

    2016-07-01

    Extant research on emotional lability in borderline personality disorder (BPD) has focused almost exclusively on lability of individual emotions or emotion types, with limited research considering how different types of emotions shift together over time. Thus, this study examined the temporal dynamics of emotion in BPD at the level of both individual emotions (i.e., self-conscious emotions [SCE], anger, and anxiety) and mixed emotions (i.e., synchrony between emotions). One hundred forty-four women from the community completed a diagnostic interview and laboratory study involving 5 emotion induction tasks (each of which was preceded and followed by a 5-min resting period or neutral task). State ratings of SCE, anger, and anxiety were provided at 14 time points (before and after each laboratory task and resting period). Hierarchical linear modeling results indicate that women with BPD reported greater mean levels of SCE and Anxiety (but not Anger), and greater lability of Anxiety. Women with BPD also exhibited greater variability in lability of all 3 emotions (suggestive of within-group differences in the relevance of lability to BPD). Results also revealed synchrony (i.e., positive relations) between each possible pair of emotions, regardless of BPD status. Follow-up regression analyses suggest the importance of accounting for lability when examining the role of synchrony in BPD, as the relation of SCE-Anger synchrony to BPD symptom severity was moderated by Anger and SCE lability. Specifically, synchronous changes in SCE and Anger were associated with greater BPD symptom severity when large shifts in SCE were paired with minor shifts in Anger. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27362623

  11. Sync or sink? Interpersonal synchrony impacts self-esteem

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Joanne; Miles, Lynden K.; Macrae, C. Neil

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized behavior has significant social influence both in terms of everyday activities (e.g., walking and talking) as well as via more historical contexts (e.g., cultural rituals). Grounded in the science of coordination dynamics, previous research has revealed that interpersonal synchrony has numerous affiliative and pro-social consequences, such as enhanced rapport, cooperation, and social-cognitive functioning. The current study sought to explore the impact of intentional synchrony versus asynchrony on an individual’s self-esteem and their feelings of social connection with a partner. The results revealed that individuals felt better about themselves following a period of synchronous compared to asynchronous movement, while they also perceived a greater self-other overlap with their partner. These findings not only extend previous research on social connections following interpersonal synchrony, but also provide the first demonstration of an influence on self-evaluations. Overall, it appears that moving in time with others may result in us feeling better about ourselves compared to moving to our own rhythm. PMID:25285090

  12. Neural Synchrony in Cortical Networks: History, Concept and Current Status

    PubMed Central

    Uhlhaas, Peter J.; Pipa, Gordon; Lima, Bruss; Melloni, Lucia; Neuenschwander, Sergio; Nikolić, Danko; Singer, Wolf

    2009-01-01

    Following the discovery of context-dependent synchronization of oscillatory neuronal responses in the visual system, the role of neural synchrony in cortical networks has been expanded to provide a general mechanism for the coordination of distributed neural activity patterns. In the current paper, we present an update of the status of this hypothesis through summarizing recent results from our laboratory that suggest important new insights regarding the mechanisms, function and relevance of this phenomenon. In the first part, we present recent results derived from animal experiments and mathematical simulations that provide novel explanations and mechanisms for zero and nero-zero phase lag synchronization. In the second part, we shall discuss the role of neural synchrony for expectancy during perceptual organization and its role in conscious experience. This will be followed by evidence that indicates that in addition to supporting conscious cognition, neural synchrony is abnormal in major brain disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. We conclude this paper with suggestions for further research as well as with critical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. PMID:19668703

  13. Spike correlations - what can they tell about synchrony?

    PubMed

    Tchumatchenko, Tatjana; Geisel, Theo; Volgushev, Maxim; Wolf, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Sensory and cognitive processing relies on the concerted activity of large populations of neurons. The advent of modern experimental techniques like two-photon population calcium imaging makes it possible to monitor the spiking activity of multiple neurons as they are participating in specific cognitive tasks. The development of appropriate theoretical tools to quantify and interpret the spiking activity of multiple neurons, however, is still in its infancy. One of the simplest and widely used measures of correlated activity is the pairwise correlation coefficient. While spike correlation coefficients are easy to compute using the available numerical toolboxes, it has remained largely an open question whether they are indeed a reliable measure of synchrony. Surprisingly, despite the intense use of correlation coefficients in the design of synthetic spike trains, the construction of population models and the assessment of the synchrony level in live neuronal networks very little was known about their computational properties. We showed that many features of pairwise spike correlations can be studied analytically in a tractable threshold model. Importantly, we demonstrated that under some circumstances the correlation coefficients can vanish, even though input and also pairwise spike cross correlations are present. This finding suggests that the most popular and frequently used measures can, by design, fail to capture the neuronal synchrony. PMID:21617732

  14. An attempt to extend the Habitat Harshness Hypothesis to tidal flats: A case study of Anomalocardia brasiliana (Bivalvia: Veneridae) reproductive biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte, Guilherme Nascimento; Yokoyama, Leonardo Querobim; Amaral, A. Cecília Z.

    2014-10-01

    The Habitat Harshness Hypothesis (HHH) predicts that populations inhabiting the intertidal area of a dissipative beach should produce more gametes and have a longer reproductive cycle than those inhabiting an intermediate or reflective beach. This hypothesis was proposed for the exposed morphodynamic continuum between the reflective and dissipative states; however, no attempt has been made thus far to verify whether the HHH is valid for tidal flats. In this study, we analysed the reproductive cycle of Anomalocardia brasiliana in an intermediate beach and in a tidal flat and compared the results to determine whether the reproductive cycles of A. brasiliana were in agreement with the predictions of the HHH and to examine the possibility of extending this hypothesis to tidal flats. A continuous spawning season and synchrony between sexes were observed at both sites, although the reproductive effort was higher in the intermediate beach. The results of this first attempt did not support the extension of the HHH to tidal flats. It is possible that hypotheses that take into account only physical variables may not be the most adequate for describing environments with such a high species richness and high abundance as tidal flats. Nevertheless, other studies are necessary to confidently expand or refute the HHH with regard to tidal flats, and this topic should be considered as a priority in future investigations in sandy beach ecology.

  15. Why Synchrony Matters during Mother-Child Interactions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Leclère, Chloë; Viaux, Sylvie; Avril, Marie; Achard, Catherine; Chetouani, Mohamed; Missonnier, Sylvain; Cohen, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of mother-child interactions is a core issue of early child development and psychopathology. This paper focuses on the concept of “synchrony” and examines (1) how synchrony in mother-child interaction is defined and operationalized; (2) the contribution that the concept of synchrony has brought to understanding the nature of mother-child interactions. Method Between 1977 and 2013, we searched several databases using the following key-words: « synchrony » « interaction » and « mother-child ». We focused on studies examining parent-child interactions among children aged 2 months to 5 years. From the 63 relevant studies, we extracted study description variables (authors, year, design, number of subjects, age); assessment conditions and modalities; and main findings. Results The most common terms referring to synchrony were mutuality, reciprocity, rhythmicity, harmonious interaction, turn-taking and shared affect; all terms were used to characterize the mother-child dyad. As a consequence, we propose defining synchrony as a dynamic and reciprocal adaptation of the temporal structure of behaviors and shared affect between interactive partners. Three main types of assessment methods for studying synchrony emerged: (1) global interaction scales with dyadic items; (2) specific synchrony scales; and (3) micro-coded time-series analyses. It appears that synchrony should be regarded as a social signal per se as it has been shown to be valid in both normal and pathological populations. Better mother-child synchrony is associated with familiarity (vs. unknown partner), a healthy mother (vs. pathological mother), typical development (vs. psychopathological development), and a more positive child outcomes. Discussion Synchrony is a key feature of mother-infant interactions. Adopting an objective approach in studying synchrony is not a simple task given available assessment tools and due to its temporality and multimodal expression. We propose an

  16. Type-II phase resetting curve is optimal for stochastic synchrony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abouzeid, Aushra; Ermentrout, Bard

    2009-07-01

    The phase-resetting curve (PRC) describes the response of a neural oscillator to small perturbations in membrane potential. Its usefulness for predicting the dynamics of weakly coupled deterministic networks has been well characterized. However, the inputs to real neurons may often be more accurately described as barrages of synaptic noise. Effective connectivity between cells may thus arise in the form of correlations between the noisy input streams. We use constrained optimization and perturbation methods to prove that the PRC shape determines susceptibility to synchrony among otherwise uncoupled noise-driven neural oscillators. PRCs can be placed into two general categories: type-I PRCs are non-negative, while type-II PRCs have a large negative region. Here we show that oscillators with type-II PRCs receiving common noisy input synchronize more readily than those with type-I PRCs.

  17. Evidence for climate-driven synchrony of marine and terrestrial ecosystems in northwest Australia.

    PubMed

    Ong, Joyce J L; Rountrey, Adam N; Zinke, Jens; Meeuwig, Jessica J; Grierson, Pauline F; O'Donnell, Alison J; Newman, Stephen J; Lough, Janice M; Trougan, Mélissa; Meekan, Mark G

    2016-08-01

    The effects of climate change are difficult to predict for many marine species because little is known of their response to climate variations in the past. However, long-term chronologies of growth, a variable that integrates multiple physical and biological factors, are now available for several marine taxa. These allow us to search for climate-driven synchrony in growth across multiple taxa and ecosystems, identifying the key processes driving biological responses at very large spatial scales. We hypothesized that in northwest (NW) Australia, a region that is predicted to be strongly influenced by climate change, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon would be an important factor influencing the growth patterns of organisms in both marine and terrestrial environments. To test this idea, we analyzed existing growth chronologies of the marine fish Lutjanus argentimaculatus, the coral Porites spp. and the tree Callitris columellaris and developed a new chronology for another marine fish, Lethrinus nebulosus. Principal components analysis and linear model selection showed evidence of ENSO-driven synchrony in growth among all four taxa at interannual time scales, the first such result for the Southern Hemisphere. Rainfall, sea surface temperatures, and sea surface salinities, which are linked to the ENSO system, influenced the annual growth of fishes, trees, and corals. All four taxa had negative relationships with the Niño-4 index (a measure of ENSO status), with positive growth patterns occurring during strong La Niña years. This finding implies that future changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are likely to have major consequences for both marine and terrestrial taxa. Strong similarities in the growth patterns of fish and trees offer the possibility of using tree-ring chronologies, which span longer time periods than those of fish, to aid understanding of both historical and future responses of fish populations to climate variation

  18. Mechanisms of interpersonal sway synchrony and stability.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Raymond F; Osler, Callum J

    2014-12-01

    Here we explain the neural and mechanical mechanisms responsible for synchronizing sway and improving postural control during physical contact with another standing person. Postural control processes were modelled using an inverted pendulum under continuous feedback control. Interpersonal interactions were simulated either by coupling the sensory feedback loops or by physically coupling the pendulums with a damped spring. These simulations precisely recreated the timing and magnitude of sway interactions observed empirically. Effects of firmly grasping another person's shoulder were explained entirely by the mechanical linkage. This contrasted with light touch and/or visual contact, which were explained by a sensory weighting phenomenon; each person's estimate of upright was based on a weighted combination of veridical sensory feedback combined with a small contribution from their partner. Under these circumstances, the model predicted reductions in sway even without the need to distinguish between self and partner motion. Our findings explain the seemingly paradoxical observation that touching a swaying person can improve postural control. PMID:25339686

  19. Mechanisms of interpersonal sway synchrony and stability

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Raymond F.; Osler, Callum J.

    2014-01-01

    Here we explain the neural and mechanical mechanisms responsible for synchronizing sway and improving postural control during physical contact with another standing person. Postural control processes were modelled using an inverted pendulum under continuous feedback control. Interpersonal interactions were simulated either by coupling the sensory feedback loops or by physically coupling the pendulums with a damped spring. These simulations precisely recreated the timing and magnitude of sway interactions observed empirically. Effects of firmly grasping another person's shoulder were explained entirely by the mechanical linkage. This contrasted with light touch and/or visual contact, which were explained by a sensory weighting phenomenon; each person's estimate of upright was based on a weighted combination of veridical sensory feedback combined with a small contribution from their partner. Under these circumstances, the model predicted reductions in sway even without the need to distinguish between self and partner motion. Our findings explain the seemingly paradoxical observation that touching a swaying person can improve postural control. PMID:25339686

  20. Aspects of reproductive ecology and benthic-pelagic coupling in the sub-antarctic sea cucumber Pseudostichopus mollis (Theel)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Andrew; Neal, Lance

    2012-07-01

    For deeper regions of the continental shelf environmental cues entraining reproduction in echinoderms are often absent, which contributes to adoption of continuous reproduction, having larger eggs, and a lecithotrophic mode of larval development. In the present study the sub-Antarctic sea cucumber Pseudostichopus mollis from the family Synallactidae was obtained during June (winter) and September (spring) from a depth of approximately 300 m north of the Auckland Islands in an area abundant in biogenic sediments. Samples were processed for body indices and gonad development. Features characteristic of non-continuous reproduction were exhibited. Although a larger egg size was found (212±14 μm), two distinct winter cohorts of oocytes occurred (41-81 and 161-201 μm) and body wall weight fluctuations (7.6% increase in males and 27.5% reduction in females) coincided with changes in gonad indices between sample dates. For males gonad as a proportion of body wall weight decreased from 3.31±0.9 to 2.11±0.37% and for females it increased from 1.59±0.28 to 2.5±0.30%. For both sample dates the gonad of males maintained mature spermatozoa whereas female gonad shifted from mainly recovery and growth of oocytes to growth and advanced growth of mature oocytes. In habitats with low or variable food availability intermittent reproduction is predicted as resources are too low for a high reproductive effort and too erratic for synchrony. A pattern of reproduction where fluctuations in seasonal organic input into an accumulated benthic food source initiates and synchronises gametogenesis for future spawning is proposed.

  1. Features of neuronal synchrony in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Nase, Gabriele; Singer, Wolf; Monyer, Hannah; Engel, Andreas K

    2003-08-01

    Synchronization of neuronal discharges has been hypothesized to play a role in defining cell assemblies representing particular constellations of stimulus features. In many systems and species, synchronization is accompanied by an oscillatory response modulation at frequencies in the gamma-band. The cellular mechanisms underlying these phenomena of synchronization and oscillatory patterning have been studied mainly in vitro due to the difficulty in designing a direct in vivo assay. With the prospect of using conditional genetic manipulations of cortical network components, our objective was to test whether the mouse would meet the criteria to provide a model system for the study of gamma-band synchrony. Multi-unit and local field potential recordings were made from the primary visual cortex of anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Neuronal responses evoked by moving gratings, bars, and random dot patterns were analyzed with respect to neuronal synchrony and temporal patterning. Oscillations at gamma-frequencies were readily evoked with all types of stimuli used. Oscillation and synchronization strength were largest for gratings and decreased when the noise level was increased in random-dot patterns. The center peak width of cross-correlograms was smallest for bars and increased with noise, yielding a significant difference between coherent random dot patterns versus patterns with 70% noise. Field potential analysis typically revealed increases of power in the gamma-band during response periods. Our findings are compatible with a role for neuronal synchrony in mediating perceptual binding and suggest the usefulness of the mouse model for testing hypotheses concerning both the mechanisms and the functional role of temporal patterning. PMID:12702711

  2. Regional Patterns of Cortical Phase Synchrony in the Resting State.

    PubMed

    Casimo, Kaitlyn; Darvas, Felix; Wander, Jeremiah; Ko, Andrew; Grabowski, Thomas J; Novotny, Edward; Poliakov, Andrew; Ojemann, Jeffrey G; Weaver, Kurt E

    2016-07-01

    Synchronized phase estimates between oscillating neuronal signals at the macroscale level reflect coordinated activities between neuronal assemblies. Recent electrophysiological evidence suggests the presence of significant spontaneous phase synchrony within the resting state. The purpose of this study was to investigate phase synchrony, including directional interactions, in resting state subdural electrocorticographic recordings to better characterize patterns of regional phase interactions across the lateral cortical surface during the resting state. We estimated spontaneous phase locking value (PLV) as a measure of functional connectivity, and phase slope index (PSI) as a measure of pseudo-causal phase interactions, across a broad range of canonical frequency bands and the modulation of the amplitude envelope of high gamma (amHG), a band that is believed to best reflect the physiological processes giving rise to the functional magnetic resonance imaging BOLD signal. Long-distance interactions had higher PLVs in slower frequencies (≤theta) than in higher ones (≥beta) with amHG behaving more like slow frequencies, and a general trend of increasing frequency band of significant PLVs when moving across the lateral surface along an anterior-posterior axis. Moreover, there was a strong trend of frontal-to-parietal directional phase synchronization, measured by PSI across multiple frequencies. These findings, which are likely indicative of coordinated and structured spontaneous cortical interactions, are important in the study of time scales and directional nature of resting state functional connectivity, and may ultimately contribute to a better understanding of how spontaneous synchrony is linked to variation in regional architecture across the lateral cortical surface. PMID:27019319

  3. Statistical Detection of EEG Synchrony Using Empirical Bayesian Inference

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Archana K.; Asoh, Hideki; Takeda, Yuji; Phillips, Steven

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding how the brain utilizes synchronized oscillatory activity to integrate information across functionally connected regions. Computing phase-locking values (PLV) between EEG signals is a popular method for quantifying such synchronizations and elucidating their role in cognitive tasks. However, high-dimensionality in PLV data incurs a serious multiple testing problem. Standard multiple testing methods in neuroimaging research (e.g., false discovery rate, FDR) suffer severe loss of power, because they fail to exploit complex dependence structure between hypotheses that vary in spectral, temporal and spatial dimension. Previously, we showed that a hierarchical FDR and optimal discovery procedures could be effectively applied for PLV analysis to provide better power than FDR. In this article, we revisit the multiple comparison problem from a new Empirical Bayes perspective and propose the application of the local FDR method (locFDR; Efron, 2001) for PLV synchrony analysis to compute FDR as a posterior probability that an observed statistic belongs to a null hypothesis. We demonstrate the application of Efron's Empirical Bayes approach for PLV synchrony analysis for the first time. We use simulations to validate the specificity and sensitivity of locFDR and a real EEG dataset from a visual search study for experimental validation. We also compare locFDR with hierarchical FDR and optimal discovery procedures in both simulation and experimental analyses. Our simulation results showed that the locFDR can effectively control false positives without compromising on the power of PLV synchrony inference. Our results from the application locFDR on experiment data detected more significant discoveries than our previously proposed methods whereas the standard FDR method failed to detect any significant discoveries. PMID:25822617

  4. Statistical detection of EEG synchrony using empirical bayesian inference.

    PubMed

    Singh, Archana K; Asoh, Hideki; Takeda, Yuji; Phillips, Steven

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in understanding how the brain utilizes synchronized oscillatory activity to integrate information across functionally connected regions. Computing phase-locking values (PLV) between EEG signals is a popular method for quantifying such synchronizations and elucidating their role in cognitive tasks. However, high-dimensionality in PLV data incurs a serious multiple testing problem. Standard multiple testing methods in neuroimaging research (e.g., false discovery rate, FDR) suffer severe loss of power, because they fail to exploit complex dependence structure between hypotheses that vary in spectral, temporal and spatial dimension. Previously, we showed that a hierarchical FDR and optimal discovery procedures could be effectively applied for PLV analysis to provide better power than FDR. In this article, we revisit the multiple comparison problem from a new Empirical Bayes perspective and propose the application of the local FDR method (locFDR; Efron, 2001) for PLV synchrony analysis to compute FDR as a posterior probability that an observed statistic belongs to a null hypothesis. We demonstrate the application of Efron's Empirical Bayes approach for PLV synchrony analysis for the first time. We use simulations to validate the specificity and sensitivity of locFDR and a real EEG dataset from a visual search study for experimental validation. We also compare locFDR with hierarchical FDR and optimal discovery procedures in both simulation and experimental analyses. Our simulation results showed that the locFDR can effectively control false positives without compromising on the power of PLV synchrony inference. Our results from the application locFDR on experiment data detected more significant discoveries than our previously proposed methods whereas the standard FDR method failed to detect any significant discoveries. PMID:25822617

  5. Retinoic Acid Signaling Affects Cortical Synchrony During Sleep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Stéphanie; Franken, Paul; Dauvilliers, Yves; Ghyselinck, Norbert B.; Chambon, Pierre; Tafti, Mehdi

    2005-10-01

    Delta oscillations, characteristic of the electroencephalogram (EEG) of slow wave sleep, estimate sleep depth and need and are thought to be closely linked to the recovery function of sleep. The cellular mechanisms underlying the generation of delta waves at the cortical and thalamic levels are well documented, but the molecular regulatory mechanisms remain elusive. Here we demonstrate in the mouse that the gene encoding the retinoic acid receptor beta determines the contribution of delta oscillations to the sleep EEG. Thus, retinoic acid signaling, which is involved in the patterning of the brain and dopaminergic pathways, regulates cortical synchrony in the adult.

  6. Timing and synchrony of births in bighorn sheep: implications for reintroduction and conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klaver, Robert W.; Jericho C. Whiting; Daniel D. Olson; Justin M. Shannon; Terry Bowyer; Jerran T. Flinders

    2012-01-01

    Implications: Consideration should be given to the adjustment of timing and synchrony of births when reintroducing bighorns, especially when animals are released into different ecoregions. Also, biologists should select release sites that are ecologically similar to source areas, thereby reducing potential negative effects of animals adjusting timing and synchrony of births to environmental conditions of restoration areas.

  7. Nonverbal Synchrony in Psychotherapy: Coordinated Body Movement Reflects Relationship Quality and Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The authors quantified nonverbal synchrony--the coordination of patient's and therapist's movement--in a random sample of same-sex psychotherapy dyads. The authors contrasted nonverbal synchrony in these dyads with a control condition and assessed its association with session-level and overall psychotherapy outcome. Method: Using an…

  8. Shadows of artistry: cortical synchrony during perception and imagery of visual art.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Petsche, Hellmuth

    2002-04-01

    Functional and topographical differences between two groups, artists and non-artists, during the performances of visual perception and imagery of paintings were presented by means of EEG phase synchrony analysis. In artists as compared with non-artists, significantly higher phase synchrony was found in the high frequency beta and gamma bands during the perception of the paintings; in the low frequency bands (primarily delta), phase synchrony was mostly enhanced during imagery. Strong decreases in phase synchrony of alpha were found primarily in artists for both tasks. The right hemisphere was found to present higher synchrony than the left in artists, whereas hemispheric asymmetry was less significant in non-artists. In the artists, enhanced synchrony in the high frequency band is most likely due to their enhanced binding capabilities of numerous visual attributes, and enhanced synchrony in the low frequency band seems to be due to the higher involvement of long-term visual memory mostly in imagery. Thus, the analysis of phase synchrony from EEG signals yields new information about the dynamical co-operation between neuronal assemblies during the cognition of visual art. PMID:11958960

  9. Region-wide synchrony and traveling waves of dengue across eight countries in Southeast Asia

    PubMed Central

    van Panhuis, Willem G.; Choisy, Marc; Xiong, Xin; Chok, Nian Shong; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Lam, Sai K.; Chong, Chee K.; Lam, Fook C.; Phommasak, Bounlay; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Bouaphanh, Khamphaphongphane; Rekol, Huy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Thai, Pham Quang; Duong, Tran Nhu; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang; Liu, Yu-Lun; Ng, Lee-Ching; Shi, Yuan; Tayag, Enrique A.; Roque, Vito G.; Lee Suy, Lyndon L.; Jarman, Richard G.; Gibbons, Robert V.; Velasco, John Mark S.; Yoon, In-Kyu; Burke, Donald S.; Cummings, Derek A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted virus infection that causes epidemics of febrile illness and hemorrhagic fever across the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Annual epidemics are commonly observed, but there is substantial spatiotemporal heterogeneity in intensity. A better understanding of this heterogeneity in dengue transmission could lead to improved epidemic prediction and disease control. Time series decomposition methods enable the isolation and study of temporal epidemic dynamics with a specific periodicity (e.g., annual cycles related to climatic drivers and multiannual cycles caused by dynamics in population immunity). We collected and analyzed up to 18 y of monthly dengue surveillance reports on a total of 3.5 million reported dengue cases from 273 provinces in eight countries in Southeast Asia, covering ∼107 km2. We detected strong patterns of synchronous dengue transmission across the entire region, most markedly during a period of high incidence in 1997–1998, which was followed by a period of extremely low incidence in 2001–2002. This synchrony in dengue incidence coincided with elevated temperatures throughout the region in 1997–1998 and the strongest El Niño episode of the century. Multiannual dengue cycles (2–5 y) were highly coherent with the Oceanic Niño Index, and synchrony of these cycles increased with temperature. We also detected localized traveling waves of multiannual dengue epidemic cycles in Thailand, Laos, and the Philippines that were dependent on temperature. This study reveals forcing mechanisms that drive synchronization of dengue epidemics on a continental scale across Southeast Asia. PMID:26438851

  10. Region-wide synchrony and traveling waves of dengue across eight countries in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    van Panhuis, Willem G; Choisy, Marc; Xiong, Xin; Chok, Nian Shong; Akarasewi, Pasakorn; Iamsirithaworn, Sopon; Lam, Sai K; Chong, Chee K; Lam, Fook C; Phommasak, Bounlay; Vongphrachanh, Phengta; Bouaphanh, Khamphaphongphane; Rekol, Huy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Thai, Pham Quang; Duong, Tran Nhu; Chuang, Jen-Hsiang; Liu, Yu-Lun; Ng, Lee-Ching; Shi, Yuan; Tayag, Enrique A; Roque, Vito G; Lee Suy, Lyndon L; Jarman, Richard G; Gibbons, Robert V; Velasco, John Mark S; Yoon, In-Kyu; Burke, Donald S; Cummings, Derek A T

    2015-10-20

    Dengue is a mosquito-transmitted virus infection that causes epidemics of febrile illness and hemorrhagic fever across the tropics and subtropics worldwide. Annual epidemics are commonly observed, but there is substantial spatiotemporal heterogeneity in intensity. A better understanding of this heterogeneity in dengue transmission could lead to improved epidemic prediction and disease control. Time series decomposition methods enable the isolation and study of temporal epidemic dynamics with a specific periodicity (e.g., annual cycles related to climatic drivers and multiannual cycles caused by dynamics in population immunity). We collected and analyzed up to 18 y of monthly dengue surveillance reports on a total of 3.5 million reported dengue cases from 273 provinces in eight countries in Southeast Asia, covering ∼ 10(7) km(2). We detected strong patterns of synchronous dengue transmission across the entire region, most markedly during a period of high incidence in 1997-1998, which was followed by a period of extremely low incidence in 2001-2002. This synchrony in dengue incidence coincided with elevated temperatures throughout the region in 1997-1998 and the strongest El Niño episode of the century. Multiannual dengue cycles (2-5 y) were highly coherent with the Oceanic Niño Index, and synchrony of these cycles increased with temperature. We also detected localized traveling waves of multiannual dengue epidemic cycles in Thailand, Laos, and the Philippines that were dependent on temperature. This study reveals forcing mechanisms that drive synchronization of dengue epidemics on a continental scale across Southeast Asia. PMID:26438851

  11. A spiking Basal Ganglia model of synchrony, exploration and decision making

    PubMed Central

    Mandali, Alekhya; Rengaswamy, Maithreye; Chakravarthy, V. Srinivasa; Moustafa, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    To make an optimal decision we need to weigh all the available options, compare them with the current goal, and choose the most rewarding one. Depending on the situation an optimal decision could be to either “explore” or “exploit” or “not to take any action” for which the Basal Ganglia (BG) is considered to be a key neural substrate. In an attempt to expand this classical picture of BG function, we had earlier hypothesized that the Indirect Pathway (IP) of the BG could be the subcortical substrate for exploration. In this study we build a spiking network model to relate exploration to synchrony levels in the BG (which are a neural marker for tremor in Parkinson's disease). Key BG nuclei such as the Sub Thalamic Nucleus (STN), Globus Pallidus externus (GPe) and Globus Pallidus internus (GPi) were modeled as Izhikevich spiking neurons whereas the Striatal output was modeled as Poisson spikes. The model is cast in reinforcement learning framework with the dopamine signal representing reward prediction error. We apply the model to two decision making tasks: a binary action selection task (similar to one used by Humphries et al., 2006) and an n-armed bandit task (Bourdaud et al., 2008). The model shows that exploration levels could be controlled by STN's lateral connection strength which also influenced the synchrony levels in the STN-GPe circuit. An increase in STN's lateral strength led to a decrease in exploration which can be thought as the possible explanation for reduced exploratory levels in Parkinson's patients. Our simulations also show that on complete removal of IP, the model exhibits only Go and No-Go behaviors, thereby demonstrating the crucial role of IP in exploration. Our model provides a unified account for synchronization, action section, and explorative behavior. PMID:26074761

  12. Auditory-visual speech perception and synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals

    PubMed Central

    Conrey, Brianna; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has identified a “synchrony window” of several hundred milliseconds over which auditory-visual (AV) asynchronies are not reliably perceived. Individual variability in the size of this AV synchrony window has been linked with variability in AV speech perception measures, but it was not clear whether AV speech perception measures are related to synchrony detection for speech only or for both speech and nonspeech signals. An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between measures of AV speech perception and AV synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals. Variability in AV synchrony detection for both speech and nonspeech signals was found to be related to variability in measures of auditory-only (A-only) and AV speech perception, suggesting that temporal processing for both speech and nonspeech signals must be taken into account in explaining variability in A-only and multisensory speech perception. PMID:16838548

  13. Mating activity and sperm penetration assay in prediction of the reproduction potential of domestic goose ganders in a harem system.

    PubMed

    Gumułka, Małgorzata; Rozenboim, Israel

    2015-10-01

    In a natural mating system, the sexual behavior of birds has an important role in fertility success. Non-competitive mating system provides special conditions to study gander-goose interactions. Behavioral and physiological data from a domestic geese breeding flock was used to determine interrelationships between mating activity (MA) parameters, sperm penetration assay (SPA), plasma testosterone (T) concentration, and fertility (F). Moreover, variation in the frequency of gander-goose interactions during the intensive breeding period and the diurnal rhythm (short day - 10L:14D) were evaluated. The 2-/3-year-old ganders (n=15) and 1-/3-year-old geese (1♂:4♀) were observed. On the basis of successful copulation (SCop), groups of ganders with low (33.3%), intermediate (40%), and high (26.7%) frequency were categorized. Frequency of SCop was greater in the morning than in the afternoon. For the entire breeding period, SPA results obtained for the low frequency group were less than for the intermediate group. Fertility success for ganders from both low and intermediate groups was similar. There was a lack of association between MA, plasma T concentration, and SPA results. However, SCop was positively correlated with fertility. It is recommended that SCop be considered as a prognostic parameter for monitoring of ganders' reproductive potential. It is recommended that the sexual behavior of ganders be evaluated before the 1200h of the day. The SCop with an average frequency of 0.4-0.8 times during the day light hours appears to be associated with fertility results that are satisfactory for geese husbandry. Additionally, the SPA may be considered for identification of ganders with poor reproductive potential to facilitate the decision of changes in harem social structure during the first half of the breeding season. PMID:26381080

  14. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as lead and mercury Chemicals such as pesticides Cigarettes Some viruses Alcohol For men, a reproductive hazard can affect the sperm. For a woman, a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. ...

  15. Reproductive Hazards

    MedlinePlus

    ... and female reproductive systems play a role in pregnancy. Problems with these systems can affect fertility and ... a reproductive hazard can cause different effects during pregnancy, depending on when she is exposed. During the ...

  16. Patterns of Behaviour, Group Structure and Reproductive Status Predict Levels of Glucocorticoid Metabolites in Zoo-Housed Ring-Tailed Lemurs, Lemur catta.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tessa E; McCusker, Cara M; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Elwood, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    In ring-tailed lemurs, Lemur catta, the factors modulating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity differ between wild and semi-free-ranging populations. Here we assess factors modulating HPA activity in ring-tailed lemurs housed in a third environment: the zoo. First we validate an enzyme immunoassay to quantify levels of glucocorticoid (GC) metabolites in the faeces of L. catta. We determine the nature of the female-female dominance hierarchies within each group by computing David's scores and examining these in relation to faecal GC (fGC). Relationships between female age and fGC are assessed to evaluate potential age-related confounds. The associations between fGC, numbers of males in a group and reproductive status are explored. Finally, we investigate the value of 7 behaviours in predicting levels of fGC. The study revealed stable linear dominance hierarchies in females within each group. The number of males in a social group together with reproductive status, but not age, influenced fGC. The 7 behavioural variables accounted for 68% of the variance in fGC. The amounts of time an animal spent locomoting and in the inside enclosure were both negative predictors of fGC. The study highlights the flexibility and adaptability of the HPA system in ring-tailed lemurs. PMID:26824528

  17. Symmetry types and phase-shift synchrony in networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Matamba Messi, Leopold; Spardy, Lucy E.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we discuss what is known about the classification of symmetry groups and patterns of phase-shift synchrony for periodic solutions of coupled cell networks. Specifically, we compare the lists of spatial and spatiotemporal symmetries of periodic solutions of admissible vector fields to those of equivariant vector fields in the three cases of Rn (coupled equations), Tn (coupled oscillators), and (Rk)n where k ≥ 2 (coupled systems). To do this we use the H / K Theorem of Buono and Golubitsky (2001) applied to coupled equations and coupled systems and prove the H / K theorem in the case of coupled oscillators. Josić and Török (2006) prove that the H / K lists for equivariant vector fields and admissible vector fields are the same for transitive coupled systems. We show that the corresponding theorem is false for coupled equations. We also prove that the pairs of subgroups H ⊃ K for coupled equations are contained in the pairs for coupled oscillators which are contained in the pairs for coupled systems. Finally, we prove that patterns of rigid phase-shift synchrony for coupled equations are contained in those of coupled oscillators and those of coupled systems.

  18. Local Variations in Spatial Synchrony of Influenza Epidemics

    PubMed Central

    Stark, James H.; Cummings, Derek A. T.; Ermentrout, Bard; Ostroff, Stephen; Sharma, Ravi; Stebbins, Samuel; Burke, Donald S.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the mechanism of influenza spread across multiple geographic scales is not complete. While the mechanism of dissemination across regions and states of the United States has been described, understanding the determinants of dissemination between counties has not been elucidated. The paucity of high resolution spatial-temporal influenza incidence data to evaluate disease structure is often not available. Methodology and Findings We report on the underlying relationship between the spread of influenza and human movement between counties of one state. Significant synchrony in the timing of epidemics exists across the entire state and decay with distance (regional correlation = 62%). Synchrony as a function of population size display evidence of hierarchical spread with more synchronized epidemics occurring among the most populated counties. A gravity model describing movement between two populations is a stronger predictor of influenza spread than adult movement to and from workplaces suggesting that non-routine and leisure travel drive local epidemics. Conclusions These findings highlight the complex nature of influenza spread across multiple geographic scales. PMID:22916274

  19. Dynamics of Coupled Cell Networks: Synchrony, Heteroclinic Cycles and Inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguiar, M.; Ashwin, P.; Dias, A.; Field, M.

    2011-04-01

    We consider the dynamics of small networks of coupled cells. We usually assume asymmetric inputs and no global or local symmetries in the network and consider equivalence of networks in this setting; that is, when two networks with different architectures give rise to the same set of possible dynamics. Focussing on transitive (strongly connected) networks that have only one type of cell (identical cell networks) we address three questions relating the network structure to dynamics. The first question is how the structure of the network may force the existence of invariant subspaces (synchrony subspaces). The second question is how these invariant subspaces can support robust heteroclinic attractors. Finally, we investigate how the dynamics of coupled cell networks with different structures and numbers of cells can be related; in particular we consider the sets of possible "inflations" of a coupled cell network that are obtained by replacing one cell by many of the same type, in such a way that the original network dynamics is still present within a synchrony subspace. We illustrate the results with a number of examples of networks of up to six cells.

  20. SPIKY: a graphical user interface for monitoring spike train synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Mulansky, Mario; Bozanic, Nebojsa

    2015-01-01

    Techniques for recording large-scale neuronal spiking activity are developing very fast. This leads to an increasing demand for algorithms capable of analyzing large amounts of experimental spike train data. One of the most crucial and demanding tasks is the identification of similarity patterns with a very high temporal resolution and across different spatial scales. To address this task, in recent years three time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony have been proposed, the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and event synchronization. The Matlab source codes for calculating and visualizing these measures have been made publicly available. However, due to the many different possible representations of the results the use of these codes is rather complicated and their application requires some basic knowledge of Matlab. Thus it became desirable to provide a more user-friendly and interactive interface. Here we address this need and present SPIKY, a graphical user interface that facilitates the application of time-resolved measures of spike train synchrony to both simulated and real data. SPIKY includes implementations of the ISI-distance, the SPIKE-distance, and the SPIKE-synchronization (an improved and simplified extension of event synchronization) that have been optimized with respect to computation speed and memory demand. It also comprises a spike train generator and an event detector that makes it capable of analyzing continuous data. Finally, the SPIKY package includes additional complementary programs aimed at the analysis of large numbers of datasets and the estimation of significance levels. PMID:25744888

  1. Climate change increases reproductive failure in Magellanic penguins.

    PubMed

    Boersma, P Dee; Rebstock, Ginger A

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is causing more frequent and intense storms, and climate models predict this trend will continue, potentially affecting wildlife populations. Since 1960 the number of days with >20 mm of rain increased near Punta Tombo, Argentina. Between 1983 and 2010 we followed 3496 known-age Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) chicks at Punta Tombo to determine how weather impacted their survival. In two years, rain was the most common cause of death killing 50% and 43% of chicks. In 26 years starvation killed the most chicks. Starvation and predation were present in all years. Chicks died in storms in 13 of 28 years and in 16 of 233 storms. Storm mortality was additive; there was no relationship between the number of chicks killed in storms and the numbers that starved (P = 0.75) or that were eaten (P = 0.39). However, when more chicks died in storms, fewer chicks fledged (P = 0.05, R(2) = 0.14). More chicks died when rainfall was higher and air temperature lower. Most chicks died from storms when they were 9-23 days old; the oldest chick killed in a storm was 41 days old. Storms with heavier rainfall killed older chicks as well as more chicks. Chicks up to 70 days old were killed by heat. Burrow nests mitigated storm mortality (N = 1063). The age span of chicks in the colony at any given time increased because the synchrony of egg laying decreased since 1983, lengthening the time when chicks are vulnerable to storms. Climate change that increases the frequency and intensity of storms results in more reproductive failure of Magellanic penguins, a pattern likely to apply to many species breeding in the region. Climate variability has already lowered reproductive success of Magellanic penguins and is likely undermining the resilience of many other species. PMID:24489663

  2. Climate Change Increases Reproductive Failure in Magellanic Penguins

    PubMed Central

    Boersma, P. Dee; Rebstock, Ginger A.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change is causing more frequent and intense storms, and climate models predict this trend will continue, potentially affecting wildlife populations. Since 1960 the number of days with >20 mm of rain increased near Punta Tombo, Argentina. Between 1983 and 2010 we followed 3496 known-age Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus) chicks at Punta Tombo to determine how weather impacted their survival. In two years, rain was the most common cause of death killing 50% and 43% of chicks. In 26 years starvation killed the most chicks. Starvation and predation were present in all years. Chicks died in storms in 13 of 28 years and in 16 of 233 storms. Storm mortality was additive; there was no relationship between the number of chicks killed in storms and the numbers that starved (P = 0.75) or that were eaten (P = 0.39). However, when more chicks died in storms, fewer chicks fledged (P = 0.05, R2 = 0.14). More chicks died when rainfall was higher and air temperature lower. Most chicks died from storms when they were 9–23 days old; the oldest chick killed in a storm was 41 days old. Storms with heavier rainfall killed older chicks as well as more chicks. Chicks up to 70 days old were killed by heat. Burrow nests mitigated storm mortality (N = 1063). The age span of chicks in the colony at any given time increased because the synchrony of egg laying decreased since 1983, lengthening the time when chicks are vulnerable to storms. Climate change that increases the frequency and intensity of storms results in more reproductive failure of Magellanic penguins, a pattern likely to apply to many species breeding in the region. Climate variability has already lowered reproductive success of Magellanic penguins and is likely undermining the resilience of many other species. PMID:24489663

  3. Age-dependent change in executive function and gamma 40 Hz phase synchrony.

    PubMed

    Paul, Robert H; Clark, C Richard; Lawrence, Jeffrey; Goldberg, Elkhonon; Williams, Leanne M; Cooper, Nicholas; Cohen, Ronald A; Brickman, Adam M; Gordon, Evian

    2005-03-01

    Decline in cognitive function is well recognized, yet few neurophysiological correlates of age-related cognitive decline have been identified. In this study we examined the impact of age on neurocognitive function and Gamma phase synchrony among 550 normal subjects (aged 11-70). Gamma phase synchrony was acquired to targets in the auditory oddball paradigm. The two tasks of executive function were switching of attention and an electronic maze. Subjects were divided into four age groups, which were balanced for sex. We hypothesized that reduced cognitive performance among older healthy individuals would be associated with age-related changes in gamma phase synchrony. Results showed a significant decrease in executive function in the oldest (51-70 years) age group. ANOVAs of age-by-frontal Gamma synchrony also showed a significant effect of age on Gamma phase synchrony in the left frontal region that corresponded modestly to the age effect found on executive task performance, with reduced performance associated with increased gamma synchrony. The results indicate that age-related changes in cognitive function evident among elderly individuals may in part be related to decreased ability to integrate information and this may be reflected as a compensatory increase in gamma synchrony in frontal regions of the brain. PMID:16035141

  4. Conversational synchrony in the communicative interactions of individuals with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Rupa Gupta; Rigon, Arianna; Duff, Melissa C.

    2016-01-01

    Primary Objective To assess conversational synchrony in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Conversational synchrony, assessed by the similarity and coordination of words and words per turn, allows for effective and efficient communication and enhances the development of rapport. Research Design Eighteen participants with TBI (7 females) and nineteen healthy comparison participants (CP; 8 females) engaged in a 10-minute conversation with an unfamiliar partner. Methods and Procedures Conversational synchrony was assessed in these conversations by measuring the degree to which the participants’ productions of words and words per turn became more similar to one another over the course of the session Main Outcomes and Results Significantly more sessions with participants with TBI (11/18 for words, 9/18 for words per turn) compared to CP sessions (5/19 for words, 4/19 for words per turns) did not display conversational synchrony. Likewise, synchrony was significantly correlated with subjective ratings of the interaction from raters who were blind to participant status and the study hypotheses. Conclusions These results suggest that TBI can disrupt conversational synchrony and can, in turn, negatively impact social perceptions. The relationship between impaired conversational synchrony and other social communicative deficits in TBI warrants further study. PMID:26083049

  5. A MIXTURE OF SEVEN ANTIANDROGENIC COMPOUNDS ELICITS ADDITIVE EFFECTS ON THE MALE RAT REPRODUCTIVE TRACT THAT CORRESPOND TO MODELED PREDICTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The main objectives of this study were to: (1) determine whether dissimilar antiandrogenic compounds display additive effects when present in combination and (2) to assess the ability of modelling approaches to accurately predict these mixture effects based on data from single ch...

  6. Resource seasonality and reproduction predict fission-fusion dynamics in black-and-white ruffed lemurs (Varecia variegata).

