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Sample records for requires ketamine anesthesia

  1. Effect of yohimbine on xylazine-ketamine anesthesia in cats.

    PubMed

    Hsu, W H; Lu, Z X

    1984-10-15

    Xylazine and ketamine are an anesthetic combination used in feline practice for routine surgical procedures. In a controlled study, we evaluated the effects of yohimbine, an antagonist of xylazine, on the anesthesia induced by this anesthetic combination in cats. Two intramuscular doses of xylazine and ketamine (2.2 mg of xylazine/kg plus 6.6 mg of ketamine/kg and 4.4 mg of xylazine/kg plus 6.6 mg of ketamine/kg) caused approximately 60 and 100 minutes of anesthesia, respectively, in control cats. When yohimbine (0.1 mg/kg) was given intravenously 45 minutes after ketamine administration, the cats regained consciousness within 3 minutes. They were ambulatory 1 to 2 minutes after regaining consciousness. Yohimbine also reversed the bradycardia and respiratory depression elicited by xylazine-ketamine. The results indicated that yohimbine may be useful for controlling the duration of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia in cats. PMID:6501048

  2. Ketamine: Current applications in anesthesia, pain, and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Madhuri S.; Theerth, Kaushic A.; Deva, Radhika S.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine was introduced commercially in 1970 with the manufacturer's description as a “rapidly acting, nonbarbiturate general anesthetic” and a suggestion that it would be useful for short procedures. With the help of its old unique pharmacological properties and newly found beneficial clinical properties, ketamine has survived the strong winds of time, and it currently has a wide variety of clinical applications. It's newly found neuroprotective, antiinflammatory and antitumor effects, and the finding of the usefulness of low dose ketamine regimens have helped to widen the clinical application profile of ketamine. The present article attempts to review the current useful applications of ketamine in anesthesia, pain and critical care. It is based on scientific evidence gathered from textbooks, journals, and electronic databases. PMID:25886322

  3. Intraperitoneal co-administration of low dose urethane with xylazine and ketamine for extended duration of surgical anesthesia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Clover, Anthony J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Procedures involving complex surgical techniques in rats, such as placement of abdominal aortic graft require extended duration of surgical anesthesia, which often can be achieved by repeated administrations of xylazine-ketamine combination. However such repeated anesthetic administration, in addition to being technically challenging, may be associated with potential adverse events due to cumulative effects of anesthesia. We report here the feasibility of using urethane at low dose (~1/10 the recommended anesthetic dose) in combination with a xylazine-ketamine mix to achieve an extended duration of surgical anesthesia in rats. The anesthesia induction phase was quick and smooth with an optimal phase of surgical anesthesia achieved for up to 90 minutes, which was significantly higher compared to that achieved with use of only xylazine-ketamine combination. The rectal temperature, heart rate and respiratory rate were within the physiological range with an uneventful recovery phase. Post surgery the rats were followed up to 3 months without any evidence of tumor or any other adverse effects related to the use of the urethane anesthetic combination. We conclude that low dose urethane can be effectively used in combination with xylazine and ketamine to achieve extended duration of surgical anesthesia up to 90 minutes in rats. PMID:26755920

  4. Anesthesia of wild red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) with medetomidine/ketamine and reversal by atipamezole.

    PubMed

    Vié, J C; De Thoisy, B; Fournier, P; Fournier-Chambrillon, C; Genty, C; Kéravec, J

    1998-01-01

    Wild red howler monkeys (Alouatta seniculus) were translocated during the flooding of the forest at a hydroelectric dam site in French Guiana. For a variety of minor clinical procedures, 96 monkeys were anesthetized with various intramuscular injections of combinations of medetomidine and ketamine. The howler population was composed of healthy animals (42 males and 54 females) of various ages. Medetomidine (150 micrograms/kg) associated with ketamine (4 mg/kg) gave the best results and was used on 63 animals. The injection rapidly resulted in complete immobilization with good to excellent myorelaxation. The induction stage was quiet, with absence of both corneal and pedal withdrawal reflexes in 57 animals after 2.9 +/- 1.4 min. Six animals required an additional injection. Rectal temperature and respiratory and heart rates decreased during anesthesia, whereas relative oxyhemoglobin saturation increased. One death occurred during anesthesia. One abortion and one death also occurred the day following anesthesia but were more probably a result of capture stress. Atipamezole given i.m. at a dose of five times the medetomidine dose 38.4 +/- 8.0 min after the anesthetic injection led to standing recovery in 7.1 +/- 4.5 min. Spontaneous recovery occurred in 17 animals before the atipamezole injection after an average of 30.6 +/- 9.6 min. Total recovery time was shorter in young animals. Medetomidine/ketamine induced good myorelaxation and provided considerably shortened immobilization duration, which are two notable advantages for field studies. We recommend this association for short procedures including minor surgery in red howler monkeys. PMID:9702284

  5. Ketamine: A Review of Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics in Anesthesia and Pain Therapy.

    PubMed

    Peltoniemi, Marko A; Hagelberg, Nora M; Olkkola, Klaus T; Saari, Teijo I

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is a phencyclidine derivative, which functions primarily as an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. It has no affinity for gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors in the central nervous system. Ketamine shows a chiral structure consisting of two optical isomers. It undergoes oxidative metabolism, mainly to norketamine by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A and CYP2B6 enzymes. The use of S-ketamine is increasing worldwide, since the S(+)-enantiomer has been postulated to be a four times more potent anesthetic and analgesic than the R(-)-enantiomer and approximately two times more effective than the racemic mixture of ketamine. Because of extensive first-pass metabolism, oral bioavailability is poor and ketamine is vulnerable to pharmacokinetic drug interactions. Sublingual and nasal formulations of ketamine are being developed, and especially nasal administration produces rapid maximum plasma ketamine concentrations with relatively high bioavailability. Ketamine produces hemodynamically stable anesthesia via central sympathetic stimulation without affecting respiratory function. Animal studies have shown that ketamine has neuroprotective properties, and there is no evidence of elevated intracranial pressure after ketamine dosing in humans. Low-dose perioperative ketamine may reduce opioid consumption and chronic postsurgical pain after specific surgical procedures. However, long-term analgesic effects of ketamine in chronic pain patients have not been demonstrated. Besides analgesic properties, ketamine has rapid-acting antidepressant effects, which may be useful in treating therapy-resistant depressive patients. Well-known psychotomimetic and cognitive adverse effects restrict the clinical usefulness of ketamine, even though fewer psychomimetic adverse effects have been reported with S-ketamine in comparison with the racemate. Safety issues in long-term use are yet to be resolved. PMID:27028535

  6. The effects of pentobarbital, ketamine-pentobarbital and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia in a rat myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury model.

    PubMed

    Shekarforoush, Shahnaz; Fatahi, Zahra; Safari, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    To achieve reliable experimental data, the side-effects of anesthetics should be eliminated. Since anesthetics exert a variety of effects on hemodynamic data and incidence of arrhythmias, the selection of anesthetic agents in a myocardial ischemic reperfusion injury model is very important. The present study was performed to compare hemodynamic variables, the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias, and infarct size during 30 min of ischemia and 120 min of reperfusion in rats using pentobarbital, ketamine-pentobarbital or ketamine-xylazine anaesthesia. A total of 30 rats were randomly divided into three groups. In group P, pentobarbital (60 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [IP]) was used solely; in group K-P, ketamine and pentobarbital (50 and 30 mg/kg, respectively, IP) were used in combination; and in group K-X, ketamine and xylazine (75 and 5 mg/kg, respectively, IP) were also used in combination. Hemodynamic data and occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias were recorded throughout the experiments. The ischemic area was measured by triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. The combination of ketamine-xylazine caused bradycardia and hypotension. The greatest reduction in mean arterial blood pressure during ischemia was in the P group. The most stability in hemodynamic parameters during ischemia and reperfusion was in the K-P group. The infarct size was significantly less in the K-X group. Whereas none of the rats anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine fibrillated during ischemia, ventricular fibrillation occurred in 57% of the animals anesthetized with pentobarbital or ketamine-pentobarbital. Because it offers the most stable hemodynamic parameters, it is concluded that the ketamine-pentobarbital anesthesia combination is the best anesthesia in a rat ischemia reperfusion injury model. PMID:26224732

  7. Mortality associated with using medetomidine and ketamine for general anesthesia in pregnant and nonpregnant Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Lauren M; Ross, Simone M; Jones, Megan L; Musk, Gabrielle C

    2014-06-01

    Medetomidine and ketamine are injectable drugs that can be used in combination to induce general anesthesia in rats. After noticing a high incidence of morbidity and mortality in pregnant Wistar rats given medetomidine and ketamine for anesthesia, the authors further investigated the effects of this combination of anesthetic drugs in both pregnant and nonpregnant Wistar rats. The time to recumbency and the duration of general anesthesia were similar between pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Pregnancy status did not affect the rats' pulse rate, respiratory rate, rectal temperature, oxygen saturation or perfusion index during 2 h of anesthesia. Pregnant rats had significantly lower blood glucose concentrations than nonpregnant rats at all time points, though blood glucose concentrations increased in both groups. The mortality rate was ∼15% both for nonpregnant rats and for pregnant rats. Researchers using medetomidine and ketamine to anesthetize Wistar rats should carefully monitor the rats in order to minimize mortality. PMID:24845007

  8. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  9. More effective induction of anesthesia using midazolam-butorphanol-ketamine-sevoflurane compared with ketamine-sevoflurane in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hidetoshi

    2016-02-01

    The common marmoset has been increasingly used for research in the biomedical field; however, there is little information available regarding effective methods of anesthesia in this species. This study retrospectively analyzed 2 regimens of anesthesia induction: intramuscular injection of ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane, and intramuscular injection of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane. Anesthetic depth did not reach the surgical anesthesia stage in 7 out of 99 animals receiving the former regimen, whereas there were only 2 such animals out of 273 receiving the latter regimen. The latter regimen, when followed by maintenance anesthesia with 3% sevoflurane inhalation, was successfully used in various nociceptive procedures. These results indicate that the injection of a combination of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of a high concentration of sevoflurane is effective for anesthesia induction in marmosets. PMID:26369292

  10. More effective induction of anesthesia using midazolam-butorphanol-ketamine-sevoflurane compared with ketamine-sevoflurane in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    ISHIBASHI, Hidetoshi

    2015-01-01

    The common marmoset has been increasingly used for research in the biomedical field; however, there is little information available regarding effective methods of anesthesia in this species. This study retrospectively analyzed 2 regimens of anesthesia induction: intramuscular injection of ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane, and intramuscular injection of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of 5% sevoflurane. Anesthetic depth did not reach the surgical anesthesia stage in 7 out of 99 animals receiving the former regimen, whereas there were only 2 such animals out of 273 receiving the latter regimen. The latter regimen, when followed by maintenance anesthesia with 3% sevoflurane inhalation, was successfully used in various nociceptive procedures. These results indicate that the injection of a combination of midazolam, butorphanol and ketamine followed by inhalation of a high concentration of sevoflurane is effective for anesthesia induction in marmosets. PMID:26369292

  11. Evaluation of medetomidine-ketamine and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol for the field anesthesia of free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) in Australia.

    PubMed

    Boardman, Wayne S J; Lethbridge, Mark R; Hampton, Jordan O; Smith, Ian; Woolnough, Andrew P; McEwen, Margaret-Mary; Miller, Graham W J; Caraguel, Charles G B

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We report the clinical course and physiologic and anesthetic data for a case series of 76 free-ranging dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius) chemically restrained, by remote injection from a helicopter, in the rangelands of Western Australia and South Australia, 2008-11, to attach satellite-tracking collars. Fifty-five camels were successfully anesthetized using medetomidine-ketamine (MK, n=27) and medetomidine-ketamine-butorphanol (MKB, n=28); the induction of anesthesia in 21 animals was considered unsuccessful. To produce reliable anesthesia for MK, medetomidine was administered at 0.22 mg/kg (± SD=0.05) and ketamine at 2.54 mg/kg (± 0.56), and for MKB, medetomidine was administered at 0.12 mg/kg (± 0.05), ketamine at 2.3 mg/kg (± 0.39), and butorphanol at 0.05 mg/kg (± 0.02). Median time-to-recumbency for MKB (8.5 min) was 2.5 min shorter than for MK (11 min) (P=0.13). For MK, the reversal atipamezole was administered at 0.24 mg/kg (± 0.10), and for MKB, atipamezole was administered at 0.23 mg/kg (± 0.13) and naltrexone at 0.17 mg/kg (± 0.16). Median time-to-recovery was 1 min shorter for MK (5 min) than MKB (6 min; P=0.02). Physiologic parameters during recumbency were not clinically different between the two regimes. Both regimes were suitable to safely anesthetize free-ranging camels; however, further investigation is required to find the safest, most consistent, and logistically practical combination. PMID:25105812

  12. Sympathoadrenal responses to cold and ketamine anesthesia in the rhesus monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolka, M. A.; Elizondo, R. S.; Weinberg, R. P.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of cold exposure on the sympathoadrenal system is investigated in eight adult rhesus monekys with and without ketamine anesthesia. It is found that a 3 hr cold exposure (12 c) was associated with a 175 percent increase above control levels of norepinephrine (NE) and a 100 percent increase in epinephrine (E). Also observed were decreases in the core temperature, mean skin temperature, and mean body temperature. No change in the plasma levels of NE and E from the control values was found during continuous infusion of ketamine; while the core temperature, mean skin temperature, and mean body temperature all showed greater declines with the addition of ketamine infusion to the cold exposure. Water exposure (28 C) under ketamine anesthesia resulted in a reduction of the core temperature to 33 C within 1 hr. Plasma levels of NE and E were found to be unchanged from control values at core temperatures of 35 and 33 C. It is concluded that the administration of ketamine abolishes both the thermoregulatory response and the catecholamine response to acute cold exposure.

  13. Hypoxic ventilatory drive in dogs during thiopental, ketamine, or pentobarbital anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Hirshman, C A; McCullough, R E; Cohen, P J; Weil, J V

    1975-12-01

    The ventilatory responses to isocapnic hypoxia and hypercapnia were studied in seven chronically tracheostomized dogs awake and during anesthesia with pentobarbital (30 mg/kg, iv), ketamine, or thiopental (10 and 15 mg/kg, respectively, followed by infusion). Isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory drive (HVD) was expressed as the parameter A such that the higher the A, the greater the hypoxic drive. HVD(A) was significantly reduced from 259 +/- 28 (mean +/- SEM) in awake dogs, to 96 +/- 14 after pentobarbital, 161 +/- 27 after thiopental, and 213 +/- 23 after ketamine. Hypercapnic ventilatory drive (HCVD) as measured by S (slope of the VE-PACO2 response curve) was significantly reduced from 1.3 +/- .32 in awake dogs to 0.4 +/- .13 after pentobarbital, 0.5 +/- .12 after thiopental, and 0.6 +/- .11 after ketamine. In addition, hypercapnia-induced augmentation of hypoxic drive was markedly diminished by the two barbiturates but was unaffected by ketamine. Therefore, ketamine at this dose level afforded greater protection during exposure to hypoxia than did barbiturates. (Key words: Ventilation, hypoxic response; Hypoxia, ventilation; Oxygen, ventilatory response; Carbon dioxide, ventilatory response; Anesthetics, intravenous, ketamine; Anesthetics, intravenous, thiopental; Hypnotics, barbiturates, pentobarbital.) PMID:1190538

  14. A genosensor based on CPE for study the interaction between ketamine as an anesthesia drug with DNA.

    PubMed

    Asghary, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Hamidi-Asl, Ezat

    2015-09-01

    The electrochemical oxidation of ketamine as an analgesia and anesthesia drug and its interaction with DNA was studied at carbon paste electrode (CPE) using voltammetric techniques. Ketamine showed one irreversible oxidation peak nearly around +1.14 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KCl (3 M) only in Britton buffer (pH 7.00). The effect of scan rate on the cyclic voltammetric behavior of ketamine was investigated at the CPE and binding constant of ketamine and DNA was also calculated. The binding mode of DNA and ketamine was elucidated by differential pulse voltammetry and UV-vis spectroscopy techniques. Based on these results, interaction between ketamine and single-stranded DNA was of electrostatic mode, while between double-stranded DNA and ketamine was of groove binding. Ketamine showed a special affinity toward guanine bases of DNA. Also, ketamine was employed as an electrochemical indicator for detection of DNA hybridization. The difference between the oxidation peak current of the DNA probe modified CPE in the presence and absence of ketamine (ΔI) was enhanced with increasing ketamine concentration and a detection limit of 1.98 nM was evaluated. To further investigate the selectivity of this biosensor, some noncomplementary sequences were used. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used for voltammetric determination of ketamine in real samples. PMID:26188294

  15. Effects of Combined Ketamine/Xylazine Anesthesia on Light Induced Retinal Degeneration in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Sylvia; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Willmann, Gabriel; Zhour, Ahmad; Zrenner, Eberhart; Fischer, M. Dominik; Gekeler, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. Methods Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively) for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG) and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography), histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay) and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining) were performed at baseline (ERG), 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. Results Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p<0.01) and significant reduction one week (p<0.01) after light damage. In contrast, ketamine-xylazine pre-treated animals showed no significant alteration of total retinal or ONL thickness at either time point (p>0.05), indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d), thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01) and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03) were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage

  16. Sympathoadrenal responses to cold and ketamine anesthesia in the rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Kolka, M A; Elizondo, R S; Weinberg, R P

    1983-04-01

    The effect of cold exposure on the sympathoadrenal system in primates was studied with and without ketamine anesthesia in eight adult rhesus monkeys. Each monkey was placed in a primate chair at a thermoneutral temperature (25 degrees C) for 1 h (control) followed by cold exposure (12 degrees C) for 3 h or placed in a circulating water bath (28 degrees C) to induce a decrease in core temperature (Tre) to 35 and 33 degrees C. Plasma catecholamines were analyzed by high-pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (60-65% recovery, coefficient of variation = 15%). The 3-h cold exposure was associated with a 175% increase above control levels of norepinephrine (NE) and a 100% increase in epinephrine (E). Decreases were evident in Tre (0.5 degree C), mean skin temperature (Tsk, 5.5 degrees C), and mean body temperature (Tb, 2.0 degrees C). Continuous infusion of ketamine (0.65 mg . kg-1 . min-1) resulted in no change in the plasma levels of NE and E from the control levels. Tre, Tsk, and Tb all showed greater declines with the addition of ketamine infusion to the cold exposure. Water exposure (28 degrees C) under ketamine anesthesia resulted in a drop in Tre to 33 degrees C within 1 h. Plasma levels of NE and E were unchanged from control values at Tre of 35 and 33 degrees C. The data suggest that the administration of ketamine abolished both the thermoregulatory response and the catecholamine response to acute cold exposure. PMID:6853296

  17. Chemical immobilization and anesthesia of free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer) with ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam and isoflurane.

    PubMed

    Rey, Benjamin; Costello, Mary-Ann; Fuller, Andrea; Haw, Anna; Hetem, Robyn S; Mitchell, Duncan; Meyer, Leith C R

    2014-10-01

    Abstract We evaluated the effectiveness of a ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam drug combination administered intramuscularly by remote injection followed by isoflurane anesthesia in free-living aardvarks (Orycteropus afer). Seven aardvarks weighing 33-45 kg were immobilized to perform surgical implantation of temperature loggers using 3.8 mg/kg ketamine, 0.1 mg/kg medetomidine, and 0.25 mg/kg midazolam. Immobilized aardvarks were transported to a surgical theater and received 0.5-1% isoflurane in oxygen after tracheal intubation. After surgery, medetomidine was antagonized with 0.5 mg/kg atipamezole, and aardvarks were released at the site of capture. We recorded induction and recovery times, clinical and physiologic parameters, and conducted blood gas analyses before and during isoflurane administration. Aardvarks showed initial effects within 3 min and reached lateral recumbency within 7 min after drug administration. Heart rate (50-67 beats/min), respiratory rate (10-15 breaths/min), oxygen hemoglobin saturation (SaO2; 90-97%), and rectal temperature (34.0-37.5 C) were within acceptable physiologic ranges. Mean arterial blood pressure was initially high (146 ± 12 mmHg), but the hypertension resolved over time. Rectal temperature dropped significantly during anesthesia. Four animals had to be treated to relieve apnea. Blood gas analyses revealed mild to moderate hypercapnia but no hypoxaemia. The ketamine-medetomidine-midazolam combination provided effective immobilization. Combined with a low concentration of isoflurane, it can be used for prolonged surgical procedures in wild aardvarks. However, caution is needed, and monitoring of clinical parameters is required. PMID:25014906

  18. Regional cerebral energy metabolism during intravenous anesthesia with etomidate, ketamine or thiopental

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose utilization (rCMRglc) was measured in rats during steady-state levels of intravenous anesthesia to determine if alterations in brain function due to anesthesia could provide information on the mechanisms of anesthesia. Intravenous anesthetics from three different chemical classes were studied: etomidate, ketamine and thiopental. All rCMRglc experiments were conducted in freely moving rats in isolation chambers, with the use of (6-/sup 14/C) glucose and guantitative autoradiography. Etomidate caused a rostral-to-caudal gradient of depression of rCMRglc. The four doses of etomidate did not differ in their effects on energy metabolism. Sub-anesthetic (5 mg kg/sup -1/) and anesthetic (30 mg kg /sup -1/) doses of ketamine produced markedly different patterns of behavior. Brain energy metabolism during the sub-anesthetic dose was stimulated in most regions, while the anesthetic dose selectively stimulated the hippocampus, leaving most brain regions unaffected. Thiopental produced a dose-dependent reduction of rCMRglc in all gray matter regions. No brain region was selectively affected. Comparison of the drug-specific alterations of cerebral energy metabolism suggests these anesthetics do not act through a common mechanism. The hypothesis that each acts by binding to specific cell membrane receptors is consistent with these observations.