    PubMed

    Baden, Andrea L; Webster, Timothy H; Kamilar, Jason M

    2016-02-01

    Ruffed lemurs (genus Varecia) are often described as having a flexible social organization, such that both cohesive (low fission-fusion dynamics) and fluid (high fission-fusion dynamics) grouping patterns have been observed. In ruffed lemur communities with high fission-fusion dynamics, group members vary in their temporal and spatial dispersion throughout a communally defended territory. These patterns have been likened to those observed in several haplorrhine species that exhibit the most fluid types of fission-fusion social organization (e.g., Pan and Ateles). To substantiate and further refine these claims, we describe the fission-fusion dynamics of a black-and-white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata) community at Mangevo, an undisturbed primary rainforest site in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar. We collected instantaneous group scan samples from August 2007-December 2008 (4,044 observation hours) to study and characterize patterns of subgroup size, composition, cohesion, and social association. In 16 consecutive months, we never found all members of the community together. In fact, individuals spent nearly half of their time alone. Subgroups were small, cohesive, and typically of mixed-sex composition. Mixed-sex subgroups were significantly larger, less cohesive, and more common than either male-only or female-only subgroups. Subgroup dynamics were related to shifts in climate, phenology of preferred fruit species, and female reproductive state. On average, association indices were low. Males and females were equally gregarious; however, adult male-male associations were significantly weaker than any other association type. Results presented herein document striking differences in fission-fusion dynamics between black-and-white ruffed lemurs and haplorrhines, while also demonstrating many broad-scale similarities to haplorrhine taxa that possess the most fluid fission-fusion societies. PMID:26606154

  7. The generation of antiphase oscillations and synchrony by a rebound-based vertebrate central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chang; Merrison-Hort, Robert; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Borisyuk, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Many neural circuits are capable of generating multiple stereotyped outputs after different sensory inputs or neuromodulation. We have previously identified the central pattern generator (CPG) for Xenopus tadpole swimming that involves antiphase oscillations of activity between the left and right sides. Here we analyze the cellular basis for spontaneous left-right motor synchrony characterized by simultaneous bursting on both sides at twice the swimming frequency. Spontaneous synchrony bouts are rare in most tadpoles, and they instantly emerge from and switch back to swimming, most frequently within the first second after skin stimulation. Analyses show that only neurons that are active during swimming fire action potentials in synchrony, suggesting both output patterns derive from the same neural circuit. The firing of excitatory descending interneurons (dINs) leads that of other types of neurons in synchrony as it does in swimming. During synchrony, the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition is 7.9 ± 1 ms, shorter than that in swimming (41 ± 2.3 ms). The occasional, extra midcycle firing of dINs during swimming may initiate synchrony, and mismatches of timing in the left and right activity can switch synchrony back to swimming. Computer modeling supports these findings by showing that the same neural network, in which reciprocal inhibition mediates rebound firing, can generate both swimming and synchrony without circuit reconfiguration. Modeling also shows that lengthening the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition by increasing dIN synaptic/conduction delay can improve the stability of synchrony. PMID:24760866

  8. Increased Synchrony and Bursting of Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Fusiform Cells Correlate with Tinnitus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Calvin; Martel, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus, the perception of phantom sounds, is thought to arise from increased neural synchrony, which facilitates perceptual binding and creates salient sensory features in the absence of physical stimuli. In the auditory cortex, increased spontaneous cross-unit synchrony and single-unit bursting are de facto physiological correlates of tinnitus. However, it is unknown whether neurons in the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), the putative tinnitus-induction site, exhibit increased synchrony. Using a temporary-threshold shift model and gap-prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle to assess tinnitus, we recorded spontaneous activity from fusiform cells, the principle neurons of the DCN, in normal hearing, tinnitus, and non-tinnitus guinea pigs. Synchrony and bursting, as well as spontaneous firing rate (SFR), correlated with behavioral evidence of tinnitus, and increased synchrony and bursting were associated with SFR elevation. The presence of increased synchrony and bursting in DCN fusiform cells suggests that a neural code for phantom sounds emerges in this brainstem location and likely contributes to the formation of the tinnitus percept. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Tinnitus, a phantom auditory percept, is encoded by pathological changes in the neural synchrony code of perceptual processing. Increased cross-unit synchrony and bursting have been linked to tinnitus in several higher auditory stations but not in fusiform cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN), key brainstem neurons in tinnitus generation. Here, we demonstrate increased synchrony and bursting of fusiform cell spontaneous firing, which correlate with frequency-specific behavioral measures of tinnitus. Thus, the neural representation of tinnitus emerges early in auditory processing and likely drives its pathophysiology in higher structures. PMID:26865628

  9. A comparative study of synchrony measures for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease based on EEG.

    PubMed

    Dauwels, J; Vialatte, F; Musha, T; Cichocki, A

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that EEG signals of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients are generally less synchronous than in age-matched control subjects. However, this effect is not always easily detectable. This is especially the case for patients in the pre-symptomatic phase, commonly referred to as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), during which neuronal degeneration is occurring prior to the clinical symptoms appearance. In this paper, various synchrony measures are studied in the context of AD diagnosis, including the correlation coefficient, mean-square and phase coherence, Granger causality, phase synchrony indices, information-theoretic divergence measures, state space based measures, and the recently proposed stochastic event synchrony measures. Experiments with EEG data show that many of those measures are strongly correlated (or anti-correlated) with the correlation coefficient, and hence, provide little complementary information about EEG synchrony. Measures that are only weakly correlated with the correlation coefficient include the phase synchrony indices, Granger causality measures, and stochastic event synchrony measures. In addition, those three families of synchrony measures are mutually uncorrelated, and therefore, they each seem to capture a specific kind of interdependence. For the data set at hand, only two synchrony measures are able to convincingly distinguish MCI patients from age-matched control patients, i.e., Granger causality (in particular, full-frequency directed transfer function) and stochastic event synchrony. Those two measures are used as features to distinguish MCI patients from age-matched control subjects, yielding a leave-one-out classification rate of 83%. The classification performance may be further improved by adding complementary features from EEG; this approach may eventually lead to a reliable EEG-based diagnostic tool for MCI and AD. PMID:19573607

  10. Reproductive conflict and the separation of reproductive generations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cant, Michael A.; Johnstone, Rufus A.

    2008-01-01

    An enduring puzzle of human life history is why women cease reproduction midway through life. Selection can favor postreproductive survival because older females can help their offspring to reproduce. But the kin-selected fitness gains of helping appear insufficient to outweigh the potential benefits of continued reproduction. Why then do women cease reproduction in the first place? Here, we suggest that early reproductive cessation in humans is the outcome of reproductive competition between generations, and we present a simple candidate model of how this competition will be resolved. We show that among primates exhibiting a postreproductive life span, humans exhibit an extraordinarily low degree of reproductive overlap between generations. The rapid senescence of the human female reproductive system coincides with the age at which, in natural fertility populations, women are expected to encounter reproductive competition from breeding females of the next generation. Several lines of evidence suggest that in ancestral hominids, this younger generation typically comprised immigrant females. In these circumstances, relatedness asymmetries within families are predicted to give younger females a decisive advantage in reproductive conflict with older females. A model incorporating both the costs of reproductive competition and the benefits of grandmothering can account for the timing of reproductive cessation in humans and so offers an improved understanding of the evolution of menopause. PMID:18378891

  11. Cell autonomy and synchrony of suprachiasmatic nucleus circadian oscillators.

    PubMed

    Mohawk, Jennifer A; Takahashi, Joseph S

    2011-07-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this review we will highlight recent advances in our knowledge of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  12. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs

    PubMed Central

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  13. Synchrony and entrainment properties of robust circadian oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Neda; Taylor, Stephanie R.; Meeker, Kirsten; Petzold, Linda R.; Doyle, Francis J.

    2008-01-01

    Systems theoretic tools (i.e. mathematical modelling, control, and feedback design) advance the understanding of robust performance in complex biological networks. We highlight phase entrainment as a key performance measure used to investigate dynamics of a single deterministic circadian oscillator for the purpose of generating insight into the behaviour of a population of (synchronized) oscillators. More specifically, the analysis of phase characteristics may facilitate the identification of appropriate coupling mechanisms for the ensemble of noisy (stochastic) circadian clocks. Phase also serves as a critical control objective to correct mismatch between the biological clock and its environment. Thus, we introduce methods of investigating synchrony and entrainment in both stochastic and deterministic frameworks, and as a property of a single oscillator or population of coupled oscillators. PMID:18426774

  14. Cell Autonomy and Synchrony of Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Circadian Oscillators

    PubMed Central

    Mohawk, Jennifer A.; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the site of the master circadian pacemaker in mammals. The individual cells of the SCN are capable of functioning independently from one another and therefore must form a cohesive circadian network through intercellular coupling. The network properties of the SCN lead to coordination of circadian rhythms among its neurons and neuronal subpopulations. There is increasing evidence for multiple interconnected oscillators within the SCN, and in this Review, we will highlight recent advances in our understanding of the complex organization and function of the cellular and network-level SCN clock. Understanding the way in which synchrony is achieved between cells in the SCN will provide insight into the means by which this important nucleus orchestrates circadian rhythms throughout the organism. PMID:21665298

  15. Neural Synchrony in Schizophrenia: From Networks to New Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Judith M.; Krystal, John H.; Mathalon, Daniel H.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that brain regions communicate with each other in the temporal domain, relying on coincidence of neural activity to detect phasic relationships among neurons and neural assemblies. This coordination between neural populations has been described as “self-organizing,” an “emergent property” of neural networks arising from the temporal synchrony between synaptic transmission and firing of distinct neuronal populations. Evidence is also accumulating that communication and coordination failures between different brain regions may account for a wide range of problems in schizophrenia, from psychosis to cognitive dysfunction. We review the knowledge about the functional neuroanatomy and neurochemistry of neural oscillations and oscillation abnormalities in schizophrenia. Based on this, we argue that we can begin to use oscillations, across frequencies, to do translational studies to understand the neural basis of schizophrenia. PMID:17567628

  16. Heartbeat, embryo communication and hatching synchrony in snake eggs.

    PubMed

    Aubret, Fabien; Blanvillain, Gaëlle; Bignon, Florent; Kok, Philippe J R

    2016-01-01

    Communication is central to life at all levels of complexity, from cells to organs, through to organisms and communities. Turtle eggs were recently shown to communicate with each other in order to synchronise their development and generate beneficial hatching synchrony. Yet the mechanism underlying embryo to embryo communication remains unknown. Here we show that within a clutch, developing snake embryos use heart beats emanating from neighbouring eggs as a clue for their metabolic level, in order to synchronise development and ultimately hatching. Eggs of the water snake Natrix maura increased heart rates and hatched earlier than control eggs in response to being incubated in physical contact with more advanced eggs. The former produced shorter and slower swimming young than their control siblings. Our results suggest potential fitness consequences of embryo to embryo communication and describe a novel driver for the evolution of egg-clustering behaviour in animals. PMID:26988725

  17. [Anti mullerian hormone (AMH)--is it a new reliable marker of the ovarian reserve? Its role in predicting the ovarian response in assisted reproductive technology (ART)].

    PubMed

    Alshiek, Jonia Amer; Lessing, Joseph B; Amit, Ami; Azem, Foad

    2012-07-01

    Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is predominantly known for its important role in the differentiation of the male and female sexual system during the early embryonic period. Recently, many animal and human researches have been studying the role of the AMH in the postnatal ovarian function. In the female, AMH is produced by the granulosa cells of early developing follicles. It plays a major role in the folliculogenesis and seems to be able to inhibit the initiation of the growth of primordial follicles and FSH-induced follicles. As AMH is expressed throughout the folliculogenesis, from the primary follicular stage to the antral stage, the serum levels of AMH may represent both the quantity and the quality of ovarian follicles. Thus, the AMH levels may be useful as a new potential marker of the ovarian reserve. As compared to other ovarian reserve tests, the AMH has unique characteristics which make it a favorable marker. The measurement of AMH levels may be useful in the prediction of poor response and cycle cancellation as well as hyper-response and the ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in assisted reproductive technology (ART). We assume that the measurement of AMH Levels may play a role in the individualization of treatment strategies among patients who are treated by ART. However, the AMH cannot predict the qualitative ovarian response in ART. In men, the AMH was not found to have satisfactory clinical utility as a single marker of spermatogenesis. PMID:23002694

  18. Impaired limbic gamma oscillatory synchrony during anxiety-related behavior in a genetic mouse model of bipolar mania

    PubMed Central

    Dzirasa, Kafui; McGarity, DeAnna L.; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Kumar, Sunil; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Dunson, David; McClung, Colleen A.; Nicolelis, Miguel A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in anxiety-related processing are observed across many neuropsychiatric disorders including bipolar disorder. Though polymorphisms in a number of circadian genes confer risk for this disorder, little remains known about how changes in circadian gene function disrupt brain circuits critical for anxiety-related processing. Here we characterize neurophysiological activity simultaneously across five limbic brain areas (nucleus accumbens, amygdala, prelimbic cortex, ventral hippocampus, and ventral tegmental area) as wild-type (WT) mice and mice with a mutation in the circadian gene, CLOCK (Clock-Δ19 mice), perform an elevated zero-maze task. In WT mice, basal limbic gamma oscillatory synchrony observed prior to task performance predicted future anxiety-related behaviors. Additionally, dynamic changes in limbic gamma oscillatory synchrony were observed based on the position of WT mice on the zero-maze. Clock-Δ19 mice, which displayed an increased propensity to enter the open section of the elevated maze, showed profound deficits in these anxiety-related circuit processes. Thus, our findings link the anxiety-related behavioral deficits observed in Clock-Δ19 mice with dysfunctional gamma oscillatory tuning across limbic circuits, and suggest that alterations in limbic oscillatory circuit function induced by circadian gene polymorphisms may contribute to the behavioral manifestations seen in bipolar mania. PMID:21525286

  19. Assisted reproductive outcomes in women with different polycystic ovary syndrome phenotypes: the predictive value of anti-Müllerian hormone.

    PubMed

    Ramezanali, Fariba; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Hemat, Mandana; Arabipoor, Arezoo; Jalali, Samaneh; Moini, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes in different polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) phenotypes (A, B, C and D) compared with a control group and the predictive values of serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) in PCOS phenotypes for main outcomes. This study evaluated 386 PCOS women and 350 patients with male factor infertility. Women with phenotypes A and C had significantly higher concentrations of AMH than those with phenotype B (P < 0.001). Clinical pregnancy rate (CPR) in the phenotype D group (53.3%) was higher than other groups (32.5%, 26.4% and 36.8%, respectively, in phenotypes A, B and C), but not to a significant level. Multivariable regression analysis, after adjusting for women's age and body mass index, revealed that PCOS phenotypes A and B were associated with a decreased CPR compared with the control group (odds ratio [OR]: 0.46, confidence interval [CI]: 0.26-0.8, P = 0.007 and OR: 0.34, CI: 0.18-0.62, P = 0.001, respectively). It seems a combination of hyperandrogenism and chronic anovulation is associated with a negative impact on the CPR in these patients. These results demonstrated that AMH concentration is related to PCO morphology but not predictive for CPR and live birth rate. PMID:26968928

  20. Maternal postpartum behavior and the emergence of infant-mother and infant-father synchrony in preterm and full-term infants: the role of neonatal vagal tone.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Ruth; Eidelman, Arthur I

    2007-04-01

    Relations between maternal postpartum behavior and the emergence of parent-infant relatedness as a function of infant autonomic maturity were examined in 56 premature infants (birthweight = 1000-1500 g) and 52 full-term infants. Maternal behavior, mother depressive symptoms, and infant cardiac vagal tone were assessed in the neonatal period. Infant-mother and infant-father synchrony, maternal and paternal affectionate touch, and the home environment were observed at 3 months. Premature birth was associated with higher maternal depression, less maternal behaviors, decreased infant alertness, and lower coordination of maternal behavior with infant alertness in the neonatal period. At 3 months, interactions between premature infants with their mothers and fathers were less synchronous. Interaction effects of premature birth and autonomic maturity indicated that preterm infants with low vagal tone received the lowest amounts of maternal behavior in the postpartum and the least maternal touch at 3 months. Infant-mother and infant-father synchrony were each predicted by cardiac vagal tone and maternal postpartum behavior in both the preterm and full-term groups. Among preterm infants, additional predictors of parent-infant synchrony were maternal depression (mother only) and the home environment (mother and father). Findings are consistent with evolutionary perspectives on the higher susceptibility of dysregulated infants to rearing contexts and underscore the compensatory mechanisms required for social-emotional growth under risk conditions for parent-infant bonding. PMID:17380505

  1. Effects of synaptic synchrony on the neuronal input-output relationship.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoshen; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2008-07-01

    The firing rate of individual neurons depends on the firing frequency of their distributed synaptic inputs, with linear and nonlinear relations subserving different computational functions. This letter explores the relationship between the degree of synchrony among excitatory synapses and the linearity of the response using detailed compartmental models of cortical pyramidal cells. Synchronous input resulted in a linear input-output relationship, while asynchronous stimulation yielded sub- and supraproportional outputs at low and high frequencies, respectively. The dependence of input-output linearity on synchrony was sigmoidal and considerably robust with respect to dendritic location, stimulus irregularity, and alteration of active and synaptic properties. Moreover, synchrony affected firing rate differently at lower and higher input frequencies. A reduced integrate-and-fire model suggested a mechanism explaining these results based on spatiotemporal integration, with fundamental implications relating synchrony to memory encoding. PMID:18254692

  2. Silent disco: dancing in synchrony leads to elevated pain thresholds and social closeness

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Dunbar, Robin I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Moving in synchrony leads to cooperative behaviour and feelings of social closeness, and dance (involving synchronisation to others and music) may cause social bonding, possibly as a consequence of released endorphins. This study uses an experimental paradigm to determine which aspects of synchrony in dance are associated with changes in pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin release) and social bonding between strangers. Those who danced in synchrony experienced elevated pain thresholds, whereas those in the partial and asynchrony conditions experienced no analgesic effects. Similarly, those in the synchrony condition reported being more socially bonded, although they did not perform more cooperatively in an economic game. This experiment suggests that dance encourages social bonding amongst co-actors by stimulating the production of endorphins, but may not make people more altruistic. We conclude that dance may have been an important human behaviour evolved to encourage social closeness between strangers. PMID:27540276

  3. Mate guarding and territorial aggression vary with breeding synchrony in golden whistlers ( Pachycephala pectoralis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dongen, Wouter F. D.

    2008-06-01

    Male paternity assurance behaviour during the female fertile period has been widely documented amongst birds. In contrast, how sex-specific behavioural strategies vary with local breeding synchrony levels remains largely unknown. This is important because, in many species, intra-population patterns of extra-pair fertilisation rates, and hence cuckoldry risk, are known to vary with the number of simultaneously fertile females. Each sex may therefore differ in how they behave towards male conspecifics during different degrees of breeding synchrony. Here I provide evidence of such sex-specific differences in the golden whistler ( Pachycephala pectoralis), a species in which within-pair paternity assurance is negatively associated with breeding synchrony. Via simulated territorial intrusions using decoy males, I show that males, but not females, increase levels of aggression to male intruders during periods of low synchrony, possibly because cuckoldry risk is greatest during this period. In addition, males appear to invest more effort into mate guarding after, but not before, territorial intrusions during this period. These inter-sexual differences may reflect conflicts in interest between the sexes, with females consistently showing interest in males during the fertile period regardless of synchrony levels and males investing more resources into expelling intruders when the risk of paternity loss is greatest. This study thus provides evidence that males may be able to detect variation in breeding synchrony and cuckoldry risk and adjust their paternity assurance behaviour accordingly.

  4. Temporally increasing spatial synchrony of North American temperature and bird populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Walter D.; Liebhold, Andrew M.

    2016-06-01

    The ecological impacts of modern global climate change are detectable in a wide variety of phenomena, ranging from shifts in species ranges to changes in community composition and human disease dynamics. So far, however, little attention has been given to temporal changes in spatial synchrony--the coincident change in abundance or value across the landscape--despite the importance of environmental synchrony as a driver of population trends and the central role of environmental variability in population rescue and extinction. Here we demonstrate that across North America, spatial synchrony of a significant proportion of 49 widespread North American wintering bird species has increased over the past 50 years--the period encompassing particularly intense anthropogenic effects in climate--paralleling significant increases in spatial synchrony of mean maximum air temperature. These results suggest the potential for increased spatial synchrony in environmental factors to be affecting a wide range of ecological phenomena. These effects are likely to vary, but for North American wildlife species, increased spatial synchrony driven by environmental factors may be the basis for a previously unrecognized threat to their long-term persistence in the form of more synchronized population dynamics reducing the potential for demographic rescue among interacting subpopulations.

  5. Prevalence of reproductive tract infections and the predictive value of girls’ symptom-based reporting: findings from a cross-sectional survey in rural western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Kerubo, Emily; Laserson, Kayla F; Otecko, Newton; Odhiambo, Collins; Mason, Linda; Nyothach, Elizabeth; Oruko, Kelvin O; Bauman, Ashley; Vulule, John; Zeh, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Reproductive tract infections (RTIs), including sexually acquired, among adolescent girls is a public health concern, but few studies have measured prevalence in low-middle-income countries. The objective of this study was to examine prevalence in rural schoolgirls in Kenya against their reported symptoms. Methods In 2013, a survey was conducted in 542 adolescent schoolgirls aged 14–17 years who were enrolled in a menstrual feasibility study. Vaginal self-swabbing was conducted after girls were interviewed face-to-face by trained nurses on symptoms. The prevalence of girls with symptoms and laboratory-confirmed infections, and the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of symptoms compared with laboratory results, were calculated. Results Of 515 girls agreeing to self-swab, 510 answered symptom questions. A quarter (24%) reported one or more symptoms; most commonly vaginal discharge (11%), pain (9%) or itching (4%). Laboratory tests confirmed 28% of girls had one or more RTI. Prevalence rose with age; among girls aged 16–17 years, 33% had infections. Bacterial vaginosis was the most common (18%), followed by Candida albicans (9%), Chlamydia trachomatis (3%), Trichomonas vaginalis (3%) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (1%). Reported symptoms had a low sensitivity and positive predictive value. Three-quarters of girls with bacterial vaginosis and C. albicans, and 50% with T. vaginalis were asymptomatic. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of adolescent schoolgirls with RTI in rural Kenya. Public efforts are required to identify and treat infections among girls to reduce longer-term sequelae but poor reliability of symptom reporting minimises utility of symptom-based diagnosis in this population. Trial registration number ISRCTN17486946. PMID:26819339

  6. Light-driven synchrony of Prochlorococcus growth and mortality in the subtropical Pacific gyre

    PubMed Central

    Ribalet, Francois; Swalwell, Jarred; Clayton, Sophie; Jiménez, Valeria; Sudek, Sebastian; Lin, Yajuan; Johnson, Zackary I.; Worden, Alexandra Z.; Armbrust, E. Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies predict that competition for limited resources reduces biodiversity to the point of ecological instability, whereas strong predator/prey interactions enhance the number of coexisting species and limit fluctuations in abundances. In open ocean ecosystems, competition for low availability of essential nutrients results in relatively few abundant microbial species. The remarkable stability in overall cell abundance of the dominant photosynthetic cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is assumed to reflect a simple food web structure strongly controlled by grazers and/or viruses. This hypothesized link between stability and ecological interactions, however, has been difficult to test with open ocean microbes because sampling methods commonly have poor temporal and spatial resolution. Here we use continuous techniques on two different winter-time cruises to show that Prochlorococcus cell production and mortality rates are tightly synchronized to the day/night cycle across the subtropical Pacific Ocean. In warmer waters, we observed harmonic oscillations in cell production and mortality rates, with a peak in mortality rate consistently occurring ∼6 h after the peak in cell production. Essentially no cell mortality was observed during daylight. Our results are best explained as a synchronized two-component trophic interaction with the per-capita rates of Prochlorococcus consumption driven either directly by the day/night cycle or indirectly by Prochlorococcus cell production. Light-driven synchrony of food web dynamics in which most of the newly produced Prochlorococcus cells are consumed each night likely enforces ecosystem stability across vast expanses of the open ocean. PMID:26080407

  7. Influence of weather on the synchrony of gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) outbreaks in New England

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, D.W.; Liebhold, A.M.

    1995-10-01

    Outbreaks of the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar (L.), were partially synchronous across New England states (Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont) from 1938 to 1992. To explain this synchrony, we investigated the Moran effect, a hypothesis that local population oscillations, which result form similar density-dependent mechanisms operating at time lags, may be synchronized over wide areas by exposure to common weather patterns. We also investigated the theory of climatic release, which ostulates that outbreaks are triggered by climatic factors favorable for population growth. Time series analysis revealed defoliation series in 2 states as 1st-order autoregressive processes and the other 2 as periodic 2nd-order autoregressive processes. Defoliation residuals series computed using the autoregressive models for each state were cross correlated with series of weather variables recorded in the respective states. The weather variables significantly correlated with defoliation residuals in all 4 states were minimum temperature and precipitation in mid-December in the same gypsy moth generation and minimum temperature in mid- to late July of the previous generation. These weather variables also were correlated strongly among the 4 states. The analyses supported the predictions of the Moran effect and suggest the common weather may synchronize local populations so as to produce pest outbreaks over wide areas. We did not find convincing evidence to support the theory of climatic release. 41 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Light-driven synchrony of Prochlorococcus growth and mortality in the subtropical Pacific gyre.

    PubMed

    Ribalet, Francois; Swalwell, Jarred; Clayton, Sophie; Jiménez, Valeria; Sudek, Sebastian; Lin, Yajuan; Johnson, Zackary I; Worden, Alexandra Z; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2015-06-30

    Theoretical studies predict that competition for limited resources reduces biodiversity to the point of ecological instability, whereas strong predator/prey interactions enhance the number of coexisting species and limit fluctuations in abundances. In open ocean ecosystems, competition for low availability of essential nutrients results in relatively few abundant microbial species. The remarkable stability in overall cell abundance of the dominant photosynthetic cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus is assumed to reflect a simple food web structure strongly controlled by grazers and/or viruses. This hypothesized link between stability and ecological interactions, however, has been difficult to test with open ocean microbes because sampling methods commonly have poor temporal and spatial resolution. Here we use continuous techniques on two different winter-time cruises to show that Prochlorococcus cell production and mortality rates are tightly synchronized to the day/night cycle across the subtropical Pacific Ocean. In warmer waters, we observed harmonic oscillations in cell production and mortality rates, with a peak in mortality rate consistently occurring ∼6 h after the peak in cell production. Essentially no cell mortality was observed during daylight. Our results are best explained as a synchronized two-component trophic interaction with the per-capita rates of Prochlorococcus consumption driven either directly by the day/night cycle or indirectly by Prochlorococcus cell production. Light-driven synchrony of food web dynamics in which most of the newly produced Prochlorococcus cells are consumed each night likely enforces ecosystem stability across vast expanses of the open ocean. PMID:26080407

  9. High lifetime and reproductive performance of sows on southern European Union commercial farms can be predicted by high numbers of pigs born alive in parity one.

    PubMed

    Iida, R; Piñeiro, C; Koketsu, Y

    2015-05-01

    Our objectives were 1) to compare reproductive performance across parity and lifetime performance in sow groups categorized by the number of pigs born alive (PBA) in parity 1 and 2) to examine the factors associated with more PBA in parity 1. We analyzed 476,816 parity records and 109,373 lifetime records of sows entered into 125 herds from 2008 to 2010. Sows were categorized into 4 groups based on the 10th, 50th, and 90th percentiles of PBA in parity 1 as follows: 7 pigs or fewer, 8 to 11 pigs, 12 to 14 pigs, and 15 pigs or more. Generalized linear models were applied to the data. For reproductive performance across parity, sows that had 15 or more PBA in parity 1 had 0.5 to 1.8 more PBA in any subsequent parity than the other 3 PBA groups ( P< 0.05). In addition, they had 2.8 to 5.4% higher farrowing rates in parities 1 through 3 than sows that had 7 or fewer PBA (P < 0.05). However, there were no differences between the sow PBA groups for weaning-to-first-mating interval in any parity (P ≥ 0.37). For lifetime performance, sows that had 15 or more PBA in parity 1 had 4.4 to 26.1 more lifetime PBA than sows that had 14 or fewer PBA (P < 0.05). Also, for sows that had 14 or fewer PBA in parity 1, those that were first mated at 229 d old (25th percentile) or earlier had 2.9 to 3.3 more lifetime PBA than those first mated at 278 d old (75th percentile) or later (P < 0.05). Factors associated with fewer PBA in parity 1 were summer mating and lower age of gilts at first mating (AFM; P < 0.05) but not reservice occurrences (P = 0.34). Additionally, there was a 2-way interaction between mated month groups and AFM for PBA in parity 1 (P < 0.05); PBA in parity 1 sows mated from July to December increased nonlinearly by 0.3 to 0.4 pigs when AFM increased from 200 to 310 d old (P < 0.05). However, the same rise in AFM had no significant effect on the PBA of sows mated between January and June (P ≥ 0.17). In conclusion, high PBA in parity 1 can be used to predict that a

  10. Prezygotic Barriers to Hybridization in Marine Broadcast Spawners: Reproductive Timing and Mating System Variation

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Carla A.; Serrão, Ester A.; Pearson, Gareth A.

    2012-01-01

    Sympatric assemblages of congeners with incomplete reproductive barriers offer the opportunity to study the roles that ecological and non-ecological factors play in reproductive isolation. While interspecific asynchrony in gamete release and gametic incompatibility are known prezygotic barriers to hybridization, the role of mating system variation has been emphasized in plants. Reproductive isolation between the sibling brown algal species Fucus spiralis, Fucus guiryi (selfing hermaphrodite) and Fucus vesiculosus (dioecious) was studied because they form hybrids in parapatry in the rocky intertidal zone, maintain species integrity over a broad geographic range, and have contrasting mating systems. We compared reproductive synchrony (spawning overlap) between the three species at several temporal scales (yearly/seasonal, semilunar/tidal, and hourly during single tides). Interspecific patterns of egg release were coincident at seasonal (single peak in spring to early summer) to semilunar timescales. Synthesis of available data indicated that spawning is controlled by semidiurnal tidal and daily light-dark cues, and not directly by semilunar cycles. Importantly, interspecific shifts in timing detected at the hourly scale during single tides were consistent with a partial ecological prezygotic hybridization barrier. The species displayed patterns of gamete release consistent with a power law distribution, indicating a high degree of reproductive synchrony, while the hypothesis of weaker selective constraints for synchrony in selfing versus outcrossing species was supported by observed spawning in hermaphrodites over a broader range of tidal phase than in outcrossers. Synchronous gamete release is critical to the success of external fertilization, while high-energy intertidal environments may offer only limited windows of reproductive opportunity. Within these windows, however, subtle variations in reproductive timing have evolved with the potential to form ecological

  11. Geographical variation in the spatial synchrony of a forest-defoliating insect: isolation of environmental and spatial drivers.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Kyle J; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Allstadt, Andrew J; Liebhold, Andrew M

    2013-02-22

    Despite the pervasiveness of spatial synchrony of population fluctuations in virtually every taxon, it remains difficult to disentangle its underlying mechanisms, such as environmental perturbations and dispersal. We used multiple regression of distance matrices (MRMs) to statistically partition the importance of several factors potentially synchronizing the dynamics of the gypsy moth, an invasive species in North America, exhibiting outbreaks that are partially synchronized over long distances (approx. 900 km). The factors considered in the MRM were synchrony in weather conditions, spatial proximity and forest-type similarity. We found that the most likely driver of outbreak synchrony is synchronous precipitation. Proximity played no apparent role in influencing outbreak synchrony after accounting for precipitation, suggesting dispersal does not drive outbreak synchrony. Because a previous modelling study indicated weather might indirectly synchronize outbreaks through synchronization of oak masting and generalist predators that feed upon acorns, we also examined the influence of weather and proximity on synchrony of acorn production. As we found for outbreak synchrony, synchrony in oak masting increased with synchrony in precipitation, though it also increased with proximity. We conclude that precipitation could synchronize gypsy moth populations directly, as in a Moran effect, or indirectly, through effects on oak masting, generalist predators or diseases. PMID:23282993

  12. Interspecific synchrony of seabird population growth rate and breeding success

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, James P W; Dornelas, Maria; Ojanguren, Alfredo F

    2013-01-01

    Environmental variability can destabilize communities by causing correlated interspecific fluctuations that weaken the portfolio effect, yet evidence of such a mechanism is rare in natural systems. Here, we ask whether the population dynamics of similar sympatric species of a seabird breeding community are synchronized, and if these species have similar exceptional responses to environmental variation. We used a 24-year time series of the breeding success and population growth rate of a marine top predator species group to assess the degree of synchrony between species demography. We then developed a novel method to examine the species group – all species combined – response to environmental variability, in particular, whether multiple species experience similar, pronounced fluctuations in their demography. Multiple species were positively correlated in breeding success and growth rate. Evidence of “exceptional” years was found, where the species group experienced pronounced fluctuations in their demography. The synchronous response of the species group was negatively correlated with winter sea surface temperature of the preceding year for both growth rate and breeding success. We present evidence for synchronous, exceptional responses of a species group that are driven by environmental variation. Such species covariation destabilizes communities by reducing the portfolio effect, and such exceptional responses may increase the risk of a state change in this community. Our understanding of the future responses to environmental change requires an increased focus on the short-term fluctuations in demography that are driven by extreme environmental variability. PMID:23919147

  13. Stimulus Coding and Synchrony in Stochastic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieniak, Jakub

    A stochastic leaky integrate-and-fire neuron model was implemented in this study to simulate the spiking activity of the electrosensory "P-unit" receptor neurons of the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. In the context of sensory coding, these cells have been previously shown to respond in experiment to natural random narrowband signals with either a linear or nonlinear coding scheme, depending on the intrinsic firing rate of the cell in the absence of external stimulation. It was hypothesised in this study that this duality is due to the relation of the stimulus to the neuron's excitation threshold. This hypothesis was validated with the model by lowering the threshold of the neuron or increasing its intrinsic noise, or randomness, either of which made the relation between firing rate and input strength more linear. Furthermore, synchronous P-unit firing to a common input also plays a role in decoding the stimulus at deeper levels of the neural pathways. Synchronisation and desynchronisation between multiple model responses for different types of natural communication signals were shown to agree with experimental observations. A novel result of resonance-induced synchrony enhancement of P-units to certain communication frequencies was also found.

  14. Casein kinase 1 promotes synchrony of the circadian clock network.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun; Sehgal, Amita

    2014-07-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbt(EY02910) loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbt(EY02910) flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbt(EY02910) mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  15. Casein Kinase 1 Promotes Synchrony of the Circadian Clock Network

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangzhong; Sowcik, Mallory; Chen, Dechun

    2014-01-01

    Casein kinase 1, known as DOUBLETIME (DBT) in Drosophila melanogaster, is a critical component of the circadian clock that phosphorylates and promotes degradation of the PERIOD (PER) protein. However, other functions of DBT in circadian regulation are not clear, in part because severe reduction of dbt causes preadult lethality. Here we report the molecular and behavioral phenotype of a viable dbtEY02910 loss-of-function mutant. We found that DBT protein levels are dramatically reduced in adult dbtEY02910 flies, and the majority of mutant flies display arrhythmic behavior, with a few showing weak, long-period (∼32 h) rhythms. Peak phosphorylation of PER is delayed, and both hyper- and hypophosphorylated forms of the PER and CLOCK proteins are present throughout the day. In addition, molecular oscillations of the circadian clock are dampened. In the central brain, PER and TIM expression is heterogeneous and decoupled in the canonical clock neurons of the dbtEY02910 mutants. We also report an interaction between dbt and the signaling pathway involving pigment dispersing factor (PDF), a synchronizing peptide in the clock network. These data thus demonstrate that overall reduction of DBT causes long and arrhythmic behavior, and they reveal an unexpected role of DBT in promoting synchrony of the circadian clock network. PMID:24820422

  16. Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naïve chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function. PMID:24923651

  17. Rhythm and interpersonal synchrony in early social development.

    PubMed

    Trainor, Laurel J; Cirelli, Laura

    2015-03-01

    Adults who engage in synchronous movement to music later report liking each other better, remembering more about each other, trusting each other more, and are more likely to cooperate with each other compared to adults who engage in asynchronous movements. Although poor motor coordination limits infants' ability to entrain to a musical beat, they perceive metrical structure in auditory rhythm patterns, their movements are affected by the tempo of music they hear, and if they are bounced by an adult to a rhythm pattern, the manner of this bouncing can affect their auditory interpretation of the meter of that pattern. In this paper, we review studies showing that by 14 months of age, infants who are bounced in synchrony with an adult subsequently show more altruistic behavior toward that adult in the form of handing back objects "accidentally" dropped by the adult compared to infants who are bounced asynchronously with the adult. Furthermore, increased helpfulness is directed at the synchronized bounce partner, but not at a neutral stranger. Interestingly, however, helpfulness does generalize to a "friend" of the synchronized bounce partner. In sum, synchronous movement between infants and adults has a powerful effect on infants' expression of directed prosocial behavior. PMID:25773616

  18. Movement Synchrony Forges Social Bonds across Group Divides

    PubMed Central

    Tunçgenç, Bahar; Cohen, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Group dynamics play an important role in the social interactions of both children and adults. A large amount of research has shown that merely being allocated to arbitrarily defined groups can evoke disproportionately positive attitudes toward one's in-group and negative attitudes toward out-groups, and that these biases emerge in early childhood. This prompts important empirical questions with far-reaching theoretical and applied significance. How robust are these inter-group biases? Can biases be mitigated by behaviors known to bond individuals and groups together? How can bonds be forged across existing group divides? To explore these questions, we examined the bonding effects of interpersonal synchrony on minimally constructed groups in a controlled experiment. In-group and out-group bonding were assessed using questionnaires administered before and after a task in which groups performed movements either synchronously or non-synchronously in a between-participants design. We also developed an implicit behavioral measure, the Island Game, in which physical proximity was used as an indirect measure of interpersonal closeness. Self-report and behavioral measures showed increased bonding between groups after synchronous movement. Bonding with the out-group was significantly higher in the condition in which movements were performed synchronously than when movements were performed non-synchronously between groups. The findings are discussed in terms of their importance for the developmental social psychology of group dynamics as well as their implications for applied intervention programs. PMID:27303341

  19. Using Component Synchrony Measure for somatosensory evoked potential detection.

    PubMed

    Melges, Danilo Barbosa; de Sà, Antonio Mauricio Ferreira Leite Miranda; Catelli, Antonio Fernando

    2006-01-01

    The multiple component synchrony measure (MCSM), a multivariate objective response detection (MORD) technique in the frequency domain, was applied to EEG signals during somatosensory stimulation of the right posterior tibial nerve collected from derivations [Fpz'-Cz'] and [C3'-C4'] of 10 adult volunteers. Stimuli were applied at the rate of 4.91 Hz and at the motor threshold intensity level. Detection was identified based on the null hypothesis of response absence rejection - when the estimates exceed the critical values (significance level alpha=0.05 and M=100, 400 and 800 epochs). For these three M values, detection was obtained in at least 80 % of the volunteers for the frequency range from 34.3 to 54.0 Hz, within the gamma band. With M=400, however, response could be detected in all subjects for this frequency range. Similar performance was observed for M=800. These findings indicate that MCSM is capable of objectively identifying stimuli response. PMID:17946251

  20. Job stress and dyadic synchrony in police marriages: a preliminary investigation.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicole A; Leonard, Rachel C; Butler, Emily A; Levenson, Robert W; Kanter, Jonathan W

    2013-06-01

    Despite reports documenting adverse effects of stress on police marriages, few empirical studies focus on actual emotional behaviors of officers and spouses. In this preliminary investigation, 17 male police officers and their nonpolice wives completed daily stress diaries for 1 week and then participated in a laboratory-based discussion about their respective days. Conversations were video-recorded and coded for specific emotional behaviors reflecting hostility and affection, which are strong predictors of marital outcomes. We examined associations between officers' job stress (per diaries and the Police Stress Survey) and couples' emotional behavior (mean levels and behavioral synchrony) using a dyadic repeated measures design capitalizing on the large number of observations available for each couple (1020 observations). When officers reported more job stress, they showed less hostility, less synchrony with their wives' hostility, and more synchrony with their wives' affection; their wives showed greater synchrony with officers' hostility and less synchrony with officers' affection. Therefore, for officers, greater job stress was associated with less behavioral negativity, potentially less attunement to wives' negativity, but potentially greater attunement to wives' affection-perhaps a compensatory strategy or attempt to buffer their marriage from stress. These attempts may be less effective, however, if, as our synchrony findings may suggest, wives are focusing on officers' hostility rather than affection. Although it will be important to replicate these results given the small sample, our findings reveal that patterns of behavioral synchrony may be a key means to better understand how job stress exacts a toll on police marriages. PMID:23763686

  1. A mixture of five phthalate esters inhibits fetal testicular testosterone production in a cummulative manner consistent with their predicted reproductive toxicity in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate diesters are plasticizers to which humans are ubiquitously exposed. Exposure to certain phthalates during sexual differentiation causes reproductive tract malformations in male rats. In the fetal rat, exposure to the phthalates benzylbutyl (BBP), di(n)butyl (DBP), and...

  2. A PHYSIOLOGICALLY BASED COMPUTATIONAL MODEL OF THE BPG AXIS IN FATHEAD MINNOWS: PREDICTING EFFECTS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING CHEMICAL EXPOSURE ON REPRODUCTIVE ENDPOINTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes development and application of a physiologically-based computational model that simulates the brain-pituitary-gonadal (BPG) axis and other endpoints important in reproduction such as concentrations of sex steroid hormones, 17-estradiol, testosterone, a...

  3. Climate change-related regime shifts have altered spatial synchrony of plankton dynamics in the North Sea.

    PubMed

    Defriez, Emma J; Sheppard, Lawrence W; Reid, Philip C; Reuman, Daniel C

    2016-06-01

    During the 1980s, the North Sea plankton community underwent a well-documented ecosystem regime shift, including both spatial changes (northward species range shifts) and temporal changes (increases in the total abundances of warmer water species). This regime shift has been attributed to climate change. Plankton provide a link between climate and higher trophic-level organisms, which can forage on large spatial and temporal scales. It is therefore important to understand not only whether climate change affects purely spatial or temporal aspects of plankton dynamics, but also whether it affects spatiotemporal aspects such as metapopulation synchrony. If plankton synchrony is altered, higher trophic-level feeding patterns may be modified. A second motivation for investigating changes in synchrony is that the possibility of such alterations has been examined for few organisms, in spite of the fact that synchrony is ubiquitous and of major importance in ecology. This study uses correlation coefficients and spectral analysis to investigate whether synchrony changed between the periods 1959-1980 and 1989-2010. Twenty-three plankton taxa, sea surface temperature (SST), and wind speed were examined. Results revealed that synchrony in SST and plankton was altered. Changes were idiosyncratic, and were not explained by changes in abundance. Changes in the synchrony of Calanus helgolandicus and Para-pseudocalanus spp appeared to be driven by changes in SST synchrony. This study is one of few to document alterations of synchrony and climate-change impacts on synchrony. We discuss why climate-change impacts on synchrony may well be more common and consequential than previously recognized. PMID:26810148

  4. Synchrony in dynamics of giant kelp forests is driven by both local recruitment and regional environmental controls.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Kyle C; Kendall, Bruce E; Siegel, David A; Reed, Daniel C; Alberto, Filipe; Assis, Jorge

    2013-02-01

    Populations of many species display spatially synchronous fluctuations in abundance. Synchrony is most commonly attributed to three processes: factors that influence recruitment (e.g., dispersal, early survival), large-scale environmental variability, and spatially autocorrelated trophic interactions. However it is often difficult to link population synchrony to a specific dominant process, particularly when multiple synchronizing forces are operating. We utilized a new satellite-based data set of giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) canopy biomass to examine population synchrony in southern California kelp forests on spatial scales ranging from 50 m to 300 km and temporal scales ranging from 1 to 11 years. We examined the relationship between synchrony and distance for adult kelp populations, kelp recruits, sea urchin abundance (a major grazer of kelp), and environmental variables known to influence kelp population dynamics. Population synchrony in giant kelp decreased with distance between populations: an initial rapid exponential decrease between 50 m and 1.3 km was followed by a second, large-scale decrease between distances of 1.3 km and 172 km. The 50-m to 1.3-km spatial scale corresponded to the scales of synchrony in the abundance of sea urchins and young kelp recruits, suggesting that local drivers of predation and recruitment influence small-scale synchrony in kelp populations. The spatial correlation patterns of environmental variables, particularly wave height, were similar to the synchrony-distance relationship of kelp populations from 1.3 km to 172 km, suggesting that regional environmental variability, i.e., the Moran effect, was the dominant process affecting synchrony at larger spatial scales. This two-step pattern in the relationship between kelp biomass synchrony and distance was apparent in each of the 11 years of our study. Our results highlight the potential for synthesizing approaches from both landscape and population ecology in order to

  5. Nonverbal Synchrony in Social Interactions of Patients with Schizophrenia Indicates Socio-Communicative Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Kupper, Zeno; Ramseyer, Fabian; Hoffmann, Holger; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Background Disordered interpersonal communication can be a serious problem in schizophrenia. Recent advances in computer-based measures allow reliable and objective quantification of nonverbal behavior. Research using these novel measures has shown that objective amounts of body and head movement in patients with schizophrenia during social interactions are closely related to the symptom profiles of these patients. In addition to and above mere amounts of movement, the degree of synchrony, or imitation, between patients and normal interactants may be indicative of core deficits underlying various problems in domains related to interpersonal communication, such as symptoms, social competence, and social functioning. Methods Nonverbal synchrony was assessed objectively using Motion Energy Analysis (MEA) in 378 brief, videotaped role-play scenes involving 27 stabilized outpatients diagnosed with paranoid-type schizophrenia. Results Low nonverbal synchrony was indicative of symptoms, low social competence, impaired social functioning, and low self-evaluation of competence. These relationships remained largely significant when correcting for the amounts of patients‘ movement. When patients showed reduced imitation of their interactants’ movements, negative symptoms were likely to be prominent. Conversely, positive symptoms were more prominent in patients when their interaction partners’ imitation of their movements was reduced. Conclusions Nonverbal synchrony can be an objective and sensitive indicator of the severity of patients’ problems. Furthermore, quantitative analysis of nonverbal synchrony may provide novel insights into specific relationships between symptoms, cognition, and core communicative problems in schizophrenia. PMID:26716444

  6. Audio-visual synchrony and feature-selective attention co-amplify early visual processing.

    PubMed

    Keitel, Christian; Müller, Matthias M

    2016-05-01

    Our brain relies on neural mechanisms of selective attention and converging sensory processing to efficiently cope with rich and unceasing multisensory inputs. One prominent assumption holds that audio-visual synchrony can act as a strong attractor for spatial attention. Here, we tested for a similar effect of audio-visual synchrony on feature-selective attention. We presented two superimposed Gabor patches that differed in colour and orientation. On each trial, participants were cued to selectively attend to one of the two patches. Over time, spatial frequencies of both patches varied sinusoidally at distinct rates (3.14 and 3.63 Hz), giving rise to pulse-like percepts. A simultaneously presented pure tone carried a frequency modulation at the pulse rate of one of the two visual stimuli to introduce audio-visual synchrony. Pulsed stimulation elicited distinct time-locked oscillatory electrophysiological brain responses. These steady-state responses were quantified in the spectral domain to examine individual stimulus processing under conditions of synchronous versus asynchronous tone presentation and when respective stimuli were attended versus unattended. We found that both, attending to the colour of a stimulus and its synchrony with the tone, enhanced its processing. Moreover, both gain effects combined linearly for attended in-sync stimuli. Our results suggest that audio-visual synchrony can attract attention to specific stimulus features when stimuli overlap in space. PMID:26226930

  7. Temporal Synchrony Detection and Associations with Language in Young Children with ASD

    PubMed Central

    Baranek, Grace T.

    2014-01-01

    Temporally synchronous audio-visual stimuli serve to recruit attention and enhance learning, including language learning in infants. Although few studies have examined this effect on children with autism, it appears that the ability to detect temporal synchrony between auditory and visual stimuli may be impaired, particularly given social-linguistic stimuli delivered via oral movement and spoken language pairings. However, children with autism can detect audio-visual synchrony given nonsocial stimuli (objects dropping and their corresponding sounds). We tested whether preschool children with autism could detect audio-visual synchrony given video recordings of linguistic stimuli paired with movement of related toys in the absence of faces. As a group, children with autism demonstrated the ability to detect audio-visual synchrony. Further, the amount of time they attended to the synchronous condition was positively correlated with receptive language. Findings suggest that object manipulations may enhance multisensory processing in linguistic contexts. Moreover, associations between synchrony detection and language development suggest that better processing of multisensory stimuli may guide and direct attention to communicative events thus enhancing linguistic development. PMID:25614835

  8. Dynamic changes in network synchrony reveal resting-state functional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuksanović, Vesna; Hövel, Philipp

    2015-02-01

    Experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have shown that spontaneous brain activity, i.e., in the absence of any external input, exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns of co-activity between segregated brain regions. These so-called large-scale resting-state functional connectivity networks represent dynamically organized neural assemblies interacting with each other in a complex way. It has been suggested that looking at the dynamical properties of complex patterns of brain functional co-activity may reveal neural mechanisms underlying the dynamic changes in functional interactions. Here, we examine how global network dynamics is shaped by different network configurations, derived from realistic brain functional interactions. We focus on two main dynamics measures: synchrony and variations in synchrony. Neural activity and the inferred hemodynamic response of the network nodes are simulated using a system of 90 FitzHugh-Nagumo neural models subject to system noise and time-delayed interactions. These models are embedded into the topology of the complex brain functional interactions, whose architecture is additionally reduced to its main structural pathways. In the simulated functional networks, patterns of correlated regional activity clearly arise from dynamical properties that maximize synchrony and variations in synchrony. Our results on the fast changes of the level of the network synchrony also show how flexible changes in the large-scale network dynamics could be.

  9. Synchrony in Psychotherapy: A Review and an Integrative Framework for the Therapeutic Alliance

    PubMed Central

    Koole, Sander L.; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    During psychotherapy, patient and therapist tend to spontaneously synchronize their vocal pitch, bodily movements, and even their physiological processes. In the present article, we consider how this pervasive phenomenon may shed new light on the therapeutic relationship– or alliance– and its role within psychotherapy. We first review clinical research on the alliance and the multidisciplinary area of interpersonal synchrony. We then integrate both literatures in the Interpersonal Synchrony (In-Sync) model of psychotherapy. According to the model, the alliance is grounded in the coupling of patient and therapist’s brains. Because brains do not interact directly, movement synchrony may help to establish inter-brain coupling. Inter-brain coupling may provide patient and therapist with access to another’s internal states, which facilitates common understanding and emotional sharing. Over time, these interpersonal exchanges may improve patients’ emotion-regulatory capacities and related therapeutic outcomes. We discuss the empirical assessment of interpersonal synchrony and review preliminary research on synchrony in psychotherapy. Finally, we summarize our main conclusions and consider the broader implications of viewing psychotherapy as the product of two interacting brains. PMID:27378968

  10. Perceived synchrony for realistic and dynamic audiovisual events

    PubMed Central

    Eg, Ragnhild; Behne, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    In well-controlled laboratory experiments, researchers have found that humans can perceive delays between auditory and visual signals as short as 20 ms. Conversely, other experiments have shown that humans can tolerate audiovisual asynchrony that exceeds 200 ms. This seeming contradiction in human temporal sensitivity can be attributed to a number of factors such as experimental approaches and precedence of the asynchronous signals, along with the nature, duration, location, complexity and repetitiveness of the audiovisual stimuli, and even individual differences. In order to better understand how temporal integration of audiovisual events occurs in the real world, we need to close the gap between the experimental setting and the complex setting of everyday life. With this work, we aimed to contribute one brick to the bridge that will close this gap. We compared perceived synchrony for long-running and eventful audiovisual sequences to shorter sequences that contain a single audiovisual event, for three types of content: action, music, and speech. The resulting windows of temporal integration showed that participants were better at detecting asynchrony for the longer stimuli, possibly because the long-running sequences contain multiple corresponding events that offer audiovisual timing cues. Moreover, the points of subjective simultaneity differ between content types, suggesting that the nature of a visual scene could influence the temporal perception of events. An expected outcome from this type of experiment was the rich variation among participants' distributions and the derived points of subjective simultaneity. Hence, the designs of similar experiments call for more participants than traditional psychophysical studies. Heeding this caution, we conclude that existing theories on multisensory perception are ready to be tested on more natural and representative stimuli. PMID:26082738

  11. Out-of-synchrony speech entrainment in developmental dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Molinaro, Nicola; Lizarazu, Mikel; Lallier, Marie; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Carreiras, Manuel

    2016-08-01

    Developmental dyslexia is a reading disorder often characterized by reduced awareness of speech units. Whether the neural source of this phonological disorder in dyslexic readers results from the malfunctioning of the primary auditory system or damaged feedback communication between higher-order phonological regions (i.e., left inferior frontal regions) and the auditory cortex is still under dispute. Here we recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals from 20 dyslexic readers and 20 age-matched controls while they were listening to ∼10-s-long spoken sentences. Compared to controls, dyslexic readers had (1) an impaired neural entrainment to speech in the delta band (0.5-1 Hz); (2) a reduced delta synchronization in both the right auditory cortex and the left inferior frontal gyrus; and (3) an impaired feedforward functional coupling between neural oscillations in the right auditory cortex and the left inferior frontal regions. This shows that during speech listening, individuals with developmental dyslexia present reduced neural synchrony to low-frequency speech oscillations in primary auditory regions that hinders higher-order speech processing steps. The present findings, thus, strengthen proposals assuming that improper low-frequency acoustic entrainment affects speech sampling. This low speech-brain synchronization has the strong potential to cause severe consequences for both phonological and reading skills. Interestingly, the reduced speech-brain synchronization in dyslexic readers compared to normal readers (and its higher-order consequences across the speech processing network) appears preserved through the development from childhood to adulthood. Thus, the evaluation of speech-brain synchronization could possibly serve as a diagnostic tool for early detection of children at risk of dyslexia. Hum Brain Mapp 37:2767-2783, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27061643

  12. Phase synchrony facilitates binding and segmentation of natural images in a coupled neural oscillator network

    PubMed Central

    Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization has been suggested as a mechanism of binding distributed feature representations facilitating segmentation of visual stimuli. Here we investigate this concept based on unsupervised learning using natural visual stimuli. We simulate dual-variable neural oscillators with separate activation and phase variables. The binding of a set of neurons is coded by synchronized phase variables. The network of tangential synchronizing connections learned from the induced activations exhibits small-world properties and allows binding even over larger distances. We evaluate the resulting dynamic phase maps using segmentation masks labeled by human experts. Our simulation results show a continuously increasing phase synchrony between neurons within the labeled segmentation masks. The evaluation of the network dynamics shows that the synchrony between network nodes establishes a relational coding of the natural image inputs. This demonstrates that the concept of binding by synchrony is applicable in the context of unsupervised learning using natural visual stimuli. PMID:24478685

  13. Phase synchrony facilitates binding and segmentation of natural images in a coupled neural oscillator network.

    PubMed

    Finger, Holger; König, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Synchronization has been suggested as a mechanism of binding distributed feature representations facilitating segmentation of visual stimuli. Here we investigate this concept based on unsupervised learning using natural visual stimuli. We simulate dual-variable neural oscillators with separate activation and phase variables. The binding of a set of neurons is coded by synchronized phase variables. The network of tangential synchronizing connections learned from the induced activations exhibits small-world properties and allows binding even over larger distances. We evaluate the resulting dynamic phase maps using segmentation masks labeled by human experts. Our simulation results show a continuously increasing phase synchrony between neurons within the labeled segmentation masks. The evaluation of the network dynamics shows that the synchrony between network nodes establishes a relational coding of the natural image inputs. This demonstrates that the concept of binding by synchrony is applicable in the context of unsupervised learning using natural visual stimuli. PMID:24478685

  14. Active Drumming Experience Increases Infants’ Sensitivity to Audiovisual Synchrony during Observed Drumming Actions

    PubMed Central

    Timmers, Renee; Hunnius, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    In the current study, we examined the role of active experience on sensitivity to multisensory synchrony in six-month-old infants in a musical context. In the first of two experiments, we trained infants to produce a novel multimodal effect (i.e., a drum beat) and assessed the effects of this training, relative to no training, on their later perception of the synchrony between audio and visual presentation of the drumming action. In a second experiment, we then contrasted this active experience with the observation of drumming in order to test whether observation of the audiovisual effect was as effective for sensitivity to multimodal synchrony as active experience. Our results indicated that active experience provided a unique benefit above and beyond observational experience, providing insights on the embodied roots of (early) music perception and cognition. PMID:26111226

  15. Cross-synaptic synchrony and transmission of signal and noise across the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Grimes, William N; Hoon, Mrinalini; Briggman, Kevin L; Wong, Rachel O; Rieke, Fred

    2014-01-01

    Cross-synaptic synchrony--correlations in transmitter release across output synapses of a single neuron--is a key determinant of how signal and noise traverse neural circuits. The anatomical connectivity between rod bipolar and A17 amacrine cells in the mammalian retina, specifically that neighboring A17s often receive input from many of the same rod bipolar cells, provides a rare technical opportunity to measure cross-synaptic synchrony under physiological conditions. This approach reveals that synchronization of rod bipolar cell synapses is near perfect in the dark and decreases with increasing light level. Strong synaptic synchronization in the dark minimizes intrinsic synaptic noise and allows rod bipolar cells to faithfully transmit upstream signal and noise to downstream neurons. Desynchronization in steady light lowers the sensitivity of the rod bipolar output to upstream voltage fluctuations. This work reveals how cross-synaptic synchrony shapes retinal responses to physiological light inputs and, more generally, signaling in complex neural networks. PMID:25180102

  16. Synchrony-dependent propagation of firing rate in iteratively constructed networks in vitro.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Alex D

    2003-06-01

    The precise role of synchronous neuronal firing in signal encoding remains unclear. To examine what kinds of signals can be carried by synchrony, I reproduced a multilayer feedforward network of neurons in an in vitro slice preparation of rat cortex using an iterative procedure. When constant and time-varying frequency signals were delivered to the network, the firing of neurons in successive layers became progressively more synchronous. Notably, synchrony in the in vitro network developed even with uncorrelated input, persisted under a wide range of physiological conditions and was crucial for the stable propagation of rate signals. The firing rate was represented by a classical rate code in the initial layers, but switched to a synchrony-based code in the deeper layers. PMID:12730700

  17. Phenological synchrony of bird migration with tree flowering at desert riparian stopover sites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kellermann, Jherime L.; Van Riper, Charles, III

    2015-01-01

    Small-bodied songbirds replenish fat reserves during migration at stopover sites where they continually encounter novel and often unpredictable environmental conditions. The ability to select and utilize high quality habitats is critical to survival and fitness. Vegetation phenology is closely linked with emergence of insect prey and may provide valid cues of food availability for stopover habitat selection. Climate change is disrupting phenological synchrony across trophic levels with negative impacts on bird populations. However, whether synchrony or mismatch indicates historic or disrupted systems remains unclear. Many Neotropical migratory songbirds of western North America must cross arid regions where drought conditions related to climate change and human water use are expected to increase. We studied migrant abundance and the diversity (niche breadth) and proportional use of vegetation species as foraging substrates and their synchrony with vegetation flowering during spring migration along the lower Colorado River in the Sonoran Desert of the U.S. and Mexico.

  18. Detection of transient synchrony across oscillating receptors by the central electrosensory system of mormyrid fish

    PubMed Central

    Vélez, Alejandro; Carlson, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we reported evidence for a novel mechanism of peripheral sensory coding based on oscillatory synchrony. Spontaneously oscillating electroreceptors in weakly electric fish (Mormyridae) respond to electrosensory stimuli with a phase reset that results in transient synchrony across the receptor population (Baker et al., 2015). Here, we asked whether the central electrosensory system actually detects the occurrence of synchronous oscillations among receptors. We found that electrosensory stimulation elicited evoked potentials in the midbrain exterolateral nucleus at a short latency following receptor synchronization. Frequency tuning in the midbrain resembled peripheral frequency tuning, which matches the intrinsic oscillation frequencies of the receptors. These frequencies are lower than those in individual conspecific signals, and instead match those found in collective signals produced by groups of conspecifics. Our results provide further support for a novel mechanism for sensory coding based on the detection of oscillatory synchrony among peripheral receptors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16851.001 PMID:27328322

  19. What Iconic Gesture Fragments Reveal about Gesture-Speech Integration: When Synchrony Is Lost, Memory Can Help

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obermeier, Christian; Holle, Henning; Gunter, Thomas C.

    2011-01-01

    The present series of experiments explores several issues related to gesture-speech integration and synchrony during sentence processing. To be able to more precisely manipulate gesture-speech synchrony, we used gesture fragments instead of complete gestures, thereby avoiding the usual long temporal overlap of gestures with their coexpressive…

  20. The Structure of Parent-Child Dyadic Synchrony in Toddlerhood and Children's Communication Competence and Self-Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Eric W.; Cremeens, Penny R.; Colwell, Malinda J.; Caldera, Yvonne M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine parent-child synchrony and its link to children's communicative competence and self-control. Data were collected from 80 families with toddler age children (41 girls, 39 boys) during a laboratory assessment. Five components of parent-child dyadic synchrony were assessed during a semi-structured…

  1. INTERSPECIFIC SYNCHRONY AMONG FOLIAGE-FEEDING FOREST LAPIDOPTERA SPECIES AND THE ROLE OF GENERALIST PREDATORS AS POSSIBLE SYNCHRONIZING AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    While synchrony among geographically disjunct populations of the same species has received considerable recent attention, much less is known about synchrony between sympatric populations of two or more species. We analyzed time series of the abundance of ten species of spring fol...

  2. THE ARABIDOPSIS GENE TARDY ASYNCHRONOUS MEIOSIS IS REQUIRED FOR THE NORMAL PACE AND SYNCHRONY OF CELL DIVISION DURING MALE MEIOSIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Male meiosis in higher organisms features synchronous cell divisions in a large number of cells. It is not clear how this synchrony is achieved, nor is it known whether the synchrony is linked to the regulation of cell cycle progression. Here, we describe an Arabidopsis mutant, named tardy asynchron...

  3. Long-range synchrony in the gamma band: role in music perception.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, J; Petsche, H; Pereda, E

    2001-08-15

    Synchronization seems to be a central mechanism for neuronal information processing within and between multiple brain areas. Furthermore, synchronization in the gamma band has been shown to play an important role in higher cognitive functions, especially by binding the necessary spatial and temporal information in different cortical areas to build a coherent perception. Specific task-induced (evoked) gamma oscillations have often been taken as an indication of synchrony, but the presence of long-range synchrony cannot be inferred from spectral power in the gamma range. We studied the usefulness of a relatively new measure, called similarity index to detect asymmetric interdependency between two brain regions. Spontaneous EEG from two groups-musicians and non-musicians-were recorded during several states: listening to music, listening to text, and at rest (eyes closed and eyes open). While listening to music, degrees of the gamma band synchrony over distributed cortical areas were found to be significantly higher in musicians than non-musicians. Yet no differences between these two groups were found at resting conditions and while listening to a neutral text. In contrast to the degree of long-range synchrony, spectral power in the gamma band was higher in non-musicians. The degree of spatial synchrony, a measure of signal complexity based on eigen-decomposition method, was also significantly increased in musicians while listening to music. As compared with non-musicians, the finding of increased long-range synchrony in musicians independent of spectral power is interpreted as a manifestation of a more advanced musical memory of musicians in binding together several features of the intrinsic complexity of music in a dynamical way. PMID:11487656

  4. Not That Heart-Stopping After All: Visuo-Cardiac Synchrony Does Not Boost Self-Face Attribution

    PubMed Central

    Porciello, Giuseppina; Daum, Moritz M.; Menghini, Cristina; Brugger, Peter; Lenggenhager, Bigna

    2016-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence and theoretical models suggest that an integration of exteroceptive and interoceptive signals underlies several key aspects of the bodily self. While it has been shown that self-attribution of both the hand and the full-body are altered by conflicting extero-exteroceptive (e.g. visuo-tactile) and extero-interoceptive (e.g. visuo-cardiac) information, no study has thus far investigated whether self-attribution of the face might be altered by visuo-cardiac stimulation similarly to visuo-tactile stimulation. In three independent groups of participants we presented ambiguous (i.e. morphed with a stranger's face) self-faces flashing synchronously or asynchronously with the participants’ heartbeat. We then measured the subjective percentages of self-face attribution of morphed stimuli. To control for a potential effect of visuo-cardiac synchrony on familiarity, a task assessing the attribution of a familiar face was introduced. Moreover, different durations of visuo-cardiac flashing and different degrees of asynchronicity were used. Based on previous studies showing that synchronous visuo-cardiac stimulation generally increases self-attribution of the full-body and the hand, and that synchronous visuo-tactile stimulation increases self-face attribution, we predicted higher self-face attribution during the synchronous visuo-cardiac flashing of the morphed stimuli. In contrast to this hypothesis, the results showed no difference between synchronous and asynchronous stimulation on self-face attribution in any of the three studies. We thus conclude that visuo-cardiac synchrony does not boost self-attribution of the face as it does that of hand and full-body. PMID:27541587

  5. REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Throughout history, humans have celebrated the beauty and fertility of flowering plants. In addition to their aesthetic appeal, flowers contain the reproductive organs of the plant and are therefore essential for sexual propagation of plant life. Our dependence on flowering is illustrated by the die...

  6. Reproductive hacking

    PubMed Central

    Dustin Rubinstein, C; Wolfner, Mariana F

    2014-01-01

    Seminal proteins are critical for reproductive success in all animals that have been studied. Although seminal proteins have been identified in many taxa, and female reproductive responses to receipt of these proteins have been documented in several, little is understood about the mechanisms by which seminal proteins affect female reproductive physiology. To explore this topic, we investigated how a Drosophila seminal protein, ovulin, increases ovulation rate in mated females. Ovulation is a relatively simple physiological process, with known female regulators: previous studies have shown that ovulation rate is promoted by the neuromodulator octopamine (OA) in D. melanogaster and other insects. We found that ovulin stimulates ovulation by increasing OA signaling in the female. This finding supports a model in which a male seminal protein acts through “hacking” a well-conserved, regulatory system females use to adjust reproductive output, rather than acting downstream of female mechanisms of control or in parallel pathways altogether. We also discuss similarities between 2 forms of intersexual control of behavior through chemical communication: seminal proteins and pheromones. PMID:25483253

  7. Synchrony in human, mouse and bacterial cell cultures--a comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen; Romero, Ana; Eward, K. Leigh

    2003-01-01

    Growth characteristics of synchronous human MOLT-4, human U-937 and mouse L1210 cultures produced with a new minimally-disturbing technology were compared to each other and to synchronous Escherichia coli B/r. Based on measurements of cell concentrations during synchronous growth, synchrony persisted in similar fashion for all cells. Cell size and DNA distributions in the mammalian cultures also progressed synchronously and reproducibly for multiple cell cycles. The results demonstrate that unambiguous multi-cycle synchrony, critical for verifying the absence of significant growth imbalances induced by the synchronization procedure, is feasible with these cell lines, and possibly others.

  8. Time-delay-induced phase-transition to synchrony in coupled bursting neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim Mani; Prasad, Awadhesh; Dhamala, Mukeshwar

    2011-06-01

    Signal transmission time delays in a network of nonlinear oscillators are known to be responsible for a variety of interesting dynamic behaviors including phase-flip transitions leading to synchrony or out of synchrony. Here, we uncover that phase-flip transitions are general phenomena and can occur in a network of coupled bursting neurons with a variety of coupling types. The transitions are marked by nonlinear changes in both temporal and phase-space characteristics of the coupled system. We demonstrate these phase-transitions with Hindmarsh-Rose and Leech-Heart interneuron models and discuss the implications of these results in understanding collective dynamics of bursting neurons in the brain.

  9. Self-recognition in the perception of actions performed in synchrony with music.

    PubMed

    Sevdalis, Vassilis; Keller, Peter E

    2009-07-01

    This study investigated self-recognition in point-light displays depicting actions performed in synchrony with music. Participants were recorded executing three different actions (dancing, walking, and clapping) and were subsequently required to identify the agent (self versus other) from point-light displays with or without the accompanying music. Results indicate that while recognition accuracy was better than chance for all actions, it was best for the relatively complex dance actions. The presence of music did not affect accuracy, suggesting that self-recognition was based on information about personal movement kinematics rather than individual differences in synchrony between movements and music. PMID:19673830

  10. Finite-size-induced transitions to synchrony in oscillator ensembles with nonlinear global coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komarov, Maxim; Pikovsky, Arkady

    2015-08-01

    We report on finite-sized-induced transitions to synchrony in a population of phase oscillators coupled via a nonlinear mean field, which microscopically is equivalent to a hypernetwork organization of interactions. Using a self-consistent approach and direct numerical simulations, we argue that a transition to synchrony occurs only for finite-size ensembles and disappears in the thermodynamic limit. For all considered setups, which include purely deterministic oscillators with or without heterogeneity in natural oscillatory frequencies, and an ensemble of noise-driven identical oscillators, we establish scaling relations describing the order parameter as a function of the coupling constant and the system size.

  11. Variation of DNA Fragmentation Levels During Density Gradient Sperm Selection for Assisted Reproduction Techniques: A Possible New Male Predictive Parameter of Pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Muratori, Monica; Tarozzi, Nicoletta; Cambi, Marta; Boni, Luca; Iorio, Anna Lisa; Passaro, Claudia; Luppino, Benedetta; Nadalini, Marco; Marchiani, Sara; Tamburrino, Lara; Forti, Gianni; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta; Borini, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Predicting the outcome of in vitro fertilization (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) is one main goal of the present research on assisted reproduction. To understand whether density gradient centrifugation (DGC), used to select sperm, can affect sperm DNA integrity and impact pregnancy rate (PR), we prospectively evaluated sperm DNA fragmentation (sDF) by TUNEL/PI, before and after DGC. sDF was studied in a cohort of 90 infertile couples the same day of IVF/ICSI treatment. After DGC, sDF increased in 41 samples (Group A, median sDF value: 29.25% [interquartile range, IQR: 16.01-41.63] in pre- and 60.40% [IQR: 32.92-93.53] in post-DGC) and decreased in 49 (Group B, median sDF value: 18.84% [IQR: 13.70-35.47] in pre- and 8.98% [IQR: 6.24-15.58] in post-DGC). PR was 17.1% and 34.4% in Group A and B, respectively (odds ratio [OR]: 2.58, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.95-7.04, P = 0.056). After adjustment for female factor, female and male age and female BMI, the estimated OR increased to 3.12 (95% CI: 1.05-9.27, P = 0.041). According to the subgroup analysis for presence/absence of female factor, heterogeneity in the association between the Group A and B and PR emerged (OR: 4.22, 95% CI: 1.16-15.30 and OR: 1.53, 95% CI: 0.23-10.40, respectively, for couples without, n = 59, and with, n = 31, female factor).This study provides the first evidence that the DGC procedure produces an increase in sDF in about half of the subjects undergoing IVF/ICSI, who then show a much lower probability of pregnancy, raising concerns about the safety of this selection procedure. Evaluation of sDF before and after DGC configures as a possible new prognostic parameter of pregnancy outcome in IVF/ICSI. Alternative sperm selection strategies are recommended for those subjects who undergo the damage after DGC. PMID:27196465

  12. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Teens > Female Reproductive System Print A ... and female reproductive systems. continue What Is the Female Reproductive System? Most species have two sexes: male and female. ...

  13. Specialization and phenological synchrony of plant-pollinator interactions along an altitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Benadi, Gita; Hovestadt, Thomas; Poethke, Hans-Joachim; Blüthgen, Nico

    2014-05-01

    One of the most noticeable effects of anthropogenic climate change is the shift in timing of seasonal events towards earlier occurrence. The high degree of variation in species' phenological shifts has raised concerns about the temporal decoupling of interspecific interactions, but the extent and implications of this effect are largely unknown. In the case of plant-pollinator systems, more specialized species are predicted to be particularly threatened by phenological decoupling, since they are assumed to be less flexible in the choice of interaction partners, but until now this hypothesis has not been tested. In this paper, we studied phenology and interactions of plant and pollinator communities along an altitudinal gradient in the Alps as a model for the possible effects of climate change in time. Our results show that even relatively specialized pollinators were much more flexible in their use of plant species as floral resources than their local flower visitation suggested. We found no relationship between local specialization of pollinators and the consistency of their visitation patterns across sites, and also no relationship between specialization and phenological synchrony of pollinators with particular plants. Thus, in contrast to the conclusions of a recent simulation study, our results suggest that most pollinator species included in this study are not threatened by phenological decoupling from specific flowering plants. However, the flexibility of many rarely observed pollinator species remains unknown. Moreover, our results suggest that specialized flower visitors select plant species based on certain floral traits such as the length of the nectar holder tube. If that is the case, the observed flexibility of plant-pollinator interactions likely depends on a high degree of functional redundancy in the plant community, which may not exist in less diverse systems. PMID:24219131

  14. Coral reproduction in the world's warmest reefs: southern Persian Gulf (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, A. G.; Baird, A. H.; Cavalcante, G. H.

    2011-06-01

    Despite extensive research on coral reproduction from numerous geographic locations, there remains limited knowledge within the Persian Gulf. Given that corals in the Persian Gulf exist in one of the most stressful environments for reef corals, with annual variations in sea surface temperature (SST) of 12°C and maximum summer mean SSTs of 36°C, understanding coral reproductive biology in the Gulf may provide clues as to how corals may cope with global warming. In this study, we examined six locally common coral species on two shallow reef sites in Dubai, United Arab Emirates (UAE), in 2008 and 2009 to investigate the patterns of reproduction, in particular the timing and synchrony of spawning. In total, 71% colonies in April 2008 and 63% colonies in April 2009 contained mature oocytes. However, the presence of mature gametes in May indicated that spawning was potentially split between April and May in all species. These results demonstrate that coral reproduction patterns within this region are highly seasonal and that multi-species spawning synchrony is highly probable. Acropora downingi, Cyphastrea microphthalma and Platygyra daedalea were all hermaphroditic broadcast spawners with a single annual gametogenic cycle. Furthermore, fecundity and mature oocyte sizes were comparable to those in other regions. We conclude that the reproductive biology of corals in the southern Persian Gulf is similar to other regions, indicating that these species have adapted to the extreme environmental conditions in the southern Persian Gulf.

  15. Auditory Stream Segregation and the Perception of Across-Frequency Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Micheyl, Christophe; Hunter, Cynthia; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which sequential auditory grouping affects the perception of temporal synchrony. In Experiment 1, listeners discriminated between 2 pairs of asynchronous "target" tones at different frequencies, A and B, in which the B tone either led or lagged. Thresholds were markedly higher when the target tones were temporally…

  16. REGIONAL DYNAMICS OF WETLAND-BREEDING FROGS AND TOADS: TURNOVER AND SYNCHRONY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used data from a statewide frog monitoring network to investigate population turnover and synchrony in eight wetland-breeding species. We found that subpopulations at many sites turn over frequently, with breeding choruses absent or undetectable in most years. Frequencies of d...

  17. Synchrony and Specificity in the Maternal and the Paternal Brain: Relations to Oxytocin and Vasopressin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atzil, Shir; Hendler, Talma; Zagoory-Sharon, Orna; Winetraub, Yonatan; Feldman, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Research on the neurobiology of parenting has defined "biobehavioral synchrony," the coordination of biological and behavioral responses between parent and child, as a central process underpinning mammalian bond formation. Bi-parental rearing, typically observed in monogamous species, is similarly thought to draw on mechanisms of…

  18. MicroRNA-276 promotes egg-hatching synchrony by up-regulating brm in locusts.

    PubMed

    He, Jing; Chen, Qianquan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Meiling; Hao, Shuguang; Guo, Xiaojiao; Chen, Dahua; Kang, Le

    2016-01-19

    Developmental synchrony, the basis of uniform swarming, migration, and sexual maturation, is an important strategy for social animals to adapt to variable environments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying developmental synchrony are largely unexplored. The migratory locust exhibits polyphenism between gregarious and solitarious individuals, with the former displaying more synchronous sexual maturation and migration than the latter. Here, we found that the egg-hatching time of gregarious locusts was more uniform compared with solitarious locusts and that microRNA-276 (miR-276) was expressed significantly higher in both ovaries and eggs of gregarious locusts than in solitarious locusts. Interestingly, inhibiting miR-276 in gregarious females and overexpressing it in solitarious females, respectively, caused more heterochronic and synchronous hatching of progeny eggs. Moreover, miR-276 directly targeted a transcription coactivator gene, brahma (brm), resulting in its up-regulation. Knockdown of brm not only resulted in asynchronous egg hatching in gregarious locusts but also impaired the miR-276-induced synchronous egg hatching in solitarious locusts. Mechanistically, miR-276 mediated brm activation in a manner that depended on the secondary structure of brm, namely, a stem-loop around the binding site of miR-276. Collectively, our results unravel a mechanism by which miR-276 enhances brm expression to promote developmental synchrony and provide insight into regulation of developmental homeostasis and population sustaining that are closely related to biological synchrony. PMID:26729868

  19. Mechanisms for synchrony and alternation in song interactions of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata (Tettigoniidae: Orthoptera)

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Kratzer, Silvia; Steiner, Klaus; Römer, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Males of the bushcricket Mecopoda elongata synchronise or alternate their chirps with their neighbours in an aggregation. Since synchrony is imperfect, leader and follower chirps are established in song interactions; females prefer leader chirps in phonotactic trials. Using playback experiments and simulations of song oscillator interactions, we investigate the mechanisms that result in synchrony and alternation, and the probability for the leader role in synchrony. A major predictor for the leader role of a male is its intrinsic chirp period, which varies in a population from 1.6 to 2.3 s. Faster singing males establish the leader role more often than males with longer chirp periods. The phase-response curve (PRC) of the song oscillators differs to other rhythmically calling or flashing insects, in that only the disturbed cycle is influenced in duration by a stimulus. This results in sustained leader or follower chirps of one male, when the intrinsic chirp periods of two males differ by 150 ms or more. By contrast, the individual shape of the male’s PRC has only little influence on the outcome of chirp interactions. The consequences of these findings for the evolution of synchrony in this species are discussed. PMID:15614532

  20. MicroRNA-276 promotes egg-hatching synchrony by up-regulating brm in locusts

    PubMed Central

    He, Jing; Chen, Qianquan; Wei, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Feng; Yang, Meiling; Hao, Shuguang; Guo, Xiaojiao; Chen, Dahua; Kang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Developmental synchrony, the basis of uniform swarming, migration, and sexual maturation, is an important strategy for social animals to adapt to variable environments. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying developmental synchrony are largely unexplored. The migratory locust exhibits polyphenism between gregarious and solitarious individuals, with the former displaying more synchronous sexual maturation and migration than the latter. Here, we found that the egg-hatching time of gregarious locusts was more uniform compared with solitarious locusts and that microRNA-276 (miR-276) was expressed significantly higher in both ovaries and eggs of gregarious locusts than in solitarious locusts. Interestingly, inhibiting miR-276 in gregarious females and overexpressing it in solitarious females, respectively, caused more heterochronic and synchronous hatching of progeny eggs. Moreover, miR-276 directly targeted a transcription coactivator gene, brahma (brm), resulting in its up-regulation. Knockdown of brm not only resulted in asynchronous egg hatching in gregarious locusts but also impaired the miR-276–induced synchronous egg hatching in solitarious locusts. Mechanistically, miR-276 mediated brm activation in a manner that depended on the secondary structure of brm, namely, a stem-loop around the binding site of miR-276. Collectively, our results unravel a mechanism by which miR-276 enhances brm expression to promote developmental synchrony and provide insight into regulation of developmental homeostasis and population sustaining that are closely related to biological synchrony. PMID:26729868

  1. Male and female synchrony and the regulation of mating in flowering plants.

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, M

    2003-01-01

    Successful mating clearly requires synchronous development of the male and female sexual organs. Evidence is accumulating that this synchrony of development also persists after pollination, with both pollen and pistil following complex, but highly integrated developmental pathways. The timing of the male-female interaction is crucial for the pistil, which, far from being a mature passive structure, is engaged in a continuing programme of development: only being receptive to the advances of the pollen for a relatively short window of time. This developmental programme is most conspicuous in the ovary, and this review focuses on the interaction between the male and female tissues in this structure. The review first considers pollen tube development in the ovary, concentrating of the mechanisms by which its growth is modulated at various control points associated with structures within the ovary. Second, alterations to this 'normal' developmental programme are reviewed and considered in the context of a breakdown of developmental synchrony. Finally, the consequences of male-female developmental synchrony and asynchrony are explored. Clearly, a synchronous male-female relationship leads to a successful fertilization. However, lack of synchrony also occurs, and could emerge as a powerful tool to investigate the regulation of mating. PMID:12831467

  2. The Critical Role of Temporal Synchrony in the Salience of Intersensory Redundancy during Prenatal Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Mark; Bahrick, Lorraine; Lickliter, Robert

    2010-01-01

    We explored the amount and timing of temporal synchrony necessary to facilitate prenatal perceptual learning using an animal model, the bobwhite quail. Quail embryos were exposed to various audiovisual combinations of a bobwhite maternal call paired with patterned light during the late stages of prenatal development and were tested postnatally for…

  3. Breeding synchrony and extrapair fertilizations in two populations of red-winged blackbirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westaeat, D.F.; Gray, E.M.

    1998-01-01

    We tested the relationship between synchrony of breeding and the frequency of extrapair fertilizations (EPFs) in two populations of red-winged blackbirds known to differ in female extrapair behavior. We found no association between the number of simultaneously fertilizable females (temporal neighbors) and EPF rate in either population, although a significant difference between populations in the direction of this relationship (positive where females initiated extrapair copulations and negative where males initiated them) suggested a modest difference in the influence of synchrony. Males losing offspring to EPFs tended to have more fertilizable females at that time than the actual sires in some analyses but not in others. We also tested several assumptions underlying two competing hypotheses for the effects of synchrony. We found no evidence that females pursued extrapair copulations more often when other females were synchronous. Rather, females were more likely to gain EPFs with extrapair males whose social mates were not yet building their nests. Synchrony also did not consistently affect male pursuit of extrapair copulations or achievement of EPFs. These results suggest that timing of breeding has some effects on extrapair activity, but that those effects are both relatively weak and influenced by other factors that vary between years or populations.

  4. Physical and Relational Aggression in Young Children: The Role of Mother-Child Interactional Synchrony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Holly N.; Menna, Rosanne

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships between the quality of parent-child interactions, specifically interactional synchrony (IS), and physical and relational aggression in young children. Seventy-three children (3-6 years; 44 males, 29 females) and their mothers participated in this study. The children's level of aggression was assessed through…

  5. Synchrony capture filterbank: auditory-inspired signal processing for tracking individual frequency components in speech.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Ramdas; Peddinti, Vijay Kumar; Cariani, Peter

    2013-06-01

    A processing scheme for speech signals is proposed that emulates synchrony capture in the auditory nerve. The role of stimulus-locked spike timing is important for representation of stimulus periodicity, low frequency spectrum, and spatial location. In synchrony capture, dominant single frequency components in each frequency region impress their time structures on temporal firing patterns of auditory nerve fibers with nearby characteristic frequencies (CFs). At low frequencies, for voiced sounds, synchrony capture divides the nerve into discrete CF territories associated with individual harmonics. An adaptive, synchrony capture filterbank (SCFB) consisting of a fixed array of traditional, passive linear (gammatone) filters cascaded with a bank of adaptively tunable, bandpass filter triplets is proposed. Differences in triplet output envelopes steer triplet center frequencies via voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs). The SCFB exhibits some cochlea-like responses, such as two-tone suppression and distortion products, and possesses many desirable properties for processing speech, music, and natural sounds. Strong signal components dominate relatively greater numbers of filter channels, thereby yielding robust encodings of relative component intensities. The VCOs precisely lock onto harmonics most important for formant tracking, pitch perception, and sound separation. PMID:23742379

  6. Light can rescue auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division in a tobacco cell line

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Fei; Petrášek, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Pattern formation in plants has to cope with ambient variability and therefore must integrate environmental cues such as light. Synchrony of cell divisions was previously observed in cell files of tobacco suspension cultures, which represents a simple case of pattern formation. To develop cellular approaches for light-dependent patterning, light-responsive tobacco cell lines were screened from the cell line Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Virginia Bright Italia 0 (VBI-0). The light responsive and auxin-autonomous cell line VBI-3 was isolated. As in the progenitor line VBI-0, cell divisions are synchronized in VBI-3 during exponential growth phase. This synchrony can be inhibited by 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid, an auxin transport inhibitor, and this process was accompanied by the disassembly of actin filaments. However, the synchrony could be rescued when the cells were cultured under white light or with exogenous indolyl-3-acetic acid. The rescue was most efficient for continuous far-red light followed by continuous blue light, whereas continuous red light was least effective. These findings are discussed in the context of phytochrome-induced auxin biosynthesis and auxin-dependent synchrony of cell division. PMID:19884227

  7. High frequency synchrony in the cerebellar cortex during goal directed movements

    PubMed Central

    Groth, Jonathan D.; Sahin, Mesut

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum is involved in sensory-motor integration and cognitive functions. The origin and function of the field potential oscillations in the cerebellum, especially in the high frequencies, have not been explored sufficiently. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the spatio-temporal characteristics of high frequency field potentials (150–350 Hz) in the cerebellar cortex in a behavioral context. To this end, we recorded from the paramedian lobule in rats using micro electro-corticogram (μ-ECoG) electrode arrays while the animal performed a lever press task using the forelimb. The phase synchrony analysis shows that the high frequency oscillations recorded at multiple points across the paramedian cortex episodically synchronize immediately before and desynchronize during the lever press. The electrode contacts were grouped according to their temporal course of phase synchrony around the time of lever press. Contact groups presented patches with slightly stronger synchrony values in the medio-lateral direction, and did not appear to form parasagittal zones. The size and location of these patches on the cortical surface are in agreement with the sensory evoked granular layer patches originally reported by Welker's lab (Shambes et al., 1978). Spatiotemporal synchrony of high frequency field potentials has not been reported at such large-scales previously in the cerebellar cortex. PMID:26257613

  8. Rethinking reproductive "tourism" as reproductive "exile".

    PubMed

    Inhorn, Marcia C; Patrizio, Pasquale

    2009-09-01

    Whereas reproductive "tourism" implies leisure travel, reproductive "exile" bespeaks the numerous difficulties and constraints faced by infertile patients who are "forced" to travel globally for assisted reproduction. Given this reality, it is time to rethink the language of "reproductive tourism," replacing it with more accurate and patient-centered terms. PMID:19249025

  9. Simulating the Effect of Reinforcement Learning on Neuronal Synchrony and Periodicity in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Hélie, Sébastien; Fleischer, Pierson J

    2016-01-01

    The study of rhythms and oscillations in the brain is gaining attention. While it is unclear exactly what the role of oscillation, synchrony, and rhythm is, it appears increasingly likely that synchrony is related to normal and abnormal brain states and possibly cognition. In this article, we explore the relationship between basal ganglia (BG) synchrony and reinforcement learning. We simulate a biologically-realistic model of the striatum initially proposed by Ponzi and Wickens (2010) and enhance the model by adding plastic cortico-BG synapses that can be modified using reinforcement learning. The effect of reinforcement learning on striatal rhythmic activity is then explored, and disrupted using simulated deep brain stimulation (DBS). The stimulator injects current in the brain structure to which it is attached, which affects neuronal synchrony. The results show that training the model without DBS yields a high accuracy in the learning task and reduced the number of active neurons in the striatum, along with an increased firing periodicity and a decreased firing synchrony between neurons in the same assembly. In addition, a spectral decomposition shows a stronger signal for correct trials than incorrect trials in high frequency bands. If the DBS is ON during the training phase, but not the test phase, the amount of learning in the model is reduced, along with firing periodicity. Similar to when the DBS is OFF, spectral decomposition shows a stronger signal for correct trials than for incorrect trials in high frequency domains, but this phenoemenon happens in higher frequency bands than when the DBS is OFF. Synchrony between the neurons is not affected. Finally, the results show that turning the DBS ON at test increases both firing periodicity and striatal synchrony, and spectral decomposition of the signal show that neural activity synchronizes with the DBS fundamental frequency (and its harmonics). Turning the DBS ON during the test phase results in chance

  10. Simulating the Effect of Reinforcement Learning on Neuronal Synchrony and Periodicity in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Hélie, Sébastien; Fleischer, Pierson J.