  19. [Materno-fetal acid-base equilibrium evaluation in parturients submitted to ketamine anesthesia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Mauad Filho, F; Meirelles, R S

    1975-01-01

    In the present work ketamine was used as anesthetic during the labor in order to evaluate the effect of this anesthetic on the binominal fetus-mother. Two groups of parturients and their fetuses, were studied: 1) The experimental group, with 22 parturients and their fetuses submitted to ketamine anesthesia during the labord, and 2) The control group, with 20 parturients and their fetuses without any analgesic treatment during the labor. In 20 cases of the experimental group the anesthetic was injected during the delivery labor and the other two just before it. It were evaluated in the mother's blood the biochemical parameters of the acid-base balance and others collateral effects of the anesthesia; on the fetus's side the same parameters also and the cardiac frequency. The newborn were evaluated by Apgar Score during the first and fifth minutes of life. The incidence of the spontaneous delivery in the experimental group, was 78%; in 22% of these patients the forceps of relief was used. In 22 cases in which Ketamine was applied it were observed, the following events: elevation of the blood pressure (50%), perineum rigidness (18%), dreams and or hallucinations (18%), increase of the cardiac frequency (9%), apneia (4%) and nausea (4%). It was also observed an increase of uterine tonus an abolishment of abdominal press during the delivery labor, studied through the uterine electromyography register. It was noted after the Ketamine application a fall in the pH of the maternal peripherical venous blood, fetal skull blood and the pH of the blood of the umbilical vein. 22% of the newborns, from the experimental group, presented a depression in the first minute of life (Apgar less than or equals to 6). The pCO2 values in the blood of the umbilical artery were higher in the experimental group than in the control one. PMID:1241148

  20. Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Donovan, J; Brown, P

    2001-05-01

    Anesthetic agents are used in laboratory animals to prevent pain or distress due to an experimental procedure or for restraint to facilitate a technically difficult procedure. This unit provides three basic protocols: injectable anesthesia for mouse, rat, and hamster; inhalant anesthesia using methoxyflurane for mouse, rat, and hamster; and injectable anesthesia using ketamine/xylazine for rabbit. An Alternate Protocol describes sedation using butorphanol/acetylpromazine in the rabbit. The Commentary further describes and compares these methods of anesthesia for various applications. PMID:18432670

  1. ETORPHINE-KETAMINE-MEDETOMIDINE TOTAL INTRAVENOUS ANESTHESIA IN WILD IMPALA (AEPYCEROS MELAMPUS) OF 120-MINUTE DURATION.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Gareth E; Stegmann, George F; Fosgate, Geoffrey; Buck, Roxanne K; Kästner, Sabine B R; Kummrow, Maya; Gerlach, Christina; Meyer, Leith C R

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing necessity to perform long-term anesthesia in wildlife, especially antelope. The costs and logistics of transporting wildlife to veterinary practices make surgical intervention a high-stakes operation. Thus there is a need for a field-ready total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) infusion to maintain anesthesia in antelope. This study explored the feasibility of an etorphine-ketamine-medetomidine TIVA for field anesthesia. Ten wild-caught, adult impala ( Aepyceros melampus ) were enrolled in the study. Impala were immobilized with a standardized combination of etorphine (2 mg) and medetomidine (2.2 mg), which equated to a median (interquartile range [IQR]) etorphine and medetomidine dose of 50.1 (46.2-50.3) and 55.1 (50.8-55.4) μg/kg, respectively. Recumbency was attained in a median (IQR) time of 13.9 (12.0-16.5) min. Respiratory gas tensions, spirometry, and arterial blood gas were analyzed over a 120-min infusion. Once instrumented, the TIVA was infused as follows: etorphine at a variable rate initiated at 40 μg/kg per hour (adjusted according to intermittent deep-pain testing); ketamine and medetomidine at a fixed rate of 1.5 mg/kg per hour and 5 μg/kg per hour, respectively. The etorphine had an erratic titration to clinical effect in four impala. Arterial blood pressure and respiratory and heart rates were all within normal physiological ranges. However, arterial blood gas analysis revealed severe hypoxemia, hypercapnia, and acidosis. Oxygenation and ventilation indices were calculated and highlighted possible co-etiologies to the suspected etorphine-induced respiratory depression as the cause of the blood gas derangements. Impala recovered in the boma post atipamezole (13 mg) and naltrexone (42 mg) antagonism of medetomidine and etorphine, respectively. The etorphine-ketamine-medetomidine TIVA protocol for impala may be sufficient for field procedures of up to 120-min duration. However, hypoxemia and hypercapnia are of paramount concern and

  2. Disruption of corticocortical information transfer during ketamine anesthesia in the primate brain.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Karen E; Irwin, Zachary T; Gaidica, Matt; Bentley, J Nicole; Patil, Parag G; Mashour, George A; Chestek, Cynthia A

    2016-07-01

    The neural mechanisms of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness have yet to be fully elucidated, in part because of the diverse molecular targets of anesthetic agents. We demonstrate, using intracortical recordings in macaque monkeys, that information transfer between structurally connected cortical regions is disrupted during ketamine anesthesia, despite preserved primary sensory representation. Furthermore, transfer entropy, an information-theoretic measure of directed connectivity, decreases significantly between neuronal units in the anesthetized state. This is the first direct demonstration of a general anesthetic disrupting corticocortical information transfer in the primate brain. Given past studies showing that more commonly used GABAergic drugs inhibit surrogate measures of cortical communication, this finding suggests the potential for a common network-level mechanism of anesthetic-induced unconsciousness. PMID:27095309

  3. COMPARISON OF ETORPHINE-ACEPROMAZINE AND MEDETOMIDINE-KETAMINE ANESTHESIA IN CAPTIVE IMPALA (AEPYCEROS MELAMPUS).

    PubMed

    Perrin, Kathryn L; Denwood, Matthew J; Grøndahl, Carsten; Nissen, Peter; Bertelsen, Mads F

    2015-12-01

    Impala (Aepyceros melampus) are a notoriously difficult species to manage in captivity, and anesthesia is associated with a high risk of complications including mortality. The aim of this study was to compare an opioid-based protocol with an α-2 agonist-based protocol. Nine female impala were studied in a random cross-over design. Subjects received either an etorphine-acepromazine (EA) protocol: 15 μg/kg etorphine and 0.15 mg/kg acepromazine, or a medetomidine-ketamine (MK) protocol: 109 μg/kg medetomidine and 4.4 mg/kg ketamine on day 1. Anaesthesia was repeated 3 days later with the alternative protocol. Subjective assessments of the quality of induction, muscle relaxation, and recovery were made by a blinded observer. Objective monitoring included blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, regional tissue oxygenation, and blood gas analysis. EA provided a significantly quicker (mean EA, 7.17 mins; MK, 17.6 mins) and more-reliable (score range EA, 3-5; MK, 1-5) induction. Respiratory rates were lower for EA with higher end-tidal CO2, but no apnoea was observed. As expected, blood pressures with EA were lower, with higher heart rates; however, arterial oxygenation and tissue oxygenation were equal or higher than with the MK protocol. In conclusion, at these doses, EA provided superior induction and equivalent muscle relaxation and recovery with apparent improved oxygen tissue delivery when compared to MK. PMID:26667544

  4. Does the use of ketamine or nitroglycerin as an adjuvant to lidocaine improve the quality of intravenous regional anesthesia?

    PubMed Central

    Elmetwaly, Khaled Fawzy; Hegazy, Nasr Abdelmohsen; Aboelseoud, Abdelkhalek Abdelmonem; Alshaer, Ahmad Abdullah

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the effect of adding ketamine or nitroglycerin (NTG) as adjuncts to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA) on intraoperative and postoperative analgesia, sensorial and motor block onset times, and tourniquet pain. Settings and Design: A prospective, randomized, double-blind study was carried out. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five patients undergoing hand surgery were divided into three groups as follows: control group receiving lidocaine 2%, LK group receiving lidocaine 2% with ketamine, and LN group administered lidocaine 2% with NTG. Sensory and motor blocks' onset and recovery times were recorded. Visual analog scale (VAS) for tourniquet pain was measured after tourniquet application and it was also used to measure postoperative pain. Analgesic consumption for tourniquet pain and postoperatively were recorded. Results: Sensory block onset times were shorter in the LK (4.4 ± 1.2 minutes) and LN (3.5 ± 0.9 minutes) groups compared with the control group (6.5 ± 1.1 minute) (P < 0.0001) and motor block onset times were shorter in the LK (7.3 ± 1.6 minutes) and LN (3.6 ± 1.2 minutes) groups compared with the control group (10.2 ± 1.5 minutes) (P< 0.0001). Sensory recovery time prolonged in the LK (6.7 ± 1.3 minutes) and LN (6.9 ± 1.1 minutes) groups compared with the control group (5.3 ± 1.4 minutes) (P = 0.0006 and < 0.0001, respectively). Motor recovery time prolonged in the LK (8.4 ± 1.4 minutes) and LN (7.9 ± 1.1 minutes) groups compared with the control group (7.1 ± 1.3 minutes) (P = 0.0014 and 0.023, respectively). The sensory and motor block onset times were also shorter in LN group than in the LK group (3.5 ± 0.9 versus 4.4 ± 1.2 minutes, P=0.004; and 3.6 ± 1.2 versus 7.3 ± 1.6 minutes, P < 0.0001, respectively). The amount of fentanyl required for tourniquet pain was less in adjuvant groups when compared with control group. It was 13.6 ± 27.9 and 27.6 ± 34.9 µg in LK group and LN groups

  5. Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia in red-tailed hawks with antagonism by yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Degernes, L A; Kreeger, T J; Mandsager, R; Redig, P T

    1988-04-01

    Five red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis) were anesthetized at weekly intervals with intravenous ketamine hydrochloride (KET, 4.4 mg/kg) and xylazine hydrochloride (XYL, 2.2 mg/kg). Twenty min after anesthesia, yohimbine hydrochloride (YOH, 0.05, 0.10, 0.20 and 0.40 mg/kg) or a control was administered. All doses of YOH significantly reduced the head-up times (F = 20.84, df = 1,24, P less than 0.0001) and the standing times (F = 12.30, df = 1,24, P less than 0.0001), compared to the control group. The heart and respiratory rates following YOH (all doses) were significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than the anesthetized rates, but were comparable to the rates observed in restrained, unanesthetized hawks. Yohimbine did not appear to have any significant effect on body temperature. Based upon administration of 4.4 mg/kg KET and 2.2 mg/kg XYL, a dose of 0.10 mg/kg YOH was recommended to achieve antagonism without causing profound cardiovascular or respiratory changes. PMID:3373637

  6. Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol (KMP-TIVA) in horses undergoing surgery

    PubMed Central

    UMAR, Mohammed Ahmed; FUKUI, Sho; KAWASE, Kodai; ITAMI, Takaharu; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular effects of total intravenous anesthesia using ketamine-medetomidine-propofol drug combination (KMP-TIVA) were determined in 5 Thoroughbred horses undergoing surgery. The horses were anesthetized with intravenous administration (IV) of ketamine (2.5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.04 mg/kg) following premedication with medetomidne (5 µg/kg, IV) and artificially ventilated. Surgical anesthesia was maintained by controlling propofol infusion rate (initially 0.20 mg/kg/min following an IV loading dose of 0.5 mg/kg) and constant rate infusions of ketamine (1 mg/kg/hr) and medetomidine (1.25 µg/kg/hr). The horses were anesthetized for 175 ± 14 min (range from 160 to 197 min). Propofol infusion rates ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mg/kg/min, and plasma concentration (Cpl) of propofol ranged from 11.4 to 13.3 µg/ml during surgery. Cardiovascular measurements during surgery remained within clinically acceptable ranges in the horses (heart rate: 33 to 37 beats/min, mean arterial blood pressure: 111 to 119 mmHg, cardiac index: 48 to 53 ml/kg/min, stroke volume: 650 to 800 ml/beat and systemic vascular resistance: 311 to 398 dynes/sec/cm5). The propofol Cpl declined rapidly after the cessation of propofol infusion and was significantly lower at 10 min (4.5 ± 1.5 µg/ml), extubation (4.0 ± 1.2 µg/ml) and standing (2.4 ± 0.9 µg/ml) compared with the Cpl at the end of propofol administration (11.4 ± 2.7 µg/ml). All the horses recovered uneventfully and stood at 74 ± 28 min after the cessation of anesthesia. KMP-TIVA provided satisfactory quality and control of anesthesia with minimum cardiovascular depression in horses undergoing surgery. PMID:25409552

  7. Impact comparison of ketamine and sodium thiopental on anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy in major depression patients with drug-resistant; a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, B.; Mohammadbeigi, A.; Kamali, A. R.; Taheri-Nejad, M. R.; Moshiri, I.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the available and the most effective therapies for the treatment of resistant depression. Considering the crucial role of seizure duration on therapeutic response in patients treated with ECT, this study aimed to compare the effect of ketamine and sodium thiopental anesthesia during ECT for treatment of patients with drug-resistant major depression (DRMD). Materials and Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 160 patients with DRMD were selected consequently and were assigned randomly into two groups including ketamine 0.8 mg/kg and sodium thiopental 1.5 mg/kg. The seizure duration, recovery time, and the side effects of anesthesia were evaluated after 1-h after anesthesia. Data of recovery time and complication collected in 2nd, 4th, 6th, and 8th ECT. Depression was assessed by Hamilton depression scale. Results: The results indicated that ketamine and sodium thiopental had a significant effect on the reduction of depression scores in patients with DRMD (P < 0.05). Complications such as a headache, nausea, pain at the injection site, short-term delirium, and long-term delirium were higher in ketamine group (P > 0.05). But ketamine was more effective in improvement of depression score and increasing systolic and diastolic blood pressure (P < 0.05). The mean of seizure duration showed a decreasing trend and was significant between two study groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Anesthesia induced by ketamine during ECT therapy increased blood pressure and seizure duration. Therefore, due to lower medical complication and attack rate of seizure, ketamine is an appropriate option for anesthesia with ECT in patients with DRMD. PMID:26440233

  8. Influence of cadmium on ketamine-induced anesthesia and brain microsomal Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.; Sangiah, S. )

    1994-10-01

    Cadmium is a rare metallic element, present in almost all types of food. Shellfish, wheat and rice accumulate very high amounts. Occupational and environmental pollutants are the main sources of cadmium exposure. Cadmium has a very long biologic half-life. Exposure to Cadmium causes anemia, hypertension, hepatic, renal, pulmonary and cardiovascular disorders as well as being a possible mutagen, teratogen and carcinogen. Acute cadmium treatment increased the hexobarbital sleeping time and inhibited hepatic microsomal drug metabolism due to a decrease in cytochrome P[sub 450] content. Cadmium potentiated ethanol-induced sleep in a dose-dependent manner. Cadmium has been shown to inhibit brain microsomal Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase activity in vitro and in vivo. Cadmium and ethanol additively inhibited brain Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase. This might be a direct interaction between cadmium and ethanol in the central nervous system. Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. It acts on central nervous system and produces [open quotes]dissociative anaesthesia.[close quotes] Ketamine provides adequate surgical anesthesia and is used alone in humans and/or combination with xylazine, an [alpha][sub 2]-adrenergic agonist in animals. It produces CNS depression, analgesia, amnesia, immobility and a feeling of dissociation from the environment. Ketamine is a non-competitive antagonist of the NMDA subset of the glutamate receptor. This perhaps results in an increase in neuronal activity leading to disorganization of normal neurotransmission and produces dissociative anesthetic state. Because it is different from most other anesthetics, ketamine may be expected to have a unique effect on brain biochemical parameters and enzymes. The purpose of this study was to examine the interactions between cadmium and ketamine on the central nervous system and ATPase, in an attempt to further understand the mechanism of action. 12 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Respiratory mechanics and morphometric changes during anesthesia with ketamine in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Alves-Neto, O; Tavares, P; Rocco, P R; Zin, W A

    2001-09-01

    Ketamine is believed to reduce airway and pulmonary tissue resistance. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of ketamine on the resistive, elastic and viscoelastic/inhomogeneous mechanical properties of the respiratory system, lungs and chest wall, and to relate the mechanical data to findings from histological lung analysis in normal animals. Fifteen adult male Wistar rats were assigned randomly to two groups: control (N = 7) and ketamine (N = 8). All animals were sedated (diazepam, 5 mg, ip) and anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium (20 mg/kg, ip) or ketamine (30 mg/kg, ip). The rats were paralyzed and ventilated mechanically. Ketamine increased lung viscoelastic/inhomogeneous pressure (26%) compared to the control group. Dynamic and static elastances were similar in both groups, but the difference was greater in the ketamine than in the control group. Lung morphometry demonstrated dilation of alveolar ducts and increased areas of alveolar collapse in the ketamine group. In conclusion, ketamine did not act at the airway level but acted at the lung periphery increasing mechanical inhomogeneities possibly resulting from dilation of distal airways and alveolar collapse. PMID:11514847

  10. Effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during laparotomy in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Naddaf, H.; Varzi, H. Najafzade; Sabiza, S.; Falah, H.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate effects of xylazine-ketamine anesthesia on plasma levels of cortisol and vital signs during and after laparotomy in dogs. Eight clinically healthy, adult male dogs, weighing 20 kg were used. All dogs were initially sedated by acepromazine. Thirty minutes later, ketamine plus xylazine was used to induce anesthesia. Surgical incision of laparotomy was done. After a 5 min manipulation of the abdominal organs, the incision was sutured. Vital signs including heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature (RT) were recorded at the times of -30: premedication, 0: induction and Surgical incision, 30: End of surgery, 60, 90 and 120 min. Blood was sampled at the above mentioned times and analyzed using a commercial ELISA kit for cortisol. A significant decreasing trend in RT was observed during the studied times. No significant changes were observed in heart rate and respiratory rate (p>0.05), except at the time of 60 respiratory rate significantly decreased when compared to the time of 90 (p=0.026) and 120 (p=0.041). A non-significant but increasing trend in plasma levels of cortisol was observed. PMID:26623345

  11. Atipamezole reverses ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia without altering the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Izer, Jenelle M; Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Butorphanol and buprenorphine are common analgesics used in laboratory mice. Inadvertent attenuation of the antinociceptive effects of these analgesics via the administration of an anesthetic reversal agent could result in postprocedural pain and distress, with subsequent negative effects on animal welfare, study outcomes, and regulatory compliance. This study was undertaken to determine whether atipamezole reverses ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia and alters the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. Atipamezole reliably reversed the anesthetic effects of ketamine-dexmedetomidine, and mice were ambulatory 17.4 ± 30.6 min after administration of the α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Atipamezole alone had no significant effect on tail-flick latency and did not alter the antinociceptive properties of butorphanol or low-dose (0.05 mg/kg) or high-dose (0.1 mg/kg) buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. After reversal of ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia, tail-flick latency at 30, 60, and 150 min after analgesic treatment differed significantly between mice treated with atipamezole alone and those given atipamezole followed by butorphanol or high-dose buprenorphine. These results suggest that the analgesic effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine are not affected by atipamezole. Buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg) administered 30 min prior to or at the time of anesthesia resulted in a greater magnitude of antinociception after antagonism of anesthesia than when given at the time of reversal. Given these results, we recommend the use of ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia with buprenorphine administered either preemptively or at the time of anesthetic induction to provide a defined period of surgical anesthesia that is effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:25650975

  12. Comparison of the effects of intravenous premedication: Midazolam, Ketamine, and combination of both on reducing anxiety in pediatric patients before general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Sajedi, Parvin; Habibi, Bashir

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In some medical circumstances, pediatric patients may need premedication for transferring to the operating room. In these situations, using intravenous premedication is preferred. We assessed the efficacy and safety of intravenous midazolam, intravenous ketamine, and combination of both to reduce the anxiety and improve behavior in children undergoing general anesthesia. Methods: In a double-blind randomized clinical trial, 90 pediatric patients aged 6 months to 6 years with American Society of Anesthesiologist grade I or II were enrolled. Before anesthesia, children were randomly divided into three groups to receive intravenous midazolam 0.1 mg/kg, or intravenous ketamine 1 mg/kg, or combination of half doses of both. Behavior types and sedation scores were recorded before premedication, after premedication, before anesthesia, and after anesthesia in the postanesthesia care unit. Anesthesia time, recovery duration, blood pressure, and heart rate were also recorded. For comparing distribution of behavior types and sedation scores among three groups, we used Kruskal–Wallis test, and for comparing mean and standard deviation of blood pressure and heart rates, we used analysis of variance. Findings: After premedication, children's behavior was significantly better in the combination group (P < 0.001). After anesthesia, behavior type was same among three groups (P = 0.421). Sedation scores among three groups were also different after premedication and the combination group was significantly more sedated than the other two groups (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Combination of 0.05 mg/kg of intravenous midazolam and 0.5 mg/kg of intravenous ketamine as premedication produced more deep sedation and more desirable behavior in children compared with each midazolam 0.1 mg/kg or ketamine 1 mg/kg. PMID:26645024

  13. Urethral Obstruction by Seminal Coagulum is Associated with Medetomidine–Ketamine Anesthesia in Male Mice on C57BL/6J and Mixed Genetic Backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Sara; Trower, Chris; Hough, Tertius A; Stewart, Michelle; Cheeseman, Michael T

    2009-01-01

    Male and female mice were anesthetized by intraperitoneal injection with a mixture delivering 0.5 mg/kg medetomidine and 50 mg/kg ketamine to achieve immobilization for whole-body radiographs and bone densitometry, as part of a phenotypic screen for bone and mineral disorders in mice carrying genetic modifications induced through mutagenesis with N′-ethyl-N′-nitrosourea. Morbidity and mortality occurred in 19 of 628 (3%) of male mice 24 to 72 h after a seemingly uneventful recovery from anesthesia. No morbidity or mortality occurred in 1564 female mice that were similar in age to the affected male mice and that underwent the same procedure. Of the 7 male mice that underwent postmortem examinations, 5 had urinary bladders grossly distended with urine and 1 had ascites. In addition, the pelvic or penile urethra in 5 of the examined male mice was obstructed with seminal coagulum associated with varying degrees of erosion of the urothelial lining and inflammation of the urethra. In 2 of these animals, from which plasma samples were recovered, azotemia, hyperphosphatemia, and hyperkalemia were present. The predilection for delayed morbidity and mortality in males after anesthesia suggests that anesthesia with 0.5 mg/kg medetomidine and 50 mg/kg ketamine is a potential risk factor for obstructive uropathy due to release of seminal coagulum. This adverse effect did not recur when we altered our anesthesia protocol to 10 mg/kg xylazine and 100 mg/kg ketamine. PMID:19476720

  14. [Continuous intravenous anesthesia in dogs using a combination of xylazine, ketamine and guaifenesin].

    PubMed

    Mezerová, J; Nĕmecek, L; Snásil, M

    1992-01-01

    The tested anaesthesia through a permanent infusion of a xylazine, ketamine and guaifenezine (XKG) mixture was used in ten experimental dogs without clinical signs of a disease and in fifty two patients during different surgical interventions. After joint i.m. atropine (0.05 mg/kg) and xylazine (2 mg/kg) premedication, anaesthesia in dogs was induced by an i.v. administration of 1% ketamine at a dose of 2 mg/kg, and the XKG was infused instantly after the previous treatment. The mixture contained 2.0 ml of 5% ketamine and 1.25 ml of 2% xylazine added to 100 ml of 5% guaifenezine. The infusion was applied at a rate of 3.3 ml/kg for the first five minutes and then it was maintained at constant values of 2.2 ml/kg during the whole surgical intervention (Tab. I). The induction and course of anaesthesia, and waking up and recovery from anaesthesia were evaluated in all dogs, and the trias values were also followed. These additional parameters were followed in the test group: breathing volumes, ECG values and acid-base balance parameters were determined from the collected blood samples. The observation of measurable parameters (Figs. 1 to 5) and ECG analysis did not demonstrate any large departures from the starting values, and the changes in the acid-base balance (Tab. II) suggest the partly compensated respiratory acidosis. On the basis of our results, we can recommend this tested method for general anaesthesia particularly of dogs of larger breeds and for longer-lasting operations. This method is suitable to be used first of all in the veterinary establishments where inhalation anaesthesia is not practicable. PMID:1413395

  15. Hesperetin, a Selective Phosphodiesterase 4 Inhibitor, Effectively Suppresses Ovalbumin-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness without Influencing Xylazine/Ketamine-Induced Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chung-Hung; Lin, Ling-Hung; Hsu, Hsin-Te; Wang, Kuo-Hsien; Lai, Chi-Yin; Chen, Chien-Ming; Ko, Wun-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Hesperetin, a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE)4 inhibitor, is present in the traditional Chinese medicine, “Chen Pi.” Therefore, we were interested in investigating its effects on ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced airway hyperresponsiveness, and clarifying its rationale for ameliorating asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hesperetin was revealed to have a therapeutic (PDE4H/PDE4L) ratio of >11. Hesperetin (10 ~ 30 μmol/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) dose-dependently and significantly attenuated the airway hyperresponsiveness induced by methacholine. It also significantly suppressed the increases in total inflammatory cells, macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils, and levels of cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-5, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). It dose-dependently and significantly suppressed total and OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in the BALF and serum. However, hesperetin did not influence xylazine/ketamine-induced anesthesia, suggesting that hesperetin has few or no emetic effects. In conclusion, the rationales for ameliorating allergic asthma and COPD by hesperetin are anti-inflammation, immunoregulation, and bronchodilation. PMID:22454667

  16. Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... arm or leg. A common type is epidural anesthesia, which is often used during childbirth. General - makes ... afterwards. Sedation can be used with or without anesthesia. The type of anesthesia or sedation you get ...

  17. The effect of ketamine versus fentanyl on the incidence of emergence agitation after sevoflurane anesthesia in pediatric patients undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhalim, Ashraf Arafat; Alarfaj, Ahmed Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergence agitation (EA) has been documented as a common side-effect of sevoflurane anesthesia. This prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was designed to compare the effects of ketamine versus fentanyl, administered 10 min before the end of surgery on the development of EA. Methods: A total of 120 children aged 3-7 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II physical status were randomly assigned to one of three equal groups receiving either ketamine 0.5 mg/kg (Group K), fentanyl 1 μg/kg (Group F) or saline (Group C) at 10 min before the end of surgery. Post-operative EA was assessed with Aono's four point scale. Recovery times, the post-operative pain and adverse reactions were assessed. Results: There was no significant difference between the three groups regarding recovery and discharge times from post-anesthesia care unit. The incidence of EA was significantly low in Group K and Group F (15% and 17.5%, respectively) compared to the control group (42.5%), with no significant difference between Group K and Group F. There were no significant differences in Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale between the three groups. The incidence of nausea or vomiting was significantly more in Group F compared to that in other two groups. However, no complications such as somnolence, oxygen desaturation or respiratory depression occurred during the study period and there were no episodes of hallucinations or bad dreams in the ketamine group. Conclusion: The intravenous administration of either ketamine 0.5 mg/kg or fentanyl 1 μg/kg before the end of surgery in sevoflurane-anesthetized children undergoing tonsillectomy with or without adenoidectomy reduces the incidence of post-operative agitation without delaying emergence. PMID:24348289

  18. Physiological, pharmacokinetic and liver metabolism comparisons between 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats under ketamine-xylazine anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Santamaria, Raphael; Hélie, Pierre; Burns, Patrick; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the physiological changes (withdrawal and corneal reflexes, respiratory and cardiac frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature) following intraperitoneal administration of ketamine (80 mg/kg) and xylazine (10 mg/kg) to 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats (n=6/age group). Plasma pharmacokinetics, liver metabolism, and blood biochemistry were examined for a limited number of animals to better explain anesthetic drug effects. Selected organs were collected for histopathology. The results for the withdrawal and corneal reflexes suggest a shorter duration and decreased depth of anesthesia with aging. Significant cardiac and respiratory depression, as well as decreased blood oxygen saturation, occurred in all age groups however, cardiac frequency was the most affected parameter with aging, since the 6-, 12-, and 18-month-old animals did not recuperate to normal values during recovery from anesthesia. Pharmacokinetic parameters (T1/2 and AUC) increased and drug clearance decreased with aging, which strongly suggests that drug exposure is associated with the physiological results. The findings for liver S9 fractions of 18-month-old rats compared with the other age groups suggest that following a normal ketamine anesthetic dose (80 mg/kg), drug metabolism is impaired, leading to a significant increase of drug exposure. In conclusion, age and related factors have a substantial effect on ketamine and xylazine availability, which is reflected by significant changes in pharmacokinetics and liver metabolism of these drugs, and this translates into shorter and less effective anesthesia with increasing age. PMID:26489361

  19. Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... does anesthesia research contribute to other fields of science and medicine? Knowledge of how anesthetics affect pain ... supported by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences Anesthesia from MedlinePlus Profile of anesthesiologist Daniel Sessler ...

  20. The effects of propofol, ketamine and combination of them in prevention of coughing and laryngospasm in patients awakening from general anesthesia: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Khazaei, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coughing and laryngospasm are undesirable outcomes occurring during emergence from general anesthesia. We compared the effect of small doses of propofol, ketamine and a combination of them on the occurrence and severity of coughing and laryngospasm in patients awakening from general anesthesia. Materials and Methods: 160 patients who were scheduled to undergo operations under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to one of the following groups, 40 in each group: propofol group (0.25 mg/kg intravenous (IV) propofol), ketamine group (0.25 mg/kg IV ketamine), combination group (0.25 mg/kg IV propofol, and 0.25 mg/kg IV ketamine) and control (0.1 ml/kg IV saline). Drugs were administered before extubation at previously defined time. Presence and severity of coughing and laryngospasm were recorded within twominutes after extubation. Results: The presence of coughing in the combination group (27.5%) was less than that in other groups; also it was less frequent in the propofol group (57.5%) than the control (82.5%) (all P < 0.05). But the incidence did not differ between the propofol and the ketamine (70%) group; nor did it differ between the ketamine and control groups (P = 0.356 and P = 0.121, respectively). The cases with severe coughing (grade 3) in the combination group (none) were significantly less than in the propofol (four) and the control groups (seven) (P = 0.040 and P = 0.006 respectively). There was no significant difference between the groups in frequency of laryngospasm. Conclusion: Administration of propofol or combination of propofol and ketamine decreases the incidence of post extubation coughing. This combination can also decrease severe cases. PMID:27135033

  1. Prophylactic use of intravenous ondansetron versus ketamine - midazolam combination for prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Mohammadsadeqie, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy intravenous (IV) ondansetron with ketamine plus midazolam for the prevention of shivering during spinal anesthesia (SA). Materials and Methods: Ninety patients, aged 18–65 years, undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery were included in the present study. SA was performed in all patients with hyperbaric bupivacaine 15 mg. The patients were randomly allocated to receive normal saline (Group C), ondansetron 8 mg IV (Group O) or ketamine 0.25 mg/kg IV plus midazolam 37.5 μg/kg IV (Group KM) immediately after SA. During surgery, shivering scores were recorded at 5 min intervals. The operating room temperature was maintained at 24°C. Results: The incidences of shivering were 18 (60%) in Group C, 6 (20%) in Group KM and 8 (26.6%) in Group O. The difference between Groups O and Group KM with Group C was statistically significant (P < 0.05). No significant difference was noted between Groups KM with Group O in this regard (P > 0.05). Peripheral and core temperature changes throughout surgery were not significantly different among three groups (P > 0.05). Incidence (%) of hallucination was not significantly different between the three groups (0, 3.3, 0 in Group O, Group KM, Group C respectively, P > 0.05). Conclusion: Prophylactic use of ondansetron 8 mg IV was comparable to ketamine 0.25 mg/kg IV plus midazolam 37.5 μg/kg IV in preventing shivering during SA. PMID:26605236

  2. Comparison of medetomidine, thiopental and ketamine/midazolam anesthesia in chick embryos for in ovo Magnetic Resonance Imaging free of motion artifacts

    PubMed Central

    Waschkies, Conny; Nicholls, Flora; Buschmann, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of the perfusion capacity of tissue engineered constructs grown on the chorioallantoic membrane by MRI is often hampered by motion artifacts. Therefore, we examined the suitability of three anesthetic regimes for sufficient sedation of the chick embryo. Medetomidine at a dosage of 0.3 mg/kg, was compared to thiopental at 100 mg/kg and ketamine/midazolam at 50 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. These soluble anesthetics were applied by dropping a total volume of 0.3 mL onto the surface of the CAM. Motion was videotaped through the window of the eggshell and scored semi-quantitatively. Medetomidine performed best in terms of reduced motion; onset of anesthesia occurred within 10 minutes and for the following 30 minutes, allowing proper in vivo MRI measurements. The other regimen were not sedating deep enough (ketamine/midazolam) and not long enough (thiopental). In sum, medetomidine allows proper sedation for MRI assessment of the perfusion capacity in a tissue engineered construct placed on the CAM. PMID:26493765

  3. Comparison of medetomidine, thiopental and ketamine/midazolam anesthesia in chick embryos for in ovo Magnetic Resonance Imaging free of motion artifacts.

    PubMed

    Waschkies, Conny; Nicholls, Flora; Buschmann, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive assessment of the perfusion capacity of tissue engineered constructs grown on the chorioallantoic membrane by MRI is often hampered by motion artifacts. Therefore, we examined the suitability of three anesthetic regimes for sufficient sedation of the chick embryo. Medetomidine at a dosage of 0.3 mg/kg, was compared to thiopental at 100 mg/kg and ketamine/midazolam at 50 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. These soluble anesthetics were applied by dropping a total volume of 0.3 mL onto the surface of the CAM. Motion was videotaped through the window of the eggshell and scored semi-quantitatively. Medetomidine performed best in terms of reduced motion; onset of anesthesia occurred within 10 minutes and for the following 30 minutes, allowing proper in vivo MRI measurements. The other regimen were not sedating deep enough (ketamine/midazolam) and not long enough (thiopental). In sum, medetomidine allows proper sedation for MRI assessment of the perfusion capacity in a tissue engineered construct placed on the CAM. PMID:26493765

  4. Evaluation of medetomidine-ketamine and atipamezole for reversible anesthesia of free-ranging gray wolves (Canis lupus).

    PubMed

    Arnemo, Jon M; Evans, Alina L; Ahlqvist, Per; Segerström, Peter; Liberg, Olof

    2013-04-01

    Twenty-eight anesthetic events were carried out on 24 free-ranging Scandinavian gray wolves (Canis lupus) by darting from a helicopter with 5 mg medetomidine and 250 mg ketamine during winter in 2002 and 2003. Mean±SD doses were 0.162±0.008 mg medetomidine/kg and 8.1±0.4 mg ketamine/kg in juveniles (7-10 mo old) and 0.110±0.014 mg medetomidine/kg and 5.7±0.5 mg ketamine/kg in adults (>19 mo old). Mean±SD induction time was shorter (P<0.01) in juveniles (2.3±0.8 min) than in adults (4.1±0.6 min). In 26 cases, the animals were completely immobilized after one dart. Muscle relaxation was good, palpebral reflexes were present, and there were no reactions to handling or minor painful stimuli. Mild to severe hyperthermia was detected in 14/28 anesthetic events. Atipamezole (5 mg per mg medetomidine) was injected intramuscularly for reversal 98±28 and 94±40 min after darting in juveniles and adults, respectively. Mean±SD time from administration of atipamezole to coordinated walking was 38±20 min in juveniles and 41±21 min in adults. Recovery was uneventful in 25 anesthetic events, although vomiting was observed in five animals. One adult that did not respond to atipamezole was given intravenous fluids and was fully recovered 8 hr after darting. Two animals died 7-9 hr after capture, despite intensive care. Both mortalities were attributed to shock and circulatory collapse following stress-induced hyperthermia. Although effective, this combination cannot be recommended for darting free-ranging wolves from helicopter at the doses presented here because of the severe hyperthermia seen in several wolves, two deaths, and prolonged recovery in one individual. PMID:23568917

  5. Potential anesthesia protocols for space exploration missions.

    PubMed

    Komorowski, Matthieu; Watkins, Sharmila D; Lebuffe, Gilles; Clark, Jonathan B

    2013-03-01

    In spaceflight beyond low Earth's orbit, medical conditions requiring surgery are of a high level of concern because of their potential impact on crew health and mission success. Whereas surgical techniques have been thoroughly studied in spaceflight analogues, the research focusing on anesthesia is limited. To provide safe anesthesia during an exploration mission will be a highly challenging task. The research objective is thus to describe specific anesthesia procedures enabling treatment of pre-identified surgical conditions. Among the medical conditions considered by the NASA Human Research Program Exploration Medical Capability element, those potentially necessitating anesthesia techniques have been identified. The most appropriate procedure for each condition is thoroughly discussed. The substantial cost of training time necessary to implement regional anesthesia is pointed out. Within general anesthetics, ketamine combines the unique advantages of preservation of cardiovascular stability, the protective airway reflexes, and spontaneous ventilation. Ketamine side effects have for decades tempered enthusiasm for its use, but recent developments in mitigation means broadened its indications. The extensive experience gathered in remote environments, with minimal equipment and occasionally by insufficiently trained care providers, confirms its high degree of safety. Two ketamine-based anesthesia protocols are described with their corresponding indications. They have been designed taking into account the physiological changes occurring in microgravity and the specific constraints of exploration missions. This investigation could not only improve surgical care during long-duration spaceflights, but may find a number of terrestrial applications in isolated or austere environments. PMID:23513283

  6. Period Prevalence of Ketamine-Propofol Admixture “Ketofol” in the Operating Room among Anesthesia Providers at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Alliene N.; Rao, Willow R.; Marienau, Mary E.; Smischney, Nathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to determine the period prevalence of the single-syringe ketamine-propofol admixture used for sedation and induction among anesthesia providers during a 5-year period before and after educational sessions addressing barriers to its use. Secondary aims were to determine barriers to its use and address the most prevalent concerns through educational sessions. Material/Methods Surveys were administered to certified and student registered nurse anesthetists, anesthesia residents, and anesthesiologists at Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN before and after educational sessions addressing common barriers. Identified barriers were addressed by oral and/or electronic presentations with identical content. Results Pre-education period prevalence for sedation was 110 (43%) and 64 (25%) for induction. Identified barriers were uncertainty of benefit in 62 respondents (23%), mixed controlled substance disposal in 48 (18%), regulatory/institutional policies in 20 (7%), and compatibility in 9 (3%). Post-education period prevalence for sedation was 102 (44%), and induction 63 (27%). No concerns were noted in 72% of the post-education group verses 42% in the pre-education group (p<0.01). No concerns were reported in 51% of the electronic only education group verses 64% in the oral education group (p<0.01). Conclusions The period prevalence of “ketofol” was greater for sedation than induction. The period prevalence following education showed a slight increase in both sedation and induction use. There was a significant reduction in barriers following education, with oral presentations being more effective than electronic only. Period prevalence was increasing following education; however, allowing more time may have shown a significant practice change. PMID:26077108

  7. Field anesthesia of golden jackals (Canis aureus) with the use of medetomidine-ketamine or medetomidine-midazolam with atipamezole reversal.