    2016-01-01

    The study of rhythms and oscillations in the brain is gaining attention. While it is unclear exactly what the role of oscillation, synchrony, and rhythm is, it appears increasingly likely that synchrony is related to normal and abnormal brain states and possibly cognition. In this article, we explore the relationship between basal ganglia (BG) synchrony and reinforcement learning. We simulate a biologically-realistic model of the striatum initially proposed by Ponzi and Wickens (2010) and enhance the model by adding plastic cortico-BG synapses that can be modified using reinforcement learning. The effect of reinforcement learning on striatal rhythmic activity is then explored, and disrupted using simulated deep brain stimulation (DBS). The stimulator injects current in the brain structure to which it is attached, which affects neuronal synchrony. The results show that training the model without DBS yields a high accuracy in the learning task and reduced the number of active neurons in the striatum, along with an increased firing periodicity and a decreased firing synchrony between neurons in the same assembly. In addition, a spectral decomposition shows a stronger signal for correct trials than incorrect trials in high frequency bands. If the DBS is ON during the training phase, but not the test phase, the amount of learning in the model is reduced, along with firing periodicity. Similar to when the DBS is OFF, spectral decomposition shows a stronger signal for correct trials than for incorrect trials in high frequency domains, but this phenoemenon happens in higher frequency bands than when the DBS is OFF. Synchrony between the neurons is not affected. Finally, the results show that turning the DBS ON at test increases both firing periodicity and striatal synchrony, and spectral decomposition of the signal show that neural activity synchronizes with the DBS fundamental frequency (and its harmonics). Turning the DBS ON during the test phase results in chance

  11. Dissecting geographic variation in population synchrony using the common vole in central Europe as a test bed.

    PubMed

    Gouveia, Ana R; Bjørnstad, Ottar N; Tkadlec, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Spatial synchrony of population fluctuations is ubiquitous in nature. Theoretical models suggest that correlated environmental stochasticity, dispersal, and trophic interactions are important promoters of synchrony in nature to leave characteristic signatures of distance-dependent decays in synchrony. Recent refinements of this theory have clarified how distance-decay curves may steepen if local dynamics are governed by different density-dependent feedbacks and how synchrony should vary regionally if the importance and correlation of environmental stochasticity is location-specific. We analysed spatiotemporal data for the common vole, Microtus arvalis from 49 districts in the Czech Republic to examine the pattern of population synchrony between 2000 and 2014. By extending the nonparametric covariation function, we develop a quantitative method that allows a dissection of the effects of distance and additional variables such as altitude on synchrony. To examine the pattern of local synchrony, we apply the noncentered local-indicators of spatial association (ncLISA) which highlights areas with different degrees of synchrony than expected by the region-wide average. Additionally, in order to understand the obtained pattern of local spatial correlations, we have regressed LISA results against the proportion of forest in each district. The common vole abundances fluctuated strongly and exhibited synchronous dynamics with the typical tendency for a decline of synchrony with increasing distance but, not with altitude. The correlation between the neighbor districts decreases as the proportion of forest increases. Forested areas are suboptimum habitats and are strongly avoided by common voles. The investigation of spatiotemporal dynamics in animal populations is a key issue in ecology. Although the majority of studies are focused on testing hypotheses about which mechanisms are involved in shaping this dynamics it is crucial to understand the sources of variation involved

  12. Vertebrate Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Kornbluth, Sally; Fissore, Rafael

    2015-10-01

    Vertebrate reproduction requires a myriad of precisely orchestrated events-in particular, the maternal production of oocytes, the paternal production of sperm, successful fertilization, and initiation of early embryonic cell divisions. These processes are governed by a host of signaling pathways. Protein kinase and phosphatase signaling pathways involving Mos, CDK1, RSK, and PP2A regulate meiosis during maturation of the oocyte. Steroid signals-specifically testosterone-regulate spermatogenesis, as does signaling by G-protein-coupled hormone receptors. Finally, calcium signaling is essential for both sperm motility and fertilization. Altogether, this signaling symphony ensures the production of viable offspring, offering a chance of genetic immortality. PMID:26430215

  13. Scale-dependent phenological synchrony between songbirds and their caterpillar food source.

    PubMed

    Hinks, Amy E; Cole, Ella F; Daniels, Katherine J; Wilkin, Teddy A; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Sheldon, Ben C

    2015-07-01

    In seasonal environments, the timing of reproduction has important fitness consequences. Our current understanding of the determinants of reproductive phenology in natural systems is limited because studies often ignore the spatial scale on which animals interact with their environment. When animals use a restricted amount of space and the phenology of resources is spatially variable, selection may favor sensitivity to small-scale environmental variation. Population-level studies of how songbirds track the changing phenology of their food source have been influential in explaining how populations adjust to changing climates but have largely ignored the spatial scale at which phenology varies. We explored whether individual great tits (Parus major) synchronize their breeding with phenological events in their local environment and investigated the spatial scale at which this occurs. We demonstrate marked variation in the timing of food availability, at a spatial scale relevant to individual birds, and that such local variation predicts the breeding phenology of individuals. Using a 45-year data set, we show that measures of vegetation phenology at very local scales are the most important predictors of timing of breeding within years, suggesting that birds can fine-tune their phenology to that of other trophic levels. Knowledge of the determinants of variation in reproductive behavior at different spatial scales is likely to be critical in understanding how selection operates on breeding phenology in natural populations. PMID:26098341

  14. An evaluation of fish early life stage tests for predicting reproductive and longer-term toxicity from plant protection product active substances.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, James R; Maynard, Samuel K; Crane, Mark

    2014-08-01

    The chronic toxicity of chemicals to fish is routinely assessed by using fish early life stage (ELS) test results. Fish full life cycle (FLC) tests are generally required only when toxicity, bioaccumulation, and persistence triggers are met or when there is a suspicion of potential endocrine-disrupting properties. This regulatory approach is based on a relationship between the results of fish ELS and FLC studies first established more than 35 yrs ago. Recently, this relationship has been challenged by some regulatory authorities, and it has been recommended that more substances should undergo FLC testing. In addition, a project proposal has been submitted to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to develop a fish partial life cycle (PLC) test including a reproductive assessment. Both FLC and PLC tests are animal- and resource-intensive and technically challenging and should therefore be undertaken only if there is clear evidence that they are necessary for coming to a regulatory decision. The present study reports on an analysis of a database of paired fish ELS and FLC endpoints for plant protection product active substances from European Union draft assessment reports and the US Environmental Protection Agency Office of Pesticide Programs Pesticide Ecotoxicity Database. Analysis of this database shows a clear relationship between ELS and FLC responses, with similar median sensitivity across substances when no-observed-effect concentrations (NOECs) are compared. There was also no indication that classification of a substance as a mammalian reproductive toxicant leads to more sensitive effects in fish FLC tests than in ELS tests. Indeed, the response of the ELS tests was generally more sensitive than the most sensitive reproduction NOEC from a FLC test. This analysis indicates that current testing strategies and guidelines are fit for purpose and that there is no need for fish full or partial life cycle tests for most plant protection

  15. Reproduction, physiology and biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter summarizes fundamental knowledge and recent discoveries about the reproduction, physiology and biochemistry of plant-parasitic nematodes. Various types of reproduction are reviewed, including sexual reproduction and mitotic and meiotic parthenogenesis. Although much is known about the p...

  16. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum , meet in the female's reproductive system to create a new individual. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans, like other organisms, ...

  17. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... gamete, the egg or ovum, meet in the female's reproductive system to create a baby. Both the male and female reproductive systems are essential for reproduction. Humans pass certain characteristics ...

  18. Normal Female Reproductive Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... Reproductive System, Female, Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the female reproductive system; drawing shows the uterus, myometrium (muscular outer layer ...

  19. Female Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Female Reproductive System KidsHealth > For Parents > Female Reproductive System Print A ... the egg or sperm. continue Components of the Female Reproductive System Unlike the male, the human female has a ...

  20. Integrator or coincidence detector --- what shapes the relation of stimulus synchrony and the operational mode of a neuron?

    PubMed

    Koutsou, Achilleas; Kanev, Jacob; Economidou, Maria; Christodoulou, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The operational mode of a neuron (i.e., whether a neuron is an integrator or a coincidence detector) is in part determined by the degree of synchrony in the firing of its pre-synaptic neural population. More specifically, it is determined by the degree of synchrony that causes the neuron to fire. In this paper, we investigate the relationship between the input and the operational mode. We compare the response-relevant input synchrony, which measures the operational mode and can be determined using a membrane potential slope-based measure [7], with the spike time distance of the spike trains driving the neuron, which measures spike train synchrony and can be determined using the multivariate SPIKE-distance metric [10]. We discover that the relationship between the two measures changes substantially based on the values of the parameters of the input (firing rate and number of spike trains) and the parameters of the post-synaptic neuron (synaptic weight, membrane leak time constant and spike threshold). More importantly, we determine how the parameters interact to shape the synchrony-operational mode relationship. Our results indicate that the amount of depolarisation caused by a highly synchronous volley of input spikes, is the most influential factor in defining the relationship between input synchrony and operational mode. This is defined by the number of input spikes and the membrane potential depolarisation caused per spike, compared to the spike threshold. PMID:27106185

  1. The "conscious pilot"-dendritic synchrony moves through the brain to mediate consciousness.

    PubMed

    Hameroff, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive brain functions including sensory processing and control of behavior are understood as "neurocomputation" in axonal-dendritic synaptic networks of "integrate-and-fire" neurons. Cognitive neurocomputation with consciousness is accompanied by 30- to 90-Hz gamma synchrony electroencephalography (EEG), and non-conscious neurocomputation is not. Gamma synchrony EEG derives largely from neuronal groups linked by dendritic-dendritic gap junctions, forming transient syncytia ("dendritic webs") in input/integration layers oriented sideways to axonal-dendritic neurocomputational flow. As gap junctions open and close, a gamma-synchronized dendritic web can rapidly change topology and move through the brain as a spatiotemporal envelope performing collective integration and volitional choices correlating with consciousness. The "conscious pilot" is a metaphorical description for a mobile gamma-synchronized dendritic web as vehicle for a conscious agent/pilot which experiences and assumes control of otherwise non-conscious auto-pilot neurocomputation. PMID:19669425

  2. Temporal synchrony and gamma to theta power conversion in the dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Vaidya, Sachin P.; Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Timing is a crucial aspect of synaptic integration. For pyramidal neurons that integrate thousands of synaptic inputs spread across hundreds of microns, it is thus a challenge to maintain the timing of incoming inputs at the axo-somatic integration site. Here we show that pyramidal neurons in the rodent hippocampus use a gradient of inductance in the form of HCN channels as an active mechanism to counteract location-dependent temporal differences of dendritic inputs at the soma. Using simultaneous multi-site whole cell recordings complemented by computational modeling, we find that this intrinsic biophysical mechanism produces temporal synchrony of rhythmic inputs in the theta and gamma frequency ranges across wide regions of the dendritic tree. While gamma and theta oscillations are known to synchronize activity across space in neuronal networks, our results identify a novel mechanism by which this synchrony extends to activity within single pyramidal neurons with complex dendritic arbors. PMID:24185428

  3. A coarse-grained framework for spiking neuronal networks: between homogeneity and synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiwei; Zhou, Douglas; Cai, David; Rangan, Aaditya V

    2014-08-01

    Homogeneously structured networks of neurons driven by noise can exhibit a broad range of dynamic behavior. This dynamic behavior can range from homogeneity to synchrony, and often incorporates brief spurts of collaborative activity which we call multiple-firing-events (MFEs). These multiple-firing-events depend on neither structured architecture nor structured input, and are an emergent property of the system. Although these MFEs likely play a major role in the neuronal avalanches observed in culture and in vivo, the mechanisms underlying these MFEs cannot easily be captured using current population-dynamics models. In this work we introduce a coarse-grained framework which illustrates certain dynamics responsible for the generation of MFEs. By using a new kind of ensemble-average, this coarse-grained framework can not only address the nucleation of MFEs, but can also faithfully capture a broad range of dynamic regimes ranging from homogeneity to synchrony. PMID:24338105

  4. Coexistence of tinnitus and hyperacusis in individuals with auditory dys-synchrony: A single case study

    PubMed Central

    Megha, K. N.; Adithya, Sugathan; Keerthana, K. P.; Konadath, Sreeraj

    2016-01-01

    Summary Certain clinical pathologies affecting the ear and hearing mechanism may co-exist. It is necessary to probe in detail into such conditions so that the pathophysiology is well understood. This research paper through a single case study tries to explain the probable pathophysiology behind coexistence of three different clinical conditions namely auditory dys-synchrony, hyperacusis and tinnitus. These conditions are common in the clinics, but the coexistence of all the three is rare and demands explanation beyond what is available in the literature. The assumed model highlights involvement of the outer hair cell's motor function in the cochlea along with the auditory central gain mechanism to explain possible pathophysiology behind coexistence of the three conditions. This model will provide insight into the probable link between the contribution of peripheral and central structures of hearing in generating tinnitus and hyperacusis in individuals having auditory dys-synchrony. PMID:26989651

  5. Incorporating oximeter analyses to investigate synchronies in heart rate while teaching and learning about race

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amat, Arnau; Zapata, Corinna; Alexakos, Konstantinos; Pride, Leah D.; Paylor-Smith, Christian; Hernandez, Matthew

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we look closely at two events selected through event-oriented inquiry that were part of a classroom presentation on race. The first event was a provocative discussion about Mark Twain's (Pudd'nhead Wilson, Harper, New York, 1899) and passing for being White. The other was a discussion on the use of the N-word. Grounded in authentic inquiry, we use ethnographic narrative, cogenerative dialogues, and video and oximeter data analyses as part of a multi-ontological approach for studying emotions. Statistical analysis of oximeter data shows statistically significant heart rate synchrony among two of the coteachers during their presentations, providing evidence of emotional synchrony, resonance, and social and emotional contagion.

  6. True and Perceived Synchrony are Preferentially Associated With Particular Sensory Pairings.

    PubMed

    Noel, Jean-Paul; Wallace, Mark T; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Alais, David; Van der Burg, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Perception and behavior are fundamentally shaped by the integration of different sensory modalities into unique multisensory representations, a process governed by spatio-temporal correspondence. Prior work has characterized temporal perception using the point in time at which subjects are most likely to judge multisensory stimuli to be simultaneous (PSS) and the temporal binding window (TBW) over which participants are likely to do so. Here we examine the relationship between the PSS and the TBW within and between individuals, and within and between three sensory combinations: audiovisual, audiotactile and visuotactile. We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not. Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony. Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony. PMID:26621493

  7. True and Perceived Synchrony are Preferentially Associated With Particular Sensory Pairings

    PubMed Central

    Noel, Jean-Paul; Wallace, Mark T.; Orchard-Mills, Emily; Alais, David; Van der Burg, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Perception and behavior are fundamentally shaped by the integration of different sensory modalities into unique multisensory representations, a process governed by spatio-temporal correspondence. Prior work has characterized temporal perception using the point in time at which subjects are most likely to judge multisensory stimuli to be simultaneous (PSS) and the temporal binding window (TBW) over which participants are likely to do so. Here we examine the relationship between the PSS and the TBW within and between individuals, and within and between three sensory combinations: audiovisual, audiotactile and visuotactile. We demonstrate that TBWs correlate within individuals and across multisensory pairings, but PSSs do not. Further, we reveal that while the audiotactile and audiovisual pairings show tightly related TBWs, they also exhibit a differential relationship with respect to true and perceived multisensory synchrony. Thus, audiotactile and audiovisual temporal processing share mechanistic features yet are respectively functionally linked to objective and subjective synchrony. PMID:26621493

  8. An Eight Month Randomized Controlled Exercise Intervention Alters Resting State Synchrony in Overweight Children

    PubMed Central

    Krafft, Cynthia E.; Pierce, Jordan E.; Schwarz, Nicolette F.; Chi, Lingxi; Weinberger, Abby L.; Schaeffer, David J.; Rodrigue, Amanda L.; Camchong, Jazmin; Allison, Jerry D.; Yanasak, Nathan E.; Liu, Tianming; Davis, Catherine L.; McDowell, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥ 85th percentile) children 8–11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  9. An eight month randomized controlled exercise intervention alters resting state synchrony in overweight children.

    PubMed

    Krafft, C E; Pierce, J E; Schwarz, N F; Chi, L; Weinberger, A L; Schaeffer, D J; Rodrigue, A L; Camchong, J; Allison, J D; Yanasak, N E; Liu, T; Davis, C L; McDowell, J E

    2014-01-01

    Children with low aerobic fitness have altered brain function compared to higher-fit children. This study examined the effect of an 8-month exercise intervention on resting state synchrony. Twenty-two sedentary, overweight (body mass index ≥85th percentile) children 8-11 years old were randomly assigned to one of two after-school programs: aerobic exercise (n=13) or sedentary attention control (n=9). Before and after the 8-month programs, all subjects participated in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. Independent components analysis identified several networks, with four chosen for between-group analysis: salience, default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks. The default mode, cognitive control, and motor networks showed more spatial refinement over time in the exercise group compared to controls. The motor network showed increased synchrony in the exercise group with the right medial frontal gyrus compared to controls. Exercise behavior may enhance brain development in children. PMID:24096138

  10. Reduction in cortical gamma synchrony during depolarized state of slow wave activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Eunjin; McNally, James M.; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2013-01-01

    EEG gamma band oscillations have been proposed to account for the neural synchronization crucial for perceptual integration. While increased gamma power and synchronization is generally observed during cognitive tasks performed during wake, several studies have additionally reported increased gamma power during sleep or anesthesia, raising questions about the characteristics of gamma oscillation during impaired consciousness and its role in conscious processing. Phase-amplitude modulation has been observed between slow wave activity (SWA, 0.5–4 Hz) and gamma oscillations during ketamine/xylazine anesthesia or sleep, showing increased gamma activity corresponding to the depolarized (ON) state of SWA. Here we divided gamma activity into its ON and OFF (hyperpolarized) state components based on the phase of SWA induced by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia and compared their power and synchrony with wake state levels in mice. We further investigated the state-dependent changes in both gamma power and synchrony across primary motor and primary somatosensory cortical regions and their interconnected thalamic regions throughout anesthesia and recovery. As observed previously, gamma power was as high as during wake specifically during the ON state of SWA. However, the synchrony of this gamma activity between somatosensory-motor cortical regions was significantly reduced compared to the baseline wake state. In addition, the somatosensory-motor cortical synchrony of gamma oscillations was reduced and restored in an anesthetic state-dependent manner, reflecting the changing depth of anesthesia. Our results provide evidence that during anesthesia changes in long-range information integration between cortical regions might be more critical for changes in consciousness than changes in local gamma oscillatory power. PMID:24379760

  11. Collective Efficacy in Sports and Physical Activities: Perceived Emotional Synchrony and Shared Flow

    PubMed Central

    Zumeta, Larraitz N.; Oriol, Xavier; Telletxea, Saioa; Amutio, Alberto; Basabe, Nekane

    2016-01-01

    This cross-sectional study analyzes the relationship between collective efficacy and two psychosocial processes involved in collective sport-physical activities. It argues that in-group identification and fusion with the group will affect collective efficacy (CE). A sample of 276 university students answered different scales regarding their participation in collective physical and sport activities. Multiple-mediation analyses showed that shared flow and perceived emotional synchrony mediate the relationship between in-group identification and CE, whereas the relationship between identity fusion and CE was only mediated by perceived emotional synchrony. Results suggest that both psychosocial processes explain the positive effects of in-group identification and identity fusion with the group in collective efficacy. Specifically, the role of perceived emotional synchrony in explaining the positive effects of participation in collective sport-physical activities is underlined. In sum, this study highlights the utility of collective actions and social identities to explain the psychosocial processes related to collective efficacy in physical and sports activities. Finally, practical implications are discussed. PMID:26779077

  12. Rigid patterns of synchrony for equilibria and periodic cycles in network dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian

    2016-09-01

    We survey general results relating patterns of synchrony to network topology, applying the formalism of coupled cell systems. We also discuss patterns of phase-locking for periodic states, where cells have identical waveforms but regularly spaced phases. We focus on rigid patterns, which are not changed by small perturbations of the differential equation. Symmetry is one mechanism that creates patterns of synchrony and phase-locking. In general networks, there is another: balanced colorings of the cells. A symmetric network may have anomalous patterns of synchrony and phase-locking that are not consequences of symmetry. We introduce basic notions on coupled cell networks and their associated systems of admissible differential equations. Periodic states also possess spatio-temporal symmetries, leading to phase relations; these are classified by the H/K theorem and its analog for general networks. Systematic general methods for computing the stability of synchronous states exist for symmetric networks, but stability in general networks requires methods adapted to special classes of model equations.

  13. Role of Myelin Plasticity in Oscillations and Synchrony of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pajevic, S.; Basser, P. J.; Fields, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Conduction time is typically ignored in computational models of neural network function. Here we consider the effects of conduction delays on the synchrony of neuronal activity and neural oscillators, and evaluate the consequences of allowing conduction velocity (CV) to be regulated adaptively. We propose that CV variation, mediated by myelin, could provide an important mechanism of activity-dependent nervous system plasticity. Even small changes in CV, resulting from small changes in myelin thickness or nodal structure, could have profound effects on neuronal network function in terms of spike-time arrival, oscillation frequency, oscillator coupling, and propagation of brain waves. For example, a conduction delay of 5 ms could change interactions of two coupled oscillators at the upper end of the gamma frequency range (∼100 Hz) from constructive to destructive interference; delays smaller than 1 ms could change the phase by 30°, significantly affecting signal amplitude. Myelin plasticity, as another form of activity-dependent plasticity, is relevant not only to nervous system development but also to complex information processing tasks that involve coupling and synchrony among different brain rhythms. We use coupled oscillator models with time delays to explore the importance of adaptive time delays and adaptive synaptic strengths. The impairment of activity-dependent myelination and the loss of adaptive time delays may contribute to disorders where hyper- and hypo-synchrony of neuronal firing leads to dysfunction (e.g., dyslexia, schizophrenia, epilepsy). PMID:24291730

  14. Neural synchrony indexes impaired motor slowing after errors and novelty following white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Ullsperger, Markus; Obrig, Hellmuth; Villringer, Arno; Quinque, Eva; Schroeter, Matthias L; Bretschneider, Katharina J; Arelin, Katrin; Roggenhofer, Elisabeth; Frisch, Stefan; Klein, Tilmann A

    2016-02-01

    In humans, action errors and perceptual novelty elicit activity in a shared frontostriatal brain network, allowing them to adapt their ongoing behavior to such unexpected action outcomes. Healthy and pathologic aging reduces the integrity of white matter pathways that connect individual hubs of such networks and can impair the associated cognitive functions. Here, we investigated whether structural disconnection within this network because of small-vessel disease impairs the neural processes that subserve motor slowing after errors and novelty (post-error slowing, PES; post-novel slowing, PNS). Participants with intact frontostriatal circuitry showed increased right-lateralized beta-band (12-24 Hz) synchrony between frontocentral and frontolateral electrode sites in the electroencephalogram after errors and novelty, indexing increased neural communication. Importantly, this synchrony correlated with PES and PNS across participants. Furthermore, such synchrony was reduced in participants with frontostriatal white matter damage, in line with reduced PES and PNS. The results demonstrate that behavioral change after errors and novelty result from coordinated neural activity across a frontostriatal brain network and that such cognitive control is impaired by reduced white matter integrity. PMID:26563990

  15. Body Movement Synchrony in Psychotherapeutic Counseling: A Study Using the Video-Based Quantification Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaoka, Chika; Komori, Masashi

    Body movement synchrony (i. e. rhythmic synchronization between the body movements of interacting partners) has been described by subjective impressions of skilled counselors and has been considered to reflect the depth of the client-counselor relationship. This study analyzed temporal changes in body movement synchrony through a video analysis of client-counselor dialogues in counseling sessions. Four 50-minute psychotherapeutic counseling sessions were analyzed, including two negatively evaluated sessions (low evaluation groups) and two positively evaluated sessions (high evaluation groups). In addition, two 50-minute ordinary advice sessions between two high school teachers and the clients in the high rating group were analyzed. All sessions represent role-playing. The intensity of the participants' body movement was measured using a video-based system. Temporal change of body movement synchrony was analyzed using moving correlations of the intensity between the two time series. The results revealed (1) A consistent temporal pattern among the four counseling cases, though the moving correlation coefficients were higher for the high evaluation group than the low evaluation group and (2) Different temporal patterns for the counseling and advice sessions even when the clients were the same. These results were discussed from the perspective of the quality of client-counselor relationship.

  16. Regional-scale climate-variability synchrony of cholera epidemics in West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Constantin de Magny, Guillaume; Guégan, Jean-François; Petit, Michel; Cazelles, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Background The relationship between cholera and climate was explored in Africa, the continent with the most reported cases, by analyzing monthly 20-year cholera time series for five coastal adjoining West African countries: Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Togo, Benin and Nigeria. Methods We used wavelet analyses and derived methods because these are useful mathematical tools to provide information on the evolution of the periodic component over time and allow quantification of non-stationary associations between time series. Results The temporal variability of cholera incidence exhibits an interannual component, and a significant synchrony in cholera epidemics is highlighted at the end of the 1980's. This observed synchrony across countries, even if transient through time, is also coherent with both the local variability of rainfall and the global climate variability quantified by the Indian Oscillation Index. Conclusion Results of this study suggest that large and regional scale climate variability influence both the temporal dynamics and the spatial synchrony of cholera epidemics in human populations in the Gulf of Guinea, as has been described for two other tropical regions of the world, western South America and Bangladesh. PMID:17371602

  17. Temporal dynamics of musical emotions examined through intersubject synchrony of brain activity.

    PubMed

    Trost, Wiebke; Frühholz, Sascha; Cochrane, Tom; Cojan, Yann; Vuilleumier, Patrik

    2015-12-01

    To study emotional reactions to music, it is important to consider the temporal dynamics of both affective responses and underlying brain activity. Here, we investigated emotions induced by music using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with a data-driven approach based on intersubject correlations (ISC). This method allowed us to identify moments in the music that produced similar brain activity (i.e. synchrony) among listeners under relatively natural listening conditions. Continuous ratings of subjective pleasantness and arousal elicited by the music were also obtained for the music outside of the scanner. Our results reveal synchronous activations in left amygdala, left insula and right caudate nucleus that were associated with higher arousal, whereas positive valence ratings correlated with decreases in amygdala and caudate activity. Additional analyses showed that synchronous amygdala responses were driven by energy-related features in the music such as root mean square and dissonance, while synchrony in insula was additionally sensitive to acoustic event density. Intersubject synchrony also occurred in the left nucleus accumbens, a region critically implicated in reward processing. Our study demonstrates the feasibility and usefulness of an approach based on ISC to explore the temporal dynamics of music perception and emotion in naturalistic conditions. PMID:25994970

  18. Rhythms and blues: modulation of oscillatory synchrony and the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments

    PubMed Central

    Leuchter, Andrew F.; Hunter, Aimee M.; Krantz, David E.; Cook, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD) act at different hierarchical levels of biological complexity, ranging from the individual synapse to the brain as a whole. Theories of antidepressant medication action traditionally have focused on the level of cell-to-cell interaction and synaptic neurotransmission. However, recent evidence suggests that modulation of synchronized electrical activity in neuronal networks is a common effect of antidepressant treatments, including not only medications, but also neuromodulatory treatments such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Synchronization of oscillatory network activity in particular frequency bands has been proposed to underlie neurodevelopmental and learning processes, and also may be important in the mechanism of action of antidepressant treatments. Here, we review current research on the relationship between neuroplasticity and oscillatory synchrony, which suggests that oscillatory synchrony may help mediate neuroplastic changes related to neurodevelopment, learning, and memory, as well as medication and neuromodulatory treatment for MDD. We hypothesize that medication and neuromodulation treatments may have related effects on the rate and pattern of neuronal firing, and that these effects underlie antidepressant efficacy. Elucidating the mechanisms through which oscillatory synchrony may be related to neuroplasticity could lead to enhanced treatment strategies for MDD. PMID:25809789

  19. Role of myelin plasticity in oscillations and synchrony of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Pajevic, S; Basser, P J; Fields, R D

    2014-09-12

    Conduction time is typically ignored in computational models of neural network function. Here we consider the effects of conduction delays on the synchrony of neuronal activity and neural oscillators, and evaluate the consequences of allowing conduction velocity (CV) to be regulated adaptively. We propose that CV variation, mediated by myelin, could provide an important mechanism of activity-dependent nervous system plasticity. Even small changes in CV, resulting from small changes in myelin thickness or nodal structure, could have profound effects on neuronal network function in terms of spike-time arrival, oscillation frequency, oscillator coupling, and propagation of brain waves. For example, a conduction delay of 5ms could change interactions of two coupled oscillators at the upper end of the gamma frequency range (∼100Hz) from constructive to destructive interference; delays smaller than 1ms could change the phase by 30°, significantly affecting signal amplitude. Myelin plasticity, as another form of activity-dependent plasticity, is relevant not only to nervous system development but also to complex information processing tasks that involve coupling and synchrony among different brain rhythms. We use coupled oscillator models with time delays to explore the importance of adaptive time delays and adaptive synaptic strengths. The impairment of activity-dependent myelination and the loss of adaptive time delays may contribute to disorders where hyper- and hypo-synchrony of neuronal firing leads to dysfunction (e.g., dyslexia, schizophrenia, epilepsy). PMID:24291730

  20. Finding synchrony in the desynchronized EEG: the history and interpretation of gamma rhythms

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Omar J.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2013-01-01

    Neocortical gamma (30–80 Hz) rhythms correlate with attention, movement and perception and are often disrupted in neurological and psychiatric disorders. Gamma primarily occurs during alert brain states characterized by the so-called “desynchronized” EEG. Is this because gamma rhythms are devoid of synchrony? In this review we take a historical approach to answering this question. Richard Caton and Adolf Beck were the first to report the rhythmic voltage fluctuations in the animal brain. They were limited by the poor amplification of their early galvanometers. Thus when they presented light or other stimuli, they observed a disappearance of the large resting oscillations. Several groups have since shown that visual stimuli lead to low amplitude gamma rhythms and that groups of neurons in the visual cortices fire together during individual gamma cycles. This synchronous firing can more strongly drive downstream neurons. We discuss how gamma-band synchrony can support ongoing communication between brain regions, and highlight an important fact: there is at least local neuronal synchrony during gamma rhythms. Thus, it is best to refer to the low amplitude, high frequency EEG as an “activated”, not “desynchronized”, EEG. PMID:23964210

  1. GABAB-mediated rescue of altered excitatory–inhibitory balance, gamma synchrony and behavioral deficits following constitutive NMDAR-hypofunction

    PubMed Central

    Gandal, M J; Sisti, J; Klook, K; Ortinski, P I; Leitman, V; Liang, Y; Thieu, T; Anderson, R; Pierce, R C; Jonak, G; Gur, R E; Carlson, G; Siegel, S J

    2012-01-01

    Reduced N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDAR) signaling has been associated with schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability. NMDAR-hypofunction is thought to contribute to social, cognitive and gamma (30–80 Hz) oscillatory abnormalities, phenotypes common to these disorders. However, circuit-level mechanisms underlying such deficits remain unclear. This study investigated the relationship between gamma synchrony, excitatory–inhibitory (E/I) signaling, and behavioral phenotypes in NMDA-NR1neo−/− mice, which have constitutively reduced expression of the obligate NR1 subunit to model disrupted developmental NMDAR function. Constitutive NMDAR-hypofunction caused a loss of E/I balance, with an increase in intrinsic pyramidal cell excitability and a selective disruption of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Disrupted E/I coupling was associated with deficits in auditory-evoked gamma signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Gamma-band abnormalities predicted deficits in spatial working memory and social preference, linking cellular changes in E/I signaling to target behaviors. The GABAB-receptor agonist baclofen improved E/I balance, gamma-SNR and broadly reversed behavioral deficits. These data demonstrate a clinically relevant, highly translatable neural-activity-based biomarker for preclinical screening and therapeutic development across a broad range of disorders that share common endophenotypes and disrupted NMDA-receptor signaling. PMID:22806213

  2. No Evidence for Threat-Induced Spatial Prioritization of Somatosensory Stimulation during Pain Control Using a Synchrony Judgment Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Stefaan

    2016-01-01

    Topical research efforts on attention to pain often take a critical look at the modulatory role of top-down factors. For instance, it has been shown that the fearful expectation of pain at a location of the body directs attention towards that body part. In addition, motivated attempts to control this pain were found to modulate this prioritization effect. Such studies have often used a temporal order judgment task, requiring participants to judge the order in which two stimuli are presented by indicating which one they perceived first. As this constitutes a forced-choice response format, such studies may be subject to response bias. The aim of the current study was to address this concern. We used a ternary synchrony judgment paradigm, in which participants judged the order in which two somatosensory stimuli occurred. Critically, participants now also had the option to give a ‘simultaneous’ response when they did not perceive a difference. This way we eliminated the need for guessing, and thus reduced the risk of response bias. One location was threatened with the possibility of pain in half of the trials, as predicted by an auditory cue. Additionally, half of the participants (pain control group) were encouraged to avoid pain stimuli by executing a quick button press. The other half (comparison group) performed a similar action, albeit unrelated to the occurrence of pain. Our data did not support threat-induced spatial prioritization, nor did we find evidence that pain control attempts influenced attention in any way. PMID:27270456

  3. Secondary reproduction in the herbaceous monocarp Lobelia inflata: time-constrained primary reproduction does not result in increased deferral of reproductive effort

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although semelparity is a life history characterized by a single reproductive episode within a single reproductive season, some semelparous organisms facultatively express a second bout of reproduction, either in a subsequent season (“facultative iteroparity”) or later within the same season as the primary bout (“secondary reproduction”). Secondary reproduction has been explained as the adaptive deferral of reproductive potential under circumstances in which some fraction of reproductive success would otherwise have been lost (due, for example, to inopportune timing). This deferral hypothesis predicts a positive relationship between constraints on primary reproduction and expression of secondary reproduction. The herbaceous monocarp Lobelia inflata has been observed occasionally to express a secondary reproductive episode in the field. However, it is unknown whether secondary reproduction is an example of adaptive reproductive deferral, or is more parsimoniously explained as the vestigial expression of iteroparity after a recent transition to semelparity. Here, we experimentally manipulate effective season length in each of three years to test whether secondary reproduction is a form of adaptive plasticity consistent with the deferral hypothesis. Results Our results were found to be inconsistent with the adaptive deferral explanation: first, plants whose primary reproduction was time-constrained exhibited decreased (not increased) allocation to subsequent secondary reproduction, a result that was consistent across all three years; second, secondary offspring—although viable in the laboratory—would not have the opportunity for expression under field conditions, and would thus not contribute to reproductive success. Conclusions Although alternative adaptive explanations for secondary reproduction cannot be precluded, we conclude that the characteristics of secondary reproduction found in L. inflata are consistent with predictions of incomplete

  4. In silico prediction and ex vivo evaluation of potential T-cell epitopes in glycoproteins 4 and 5 and nucleocapsid protein of genotype-I (European) of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Pujols, Joan; Ganges, Llilianne; Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Domingo, Mariano; Mateu, Enric

    2009-09-18

    T-cell epitopes of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) glycoproteins 4 (GP4), 5 (GP5) and nucleocapsid (N) were predicted using bioinformatics and later tested by IFN-gamma ELISPOT in pigs immunized with either a modified live vaccine (MLV) or DNA (open reading frames 4, 5 or 7). For MLV-vaccinated pigs, immunodominant epitopes were found in N but T-epitopes were also found in GP4 and GP5. For DNA-immunized pigs, some peptides were differently recognized. Using a large set of PRRSV sequences it was shown that N contains a conserved epitope and that for GP5, the genotype-I counterparts of previously reported epitopes of genotype-II strains were also immunogenic. PMID:19646408

  5. Neuromolecular Imaging Shows Temporal Synchrony Patterns between Serotonin and Movement within Neuronal Motor Circuits in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Broderick, Patricia A.

    2013-01-01

    The present discourse links the electrical and chemical properties of the brain with neurotransmitters and movement behaviors to further elucidate strategies to diagnose and treat brain disease. Neuromolecular imaging (NMI), based on electrochemical principles, is used to detect serotonin in nerve terminals (dorsal and ventral striata) and somatodendrites (ventral tegmentum) of reward/motor mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal brain circuits. Neuronal release of serotonin is detected at the same time and in the same animal, freely moving and unrestrained, while open-field behaviors are monitored via infrared photobeams. The purpose is to emphasize the unique ability of NMI and the BRODERICK PROBE® biosensors to empirically image a pattern of temporal synchrony, previously reported, for example, in Aplysia using central pattern generators (CPGs), serotonin and cerebral peptide-2. Temporal synchrony is reviewed within the context of the literature on central pattern generators, neurotransmitters and movement disorders. Specifically, temporal synchrony data are derived from studies on psychostimulant behavior with and without cocaine while at the same time and continuously, serotonin release in motor neurons within basal ganglia, is detected. The results show that temporal synchrony between the neurotransmitter, serotonin and natural movement occurs when the brain is NOT injured via, e.g., trauma, addictive drugs or psychiatric illness. In striking contrast, in the case of serotonin and cocaine-induced psychostimulant behavior, a different form of synchrony and also asynchrony can occur. Thus, the known dysfunctional movement behavior produced by cocaine may well be related to the loss of temporal synchrony, the loss of the ability to match serotonin in brain with motor activity. The empirical study of temporal synchrony patterns in humans and animals may be more relevant to the dynamics of motor circuits and movement behaviors than are studies of static parameters

  6. Reproductive health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Mark C; Ross, Lawrence S

    2014-02-01

    Most patients in the United States with reproductive health disorders are not covered by their health insurance for these problems. Health insurance plans consider reproductive care as a lifestyle choice not as a disease. If coverage is provided it is, most often, directed to female factor infertility and advanced reproductive techniques, ignoring male factor reproductive disorders. This article reviews the history of reproductive health care delivery and its present state, and considers its possible future direction. PMID:24286778

  7. Advantages of using aquatic animals for biomedical research on reproductive toxicology

    SciTech Connect

    Mottet, N.K.; Landolt, M.L.

    1987-04-01

    Major advantages of the use of aquatic animals, such as trout, English sole, or sea urchins, for studying the mechanisms of reproductive toxicology are discussed. The remarkable synchrony of differentiation of gametes in large quantities for detailed morphologic and biochemical measurements enables research not readily done on mammalian nonseasonal breeders. Structural differences such as the absence of a fibrous sheath in the more simple structure of fish and sea urchin sperm flagella facilitates comparative study of the mechanism of action of microtubules in flagella movement and the coupling of mitochondrial energy production to microtubules movement.

  8. Advantages of using aquatic animals for biomedical research on reproductive toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Mottet, N K; Landolt, M L

    1987-01-01

    Major advantages of the use of aquatic animals, such as trout, English sole, or sea urchins, for studying the mechanisms of reproductive toxicology are discussed. The remarkable synchrony of differentiation of gametes in large quantities for detailed morphologic and biochemical measurements enables research not readily done on mammalian nonseasonal breeders. Structural differences such as the absence of a fibrous sheath in the more simple structure of fish and sea urchin sperm flagella facilitates comparative study of the mechanism of action of microtubules in flagella movement and the coupling of mitochondrial energy production to microtubules movement. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:3297666

  9. Reproductive toxicity of binary and ternary mixture combinations of nickel, zinc, and lead to Ceriodaphnia dubia is best predicted with the independent action model.

    PubMed

    Nys, Charlotte; Janssen, Colin R; Blust, Ronny; Smolders, Erik; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2016-07-01

    Metals occur as mixtures in the environment. Risk assessment procedures for metals currently lack a framework to incorporate chronic metal mixture toxicity. In the present study, the toxicity of binary and ternary mixture combinations of Ni, Zn, and Pb was investigated in 3 large-scale experiments using the standard chronic (7-d) Ceriodaphnia dubia reproductive toxicity test. These metals were selected because of anticipated differences in mode of action. The toxicity of the metals in most mixtures, expressed as either free metal ion activities or as dissolved metal concentrations, were antagonistic relative to the concentration addition model, whereas no significant (p < 0.05) interactive effects were observed relative to the independent action model. The only exception was the binary Pb-Zn mixture, for which mixture effects were noninteractive based on the dissolved concentrations, but antagonistic based on free ion activities all relative to the independent action model. Overall, the independent action model fitted the observed toxicity better than the concentration addition model, which is consistent with the different modes of action of these metals. The concentration addition model mostly overestimated toxicity. Finally, the present study warns against extrapolation of the type of interactive effects between species, even when they are closely related. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1796-1805. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26648335

  10. Spatial-temporal scales of synchrony in marine zooplankton biomass and abundance patterns: A world-wide comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelder, Harold P.; Mackas, David L.; O'Brien, Todd D.