    PubMed

    King, Roni; Lapid, Roi; Epstein, Ana; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Shilo, Yael

    2008-12-01

    Twenty-two free-ranging golden jackals (Canis aureus) were immobilized with a combination of 113 +/- 24 microg/kg medetomidine and 2.1 +/- 0.3 mg/kg ketamine (M-K) or 88 +/- 16 microg/kg medetomidine and 0.47 +/- 0.08 mg/ kg midazolam (M-M) by i.m. injection. Induction and recovery times were recorded. Pulse rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, and oxygen saturation were measured. Anesthesia depth indicators were observed. There was no significant difference between the M-K and the M-M groups regarding induction time (6:14 +/- 1:45 and 7:16 +/- 2:09 min, respectively). Both combinations provided safe and effective immobilization for at least 20-30 min. Pulse rate was significantly higher in the M-K group. There was no significant difference in any other objective or subjective parameter. Following administration of atipamezole at five times the dose of medetomidine given, there was a significant difference between the two combinations in recovery time; M-K jackals were standing within 3:42 +/- 2:17 min and M-M jackals within 8:47 +/- 4:32 min. Neither of the combinations caused rough or prolonged recovery. Subjectively, the M-M group had smoother and less ataxic recovery. PMID:19110699

  8. Effects of Selective iNOS Inhibitor on Spatial Memory in Recovered and Non-Recovered Ketamine Induced Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Najafi, Sheyda; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Azami, Kian; Soodi, Maliheh; Kazemi, Ali; Kebriaeezadeh, Abbas; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in spatial learning and memory in several brain areas such as hippocampus. This study examined the effects of post-training intrahippocampal microinjections of 1400W as a selective iNOS inhibitor on spatial memory, in anesthetized and non-anesthetized situations in rats. In the present work, 4-day training trials of animals were conducted. Spatial memory was tested 48 hours after the drug infusions. For microinjection of 1400W into CA1 region of the hippocampus in conscious animals, guide cannula was implanted into the CA1 area and 1400W was infused after recovery from surgical anesthesia. In anesthetized animals, 1400W was microinjected directly into CA1 region by Hamilton syringe during anesthesia. After completion of training, 1400W (10, 50 and 100 μM/side) were microinjected bilaterally (1 μL/side) and testing trials were performed 48 h after drug infusions in both groups of cannulated and non-cannulated rats. Significant reduction was observed in escape latency and traveled distance in animals that received 1400W (100 μM/side, *p < 0.05) via cannula after recovery in comparison with control group. Also, microinjection of 1400W (100 μM/side) in post recovery phase caused a significant (***p < 0.001) reduction in time and distance of finding the hidden platform in comparison with anesthetized situation. These findings suggest that 1400W has a significant improvement on spatial memory and memory enhancement induced by iNOS inhibitor can be affected by anesthesia in a period of time. PMID:24250424

  9. The role of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain

    PubMed Central

    ZGAIA, ARMEANA OLIMPIA; IRIMIE, ALEXANDRU; SANDESC, DOREL; VLAD, CATALIN; LISENCU, COSMIN; ROGOBETE, ALEXANDRU; ACHIMAS-CADARIU, PATRICIU

    2015-01-01

    Background and aim Ketamine is a drug used for the induction and maintenance of general anesthesia, for the treatment of postoperative and posttraumatic acute pain, and more recently, for the reduction of postoperative opioid requirements. The main mechanism of action of ketamine is the antagonization of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors that are associated with central sensitization. In the pathogenesis of chronic pain and particularly in neuropathic pain, an important role is played by the activation of NMDA receptors. Although ketamine is indicated and used for the treatment of chronic cancer pain as an adjuvant to opioids, there are few clinical studies that clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of ketamine in this type of pain. The aim of this study is to analyze evidence-based clinical data on the effectiveness and safety of ketamine administration in the treatment of chronic neoplastic pain, and to summarize the evidence-based recommendations for the use of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain. Method We reviewed the literature from the electronic databases of MEDLINE, COCHRANE, PUBMED, MEDSCAPE (1998–2014), as well as chapters of specialized books (palliative care, pain management, anesthesia). Results A number of studies support the effectiveness of ketamine in the treatment of chronic cancer pain, one study does not evidence clear clinical benefits for the use of ketamine, and some studies included too few patients to be conclusive. Conclusions Ketamine represents an option for neoplasic pain that no longer responds to conventional opioid treatment, but this drug should be used with caution, and the development of potential side effects should be carefully monitored. PMID:26733743

  10. Cardiovascular effects of ketamine following administration of aminophylline in dogs.

    PubMed

    Stirt, J A; Berger, J M; Roe, S D; Ricker, S M; Sullivan, S F

    1982-08-01

    The induction of halothane anesthesia following intravenous administration of aminophylline may cause ventricular arrhythmias. Ketamine has been recommended for anesthesia induction and maintenance in patients with asthma. This study was designed to determine whether induction and maintenance of ketamine anesthesia following intravenous aminophylline is arrhythmogenic in dogs. One group of six dogs was anesthetized with intravenous ketamine, 5 mg/kg, followed by infusion of 5 mg/kg/hr. Three additional groups of six dogs were given intravenous aminophylline, 10, 25, and 50 mg/kg, respectively, followed 3 minutes later by intravenous ketamine, 5 mg/kg, and a 5 mg/kg/hr ketamine infusion. No arrhythmias occurred at any time in any animal. Ketamine use following aminophylline would appear to lack arrhythmogenic potential and may be advantageous in the clinical setting. PMID:6807136

  11. Ketamine activation of experimental corticoreticular epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Golden, G T; Fariello, R G

    1980-03-01

    Generalized corticoreticular epilepsy was established in adult cats by parenteral penicillin, and electroencephalographic monitoring was carried out. Ketamine HCl was injected intravenously in doses of 2.5 to 20 mg per kilogram. If doses of penicillin were inadequate to establish typical spike-wave activity, ketamine induced the spike-wave pattern typical of much higher doses of penicillin. At doses of penicillin that established the spike-wave pattern, ketamine potentiated the spike-wave activity and sometimes induced spike-and-wave status. These findings suggest caution in the clinical use of ketamine in patients with corticoreticular epilepsy. Because analogous effects have been observed upon administration of GABA-mimetic agents, GABA systems may play a role in ketamine anesthesia and corticoreticular epilepsy. Precollicular brain transections failed to modify ketamine effects, excluding a possible influence of mesencephalic centers on the observed potentiation. PMID:7189033

  12. Suppressive effects of ketamine on macrophage functions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Yi; Chen, T.-L.; Sheu, J.-R.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2005-04-01

    Ketamine is an intravenous anesthetic agent. Clinically, induction of anesthesia with ketamine can cause immunosuppression. Macrophages play important roles in host defense. In this study, we attempted to evaluate the effects of ketamine on macrophage functions and its possible mechanism using mouse macrophage-like Raw 264.7 cells as the experimental model. Exposure of macrophages to 10 and 100 {mu}M ketamine, which correspond to 0.1 and 1 times the clinically relevant concentration, for 1, 6, and 24 h had no effect on cell viability or lactate dehydrogenase release. When the administered concentration reached 1000 {mu}M, ketamine caused a release of lactate dehydrogenase and cell death. Ketamine, at 10 and 100 {mu}M, did not affect the chemotactic activity of macrophages. Administration of 1000 {mu}M ketamine in macrophages resulted in a decrease in cell migration. Treatment of macrophages with ketamine reduced phagocytic activities. The oxidative ability of macrophages was suppressed by ketamine. Treatment with lipopolysaccharide induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA in macrophages. Administration of ketamine alone did not influence TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, or IL-6 mRNA production. Meanwhile, cotreatment with ketamine and lipopolysaccharide significantly inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, and IL-6 mRNA levels. Exposure to ketamine led to a decrease in the mitochondrial membrane potential. However, the activity of mitochondrial complex I NADH dehydrogenase was not affected by ketamine. This study shows that a clinically relevant concentration of ketamine (100 {mu}M) can suppress macrophage function of phagocytosis, its oxidative ability, and inflammatory cytokine production possibly via reduction of the mitochondrial membrane potential instead of direct cellular toxicity.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of Propranolol in Comparison With Combination of Fentanyl and Ketamine as Premedication in Cataract Surgery Under the Topical Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Fazel, Farhad; Saryazdi, Hamidhajigholam; Rezaei, Leila; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and effects of propranolol as a premedication before cataract surgery and compared them with the usual combination doses of fentanyl and ketamine. Among all reffered patients to Feiz Hospital of Esfahan for cataract surgery, 122 patients between Mar to Sep 2010 were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated into one of the following equal groups: 40 mg propranolol, 2 hours before surgery and combination of 15 mg ketamine and 50 µg fentanyl l. 5 min before surgery. The ability to control of hemodynamic instabilities caused by stress and to gain patients satisfaction was compared between two groups. Also, the efficacy of each premedication to control of hemodynamic changes during surgery were evaluated and compared. No significant differences were seen in the patients satisfaction and controlling of stress induced hemodynamic changes between two groups (P>0.05). However, patients in ketamine + fentanyl group showed more nausea and less pain during and after surgery. Moreover, no significant adverse effects were reported during and after the surgery. Our results demonstrated that propranolol can be used safely as a premedication in cataract surgery in the comparable efficacy to ketamine plus fentanyl premedication. PMID:26153173

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Propranolol in Comparison With Combination of Fentanyl and Ketamine as Premedication in Cataract Surgery Under the Topical Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Farhad; Saryazdi, Hamidhajigholam; Rezaei, Leila; Mahboubi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the safety and effects of propranolol as a premedication before cataract surgery and compared them with the usual combination doses of fentanyl and ketamine. Among all reffered patients to Feiz Hospital of Esfahan for cataract surgery, 122 patients between Mar to Sep 2010 were enrolled in this study and randomly allocated into one of the following equal groups: 40 mg propranolol, 2 hours before surgery and combination of 15 mg ketamine and 50 µg fentanyl l. 5 min before surgery. The ability to control of hemodynamic instabilities caused by stress and to gain patients satisfaction was compared between two groups. Also, the efficacy of each premedication to control of hemodynamic changes during surgery were evaluated and compared. No significant differences were seen in the patients satisfaction and controlling of stress induced hemodynamic changes between two groups (P>0.05). However, patients in ketamine + fentanyl group showed more nausea and less pain during and after surgery. Moreover, no significant adverse effects were reported during and after the surgery. Our results demonstrated that propranolol can be used safely as a premedication in cataract surgery in the comparable efficacy to ketamine plus fentanyl premedication. PMID:26153173

  15. Cardiorespiratory effects of induction and maintenance of anesthesia with ketamine-midazolam combination, with and without prior administration of butorphanol or oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J D; McGrath, C J; Smith, E P

    1994-04-01

    Cardiorespiratory effects of an IV administered bolus of ketamine (7.5 mg/kg of body weight) and midazolam (0.375 mg/kg) followed by IV infusion of ketamine (200 micrograms/kg/min) and midazolam (10 micrograms/kg/min) for 60 minutes was determined in 6 dogs. Ketamine-midazolam combination was administered to dogs on 3 occasions to determine effects of prior administration of IV administered saline solution (1 ml), butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg), or oxymorphone (0.1 mg/kg). The infusion rate of ketamine and midazolam was decreased by 25% for anesthetic maintenance after opioid administration. There were no significant differences in cardiorespiratory variables after saline solution or butorphanol administration; however, oxymorphone caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in mean arterial blood pressure, systemic vascular resistance, and breathing rate. Bolus administration of ketamine-midazolam combination after saline solution caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac index, mean pulmonary blood pressure, venous admixture, and significant decreases in stroke index, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, arterial and mixed venous oxygen tension, arterial oxygen content, and alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient. Opioid administration was associated with significantly (P < 0.05) lower values than was saline administration for heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, and arterial and mixed venous pH and with higher values for stroke index, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension. Prior oxymorphone administration resulted in the highest (P < 0.05) values for mean pulmonary blood pressure, venous admixture, and arterial and mixed venous carbon dioxide tension, and the lowest values for arterial oxygen tension, and arterial and mixed venous pH. Each treatment provided otherwise uncomplicated anesthetic induction, maintenance, and recovery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8017701

  16. Evaluation of medetomidine, ketamine and buprenorphine for neutering feral cats.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kelly A; Robertson, Sheilah A; Levy, Julie K; Isaza, Natalie M

    2011-12-01

    A combination of medetomidine (M, 100 μg/kg), ketamine (K, 10 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (B, 10 μg/kg), administered by intramuscular injection, was evaluated for spaying and castration (neutering) of feral cats (n = 101). Eleven animals (11%) required supplemental anesthesia (isoflurane by mask) to maintain an adequate plane of surgical anesthesia. Atipamezole (A, 125 μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously at the completion of surgery. All cats recovered from surgery and were released the following day. A hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) value of < 95% was recorded at least once during anesthesia in all cats. This MKB combination can be used in a feral cat sterilization clinic, but isoflurane supplementation may be necessary. Further research is indicated to determine the clinical significance of the low SpO(2) values associated with this anesthetic regimen. PMID:21885310

  17. Ketamine as an Adjunct to Postoperative Pain Management in Opioid Tolerant Patients After Spinal Fusions: A Prospective Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ya Deau, Jacques T.; Wukovits, Barbara; Lipnitsky, Jane Y.

    2007-01-01

    Management of acute postoperative pain is challenging, particularly in patients with preexisting narcotic dependency. Ketamine has been used at subanesthetic doses as a N-methyl d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist to block the processing of nociceptive input in chronic pain syndromes. This prospective randomized study was designed to assess the use of ketamine as an adjunct to acute pain management in narcotic tolerant patients after spinal fusions. Twenty-six patients for 1–2 level posterior lumbar fusions with segmental instrumentation were randomly assigned to receive ketamine or act as a control. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.2 mg/kg on induction of general anesthesia and then 2 mcg kg−1 hour−1 for the next 24 hours. Patients were extubated in the operating room and within 15 minutes of arriving in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) were started on intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) hydromorphone without a basal infusion. Patients were assessed for pain (numerical rating scale [NRS]), narcotic use, level of sedation, delirium, and physical therapy milestones until discharge. The ketamine group had significantly less pain during their first postoperative hour in the PACU (NRS 4.8 vs 8.7) and continued to have less pain during the first postoperative day at rest (3.6 vs 5.5) and with physical therapy (5.6 vs 8.0). Three patients in the control group failed PCA pain management and were converted to intravenous ketamine infusions when their pain scores improved. Patients in the ketamine group required less hydromorphone than the control group, but the differences were not significant. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine reduced postoperative pain in narcotic tolerant patients undergoing posterior spine fusions. PMID:18751864

  18. Effects of lidocaine constant rate infusion on sevoflurane requirement, autonomic responses, and postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariectomy under opioid-based balanced anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Columbano, Nicolò; Secci, Fabio; Careddu, Giovanni M; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Rossi, Gabriele; Driessen, Bernd

    2012-08-01

    The effects of constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine on sevoflurane (SEVO) requirements, autonomic responses to noxious stimulation, and postoperative pain relief were evaluated in dogs undergoing opioid-based balanced anesthesia. Twenty-four dogs scheduled for elective ovariectomy were randomly assigned to one of four groups: BC, receiving buprenorphine without lidocaine; FC, receiving fentanyl without lidocaine; BL, receiving buprenorphine and lidocaine; FL, receiving fentanyl and lidocaine. Dogs were anesthetized with intravenous (IV) diazepam and ketamine and anesthesia maintained with SEVO in oxygen/air. Lidocaine (2mg/kg plus 50 μg/kg/min) or saline were infused in groups BL/FL and BC/FC, respectively. After initiation of lidocaine or saline CRI IV buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg plus 8 μg/kg/h CRI) were administered IV in BC/BL and FC/FL, respectively. Respiratory and hemodynamic variables, drug plasma concentrations, and end-tidal SEVO concentrations (E'SEVO) were measured. Behaviors and pain scores were subjectively assessed 1 and 2h post-extubation. Lidocaine CRI produced median drug plasma concentrations <0.4 μg/mL during peak surgical stimulation. Lidocaine produced a 14% decrease in E'SEVO in the BL (P<0.01) but none in the FL group and no change in cardio-pulmonary responses to surgery or postoperative behaviors and pain scores in any group. Thus, depending on the opioid used, supplementing opioid-based balanced anesthesia with lidocaine (50 μg/kg/min) may not have any or only a minor impact on anesthetic outcome in terms of total anesthetic dose, autonomic responses to visceral nociception, and postoperative analgesia. PMID:22261004

  19. Biological effect of ketamine in urothelial cell lines and global gene expression analysis in the bladders of ketamine-injected mice

    PubMed Central

    SHEN, CHENG-HUANG; WANG, SHOU-TSUNG; LEE, YING-RAY; LIU, SHIAU-YUAN; LI, YI-ZHEN; WU, JIANN-DER; CHEN, YI-JU; LIU, YI-WEN

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is used clinically for anesthesia but is also abused as a recreational drug. Previously, it has been established that ketamine-induced bladder interstitial cystitis is a common syndrome in ketamine-abusing individuals. As the mechanisms underlying ketamine-induced cystitis have yet to be revealed, the present study investigated the effect of ketamine on human urothelial cell lines and utilized a ketamine-injected mouse model to identify ketamine-induced changes in gene expression in mice bladders. In the in vitro bladder cell line assay, ketamine induced cytotoxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Ketamine arrested the cells in G1 phase and increased the sub-G1 population, and also increased the barrier permeability of these cell lines. In the ketamine-injected mouse model, ketamine did not change the body weight and bladder histology of the animals at the dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 60 days. Global gene expression analysis of the animals’ bladders following data screening identified ten upregulated genes and 36 downregulated genes induced by ketamine. A total of 52% of keratin family genes were downregulated, particularly keratin 6a, 13 and 14, which was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. Keratin 14 protein, one of the 36 ketamine-induced downregulated genes, was also reduced in the ketamine-treated mouse bladder, as determined by immunohistochemical analysis. This suggested that cytotoxicity and keratin gene downregulation may have a critical role in ketamine-induced cystitis. PMID:25370987

  20. [General anesthesia during short operations in patients using the herbal psychogenic stimulant CAT (Catha edulis)].

    PubMed

    Nuzeĭli, M; Burov, N E; Marinchev, V N; Khureĭbi, Ia

    2009-01-01

    The specific features of general anesthesia during short inpatient operations were performed in 85 patients who were regular CAT users owing to their national habits. According to the herbal psychogenic stimulant CAT dependence, the patients were divided into 3 groups. The findings indicate that propofol (2 mg/kg) in combination with isoflurane and premedication as diatepam (0.1-0.15 mg/kg) and fentanyl (1 mg/kg) is the anesthesia of choice in all group patients. Ketamine in combination with isoflurane may be used in the controls and Group 1 patients with mild CAT dependence. In patients with moderate and severe CAT dependence, ketamine should be considered to be contraindicated due to the development of adverse psychomotor and somatic reactions requiring monitoring and drug correction in an intensive care unit. The results of the study have been introduced into practice on choosing the modes of anesthesia at the Revolution Hospital, Republic of Yemen. PMID:19824416

  1. Clinical and practical requirements of online software for anesthesia documentation an experience report.

    PubMed

    Benson, M; Junger, A; Quinzio, L; Fuchs, C; Sciuk, G; Michel, A; Marquardt, K; Hempelmann, G

    2000-07-01

    The aim of this paper is the presentation of a new version of the anesthesia documentation software, NarkoData, that has been used in routine clinical work in our department as part of an anesthesia information management system (AIMS) since 1995. The performance of this software is presented along with requirements for future development of such a system. The originally used version, NarkoData 3.0, is an online anesthesia documentation software established by the software company ProLogic GmbH. It was primarily developed as a disk-based system for the MacOS operating system (Apple Computer Inc.). Based on our routine experience with the system, a catalogue of requirements was developed that concentrated on improvement in the sequence of work, administration and data management. In 1996, the concepts developed in our department, in close co-operation with medical personnel and the software company, led to a considerable enlargement of the program functions and the subsequent release of a new version of NarkoData. Since 1997, more than 20 000 anesthesia procedures have been recorded annually with this new version at 115 decentralized work stations at our university hospital. PMID:10961571

  2. Pharmacokinetics of Ketamine and Xylazine in Young and Old Sprague–Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Veilleux-Lemieux, Daphnée; Castel, Aude; Carrier, Denise; Beaudry, Francis; Vachon, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    To compare the pharmacokinetics of coadministered intraperitoneal ketamine and xylazine in young (8 to 10 wk; n = 6) and old rats (2 to 2.4 y; n = 6), blood samples obtained at 15 and 30 min and 1, 2, and 4 h after drug administration were analyzed by HPLC–tandem mass spectrometry. In both groups, the withdrawal reflex was absent during anesthesia and was present at 1.1 (± 0.2) and 2.6 (± 0.7) h after drug administration in young and old rats, respectively, with the first voluntary movement at 1.5 ± 0.2 and 4.9 ± 1.0 h. Drug availability of ketamine and xylazine was 6.0 and 6.7 times greater, respectively, in old than young rats. The rate constant of elimination of both drugs was greatly decreased and the elimination half-life was significantly greater in old compared with young rats. In conclusion, age and associated factors affect the availability of ketamine and xylazine when coadministered to attain clinical anesthesia, changing the pharmacokinetics of these drugs and prolonging anesthesia duration and recovery times with aging. Compared with their young counterparts, aged rats required much higher doses to attain a similar level of anesthesia. Finally, the long half-life of both ketamine and xylazine, when coadministered to old rats, may be a factor in research protocols because residual plasma concentrations could still be present for as long as 3 and 5 d, respectively, after administration. PMID:24041212

  3. Effects of Selective iNOS Inhibitor on Spatial Memory in Recovered and Non-recovered Ketamine Induced-anesthesia in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Najafi, Sheyda; Belaran, Maryam; Hosseini-Sharifabad, Ali; Azami, Kian; Hosseini, Asieh; Soodi, Maliheh; Kazemi, Ali; Abbas, Abbas; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is thought to be involved in spatial learning and memory in several brain areas such as hippocampus. This study examined the effects of post-training intrahippocampal microinjections of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor on spatial memory, in both anesthetized and non-anesthetized situations in rats. In the present work, 4-day training trials of animals were conducted. Spatial memory was tested 48 h after the drug infusions. For microinjection of 1400W into CA1 region of the hippocampus in conscious animals, guide cannula was implanted into the CA1 area and 1400W was infused after recovery from surgical anesthesia. In anesthetized animals, 1400W was microinjected directly into CA1 region by Hamilton syringe during anesthesia. After completion of training, 1400W (10, 50 and 100 μM/side) were microinjected bilaterally (1 μL/side) and testing trials were performed 48 h after drug infusions in both groups of cannulated and non-cannulated rats. Significant reduction was observed in escape latency and traveled distance in animals that received 1400W (100 μM/side, * P < 0.05) via cannula after recovery in comparison with control group. Moreover, microinjection of 1400W (100 μM/side) in post recovery phase also caused a significant (*** P < 0.001) reduction in time and distance of finding the hidden platform in comparison with anesthetized situation. These results suggest that 1400W has a significant improvement on spatial memory, and memory enhancement induced by iNOS inhibitor can be affected by anesthesia in a period of time. PMID:24363743

  4. A REVIEW OF KETAMINE ABUSE AND DIVERSION.

    PubMed

    Sassano-Higgins, Sean; Baron, Dave; Juarez, Grace; Esmaili, Neevon; Gold, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine was discovered in the 1960s and released for public use in 1970. Originally developed as a safer alternative to phencyclidine, ketamine is primarily used in clinical settings for analgesia and sedation. In recent years, other uses have been developed, including pain management and treatment of asthma and depression. Clinical use of ketamine causes dissociation and emergence delirium. These effects have led to recreational abuse. Although death from direct pharmacologic effects appears rare, the disinhibition and altered sensory perceptions caused by ketamine puts users at risk of environmental harm. Ketamine has also been implicated in nonconsensual sexual intercourse. Data continue to build that chronic ketamine use may lead to morbidity. Impairment of memory and persistent dissociative, depressive, and delusional thinking has also been reported with long-term use. Lower urinary tract symptoms, including cystitis have been described. Gastric and hepatic pathology have also been noted, including abnormal liver function tests, choledochal cysts and dilations of the common bile duct. S-ketamine, an enantiomer in racemic ketamine, has been shown to be hepatotoxic in vitro. Abstinence from ketamine may reduce the adverse effects of chronic use and is considered the mainstay of treatment. Specialized urine drug testing may be required to detect use, as not all point of care urine drug screens include ketamine. PMID:27328618

  5. Exploring the simulation requirements for virtual regional anesthesia training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charissis, V.; Zimmer, C. R.; Sakellariou, S.; Chan, W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation towards the simulation requirements for virtual regional anaesthesia training. To this end we have developed a prototype human-computer interface designed to facilitate Virtual Reality (VR) augmenting educational tactics for regional anaesthesia training. The proposed interface system, aims to compliment nerve blocking techniques methods. The system is designed to operate in real-time 3D environment presenting anatomical information and enabling the user to explore the spatial relation of different human parts without any physical constrains. Furthermore the proposed system aims to assist the trainee anaesthetists so as to build a mental, three-dimensional map of the anatomical elements and their depictive relationship to the Ultra-Sound imaging which is used for navigation of the anaesthetic needle. Opting for a sophisticated approach of interaction, the interface elements are based on simplified visual representation of real objects, and can be operated through haptic devices and surround auditory cues. This paper discusses the challenges involved in the HCI design, introduces the visual components of the interface and presents a tentative plan of future work which involves the development of realistic haptic feedback and various regional anaesthesia training scenarios.

  6. Effect of disulfiram on ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Altuner, Durdu; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Ozcicek, Fatih; Coskun, Resit; Kurt, Nazahat; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    It is known that ketamine increases the production of catecholamines, causing oxidative damage to the heart. Suppression of the production of catecholamines by disulfiram, a drug with antioxidant properties, indicates that disulfiram may decrease ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of disulfiram on ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Disulfiram was administered by oral gavage in doses of 25 mg/kg to rats in the DK-25 group and 50 mg/kg to rats in the DK-50 group. Distilled water was applied in the ketamine control (KC) and healthy (HG) rat groups. At one hour after drug administration and subsequently at ten-minute intervals, a 60 mg/kg dose of ketamine was intraperitoneally injected in the rats in all groups other than HG, and anesthesia was maintained for three hours. Disulfiram prevented both increase in the levels of parameters indicating oxidative and myocardial damage and decrease of antioxidant levels in the heart tissue with ketamine in a dose-dependent manner. Disulfiram better prevented occurrence of cardiotoxicity with ketamine in the 50 mg/kg dose than in the 25 mg/kg dose. It is concluded that disulfiram may usefully be applied in clinical practice in the prevention of cardiotoxicity as observed during anesthesia with ketamine. PMID:26550292

  7. Effect of disulfiram on ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Nihal; Suleyman, Bahadir; Altuner, Durdu; Kuyrukluyildiz, Ufuk; Ozcicek, Fatih; Coskun, Resit; Kurt, Nazahat; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    It is known that ketamine increases the production of catecholamines, causing oxidative damage to the heart. Suppression of the production of catecholamines by disulfiram, a drug with antioxidant properties, indicates that disulfiram may decrease ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of disulfiram on ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Disulfiram was administered by oral gavage in doses of 25 mg/kg to rats in the DK-25 group and 50 mg/kg to rats in the DK-50 group. Distilled water was applied in the ketamine control (KC) and healthy (HG) rat groups. At one hour after drug administration and subsequently at ten-minute intervals, a 60 mg/kg dose of ketamine was intraperitoneally injected in the rats in all groups other than HG, and anesthesia was maintained for three hours. Disulfiram prevented both increase in the levels of parameters indicating oxidative and myocardial damage and decrease of antioxidant levels in the heart tissue with ketamine in a dose-dependent manner. Disulfiram better prevented occurrence of cardiotoxicity with ketamine in the 50 mg/kg dose than in the 25 mg/kg dose. It is concluded that disulfiram may usefully be applied in clinical practice in the prevention of cardiotoxicity as observed during anesthesia with ketamine. PMID:26550292

  8. Mania following ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yuan-Yuan; Lin, Chieh-Hsin; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, has multiple clinical uses. On the other hand, ketamine abuse or recreational use has been gaining increasing attention. Induction of mania and psychotic symptoms has been reported in a patient receiving IV ketamine therapy for reflex sympathetic dystrophy. We here report a 26 year-old man who abused ketamine by inhalation for 12 months and developed manic-like symptoms after ketamine use. This case suggests a possible relationship between manic symptoms and ketamine abuse. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first report regarding mania after recreational use of ketamine. PMID:26869791

  9. Effect of Intravenous Patient Controlled Ketamine Analgesiaon Postoperative Pain in Opium Abusers

    PubMed Central

    Dahi-Taleghani, Mastane; Fazli, Benjamin; Ghasemi, Mahshid; Vosoughian, Maryam; Dabbagh, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acutepostoperative pain is among the worst experience that patient scan undergo, and many analgesics have been used to suppress it; especially in chronic opium abusers. Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist analgesic, having both anesthetic and analgesic properties, which are not affected to the same extent in chronic opium abusers. Objectives: In this study, we assessed the analgesic effects of ketamine added to morphine as a patient-controlled analgesia method for acute pain management, compared with a placebo, inchronic maleopium abusers. Patients and Methods: After institutional review board approval for ethical considerations, a randomized double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial was conducted. A total of 140 male patients aged 18-65 years, undergoing orthopedic surgery, were entered into the study after matching inclusion and exclusion criteria. All patients received the same anesthesia method; while the first group received ketamine (1mg/mL) and morphine (0.5 mg/mL) as a patient-controlled analgesia (70 patients), the second group received morphine (0.5 mg/mL) plus normal saline (70 patients). P value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The ketamine and morphine group of patients experienced less postoperative pain and required less postoperative rescue analgesia. However, the unwanted postoperative side effects were nearly the same; although increased levels of postoperative nausea and vomiting were observed in the ketamine and morphine group Conclusions: This study demonstrated improved analgesic effects after using intravenous patient controlled analgesia with ketamine on postoperative pain in opium abusers. PMID:24701419

  10. [Periods of post-anesthetic rehabilitation and anesthesia dosage for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: retrospective investigation].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    A retrospective descriptive nonrandomized cohort study of 585 anesthesia cards of patients who had undergone planned laparoscopic cholecystectomy showed no effect of the patient age and sex on the length of post-anesthetic rehabilitation period. The doses of sodium thiopental, ketamine, and trimeperidine affect the length of these periods by no more than 12%. Further search for and studying of factors affecting the duration of post-anesthetic rehabilitation is required in order to improve the safety and adequacy of general anesthesia. PMID:25335384

  11. Ketamine-induced neuronal cell death in the perinatal rhesus monkey.

    PubMed

    Slikker, William; Zou, Xiaoju; Hotchkiss, Charlotte E; Divine, Rebecca L; Sadovova, Natalya; Twaddle, Nathan C; Doerge, Daniel R; Scallet, Andrew C; Patterson, Tucker A; Hanig, Joseph P; Paule, Merle G; Wang, Cheng

    2007-07-01

    Ketamine is widely used as a pediatric anesthetic. Studies in developing rodents have indicated that ketamine-induced anesthesia results in brain cell death. Additional studies are needed to determine if ketamine anesthesia results in brain cell death in the nonhuman primate and if so, to begin to define the stage of development and the duration of ketamine anesthesia necessary to produce brain cell death. Rhesus monkeys (N = 3 for each treatment and control group) at three stages of development (122 days of gestation and 5 and 35 postnatal days [PNDs]) were administered ketamine intravenously for 24 h to maintain a surgical anesthetic plane, followed by a 6-h withdrawal period. Similar studies were performed in PND 5 animals with 3 h of ketamine anesthesia. Animals were subsequently perfused and brain tissue processed for analyses. Ketamine (24-h infusion) produced a significant increase in the number of caspase 3-, Fluoro-Jade C- and silver stain-positive cells in the cortex of gestational and PND 5 animals but not in PND 35 animals. Electron microscopy indicated typical nuclear condensation and fragmentation in some neuronal cells, and cell body swelling was observed in others indicating that ketamine-induced neuronal cell death is most likely both apoptotic and necrotic in nature. Ketamine increased N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor NR1 subunit messenger RNA in the frontal cortex where enhanced cell death was apparent. Earlier developmental stages (122 days of gestation and 5 PNDs) appear more sensitive to ketamine-induced neuronal cell death than later in development (35 PNDs). However, a shorter duration of ketamine anesthesia (3 h) did not result in neuronal cell death in the 5-day-old monkey. PMID:17426105

  12. Ketamine in status asthmaticus: A review

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Shweta; Agrawal, Amit

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Status asthmaticus is a common cause of morbidity and mortality. The addition of ketamine to the standard treatment regimen of severe asthma has shown to improve outcome and alleviate the need for mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this review is to determine the pulmonary effects of ketamine and to determine whether sufficient evidence exists to support its use for refractory status asthmaticus. Data Source: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane data bases (from their inception to Jan 2012) using key words “ketamine”, “asthma”, “bronchospasm”, “bronchodilator”, and “mechanical ventilation” were searched to identify the reports on the use of ketamine as a bronchodilator in acute severe asthma or status asthmaticus, and manual review of article bibliographies was done. Relevant databases were searched for the ongoing trials on use of ketamine as a bronchodilator. Outcome measures were analyzed using following clinical questions: Indication, dose and duration of ketamine use, main effects on respiratory mechanics, adverse effects, and mortality. Results: Twenty reports illustrating the use of ketamine as a bronchodilator were identified. In total, 244 patients aged 5 months to 70 years received ketamine for bronchospasm. Twelve case reports, 3 double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trials, 2 prospective observational studies, 2 clinical evaluation study, and 1 retrospective chart review were retrieved. Most of the studies showed improved outcome with use of ketamine in acute severe asthma unresponsive to conventional treatment. Patients who received ketamine improved clinically, had lower oxygen requirements, and obviated the need for invasive ventilation. Mechanically-ventilated patients for severe bronchospasm showed reduction in peak inspiratory pressures, improved gas exchange, dynamic compliance and minute ventilation, and could be weaned off successfully following introduction of ketamine. Conclusion: In

  13. Intranasally Administered Adjunctive Dexmedetomidine Reduces Perioperative Anesthetic Requirements in General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang; Hang, Li-Hua; Wang, Hong; Shao, Dong-Hua; Xu, Yi-Guo; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intranasal dexmedetomidine is an effective sedative for premedication and is regularly used to reduce preoperative tension and anxiety in children. This study aimed to assess the effect of intranasally adjunctive dexmedetomidine on perioperative sedative and analgesic requirements in adults. Materials and Methods Patients were randomly divided into four groups to receive preoperative administration of saline, intranasal dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg and 2 µg/kg, and intravenous dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg, respectively. Propofol and remifentanil were target-controlled infused to maintain intraoperative bispectral index at 45–55 and blood pressure at baseline value±20%. Sufentanil was administered to maintain postoperative visual analogue scale ≤3. Perioperative anesthetics requirements were compared using nonparametric tests. Results Intranasal dexmedetomidine significantly attenuated propofol requirements for anesthesia induction and maintenance in a dose-dependent manner. Patients given intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg required less remifentanil for anesthesia maintenance. The first postoperative request for sufentanil analgesia was delayed in patients given intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg. The anesthetics-sparing effect of intranasal dexmedetomidine was significantly weaker than intravenous dexmedetomidine at the same dose of 1 µg/kg. The incidences of adverse events, including hemodynamic instability and delayed recovery, were comparable with and without intranasal dexmedetomidine. Conclusion Intranasal administration of dexmedetomidine can reduce perioperative anesthetic requirements, and a dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg produces a better effect in adults. The anesthetics-sparing effect of intranasal dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg is less than that with the same intravenous dose of dexmedetomidine. PMID:27189297

  14. Betaine enhances antidepressant-like, but blocks psychotomimetic effects of ketamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Cheng; Lee, Mei-Yi; Chan, Ming-Huan; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is emerging as a new hope against depression, but ketamine-associated psychotomimetic effects limit its clinical use. An adjunct therapy along with ketamine to alleviate its adverse effects and even potentiate the antidepressant effects might be an alternative strategy. Betaine, a methyl derivative of glycine and a dietary supplement, has been shown to have antidepressant-like effects and to act like a partial agonist at the glycine site of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). Accordingly, betaine might have potential to be an adjunct to ketamine treatment for depression. The antidepressant-like effects of ketamine and betaine were evaluated by forced swimming test and novelty suppressed feeding test in mice. Both betaine and ketamine produced antidepressant-like effects. Furthermore, we determined the effects of betaine on ketamine-induced antidepressant-like and psychotomimetic behaviors, motor incoordination, hyperlocomotor activity, and anesthesia. The antidepressant-like responses to betaine combined with ketamine were stronger than their individual effects. In contrast, ketamine-induced impairments in prepulse inhibition, novel object recognition test, social interaction, and rotarod test were remarkably attenuated, whereas ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion and loss of righting reflex were not affected by betaine. These findings revealed that betaine could enhance the antidepressant-like effects, yet block the psychotomimetic effects of ketamine, suggesting that betaine can be considered as an add-on therapy to ketamine for treatment-resistant depression and suitable for the treatment of depressive symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:27363702

  15. Case report: A pulseless radial artery in a child under anesthesia for radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Shahram; Javid, Mihan Jafari; Maghsoudloo, Maziar; Faghihnasiri, Sorousg; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of cancer in children often requires a combination of chemotherapy, surgery, and/or radiotherapy. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are not painful processes, but children undergoing these procedures must be made motionless through anesthesia or sedation. There are a few reports of complications during these procedures in relation to the procedures themselves or to the anesthesia given. This report describes an unexpected pulseless radial artery which was preliminarily and unduly attributed to anesthesia. A 2.5 year-old male pediatric patient with an acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was scheduled for radiotherapy. Anesthesia with intramuscular ketamine was induced before starting radiotherapy. About 5 minutes after injection of ketamine we found the right radial pulse undetectable. There was no other manifestation of hypoxia or hypo-perfusion. Carotid pulsation was normal. Examination of the left radial pulse and other peripheral pulses showed normal pulsation. The procedure was continued uneventfully. The next follow-up after radiotherapy, showed a scar and swelling on the right antecubital area, caused by extravasation of chemotherapeutic agent in the prior period of chemotherapy. Doppler ultrasonography of the antecubital vein confirmed the diagnosis. This case study therefore demonstrates that proper intravenous cannula establishment before chemotherapy is of great importance. Furthermore, accurate history and physical examination before induction of anesthesia or sedation may be useful in preventing mismanagement in pediatric cancer procedures. PMID:26396727

  16. [Monitoring Required for Monitored Anesthesia Care (MAC) and Specific MAC Methodologies].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Toshiyasu

    2015-03-01

    Many physicians responsible for monitored anesthesia care (MAC) are not anesthesiologists and are not acquainted with treatment in response to sudden changes in patient condition. In particular, rapid response and early detection are essential for respiratory depression. Physicians engaged in MAC require pharmacological knowledge regarding sedative and analgesic medications, need to be able to accurately evaluate physiological responses to sedative and anesthetic levels, and need to be acquainted with emergency procedures such as basic life support (BLS) and advanced cardiovascular life support (ACLS). Patient management focusing on both ventilation and oxygenation, through the use of capnography and continuous respiratory monitoring, in addition to oxygenation monitoring using a pulse oximeter, and measuring ECGs and blood pressure in the management of sedated patients, is also important. PMID:26121782

  17. Efficacy of oral ketamine compared to midazolam for sedation of children undergoing laceration repair

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Orit; Barkan, Shiri; Breitbart, Rachelle; Berkovitch, Sofia; Toledano, Michal; Weiser, Giora; Karadi, Natali; Nassi, Anat; Kozer, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the efficacy of oral ketamine versus oral midazolam for sedation during laceration repair at a pediatric emergency department. Methods: Children between 1 and 10 years requiring laceration repair were randomly assigned to 2 groups, treated either with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg) or with oral ketamine (5 mg/kg). Main outcomes measured were level of pain during local anesthesia, as assessed by the parent on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS) and the number of children who required intravenous sedation. Secondary outcomes included VAS by physician, pain assessment by child, maximal sedation depth assessed by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale, time until University of Michigan Sedation Scale 2 or more, general satisfaction of a parent and treating physician, length of procedure, total sedation time, and the incidence of any adverse events. Results: Sixty-eight children were recruited of which 33 were girls. Average age was 5.08 ± 2.14 years. Thirty-seven children were treated with ketamine and 31 with midazolam. Parent-assessed VAS in ketamine treated patients was 5.07 ± 0.75 compared with 3.68 ± 0.7 in midazolam treated patients [mean difference = 1.39 95% confidence interval (CI) –0.47 to 3.26]. Twelve (32%) of the children treated with ketamine required the addition of IV sedation compared to only 2 children (6%) of the children treated with midazolam [odds ratio (adjusted for age and gender) 6.1, 95% CI: 1.2 to 30.5]. The rest of the measured variables were similar between the groups, with no statistical significance. Discussion: No difference in the level of pain was found between ketamine and midazolam treated patients. Compared with oral midazolam (0.7 mg/kg), oral ketamine (5 mg/kg) was associated with higher rates of sedation failure, and thus is not recommended as a single agent for oral sedation in children requiring laceration repair. PMID:27368000

  18. Consciousness and Complexity during Unresponsiveness Induced by Propofol, Xenon, and Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Sarasso, Simone; Boly, Melanie; Napolitani, Martino; Gosseries, Olivia; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Casarotto, Silvia; Rosanova, Mario; Casali, Adenauer Girardi; Brichant, Jean-Francois; Boveroux, Pierre; Rex, Steffen; Tononi, Giulio; Laureys, Steven; Massimini, Marcello

    2015-12-01

    A common endpoint of general anesthetics is behavioral unresponsiveness, which is commonly associated with loss of consciousness. However, subjects can become disconnected from the environment while still having conscious experiences, as demonstrated by sleep states associated with dreaming. Among anesthetics, ketamine is remarkable in that it induces profound unresponsiveness, but subjects often report "ketamine dreams" upon emergence from anesthesia. Here, we aimed at assessing consciousness during anesthesia with propofol, xenon, and ketamine, independent of behavioral responsiveness. To do so, in 18 healthy volunteers, we measured the complexity of the cortical response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)--an approach that has proven helpful in assessing objectively the level of consciousness irrespective of sensory processing and motor responses. In addition, upon emergence from anesthesia, we collected reports about conscious experiences during unresponsiveness. Both frontal and parietal TMS elicited a low-amplitude electroencephalographic (EEG) slow wave corresponding to a local pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during propofol anesthesia, a high-amplitude EEG slow wave corresponding to a global, stereotypical pattern of cortical activation with low complexity during xenon anesthesia, and a wakefulness-like, complex spatiotemporal activation pattern during ketamine anesthesia. Crucially, participants reported no conscious experience after emergence from propofol and xenon anesthesia, whereas after ketamine they reported long, vivid dreams unrelated to the external environment. These results are relevant because they suggest that brain complexity may be sensitive to the presence of disconnected consciousness in subjects who are considered unconscious based on behavioral responses. PMID:26752078

  19. Anesthesia Awareness

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Anesthesia Awareness Very rarely – in only one or two out ... become aware or conscious. The condition – called anesthesia awareness – means the patient can recall the surroundings or ...