    2012-05-01

    Large scale synchrony in the fluctuations of abundance or biomass of marine fish populations in regions on opposite sides of an ocean basin or in different oceans have been viewed as externally forced by correlated environmental stochasticity (e.g., common external forcing), most often as atmospheric teleconnections of basin-to-global scale atmospheric forcing, such as the Arctic Oscillation, North Atlantic Oscillation or the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Specific causal mechanisms have been difficult to unequivocally discover, but possible mechanisms include influences on habitat temperatures, productivity operating through bottom-up (trophodynamic) mechanisms or direct climate influence on the fish populations (top-down mechanisms). For small pelagic fishes (sardines and anchovies) in widely separated large marine ecosystems that lack obvious ocean interconnectivity, it has been argued that the teleconnections may be atmospheric, acting on the fishes directly and propagating to the ecosystem from the middle out (wasp-waist species). Zooplankton biomass or abundance time series data from >100 sites world-wide are used to examine the spatial scales of coherent temporal synchrony. If spatially correlated environmental factors (like climate) are important for creating synchrony in fish populations via bottom-up effects (trophic interactions involving fish prey, e.g., zooplankton), then we would expect to observe synchrony in fluctuations of zooplankton biomass/numbers at spatial scales similar to those found for fish species. Zooplankton biomass/abundance have 50% spatial decorrelation scales of ca. 700-1400 km and scales of significant coherence that extend to separation distances of ca. 3000 km. These are also the spatial scales of environmental (sea surface temperature) synchrony from our global analysis. These scales are slightly greater than the 50% decorrelation scales of ca. 150-700 km for recruitment synchrony in Atlantic marine fish and survival and

  11. Spatial and temporal variation of seasonal synchrony in the deep-sea shrimp Aristeus antennatus in the Western Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Rueda, Lucía; Molinero, Juan Carlos; Guijarro, Beatriz; Massutí, Enric

    2015-08-01

    Resolving drivers of spatial synchrony in marine species is fundamental for the management and conservation of deep-sea ecosystems. Here we examine an 11-year data set of monthly catches per unit of effort (CPUE) of the red-shrimp Aristeus antennatus. These data comprise 16 locations of two population subunits in the Western Mediterranean, the Catalan coast and the Balearic archipelago. The analysis of their seasonal covariation and its space-time structure showed small-scale geographical segregation of locations linked with the seasonal fluctuations of CPUE. Results further revealed that seasonal synchrony dominates at short spatial scales (ca. 50 km), while asynchrony prevails are broader spatial scales (ca. 200-300 km). This spatial pattern, however, varied over the period examined, although it was specific for each population subunit suggesting contrasting drivers of seasonal synchrony. The Balearic Islands, a patchier population subunit, displayed a seasonal synchrony pattern mainly dependent on biological and oceanographic processes at local scales. By contrast, in the Catalan coast, the pattern appeared related with regional-scale climate, which triggers spatial differences in the phenology of primary producers and the timing of food advection to the seabed. These cascading processes depicted by our investigation shed light on underlying mechanisms shaping the temporal synchrony of broadly distributed deep-sea populations.

  12. Spatial synchrony in population dynamics: The effects of demographic stochasticity and density regulation with a spatial scale.

    PubMed

    Engen, Steinar; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2016-04-01

    We generalize a previous simple result by Lande et al. (1999) on how spatial autocorrelated noise, dispersal rate and distance as well as strength of density regulation determine the spatial scale of synchrony in population density. It is shown how demographic noise can be incorporated, what effect it has on variance and spatial scale of synchrony, and how it interacts with the point process for locations of individuals under random sampling. Although the effect of demographic noise is a rather complex interaction with environmental noise, migration and density regulation, its effect on population fluctuations and scale of synchrony can be presented in a transparent way. This is achieved by defining a characteristic area dependent on demographic and environmental variances as well as population density, and subsequently using this area to define a spatial demographic coefficient. The demographic noise acts through this coefficient on the spatial synchrony, which may increase or decrease with increasing demographic noise depending on other parameters. A second generalization yields the modeling of density regulation taking into account that regulation at a given location does not only depend on the density at that site but also on densities in the whole territory or home range of individuals. It is shown that such density regulation with a spatial scale reduces the scale of synchrony in population fluctuations relative to the simpler model with density regulation at each location determined only by the local point density, and may even generate negative spatial autocorrelations. PMID:26852669

  13. Use of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with daughter pregnancy rate for prediction of genetic merit for reproduction in Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated 69 SNPs in genes previously related to fertility and production traits for relationship to daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), cow conception rate (CCR) and heifer conception rate (HCR) in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped according to their predicted transmitting ability for DP...

  14. An empirical test of evolutionary theories for reproductive senescence and reproductive effort in the garter snake Thamnophis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Sparkman, Amanda M; Arnold, Stevan J; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary theory predicts that differential reproductive effort and rate of reproductive senescence will evolve under different rates of external mortality. We examine the evolutionary divergence of age-specific reproduction in two life-history ecotypes of the western terrestrial garter snake, Thamnophis elegans. We test for the signature of reproductive senescence (decreasing fecundity with age) and increasing reproductive effort with age (increasing reproductive productivity per gram female) in replicate populations of two life-history ecotypes: snakes that grow fast, mature young and have shorter lifespans, and snakes that grow slow, mature late and have long lives. The difference between life-history ecotypes is due to genetic divergence in growth rate. We find (i) reproductive success (live litter mass) increases with age in both ecotypes, but does so more rapidly in the fast-growth ecotype, (ii) reproductive failure increases with age in both ecotypes, but the proportion of reproductive failure to total reproductive output remains invariant, and (iii) reproductive effort remains constant in fast-growth individuals with age, but declines in slow-growth individuals. This illustration of increasing fecundity with age, even at the latest ages, deviates from standard expectations for reproductive senescence, as does the lack of increases in reproductive effort. We discuss our findings in light of recent theories regarding the phenomenon of increased reproduction throughout life in organisms with indeterminate growth and its potential to offset theoretical expectations for the ubiquity of senescence. PMID:17251099

  15. Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology PATIENTS Patient Information What Is SART? Risks of IVF Third Party Reproduction A Patient's Guide to Assisted Reproductive Technology Frequently Asked ...

  16. Left Ventricular Synchrony and Function in Pediatric Patients with Definitive Pacemakers

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Michel Cabrera; Morejón, Adel Eladio Gonzales; Ricardo, Giselle Serrano

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic right ventricular pacing (RVP) induces a dyssynchronous contraction pattern, producing interventricular and intraventricular asynchrony. Many studies have shown the relationship of RVP with impaired left ventricular (LV) form and function. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate LV synchrony and function in pediatric patients receiving RVP in comparison with those receiving LV pacing (LVP). Methods LV systolic and diastolic function and synchrony were evaluated in 80 pediatric patients with either nonsurgical or postsurgical complete atrioventricular block, with pacing from either the RV endocardium (n = 40) or the LV epicardium (n = 40). Echocardiographic data obtained before pacemaker implantation, immediately after it, and at the end of a mean follow-up of 6.8 years were analyzed. Results LV diastolic function did not change in any patient during follow-up. LV systolic function was preserved in patients with LVP. However, in children with RVP the shortening fraction and ejection fraction decreased from medians of 41% ± 2.6% and 70% ± 6.9% before implantation to 32% ± 4.2% and 64% ± 2.5% (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), respectively, at final follow-up. Interventricular mechanical delay was significantly larger with RVP (66 ± 13 ms) than with LVP (20 ± 8 ms). Similarly, the following parameters were significantly different in the two groups: LV mechanical delay (RVP: 69 ± 6 ms, LVP: 30 ± 11 ms, p < 0.0001); septal to lateral wall motion delay (RVP: 75 ± 19 ms, LVP: 42 ± 10 ms, p < 0.0001); and, septal to posterior wall motion delay (RVP: 127 ± 33 ms, LVP: 58 ± 17 ms, p < 0.0001). Conclusion Compared with RV endocardium, LV epicardium is an optimal site for pacing to preserve cardiac synchrony and function. PMID:24061683

  17. The Association of Therapist Empathy and Synchrony in Vocally Encoded Arousal

    PubMed Central

    Imel, Zac E.; Barco, Jacqueline S.; Brown, Halley J.; Baucom, Brian R.; Kircher, John C.; Baer, John S.; Atkins, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Empathy is a critical ingredient in motivational interviewing (MI) and in psychotherapy generally. It is typically defined as the ability to experience and understand the feelings of another. Basic science indicates that empathy is related to the development of synchrony in dyads. However, in clinical research, empathy has proved difficult to operationalize and measure, and has mostly relied on the felt sense of observers, clients, or therapists. We extracted estimates of therapist and standardized patient (SP) vocally encoded arousal (mean fundamental frequency; mean f0) in 89 MI sessions with high and low empathy ratings from independent observers. We hypothesized (a) therapist and SP mean f0 would be correlated and (b) the correlation of therapist and SP mean f0 would be greater in sessions with high empathy as compared with low. On the basis of a multivariate mixed model, the correlation between therapist and SP mean f0 was large (r = .71) and close to 0 in randomly assigned therapist–SP dyads (r = −.08). The association was higher in sessions with high empathy ratings (r = .80) than in sessions with low ratings (r = .36). There was strong evidence for vocal synchrony in clinical dyads as well as for the association of synchrony with empathy ratings, illustrating the relevance of basic psychological processes to clinical interactions. These findings provide initial evidence for an objective and nonobtrusive method for assessing therapist performance. Novel indicators of therapist empathy may have implications for the study of MI process as well as the training of therapists generally. PMID:24274679

  18. Gamma synchrony: towards a translational biomarker for the treatment resistant symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gandal, Michael J.; Edgar, J. Christopher; Klook, Kerstin; Siegel, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    The lack of efficacy for antipsychotics with respect to negative symptoms and cognitive deficits is a significant obstacle for the treatment of schizophrenia. Developing new drugs to target these symptoms requires appropriate neural biomarkers that can be investigated in model organisms, be used to track treatment response, and provide insight into pathophysiological disease mechanisms. A growing body of evidence indicates that neural oscillations in the gamma frequency range (30–80 Hz) are disturbed in schizophrenia. Gamma synchrony has been shown to mediate a host of sensory and cognitive functions, including perceptual encoding, selective attention, salience, and working memory – neurocognitive processes that are dysfunctional in schizophrenia and largely refractory to treatment. This review summarizes the current state of clinical literature with respect to gamma band responses (GBRs) in schizophrenia, focusing on resting and auditory paradigms. Next, preclinical studies of schizophrenia that have investigated gamma band activity are reviewed to gain insight into neural mechanisms associated with these deficits. We conclude that abnormalities in gamma synchrony are ubiquitous in schizophrenia and likely reflect an elevation in baseline cortical gamma synchrony (‘noise’) coupled with reduced stimulus-evoked GBRs (‘signal’). Such a model likely reflects hippocampal and cortical dysfunction, as well as reduced glutamatergic signaling with downstream GABAergic deficits, but is probably less influenced by dopaminergic abnormalities implicated in schizophrenia. Finally, we propose that analogous signal-to-noise deficits in the flow of cortical information in preclinical models are useful targets for the development of new drugs that target the treatment-resistant symptoms of schizophrenia. PMID:21349276

  19. Functional Contributions of Strong and Weak Cellular Oscillators to Synchrony and Light-shifted Phase Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Logan; Leise, Tanya L; Welsh, David K; Holmes, Todd C

    2016-08-01

    Light is the primary signal that calibrates circadian neural circuits and thus coordinates daily physiological and behavioral rhythms with solar entrainment cues. Drosophila and mammalian circadian circuits consist of diverse populations of cellular oscillators that exhibit a wide range of dynamic light responses, periods, phases, and degrees of synchrony. How heterogeneous circadian circuits can generate robust physiological rhythms while remaining flexible enough to respond to synchronizing stimuli has long remained enigmatic. Cryptochrome is a short-wavelength photoreceptor that is endogenously expressed in approximately half of Drosophila circadian neurons. In a previous study, physiological light response was measured using real-time bioluminescence recordings in Drosophila whole-brain explants, which remain intrinsically light-sensitive. Here we apply analysis of real-time bioluminescence experimental data to show detailed dynamic ensemble representations of whole circadian circuit light entrainment at single neuron resolution. Organotypic whole-brain explants were either maintained in constant darkness (DD) for 6 days or exposed to a phase-advancing light pulse on the second day. We find that stronger circadian oscillators support robust overall circuit rhythmicity in DD, whereas weaker oscillators can be pushed toward transient desynchrony and damped amplitude to facilitate a new state of phase-shifted network synchrony. Additionally, we use mathematical modeling to examine how a network composed of distinct oscillator types can give rise to complex dynamic signatures in DD conditions and in response to simulated light pulses. Simulations suggest that complementary coupling mechanisms and a combination of strong and weak oscillators may enable a robust yet flexible circadian network that promotes both synchrony and entrainment. A more complete understanding of how the properties of oscillators and their signaling mechanisms facilitate their distinct roles

  20. Synchrony due to parametric averaging in neurons coupled by a shared signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khadra, Anmar

    2009-04-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a decapeptide secreted by GnRH neurons located in the hypothalamus. It is responsible for the onset of puberty and the regulation of hormone release from the pituitary. There is a strong evidence suggesting that GnRH exerts an autocrine regulation on its own release via three types of G-proteins [L.Z. Krsmanovic, N. Mores, C.E. Navarro, K.K. Arora, K.J. Catt, An agonist-induced switch in G protein coupling of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor regulates pulsatile neuropeptide secretion, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 100 (2003) 2969-2974]. A mathematical model based on this proposed mechanism has been developed and extended to explain the synchrony observed in GnRH neurons by incorporating the idea of a common pool of GnRH [A. Khadra, Y.X. Li, A model for the pulsatile secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from synchronized hypothalamic neurons, Biophys. J. 91 (2006) 74-83]. This type of coupling led to a very robust synchrony between these neurons. We aim in this paper to reduce the one cell model to a two-variable model using quasi-steady state (QSS) analysis, to further examine its dynamics analytically and geometrically. The concept of synchrony of a heterogeneous population will be clearly defined and established for certain cases, while, for the general case, two different types of phases are introduced to gain more insight on how the model behaves. Bifurcation diagrams for certain parameters in the one cell model are also shown to explain some of the phenomena observed in a coupled population. A comparison between the population model and an averaged two-variable model is also conducted.

  1. ASSESSMENT OF SYNCHRONY IN MULTIPLE NEURAL SPIKE TRAINS USING LOGLINEAR POINT PROCESS MODELS.

    PubMed

    Kass, Robert E; Kelly, Ryan C; Loh, Wei-Liem

    2011-06-01

    Neural spike trains, which are sequences of very brief jumps in voltage across the cell membrane, were one of the motivating applications for the development of point process methodology. Early work required the assumption of stationarity, but contemporary experiments often use time-varying stimuli and produce time-varying neural responses. More recently, many statistical methods have been developed for nonstationary neural point process data. There has also been much interest in identifying synchrony, meaning events across two or more neurons that are nearly simultaneous at the time scale of the recordings. A natural statistical approach is to discretize time, using short time bins, and to introduce loglinear models for dependency among neurons, but previous use of loglinear modeling technology has assumed stationarity. We introduce a succinct yet powerful class of time-varying loglinear models by (a) allowing individual-neuron effects (main effects) to involve time-varying intensities; (b) also allowing the individual-neuron effects to involve autocovariation effects (history effects) due to past spiking, (c) assuming excess synchrony effects (interaction effects) do not depend on history, and (d) assuming all effects vary smoothly across time. Using data from primary visual cortex of an anesthetized monkey we give two examples in which the rate of synchronous spiking can not be explained by stimulus-related changes in individual-neuron effects. In one example, the excess synchrony disappears when slow-wave "up" states are taken into account as history effects, while in the second example it does not. Standard point process theory explicitly rules out synchronous events. To justify our use of continuous-time methodology we introduce a framework that incorporates synchronous events and provides continuous-time loglinear point process approximations to discrete-time loglinear models. PMID:21837263

  2. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding.

    PubMed

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-10-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  3. Synchrony and exertion during dance independently raise pain threshold and encourage social bonding

    PubMed Central

    Tarr, Bronwyn; Launay, Jacques; Cohen, Emma; Dunbar, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Group dancing is a ubiquitous human activity that involves exertive synchronized movement to music. It is hypothesized to play a role in social bonding, potentially via the release of endorphins, which are analgesic and reward-inducing, and have been implicated in primate social bonding. We used a 2 × 2 experimental design to examine effects of exertion and synchrony on bonding. Both demonstrated significant independent positive effects on pain threshold (a proxy for endorphin activation) and in-group bonding. This suggests that dance which involves both exertive and synchronized movement may be an effective group bonding activity. PMID:26510676

  4. Feedback controller for destroying synchrony in an array of the FitzHugh-Nagumo oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaševičius, Arunas; Tamaševičítė, Elena; Mykolaitis, Gytis

    2012-11-01

    We describe an implementation of an electronic feedback controller, destroying synchrony and/or suppressing the mean field in arrays of globally coupled nonidentical oscillators. We demonstrate that the mean field, either artificially nullified or fed back into the array with a negative sign can break up the phase synchronization. The experiments have been carried out with an array of thirty electronic oscillators, imitating dynamical behavior of the spiking neurons. We have found that the negative mean-field technique, depending on the control parameter, can either desynchronize or synchronize the oscillators, whereas in the both cases, it ensures low mean-field voltage.

  5. Reproductive Information and Reproductive Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Mehlman, Maxwell J

    2015-01-01

    Opponents of reproductive choice are attempting to limit reproductive decisions based on certain underlying reasons. This commentary explores the rationales for these limitations and the objections to them. It concludes that reasoned-based limitations are unsupportable and unenforceable. PMID:26242944

  6. Quantifying synchrony patterns in the EEG of Alzheimer's patients with linear and non-linear connectivity markers.

    PubMed

    Waser, Markus; Garn, Heinrich; Schmidt, Reinhold; Benke, Thomas; Dal-Bianco, Peter; Ransmayr, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helena; Seiler, Stephan; Sanin, Günter; Mayer, Florian; Caravias, Georg; Grossegger, Dieter; Frühwirt, Wolfgang; Deistler, Manfred

    2016-03-01

    We analyzed the relation of several synchrony markers in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) severity as measured by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores. The study sample consisted of 79 subjects diagnosed with probable AD. All subjects were participants in the PRODEM-Austria study. Following a homogeneous protocol, the EEG was recorded both in resting state and during a cognitive task. We employed quadratic least squares regression to describe the relation between MMSE and the EEG markers. Factor analysis was used for estimating a potentially lower number of unobserved synchrony factors. These common factors were then related to MMSE scores as well. Most markers displayed an initial increase of EEG synchrony with MMSE scores from 26 to 21 or 20, and a decrease below. This effect was most prominent during the cognitive task and may be owed to cerebral compensatory mechanisms. Factor analysis provided interesting insights in the synchrony structures and the first common factors were related to MMSE scores with coefficients of determination up to 0.433. We conclude that several of the proposed EEG markers are related to AD severity for the overall sample with a wide dispersion for individual subjects. Part of these fluctuations may be owed to fluctuations and day-to-day variability associated with MMSE measurements. Our study provides a systematic analysis of EEG synchrony based on a large and homogeneous sample. The results indicate that the individual markers capture different aspects of EEG synchrony and may reflect cerebral compensatory mechanisms in the early stages of AD. PMID:26411482

  7. Synchrony of Cardiomyocyte Ca2+ Release is Controlled by t-tubule Organization, SR Ca2+ Content, and Ryanodine Receptor Ca2+ Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Øyehaug, Leiv; Loose, Kristian Ø.; Jølle, Guro F.; Røe, Åsmund T.; Sjaastad, Ivar; Christensen, Geir; Sejersted, Ole M.; Louch, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that cardiomyocyte Ca2+release is desynchronized in several pathological conditions. Loss of Ca2+ release synchrony has been attributed to t-tubule disruption, but it is unknown if other factors also contribute. We investigated this issue in normal and failing myocytes by integrating experimental data with a mathematical model describing spatiotemporal dynamics of Ca2+ in the cytosol and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Heart failure development in postinfarction mice was associated with progressive t-tubule disorganization, as quantified by fast-Fourier transforms. Data from fast-Fourier transforms were then incorporated in the model as a dyadic organization index, reflecting the proportion of ryanodine receptors located in dyads. With decreasing dyadic-organization index, the model predicted greater dyssynchrony of Ca2+ release, which exceeded that observed in experimental line-scan images. Model and experiment were reconciled by reducing the threshold for Ca2+ release in the model, suggesting that increased RyR sensitivity partially offsets the desynchronizing effects of t-tubule disruption in heart failure. Reducing the magnitude of SR Ca2+ content and release, whether experimentally by thapsigargin treatment, or in the model, desynchronized the Ca2+ transient. However, in cardiomyocytes isolated from SERCA2 knockout mice, RyR sensitization offset such effects. A similar interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR content was observed during treatment of myocytes with low-dose caffeine. Initial synchronization of Ca2+ release during caffeine was reversed as SR content declined due to enhanced RyR leak. Thus, synchrony of cardiomyocyte Ca2+ release is not only determined by t-tubule organization but also by the interplay between RyR sensitivity and SR Ca2+ content. PMID:23601316

  8. Male Reproductive System

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Reproductive System » Male Reproductive System Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  9. Men's Reproductive Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Men's Reproductive Health: Overview Skip sharing on social media ... Content Reproductive health is an important component of men's overall health and well-being. Too often, males ...

  10. Reproductive tract microbiome in assisted reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Franasiak, Jason M; Scott, Richard T

    2015-12-01

    The human microbiome has gained much attention recently for its role in health and disease. This interest has come as we have begun to scratch the surface of the complexity of what has been deemed to be our "second genome" through initiatives such as the Human Microbiome Project. Microbes have been hypothesized to be involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of assisted reproduction since before the first success in IVF. Although the data supporting or refuting this hypothesis remain somewhat sparse, thanks to sequencing data from the 16S rRNA subunit, we have begun to characterize the microbiome in the male and female reproductive tracts and understand how this may play a role in reproductive competence. In this review, we discuss what is known about the microbiome of the reproductive tract as it pertains to assisted reproductive technologies. PMID:26597628

  11. Use of a statistical model to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity of dermally administered crude oil and relation to reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    McKee, Richard H; Nicolich, Mark; Roy, Timothy; White, Russell; Daughtrey, Wayne C

    2014-01-01

    Petroleum (commonly called crude oil) is a complex substance primarily composed of hydrocarbon constituents. Based on the results of previous toxicological studies as well as occupational experience, the principal acute toxicological hazards are those associated with exposure by inhalation to volatile hydrocarbon constituents and hydrogen sulfide, and chronic hazards are associated with inhalation exposure to benzene and dermal exposure to polycyclic aromatic compounds. The current assessment was an attempt to characterize the potential for repeated dose and/or developmental effects of crude oils following dermal exposures and to generalize the conclusions across a broad range of crude oils from different sources. Statistical models were used to predict the potential for repeated dose and developmental toxicity from compositional information. The model predictions indicated that the empirical data from previously tested crude oils approximated a "worst case" situation, and that the data from previously tested crude oils could be used as a reasonable basis for characterizing the repeated dose and developmental toxicological hazards of crude oils in general. PMID:24179028

  12. Scalp spindles are associated with widespread intracranial activity with unexpectedly low synchrony.

    PubMed

    Frauscher, Birgit; von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2015-01-15

    In humans, the knowledge of intracranial correlates of spindles is mainly gathered from noninvasive neurophysiologic and functional imaging studies which provide an indirect estimate of neuronal intracranial activity. This potential limitation can be overcome by intracranial electroencephalography used in presurgical epilepsy evaluation. We investigated the intracranial correlates of scalp spindles using combined scalp and intracerebral depth electrodes covering the frontal, parietal and temporal neocortex, and the scalp and intracranial correlates of hippocampal and insula spindles in 35 pre-surgical epilepsy patients. Spindles in the scalp were accompanied by widespread cortical increases in sigma band energy (10-16 Hz): the highest percentages were observed in the frontoparietal lateral and mesial cortex, whereas in temporal lateral and mesial structures only a low or no simultaneous increase was present. This intracranial involvement during scalp spindles showed no consistent pattern, and exhibited unexpectedly low synchrony across brain regions. Hippocampal spindles were shorter and spatially restricted with a low synchrony even within the temporal lobe. Similar results were found for the insula. We suggest that the generation of spindles is under a high local cortical influence contributing to the concept of sleep as a local phenomenon and challenging the notion of spindles as widespread synchronous oscillations. PMID:25450108

  13. What is a moment? Transient synchrony as a collective mechanism for spatiotemporal integration.

    PubMed

    Hopfield, J J; Brody, C D

    2001-01-30

    A previous paper described a network of simple integrate-and-fire neurons that contained output neurons selective for specific spatiotemporal patterns of inputs; only experimental results were described. We now present the principles behind the operation of this network and discuss how these principles point to a general class of computational operations that can be carried out easily and naturally by networks of spiking neurons. Transient synchrony of the action potentials of a group of neurons is used to signal "recognition" of a space-time pattern across the inputs of those neurons. Appropriate synaptic coupling produces synchrony when the inputs to these neurons are nearly equal, leaving the neurons unsynchronized or only weakly synchronized for other input circumstances. When the input to this system comes from timed past events represented by decaying delay activity, the pattern of synaptic connections can be set such that synchronization occurs only for selected spatiotemporal patterns. We show how the recognition is invariant to uniform time warp and uniform intensity change of the input events. The fundamental recognition event is a transient collective synchronization, representing "many neurons now agree," an event that is then detected easily by a cell with a small time constant. If such synchronization is used in neurobiological computation, its hallmark will be a brief burst of gamma-band electroencephalogram noise when and where such a recognition event or decision occurs. PMID:11158631

  14. Testing Synchrony in Historical Biogeography: The Case of New World Primates and Hystricognathi Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Loss-Oliveira, Leticia; Aguiar, Barbara O.; Schrago, Carlos G.

    2012-01-01

    The abrupt appearance of primates and hystricognath rodents in early Oligocene deposits of South America has puzzled mastozoologists for decades. Based on the geoclimatic changes that occurred during the Eocene/Oligocene transition period that may have favoured their dispersal, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that these groups arrived in synchrony. Nevertheless, the hypothesis of synchronous origins of platyrrhine and caviomorph in South America has not been explicitly evaluated. Our aim in this work was to apply a formal test for synchronous divergence times to the Platyrrhini and Caviomorpha splits. We have examined a previous work on platyrrhine and hystricognath origins, applied the test to a case where synchrony is known to occur and conducted simulations to show that it is possible to formally test the age of synchronous nodes. We show that the absolute ages of Platyrrhini/Catarrhini and Caviomorpha/Phiomorpha splits depend on data partitioning and that the test applied consistently detected synchronous events when they were known to have happened. The hypothesis that the arrival of primates and hystricognaths to the New World consisted of a unique event cannot be rejected PMID:22346342

  15. Light-induced division and genomic synchrony in phototrophically growing cultures of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Lueking, D R; Campbell, T B; Burghardt, R C

    1981-05-01

    An experimental procedure for rapidly obtaining cell populations of phototrophically growing Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides which display division and genomic synchrony has been developed. The basis of the procedure resides with the normal physiological response displayed by cells of R. sphaeroides that have been subjected to an immediate decrease in incident light intensity. After an abrupt high- to low-light transition of an asynchronously dividing cell population, an immediate cessation of increases in culture turbidity, total cell number, and net accumulations of culture deoxyribonucleic acid and phospholipid occurs. Total cell number remains constant for 2.5 h after the transition to low light, after which time, it undergoes a sharp increase. Reinitiation of high-light conditions of growth 1 h subsequent to this increase in total cell number results in a cell population possessing a high degree of division and genomic synchrony. A characterization of this procedure, together with a demonstration of its utility for studies on intracytoplasmic membrane assembly, is presented. PMID:7012139

  16. Fourteen-month-old infants use interpersonal synchrony as a cue to direct helpfulness

    PubMed Central

    Cirelli, Laura K.; Wan, Stephanie J.; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2014-01-01

    Musical behaviours such as dancing, singing and music production, which require the ability to entrain to a rhythmic beat, encourage high levels of interpersonal coordination. Such coordination has been associated with increased group cohesion and social bonding between group members. Previously, we demonstrated that this association influences even the social behaviour of 14-month-old infants. Infants were significantly more likely to display helpfulness towards an adult experimenter following synchronous bouncing compared with asynchronous bouncing to music. The present experiment was designed to determine whether interpersonal synchrony acts as a cue for 14-month-olds to direct their prosocial behaviours to specific individuals with whom they have experienced synchronous movement, or whether it acts as a social prime, increasing prosocial behaviour in general. Consistent with the previous results, infants were significantly more likely to help an experimenter following synchronous versus asynchronous movement with this person. Furthermore, this manipulation did not affect infant's behaviour towards a neutral stranger, who was not involved in any movement experience. This indicates that synchronous bouncing acts as a social cue for directing prosociality. These results have implications for how musical engagement and rhythmic synchrony affect social behaviour very early in development. PMID:25385778

  17. Synchrony, Complexity and Directiveness in Mothers’ Interactions with Infants Pre- and Post-Cochlear Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Mary K.; Bergeson, Tonya R.; Morris, Kourtney J.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of profound hearing loss on mother-infant interactions before and after cochlear implantation with a focus on maternal synchrony, complexity, and directiveness. Participants included two groups of mother-infant dyads: 9 dyads of mothers and infants with normal hearing; and 9 dyads of hearing mothers and infants with profound hearing loss. Dyads were observed at two time points: Time 1, scheduled to occur before cochlear implantation for infants with profound hearing loss (mean age = 13.6 months); and Time 2 (mean age = 23.3 months), scheduled to occur approximately six months after cochlear implantation. Hearing infants were age-matched to infants with hearing loss at both time points. Dependent variables included the proportion of maternal utterances that overlapped infant vocalizations, maternal mean length of utterance, infant word use, and combined maternal directives and prohibitions. Results showed mothers’ utterances overlapped the vocalizations of infants with hearing loss more often before cochlear implantation than after, mothers used less complex utterances with infants with cochlear implants compared to hearing peers (Time 2), and mothers of infants with profound hearing loss used frequent directives and prohibitions both before and after cochlear implantation. Together, mothers and infants adapted relatively quickly to infants’ access to cochlear implants, showing improved interactional synchrony, increased infant word use, and levels of maternal language complexity compatible with infants’ word use, all within seven months of cochlear implant activation. PMID:24793733

  18. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J.; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B.; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital–cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH. PMID:25379429

  19. Abnormal synchrony and effective connectivity in patients with schizophrenia and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    de la Iglesia-Vaya, Maria; Escartí, Maria José; Molina-Mateo, Jose; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis; Gadea, Marien; Castellanos, Francisco Xavier; Aguilar García-Iturrospe, Eduardo J; Robles, Montserrat; Biswal, Bharat B; Sanjuan, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Auditory hallucinations (AH) are the most frequent positive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Hallucinations have been related to emotional processing disturbances, altered functional connectivity and effective connectivity deficits. Previously, we observed that, compared to healthy controls, the limbic network responses of patients with auditory hallucinations differed when the subjects were listening to emotionally charged words. We aimed to compare the synchrony patterns and effective connectivity of task-related networks between schizophrenia patients with and without AH and healthy controls. Schizophrenia patients with AH (n = 27) and without AH (n = 14) were compared with healthy participants (n = 31). We examined functional connectivity by analyzing correlations and cross-correlations among previously detected independent component analysis time courses. Granger causality was used to infer the information flow direction in the brain regions. The results demonstrate that the patterns of cortico-cortical functional synchrony differentiated the patients with AH from the patients without AH and from the healthy participants. Additionally, Granger-causal relationships between the networks clearly differentiated the groups. In the patients with AH, the principal causal source was an occipital-cerebellar component, versus a temporal component in the patients without AH and the healthy controls. These data indicate that an anomalous process of neural connectivity exists when patients with AH process emotional auditory stimuli. Additionally, a central role is suggested for the cerebellum in processing emotional stimuli in patients with persistent AH. PMID:25379429

  20. Testing synchrony in historical biogeography: the case of new world primates and hystricognathi rodents.

    PubMed

    Loss-Oliveira, Leticia; Aguiar, Barbara O; Schrago, Carlos G

    2012-01-01

    The abrupt appearance of primates and hystricognath rodents in early Oligocene deposits of South America has puzzled mastozoologists for decades. Based on the geoclimatic changes that occurred during the Eocene/Oligocene transition period that may have favoured their dispersal, researchers have proposed the hypothesis that these groups arrived in synchrony. Nevertheless, the hypothesis of synchronous origins of platyrrhine and caviomorph in South America has not been explicitly evaluated. Our aim in this work was to apply a formal test for synchronous divergence times to the Platyrrhini and Caviomorpha splits. We have examined a previous work on platyrrhine and hystricognath origins, applied the test to a case where synchrony is known to occur and conducted simulations to show that it is possible to formally test the age of synchronous nodes. We show that the absolute ages of Platyrrhini/Catarrhini and Caviomorpha/Phiomorpha splits depend on data partitioning and that the test applied consistently detected synchronous events when they were known to have happened. The hypothesis that the arrival of primates and hystricognaths to the New World consisted of a unique event cannot be rejected. PMID:22346342

  1. Egg-hatching synchrony and larval cannibalism in the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Kutcherov, Dmitry

    2015-12-01

    Females of leaf beetles and many other herbivorous insects lay eggs in coherent batches. Hatchlings emerge more or less simultaneously and often prey on their late-hatching clutchmates. It is not certain, however, whether this synchrony of hatching is a mere by-product of cannibalism or whether an additional synchronizing factor exists. The following simple experiment was aimed at determining the causal relationship between cannibalism and simultaneous larval emergence. Egg clutches of the dock leaf beetle Gastrophysa viridula were split into two halves. These halves were either kept as coherent groups in two separate dishes or, alternatively, only one half remained whole, whereas the other one was divided into single eggs, each of which was incubated in a separate dish. Halving of a clutch into coherent groups only slightly disrupted the synchrony of emergence. The consequence of individual isolation was more dramatic. Half-clutches consisting of disconnected solitary eggs required almost twice as much time for complete emergence of all larvae, which was significantly more than cannibalism as a sole synchronizing factor might explain. Moreover, survival rates were the same in coherent half-clutches (in the presence of cannibalism) and among isolated individuals. This group effect and the small contribution of cannibalism suggest the existence of an additional synchronizing factor. Possible mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are discussed. PMID:26482400

  2. Repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony: An underrecognized cause of pacemaker-related arrhythmia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parikshit S; Kaszala, Karoly; Tan, Alex Y; Koneru, Jayanthi N; Shepard, Richard; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A; Huizar, Jose F

    2016-08-01

    Similar to endless loop tachycardia (ELT), repetitive nonreentrant ventriculoatrial synchrony (RNRVAS) is a ventriculoatrial (VA) synchrony pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia. RNRVAS was first described in 1990 and can only occur in the presence of retrograde VA conduction and dual-chamber or cardiac resynchronization devices with tracking (P-synchronous ventricular pacing such as DDD, DDDR) or nontracking pacing modes that allow AV-sequential pacing (DDI, DDIR). RNRVAS is promoted by (1) high lower rate limit or any feature that allows rapid pacing, (2) long AV intervals, or (3) long postventricular atrial refractory period (PVARP). In contrast to ELT, RNRVAS is a less well-recognized form of pacemaker-mediated arrhythmia; thus, unlike ELT, there are no specific device algorithms to prevent, recognize, and terminate RNRVAS. However, RNRVAS has been recently shown to occur frequently. We present a series of cases, some of which were found fortuitously. Owing to its clinical implications, we propose that algorithms should be developed to prevent, identify, and terminate RNRVAS. PMID:27050909

  3. Fourteen-month-old infants use interpersonal synchrony as a cue to direct helpfulness.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Laura K; Wan, Stephanie J; Trainor, Laurel J

    2014-12-19

    Musical behaviours such as dancing, singing and music production, which require the ability to entrain to a rhythmic beat, encourage high levels of interpersonal coordination. Such coordination has been associated with increased group cohesion and social bonding between group members. Previously, we demonstrated that this association influences even the social behaviour of 14-month-old infants. Infants were significantly more likely to display helpfulness towards an adult experimenter following synchronous bouncing compared with asynchronous bouncing to music. The present experiment was designed to determine whether interpersonal synchrony acts as a cue for 14-month-olds to direct their prosocial behaviours to specific individuals with whom they have experienced synchronous movement, or whether it acts as a social prime, increasing prosocial behaviour in general. Consistent with the previous results, infants were significantly more likely to help an experimenter following synchronous versus asynchronous movement with this person. Furthermore, this manipulation did not affect infant's behaviour towards a neutral stranger, who was not involved in any movement experience. This indicates that synchronous bouncing acts as a social cue for directing prosociality. These results have implications for how musical engagement and rhythmic synchrony affect social behaviour very early in development. PMID:25385778

  4. On a Possible Relationship between Linguistic Expertise and EEG Gamma Band Phase Synchrony

    PubMed Central

    Reiterer, Susanne; Pereda, Ernesto; Bhattacharya, Joydeep

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has shown that extensive training in and exposure to a second language can modify the language organization in the brain by causing both structural and functional changes. However it is not yet known how these changes are manifested by the dynamic brain oscillations and synchronization patterns subserving the language networks. In search for synchronization correlates of proficiency and expertise in second language acquisition, multivariate EEG signals were recorded from 44 high and low proficiency bilinguals during processing of natural language in their first and second languages. Gamma band (30–45 Hz) phase synchronization (PS) was calculated mainly by two recently developed methods: coarse-graining of Markov chains (estimating global phase synchrony, measuring the degree of PS between one electrode and all other electrodes), and phase lag index (PLI; estimating bivariate phase synchrony, measuring the degree of PS between a pair of electrodes). On comparing second versus first language processing, global PS by coarse-graining Markov chains indicated that processing of the second language needs significantly higher synchronization strength than first language. On comparing the proficiency groups, bivariate PS measure (i.e., PLI) revealed that during second language processing the low proficiency group showed stronger and broader network patterns than the high proficiency group, with interconnectivities between a left fronto-parietal network. Mean phase coherence analysis also indicated that the network activity was globally stronger in the low proficiency group during second language processing. PMID:22125542

  5. Long-distance neural synchrony correlates with processing strategies to compare fractions.

    PubMed

    Barraza, Paulo; Gómez, David M; Oyarzún, Felipe; Dartnell, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    Adults use different processing strategies to work with fractions. Depending on task requirements, they may analyze the fraction components separately (componential processing strategy, CPS) or consider the fraction as a whole (holistic processing strategy, HPS). It is so far unknown what is the brain coordination dynamics underlying these types of fraction processing strategies. To elucidate this issue, we analyzed oscillatory brain activity during a fraction comparison task, presenting pairs of fractions either with or without common components. Results show that CPS induces a left frontal-parietal alpha phase desynchronization after the onset of fraction pairs, while HPS induces an increase of phase synchrony on theta and gamma bands, over frontal and central-parietal sites, respectively. Additionally, the HPS evokes more negative ERPs around 400 ms over the right frontal scalp than the CPS. This ERP activity correlates with the increase of Theta phase synchrony. Our results reveal the emergence of different functional neural networks depending on the kind of cognitive strategy used for processing fractions. PMID:24680853

  6. Regional synchrony of temperature variation and internal wave forcing along the Florida Keys reef tract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leichter, James J.; Stokes, M. Dale; Vilchis, L. Ignacio; Fiechter, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of 10 year temperature records collected along the Florida Keys reef tract (FLKRT) reveals strong, regional-scale synchrony in high-frequency temperature variation suggestive of internal wave forcing at predominately semidiurnal frequencies. In each year and at all sites, the amplitude of semidiurnal temperature variation was greatest from March to September, and markedly lower from October to February. Comparisons of the semidiurnal component of the temperature variation among sites suggest complex patterns in the arrival of internal waves, with highest cross correlation among closely spaced sites and synchrony in periods of enhanced internal wave activity across the length of the FLKRT, particularly in summer. The periods of enhanced semidiurnal temperature variation at the 20 and 30 m isobaths on the reef slopes appear to be associated with the dynamics of the Florida Current and the onshore movement of warm fronts preceding the passage of Florida Current frontal eddies. Regional-scale satellite altimetry observations suggest temporal linkages to sea surface height anomalies in the Loop Current (upstream of the Florida Current) and setup of the Tortugas Gyre. The synchronized forcing of cool water onto the reef slope sites across the FLKRT is likely to affect physiological responses to temperature variation in corals and other ectothermic organisms, as well as larval transport and nutrient dynamics with the potential for regionally coherent pulses of larvae and nutrients arriving on reef slopes across the FLKRT.

  7. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 yr and exposed for 21 days in a confined regulated environment to 16L:8D light:dark cycle with a view toward determining whether the light environment of 16L:8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft.c. is adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in man. The light intensity was 100 ft.c. during the first seven days, reduced to 15 ft.c. during the next seven days, and increased again to 100 ft.c. during the last seven days. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded throughout the three phases. In the 100 ft.c. regime, the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. It is shown that 15 ft.c. light intensity is at or below threshold for maintaining circadian synchrony of human physiologic rhythms marked by instability and internal desynchronization with degradation of performance and well-being.

  8. Predation inhibits the positive effect of dispersal on intraspecific and interspecific synchrony in pond metacommunities.

    PubMed

    Howeth, Jennifer G; Leibold, Mathew A

    2013-10-01

    Recent interest in the ecological drivers of compensatory and synchronous population dynamics has provided an improved yet incomplete understanding of local and regional population oscillations in response to variable environments. Here, we evaluate the effect of dispersal rate and spatiotemporal heterogeneity in predation by the selective planktivore, bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), on local and regional dynamics of zooplankton in pond metacommunities. A metacommunity consisted of three pond mesocosm communities, one with constant presence of predators, one without predators, and one with alternating presence-absence of predators. The three communities were connected at either no, low (0.7% per day), or high (20% per day) planktonic dispersal. Results demonstrate that heterogeneous predation (1) prevents spatial synchrony among prey populations across local communities, (2) disrupts the synchronous population dynamics within communities produced by dispersal, and (3) induces local compensatory dynamics between species within communities regardless of dispersal rate. Taken together, the results emphasize that spatiotemporal heterogeneity in selective predation can inhibit both intraspecific and interspecific synchrony in metacommunities. PMID:24358708

  9. Individual variation in reproductive costs of reproduction: high-quality females always do better.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Sandra; Côté, Steeve D; Gaillard, Jean-Michel; Festa-Bianchet, Marco

    2009-01-01

    1. Although life-history theory predicts substantial costs of reproduction, individuals often show positive correlations among life-history traits, rather than trade-offs. The apparent absence of reproductive costs may result from heterogeneity in individual quality. 2. Using detailed longitudinal data from three contrasted ungulate populations (mountain goats, Oreamnos americanus; bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis; and roe deer, Capreolus capreolus), we assessed how individual quality affects the probability of detecting a cost of current reproduction on future reproduction for females. We used a composite measure of individual quality based on variations in longevity (all species), success in the last breeding opportunity before death (goats and sheep), adult mass (all species), and social rank (goats only). 3. In all species, high-quality females consistently had a higher probability of reproduction, irrespective of previous reproductive status. In mountain goats, we detected a cost of reproduction only after accounting for differences in individual quality. Only low-quality female goats were less likely to reproduce following years of breeding than of nonbreeding. Offspring survival was lower in bighorn ewes following years of successful breeding than after years when no lamb was produced, but only for low-quality females, suggesting that a cost of reproduction only occurred for low-quality females. 4. Because costs of reproduction differ among females, studies of life-history evolution must account for heterogeneity in individual quality. PMID:18700872

  10. Reproductive Cytotoxicity Is Predicted by Magnetic Resonance Microscopy and Confirmed by Ubiquitin Proteasome Immunohistochemistry in a Theophylline-Induced Model of Rat Testicular and Epididymal Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tengowski, M. W.; Sutovsky, P.; Hedlund, L. W.; Guyot, D. J.; Burkhardt, J. E.; Thompson, W. E.; Sutovsky, M.; Johnson, G. A.

    2005-08-01

    This study investigated the testicular changes in the rat induced by the nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, theophylline using magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) and ubiquitin immunostaining techniques. In vivo T1- and T2-weighted images were acquired at 2 T under anesthesia. Increased signal observed in the theophylline-treated rats suggests that leakage of MRM contrast was occurring. In vivo MRM results indicate that day 16 testis displayed an increased T1-weighted water signal in the area of the seminiferous tubule that decreased by day 32. These findings were validated by histopathology, suggesting that in vivo MRM has the sensitivity to predict changes in testis and epididymal tissues. The participation of the ubiquitin system was investigated, using probes for various markers of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. MRM can be used to detect subtle changes in the vascular perfusion of organ systems, and the up-regulation/mobilization of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway may be one of the mechanisms used in theophylline-treated epididymis to remove damaged cells before storage in the cauda epididymis. The combined use of in vivo MRM and subsequent tissue or seminal analysis for the presence of ubiquitin in longitudinal studies may become an important biomarker for assessing testis toxicities drug studies.