  20. New Hippocampal Neurons Mature Rapidly in Response to Ketamine But Are Not Required for Its Acute Antidepressant Effects on Neophagia in Rats123

    PubMed Central

    Soumier, Amelie; Carter, Rayna M.; Schoenfeld, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Virtually all antidepressant agents increase the birth of granule neurons in the adult dentate gyrus in rodents, providing a key basis for the neurogenesis hypothesis of antidepressant action. The novel antidepressant ketamine, however, shows antidepressant activity in humans within hours, far too rapid for a mechanism involving neuronal birth. Ketamine could potentially act more rapidly by enhancing maturation of new neurons born weeks earlier. To test this possibility, we assessed the effects of S-ketamine (S-(+)-ketamine hydrochloride) injection on maturation, as well as birth and survival, of new dentate gyrus granule neurons in rats, using the immediate-early gene zif268, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and BrdU, respectively. We show that S-ketamine has rapid effects on new neurons, increasing the proportion of functionally mature young granule neurons within 2 h. A single injection of S-ketamine also increased cell proliferation and functional maturation, and decreased depressive-like behavior, for at least 4 weeks in rats treated with long-term corticosterone administration (a depression model) and controls. However, the behavioral effects of S-ketamine on neophagia were unaffected by elimination of adult neurogenesis. Together, these results indicate that ketamine has surprisingly rapid and long-lasting effects on the recruitment of young neurons into hippocampal networks, but that ketamine has antidepressant-like effects that are independent of adult neurogenesis. PMID:27066531

  1. Ketamine/Xylazine-Induced Corneal Damage in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Nasreen A.; Anderson, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We have observed that the commonly used ketamine/xylazine anesthesia mix can induce a focally severe and permanent corneal opacity. The purpose of this study was to establish the clinical and histological features of this deleterious side effect, its sensitivity with respect to age and anesthesia protocol, and approaches for avoiding it. Methods Young C57BL/6J, C57BLKS/J, and SJL/J mice were treated with permutations of anesthesia protocols and compared using slit-lamp exams, optical coherence tomography, histologic analyses, and telemetric measurements of body temperature. Results Ketamine/xylazine induces corneal damage in mice with a variable frequency. Among 12 experimental cohorts, corneal damage associated with ketamine/xylazine was observed in 9 of them. Despite various treatments to avoid corneal dehydration during anesthesia, the frequency of corneas experiencing damage among responding cohorts was 42% (26% inclusive of all cohorts), which is significantly greater than the natural prevalence (5%). The damage was consistent with band keratopathy. It appeared as a white or gray horizontal band located proximal to the pupil and was positive for subepithelial calcium deposition with von Kossa stain. Conclusions The sum of our clinical and histological observations is consistent with ketamine/xylazine-induced band keratopathy in mice. This finding is relevant for mouse studies involving the eye and/or vision-dependent behavioral assays, which would both be prone to artifact without appreciation of the damage caused by ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Use of yohimbine is suggested as a practical means of avoiding this complication. PMID:26222692

  2. Ketamine Affects the Neurogenesis of the Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus in 7-Day-Old Rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Liu, Cun-Ming; Sun, Jie; Hao, Ting; Xu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Dan; Wu, Yu-Qing

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has been reported to cause neonatal neurotoxicity via a neuronal apoptosis mechanism; however, no in vivo research has reported whether ketamine could affect postnatal neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). A growing number of experiments suggest that postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis is the foundation of maintaining normal hippocampus function into adulthood. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of ketamine on hippocampal neurogenesis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups: the control group (equal volume of normal saline), and the ketamine-anesthesia group (40 mg/kg ketamine in four injections at 1 h intervals). The S-phase marker 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered after ketamine exposure to postnatal day 7 (PND-7) rats, and the neurogenesis in the hippocampal DG was assessed using single- or double-immunofluorescence staining. The expression of GFAP in the hippocampal DG was measured by western blot analysis. Spatial reference memory was tested by Morris water maze at 2 months after PND-7 rats exposed to ketamine treatment. The present results showed that neonatal ketamine exposure significantly inhibited neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation, decreased astrocytic differentiation, and markedly enhanced neuronal differentiation. The disruptive effect of ketamine on the proliferation and differentiation of NSCs lasted at least 1 week and disappeared by 2 weeks after ketamine exposure. Moreover, the migration of newborn neurons in the granule cell layer and the growth of astrocytes in the hippocampal DG were inhibited by ketamine on PND-37 and PND-44. Finally, ketamine caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent spatial reference memory tasks at 2 months old. Our results suggested that ketamine may interfere with hippocampal neurogenesis and long-term neurocognitive function in PND-7 rats. These findings may provide a new perspective to explain the adult neurocognitive dysfunction induced by neonatal

  3. N,N-dimethylglycine differentially modulates psychotomimetic and antidepressant-like effects of ketamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Cheng; Chan, Ming-Huan; Lee, Mei-Yi; Chen, Yi-Chyan; Chen, Hwei-Hsien

    2016-11-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, produces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects at subanesthtic doses. However, it still inevitably induces psychotomimetic side effects. N,N-dimethylglycine (DMG) is a derivative of the amino acid glycine and is used as a dietary supplement. Recently, DMG has been found acting at glycine binding site of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). As blockade of NMDARs is one of the main mechanisms responsible for the action of ketamine on central nervous system, DMG might modulate the behavioral responses to ketamine. The present study determined the effects of DMG on the ketamine-induced psychotomimetic, anesthetic and antidepressant-like effects in mice. DMG pretreatment reversed the ketamine-induced locomotor hyperactivity and impairment in the rotarod performance, novel location and novel object recognition tests, and prepulse inhibition. In addition, DMG alone exhibited antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test and produced additive effects when combined with ketamine. However, DMG did not affect ketamine-induced anesthesia. These results reveal that DMG could antagonize ketamine's psychotomimetic effects, yet produce additive antidepressant-like effects with ketamine, suggesting that DMG might have antipsychotic potential and be suitable as an add-on therapy to ketamine for patients with treatment-resistant depression. PMID:27296677

  4. Influence of valproate on the required dose of propofol for anesthesia during electroconvulsive therapy of bipolar affective disorder patients

    PubMed Central

    Hızlı Sayar, Gökben; Eryılmaz, Gül; Şemieoğlu, Siban; Özten, Eylem; Göğcegöz Gül, Işıl

    2014-01-01

    Background Propofol is often used as an anesthetic agent for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). In recent studies, propofol was shown to possess significant seizure-shortening properties during ECT. “Valproate” is a mood stabilizer used mainly in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder. It is reported that valproate, being an anticonvulsant, raises the seizure threshold, thus decreases the efficacy of ECT treatment. Aim The purpose of our study was to compare the dose of propofol in valproate-using patients and valproate-free patients. Methods In an open design, 17 patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes who were to be treated with valproate and ECT in combination, were compared with 16 manic-episode patients who were to be treated with ECT but not valproate. The two groups were compared on the basis of electroencephalography-registered seizure duration and the propofol dosage required to induce anesthesia. Results Valproate, compared with no valproate treatment, results in a decrease in the propofol dose required to induce anesthesia. In the valproate group of study participants, seizure duration was significantly shorter than in the valproate-free group. Conclusion The results suggest that valproate reduces the dose of propofol required for anesthesia during ECT treatment in patients with bipolar affective disorder manic episodes. Although propofol is a safe and efficacious anesthetic for ECT treatment, lower doses of propofol should be used to induce anesthesia for patients under valproate treatment. When the clinician needs to prolong seizure duration in patients treated with valproate, interruption of the valproate treatment or an anesthetic agent other than propofol should be considered. PMID:24623978

  5. Ketamine - reves et realites.

    PubMed

    Arditti, J; Spadari, M; de Haro, L; Brun, A; Bourdon, J H; Valli, M

    2002-01-01

    Ketamine is an anaesthetic used in human medicine and veterinary practice, synthesised on 1962 and marketed on 1970 in France. Recreational uses were described during 1992 in the medical communauty and in 1996 in the dance settings. The chemical name of ketamine is 2 - (2chlorophenyl) 2-(methylamine)-cyclohexanone, an aryl cyclohexylamine, structurally related to phencyclidine. Ketamine is known under the following street names : Keta K, Kate, Special K, Vitamine K, la Golden, la Vétérinaire. Ketamine is used intranasally, orally and intramusculary in recreational use. Ketamine is manufactured by the chemical industry. Due to the complicated synthesis, it is sold illicitly for recreational use. Ketamine is a dissociative drug, and the user enters in a psychedelic dream with hallucinations, floating sensation, feeling of dissociation of the mind from the body. The dream is forgotten, the user fulls in reality with loss of self control, risk of acute intoxication. In long term exposure, tolerance, dependence, withdrawal signs and flash back are described. Ketamine trademarks are subject to control in France through medicine legislation Ketamine and its salts are subject to control under the national legislation on narcotics and psychotropics substance. From September 2001, the theft of medical and veterinary trademarks have to be declared to police, care health authority Pharmacy control authority and French Health Products Safety Agency. PMID:24862521

  6. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima e

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg−1·h−1 (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  7. Efficacy of Continuous S(+)-Ketamine Infusion for Postoperative Pain Control: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Miziara, Luiz Eduardo de Paula Gomes; Simoni, Ricardo Francisco; Esteves, Luís Otávio; Cangiani, Luis Henrique; Grillo-Filho, Gil Fernando Ribeiro; Paula, Anderson Garcia Lima E

    2016-01-01

    Aim. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was designed to evaluate the efficacy of continuous intraoperative infusion of S(+)-ketamine under intravenous anesthesia with target-controlled infusion of remifentanil and propofol for postoperative pain control. Methods. Forty-eight patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were assigned to receive continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion at a rate of 0.3 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1) (n = 24, intervention group) or an equivalent volume of saline at the same rate (n = 24, placebo group). The same target-controlled intravenous anesthesia was induced in both groups. Pain was assessed using a 0 to 10 verbal numeric rating scale during the first 12 postoperative hours. Pain scores and morphine consumption were recorded in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) and at 4 and 12 hours after surgery. Results. Pain scores were lower in the intervention group at all time points. Morphine consumption did not differ significantly between groups during PACU stay, but it was significantly lower in the intervention group at each time point after PACU discharge (P = 0.0061). At 12 hours after surgery, cumulative morphine consumption was also lower in the intervention group (5.200 ± 2.707) than in the placebo group (7.525 ± 1.872). Conclusions. Continuous S(+)-ketamine infusion during laparoscopic cholecystectomy under target-controlled intravenous anesthesia provided better postoperative pain control than placebo, reducing morphine requirement. Trial Registration. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02421913. PMID:26949390

  8. Anesthesia and epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Reema; Howard, Richard

    2010-04-01

    Patients with epidermolysis bullosa (EB) may present for anesthesia with an unrelated surgical condition or, more commonly, for diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Children in particular may require frequent anesthetics. Safe and effective management of anesthesia presents a significant challenge and although there is little rigorous evidence available to aid decision-making, in this article the elements of current good anesthesia care in EB are summarized. PMID:20447497

  9. Molecular recognition of ketamine by a subset of olfactory G protein–coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Saven, Jeffery G.; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Eckenhoff, Roderic G.

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine elicits various neuropharmacological effects, including sedation, analgesia, general anesthesia, and antidepressant activity. Through an in vitro screen, we identified four mouse olfactory receptors (ORs) that responded to ketamine. In addition to their presence in the olfactory epithelium, these G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are distributed throughout the central nervous system. To better understand the molecular basis of the interactions between ketamine and ORs, we used sequence comparison and molecular modeling to design mutations that (i) increased, reduced, or abolished ketamine responsiveness in responding receptors, and (ii) rendered non-responding receptors responsive to ketamine. We showed that olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that expressed distinct ORs responded to ketamine in vivo, suggesting that ORs may serve as functional targets for ketamine. The ability to both abolish and introduce responsiveness to ketamine in GPCRs enabled us to identify and confirm distinct interaction loci in the binding site, which suggested a signature ketamine-binding pocket that may guide exploration of additional receptors for this general anesthetic drug. PMID:25829447

  10. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ketamine in dogs anesthetized with enflurane.

    PubMed

    Schwieger, I M; Szlam, F; Hug, C C

    1991-04-01

    The plasma concentration vs. anesthetic effect relationships for ketamine are not well known. It is desirable to establish stable and predictable drug concentrations in plasma (and brain) in order to define such relationships. As a prelude to pharmacodynamic studies, we investigated ketamine pharmacokinetics in eight dogs anesthetized with enflurane and correlated ketamine concentration in plasma (KET) with its ability to reduce the enflurane concentration required for anesthesia (enflurane EC50: MAC--the end-tidal concentration at which half the dogs moved in response to clamping of the tail and half did not move). Four dogs (Group 1) received ketamine 10 mg/kg iv over 30 sec. Blood for determination of KET was collected repeatedly over the 5-h period following injection. Based on the pharmacokinetic parameters determined for Group 1, four dogs in Group 2 received ketamine as a continuous infusion of 300 micrograms.kg-1.min-1 for 5 hr accompanied by an initial loading dose (26 mg/kg administered over 20 min) designed to produce a stable KET of 20 micrograms/ml of plasma. Enflurane MAC and KET were determined regularly during the infusion and for 5 hr after discontinuation of the infusion. There were no significant differences in the following pharmacokinetic parameters determined for Group 1 vs. Group 2: t1/2 beta = 122 +/- 9 vs. 141 +/- 40 min (mean +/- SD) and CL = 18.1 +/- 5.9 vs. 13.9 +/- 2.5 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively. When administered as a continuous infusion (Group 2), KET remained relatively stable at 22.1 +/- 4.6 micrograms/ml for 5 hr. The degree of MAC reduction remained relatively stable at 73% during the continuous infusion. Finally, the enflurane MAC reduction vs. KET was established over a wide range of plasma concentrations in 4 additional dogs (Group 3). This study determined that the pharmacokinetics of ketamine were consistent under two different experimental conditions and demonstrated the relationship between plasma concentration and

  11. Ideal anesthetic agents for day-care gynecological procedures: A clinical trial comparing thiopentone with ketamine as adjuncts to propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Hemani; Abraham, Valsamma; Abraham, John; Liddle, Dootika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Day-care gynecological procedures require the use of anesthetic agents, which ensure rapid induction and recovery. Although propofol is the gold standard drug in day-care procedures, it has its own side effects like apnea, cardiovascular instability, pain on injection, as well as its cost. The ideal drug combination to achieve this end remains elusive. Therefore, a combination of propofol, thiopentone, and ketamine may be a better alternative. Materials and Methods: This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was conducted on 60 women, aged 18-50 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status 1 and 2, undergoing day-care gynecological surgeries. The patients were allocated to two groups. Group T received an admixture containing 10 ml of 1% propofol and 10 ml of 1.25% thiopentone. Group K received an admixture containing 10 ml of 1% propofol and 10 ml of 0.5% ketamine. Results: There was less variation in the mean systolic blood pressure of patients in Group K as compared to patients in Group T. The mean total dose of propofol required in Group K (0.85 mg/kg) was significantly less than that required in Group T (1.12 mg/kg) (P = 0.0004). The mean recovery time in Group T (3.67 minutes) was significantly less than in Group K (6.27 minutes; P = 0.0001). However, the mean discharge time in both the groups was similar. (P = 0.7392). The results were analyzed statistically using the Student's t-test and the Fisher's exact test. Conclusions: Both the propofol-thiopentone and propofol-ketamine admixtures provided adequate anesthesia. Propofol-ketamine proved superior to propofol-thiopentone in terms of hemodynamic stability and requirement of a lesser total dose of propofol. However, the patients in the propofol-thiopentone group had faster recovery. PMID:26015907

  12. [Analgesia and anesthesia in the prehospital stage of mechanical trauma].

    PubMed

    Beliakov, V A; Sinitsyn, L N; Maksimov, G A; Akulov, M S; Kalachev, S A; Medvedskiĭ

    1993-01-01

    The work reviews the results of the use of various analgesics and anesthetics in 965 outpatients with mechanical traumas, including 340 ones with shock and blood loss. Central hemodynamics has been studied in 60 patients during anesthesia with lexir, ketamine, sodium hydroxybutyrate, respiratory function has been assessed in 20 patients. The results have been confirmed experimentally on 160 rats, 50 cats, and 40 dogs. It is recommended to apply narcotic and nonnarcotic analgesics, lexir, ketamine intramuscularly not only to patients with shock and pronounced blood loss in whom infusion therapy and intravenous anesthesia with sodium hydroxybutyrate are necessary but in all other cases as well. PMID:8116897

  13. General anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    General anesthesia is treatment with certain medicines that puts you into a deep sleep so you do not feel ... doctor called an anesthesiologist will give you the anesthesia. Sometimes, a certified and registered nurse anesthetist will ...

  14. Anesthesia Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... as an injection or through inhaled gases or vapors, different types of anesthesia affect the nervous system ... in the arm) or by inhaling gases or vapors. Regional anesthesia. An anesthetic drug is injected near ...

  15. Intravenous ketamine, propofol and propofol-ketamine combination used for pediatric dental sedation: A randomized clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Canpolat, Dilek Gunay; Yildirim, Mustafa Denizhan; Aksu, Recep; Kutuk, Nukhet; Alkan, Alper; Cantekin, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Dental treatments cannot bealways performed under local anesthesia inpediatric non-cooperative patients. For this purpose, differentanesthetic techniques have been applied to increase patient comport to dental treatments. Methods: Sixty children classified as ASA I-II, between aged 3 to 9, who were scheduled to undergo tooth extraction, were enrolled for this randomized study. Group K received 1 mg/kg ketamine, Group P received 1 mg/kg propofol, and Group KP received 0.5 mg/kg propofol plus 0.5 mg/kg ketamine intravenously for anesthesia induction. Results: Recovery time was significantly lower in Group P than Group KP. No significant differences were found between groups regarding HR, before and after the induction, at tenth minute. Fifth minute’s HR was higher in Group K than Group KP. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) values were similar at baseline, before and after the induction, and at tenth minute, whereas significantly lower values were found in Group P and Group KP than in Group K at fifth minute. Conclusions: Although ketamine, propofol and ketamine-propofol combination are effective for sedation in tooth extraction in pediatric patients, propofol may be an excellent alternative, with the shortest recovery, no nausea and vomiting, and reasonable surgical satisfaction. PMID:27375714

  16. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  17. Prenatal ketamine exposure causes abnormal development of prefrontal cortex in rat.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Tianyun; Li, Chuanxiang; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Haixing; Ma, Daqing; Song, Xingrong; Zhou, Libing

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is commonly used for anesthesia and as a recreational drug. In pregnant users, a potential neurotoxicity in offspring has been noted. Our previous work demonstrated that ketamine exposure of pregnant rats induces affective disorders and cognitive impairments in offspring. As the prefrontal cortex (PFC) is critically involved in emotional and cognitive processes, here we studied whether maternal ketamine exposure influences the development of the PFC in offspring. Pregnant rats on gestational day 14 were treated with ketamine at a sedative dose for 2 hrs, and pups were studied at postnatal day 0 (P0) or P30. We found that maternal ketamine exposure resulted in cell apoptosis and neuronal loss in fetal brain. Upon ketamine exposure in utero, PFC neurons at P30 showed more dendritic branching, while cultured neurons from P0 PFC extended shorter neurites than controls. In addition, maternal ketamine exposure postponed the switch of NR2B/2A expression, and perturbed pre- and postsynaptic protein expression in the PFC. These data suggest that prenatal ketamine exposure impairs neuronal development of the PFC, which may be associated with abnormal behavior in offsprings. PMID:27226073

  18. Influence of ketamine on regional brain glucose use

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, D.W.; Mans, A.M.; Biebuyck, J.F.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1988-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of different doses of ketamine on cerebral function at the level of individual brain structures as reflected by glucose use. Rats received either 5 or 30 mg/kg ketamine intravenously as a loading dose, followed by an infusion to maintain a steady-state level of the drug. An additional group received 30 mg/kg as a single injection only, and was studied 20 min later, by which time they were recovering consciousness (withdrawal group). Regional brain energy metabolism was evaluated with (6-/sup 14/C)glucose and quantitative autoradiography during a 5-min experimental period. A subhypnotic, steady-state dose (5 mg/kg) of ketamine caused a stimulation of glucose use in most brain areas, with an average increase of 20%. At the larger steady-state dose (30 mg/kg, which is sufficient to cause anesthesia), there was no significant effect on most brain regions; some sensory nuclei were depressed (inferior colliculus, -29%; cerebellar dentate nucleus, -18%; vestibular nucleus, -16%), but glucose use in the ventral posterior hippocampus was increased by 33%. In contrast, during withdrawal from a 30-mg/kg bolus, there was a stimulation of glucose use throughout the brain (21-78%), at a time when plasma ketamine levels were similar to the levels in the 5 mg/kg group. At each steady-state dose, as well as during withdrawal, ketamine caused a notable stimulation of glucose use by the hippocampus.

  19. Effect of Etomidate Versus Combination of Propofol-Ketamine and Thiopental-Ketamine on Hemodynamic Response to Laryngoscopy and Intubation: A Randomized Double Blind Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Gholipour Baradari, Afshin; Firouzian, Abolfazl; Zamani Kiasari, Alieh; Aarabi, Mohsen; Emadi, Seyed Abdollah; Davanlou, Ali; Motamed, Nima; Yousefi Abdolmaleki, Ensieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Laryngoscopy and intubation frequently used for airway management during general anesthesia, is frequently associated with undesirable hemodynamic disturbances. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of etomidate, combination of propofol-ketamine and thiopental-ketamine as induction agents on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Patients and Methods: In a double blind, randomized clinical trial a total of 120 adult patients of both sexes, aged 18 - 45 years, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into three equally sized groups. Patients in group A received etomidate (0.3 mg/kg) plus normal saline as placebo. Patients in group B and C received propofol (1.5 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) and thiopental sodium (3 mg/kg) plus ketamine (0.5 mg/kg), respectively for anesthesia induction. Before laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation, immediately after, and also one and three minutes after the procedures, hemodynamic values (SBP, DBP, MAP and HR) were measured. Results: A repeated measurement ANOVA showed significant changes in mean SBP and DBP between the time points (P < 0.05). In addition, the main effect of MAP and HR were statistically significant during the course of study (P < 0.05). Furthermore, after induction of anesthesia, the three study groups had significantly different SBP, DBP and MAP changes overtime (P < 0.05). However, HR changes over time were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). Combination of propofol-ketamine had superior hemodynamic stability compared to other induction agents. Conclusions: Combination of propofol-ketamine may be recommended as an effective and safe induction agent for attenuating hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and intubation with better hemodynamic stability. Although, further well-designed randomized clinical trials to confirm the safety and efficacy of this combination, especially in critically ill patients or patients with

  20. Ketamine effects on somatosensory cortical single neurons and on behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Patel, I M; Chapin, J K

    1990-06-01

    cortical neuronal excitation and sensory suppression in the same cortical region may explain in part the mechanism of dissociative anesthesia and hallucinatory side effects observed in humans during emergence from ketamine anesthesia. PMID:2344058

  1. Effects of anesthesia with isoflurane on plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Duke-Novakovski, Tanya; Schott, Harold C; van der Kolk, Johannes H

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine effects of anesthesia on plasma concentrations and pulsatility of ACTH in samples obtained from the cavernous sinus and jugular vein of horses. ANIMALS 6 clinically normal adult horses. PROCEDURES Catheters were placed in a jugular vein and into the cavernous sinus via a superficial facial vein. The following morning (day 1), cavernous sinus blood samples were collected every 5 minutes for 1 hour (collection of first sample = time 0) and jugular venous blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. On day 2, horses were sedated with xylazine hydrochloride and anesthesia was induced with propofol mixed with ketamine hydrochloride. Horses were positioned in dorsal recumbency. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a continuous rate infusion of butorphanol tartrate. One hour after anesthesia was induced, the blood sample protocol was repeated. Plasma ACTH concentrations were quantified by use of a commercially available sandwich assay. Generalized estimating equations that controlled for horse and an expressly automated deconvolution algorithm were used to determine effects of anesthesia on plasma ACTH concentrations and pulsatility, respectively. RESULTS Anesthesia significantly reduced the plasma ACTH concentration in blood samples collected from the cavernous sinus. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Mean plasma ACTH concentrations in samples collected from the cavernous sinus of anesthetized horses were reduced. Determining the success of partial ablation of the pituitary gland in situ for treatment of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction may require that effects of anesthesia be included in interpretation of plasma ACTH concentrations in cavernous sinus blood. PMID:27347826

  2. Reversible chemical restraint of free-range cattle with a concentrated combination of tiletamine–zolazepam, ketamine, and detomidine

    PubMed Central

    Re, Michela; Blanco-Murcia, Francisco J.; San Miguel, José Maria; Gómez de Segura, Ignacio A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of a concentrated combination of tiletamine–zolazepam [TZ, 0.53 mg/kg body weight (BW)], ketamine (Ket, 0.53 mg/kg BW), and detomidine (Det, 0.04 mg/kg BW) in the immobilization of free-range cattle for clinical procedures. The combination was administered intramuscularly to 53 animals. Anesthesia was reversed with the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole. Locoregional anesthesia was provided with lidocaine when required. The TZKD combination induced suitable immobilization for minor surgical procedures or medical treatments. Anesthetic onset was rapid, taking a mean of 6.1 min [standard deviation (SD) 2.8 min]. The duration of anesthesia depended on the time of administration of the antagonist; the animals recovered in the standing position in 12.9 ± 8.9 min after the administration of atipamezole. The quality of anesthesia and analgesia were satisfactory. In conclusion, this TZKD combination can be used for both immobilization and minor surgical procedures in free-range cattle. PMID:24124271

  3. Does Intravenous Ketamine Enhance Analgesia after Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery with Ultrasound Guided Single-Injection Interscalene Block?: A Randomized, Prospective, Double-Blind Trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine has anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antihyperalgesic effect and prevents pain associated with wind-up. We investigated whether low doses of ketamine infusion during general anesthesia combined with single-shot interscalene nerve block (SSISB) would potentiate analgesic effect of SSISB. Forty adult patients scheduled for elective arthroscopic shoulder surgery were enrolled and randomized to either the control group or the ketamine group. All patients underwent SSISB and followed by general anesthesia. During an operation, intravenous ketamine was infused to the patients of ketamine group continuously. In control group, patients received normal saline in volumes equivalent to ketamine infusions. Pain score by numeric rating scale was similar between groups at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 hr following surgery, which was maintained lower than 3 in both groups. The time to first analgesic request after admission on post-anesthesia care unit was also not significantly different between groups. Intraoperative low dose ketamine did not decrease acute postoperative pain after arthroscopic shoulder surgery with a preincisional ultrasound guided SSISB. The preventive analgesic effect of ketamine could be mitigated by SSISB, which remains one of the most effective methods of pain relief after arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Graphical Abstract PMID:25045235

  4. Response of great horned owls given the optical isomers of ketamine.

    PubMed

    Redig, P T; Larson, A A; Duke, G E

    1984-01-01

    The relative anesthetic effects of the 2 purified isomers and the racemic mixture of ketamine were compared in 6 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), a species in which racemic ketamine is poorly tolerated. Other investigators have reported that the L(-) form is only a 3rd as potent as the D(+) form with respect to analgesic action in mammals. Accordingly, the racemic and the - forms were given at 2 X and 3 X, respectively, the dose of the + form in an attempt to achieve a potentially equivalent state of anesthesia. At these dose levels, there was no difference observed in the average duration of anesthesia with the 3 ketamine preparations. The - isomer yielded a poorer anesthetic response characterized by inadequate muscle relaxation, cardiac arrhythmias, and marked excitatory behavior during recovery. With the dosages used, the + form and the racemate were comparable in degree of muscle relaxation produced. The + form yielded smoother inductions and less cardiac arrhythmia than did the racemate. PMID:6703445

  5. Comparison of quality of induction of anaesthesia between intramuscularly administered ketamine, intravenously administered ketamine and intravenously administered propofol in xylazine premedicated cats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T B; Chanaiwa, S; Mponda, P; Sigauke, C; Dzikiti, L N

    2007-12-01

    The quality of induction of general anesthesia produced by ketamine and propofol, 2 of the most commonly used anaesthetic agents in cats, was assessed. Eighteen cats admitted for elective procedures were randomly assigned to 3 groups and then premedicated with xylazine 0.75 mg/kg intramuscularly before anaesthesia was induced with ketamine 15 mg/kg intramuscularly (KetIM group), ketamine 10 mg/kg intravenously (KetIV group) or propofol 4 mg/kg intravenously (PropIV group). Quality of induction of general anaesthesia was determined by scoring ease of intubation, degree of struggling, and vocalisation during the induction period. The quality of induction of anaesthesia of intramuscularly administered ketamine was inferior to that of intravenously administered ketamine, while intravenously administered propofol showed little difference in quality of induction from ketamine administered by both the intramuscular and intravenous routes. There were no significant differences between groups in the ease of intubation scores, while vocalisation and struggling were more common in cats that received ketamine intramuscularly than in those that received intravenously administered ketamine or propofol for induction of anaesthesia. Laryngospasms occurred in 2 cats that received propofol. The heart rates and respiratory rates decreased after xylazine premedication and either remained the same or decreased further after induction for all 3 groups, but remained within normal acceptable limits. This study indicates that the 3 regimens are associated with acceptable induction characteristics, but administration of ketamine intravenously is superior to its administration intramuscularly and laryngeal desensitisation is recommended to avoid laryngospasms. PMID:18507218

  6. Antinociceptive effects, metabolism and disposition of ketamine in ponies under target-controlled drug infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Knobloch, M.; Portier, C.J.; Levionnois, O.L.; Theurillat, R.; Thormann, W.; Spadavecchia, C.; Mevissen, M. . E-mail: meike.mevissen@vpi.unibe.ch

    2006-11-01

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic in a variety of drug combinations in human and veterinary medicine. Recently, it gained new interest for use in long-term pain therapy administered in sub-anesthetic doses in humans and animals. The purpose of this study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPk) model for ketamine in ponies and to investigate the effect of low-dose ketamine infusion on the amplitude and the duration of the nociceptive withdrawal reflex (NWR). A target-controlled infusion (TCI) of ketamine with a target plasma level of 1 {mu}g/ml S-ketamine over 120 min under isoflurane anesthesia was performed in Shetland ponies. A quantitative electromyographic assessment of the NWR was done before, during and after the TCI. Plasma levels of R-/S-ketamine and R-/S-norketamine were determined by enantioselective capillary electrophoresis. These data and two additional data sets from bolus studies were used to build a PBPk model for ketamine in ponies. The peak-to-peak amplitude and the duration of the NWR decreased significantly during TCI and returned slowly toward baseline values after the end of TCI. The PBPk model provides reliable prediction of plasma and tissue levels of R- and S-ketamine and R- and S-norketamine. Furthermore, biotransformation of ketamine takes place in the liver and in the lung via first-pass metabolism. Plasma concentrations of S-norketamine were higher compared to R-norketamine during TCI at all time points. Analysis of the data suggested identical biotransformation rates from the parent compounds to the principle metabolites (R- and S-norketamine) but different downstream metabolism to further metabolites. The PBPk model can provide predictions of R- and S-ketamine and norketamine concentrations in other clinical settings (e.g. horses)

  7. Post-anesthesia AMPA receptor potentiation prevents anesthesia-induced learning and synaptic deficits.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lianyan; Cichon, Joseph; Ninan, Ipe; Yang, Guang

    2016-06-22

    Accumulating evidence has shown that repeated exposure to general anesthesia during critical stages of brain development results in long-lasting behavioral deficits later in life. To date, there has been no effective treatment to mitigate the neurotoxic effects of anesthesia on brain development. By performing calcium imaging in the mouse motor cortex, we show that ketamine anesthesia causes a marked and prolonged reduction in neuronal activity during the period of post-anesthesia recovery. Administration of the AMPAkine drug CX546 [1-(1,4-benzodioxan-6-ylcarbonyl)piperidine] to potentiate AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) receptor activity during emergence from anesthesia in mice enhances neuronal activity and prevents long-term motor learning deficits induced by repeated neonatal anesthesia. In addition, we show that CX546 administration also ameliorates various synaptic deficits induced by anesthesia, including reductions in synaptic expression of NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) and AMPA receptor subunits, motor training-evoked neuronal activity, and dendritic spine remodeling associated with motor learning. Together, our results indicate that pharmacologically enhancing neuronal activity during the post-anesthesia recovery period could effectively reduce the adverse effects of early-life anesthesia. PMID:27334260

  8. Disruption of Frontal-Parietal Communication by Ketamine, Propofol, and Sevoflurane

    PubMed Central

    Lee, UnCheol; Ku, SeungWoo; Noh, GyuJeong; Baek, SeungHye; Choi, ByungMoon; Mashour, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Directional connectivity from anterior to posterior brain regions (or “feedback” connectivity) has been shown to be inhibited by the gamma-aminobutyric acid agonists propofol and sevoflurane. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ketamine would also inhibit cortical feedback connectivity in frontoparietal networks. Methods Surgical patients (n=30) were recruited for induction of anesthesia with intravenous ketamine (2mg/kg); electroencephalography of the frontal and parietal regions was acquired. We used normalized symbolic transfer entropy, a computational method based in information theory, to measure directional connectivity across frontal and parietal regions. Statistical analysis of transfer entropy measures was performed with the permutation test and the time shift test to exclude false positive connectivity. For comparison, we used normalized symbolic transfer entropy to reanalyze electroencephalographic data gathered from surgical patients receiving either propofol (n=9) or sevoflurane (n=9) for anesthetic induction. Results Ketamine reduced alpha power and increased gamma power, in contrast to both propofol and sevoflurane. During administration of ketamine, feedback connectivity gradually diminished and was significantly inhibited after loss of consciousness (Mean±SD of baseline & anesthesia: 0.0074±0.003 & 0.0055±0.0027, F(5,179)= 7.785, p<0.0001). By contrast, feedforward connectivity was preserved during exposure to ketamine (Mean±SD of baseline & anesthesia: 0.0041±0.0015 & 0.0046±0.0018, F(5,179)=2.07, p=0.072). Like ketamine, propofol and sevoflurane selectively inhibited feedback connectivity after anesthetic induction. Conclusions Three major classes of anesthetics disrupt frontal-parietal communication, despite molecular and neurophysiologic differences. Analysis of directional connectivity in frontal-parietal networks could provide a common metric of general anesthesia and insight into the cognitive neuroscience of

  9. Etomidate and Ketamine: Residual Motor and Adrenal Dysfunction that Persist beyond Recovery from Loss of Righting Reflex in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Gil, Daniel; Mueller, Noomi; Moreno-Duarte, Ingrid; Lin, Hsin; Ayata, Cenk; Cusin, Cristina; Cotten, Joseph F.; Eikermann, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that etomidate and ketamine produce residual effects that modify functional mobility (measured by the balance beam test) and adrenal function (adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation) immediately following recovery from loss of righting reflex in rats. Intravenous etomidate or ketamine was administered in a randomized, crossover fashion (2 or 4 mg/kg and 20 or 40 mg/kg, respectively) on eight consecutive days. Following recovery of righting reflex, animals were assessed for residual effects on functional mobility on the balance beam, motor behavior in the open field and adrenal function through ACTH stimulation. We evaluated the consequences of the effects of the anesthetic agent-induced motor behavior on functional mobility. On the balance beam, etomidate-treated rats maintained their grip longer than ketamine-treated rats, indicating greater balance abilities (mean ± SD, 21.5 ± 25.1 s vs. 3.0 ± 4.3 s respectively, p < 0.021). In the open field test, both dosages of etomidate and ketamine had opposite effects on travel behavior, showing ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion and etomidate-induced hypolocomotion. There was a significant interaction between anesthetic agent and motor behavior effects for functional mobility effects (p < 0.001). Corticosterone levels were lower after both 40 mg/kg ketamine and 4 mg/kg etomidate anesthesia compared to placebo, an effect stronger with etomidate than ketamine (p < 0.001). Following recovery from anesthesia, etomidate and ketamine have substantial side effects. Ketamine-induced hyperlocomotion with 20 and 40 mg/kg has stronger effects on functional mobility than etomidate-induced hypolocomotion with 2 and 4 mg/kg. Etomidate (4 mg/kg) has stronger adrenal suppression effects than ketamine (40 mg/kg). PMID:25551398

  10. Anesthetic Activity of Alfaxalone Compared with Ketamine in Mice.

    PubMed

    Siriarchavatana, Parkpoom; Ayers, Jessica D; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-01-01

    Alfaxalone encased in hydroxypropyl-β -cyclodextrin is a neuroactive steroid compound that has recently been approved in the United States for use as an anesthetic in dogs and cats. We evaluated the use of alfaxalone compared with ketamine, both alone and in combination with xylazine, for anesthesia of C57BL/6 mice. We assessed time to onset of anesthesia, duration of action, reflex responses, respiratory rate, and clinical signs. Alfaxalone (80 mg/kg IP) induced a light surgical plane of anesthesia in all mice, with a time to onset of 2.2 ± 0.2 min and duration of 57.1 ± 3.8 min, whereas ketamine (80 mg/kg IP) provided only sedative effects (time to onset, 5.4 ± 0.4 min; duration, 6.9 ± 0.8 min). Clinically, alfaxalone caused a spectrum of activities, including popcorn-like jumping movements after injection, intense scratching of the face, hyperresponsiveness to noise or touch, and marked limb jerking during recovery. Adding xylazine to the single-agent protocols achieved deep surgical anesthesia (duration: alfaxalone + xylazine, 80.3 ± 17.8 min; ketamine + xylazine, 37.4 ± 8.2 min) and ameliorated the adverse clinical signs. Our preliminary analysis suggests that, because of its side effects, alfaxalone alone is not a viable anesthetic option for mice. Although alfaxalone combined with xylazine appeared to be a more viable option, some mice still experienced mild adverse reactions, and the long duration of action might be problematic regarding the maintenance of body temperature and monitoring of recovery. Further studies evaluating different routes of administration and drug combinations are warranted. PMID:27423149

  11. Caudal epidural anesthesia for a 2-year old child with congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Calişkan, Esra; Koçum, Aysu; Sener, Mesut; Bozdoğan, Nesrin; Ariboğan, Aniş

    2008-10-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease with antibodies directed against the acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction. Anesthetists have a special interest in myasthenia gravis because of its interaction with various anesthetic agents. Unlike adult myasthenic patients; very little report has been written about the anesthetic management in children, other than in relation to thymectomy. Although the use of caudal anesthesia in pediatric patients is common, have not seen any report concerning its use in a myasthenic child. In this case report, we represented a 2 year-old boy was performed caudal anesthesia for orchiopexy operation. He had presented difficulty in breathing, generalized weakness and droopy eyes due to congenital myasthenia gravis. In the operating room, following the routine monitoring, the patient was sedated with intravenous 1mg midazolam and 10 mg ketamine. Then caudal block was performed. 17 minutes later from the local anesthetic injection; operation was started and lasted 45 minutes. The patient did not require intraoperative supplemental analgesia and postoperative course was uneventful. Specific attention should be paid to voluntary and respiratory muscle strength in myasthenia gravis patients. Caudal anesthesia allowed airway control of myasthenia gravis patients without endotracheal intubations and muscle relaxant. In conclusion, we think that caudal anesthetic technique may be considered as a safe and suitable for the myasthenic child and it may represent a valid alternative to general anesthesia for these patients. PMID:19117157

  12. Effects of a propofol--ketamine admixture in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Kanri, Tomio

    2003-03-01

    As the ideal sedative does not exist for all situations, particularly in settings with limited resources, the effect of a propofol-ketamine combination in human volunteers was examined. Eleven American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I volunteers were administered propofol at a loading dose of 1 mg/kg and two minutes later by 0.7 mg/kg of ketamine. This was followed by a propofol-ketamine combination of 5 mg/kg of propofol admixed with 0.7 mg/kg of ketamine that was infused over one hour via a 60 gtts/ml intravenous. Infusion set. Cardiorespiratory parameters were recorded and blood samples taken to measure plasma catecholamine levels prior to, during and for thirty minutes following the termination of the infusion. Rate of respiration and oxygen saturation levels did not alter significantly from baseline levels. When there was a cardiovascular decrease from base line levels it was on average 11% for systolic, 15% diastolic blood pressure and 14% for heart rate. Only plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline increased by 28 and 20%, 10 minutes following the bolus injectons. No dysphoria was experienced. This combined sedoanalgesic technique in nonstimulated human volunteers maintains spontaneous ventilation and may be considered as abalanced alternative to traditional conscious sedation or general anesthesia. PMID:16276943

  13. Ketamine – A Multifaceted Drug

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingzhong; Li, Jian; Lu, Yi; Sun, Dajin; Tao, Yuan-Xiang; Liu, Renyu; Luo, Jin Jun

    2015-01-01

    There is a petition for tight control of ketamine from the Chinese government to classify ketamine as a Schedule I drug, which is defined as a drug with no currently accepted medical use but a high potential for abuse. However, ketamine has unique properties that can benefit different patient populations. Scholars from the Translational Perioperative and Pain Medicine and the International Chinese Academy of Anesthesiology WeChat groups had an interactive discussion on ketamine, including its current medical applications, future research priorities, and benefits versus risks. The discussion is summarized in this manuscript with some minor edits. PMID:26366428

  14. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats.

    PubMed

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-10-19

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large-amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, whereas under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were mostly uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS, they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that, although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS compared with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. PMID:22016533

  15. New use for an old drug: oral ketamine for treatment-resistant depression.

    PubMed

    Swiatek, Kevin M; Jordan, Kim; Coffman, Julie

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) is a disabling disorder that can interfere with a patient's capacity to understand and participate in medical care and thus negatively impact individual morbidity and mortality. Hospitalised patients with TRD may require rapid alleviation of severe symptomatology, particularly when suicidal or if unable to participate in care decisions. Ketamine is well known for its anaesthetic effects and its use as a 'street' drug; however, its action as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist makes ketamine a potential therapy for TRD. The majority of studies investigating ketamine for TRD have used intravenous drug delivery, demonstrating benefit for rapid alleviation and sustained response of depression symptoms. Oral ketamine for urgent alleviation of TRD symptoms is less reported. We describe rapid alleviation of severe TRD with oral ketamine in a severely ill postoperative hospitalised patient, and review the current literature on 'off-label' use of ketamine for treatment of refractory depression. PMID:27489070

  16. Midazolam premedication for Ketamine-induced emergence phenomenon: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Perumal, Deepa Kameswari; Adhimoolam, Mangaiarkkarasi; Selvaraj, Nitya; Lazarus, Suneeth Pullikotil; Mohammed, Meher Ali Raja

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Ketamine administration is known to induce hemodynamic pressor response and psychomimetic effects which could be attenuated by appropriate premedication. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of midazolam on hemodynamic stability and postoperative emergence phenomenon following ketamine anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective observational study including 30 adult patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical grades I and II scheduled for elective short surgeries under ketamine anesthesia. Patients were premedicated with midazolam (0.02 mg/kg intravenously) before the ketamine induction (1 mg/kg intravenously). Demographic data and hemodynamic variables were observed during the perioperative period. Pain score by visual analog scale score and psychomimetic effects were recorded postoperatively. Findings: The mean ± standard deviation of heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and respiratory rate were decreased postoperatively (85.3 ± 11.4, 120.7 ± 8.2, 79.2 ± 5.5, 13.5 ± 1.8, respectively) compared to intraoperative period (88.53 ± 14.1, 123.83 ± 13.8, 83 ± 9.1, 14.13 ± 2.0, respectively). There was statistically significant decrease in systolic (P = 0.03) and diastolic (P = 0.002) blood pressure, but not with heart rate and respiratory rate. Eighty percent of patients had no pain at ½ hour and 1 hour, while this increased to 90% at 2 hours postoperatively. Mild emergence delirium was noted in 13.3% and 16.7% at ½ hour and 1 hour, respectively, which decreased to 13.3% at 2 hours. Dreams were noticed in 20%, 27% and 10% of patients at ½ hour, 1 and 2 hours after surgery, respectively. Conclusion: Midazolam premedication in ketamine anesthesia effectively attenuated the hemodynamic pressor response and postoperative emergence phenomenon. Hence, the combination of midazolam with ketamine can be safely used for short surgical painful procedures in adults. PMID:25984547

  17. [Ketamine--dreams and realities].