  11. Reproduction (II): Human Control of Reproductive Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jost, Alfred

    1970-01-01

    Describes methods of intervening in reproduction of animals and humans (artificial insemination, contraception, ovular and blastodisc transplants, pre selection of sex, cloning) and discusses the social implications of their use with humans. (AL)

  12. Use of single nucleotide polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with daughter pregnancy rate for prediction of genetic merit for reproduction in Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Ortega, M S; Denicol, A C; Cole, J B; Null, D J; Hansen, P J

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated 69 SNPs in genes previously related to fertility and production traits for their relationship to daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), cow conception rate (CCR) and heifer conception rate (HCR) in a separate population of Holstein cows grouped according to their predicted transmitting ability (PTA) [≤-1 (n = 1287) and ≥1.5 (n = 1036)] for DPR. Genotyping was performed using Sequenom MassARRAY(®) . There were a total of 39 SNPs associated with the three fertility traits. The SNPs that explained the greater proportion of the genetic variation for DPR were COQ9 (3.2%), EPAS1 (1.0%), CAST (1.0%), C7H19orf60 (1.0%) and MRPL48 (1.0%); for CCR were GOLGA4 (2.4%), COQ9 (1.8%), EPAS1 (1.1%) and MRPL48 (0.8%); and for HCR were HSD17B7 (1.0%), AP3B1 (0.8%), HSD17B12 (0.7%) and CACNA1D (0.6%). Inclusion of 39 SNPs previously associated with DPR in the genetic evaluation system increased the reliability of PTA for DPR by 0.20%. Many of the genes represented by SNPs associated with fertility are involved in steroidogenesis or are regulated by steroids. A large proportion of SNPs previously associated with genetic merit for fertility in Holstein bulls maintained their association in a separate population of cows. The inclusion of these genes in genetic evaluation can improve reliabilities of genomic estimates for fertility. PMID:26923315

  13. Reproduction of a Protocell by Replication of a Minority Molecule in a Catalytic Reaction Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Atsushi; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2010-12-01

    For understanding the origin of life, it is essential to explain the development of a compartmentalized structure, which undergoes growth and division, from a set of chemical reactions. In this study, a hypercycle with two chemicals that mutually catalyze each other is considered in order to show that the reproduction of a protocell with a growth-division process naturally occurs when the replication speed of one chemical is considerably slower than that of the other chemical, and molecules are crowded as a result of replication. It is observed that the protocell divides after a minority molecule is replicated at a slow synthesis rate, and thus, a synchrony between the reproduction of a cell and molecule replication is achieved. The robustness of such protocells against the invasion of parasitic molecules is also demonstrated.

  14. Structure-function relationships between aldolase C/zebrin II expression and complex spike synchrony in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Shinichiro; Yamazaki, Maya; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Watanabe, Masahiko; Sakimura, Kenji; Kano, Masanobu; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2015-01-14

    Simple and regular anatomical structure is a hallmark of the cerebellar cortex. Parasagittally arrayed alternate expression of aldolase C/zebrin II in Purkinje cells (PCs) has been extensively studied, but surprisingly little is known about its functional significance. Here we found a precise structure-function relationship between aldolase C expression and synchrony of PC complex spike activities that reflect climbing fiber inputs to PCs. We performed two-photon calcium imaging in transgenic mice in which aldolase C compartments can be visualized in vivo, and identified highly synchronous complex spike activities among aldolase C-positive or aldolase C-negative PCs, but not across these populations. The boundary of aldolase C compartments corresponded to that of complex spike synchrony at single-cell resolution. Sensory stimulation evoked aldolase C compartment-specific complex spike responses and synchrony. This result further revealed the structure-function segregation. In awake animals, complex spike synchrony both within and between PC populations across the aldolase C boundary were enhanced in response to sensory stimuli, in a way that two functionally distinct PC ensembles are coactivated. These results suggest that PC populations characterized by aldolase C expression precisely represent distinct functional units of the cerebellar cortex, and these functional units can cooperate to process sensory information in awake animals. PMID:25589776

  15. Learning and Discrimination of Audiovisual Events in Human Infants: The Hierarchical Relation between Intersensory Temporal Synchrony and Rhythmic Pattern Cues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewkowicz, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Three experiments examined 4- to 10-month-olds' perception of audio-visual (A-V) temporal synchrony cues in the presence or absence of rhythmic pattern cues. Results established that infants of all ages could discriminate between two different audio-visual rhythmic events. Only 10-month-olds detected a desynchronization of the auditory and visual…

  16. Parent-Infant Synchrony and the Construction of Shared Timing; Physiological Precursors, Developmental Outcomes, and Risk Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    Synchrony, a construct used across multiple fields to denote the temporal relationship between events, is applied to the study of parent-infant interactions and suggested as a model for intersubjectivity. Three types of timed relationships between the parent and child's affective behavior are assessed: concurrent, sequential, and organized in an…

  17. Perception of Audio-Visual Speech Synchrony in Spanish-Speaking Children with and without Specific Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pons, Ferran; Andreu, Llorenc; Sanz-Torrent, Monica; Buil-Legaz, Lucia; Lewkowicz, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Speech perception involves the integration of auditory and visual articulatory information, and thus requires the perception of temporal synchrony between this information. There is evidence that children with specific language impairment (SLI) have difficulty with auditory speech perception but it is not known if this is also true for the…

  18. Learning of Syllable-Object Relations by Preverbal Infants: The Role of Temporal Synchrony and Syllable Distinctiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogate, Lakshmi J.

    2010-01-01

    The role of temporal synchrony and syllable distinctiveness in preverbal infants' learning of word-object relations was investigated. In Experiment 1, 7- and 8-month-olds (N=64) were habituated under conditions where two "similar-sounding" syllables, /tah/ and /gah/, were spoken simultaneously with the motions of one of two sets of objects…

  19. Stressed but stable: canopy loss decreased species synchrony and metabolic variability in an intertidal hard-bottom community.

    PubMed

    Valdivia, Nelson; Golléty, Claire; Migné, Aline; Davoult, Dominique; Molis, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The temporal stability of aggregate community properties depends on the dynamics of the component species. Since species growth can compensate for the decline of other species, synchronous species dynamics can maintain stability (i.e. invariability) in aggregate properties such as community abundance and metabolism. In field experiments we tested the separate and interactive effects of two stressors associated with storminess--loss of a canopy-forming species and mechanical disturbances--on species synchrony and community respiration of intertidal hard-bottom communities on Helgoland Island, NE Atlantic. Treatments consisted of regular removal of the canopy-forming seaweed Fucus serratus and a mechanical disturbance applied once at the onset of the experiment in March 2006. The level of synchrony in species abundances was assessed from estimates of species percentage cover every three months until September 2007. Experiments at two sites consistently showed that canopy loss significantly reduced species synchrony. Mechanical disturbance had neither separate nor interactive effects on species synchrony. Accordingly, in situ measurements of CO(2)-fluxes showed that canopy loss, but not mechanical disturbances, significantly reduced net primary productivity and temporal variation in community respiration during emersion periods. Our results support the idea that compensatory dynamics may stabilise aggregate properties. They further suggest that the ecological consequences of the loss of a single structurally important species may be stronger than those derived from smaller-scale mechanical disturbances in natural ecosystems. PMID:22574181

  20. Incorporating Temperature-driven Seasonal Variation in Survival, Growth, and Reproduction Models for Small Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal variation in survival and reproduction can be a large source of prediction uncertainty in models used for conservation and management. A seasonally varying matrix population model is developed that incorporates temperature-driven differences in mortality and reproduction...

  1. Comparison of timed AI after synchronized ovulation to AI at estrus: reproductive and economic considerations.

    PubMed

    Tenhagen, B A; Drillich, M; Surholt, R; Heuwieser, W

    2004-01-01

    A timed artificial insemination (TAI) protocol using OvSynch was compared to artificial insemination (AI) at detected estrus in 2 large dairy herds differing in reproductive management. Cows were synchronized for TAI starting at 62 and 42 d in milk in herds 1 and 2, respectively. The OvSynch regimen included: GnRH (buserelin) at 0.02 mg (i.m.) on d 0; PGF2alpha (tiaprost) at 0.75 mg (i.m.) on d 7; buserelin at 0.02 mg (i.m.) on d 9; and TAI 16 to 20 h later. After TAI, cows seen in estrus received AI, whereas cows diagnosed not pregnant were resynchronized for TAI. Control cows received AI based on detected estrus after voluntary waiting periods of 72 d in herd 1 and 50 d in herd 2. An economic analysis included costs associated with days open, culling, AI, synchrony products, treatment, and examinations. A sensitivity analysis of those variables determined effects on total costs per pregnancy. Use of OvSynch reduced intervals to first AI and days open in both herds and reduced culling for infertility in herd 2. Conception rates for first AI at detected estrus were significantly higher compared to TAI in both herds and for overall AI at estrus in herd 2. For groups assigned to AI at estrus, mean 21-d submission rates over 200 d for AI were higher in herd 1 than in herd 2 (55.6 vs. 28.6%). Days open and culling were the major cost factors. Although OvSynch improved reproduction in both herds, AI based on detected estrus was economically superior in herd 1, whereas OvSynch was superior in herd 2. This was consistent across ranges of cost factors evaluated. Evaluation of synchrony protocols should include reproductive performance along with appropriate costs associated with treatments. Such costs may offset benefits to reproduction in herds with good estrous detection rates. PMID:14765814

  2. Accounting for Sampling Error When Inferring Population Synchrony from Time-Series Data: A Bayesian State-Space Modelling Approach with Applications

    PubMed Central

    Santin-Janin, Hugues; Hugueny, Bernard; Aubry, Philippe; Fouchet, David; Gimenez, Olivier; Pontier, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background Data collected to inform time variations in natural population size are tainted by sampling error. Ignoring sampling error in population dynamics models induces bias in parameter estimators, e.g., density-dependence. In particular, when sampling errors are independent among populations, the classical estimator of the synchrony strength (zero-lag correlation) is biased downward. However, this bias is rarely taken into account in synchrony studies although it may lead to overemphasizing the role of intrinsic factors (e.g., dispersal) with respect to extrinsic factors (the Moran effect) in generating population synchrony as well as to underestimating the extinction risk of a metapopulation. Methodology/Principal findings The aim of this paper was first to illustrate the extent of the bias that can be encountered in empirical studies when sampling error is neglected. Second, we presented a space-state modelling approach that explicitly accounts for sampling error when quantifying population synchrony. Third, we exemplify our approach with datasets for which sampling variance (i) has been previously estimated, and (ii) has to be jointly estimated with population synchrony. Finally, we compared our results to those of a standard approach neglecting sampling variance. We showed that ignoring sampling variance can mask a synchrony pattern whatever its true value and that the common practice of averaging few replicates of population size estimates poorly performed at decreasing the bias of the classical estimator of the synchrony strength. Conclusion/Significance The state-space model used in this study provides a flexible way of accurately quantifying the strength of synchrony patterns from most population size data encountered in field studies, including over-dispersed count data. We provided a user-friendly R-program and a tutorial example to encourage further studies aiming at quantifying the strength of population synchrony to account for uncertainty in

  3. Sex differences in nutrient-dependent reproductive ageing.

    PubMed

    Maklakov, Alexei A; Hall, Matthew D; Simpson, Stephen J; Dessmann, Josephine; Clissold, Fiona J; Zajitschek, Felix; Lailvaux, Simon P; Raubenheimer, David; Bonduriansky, Russell; Brooks, Robert C

    2009-06-01

    Evolutionary theories of aging predict that fitness-related traits, including reproductive performance, will senesce because the strength of selection declines with age. Sexual selection theory predicts, however, that male reproductive performance (especially sexual advertisement) will increase with age. In both bodies of theory, diet should mediate age-dependent changes in reproductive performance. In this study, we show that the sexes exhibit dramatic, qualitative differences in age-dependent reproductive performance trajectories and patterns of reproductive ageing in the cricket Teleogryllus commodus. In females, fecundity peaked early in adulthood and then declined. In contrast, male sexual advertisement increased across the natural lifespan and only declined well beyond the maximum field lifespan. These sex differences were robust to deviations from sex-specific dietary requirements. Our results demonstrate that sexual selection can be at least as important as sex-dependent mortality in shaping the signal of reproductive ageing. PMID:19627271

  4. Mean-field dispersion-induced spatial synchrony, oscillation and amplitude death, and temporal stability in an ecological model.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Gupta, Anubhav

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important issues in spatial ecology is to understand how spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability interact. In the existing studies it is shown that dispersion among identical patches results in spatial synchrony; on the other hand, the combination of spatial heterogeneity and dispersion is necessary for dispersal-induced stability (or temporal stability). Population synchrony and temporal stability are thus often thought of as conflicting outcomes of dispersion. In contrast to the general belief, in this present study we show that mean-field dispersion is conducive to both spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability even in identical patches. This simultaneous occurrence of rather conflicting phenomena is governed by the suppression of oscillation states, namely amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). These states emerge through spatial synchrony of the oscillating patches in the strong-coupling strength. We present an interpretation of the mean-field diffusive coupling in the context of ecology and identify that, with increasing mean-field density, an open ecosystem transforms into a closed ecosystem. We report on the occurrence of OD in an ecological model and explain its significance. Using a detailed bifurcation analysis we show that, depending on the mortality rate and carrying capacity, the system shows either AD or both AD and OD. We also show that the results remain qualitatively the same for a network of oscillators. We identify a new transition scenario between the same type of oscillation suppression states whose geneses differ. In the parameter-mismatched case, we further report on the direct transition from OD to AD through a transcritical bifurcation. We believe that this study will lead to a proper interpretation of AD and OD in ecology, which may be important for the conservation and management of several communities in ecosystems. PMID:26066241

  5. Mean-field dispersion-induced spatial synchrony, oscillation and amplitude death, and temporal stability in an ecological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Tanmoy; Dutta, Partha Sharathi; Gupta, Anubhav

    2015-05-01

    One of the most important issues in spatial ecology is to understand how spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability interact. In the existing studies it is shown that dispersion among identical patches results in spatial synchrony; on the other hand, the combination of spatial heterogeneity and dispersion is necessary for dispersal-induced stability (or temporal stability). Population synchrony and temporal stability are thus often thought of as conflicting outcomes of dispersion. In contrast to the general belief, in this present study we show that mean-field dispersion is conducive to both spatial synchrony and dispersal-induced stability even in identical patches. This simultaneous occurrence of rather conflicting phenomena is governed by the suppression of oscillation states, namely amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). These states emerge through spatial synchrony of the oscillating patches in the strong-coupling strength. We present an interpretation of the mean-field diffusive coupling in the context of ecology and identify that, with increasing mean-field density, an open ecosystem transforms into a closed ecosystem. We report on the occurrence of OD in an ecological model and explain its significance. Using a detailed bifurcation analysis we show that, depending on the mortality rate and carrying capacity, the system shows either AD or both AD and OD. We also show that the results remain qualitatively the same for a network of oscillators. We identify a new transition scenario between the same type of oscillation suppression states whose geneses differ. In the parameter-mismatched case, we further report on the direct transition from OD to AD through a transcritical bifurcation. We believe that this study will lead to a proper interpretation of AD and OD in ecology, which may be important for the conservation and management of several communities in ecosystems.

  6. Volitional enhancement of firing synchrony and oscillation by neuronal operant conditioning: interaction with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Yoshio; Song, Kichan; Tachibana, Shota; Takahashi, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    In this review, we focus on neuronal operant conditioning in which increments in neuronal activities are directly rewarded without behaviors. We discuss the potential of this approach to elucidate neuronal plasticity for enhancing specific brain functions and its interaction with the progress in neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interfaces. The key to-be-conditioned activities that this paper emphasizes are synchronous and oscillatory firings of multiple neurons that reflect activities of cell assemblies. First, we introduce certain well-known studies on neuronal operant conditioning in which conditioned enhancements of neuronal firing were reported in animals and humans. These studies demonstrated the feasibility of volitional control over neuronal activity. Second, we refer to the recent studies on operant conditioning of synchrony and oscillation of neuronal activities. In particular, we introduce a recent study showing volitional enhancement of oscillatory activity in monkey motor cortex and our study showing selective enhancement of firing synchrony of neighboring neurons in rat hippocampus. Third, we discuss the reasons for emphasizing firing synchrony and oscillation in neuronal operant conditioning, the main reason being that they reflect the activities of cell assemblies, which have been suggested to be basic neuronal codes representing information in the brain. Finally, we discuss the interaction of neuronal operant conditioning with neurorehabilitation and brain-machine interface (BMI). We argue that synchrony and oscillation of neuronal firing are the key activities required for developing both reliable neurorehabilitation and high-performance BMI. Further, we conclude that research of neuronal operant conditioning, neurorehabilitation, BMI, and system neuroscience will produce findings applicable to these interrelated fields, and neuronal synchrony and oscillation can be a common important bridge among all of them. PMID:24567704

  7. Repeated injections of D-Amphetamine evoke rapid and dynamic changes in phase synchrony between the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Linsenbardt, David N.; Lapish, Christopher C.; Rubchinsky, Leonid L.

    2013-01-01

    Repeated drug use evokes a number of persistent alterations in oscillatory power and synchrony. How synchronous activity in cortico-hippocampal circuits is progressively modified with repeated drug exposure, however, remains to be characterized. Drugs of abuse induce both short-term and long-term adaptations in cortical and hippocampal circuits and these changes are likely important for the expression of the altered behavioral and neurobiological phenotype associated with addiction. The present study explores how the initial (up to 1 h) pharmacological response to D-Amphetamine (AMPH) is altered with repeated injections in the rat. The methods employed herein allow for the progressive changes in synchronized dynamics with repeated intermittent AMPH exposure to be characterized over short time scales (minutes). Specifically, we examined the temporal variations of phase-locking strength in delta and theta bands within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and between PFC and hippocampus (HC) shortly after drug injection. After the first injection of AMPH synchrony increased within the PFC in the delta band, which was followed, by an increase in theta synchrony between the PFC and HC several minutes later. This relationship switched after repeated AMPH injections, where increases in theta synchrony between the PFC and HC preceded increases in delta synchrony in the PFC. The time-course of increases in synchronous activity were negatively correlated between the PFC delta and the PFC-HC theta. Collectively these data highlight the potential role of PFC-HC circuits in the development of addiction and outline dynamic changes in the time-course that cortico-hippocampal circuits become synchronized with repeated AMPH exposure. PMID:23908609

  8. Reproductive cessation and post-reproductive lifespan in Asian elephants and pre-industrial humans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Short post-reproductive lifespan is widespread across species, but prolonged post-reproductive life-stages of potential adaptive significance have been reported only in few mammals with extreme longevity. Long post-reproductive lifespan contradicts classical evolutionary predictions of simultaneous senescence in survival and reproduction, and raises the question of whether extreme longevity in mammals promotes such a life-history. Among terrestrial mammals, elephants share the features with great apes and humans, of having long lifespan and offspring with long dependency. However, little data exists on the frequency of post-reproductive lifespan in elephants. Here we use extensive demographic records on semi-captive Asian elephants (n = 1040) and genealogical data on pre-industrial women (n = 5336) to provide the first comparisons of age-specific reproduction, survival and post-reproductive lifespan in both of these long-lived species. Results We found that fertility decreased after age 50 in elephants, but the pattern differed from a total loss of fertility in menopausal women with many elephants continuing to reproduce at least until the age of 65 years. The probability of entering a non-reproductive state increased steadily in elephants from the earliest age of reproduction until age 65, with the longer living elephants continuing to reproduce until older ages, in contrast to humans whose termination probability increased rapidly after age 35 and reached 1 at 56 years, but did not depend on longevity. Post-reproductive lifespan reached 11–17 years in elephants and 26–27 years in humans living until old age (depending on method), but whereas half of human adult lifespan (of those reproductive females surviving to the age of 5% fecundity) was spent as post-reproductive, only one eighth was in elephants. Consequently, although some elephants have long post-reproductive lifespans, relatively few individuals reach such a phase and the

  9. Enhanced phase synchrony in the electroencephalograph γ band for musicians while listening to music

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Joydeep; Petsche, Hellmuth

    2001-07-01

    Multichannel electroencephalograph signals from two broad groups, 10 musicians and 10 nonmusicians, recorded in different states (in resting states or no task condition, with eyes opened and eyes closed, and with two musical tasks, listening to two different pieces of music) were studied. Degrees of phase synchrony in various frequency bands were assessed. No differences in the degree of synchronization in any frequency band were found between the two groups in resting conditions. Yet, while listening to music, significant increases of synchronization were found only in the γ-frequency range (>30 Hz) over large cortical areas for the group of musicians. This high degree of synchronization elicited by music in the group of musicians might be due to their ability to host long-term memory representations of music and mediate access to these stored representations.

  10. Synchrony suppression in ensembles of coupled oscillators via adaptive vanishing feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaseri, Ghazal; Javad Yazdanpanah, Mohammad; Pikovsky, Arkady; Rosenblum, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Synchronization and emergence of a collective mode is a general phenomenon, frequently observed in ensembles of coupled self-sustained oscillators of various natures. In several circumstances, in particular in cases of neurological pathologies, this state of the active medium is undesirable. Destruction of this state by a specially designed stimulation is a challenge of high clinical relevance. Typically, the precise effect of an external action on the ensemble is unknown, since the microscopic description of the oscillators and their interactions are not available. We show that, desynchronization in case of a large degree of uncertainty about important features of the system is nevertheless possible; it can be achieved by virtue of a feedback loop with an additional adaptation of parameters. The adaptation also ensures desynchronization of ensembles with non-stationary, time-varying parameters. We perform the stability analysis of the feedback-controlled system and demonstrate efficient destruction of synchrony for several models, including those of spiking and bursting neurons.

  11. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, K K; Kavya, K M; Jerome, A; Sharma, R K

    2016-04-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species. PMID:27182135

  12. Advances in reproductive biotechnologies

    PubMed Central

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kavya, K. M.; Jerome, A.; Sharma, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    In recent times, reproductive biotechnologies have emerged and started to replace the conventional techniques. It is noteworthy that for sustained livestock productivity, it is imperative to start using these techniques for facing the increasing challenges for productivity, reproduction and health with impending environment conditions. These recent biotechniques, both in male and female, have revolutionized and opened avenues for studying and manipulating the reproductive process both in vitro and in vivo in various livestock species for improving tis efficiency. This review attempts to highlight pros and cons, on the recent developments in reproductive biotechnologies, both in male and female in livestock species. PMID:27182135

  13. Content congruency and its interplay with temporal synchrony modulate integration between rhythmic audiovisual streams

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yi-Huang

    2014-01-01

    Both lower-level stimulus factors (e.g., temporal proximity) and higher-level cognitive factors (e.g., content congruency) are known to influence multisensory integration. The former can direct attention in a converging manner, and the latter can indicate whether information from the two modalities belongs together. The present research investigated whether and how these two factors interacted in the perception of rhythmic, audiovisual (AV) streams derived from a human movement scenario. Congruency here was based on sensorimotor correspondence pertaining to rhythm perception. Participants attended to bimodal stimuli consisting of a humanlike figure moving regularly to a sequence of auditory beat, and detected a possible auditory temporal deviant. The figure moved either downwards (congruently) or upwards (incongruently) to the downbeat, while in both situations the movement was either synchronous with the beat, or lagging behind it. Greater cross-modal binding was expected to hinder deviant detection. Results revealed poorer detection for congruent than for incongruent streams, suggesting stronger integration in the former. False alarms increased in asynchronous stimuli only for congruent streams, indicating greater tendency for deviant report due to visual capture of asynchronous auditory events. In addition, a greater increase in perceived synchrony was associated with a greater reduction in false alarms for congruent streams, while the pattern was reversed for incongruent ones. These results demonstrate that content congruency as a top-down factor not only promotes integration, but also modulates bottom-up effects of synchrony. Results are also discussed regarding how theories of integration and attentional entrainment may be combined in the context of rhythmic multisensory stimuli. PMID:25538576

  14. Simulated climate warming alters phenological synchrony between an outbreak insect herbivore and host trees.

    PubMed

    Schwartzberg, Ezra G; Jamieson, Mary A; Raffa, Kenneth F; Reich, Peter B; Montgomery, Rebecca A; Lindroth, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    As the world's climate warms, the phenologies of interacting organisms in seasonally cold environments may advance at differing rates, leading to alterations in phenological synchrony that can have important ecological consequences. For temperate and boreal species, the timing of early spring development plays a key role in plant-herbivore interactions and can influence insect performance, outbreak dynamics, and plant damage. We used a field-based, meso-scale free-air forest warming experiment (B4WarmED) to examine the effects of elevated temperature on the phenology and performance of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) in relation to the phenology of two host trees, aspen (Populus tremuloides) and birch (Betula papyrifera). Results of our 2-year study demonstrated that spring phenology advanced for both insects and trees, with experimentally manipulated increases in temperature of 1.7 and 3.4 °C. However, tree phenology advanced more than insect phenology, resulting in altered phenological synchrony. Specifically, we observed a decrease in the time interval between herbivore egg hatch and budbreak of aspen in both years and birch in one year. Moreover, warming decreased larval development time from egg hatch to pupation, but did not affect pupal mass. Larvae developed more quickly on aspen than birch, but pupal mass was not affected by host species. Our study reveals that warming-induced phenological shifts can alter the timing of ecological interactions across trophic levels. These findings illustrate one mechanism by which climate warming could mediate insect herbivore outbreaks, and also highlights the importance of climate change effects on trophic interactions. PMID:24889969

  15. A Novel Quantitative Approach to Women’s Reproductive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Milne, Fritha H.; Judge, Debra S.

    2012-01-01

    The patterned way in which individuals allocate finite resources to various components of reproduction (e.g. mating effort, reproductive timing and parental investment) is described as a reproductive strategy. As energy is limited, trade-offs between and within aspects of reproductive strategies are expected. The first aim of this study was to derive aspects of reproductive strategies using complete reproductive histories from 718 parous Western Australian women. Factor analysis using a subset of these participants resulted in six factors that represented ‘short-term mating strategy’, ‘early onset of sexual activity’, ‘reproductive output’, ‘timing of childbearing’, ‘breastfeeding’, and ‘child spacing’. This factor structure was internally validated by replication using a second independent subset of the data. The second aim of this study examined trade-offs between aspects of reproductive strategies derived from aim one. Factor scores calculated for each woman were incorporated in generalised linear models and interaction terms were employed to examine the effect of mating behaviour on the relationships between reproductive timing, parental investment and overall reproductive success. Early sexual activity correlates with early reproductive onset for women displaying more long-term mating strategies. Women with more short-term mating strategies exhibit a trade-off between child quantity and child quality not observed in women with a long-term mating strategy. However, women with a short-term mating strategy who delay reproductive timing exhibit levels of parental investment (measured as breastfeeding duration per child) similar to that of women with long-term mating strategies. Reproductive delay has fitness costs (fewer births) for women displaying more short-term mating strategies. We provide empirical evidence that reproductive histories of contemporary women reflect aspects of reproductive strategies, and associations between these

  16. Reproductive efficiency and shade avoidance plasticity under simulated competition.

    PubMed

    Fazlioglu, Fatih; Al-Namazi, Ali; Bonser, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Plant strategy and life-history theories make different predictions about reproductive efficiency under competition. While strategy theory suggests under intense competition iteroparous perennial plants delay reproduction and semelparous annuals reproduce quickly, life-history theory predicts both annual and perennial plants increase resource allocation to reproduction under intense competition. We tested (1) how simulated competition influences reproductive efficiency and competitive ability (CA) of different plant life histories and growth forms; (2) whether life history or growth form is associated with CA; (3) whether shade avoidance plasticity is connected to reproductive efficiency under simulated competition. We examined plastic responses of 11 herbaceous species representing different life histories and growth forms to simulated competition (spectral shade). We found that both annual and perennial plants invested more to reproduction under simulated competition in accordance with life-history theory predictions. There was no significant difference between competitive abilities of different life histories, but across growth forms, erect species expressed greater CA (in terms of leaf number) than other growth forms. We also found that shade avoidance plasticity can increase the reproductive efficiency by capitalizing on the early life resource acquisition and conversion of these resources into reproduction. Therefore, we suggest that a reassessment of the interpretation of shade avoidance plasticity is necessary by revealing its role in reproduction, not only in competition of plants. PMID:27547325

  17. Efficient reproduction of cynomolgus monkey using pronuclear embryo transfer technique.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Dong, Juan; Yang, Wenting; Jin, Yujuan; Yang, Mingying; Wang, Yan; Wang, Philip L; Hu, Yinghe; Tsien, Joe Z

    2008-09-01

    One of the technical bottlenecks in producing nonhuman primate models is that current assisted reproductive techniques, such as in vitro culture and frozen conservation of multicell-stage embryos, often result in poor embryo quality and subsequently lead to low birth rates. We investigated whether pronuclear embryo transfer can be used as an effective means for improving pregnancy and live birth rates of nonhuman primates. We collected 174 metaphase II oocytes by laparoscopy from 22 superovulated mature females and then fertilized these eggs using either in vitro fertilization or intracytoplasmic sperm injection, resulting in a 33.3% and a 50% fertilization rate, respectively. These 66 fertilized pronuclear-stage embryos were then tubally transferred to 30 recipients and led to 7 births and 1 abortion. Importantly, we observed that the highest live birth rate of approximately 64% was obtained when the transfer of pronuclear embryos was performed in the presence of new corpus luteum in the ovary of recipients between 24 h and 36 h after estradiol peak. Therefore, our experiments demonstrate that by matching the critical time window in the recipient's reproductive cycle for achieving optimal embryo-uterine synchrony, pronuclear embryo transfer technology can significantly improve the pregnancy rate and live birth of healthy baby monkeys. This efficient method should be valuable to the systematic efforts in construction of various transgenic primate disease models. PMID:18725640

  18. Sexual Reproduction and Breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the second edition of Plant Propagation Concepts and Laboratory Exercises, we have combined the first edition chapters 36: Sexual Reproduction in Angiosperms and 37: Breeding Horticultural Plants into the present single chapter Sexual Reproduction and Breeding. These topics are so closely relate...

  19. CONTROL OF REPRODUCTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of reproduction is important for seed stock production, selective breeding, growth rate, feed efficiency, meat quality, and biosecurity. These needs to control reproduction differ among cultivars and even segments of the same industry. No matter the impetus for aquaculturists to want to alte...

  20. Reproduction, Physiology and Biochemistry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on the reproduction, physiology, and biochemistry of the root-knot nematodes. The extensive amount of information on the reproduction and cytogenetics of species of Meloidogyne contrasts with the limited information on physiology, biochemistry, and biochemical pathways. In commo...

  1. Aerial photographic reproductions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1971-01-01

    Geological Survey vertical aerial photography is obtained primarily for topographic and geologic mapping. Reproductions from this photography are usually satisfactory for general use. Because reproductions are not stocked, but are custom processed for each order, they cannot be returned for credit or refund.

  2. The Reproduction of Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Although a negative relationship between fertility and education has been described consistently in most countries of the world, less is known about the relationship between intelligence and reproductive outcomes. Also the paths through which intelligence influences reproductive outcomes are uncertain. The present study uses the NLSY79 to analyze…

  3. Reproductive Physiology of Marsupials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharman, G. B.

    1970-01-01

    Describes some unique features of marsupial reproduction which include (1) chromosomal sex determination, (2) reproductive system, (3) birth, (4) location, and (5) embryonic diapause. These features suggest that viviparity evolved separately in eutherian and marsupial stocks after their derivation from a common oviparous ancestor. Bibliography.…

  4. Assessment of Male Reproductive Toxicity##

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review covers all aspects of male reproductive toxicology. It begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and then transitions to the considerations of conducting male reproductive toxicology studies. We discuss multigenerational study as proposed in EPAs harmoniz...

  5. Temporal Characteristics of the Predictive Synchronous Firing Modeled by Spike-Timing-Dependent Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitano, Katsunori; Fukai, Tomoki

    2004-01-01

    When a sensory cue was repeatedly followed by a behavioral event with fixed delays, pairs of premotor and primary motor neurons showed significant increases of coincident spikes at times a monkey was expecting the event. These results provided evidence that neuronal firing synchrony has predictive power. To elucidate the underlying mechanism, here…

  6. Geographic mosaics of species' association: a definition and an example driven by plant-insect phenological synchrony.

    PubMed

    Singer, Michael C; McBride, Carolyn S

    2012-12-01

    Spatial mosaics occur in both evolutionary and ecological properties of species' interactions. Studies of these patterns have facilitated description and prediction of evolutionary responses of interacting species to each other and to changing environments. We propose seeking complementary understanding of community assembly and dynamics by studying ecological and mechanistic properties of mosaics. We define "species' association mosaics" as deviations from a null model in which spatial variation in the extent to which particular species interact ecologically is explained solely by variation in their densities. In extreme deviations from the null, a focal species interacts exclusively with different partners at different sites despite similar abundances of potential partners. We investigate this type of mosaic involving the butterfly Euphydryas editha and its hosts, the perennial Pedicularis semibarbata (Psem) and the ephemeral annual Collinsia torreyi (Ctor). A reciprocal transplant experiment showed that the proximate, mechanistic driver of the mosaic was variation in butterfly oviposition preference: the identity of the preferred host species depended on the site of origin of the insects, not that of the plants. In contrast, the evolutionary driver was phenological asynchrony between the insects and Ctor. Censuses showed that larvae hatching from eggs laid on Ctor would have suffered significantly greater mortality from host senescence at five sites where Ctor was avoided than at two sites where it was used. These differences among sites in phenological synchrony were caused by variation in life span of Ctor. At sites where Ctor was avoided, natural selection on host preference was stabilizing because Ctor life span was too short to accommodate the development time of most larvae. At sites where Ctor was used, selection on preference was also stabilizing because larvae lacked physiological adaptation to feed on Psem. These reciprocal forces of stabilizing

  7. Recent improvements in channel catfish reproduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Control of reproduction in fish is a primary requisite for reliable, predictable and quality seed stock for aquaculture production or a stock enhancement program. Channel catfish is the leading aquaculture species in USA, accounting for 335 million pounds with a farm gate value of over $ 400 millio...

  8. A new approach for the quantification of synchrony of multivariate non-stationary psychophysiological variables during emotion eliciting stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Kelava, Augustin; Muma, Michael; Deja, Marlene; Dagdagan, Jack Y.; Zoubir, Abdelhak M.

    2015-01-01

    Emotion eliciting situations are accompanied by changes of multiple variables associated with subjective, physiological and behavioral responses. The quantification of the overall simultaneous synchrony of psychophysiological reactions plays a major role in emotion theories and has received increased attention in recent years. From a psychometric perspective, the reactions represent multivariate non-stationary intra-individual time series. In this paper, a new time-frequency based latent variable approach for the quantification of the synchrony of the responses is presented. The approach is applied to empirical data, collected during an emotion eliciting situation. The results are compared with a complementary inter-individual approach of Hsieh et al. (2011). Finally, the proposed approach is discussed in the context of emotion theories, and possible future applications and limitations are provided. PMID:25653624

  9. Climate change and seasonal reproduction in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Bronson, F. H.

    2009-01-01

    Seasonal reproduction is common among mammals at all latitudes, even in the deep tropics. This paper (i) discusses the neuroendocrine pathways via which foraging conditions and predictive cues such as photoperiod enforce seasonality, (ii) considers the kinds of seasonal challenges mammals actually face in natural habitats, and (iii) uses the information thus generated to suggest how seasonal reproduction might be influenced by global climate change. Food availability and ambient temperature determine energy balance, and variation in energy balance is the ultimate cause of seasonal breeding in all mammals and the proximate cause in many. Photoperiodic cueing is common among long-lived mammals from the highest latitudes down to the mid-tropics. It is much less common in shorter lived mammals at all latitudes. An unknown predictive cue triggers reproduction in some desert and dry grassland species when it rains. The available information suggests that as our climate changes the small rodents of the world may adapt rather easily but the longer lived mammals whose reproduction is regulated by photoperiod may not do so well. A major gap in our knowledge concerns the tropics; that is where most species live and where we have the least understanding of how reproduction is regulated by environmental factors. PMID:19833645

  10. Reproductive strategies in snakes.

    PubMed Central

    Shine, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Snakes of both sexes display remarkable flexibility and diversity in their reproductive tactics. Many features of reproduction in female snakes (such as reproductive mode and frequency, seasonality and multiple mating) allow flexible maternal control. For example, females can manipulate not only the genotypes of their offspring (through mate choice or enhanced sperm competition) but also the phenotypes of their offspring (through allocation 'decisions', behavioural and physiological thermoregulation, and nest-site selection). Reliance on stored energy ('capital') to fuel breeding results in low frequencies of female reproduction and, in extreme cases, semelparity. A sophisticated vomeronasal system not only allows male snakes to locate reproductive females by following scent trails, but also facilitates pheromonally mediated mate choice by males. Male-male rivalry takes diverse forms, including female mimicry and mate guarding; combat bouts impose strong selection for large body size in males of some species. Intraspecific (geographical) variation and phenotypic plasticity in a wide array of reproductive traits (offspring size and number; reproductive frequency; incidence of multiple mating; male tactics such as mate guarding and combat; mate choice criteria) provide exceptional opportunities for future studies. PMID:12803888

  11. Reproductive skew and the threat of eviction: a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, R. A.; Cant, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Most recent models of the partitioning of reproduction attempt to explain patterns of skew on the assumption that dominant individuals have complete control over breeding opportunities within the group, but may nevertheless concede a share of direct reproduction to subordinates as an incentive to remain peacefully in the association. Although these models may be applicable to some animal societies, we argue that they fail to provide a comprehensive theory of skew. Instead, we suggest that subordinates may often be able to claim unsanctioned reproduction for themselves, but will be forced to exercise a degree of reproductive restraint lest they incite ejection by the dominant. Reproductive skew, in other words, may reflect the threat of ejection (inducing subordinate restraint) rather than the threat of subordinate departure (inducing reproductive concessions by dominants). We present a simple ESS model of reproductive skew under these circumstances, which demonstrates that a shift in emphasis from reproductive concessions by dominants to reproductive restraint on the part of subordinates, radically alters the predictions of skew models. High group productivity, high relatedness and (when group members are related) strong ecological constraints are all expected to lead to reduced skew (the opposite conclusions to those of previous, concession-based analyses). The reason is that these factors reduce the benefits (or increase the costs) of ejection to the dominant, who therefore does best to tolerate more subordinate reproduction.

  12. Variation in Population Synchrony in a Multi-Species Seabird Community: Response to Changes in Predator Abundance.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Gail S; Bolton, Mark; Morrison, Paul; Monaghan, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Ecologically similar sympatric species, subject to typical environmental conditions, may be expected to exhibit synchronous temporal fluctuations in demographic parameters, while populations of dissimilar species might be expected to show less synchrony. Previous studies have tested for synchrony in different populations of single species, and those including data from more than one species have compared fluctuations in only one demographic parameter. We tested for synchrony in inter-annual changes in breeding population abundance and productivity among four tern species on Coquet Island, northeast England. We also examined how manipulation of one independent environmental variable (predator abundance) influenced temporal changes in ecologically similar and dissimilar tern species. Changes in breeding abundance and productivity of ecologically similar species (Arctic Sterna paradisaea, Common S. hirundo and Roseate Terns S. dougallii) were synchronous with one another over time, but not with a species with different foraging and breeding behaviour (Sandwich Terns Thalasseus sandvicensis). With respect to changes in predator abundance, there was no clear pattern. Roseate Tern abundance was negatively correlated with that of large gulls breeding on the island from 1975 to 2013, while Common Tern abundance was positively correlated with number of large gulls, and no significant correlations were found between large gull and Arctic and Sandwich Tern populations. Large gull abundance was negatively correlated with productivity of Arctic and Common Terns two years later, possibly due to predation risk after fledging, while no correlation with Roseate Tern productivity was found. The varying effect of predator abundance is most likely due to specific differences in the behaviour and ecology of even these closely-related species. Examining synchrony in multi-species assemblages improves our understanding of how whole communities react to long-term changes in the

  13. Variation in Population Synchrony in a Multi-Species Seabird Community: Response to Changes in Predator Abundance

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Gail S.; Bolton, Mark; Morrison, Paul; Monaghan, Pat

    2015-01-01

    Ecologically similar sympatric species, subject to typical environmental conditions, may be expected to exhibit synchronous temporal fluctuations in demographic parameters, while populations of dissimilar species might be expected to show less synchrony. Previous studies have tested for synchrony in different populations of single species, and those including data from more than one species have compared fluctuations in only one demographic parameter. We tested for synchrony in inter-annual changes in breeding population abundance and productivity among four tern species on Coquet Island, northeast England. We also examined how manipulation of one independent environmental variable (predator abundance) influenced temporal changes in ecologically similar and dissimilar tern species. Changes in breeding abundance and productivity of ecologically similar species (Arctic Sterna paradisaea, Common S. hirundo and Roseate Terns S. dougallii) were synchronous with one another over time, but not with a species with different foraging and breeding behaviour (Sandwich Terns Thalasseus sandvicensis). With respect to changes in predator abundance, there was no clear pattern. Roseate Tern abundance was negatively correlated with that of large gulls breeding on the island from 1975 to 2013, while Common Tern abundance was positively correlated with number of large gulls, and no significant correlations were found between large gull and Arctic and Sandwich Tern populations. Large gull abundance was negatively correlated with productivity of Arctic and Common Terns two years later, possibly due to predation risk after fledging, while no correlation with Roseate Tern productivity was found. The varying effect of predator abundance is most likely due to specific differences in the behaviour and ecology of even these closely-related species. Examining synchrony in multi-species assemblages improves our understanding of how whole communities react to long-term changes in the

  14. Parallel application of the experiential analysis technique with subject and hypnotist: a new possibility for measuring interactional synchrony.

    PubMed

    Varga, K; Bányai, E I; Gösi-Greguss, A C

    1994-04-01

    The Parallel Experiential Analysis Technique (PEAT), a new method for gathering data on the subjective experiences of both the hypnotist and the subject, is described. The PEAT is an interactional modification of the Experiential Analysis Technique (EAT). Procedural details and methodological observations resulting from the modification of the EAT are discussed. Suggestions on how to characterize the phenomenology of the hypnotic interaction and to determine the degree of interactional synchrony on the subjective level between the hypnotist and subject are made. PMID:8200715

  15. The politics of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, F; Rapp, R

    1991-01-01

    The topic of human reproduction encompasses events throughout the human and especially female life-cycle as well as ideas and practices surrounding fertility, birth, and child care. Most of the scholarship on the subject, up through the 1960s, was based on cross-cultural surveys focused on the beliefs, norms, and values surrounding reproductive behaviors. Multiple methodologies and subspecialties, and fields like social history, human biology, and demography were utilized for the analysis. The concept of the politics of reproduction synthesizes local and global perspectives. The themes investigated include: the concept of reproduction, population control, and the internationalization of state and market interests (new reproductive technologies); social movements and contested domains; medicalization and its discontents; fertility and its control; adolescence and teen pregnancy; birth; birth attendants; the construction of infancy and the politics of child survival; rethinking the demographic transition; networks of nurturance; and meanings of menopause. The medicalization of reproduction is a central issue of studies of birth, midwifery, infertility, and reproductive technologies. Scholars have also analyzed different parts of the female life-cycle as medical problems. Other issues worth analysis include the internationalization of adoption and child care workers; the crisis of infertility of low-income and minority women who are not candidates for expensive reproductive technologies; the concerns of women at high risk for HIV whose cultural status depends on their fertility; questions of reproduction concerning, lesbians and gay men (artificial insemination and discrimination in child rearing); the study of menopause; and fatherhood. New discourse analysis is used to analyze state eugenic policies; conflicts over Western neocolonial influences in which women's status as childbearers represent nationalist interests; fundamentalist attacks on abortion rights; and

  16. Judged and Remembered Trustworthiness of Faces Is Enhanced by Experiencing Multisensory Synchrony and Asynchrony in the Right Order

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, Hugo; Schubert, Thomas W.

    2015-01-01

    This work builds on the enfacement effect. This effect occurs when experiencing a rhythmic stimulation on one’s cheek while seeing someone else’s face being touched in a synchronous way. This typically leads to cognitive and social-cognitive effects similar to self-other merging. In two studies, we demonstrate that this multisensory stimulation can change the evaluation of the other’s face. In the first study, participants judged the stranger’s face and similar faces as being more trustworthy after synchrony, but not after asynchrony. Synchrony interacted with the order of the stroking; hence trustworthiness only changed when the synchronous stimulation occurred before the asynchronous one. In the second study, a synchronous stimulation caused participants to remember the stranger’s face as more trustworthy, but again only when the synchronous stimulation came before the asynchronous one. The results of both studies show that order of stroking creates a context in which multisensory synchrony can affect the trustworthiness of faces. PMID:26716682

  17. Movement Coordination in Psychotherapy: Synchrony of Hand Movements is Associated with Session Outcome. A Single-Case Study.

    PubMed

    Ramseyer, Fabian; Tschacher, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Previous work has shown that nonverbal behavior was associated with both session-level outcome and global outcome in psychotherapy. Nonverbal synchrony - here the coordination between patient's and psychotherapist's movement behavior - is a facet of nonverbal behavior that has recently been studied with video-based motion energy analysis (MEA). The present study aimed to replicate and extend these findings by using direct acquisition of movement data. In a single-case analysis, we monitored patient's and therapist's hand movements with a high-resolution accelerometric measurement system (Vitaport (r)). In addition to these behavioral data, both patient and therapist provided session-level ratings of various factors relevant to the psychotherapy process, which were assessed with post-session questionnaires. The patient-therapist coordination of hand movements, i.e. nonverbal synchrony, in (N = 27) sessions of this dyadic psychotherapy was positively associated with progress reported in post-session questionnaires. Sessions with good evaluations concerning the quality of therapeutic alliance were characterized by high movement coordination. Thus, accelerometric data of this therapy dyad confirmed previous findings gained through video analyses: The coordination of nonverbal behavior shown by patient and therapist was an indicator of beneficial processes occurring within sessions. This replication study showed that nonverbal synchrony embodies important aspects of the alliance. Its assessment and quantification may provide therapists important additional information on processes that usually occur outside conscious awareness, but that nevertheless influence core aspects of the therapy. PMID:27033131

  18. Growth Models of Dyadic Synchrony and Mother-Child Vagal Tone in the Context of Parenting At-Risk

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Ryan J.; Skowron, Elizabeth A.; Berkman, Elliot T.

    2015-01-01

    We used multilevel modeling to examine dynamic changes in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and observer-coded interactive synchrony for mother-child dyads engaged in a laboratory interaction, to characterize parenting-at-risk. Seventy-nine preschooler-mother dyads including a subset with documented child maltreatment (CM; n=43) were observed completing a joint puzzle task while physiological measures were recorded. Dyads led by CM mothers showed decreases in positive synchrony over time, whereas no variation was observed in non-CM dyads. Growth models of maternal RSA indicated that mothers who maintained high levels of positive interactive synchrony with their child evidenced greater RSA reactivity, characterized by an initial withdrawal followed by augmentation as the task progressed, after accounting for CM group status. These results help to clarify patterns of RSA responding in the context of caregiver-child interactions, and demonstrate the importance of modeling dynamic changes in physiology over time in order to better understanding biological correlates of parenting-at-risk. PMID:25542759

  19. Long-term meditation training induced changes in the operational synchrony of default mode network modules during a resting state.

    PubMed

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Kallio-Tamminen, Tarja

    2016-02-01

    Using theoretical analysis of self-consciousness concept and experimental evidence on the brain default mode network (DMN) that constitutes the neural signature of self-referential processes, we hypothesized that the anterior and posterior subnets comprising the DMN should show differences in their integrity as a function of meditation training. Functional connectivity within DMN and its subnets (measured by operational synchrony) has been measured in ten novice meditators using an electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in a pre-/post-meditation intervention design. We have found that while the whole DMN was clearly suppressed, different subnets of DMN responded differently after 4 months of meditation training: The strength of EEG operational synchrony in the right and left posterior modules of the DMN decreased in resting post-meditation condition compared to a pre-meditation condition, whereas the frontal DMN module on the contrary exhibited an increase in the strength of EEG operational synchrony. These findings combined with published data on functional-anatomic heterogeneity within the DMN and on trait subjective experiences commonly found following meditation allow us to propose that the first-person perspective and the sense of agency (the witnessing observer) are presented by the frontal DMN module, while the posterior modules of the DMN are generally responsible for the experience of the continuity of 'I' as embodied and localized within bodily space. Significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:26525051

  20. Passive Synaptic Normalization and Input Synchrony-Dependent Amplification of Cortical Feedback in Thalamocortical Neuron Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Connelly, William M.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    Thalamocortical neurons have thousands of synaptic connections from layer VI corticothalamic neurons distributed across their dendritic trees. Although corticothalamic synapses provide significant excitatory input, it remains unknown how different spatial and temporal input patterns are integrated by thalamocortical neurons. Using dendritic recording, 2-photon glutamate uncaging, and computational modeling, we investigated how rat dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus thalamocortical neurons integrate excitatory corticothalamic feedback. We find that unitary corticothalamic inputs produce small somatic EPSPs whose amplitudes are passively normalized and virtually independent of the site of origin within the dendritic tree. Furthermore, uncaging of MNI glutamate reveals that thalamocortical neurons have postsynaptic voltage-dependent mechanisms that can amplify integrated corticothalamic input. These mechanisms, involving NMDA receptors and T-type Ca2+ channels, require temporally synchronous synaptic activation but not spatially coincident input patterns. In hyperpolarized thalamocortical neurons, T-type Ca2+ channels produce nonlinear amplification of temporally synchronous inputs, whereas asynchronous inputs are not amplified. At depolarized potentials, the input–output function for synchronous synaptic input is linear but shows enhanced gain due to activity-dependent recruitment of NMDA receptors. Computer simulations reveal that EPSP amplification by T-type Ca2+ channels and NMDA receptors occurs when synaptic inputs are either clustered onto individual dendrites or when they are distributed throughout the dendritic tree. Consequently, postsynaptic EPSP amplification mechanisms limit the “modulatory” effects of corticothalamic synaptic inputs on thalamocortical neuron membrane potential and allow these synapses to act as synchrony-dependent “drivers” of thalamocortical neuron firing. These complex thalamocortical input–output transformations

  1. Temporal windows of reproductive opportunity reinforce species barriers in a marine broadcast spawning assemblage.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Carla A; Paulino, Cristina; Jacinto, Rita; Serrão, Ester A; Pearson, Gareth A

    2016-01-01

    Prezygotic isolating mechanisms act to limit hybridization and maintain the genetic identity of closely-related species. While synchronous intraspecific spawning is a common phenomenon amongst marine organisms and plays an important role in reproductive success, asynchronous spawning between potentially hybridizing lineages may also be important in maintaining species boundaries. We tested this hypothesis by comparing reproductive synchrony over daily to hourly timescales in a sympatric assemblage of intertidal fucoid algae containing selfing hermaphroditic (Fucus spiralis and Fucus guiryi) and dioecious (Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) species. Our results confirm that gametes are released on semi-lunar cycles in all species. However, sister species with different mating systems showed asynchronous spawning at finer circadian timescales, thus providing evidence for a partial reproductive barrier between hermaphroditic and dioecious species. Finally, our data also emphasize the ecological, developmental, and/or physiological constraints that operate to restrict reproduction to narrow temporal windows of opportunity in the intertidal zone and more generally the role of ecological factors in marine speciation. PMID:27373816

  2. Experimental food supplementation reveals habitat-dependent male reproductive investment in a migratory bird.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Sara A; Sillett, T Scott; Risk, Benjamin B; Webster, Michael S

    2015-03-22

    Environmental factors can shape reproductive investment strategies and influence the variance in male mating success. Environmental effects on extrapair paternity have traditionally been ascribed to aspects of the social environment, such as breeding density and synchrony. However, social factors are often confounded with habitat quality and are challenging to disentangle. We used both natural variation in habitat quality and a food supplementation experiment to separate the effects of food availability-one key aspect of habitat quality-on extrapair paternity (EPP) and reproductive success in the black-throated blue warbler, Setophaga caerulescens. High natural food availability was associated with higher within-pair paternity (WPP) and fledging two broods late in the breeding season, but lower EPP. Food-supplemented males had higher WPP leading to higher reproductive success relative to controls, and when in low-quality habitat, food-supplemented males were more likely to fledge two broods but less likely to gain EPP. Our results demonstrate that food availability affects trade-offs in reproductive activities. When food constraints are reduced, males invest in WPP at the expense of EPP. These findings imply that environmental change could alter how individuals allocate their resources and affect the selective environment that drives variation in male mating success. PMID:25673677

  3. Temporal windows of reproductive opportunity reinforce species barriers in a marine broadcast spawning assemblage

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Carla A.; Paulino, Cristina; Jacinto, Rita; Serrão, Ester A.; Pearson, Gareth A.

    2016-01-01

    Prezygotic isolating mechanisms act to limit hybridization and maintain the genetic identity of closely-related species. While synchronous intraspecific spawning is a common phenomenon amongst marine organisms and plays an important role in reproductive success, asynchronous spawning between potentially hybridizing lineages may also be important in maintaining species boundaries. We tested this hypothesis by comparing reproductive synchrony over daily to hourly timescales in a sympatric assemblage of intertidal fucoid algae containing selfing hermaphroditic (Fucus spiralis and Fucus guiryi) and dioecious (Fucus vesiculosus and Fucus serratus) species. Our results confirm that gametes are released on semi-lunar cycles in all species. However, sister species with different mating systems showed asynchronous spawning at finer circadian timescales, thus providing evidence for a partial reproductive barrier between hermaphroditic and dioecious species. Finally, our data also emphasize the ecological, developmental, and/or physiological constraints that operate to restrict reproduction to narrow temporal windows of opportunity in the intertidal zone and more generally the role of ecological factors in marine speciation. PMID:27373816

  4. Ultrasonographic Doppler Use for Female Reproduction Management.

    PubMed

    Bollwein, Heinrich; Heppelmann, Maike; Lüttgenau, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Transrectal color Doppler ultrasonography is a useful technique to get new information about physiologic and pathophysiologic alterations of the uterus and ovaries in female cattle. During all reproductive stages characteristic changes in uterine blood flow are observed. Cows with puerperal disturbances show delayed decrease in uterine blood flow in the first few weeks postparturition compared with healthy cows. Measurement of follicular blood flow is used to identify normally developing follicles and predict superovulatory response. Determination of luteal blood is more reliable than B-mode sonography to distinguish between functional and nonfunctional corpora lutea. Color Doppler ultrasonography is a promising tool to improve reproductive management in female cattle. PMID:26922117

  5. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies.

    PubMed

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Jones Littles, Chanda; Saucedo, Omar; Lorenzen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp. PMID:27158895

  6. A simulation exercise to teach principles of bovine reproductive management.

    PubMed

    Perry, G A; Smith, M F

    2004-05-01

    Students in Reproductive Management (a senior-level course with approximately 20 to 50 students per semester) at the University of Missouri-Columbia are required to participate in a simulation exercise that is designed to improve reproductive efficiency in a beef herd. During a simulated 5-yr period, students must 1) improve reproductive efficiency in a beef cow-herd through implementation of reproductive management principles; 2) determine the economic impact of reproductive management decisions in a beef herd; and 3) evaluate the constraints of different geographical locations on approaches to reproductive management. Groups of three to four students are provided with the reproductive and economic records of a farm/ranch located in different parts of North America. Students create reproductive management plans consisting of 1) detailed discussion of farm/ranch environment (climate, terrain, forage and grain availability, and stocking rate; season for breeding and calving; and justification for choice of breed); 2) assessment of current level of reproductive performance; 3) identification and economic justification of specific (measurable) objectives; 4) discussion of alternatives for accomplishing specific objectives; 5) prediction of reproductive performance (pregnancy rate, quantity of calf weaned per cow exposed, and cost per quantity of calf weaned) in response to implementation of specific management practices; and 6) an annual and 5-yr reproductive and economic summary. Students obtain livestock marketing information for their assigned location via the Internet. Spreadsheets were developed to calculate the reproductive efficiency of postpartum cows and replacement heifers based on management decisions made by the groups and to calculate a yearly economic summary for each of the 5 yr. Management decisions are justified in a written report, and oral presentations are given to the class when the project is completed. Greater than 85% of students indicated that

  7. The Effect of Latitudinal Variation on Shrimp Reproductive Strategies

    PubMed Central

    van de Kerk, Madelon; Jones Littles, Chanda; Saucedo, Omar; Lorenzen, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Reproductive strategies comprise the timing and frequency of reproductive events and the number of offspring per reproductive event, depending on factors such as climate conditions. Therefore, species that exhibit plasticity in the allocation of reproductive effort can alter their behavior in response to climate change. Studying how the reproductive strategy of species varies along the latitudinal gradient can help us understand and predict how they will respond to climate change. We investigated the effects of the temporal allocation of reproductive effort on the population size of brown shrimp (Farfantepenaeus aztecus) along a latitudinal gradient. Multiple shrimp species exhibit variation in their reproductive strategies, and given the economic importance of brown shrimp to the commercial fishing sector of the Unites States, changes in the timing of their reproduction could have significant economic and social consequences. We used a stage-based, density-dependent matrix population model tailored to the life history of brown shrimp. Shrimp growth rates and environmental carrying capacity were varied based on the seasonal climate conditions at different latitudes, and we estimated the population size at equilibrium. The length of the growing season increased with decreasing latitude and the reproductive strategy leading to the highest population size changed from one annual birth pulse with high reproductive output to continuous low-output reproduction. Hence, our model confirms the classical paradigm of continuous reproduction at low latitudes, with increased seasonality of the breeding period towards the poles. Our results also demonstrate the potential for variation in climate to affect the optimal reproductive strategy for achieving maximum population sizes. Certainly, understanding these dynamics may inform more comprehensive management strategies for commercially important species like brown shrimp. PMID:27158895

  8. My Reproductive Life Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information For... Media Policy Makers My Reproductive Life Plan Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... use with their patients. How to Make a Plan First, think about your goals for school, for ...

  9. Teaching Plant Reproduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tolman, Marvin N., Ed.; Hardy, Garry R., Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using Amaryllis hippeastrum to teach young children about plant reproduction. Provides tips for growing these plants, discusses the fast growing rate of the plant, and explains the anatomy. (YDS)

  10. Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    Assisted reproductive technology (ART) is used to treat infertility. It includes fertility treatments that handle both a woman's egg and a man's sperm. ... is the most common and effective type of ART. ART procedures sometimes use donor eggs, donor sperm, ...

  11. Avian reproductive physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gee, G.F.

    1995-01-01

    Knowledge of the many physiological factors associated with egg production , fertility, incubation, and brooding in nondomestic birds is limited. Science knows even less about reproduction in most of the 238 endangered or threatened birds. This discussion uses studies of nondomestic and, when necessary, domestic birds to describe physiological control of reproduction. Studies of the few nondomestic avian species show large variation in physiological control of reproduction. Aviculturists, in order to successfully propagate an endangered bird, must understand the bird's reproductive peculiarities. First, investigators can do studies with carefully chosen surrogate species, but eventually they need to confirm the results in the target endangered bird. Studies of reproduction in nondomestic birds increased in the last decade. Still, scientists need to do more comparative studies to understand the mechanisms that control reproduction in birds. New technologies are making it possible to study reproductive physiology of nondomestic species in less limiting ways. These technologies include telemetry to collect information without inducing stress on captives (Howey et al., 1987; Klugman, 1987), new tests for most of the humoral factors associated with reproduction, and the skill to collect small samples and manipulate birds without disrupting the physiological mechanisms (Bercovitz et al., 1985). Managers are using knowledge from these studies to improve propagation in zoological parks, private and public propagation facilities, and research institutions. Researchers need to study the control of ovulation, egg formation, and oviposition in the species of nondomestic birds that lay very few eggs in a season, hold eggs in the oviduct for longer intervals, or differ in other ways from the more thoroughly studied domestic birds. Other techniques that would enhance propagation for nondomestlc birds include tissue culture of cloned embryonic cells, cryopreservation of embryos

  12. Eating disorders and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J F

    1999-05-01

    Eating disorders are common and characteristically affect young women at what would otherwise be their peak of reproductive functioning. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa impinge on reproduction both behaviourally and physiologically, with effects on menstruation, ovarian function, fertility, sexuality and pregnancy. This review presents a summary of current knowledge and makes suggestions for future research, along with some clinical recommendations for the management of eating disorders in pregnancy. PMID:10755771

  13. Early reproductive investment, senescence and lifetime reproductive success in female Asian elephants

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, A D; Mar, K U; Lahdenperä, M; Lummaa, V

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary theory of senescence posits that as the probability of extrinsic mortality increases with age, selection should favour early-life over late-life reproduction. Studies on natural vertebrate populations show early reproduction may impair later-life performance, but the consequences for lifetime fitness have rarely been determined, and little is known of whether similar patterns apply to mammals which typically live for several decades. We used a longitudinal dataset on Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) to investigate associations between early-life reproduction and female age-specific survival, fecundity and offspring survival to independence, as well as lifetime breeding success (lifetime number of calves produced). Females showed low fecundity following sexual maturity, followed by a rapid increase to a peak at age 19 and a subsequent decline. High early life reproductive output (before the peak of performance) was positively associated with subsequent age-specific fecundity and offspring survival, but significantly impaired a female's own later-life survival. Despite the negative effects of early reproduction on late-life survival, early reproduction is under positive selection through a positive association with lifetime breeding success. Our results suggest a trade-off between early reproduction and later survival which is maintained by strong selection for high early fecundity, and thus support the prediction from life history theory that high investment in reproductive success in early life is favoured by selection through lifetime fitness despite costs to later-life survival. That maternal survival in elephants depends on previous reproductive investment also has implications for the success of (semi-)captive breeding programmes of this endangered species. PMID:24580655

  14. Asexual Reproduction in Holothurians

    PubMed Central

    Dolmatov, Igor Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Aspects of asexual reproduction in holothurians are discussed. Holothurians are significant as fishery and aquaculture items and have high commercial value. The last review on holothurian asexual reproduction was published 18 years ago and included only 8 species. An analysis of the available literature shows that asexual reproduction has now been confirmed in 16 holothurian species. Five additional species are also most likely capable of fission. The recent discovery of new fissiparous holothurian species indicates that this reproduction mode is more widespread in Holothuroidea than previously believed. New data about the history of the discovery of asexual reproduction in holothurians, features of fission, and regeneration of anterior and posterior fragments are described here. Asexual reproduction is obviously controlled by the integrated systems of the organism, primarily the nervous system. Special molecular mechanisms appear to determine the location where fission occurs along the anterior-posterior axis of the body. Alteration of the connective tissue strength of the body wall may play an important role during fission of holothurians. The basic mechanism of fission is the interaction of matrix metalloproteinases, their inhibitors, and enzymes forming cross-link complexes between fibrils of collagen. The population dynamics of fissiparous holothurians are discussed. PMID:25405228

  15. The anti-predator role of within-nest emergence synchrony in sea turtle hatchlings.

    PubMed

    Santos, Robson G; Pinheiro, Hudson Tercio; Martins, Agnaldo Silva; Riul, Pablo; Bruno, Soraya Christina; Janzen, Fredric J; Ioannou, Christos C

    2016-07-13

    Group formation is a common behaviour among prey species. In egg-laying animals, despite the various factors that promote intra-clutch variation leading to asynchronous hatching and emergence from nests, synchronous hatching and emergence occurs in many taxa. This synchrony may be adaptive by reducing predation risk, but few data are available in any natural system, even for iconic examples of the anti-predator function of group formation. Here, we show for the first time that increased group size (number of hatchlings emerging together from a nest) reduces green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling predation. This effect was only observed earlier in the night when predation pressure was greatest, indicated by the greatest predator abundance and a small proportion of predators preoccupied with consuming captured prey. Further analysis revealed that the effect of time of day was due to the number of hatchlings already killed in an evening; this, along with the apparent lack of other anti-predatory mechanisms for grouping, suggests that synchronous emergence from a nest appears to swamp predators, resulting in an attack abatement effect. Using a system with relatively pristine conditions for turtle hatchlings and their predators provides a more realistic environmental context within which intra-nest synchronous emergence has evolved. PMID:27383817

  16. Top-down-directed synchrony from medial frontal cortex to nucleus accumbens during reward anticipation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X; Bour, Lo; Mantione, Mariska; Figee, Martijn; Vink, Matthijs; Tijssen, Marina A J; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens and medial frontal cortex (MFC) are part of a loop involved in modulating behavior according to anticipated rewards. However, the precise temporal landscape of their electrophysiological interactions in humans remains unknown because it is not possible to record neural activity from the nucleus accumbens using noninvasive techniques. We recorded electrophysiological activity simultaneously from the nucleus accumbens and cortex (via surface EEG) in humans who had electrodes implanted as part of deep-brain-stimulation treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder. Patients performed a simple reward motivation task previously shown to activate the ventral striatum. Spectral Granger causality analyses were applied to dissociate "top-down" (cortex → nucleus accumbens)- from "bottom-up" (nucleus accumbens → cortex)-directed synchronization (functional connectivity). "Top-down"-directed synchrony from cortex to nucleus accumbens was maximal over medial frontal sites and was significantly stronger when rewards were anticipated. These findings provide direct electrophysiological evidence for a role of the MFC in modulating nucleus accumbens reward-related processing and may be relevant to understanding the mechanisms of deep-brain stimulation and its beneficial effects on psychiatric conditions. PMID:21547982

  17. The anti-predator role of within-nest emergence synchrony in sea turtle hatchlings

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Hudson Tercio; Martins, Agnaldo Silva; Riul, Pablo; Bruno, Soraya Christina; Janzen, Fredric J.

    2016-01-01

    Group formation is a common behaviour among prey species. In egg-laying animals, despite the various factors that promote intra-clutch variation leading to asynchronous hatching and emergence from nests, synchronous hatching and emergence occurs in many taxa. This synchrony may be adaptive by reducing predation risk, but few data are available in any natural system, even for iconic examples of the anti-predator function of group formation. Here, we show for the first time that increased group size (number of hatchlings emerging together from a nest) reduces green turtle (Chelonia mydas) hatchling predation. This effect was only observed earlier in the night when predation pressure was greatest, indicated by the greatest predator abundance and a small proportion of predators preoccupied with consuming captured prey. Further analysis revealed that the effect of time of day was due to the number of hatchlings already killed in an evening; this, along with the apparent lack of other anti-predatory mechanisms for grouping, suggests that synchronous emergence from a nest appears to swamp predators, resulting in an attack abatement effect. Using a system with relatively pristine conditions for turtle hatchlings and their predators provides a more realistic environmental context within which intra-nest synchronous emergence has evolved. PMID:27383817

  18. The consistency of crossmodal synchrony perception across the visual, auditory, and tactile senses.

    PubMed

    Machulla, Tonja-Katrin; Di Luca, Massimiliano; Ernst, Marc O

    2016-07-01

    Crossmodal judgments of relative timing commonly yield a nonzero point of subjective simultaneity (PSS). Here, we test whether subjective simultaneity is coherent across all pairwise combinations of the visual, auditory, and tactile modalities. To this end, we examine PSS estimates for transitivity: If Stimulus A has to be presented x ms before Stimulus B to result in subjective simultaneity, and B y ms before C, then A and C should appear simultaneous when A precedes C by z ms, where z = x + y. We obtained PSS estimates via 2 different timing judgment tasks-temporal order judgments (TOJs) and synchrony judgments (SJs)-thus allowing us to examine the relationship between TOJ and SJ. We find that (a) SJ estimates do not violate transitivity, and that (b) TOJ and SJ data are linearly related. Together, these findings suggest that both TOJ and SJ access the same perceptual representation of simultaneity and that this representation is globally coherent across the tested modalities. Furthermore, we find that (b) TOJ estimates are intransitive. This is consistent with the proposal that while the perceptual representation of simultaneity is coherent, relative timing judgments that access this representation can at times be incoherent with each other because of postperceptual response biases. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27045320

  19. General Anesthetic Conditions Induce Network Synchrony and Disrupt Sensory Processing in the Cortex.

    PubMed

    Lissek, Thomas; Obenhaus, Horst A; Ditzel, Désirée A W; Nagai, Takeharu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics are commonly used in animal models to study how sensory signals are represented in the brain. Here, we used two-photon (2P) calcium activity imaging with cellular resolution to investigate how neuronal activity in layer 2/3 of the mouse barrel cortex is modified under the influence of different concentrations of chemically distinct general anesthetics. Our results show that a high isoflurane dose induces synchrony in local neuronal networks and these cortical activity patterns closely resemble those observed in EEG recordings under deep anesthesia. Moreover, ketamine and urethane also induced similar activity patterns. While investigating the effects of deep isoflurane anesthesia on whisker and auditory evoked responses in the barrel cortex, we found that dedicated spatial regions for sensory signal processing become disrupted. We propose that our isoflurane-2P imaging paradigm can serve as an attractive model system to dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms that induce the anesthetic state, and it might also provide important insight into sleep-like brain states and consciousness. PMID:27147963

  20. Resting state synchrony in long-term abstinent alcoholics with versus without comorbid drug dependence☆

    PubMed Central

    Camchong, Jazmin; Stenger, Victor Andrew; Fein, George

    2013-01-01

    Background We previously reported that when long-term abstinent alcoholics (LTAA; with no drug comorbidity) are compared to controls, they show increased resting state synchrony (RSS) in the executive control network and reduced RSS in the appetitive drive network suggestive of compensatory mechanisms that may facilitate abstinence. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether long-term abstinent alcoholics with comorbid stimulants dependence (LTAAS) show similar RSS mechanisms. Methods Resting-state functional MRI data were collected on 36 LTAAS (20 females, age: 47.85 ± 7.30), 23 LTAA (8 females, age: M = 47.91 ± 6.76), and 23 non-substance abusing controls (NSAC; 8 females, age: M = 47.99 ± 6.70). Using seed-based measures, we examined RSS with the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC). Results Results showed commonalities in LTAA and LTAAS RSS (similar enhanced executive control RSS and left insula RSS) as well as differences (no attenuation of appetitive drive RSS in LTAAS and no enhancement of RSS in right insula in LTAA). Conclusions We believe these differences are adaptive mechanisms that support abstinence. These findings suggest common as well as specific targets for treatment in chronic alcoholics with vs without comorbid stimulant dependence. PMID:23639390

  1. Microsaccades enable efficient synchrony-based coding in the retina: a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Masquelier, Timothée; Portelli, Geoffrey; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is now reasonably well established that microsaccades (MS) enhance visual perception, although the underlying neuronal mechanisms are unclear. Here, using numerical simulations, we show that MSs enable efficient synchrony-based coding among the primate retinal ganglion cells (RGC). First, using a jerking contrast edge as stimulus, we demonstrate a qualitative change in the RGC responses: synchronous firing, with a precision in the 10 ms range, only occurs at high speed and high contrast. MSs appear to be sufficiently fast to be able reach the synchronous regime. Conversely, the other kinds of fixational eye movements known as tremor and drift both hardly synchronize RGCs because of a too weak amplitude and a too slow speed respectively. Then, under natural image stimulation, we find that each MS causes certain RGCs to fire synchronously, namely those whose receptive fields contain contrast edges after the MS. The emitted synchronous spike volley thus rapidly transmits the most salient edges of the stimulus, which often constitute the most crucial information. We demonstrate that the readout could be done rapidly by simple coincidence-detector neurons without knowledge of the MS landing time, and that the required connectivity could emerge spontaneously with spike timing-dependent plasticity. PMID:27063867

  2. Poorer resolution for audiotactile than for audiovisual synchrony detection in cluttered displays.

    PubMed

    Orchard-Mills, Emily; Van der Burg, Erik; Alais, David

    2016-07-01

    The brain integrates signals from multiple modalities to provide a reliable estimate of environmental events. A temporally cluttered environment presents a challenge for sensory integration because of the risk of misbinding, yet it also provides scope for cross-modal binding to greatly enhance performance by highlighting multimodal events. We present a tactile search task in which fingertips received pulsed vibrations and participants identified which finger was stimulated in synchrony with an auditory signal. Results showed that performance for identifying the target finger was impaired when other fingers were stimulated, even though all fingers were stimulated sequentially. When the number of fingers vibrated was fixed, we found that both spatial and temporal factors constrained performance, because events occurring close to the target vibration in either space or time reduced accuracy. When tactile search was compared with visual search, we found overall performance was lower in touch than in vision, although the cost of reducing temporal separation between stimuli or increasing the presentation rate was similar for both target modalities. Audiotactile performance benefitted from increasing spatial separation between target and distractors, with a particularly strong benefit for locating the target on a different hand to the distractors, whereas the spatial manipulations did not affect audiovisual performance. The similar trends in performance for temporal manipulations across vision and touch suggest a common supramodal binding mechanism that, when combining audition and touch, is limited by the poor resolution of the underlying unisensory representation of touch in cluttered settings. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26766511

  3. Super El Nino - a synchrony of Indian Ocean Dipole and ENSO dynamics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hameed, Saji; Dachao, Jin; Thilakan, Vishnu; An, KyongHee

    2016-04-01

    El Ninos significantly affect societies, economies and ecosystems on a global scale. The strongest of these events, hereafter super El Ninos, have disproportionately larger impacts. It is unclear whether a particular combination of climate states, either internal or external to the equatorial Pacific, is associated with the unique spatial and temporal characteristics of these events. This became clear in the case of the much anticipated 2014 super El Nino - although several hypothesized precursor climate states were present, the Pacific warming of 2014 did not develop into a super El Nino. Past studies using statistical analysis and coupled model experiments have pointed to the possible role of the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) in affecting El Nino. However, no direct observational evidence for the role of IOD has yet been found. Here we present for the first time strong and direct observational evidence for the distinct role of IOD dynamics in modulating El Nino evolution during co-occurring events. Further, we identify the key process in this interaction as an atmospheric Kelvin wave dominated downstream circulation forced by equatorial Indian Ocean convection. We propose that the synchrony of this IOD forced process with the inherent coupled dynamics in the Pacific associated with El Nino explains the strong intensity as well as the rapid evolution and termination of super El Ninos, along with their disproportionate global impacts. We discuss the implication of our findings for the ongoing El Nino event which has been projected to rival the 1997 super El Nino in strength and impacts.

  4. Synchrony and Divergence in Stream Metabolism across the Continental United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appling, A.; Read, J. S.; Hall, R. O., Jr.; Stets, E.; Stanley, E. H.; Bernhardt, E. S.; Heffernan, J. B.; Arroita, M.; Griffiths, N.; Harvey, J. W.; Lorenz, D. L.; Winslow, L.; Yackulic, C. B.

    2015-12-01

    River and stream ecosystems experience highly variable inputs of water, nutrients, organic matter, heat, and light over the scales of hours to storms to seasons. Despite the unstable physical and chemical environments of such ecosystems, benthic and pelagic communities persist and even thrive. Whole-stream metabolism estimates allow us to quantify the overall activity of these diverse and responsive communities. They also provide a holistic way to assess how the temporal patterns of that activity are structured by streams' dynamic hydrology and resource availability. We synthesized continental-scale datasets of high-frequency dissolved oxygen, discharge, water temperature, and light to estimate metabolism in over 200 streams to answer the question, "What are the drivers of synchrony and divergence in the temporal patterns of metabolism among streams of North America?" We find that short-term disturbances in the form of storms and cloudy days have strong proximate, dampening effects on whole-ecosystem metabolism; however, despite these strong proximate effects, streams with similar resource and discharge regimes are largely synchronous in their overall seasonal patterns. The median date of peak gross primary productivity is close to the summer solstice in June, while ecosystem respiration has two most-common annual peaks, one in early spring and another in mid fall. These differences in peak timing point to systematic differences at the continental scale in the timing of light versus organic matter availability, with consequent seasonality in net ecosystem productivity.

  5. Did Terrestrial Diversification of Amoebas (Amoebozoa) Occur in Synchrony with Land Plants?

    PubMed Central

    Fiz-Palacios, Omar; Romeralo, Maria; Ahmadzadeh, Afsaneh; Weststrand, Stina; Ahlberg, Per Erik; Baldauf, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Evolution of lineage diversification through time is an active area of research where much progress has been made in the last decade. Contrary to the situation in animals and plants little is known about how diversification rates have evolved in most major groups of protist. This is mainly due to uncertainty about phylogenetic relationships, scarcity of the protist fossil record and the unknown diversity within these lineages. We have analyzed the evolutionary history of the supergroup Amoebozoa over the last 1000 million years using molecular dating and species number estimates. After an origin in the marine environment we have dated the colonization of terrestrial habitats by three distinct lineages of Amoebozoa: Dictyostelia, Myxogastria and Arcellinida. The common ancestor of the two sister taxa, Dictyostelia and Myxogastria, appears to have existed before the colonization of land by plants. In contrast Arcellinida seems to have diversify in synchrony with land plant radiation, and more specifically with that of mosses. Detection of acceleration of diversification rates in Myxogastria and Arcellinida points to a co-evolution within the terrestrial habitats, where land plants and the amoebozoans may have interacted during the evolution of these new ecosystems. PMID:24040233

  6. Synchrony between fruit maturation and effective dispersers' foraging activity increases seed protection against seed predators

    PubMed Central

    Boulay, Raphaël; Carro, Francisco; Soriguer, Ramón C; Cerdá, Xim

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of pollination and seed dispersal mutualisms is conditioned by the spatial and temporal co-occurrence of animals and plants. In the present study we explore the timing of seed release of a myrmecochorous plant (Helleborus foetidus) and ant activity in two populations in southern Spain during 2 consecutive years. The results indicate that fruit dehiscence and seed shedding occur mostly in the morning and correspond to the period of maximum foraging activity of the most effective ant dispersers. By contrast, ant species that do not transport seeds and/or that do not abound near the plants are active either before or after H. foetidus diaspores are released. Experimental analysis of diet preference for three kinds of food shows that effective ant dispersers are mostly scavengers that readily feed on insect corpses and sugars. Artificial seed depots suggest that seeds deposited on the ground out of the natural daily time window of diaspore releasing are not removed by ants and suffer strong predation by nocturnal rodents Apodemus sylvaticus. Nevertheless, important inter-annual variations in rodent populations cast doubts on their real importance as selection agents. We argue that traits allowing synchrony between seed presentation and effective partners may constitute a crucial pre-adaptation for the evolution of plant–animal mutualisms involving numerous animal partners. PMID:17698486

  7. General Anesthetic Conditions Induce Network Synchrony and Disrupt Sensory Processing in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Lissek, Thomas; Obenhaus, Horst A.; Ditzel, Désirée A. W.; Nagai, Takeharu; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Sprengel, Rolf; Hasan, Mazahir T.

    2016-01-01

    General anesthetics are commonly used in animal models to study how sensory signals are represented in the brain. Here, we used two-photon (2P) calcium activity imaging with cellular resolution to investigate how neuronal activity in layer 2/3 of the mouse barrel cortex is modified under the influence of different concentrations of chemically distinct general anesthetics. Our results show that a high isoflurane dose induces synchrony in local neuronal networks and these cortical activity patterns closely resemble those observed in EEG recordings under deep anesthesia. Moreover, ketamine and urethane also induced similar activity patterns. While investigating the effects of deep isoflurane anesthesia on whisker and auditory evoked responses in the barrel cortex, we found that dedicated spatial regions for sensory signal processing become disrupted. We propose that our isoflurane-2P imaging paradigm can serve as an attractive model system to dissect cellular and molecular mechanisms that induce the anesthetic state, and it might also provide important insight into sleep-like brain states and consciousness. PMID:27147963

  8. Microsaccades enable efficient synchrony-based coding in the retina: a simulation study.

    PubMed

    Masquelier, Timothée; Portelli, Geoffrey; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is now reasonably well established that microsaccades (MS) enhance visual perception, although the underlying neuronal mechanisms are unclear. Here, using numerical simulations, we show that MSs enable efficient synchrony-based coding among the primate retinal ganglion cells (RGC). First, using a jerking contrast edge as stimulus, we demonstrate a qualitative change in the RGC responses: synchronous firing, with a precision in the 10 ms range, only occurs at high speed and high contrast. MSs appear to be sufficiently fast to be able reach the synchronous regime. Conversely, the other kinds of fixational eye movements known as tremor and drift both hardly synchronize RGCs because of a too weak amplitude and a too slow speed respectively. Then, under natural image stimulation, we find that each MS causes certain RGCs to fire synchronously, namely those whose receptive fields contain contrast edges after the MS. The emitted synchronous spike volley thus rapidly transmits the most salient edges of the stimulus, which often constitute the most crucial information. We demonstrate that the readout could be done rapidly by simple coincidence-detector neurons without knowledge of the MS landing time, and that the required connectivity could emerge spontaneously with spike timing-dependent plasticity. PMID:27063867

  9. Probing the causal role of prestimulus interregional synchrony for perceptual integration via tACS.

    PubMed

    Stonkus, Rolandas; Braun, Verena; Kerlin, Jess R; Volberg, Gregor; Hanslmayr, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The phase of prestimulus oscillations at 7-10 Hz has been shown to modulate perception of briefly presented visual stimuli. Specifically, a recent combined EEG-fMRI study suggested that a prestimulus oscillation at around 7 Hz represents open and closed windows for perceptual integration by modulating connectivity between lower order occipital and higher order parietal brain regions. We here utilized brief event-related transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to specifically modulate this prestimulus 7 Hz oscillation, and the synchrony between parietal and occipital brain regions. To this end we tested for a causal role of this particular prestimulus oscillation for perceptual integration. The EEG was acquired at the same time allowing us to investigate frequency specific after effects phase-locked to stimulation offset. On a behavioural level our results suggest that tACS did modulate perceptual integration, however, in an unexpected manner. On an electrophysiological level our results suggest that brief tACS does induce oscillatory entrainment, as visible in frequency specific activity phase-locked to stimulation offset. Together, our results do not strongly support a causal role of prestimulus 7 Hz oscillations for perceptual integration. However, our results suggest that brief tACS is capable of modulating oscillatory activity in a temporally sensitive manner. PMID:27616188

  10. Synchrony of trend shifts in Sahel summer rainfall and global oceanic evaporation, 1950-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diawara, A.; Tachibana, Y.; Oshima, K.; Nishikawa, H.; Ando, Y.

    2015-11-01

    Between 1950 and 2012, summer (rainy season) rainfall in the Sahel changed from a multi-decadal decreasing trend to an increasing trend (positive trend shift) in the mid-1980s. We found that this trend shift was synchronous with similar trend shifts in global oceanic evaporation and in land precipitation in all continents except the Americas. The trend shift in oceanic evaporation occurred mainly in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and the subtropical oceans of the Northern Hemisphere (NH). Because increased oceanic evaporation strengthens the atmospheric moisture transport toward land areas, the synchrony of oceanic evaporation and land precipitation is reasonable. Surface scalar winds over the SH oceans also displayed a positive trend shift. Sea surface temperature (SST) displayed a trend shift in the mid-1980s that was negative (increasing, then decreasing) in the SH and positive in the NH. Although SST had opposite trend shifts in both hemispheres, the trend shift in evaporation was positive in both hemispheres. We infer that because strong winds promote evaporative cooling, the trend shift in SH winds strengthened the trend shifts of both SST and evaporation in the SH. Because high SST promotes evaporation, the trend shift in NH SST strengthened the NH trend shift in evaporation. Thus differing oceanic roles in the SH and NH generated the positive trend shift in evaporation; however, the details of moisture transport toward the Sahel are still unclear.

  11. Can hyper-synchrony in meditation lead to seizures? Similarities in meditative and epileptic brain states.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Shane

    2014-10-01

    Meditation is used worldwide by millions of people for relaxation and stress relief. Given sufficient practice, meditators may also experience a variety of altered states of consciousness. These states can lead to a variety of unusual experiences, including physical, emotional and psychic disturbances. This paper highlights the correspondences between brain states associated with these experiences and the symptoms and neurophysiology of epileptic simple partial seizures. Seizures, like meditation practice, can result in both positive and negative experiences. The neurophysiology and chemistry underlying simple partial seizures are characterised by a high degree of excitability and high levels of neuronal synchrony in gamma-band brain activity. Following a survey of the literature that shows that meditation practice is also linked to high power gamma activity, an account of how meditation could cause such activity is provided. This paper discusses the diagnostic challenges for the claim that meditation practices lead to brain states similar to those found in epileptic seizures, and seeks to develop our understanding of the range of pathological and non-pathological states that result from a hyper-excited and hyper-synchronous brain. PMID:25149320

  12. Intralaminar and medial thalamic influence on cortical synchrony, information transmission and cognition

    PubMed Central

    Saalmann, Yuri B.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar and medial thalamic nuclei are part of the higher-order thalamus, which receives little sensory input, and instead forms extensive cortico-thalamo-cortical pathways. The large mediodorsal thalamic nucleus predominantly connects with the prefrontal cortex, the adjacent intralaminar nuclei connect with fronto-parietal cortex, and the midline thalamic nuclei connect with medial prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe. Taking into account this connectivity pattern, it is not surprising that the intralaminar and medial thalamus has been implicated in a variety of cognitive functions, including memory processing, attention and orienting, as well as reward-based behavior. This review addresses how the intralaminar and medial thalamus may regulate information transmission in cortical circuits. A key neural mechanism may involve intralaminar and medial thalamic neurons modulating the degree of synchrony between different groups of cortical neurons according to behavioral demands. Such a thalamic-mediated synchronization mechanism may give rise to large-scale integration of information across multiple cortical circuits, consequently influencing the level of arousal and consciousness. Overall, the growing evidence supports a general role for the higher-order thalamus in the control of cortical information transmission and cognitive processing. PMID:24847225

  13. Multiple Coherence vs Multiple Component Synchrony Measure for somatosensory evoked response detection.

    PubMed

    Melges, Danilo B; Miranda de Sa, Antonio Mauricio F L; Infantosi, Antonio Fernando C

    2010-01-01

    This work aims at comparing the performance of two Multivariate Objective Response Detection (MORD) techniques in the frequency domain, the Multiple Coherence (MC) and the Multiple Component Synchrony Measure (MCSM), for tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) detection. Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals during somatosensory stimulation were collected from forty adult volunteers using the 10-20 International System. The stimulation was carried out throughout current pulses (200 µs width) applied to the right posterior tibial nerve (motor threshold intensity level) at the rate of 5 Hz. The response detection was based on rejecting the null hypothesis of response absence (M = 100 and M = 800 epochs and significance level α = 0.05). The MORD techniques were applied to the pairs of derivations [Cz][Fz] and [C3][C4]. The MC outperforms the MCSM, regardless the pair of derivations or the number of epochs used for the estimates calculation. Hence, the MC should be used, if two derivations are available for SEP recording. PMID:21096391

  14. Neural synchrony in ventral cochlear nucleus neuron populations is not mediated by intrinsic processes but is stimulus induced: implications for auditory brainstem implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Mauger, Stefan J.; Rathbone, Graeme D.; Paolini, Antonio G.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to elucidate if neural synchrony forms part of the spike time-based theory for coding of sound information in the ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) of the auditory brainstem. Previous research attempts to quantify the degree of neural synchrony at higher levels of the central auditory system have indicated that synchronized firing of neurons during presentation of an acoustic stimulus could play an important role in coding complex sound features. However, it is unknown whether this synchrony could in fact arise from the VCN as it is the first station in the central auditory pathway. Cross-correlation analysis was conducted on 499 pairs of multiunit clusters recorded in the urethane-anesthetized rat VCN in response to pure tones and combinations of two tones to determine the presence of neural synchrony. The shift predictor correlogram was used as a measure for determining the synchrony owing to the effects of the stimulus. Without subtraction of the shift predictor, over 65% of the pairs of multiunit clusters exhibited significant correlation in neural firing when the frequencies of the tones presented matched their characteristic frequencies (CFs). In addition, this stimulus-evoked neural synchrony was dependent on the physical distance between electrode sites, and the CF difference between multiunit clusters as the number of correlated pairs dropped significantly for electrode sites greater than 800 µm apart and for multiunit cluster pairs with a CF difference greater than 0.5 octaves. However, subtraction of the shift predictor correlograms from the raw correlograms resulted in no remaining correlation between all VCN pairs. These results suggest that while neural synchrony may be a feature of sound coding in the VCN, it is stimulus induced and not due to intrinsic neural interactions within the nucleus. These data provide important implications for stimulation strategies for the auditory brainstem implant, which is used to

  15. Dose addition predicts the effects of a mixture of five phthalate esters to inhibit fetal testosterone production and gene expression, and postnatal reproductive development in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some phthalate esters (PE) during sexual differentiation induces reproductive malformations in male and female rats. In the fetal male, these lesions result from phthalate-induced reductions in testicular testosterone (T) production and insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) ...

  16. Development of a swine specific 9-plex Luminex cytokine assay and assessment of immunity after porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccination: Elevated serum IL-12 levels are not predictive of protect

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A Luminex multiplex swine cytokine assay was developed to measure 9 cytokines simultaneously in pig serum and tested in a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine/challenge study. This assay detects innate (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IFNa, TNFa); regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, I...

  17. Reproductive aging patterns in primates reveal that humans are distinct

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Susan C.; Altmann, Jeanne; Brockman, Diane K.; Cords, Marina; Fedigan, Linda M.; Pusey, Anne; Stoinski, Tara S.; Strier, Karen B.; Morris, William F.; Bronikowski, Anne M.

    2013-01-01

    Women rarely give birth after ∼45 y of age, and they experience the cessation of reproductive cycles, menopause, at ∼50 y of age after a fertility decline lasting almost two decades. Such reproductive senescence in mid-lifespan is an evolutionary puzzle of enduring interest because it should be inherently disadvantageous. Furthermore, comparative data on reproductive senescence from other primates, or indeed other mammals, remains relatively rare. Here we carried out a unique detailed comparative study of reproductive senescence in seven species of nonhuman primates in natural populations, using long-term, individual-based data, and compared them to a population of humans experiencing natural fertility and mortality. In four of seven primate species we found that reproductive senescence occurred before death only in a small minority of individuals. In three primate species we found evidence of reproductive senescence that accelerated throughout adulthood; however, its initial rate was much lower than mortality, so that relatively few individuals experienced reproductive senescence before death. In contrast, the human population showed the predicted and well-known pattern in which reproductive senescence occurred before death for many women and its rate accelerated throughout adulthood. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that reproductive senescence in midlife, although apparent in natural-fertility, natural-mortality populations of humans, is generally absent in other primates living in such populations. PMID:23898189

  18. Reproductive Phenology of a Seasonally-Dry Dipterocarp Forest in Southern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurten, E.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Davies, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Our understanding of the proximate and ultimate factors that shape reproductive phenology in dipterocarp forests comes exclusively from studies of everwet, general flowering forests. This study, for the first time, examines the reproductive phenology of a dipterocarp-dominated forest in a seasonally-dry region in Southeast Asia. We monitored flowering and fruiting monthly for 1344 trees (>300 spp.) in a seasonally-dry forest in Khao Chong, Thailand from 2001-2009, and assessed frequency, duration, seasonality, and synchrony of reproduction. Reproductive phenology of the Khao Chong forest was more similar to tropical forests in other seasonally-dry parts of the tropics than it was to dipterocarp forests in everwet regions of Southeast Asia, despite being more phylogenetically similar to the latter. The Khao Chong forest exhibited annual reproduction, with peak flowering occurring at the end of the dry season, and peak fruiting occurring early in the wet season. The majority of species and individuals also reproduced annually, including some species that are known to be "general flowering" in everwet climates. Short periods of drought appeared to be the cue that initiated flowering in early flowering species, while species flowering later in the dry season may have responded to either drought or low temperature. Over the eight years of our study, we observed a decline in the proportion of individuals reproducing each season. This decline appeared to be associated with a shorter dry season due to a later onset of continuous drought, suggesting that changing climate in the region may have significant impacts on plant reproduction and recruitment.

  19. Leptin and reproductive function.

    PubMed

    Hausman, Gary J; Barb, C Richard; Lents, Clay A

    2012-10-01

    Adipose tissue plays a dynamic role in whole-body energy homeostasis by acting as an endocrine organ. Collective evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of leptin. Developmental changes in these relationships are considered important for pubertal transition in reproductive function. Leptin augments secretion of gonadotropin hormones, which are essential for initiation and maintenance of normal reproductive function, by acting centrally at the hypothalamus to regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal activity and secretion. The effects of leptin on GnRH are mediated through interneuronal pathways involving neuropeptide-Y, proopiomelanocortin and kisspeptin. Increased infertility associated with diet induced obesity or central leptin resistance are likely mediated through the kisspeptin-GnRH pathway. Furthermore, Leptin regulates reproductive function by altering the sensitivity of the pituitary gland to GnRH and acting at the ovary to regulate follicular and luteal steroidogenesis. Thus leptin serves as a putative signal that links metabolic status with the reproductive axis. The intent of this review is to examine the biological role of leptin with energy metabolism, and reproduction. PMID:22980196

  20. Adipokines in human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Dupont, Joëlle; Pollet-Villard, Xavier; Reverchon, Maxime; Mellouk, Namya; Levy, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    Adipose tissue communicates with other central and peripheral organs by the synthesis and release of substances called adipokines. The most studied adipokine is leptin but others have been recently identified including resistin, adiponectin, chemerin, omentin and visfatin. These adipokines have a critical role in the development of obesity-related complications and inflammatory conditions. However, they are also involved in other functions in the organism including reproductive functions. Indeed, many groups have demonstrated that adipokine receptors, such as adiponectin and chemerin, but also adipokines themselves (adiponectin, chemerin, resistin, visfatin and omentin) are expressed in human peripheral reproductive tissues and that these adipokines are likely to exert direct effects on these tissues. After a brief description of these new adipokines, an overview of their actions in different human reproductive organs (hypothalamus, pituitary, ovary, testis, uterus and placenta) will be presented. Finally, comments will be made on the eventual alterations of these adipokines in reproductive disorders, with special attention to polycystic ovary syndrome, a disease characterized by dysfunction of gonadal axis and systemic nerve endocrine metabolic network with a prevalence of up to 10% in women of reproductive age. PMID:26574894

  1. Parental Synchrony and Nurturance as Targets in an Attachment Based Intervention: Building Upon Mary Ainsworth’s Insights About Mother-Infant Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Kristin; Meade, EB; Dozier, Mary

    2013-01-01

    As an astute observer of parent-infant interaction, Mary Ainsworth described and assessed facets of maternal sensitivity, including responsiveness to conditions of infant distress and non-distress. In this paper, we consider the importance of distinguishing between parental sensitivity to children’s distress cues (which we refer to as nurturance) and parental sensitivity to children’s non-distress cues (which we refer to as synchrony). Observations of parents in our intervention, Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC), have led us to believe that distress and non-distress represent distinct contexts in which parents can be differentially sensitive or insensitive in responding. Thus, we have conceptualized nurturance and synchrony as distinct targets of the ABC intervention, and, in deciding how to assess parental sensitivity, we have chosen measures that distinguish between nurturance and synchrony. We describe the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches we have taken to assess parental sensitivity, including diary methodology that we developed for assessing parental nurturance and global measures that we have used for assessing parental synchrony. Finally, we describe a frequency-based coding system that we developed for assessing parental nurturance and synchrony from videotaped intervention sessions. PMID:24299132

  2. Dominance, reproduction and survival in banded mongooses: towards an egalitarian social system?

    PubMed

    de Luca, D. W.; Ginsberg, J. R.

    2001-01-01

    The banded mongoose, Mungos mungo, is a social species that forms multimale and multifemale family groups. Earlier studies suggest these family groups are relatively egalitarian with small differences in reproductive opportunities among individuals of different rank. In contrast, previous studies of other social mongooses have focused on species with more despotic control of reproduction (meerkats, Suricata suricatta, dwarf mongooses, Helogale parvula). In these species, the distribution of reproductive opportunities amongst individuals of different rank has met the predictions of reproductive skew theory: dominant individuals accrue greater reproductive benefits than subordinates, with subordinates breeding less often than dominants. In this paper we test how well two predictions of reproductive skew theory explain variance in measures of reproductive effort, and its correlates, in a wild population of banded mongooses in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda. We measure dominance rank in males and females, and we investigate whether individuals of higher social rank accrue greater benefits than subordinates in terms of survival and reproduction. Banded mongoose dominance hierarchies showed linearity, but low reproductive skew. Rank was not significantly correlated with age. Furthermore, there were only small effects of dominance rank on nutritional levels, and no effects on reproduction and survival, suggesting that banded mongoose societies are indeed relatively egalitarian. No evidence of reproductive suppression was found and other forms of reproductive control were not observed. However, we do not exclude the possibility of increased reproductive competition in circumstances of higher ecological constraints. These findings show that reproductive skew theory is equally useful in explaining variation in reproduction in societies with low reproductive skew, as it is in explaining the allocation of reproductive effort in despotic social systems. Copyright 2001

  3. Asymmetric reproductive barriers and mosaic reproductive isolation: insights from Misty lake-stream stickleback.

    PubMed

    Räsänen, Katja; Hendry, Andrew P

    2014-04-01

    Ecological speciation seems to occur readily but is clearly not ubiquitous - and the relative contributions of different reproductive barriers remain unclear in most systems. We here investigate the potential importance of selection against migrants in lake/stream stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from the Misty Lake system, Canada. This system is of particular interest because one population contrast (Lake vs. Outlet stream) shows very low genetic and morphological divergence, whereas another population contrast (Lake vs. Inlet stream) shows dramatic genetic and morphological divergence apparently without strong and symmetric reproductive barriers. To test whether selection against migrants might solve this "conundrum of missing reproductive isolation", we performed a fully factorial reciprocal transplant experiment using 225 individually marked stickleback collected from the wild. Relative fitness of the different ecotypes (Lake, Inlet, and Outlet) was assessed based on survival and mass change in experimental enclosures. We found that Inlet fish performed poorly in the lake (selection against migrants in that direction), whereas Lake fish outperformed Inlet fish in all environments (no selection against migrants in the opposite direction). As predicted from their phenotypic and genetic similarity, Outlet and Lake fish performed similarly in all environments. These results suggest that selection against migrants is asymmetric and, together with previous work, indicates that multiple reproductive barriers contribute to reproductive isolation. Similar mosaic patterns of reproductive isolation are likely in other natural systems. PMID:24772291

  4. Power over reproduction in social hymenoptera.

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Madeleine; Ratnieks, Francis L W

    2003-01-01

    Inclusive fitness theory has been very successful in predicting and explaining much of the observed variation in the reproductive characteristics of insect societies. For example, the theory correctly predicts sex-ratio biasing by workers in relation to the queen's mating frequency. However, within an insect society there are typically multiple reproductive optima, each corresponding to the interest of different individual(s) or parties of interest. When multiple optima occur, which party's interests prevail? Presumably, the interests of the party with the greatest 'power'; the ability to do or act. This article focuses on factors that influence power over colony reproduction. In particular, we seek to identify the principles that may cause different parties of interest to have greater or lesser power. In doing this, we discuss power from two different angles. On the one hand, we discuss general factors based upon non-idiosyncratic biological features (e.g. information, access to and ability to process food) that are likely to be important to all social Hymenoptera. On the other hand, we discuss idiosyncratic factors that depend upon the biology of a taxon at any hierarchical level. We propose that a better understanding of the diversity of reproductive characteristics of insect societies will come from combining inclusive fitness theory with a wide range of other factors that affect relative power in a conflict situation. PMID:14561330

  5. Variation in probability of first reproduction of Weddell seals.

    PubMed

    Hadley, Gillian L; Rotella, Jay J; Garrott, Robert A; Nichols, James D

    2006-09-01

    1. For many species, when to begin reproduction is an important life-history decision that varies by individual and can have substantial implications for lifetime reproductive success and fitness. 2. We estimated age-specific probabilities of first-time breeding and modelled variation in these rates to determine age at first reproduction and understand why it varies in a population of Weddell seals in Erebus Bay, Antarctica. We used multistate mark-recapture modelling methods and encounter histories of 4965 known-age female seals to test predictions about age-related variation in probability of first reproduction and the effects of annual variation, cohort and population density. 3. Mean age at first reproduction in this southerly located study population (7.62 years of age, SD=1.71) was greater than age at first reproduction for a Weddell seal population at a more northerly and typical latitude for breeding Weddell seals (mean=4-5 years of age). This difference suggests that age at first reproduction may be influenced by whether a population inhabits the core or periphery of its range. 4. Age at first reproduction varied from 4 to 14 years, but there was no age by which all seals recruited to the breeding population, suggesting that individual heterogeneity exists among females in this population. 5. In the best model, the probability of breeding for the first time varied by age and year, and the amount of annual variation varied with age (average variance ratio for age-specific rates=4.3%). 6. Our results affirmed the predictions of life-history theory that age at first reproduction in long-lived mammals will be sensitive to environmental variation. In terms of life-history evolution, this variability suggests that Weddell seals display flexibility in age at first reproduction in order to maximize reproductive output under varying environmental conditions. Future analyses will attempt to test predictions regarding relationships between environmental covariates

  6. Biofluidmechanics of Reproduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauci, Lisa J.; Dillon, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization requires the coordinated activity of motile spermatozoa, muscular contractions of the uterus and oviduct, as well as ciliary beating. These elastic structures generate forces that drive fluid motion, but their configurations are, in turn, determined by the fluid dynamics. We review the basic fluid mechanical aspects of reproduction, including flagellar/ciliary beating and peristalsis. We report on recent biological studies that have shed light on the relative importance of the mechanical ingredients of reproduction. In particular, we examine sperm motility in the reproductive tract, ovum pickup and transport in the oviduct, as well as sperm-egg interactions. We review recent advances in understanding the internal mechanics of cilia and flagella, flagellar surface interaction, sperm motility in complex fluids, and the role of fluid dynamics in embryo transfer. We outline promising computational fluid dynamics frameworks that may be used to investigate these complex, fluid-structure interactions.

  7. Dinosaur Reproduction and Parenting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horner, John R.

    Non-avian dinosaur reproductive and parenting behaviors were mostly similar to those of extant archosaurs. Non-avian dinosaurs were probably sexually dimorphic and some may have engaged in hierarchical rituals. Non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodontidae, Oviraptorosauria) had two active oviducts, each of which produced single eggs on a daily or greater time scale. The eggs of non-coelurosaurian dinosaurs (e.g. Ornithischia, Sauropoda) were incubated in soils, whereas the eggs of non-avian coelurosaurs (e.g. Troodon, Oviraptor) were incubated with a combination of soil and direct parental contact. Parental attention to the young was variable, ranging from protection from predators to possible parental feeding of nest-bound hatchlings. Semi-altricial hadrosaur hatchlings exited their respective nests near the time of their first linear doubling. Some reproductive behaviors, once thought exclusive to Aves, arose first in non-avian dinosaurs. The success of the Dinosauria may be related to reproductive strategies.

  8. Human reproduction: Jewish perspectives.

    PubMed

    Schenker, Joseph G

    2013-11-01

    Developments in science and technology and corresponding clinical applications raise new religious questions, often without clear answers. The role of theology in bioethics is integral to clarify perceived attitudes toward these developments for different religious communities. The Jewish attitude towards procreation is derived from the first commandment of God to Adam to 'Be fruitful and multiply'. Judaism allows the practice of all techniques of assisted reproduction when the oocyte and spermatozoon originate from the wife and husband respectively. This paper presents the attitude of Jewish Law -- Halacha to therapeutic procedures, such as IVF-embryo transfer, spermatozoa, oocytes, embryo donation, cryopreservation of genetic material, surrogacy, posthumous reproduction, gender preselection, reproductive and therapeutic cloning. PMID:24000935

  9. Introduction: Communicating Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hopwood, Nick; Jones, Peter Murray; Kassell, Lauren; Secord, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Communication should be central to histories of reproduction, because it has structured how people do and do not reproduce. Yet communication has been so pervasive, and so various, that it is often taken for granted and the historical specificities overlooked. Making communication a frame for histories of reproduction can draw a fragmented field together, including by putting the promotion of esoteric ideas on a par with other practical activities. Paying communication close attention can revitalize the history of reproduction over the long term by highlighting continuities as well as the complex connections between new technologies and new approaches. Themes such as the power of storytelling, the claiming and challenging of expertise, and relations between knowledge and ignorance, secrecy and propriety also invite further study. PMID:26521666

  10. Reproductive Biology and Its Impact on Body Size: Comparative Analysis of Mammalian, Avian and Dinosaurian Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Jan; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2011-01-01

    Janis and Carrano (1992) suggested that large dinosaurs might have faced a lower risk of extinction under ecological changes than similar-sized mammals because large dinosaurs had a higher potential reproductive output than similar-sized mammals (JC hypothesis). First, we tested the assumption underlying the JC hypothesis. We therefore analysed the potential reproductive output (reflected in clutch/litter size and annual offspring number) of extant terrestrial mammals and birds (as “dinosaur analogs”) and of extinct dinosaurs. With the exception of rodents, the differences in the reproductive output of similar-sized birds and mammals proposed by Janis and Carrano (1992) existed even at the level of single orders. Fossil dinosaur clutches were larger than litters of similar-sized mammals, and dinosaur clutch sizes were comparable to those of similar-sized birds. Because the extinction risk of extant species often correlates with a low reproductive output, the latter difference suggests a lower risk of population extinction in dinosaurs than in mammals. Second, we present a very simple, mathematical model that demonstrates the advantage of a high reproductive output underlying the JC hypothesis. It predicts that a species with a high reproductive output that usually faces very high juvenile mortalities will benefit more strongly in terms of population size from reduced juvenile mortalities (e.g., resulting from a stochastic reduction in population size) than a species with a low reproductive output that usually comprises low juvenile mortalities. Based on our results, we suggest that reproductive strategy could have contributed to the evolution of the exceptional gigantism seen in dinosaurs that does not exist in extant terrestrial mammals. Large dinosaurs, e.g., the sauropods, may have easily sustained populations of very large-bodied species over evolutionary time. PMID:22194835

  11. Metals and female reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Sengupta, P; Banerjee, R; Nath, S; Das, S; Banerjee, S

    2015-07-01

    Research into occupational exposure of metals and consequences of reproductive systems has made imperative scientific offerings in the preceding few decades. Early research works focused on possible effects on the reproductive functions rather than the complete reproductive health of the woman. Later, it was realized that metals, as reproductive toxins, may also induce hormonal changes affecting other facets of reproductive health such as the menstrual cycle, ovulation, and fertility. Concern is now shifting from considerations for the pregnant woman to the entire spectrum of occupational health threats and thus reproductive health among women. PMID:25425549

  12. Anatomically Detailed and Large-Scale Simulations Studying Synapse Loss and Synchrony Using NeuroBox.

    PubMed

    Breit, Markus; Stepniewski, Martin; Grein, Stephan; Gottmann, Pascal; Reinhardt, Lukas; Queisser, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of neurons and networks plays an important role in processing electrical and biochemical signals. Based on neuronal reconstructions, which are becoming abundantly available through databases such as NeuroMorpho.org, numerical simulations of Hodgkin-Huxley-type equations, coupled to biochemical models, can be performed in order to systematically investigate the influence of cellular morphology and the connectivity pattern in networks on the underlying function. Development in the area of synthetic neural network generation and morphology reconstruction from microscopy data has brought forth the software tool NeuGen. Coupling this morphology data (either from databases, synthetic, or reconstruction) to the simulation platform UG 4 (which harbors a neuroscientific portfolio) and VRL-Studio, has brought forth the extendible toolbox NeuroBox. NeuroBox allows users to perform numerical simulations on hybrid-dimensional morphology representations. The code basis is designed in a modular way, such that e.g., new channel or synapse types can be added to the library. Workflows can be specified through scripts or through the VRL-Studio graphical workflow representation. Third-party tools, such as ImageJ, can be added to NeuroBox workflows. In this paper, NeuroBox is used to study the electrical and biochemical effects of synapse loss vs. synchrony in neurons, to investigate large morphology data sets within detailed biophysical simulations, and used to demonstrate the capability of utilizing high-performance computing infrastructure for large scale network simulations. Using new synapse distribution methods and Finite Volume based numerical solvers for compartment-type models, our results demonstrate how an increase in synaptic synchronization can compensate synapse loss at the electrical and calcium level, and how detailed neuronal morphology can be integrated in large-scale network simulations. PMID:26903818

  13. Traces across the body: influence of music-dance synchrony on the observation of dance

    PubMed Central

    Woolhouse, Matthew Harold; Lai, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies investigating entrainment and person perception, synchronized movements were found to enhance memory for incidental person attributes. Although this effect is robust, including in dance, the process by which it is actuated are less well understood. In this study, two hypotheses are investigated: that enhanced memory for person attributes is the result of (1) increased gaze time between in-tempo dancers; and/or (2) greater attentional focus between in-tempo dancers. To explore these possible mechanisms in the context of observing dance, an eye-tracking study was conducted in which subjects watched videos of pairs of laterally positioned dancers; only one of the dancers was synchronized with the music, the other being asynchronous. The results were consistent with the first hypothesis—music-dance synchrony gives rise to increased visual inspection times. In addition, there was a preference for upper-body fixations over lower-body fixations across both synchronous and asynchronous conditions. A subsequent, single-dancer eye-tracking study investigated fixations across different body regions, including head, torso, legs and feet. Significantly greater dwell times were recorded for head than torso and legs; feet attracted significantly less dwell time than any other body region. Lastly, the study sought to identify dance gestures responsible for torso- and head-directed fixations. Specifically we asked whether there are features in dance that are specially designed to direct an observer’s gaze towards the face—the main “communicative portal” with respect to the transmission of intent, affect and empathy. PMID:25520641

  14. Anatomically Detailed and Large-Scale Simulations Studying Synapse Loss and Synchrony Using NeuroBox

    PubMed Central

    Breit, Markus; Stepniewski, Martin; Grein, Stephan; Gottmann, Pascal; Reinhardt, Lukas; Queisser, Gillian

    2016-01-01

    The morphology of neurons and networks plays an important role in processing electrical and biochemical signals. Based on neuronal reconstructions, which are becoming abundantly available through databases such as NeuroMorpho.org, numerical simulations of Hodgkin-Huxley-type equations, coupled to biochemical models, can be performed in order to systematically investigate the influence of cellular morphology and the connectivity pattern in networks on the underlying function. Development in the area of synthetic neural network generation and morphology reconstruction from microscopy data has brought forth the software tool NeuGen. Coupling this morphology data (either from databases, synthetic, or reconstruction) to the simulation platform UG 4 (which harbors a neuroscientific portfolio) and VRL-Studio, has brought forth the extendible toolbox NeuroBox. NeuroBox allows users to perform numerical simulations on hybrid-dimensional morphology representations. The code basis is designed in a modular way, such that e.g., new channel or synapse types can be added to the library. Workflows can be specified through scripts or through the VRL-Studio graphical workflow representation. Third-party tools, such as ImageJ, can be added to NeuroBox workflows. In this paper, NeuroBox is used to study the electrical and biochemical effects of synapse loss vs. synchrony in neurons, to investigate large morphology data sets within detailed biophysical simulations, and used to demonstrate the capability of utilizing high-performance computing infrastructure for large scale network simulations. Using new synapse distribution methods and Finite Volume based numerical solvers for compartment-type models, our results demonstrate how an increase in synaptic synchronization can compensate synapse loss at the electrical and calcium level, and how detailed neuronal morphology can be integrated in large-scale network simulations. PMID:26903818

  15. The effect of low light intensity on the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winget, C. M.; Lyman, J.; Beljan, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The light-intensity threshold for humans is not known. In past space flights owing to power restrictions, light intensities have been minimal and reported to be as low as 15 ft. c. This study was conducted to determine whether the light (L)/dark (D) environment of 16L : 8D at the relatively low light intensity of 15 ft. c. was adequate for the maintenance of circadian synchrony in human subjects. Six healthy male subjects aged 20-23 years were exposed for 21 days to a 16L : 8D photoperiod. During the first 7 days the light intensity was 100 ft. c.; it was reduced to 15 ft. c. during the next 7 days and increased again to 100 ft. c. during the last 7 days of the study. Rectal temperature (RT) and heart rate (HR) were recorded continuously throughout the 21 days of the study. In the 100 ft. c. 16L : 8D the RT and HR rhythms remained stable and circadian throughout. When the light intensity was decreased to 15 ft. c. the periodicity of the HR rhythm was significantly decreased and this rhythm showed marked instability. In contrast the period of the RT rhythm did not change but a consistent phase delay occurred due to a delay in the lights-on associated rise in RT. These divergent effects on these two rhythms in internal desynchronization and performance decrement during the 15 ft. c. exposure. The data emphasize the need for establishing accurately the minimal lighting requirements for the maintenance of circadian rhythms of humans in confined environments.

  16. Neural synchrony examined with magnetoencephalography (MEG) during eye gaze processing in autism spectrum disorders: preliminary findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Gaze processing deficits are a seminal, early, and enduring behavioral deficit in autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, a comprehensive characterization of the neural processes mediating abnormal gaze processing in ASD has yet to be conducted. Methods This study investigated whole-brain patterns of neural synchrony during passive viewing of direct and averted eye gaze in ASD adolescents and young adults (M Age  = 16.6) compared to neurotypicals (NT) (M Age  = 17.5) while undergoing magnetoencephalography. Coherence between each pair of 54 brain regions within each of three frequency bands (low frequency (0 to 15 Hz), beta (15 to 30 Hz), and low gamma (30 to 45 Hz)) was calculated. Results Significantly higher coherence and synchronization in posterior brain regions (temporo-parietal-occipital) across all frequencies was evident in ASD, particularly within the low 0 to 15 Hz frequency range. Higher coherence in fronto-temporo-parietal regions was noted in NT. A significantly higher number of low frequency cross-hemispheric synchronous connections and a near absence of right intra-hemispheric coherence in the beta frequency band were noted in ASD. Significantly higher low frequency coherent activity in bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortical regions and higher gamma band coherence in right temporo-parieto-occipital brain regions during averted gaze was related to more severe symptomology as reported on the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised (ADI-R). Conclusions The preliminary results suggest a pattern of aberrant connectivity that includes higher low frequency synchronization in posterior cortical regions, lack of long-range right hemispheric beta and gamma coherence, and decreased coherence in fronto-temporo-parietal regions necessary for orienting to shifts in eye gaze in ASD; a critical behavior essential for social communication. PMID:24976870

  17. Spatial patterning and floral synchrony among trillium populations with contrasting histories of herbivory

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Michael A.; Poznanovic, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the spatial patterning and floral synchrony within and among populations of a non-clonal, forest understory herb, Trillium catesbaei. Two populations of T. catesbaei within Great Smoky Mountains National Park were monitored for five years: Cades Cove (high deer abundance) and Whiteoak Sink (low deer abundance). All individuals within each population were mapped during year one and five. Only flowering and single-leaf juveniles were mapped during intervening years. Greater distances between flowering plants (plants currently in flower) and substantially lower population densities and smaller patch sizes were observed at Cades Cove versus Whiteoak Sink. However, with the exception of flowering plants, contrasting histories of herbivory did not appear to fundamentally alter the spatial patterning of the T. catesbaei population at Cades Cove, an area with a long and well-documented history of deer overabundance. Regardless of browse history, non-flowering life stages were significantly clustered at all spatial scales examined. Flowering plants were clustered in all years at Whiteoak Sink, but more often randomly distributed at Cades Cove, possibly as a result of their lower abundance. Between years, however, there was a positive spatial association between the locations of flowering plants at both sites. Flowering rate was synchronous between sites, but lagged a year behind favorable spring growing conditions, which likely allowed plants to allocate photosynthate from a favorable year towards flowering the subsequent year. Collectively, our results suggest that chronically high levels of herbivory may be associated with spatial patterning of flowering within populations of a non-clonal plant. They also highlight the persistence of underlying spatial patterns, as evidenced by high levels of spatial clustering among non-flowering individuals, and the pervasive, although muted in a population subjected to chronic herbivory, influence of precipitation and

  18. Traces across the body: influence of music-dance synchrony on the observation of dance.

    PubMed

    Woolhouse, Matthew Harold; Lai, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies investigating entrainment and person perception, synchronized movements were found to enhance memory for incidental person attributes. Although this effect is robust, including in dance, the process by which it is actuated are less well understood. In this study, two hypotheses are investigated: that enhanced memory for person attributes is the result of (1) increased gaze time between in-tempo dancers; and/or (2) greater attentional focus between in-tempo dancers. To explore these possible mechanisms in the context of observing dance, an eye-tracking study was conducted in which subjects watched videos of pairs of laterally positioned dancers; only one of the dancers was synchronized with the music, the other being asynchronous. The results were consistent with the first hypothesis-music-dance synchrony gives rise to increased visual inspection times. In addition, there was a preference for upper-body fixations over lower-body fixations across both synchronous and asynchronous conditions. A subsequent, single-dancer eye-tracking study investigated fixations across different body regions, including head, torso, legs and feet. Significantly greater dwell times were recorded for head than torso and legs; feet attracted significantly less dwell time than any other body region. Lastly, the study sought to identify dance gestures responsible for torso- and head-directed fixations. Specifically we asked whether there are features in dance that are specially designed to direct an observer's gaze towards the face-the main "communicative portal" with respect to the transmission of intent, affect and empathy. PMID:25520641

  19. Does the Thalamo-Cortical Synchrony Play a Role in Seizure Termination?

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Elisa; Bénar, Christian; Bonini, Francesca; Carron, Romain; Colombet, Bruno; Régis, Jean; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying seizure termination are still unclear despite their therapeutic importance. We studied thalamo-cortical connectivity and synchrony in human mesial temporal lobe seizures in order to analyze their role in seizure termination. Twenty-two seizures from 10 patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing pre-surgical evaluation were analyzed using intracerebral recordings [stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)]. We performed a measure of SEEG signal interdependencies (non-linear correlation), to estimate the functional connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions. Then, we derived synchronization indices, namely global, thalamic, mesio-temporal, and thalamo-mesio temporal index at the onset and the end of seizures. In addition, an estimation of thalamic “outputs and inputs” connectivity was proposed. Thalamus was consistently involved in the last phase of all analyzed seizures and thalamic synchronization index was significantly more elevated at the end of seizure than at the onset. The global synchronization index at the end of seizure negatively correlated with seizure duration (p = 0.045) and in the same way the thalamic synchronization index showed an inverse tendency with seizure duration. Six seizures out of twenty-two displayed a particular thalamo-cortical spike-and-wave pattern at the end. They were associated to higher values of all synchronization indices and outputs from thalamus (p = 0.0079). SWP seizures displayed a higher and sustained increase of cortical and thalamo-cortical synchronization with a stronger participation of thalamic outputs. We suggest that thalamo-cortical oscillations might contribute to seizure termination via modulation of cortical synchronization. In the subgroup of SWP seizures, thalamus may exert a control on temporal lobe structures by inducing a stable hypersynchronization that ultimately leads to seizure termination. PMID:26388834

  20. Decisions Made with Less Evidence Involve Higher Levels of Corticosubthalamic Nucleus Theta Band Synchrony.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Baltazar; Tan, Huiling; Little, Simon; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Zaghloul, Kareem; Brown, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The switch between automatic action selection and more controlled forms of decision-making is a dynamic process thought to involve both cortical and subcortical structures. During sensory conflict, medial pFC oscillations in the theta band (<8 Hz) drive those of the subthalamic nucleus (STN), and this is thought to increase the threshold of evidence needed for one competing response to be selected over another. Here, we were interested in testing whether STN activity is also altered by the rate at which evidence is presented during a congruent dot motion task absent of any explicit sensory conflict. By having a series of randomly moving dots gradually transform to congruent motion at three different rates (slow, medium, fast), we were able to show that a slower rate increased the time it took participants to make a response but did not alter the total amount of evidence that was integrated before the response. Notably, this resulted in a decision being made with a lower amount of instantaneous evidence during the slow and medium trials. Consistent with the idea that medial pFC-STN activity is involved in executing cognitive control, the higher levels of ambiguity during these trials were associated with increased theta band synchrony between the cortex and the STN, with the cortical oscillations Granger-causal to those of the STN. These results further confirm the involvement of the STN in decision-making and suggest that the disruption of this network may underlie some of the unwanted cognitive deficits associated with STN deep brain stimulation. PMID:26845109

  1. Reproductive rights under attack.

    PubMed

    Mcdonald, K

    1995-01-01

    Women's groups, politicians, nongovernmental organizations, funding groups, and donor countries must all be lobbied with the message that sexual and reproductive health issues are inextricably linked to women in development, education, and future economic strength of nations worldwide. In the Beijing Nongovernmental Organization (NGO) Forum the draft Plan of Action had 35% of its language bracketed and subject to negotiation in Beijing. The previous International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo had only 15% of its language bracketed. Much of the language bracketed for Beijing had already been fully agreed upon before the Cairo conference. The bracketed language was in the health and human rights sections, and most of the language pertained to sexual and reproductive health. The increase in controversy is due to an opposition better organized in Beijing than it had been in Cairo, due to the opposition's failure to recognize the implications of the Cairo declarations on women, men, and children, and due to the opposition's general intolerance of sexual and reproductive issues. The major factor, however, was the linking of women's rights with sexual and reproductive health issues. Family planners joined with women's rights groups, which had always promoted women's control over their bodies as the cornerstone of equality. This connection was interpreted as a threat to the social order by conservative societies. NGO participants included 1400 people representing 170 countries. The NGO anti-abortion contingent was well-funded, well-organized, and large. Lobbying was conducted in an effort to convince people to oppose any language pertaining to gender, sexual and reproductive health, and adolescent rights. Anti-abortion lobbyists also rifled through documents of pro-choice participants. In Canada and the United States anti-abortion groups are lobbying hard to overturn the Cairo Plan of Action and to expand their efforts internationally among

  2. Reproductive Disorders in Horses.

    PubMed

    Snider, Timothy A

    2015-08-01

    Reproductive disease is relatively common in the horse, resulting in a variable, yet significant, economic impact on individual horsemen as well as the entire industry. Diverse expertise from the veterinary community ensures and improves individual and population health of the horse. From a pathology and diagnostics perspective, this review provides a comprehensive overview of pathology of the male and female equine reproductive tract. Recognition by clinical and gross features is emphasized, although some essential histologic parameters are included, as appropriate. Where relevant, discussion of ancillary diagnostic tests and approaches are included for some diseases and lesions. PMID:26210954

  3. Feminism and reproductive technologies.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Joan C

    1994-01-01

    ... Rowland is a social scientist and a radical feminist, and she has undertaken the task of making readers think twice about reproductive technologies. If a reader isn't thinking twice, it will not do to blame it on Rowland and the shortcomings of her book. She has a good deal to say that is extremely important and that needs to be considered by anyone who is interested in the moral issues, in general, and the issues for women and children, in particular, that are raised by the new and emerging reproductive technologies. Her book should be widely read. And it should generate the worries it is written to generate. PMID:11644539

  4. The impact of reproduction on the stress axis of free-living male northern red backed voles (Myodes rutilus).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Quinn E; Dantzer, Ben; Boonstra, Rudy

    2015-12-01

    Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis culminates in the release of glucocorticoids (henceforth CORT), which have wide-reaching physiological effects. Three hypotheses potentially explain seasonal variation in CORT. The enabling hypothesis predicts that reproductive season CORT exceeds post-reproductive season CORT because CORT enables reproductive investment. The inhibitory hypothesis predicts the opposite because CORT can negatively affect reproductive function. The costs of reproduction hypothesis predicts that HPA axis condition declines over and following the reproductive season. We tested these hypotheses in wild male red-backed voles (Myodes rutilus) during the reproductive and post-reproductive seasons. We quantified CORT levels in response to restraint stress tests consisting of three blood samples (initial, stress-induced, and recovery). Mineralocorticoid (MR) and glucocorticoid (GR) receptor mRNA levels in the brain were also quantified over the reproductive season. Total CORT (tCORT) in the initial and stress-induced samples were greater in the post-reproductive than in the reproductive season, which supported the inhibitory hypothesis. Conversely, free CORT (fCORT) did not differ between the reproductive and post-reproductive seasons, which was counter to both the enabling and inhibitory hypotheses. Evidence for HPA axis condition decline in CORT as well as GR and MR mRNA over the reproductive season (i.e. costs of reproduction hypothesis) was mixed. Moreover, all of the parameters that showed signs of declining condition over the reproductive season did not also show signs of declining condition over the post-reproductive season suggesting that the costs resulting from reproductive investment had subsided. In conclusion, our results suggest that different aspects of the HPA axis respond differently to seasonal changes and reproductive investment. PMID:26188715

  5. Life-stage differences in spatial genetic structure in an irruptive forest insect: implications for dispersal and spatial synchrony.

    PubMed

    James, Patrick M A; Cooke, Barry; Brunet, Bryan M T; Lumley, Lisa M; Sperling, Felix A H; Fortin, Marie-Josée; Quinn, Vanessa S; Sturtevant, Brian R

    2015-01-01

    Dispersal determines the flux of individuals, energy and information and is therefore a key determinant of ecological and evolutionary dynamics. Yet, it remains difficult to quantify its importance relative to other factors. This is particularly true in cyclic populations in which demography, drift and dispersal contribute to spatio-temporal variability in genetic structure. Improved understanding of how dispersal influences spatial genetic structure is needed to disentangle the multiple processes that give rise to spatial synchrony in irruptive species. In this study, we examined spatial genetic structure in an economically important irruptive forest insect, the spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) to better characterize how dispersal, demography and ecological context interact to influence spatial synchrony in a localized outbreak. We characterized spatial variation in microsatellite allele frequencies using 231 individuals and seven geographic locations. We show that (i) gene flow among populations is likely very high (Fst  ≈ 0); (ii) despite an overall low level of genetic structure, important differences exist between adult (moth) and juvenile (larvae) life stages; and (iii) the localized outbreak is the likely source of moths captured elsewhere in our study area. This study demonstrates the potential of using molecular methods to distinguish residents from migrants and for understanding how dispersal contributes to spatial synchronization. In irruptive populations, the strength of genetic structure depends on the timing of data collection (e.g. trough vs. peak), location and dispersal. Taking into account this ecological context allows us to make more general characterizations of how dispersal can affect spatial synchrony in irruptive populations. PMID:25439007

  6. Reproductive Market Values Explain Post-reproductive Lifespans in Men.

    PubMed

    Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2016-03-01

    Post-reproductive lifespans (PRLSs) of men vary across traditional societies. We argue that if sexual selection operates on male age-dependent resource availability (or 'reproductive market values') the result is variation in male late-life reproduction across subsistence systems. This perspective highlights the uniqueness of PRLS in both women and men. PMID:26774275

  7. Male Reproductive Toxicology: Environmental Exposures vs Reproductive Competence

    EPA Science Inventory

    Like the lecture this chapter begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and transitions into male reproductive toxicology. It ends with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses in male reproductive toxicology and epidemiology today. This chapter is highly il...

  8. Spatial synchronies in the seasonal occurrence of larvae of oysters (Crassostrea gigas) and mussels (Mytilus edulis/galloprovincialis) in European coastal waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippart, Catharina J. M.; Amaral, Ana; Asmus, Ragnhild; van Bleijswijk, Judith; Bremner, Julie; Buchholz, Fred; Cabanellas-Reboredo, Miguel; Catarino, Diana; Cattrijsse, André; Charles, François; Comtet, Thierry; Cunha, Alexandra; Deudero, Salud; Duchêne, Jean-Claude; Fraschetti, Simonetta; Gentil, Franck; Gittenberger, Arjan; Guizien, Katell; Gonçalves, João M.; Guarnieri, Giuseppe; Hendriks, Iris; Hussel, Birgit; Vieira, Raquel Pinheiro; Reijnen, Bastian T.; Sampaio, Iris; Serrao, Ester; Pinto, Isabel Sousa; Thiebaut, Eric; Viard, Frédérique; Zuur, Alain F.

    2012-08-01

    Reproductive cycles of marine invertebrates with complex life histories are considered to be synchronized by water temperature and feeding conditions, which vary with season and latitude. This study analyses seasonal variation in the occurrence of oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and mussel (Mytilus edulis/galloprovincialis) larvae across European coastal waters at a synoptic scale (1000s of km) using standardised methods for sampling and molecular analyses. We tested a series of hypotheses to explain the observed seasonal patterns of occurrence of bivalve larvae at 12 European stations (located between 37°N and 60°N and 27°W and 18°E). These hypotheses included a model that stated that there was no synchronisation in seasonality of larval presence at all between the locations (null hypothesis), a model that assumed that there was one common seasonality pattern for all stations within Europe, and various models that supposed that the variation in seasonality could be grouped according to specific spatial scales (i.e., latitude, large marine ecosystems and ecoregions), taxonomic groups, or several combinations of these factors. For oysters, the best models explaining the presence/absence of larvae in European coastal waters were (1) the model that assumed one common seasonal pattern, and (2) the one that, in addition to this common pattern, assumed an enhanced probability of occurrence from south to north. The third best model for oysters, with less empirical support than the first two, stated that oysters reproduced later in the south than in the north. For mussels, the best models explaining the seasonality in occurrence of larvae were (1) the model that assumed four underlying trends related to large marine ecosystems, and (2) the one that assumed one common seasonal pattern for larvae occurrence throughout Europe. Such synchronies in larval occurrences suggest that environmental conditions relevant to bivalve larval survival are more or less similar at large

  9. Preparing for Assisted Reproductive Technology

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) What Is ART Patient Resources Preparing for ...

  10. Reproductive Resilience to Food Shortage in a Small Heterothermic Primate

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Martine; Henry, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    The massive energetic costs entailed by reproduction in most mammalian females may increase the vulnerability of reproductive success to food shortage. Unexpected events of unfavorable climatic conditions are expected to rise in frequency and intensity as climate changes. The extent to which physiological flexibility allows organisms to maintain reproductive output constant despite energetic bottlenecks has been poorly investigated. In mammals, reproductive resilience is predicted to be maximal during early stages of reproduction, due to the moderate energetic costs of ovulation and gestation relative to lactation. We experimentally tested the consequences of chronic-moderate and short-acute food shortages on the reproductive output of a small seasonally breeding primate, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus) under thermo-neutral conditions. These two food treatments were respectively designed to simulate the energetic constraints imposed by a lean year (40% caloric restriction over eight months) or by a sudden, severe climatic event occurring shortly before reproduction (80% caloric restriction over a month). Grey mouse lemurs evolved under the harsh, unpredictable climate of the dry forest of Madagascar and should thus display great potential for physiological adjustments to energetic bottlenecks. We assessed the resilience of the early stages of reproduction (