    PubMed

    Arditti, J; Spadari, M; de Haro, L; Brun, A; Bourdon, J H; Valli, M

    2002-01-01

    Ketamine is an anaesthetic used in human medicine and veterinary practice, synthesised on 1962 and marketed on 1970 in France. Recreational uses were described during 1992 in the medical community and in 1996 in the dance settings. The chemical name of ketamine is 2--(2chlorophenyl)2-(methylamine)-cyclohexanone, an aryl cyclohexylamine, structurally related to phencyclidine. Ketamine is known under the following street names: Keta K, Kate, Special K, Vitamin K, la Golden, la Vétérinaire. Ketamine is used intranasally, orally and intramusculary in recreational use. Ketamine is manufactured by the chemical industry. Due to the complicated synthesis, it is sold illicitly for recreational use. Ketamine is a dissociative drug, and the user enters in a psychedelic dream with hallucinations, floating sensation, feeling of dissociation of the mind from the body. The dream is forgotten, the user full in reality with loss of self control, risk of acute intoxication. In long-term exposure, tolerance, dependence, withdrawal signs and flash back are described. Ketamine trademarks are subject to control in France through medicine legislation Ketamine and its salts are subject to control under the national legislation on narcotics and psychotropics substance. From September 2001, the theft of medical and veterinary trademarks have to be declared to police, care health authority Pharmacy control authority and French Health Products Safety Agency. PMID:11974440

  18. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs..., AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains ketamine hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams (mg) ketamine...

  19. Role of ketamine for analgesia in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Schermer, Erika; Kodumudi, Vijay; Belani, Kumar; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocking agent and a dissociative anesthetic with neurostimulatory side effects. In recent years, multiple research trials as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses suggest the usefulness of ketamine as a strong analgesic used in subanesthetic intravenous doses, and also as a sedative. In addition, ketamine was noted to possess properties of anti-tolerance, anti-hyperalgesia and anti-allodynia most likely secondary to inhibition of the NMDA receptors. Tolerance, hyperalgesia and allodynia phenomena are the main components of opioid resistance, and pathological pain is often seen in the clinical conditions involving neuropathic pain, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, and central sensitization with allodynia or hyperalgesia. All these conditions are challenging to treat. In low doses, ketamine does not have major adverse dysphoric effects and also has the favorable effects of reduced incidence of opioid-induced nausea and vomiting. Therefore, ketamine can be a useful adjunct for pain control after surgery. Additional studies are required to determine the role of ketamine in the immediate postoperative period after surgical interventions known to produce severe pain and in the prevention and treatment of chronic pain. PMID:27625475

  20. Immobilization of swift foxes with ketamine hydrochloride-xylazine hydrochloride

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Telesco, R.L.; Sovada, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing need to develop field immobilization techniques that allow researchers to handle safely swift foxes (Vulpes velox) with minimal risk of stress or injury. We immobilized captive swift foxes to determine the safety and effectiveness of ketamine hydrochloride and xylazine hydrochloride at different dosages. We attempted to determine appropriate dosages to immobilize swift foxes for an adequate field-handling period based on three anesthesia intervals (induction period, immobilization period, and recovery period) and physiologic responses (rectal temperature, respiration rate, and heart rate). Between October 1998-July 1999, we conducted four trials, evaluating three different dosage ratios of ketamine and xylazine (2.27:1.2, 5.68:1.2, and 11.4:1.2 mg/kg ketamine:mg/kg xylazine, respectively), followed by a fourth trial with a higher dosage at the median ratio (11.4 mg/kg ketamine:2.4 mg/kg xylazine). We found little difference in induction and recovery periods among trials 1-3, but immobilization time increased with increasing dosage (P<0.08). Both the immobilization period and recovery period increased in trial 4 compared with trials 1-3 (P???0.03). There was a high variation in responses of individual foxes across trials, making it difficult to identify an appropriate dosage for field handling. Heart rate and respiration rates were depressed but all physiologic measures remained within normal parameters established for domestic canids. We recommend a dosage ratio of 10 mg/kg ketamine to 1 mg/kg xylazine to immobilize swift foxes for field handling.

  1. Effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the sevoflurane minimum alveolar concentration in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Queiroz-Williams, Patricia; Doherty, Thomas J; da Cunha, Anderson F; Leonardi, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    This study investigated the effects of ketamine and lidocaine in combination on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane (MACSEVO) in alpacas. Eight healthy, intact male, adult alpacas were studied on 2 separate occasions. Anesthesia was induced with SEVO, and baseline MAC (MACB) determination began 45 min after induction. After MACB determination, alpacas were randomly given either an intravenous (IV) loading dose (LD) and infusion of saline or a loading dose [ketamine = 0.5 mg/kg body weight (BW); lidocaine = 2 mg/kg BW] and an infusion of ketamine (25 μg/kg BW per minute) in combination with lidocaine (50 μg/kg BW per minute), and MACSEVO was re-determined (MACT). Quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were also evaluated. Mean MACB was 1.88% ± 0.13% and 1.89% ± 0.14% for the saline and ketamine + lidocaine groups, respectively. Ketamine and lidocaine administration decreased (P < 0.05) MACB by 57% and mean MACT was 0.83% ± 0.10%. Saline administration did not change MACB. Time to determine MACB and MACT was not significantly different between the treatments. The quality of recovery, time-to-extubation, and time-to-standing, were not different between groups. The infusion of ketamine combined with lidocaine significantly decreased MACSEVO by 57% and did not adversely affect time-to-standing or quality of recovery. PMID:27127341

  2. Cardiovascular changes in unanesthetized and ketamine-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to 2. 8-GHz radiofrequency radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 2.8-GHz radiofrequency radiation, first while unanesthetized and then while anesthetized with ketamine (150 mg/kg.I.M.). Irradiation at a power density of 60 mW/cm2 (whole-body average specific absorption rate of approximately 14 W/kg) was conducted for sufficient duration to increase colonic temperature from 38.5 to 39.5 degrees C. The time required for the temperature increase was significantly longer in the anesthetized state. During irradiation, heart rate increased significantly both with and without anesthesia, while mean arterial blood pressure increased only when the rats were unanesthetized. The heart rate increase in the anesthetized state contrasts with a lack of change in a previous study of Fischer rats. This difference between anesthetized Sprague-Dawley and Fischer rats should be considered when comparing cardiovascular data obtained from these two strains of rats.

  3. Sedation and anesthesia of hatchling leatherback sea turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) for auditory evoked potential measurement in air and in water.

    PubMed

    Harms, Craig A; Piniak, Wendy E D; Eckert, Scott A; Stringer, Elizabeth M

    2014-03-01

    Sedation or anesthesia of hatchling leatherback sea turtles was employed to acquire auditory evoked potential (AEP) measurements in air and in water to assess their hearing sensitivity in relation to potential consequences from anthropogenic noise. To reduce artifacts in AEP collection caused by muscle movement, hatchlings were sedated with midazolam 2 or 3 mg/kg i.v. for in-air (n = 7) or in-water (n = 11) AEP measurements; hatchlings (n = 5) were anesthetized with ketamine 6 mg/kg and dexmedetomidine 30 microg/kg i.v. reversed with atipamezole 300 microg/kg, half i.m. and half i.v. for in-air AEP measurements. Midazolam-sedated turtles were also physically restrained with a light elastic wrap. For in-water AEP measurements, sedated turtles were brought to the surface every 45-60 sec, or whenever they showed intention signs for breathing, and not submerged again until they took a breath. Postprocedure temperature-corrected venous blood pH, pCO2, pO2, and HCO3- did not differ among groups, although for the midazolam-sedated in-water group, pCO2 trended lower, and in the ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthetized group there was one turtle considered clinically acidotic (temperature-corrected pH = 7.117). Venous blood lactate was greater for hatchlings recently emerged from the nest than for turtles sedated with midazolam in air, with the other two groups falling intermediate between, but not differing significantly from the high and low lactate groups. Disruptive movements were less frequent with anesthesia than with sedation in the in-air group. Both sedation with midazolam and anesthesia with ketamine-dexmedetomidine were successful for allowing AEP measurements in hatchling leatherback sea turtles. Sedation allowed the turtle to protect its airway voluntarily while limiting flipper movement. Midazolam or ketamine-dexmedetomidine (and reversal with atipamezole) would be useful for other procedures requiring minor or major restraint in leatherback sea turtle hatchlings

  4. Reduction of the ventricular arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine by ketamine administration in halothane-anesthetized cats.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, R M; Sams, R A; Majors, L J; Ashcraft, S

    1988-03-01

    The effect of ketamine administration on the ventricular arrhythmogenic dose of epinephrine (VADE) was studied in 4 halothane-anesthetized cats. Each cat was anesthetized 4 times, 1 week apart, with halothane (end-tidal concentration, 1.5%) and with halothane (end-tidal concentration, 1.5%) combined with ketamine infusion (50, 100, and 200 micrograms/kg of body weight/min). Epinephrine was infused in progressively increasing doses. The VADE (micrograms/kg) was calculated as the product of infusion rate of epinephrine and time of infusion necessary to induce 4 or more ventricular premature depolarizations within 15 s. The mean (+/- SD) VADE during halothane anesthesia was 1.1 (+/- 0.30) micrograms/kg. Ketamine infusion significantly (P less than 0.01) lowered the VADE independently of dose. The dose of epinephrine (micrograms/kg) that induced an ECG change in P-wave configuration was calculated similarly. Less epinephrine was necessary to induce a change in P-wave configuration than was necessary to induce 4 or more ventricular premature depolarizations within 15 s. Blood samples were collected after 4 hours of ketamine infusion and again immediately after determination of the VADE for analysis of plasma ketamine and norketamine concentrations by use of gas chromatography. Plasma ketamine and norketamine concentrations after a 4-hour infusion and immediately after determination of the VADE were similar for any given ketamine infusion rate, indicating that steady-state plasma concentrations had been reached for each infusion rate. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured immediately before (base line) and immediately after infusion of the VADE. Ketamine infusion significantly (P less than 005) lowered base-line blood pressure, but not heart rate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3358546

  5. Sudden Tracheal Collapse during EGD and Subsequent Anesthetic Management with Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine in a Patient with Achalasia and Tracheomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Joshua H.; Mandel, Jeff E.; Metz, David C.

    2011-01-01

    We present a patient who experienced airway obstruction during an elective esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) under anesthesia secondary to previously undiagnosed tracheomalacia. Physiology of airway obstruction with forced breathing maneuvers is discussed along with the potential advantages of dexmedetomidine-ketamine sedation for management of patients with achalasia undergoing outpatient endoscopic procedures. PMID:22606385

  6. Anesthesia with Disuse Leads to Autophagy Upregulation in the Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kashiwagi, Aki; Hosokawa, Sachiko; Maeyama, Yoshihiro; Ueki, Ryusuke; Kaneki, Masao; Martyn, J.A. Jeevendra; Yasuhara, Shingo

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been known that skeletal muscles show atrophic changes after prolonged sedation or general anesthesia. Whether these effects are due to anesthesia itself or to disuse during anesthesia has not been fully clarified. Autophagy dysregulation has been implicated in muscle wasting conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that the magnitude of skeletal muscle autophagy is affected by both anesthesia and immobility. Methods The extent of autophagy was analyzed chronologically during general anesthesia. In vivo microscopy was performed using green fluorescent protein-tagged LC3 for detection of autophagy using sternomastoid muscles of live mice during pentobarbital anesthesia (n = 6 to 7). Western blotting and histological analyses were also conducted on tibialis anterior muscles (n = 3 to 5). To distinguish the effect of anesthesia from that due to disuse, autophagy was compared between animals anesthetized with pentobarbital and those immobilized by short-term denervation without continuation of anesthesia. Conversely, tibialis anterior and sternomastoid muscles were electrically stimulated during anesthesia. Results Western blots and microscopy showed time-dependent autophagy upregulation during pentobarbital anesthesia, peaking at 3 h (728.6+/− 93.5% of basal level, mean +/−SE). Disuse by denervation without sustaining anesthesia did not lead to equivalent autophagy, suggesting that anesthesia is essential to causes autophagy. In contrast, contractile stimulation of the tibialis anterior and sternomastoid muscles significantly reduced the autophagy upregulation during anesthesia (85% at 300 min). Ketamine, Ketamine plus xylazine, isoflurane, and propofol also upregulated autophagy. Conclusions Short-term disuse without anesthesia does not lead to autophagy, but anesthesia with disuse leads to marked upregulation of autophagy. PMID:25501690

  7. Total intravenous anesthesia for major burn surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Leopoldo C; Cuenca, Phillip B; Walker, Stephen C; Shepherd, John M

    2013-01-01

    Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) is frequently used for major operations requiring general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. We reviewed our experience with this approach. Methods: During a 22-month period, 547 major burn surgeries were performed in this center’s operating room and were staffed by full-time burn anesthesiologists. The records of all 123 TIVA cases were reviewed; 112 records were complete and were included. For comparison, 75 cases were selected at random from a total of 414 non-TIVA general anesthetics. Some patients had more than one operation during the study: as appropriate for the analysis in question, each operation or each patient was entered as an individual case. For inter-patient analysis, exposure to 1 or more TIVAs was used to categorize a patient as member of the TIVA group. Results: Excision and grafting comprised 78.2% of the operations. 14 TIVA regimens were used, employing combinations of 4 i.v. drugs: ketamine (K, 91 cases); i.v. methadone (M, 62); fentanyl (F, 58); and propofol (P, 21). The most common regimens were KM (34 cases); KF (26); KMF (16); and K alone (8). Doses used often exceeded those used in non-burn patients. TIVA was preferred for those patients who were more critically ill prior to surgery, with a higher ASA score (3.87 vs. 3.11). Consistent with this, inhalation injury (26.7 vs. 1.6%), burn size (TBSA, 36.3 vs. 15.8%), and full-thickness burn size (FULL, 19.8 vs. 6.5%) were higher in TIVA than in non-TIVA patients. Despite this, intraoperative pressor use was as common in TIVA as in non-TIVA cases (23.9 vs. 22.7%). Conclusions: TIVA was used in patients whose inhalation injury rate and TBSA were greater than those of non-TIVA patients. TIVA cases were not associated with increased hemodynamic instability. TIVA is a viable approach to general anesthesia in critically ill burn patients. PMID:23638329

  8. Low-dose intravenous ketamine and clonidine for poor postoperative opioid responsiveness: a double blind randomized study.

    PubMed

    Salengros, J C; Hecquet, F; Touihri, K; Sekkat, J; Barvais, L; Engelman, E

    2011-01-01

    In the immediate postoperative period, some patients present with pain that responds poorly to intravenous opioids. In a double-blind randomized study, we tested the hypothesis that administering small doses of intravenous ketamine (0.125 mg/kg) combined with clonidine (0.5 microg/kg) would enhance the speed of onset and the quality of an opioid analgesic regimen in patients who initially responded poorly to opioids. We enrolled 68 patients in the study, all physical status I to III according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists classification. If the patient's numerical rating scale (NRS) score remained > or = 5 after an initial intravenous injection of 10 mg piritramide (2-mg boluses every 5 minutes) in the post-anesthesia care unit, patients were randomized to either intravenous placebo (sodium chloride 0.9%) or active substances (ketamine 0.125 mg/kg plus clonidine 0.5 microg/kg). Fifteen minutes after administration of either placebo or active agents, patients with severe pain (NRS > 4) again received intravenous opioids until NRS < 4. The primary endpoint of the study was to reduce by 20 minutes the time necessary to achieve an NRS < 4. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups regarding the time required for patients to achieve an NRS < 4. It was concluded that in the immediate postoperative period, the acute administration of small combined doses of intravenous ketamine (0.125 mg/kg) and clonidine (0.5 mirog/kg) does not reduce the onset of an opioid-based analgesia in patients with an initial poor response to intravenous opioids. PMID:21919372

  9. Pulmonary perfusion during anesthesia and mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Hedenstierna, G

    2005-06-01

    Cardiac output and the pulmonary perfusion can be affected by anesthesia and by mechanical ventilation. The changes contribute to impeded oxygenation of the blood. The major determinant of perfusion distribution in the lung is the relation between alveolar and pulmonary capillary pressures. Perfusion increases down the lung, due to hydrostatic forces. Since atelectasis is located in dependent lung regions, perfusion of non-ventilated lung parenchyma is common, producing shunt of around 8-10% of cardiac output. In addition, non-gravitational inhomogeneity of perfusion, that can be greater than the gravitational inhomogeneity, adds to impeded oxygenation of blood. Essentially all anaesthetics exert some, although mild, cardiodepressant action with one exception, ketamine. Ketamine may also increase pulmonary artery pressure, whereas other agents have little effect on pulmonary vascular tone. Mechanical ventilation impedes venous return and pushes blood flow downwards to dependent lung regions, and the effect may be striking with higher levels of PEEP. During one-lung anesthesia, there is shunt blood flow both in the non-ventilated and the ventilated lung, and shunt can be much larger in the ventilated lung than thought of. Recruitment manoeuvres shall be directed to the ventilated lung and other physical and pharmacological measures can be taken to manipulate blood flow in one lung anesthesia. PMID:15886595

  10. KETAMINE ABREACTION : A NEW APPROACH TO NARCOANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Golechha, G.R.; Sethi, I.C.; Misra, S.L.; Jayaprakash, N.P.

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Ketamine is a parenterally administered non barbiturate anaesthetic agent, in use for more than a decade. It is a safer than Na Pentothal. Administered intramuscularly, in dose of 6 to 15 mgm/Kg body wt. it produces dissociative anaesthesia. But, in smaller sub anaesthetic doses it may act as an abreactant. We report in this study the abreaction effect of Ketamine in dose of .5 to 1.5 mgm/kg body wt. given intramuscularly in 30 selected psychiatric cases requiring narcoanalysis for diagnostic or therapeutic purpose. The results are compared with another ten cases subjected to pentothal interview and five cases subjected to narcoanalysis with intravenous Na Amytal and methidrine. Our findings suggest that Ketamine has property of an efficacious abreactant in doses of 1 to 1.5 mgm/kg body wt. administered intramuscularly and can successfully be used for narcoanalysis in properly selected cases as a good substitute for intravenous pentothal or sodium amytal with methidrine. The relative cardio respiratory safety and ease of administration are its two added advantages. PMID:21927193

  11. Nerve hyperplasia: a unique feature of ketamine cystitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is an emerging association between ketamine abuse and the development of urological symptoms including dysuria, frequency and urgency, which have a neurological component. In addition, extreme cases are associated with severe unresolving bladder pain in conjunction with a thickened, contracted bladder and an ulcerated/absent urothelium. Here we report on unusual neuropathological features seen by immunohistology in ketamine cystitis. Results In all cases, the lamina propria was replete with fine neurofilament protein (NFP+) nerve fibres and in most patients (20/21), there was prominent peripheral nerve fascicle hyperplasia that showed particular resemblance to Morton’s neuroma. The nerve fascicles, which were positive for NFP, S100 and the p75 low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR), were generally associated with a well-developed and in places, prominent, epithelial membrane antigen+/NGFR+ perineurium. This peripheral nerve fascicle hyperplasia is likely to account for the extreme pain experienced by ketamine cystitis patients. Urothelial damage was a notable feature of all ketamine cystitis specimens and where urothelium remained, increased NGFR expression was observed, with expansion from a basal-restricted normal pattern of expression into the suprabasal urothelium. Conclusions The histological findings were distinguishing features of ketamine cystitis and were not present in other painful bladder conditions. Ketamine cystitis afflicts predominantly young patients, with unknown long-term consequences, and requires a strategy to control severe bladder pain in order to remove a dependency on the causative agent. Our study indicates that the development of pain in ketamine cystitis is mediated through a specific neurogenic mechanism that may also implicate the urothelium. PMID:24252413

  12. The dexmedetomidine concentration required after remifentanil anesthesia is three-fold higher than that after fentanyl anesthesia or that for general sedation in the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Kunisawa, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Kazuhiro; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Nagashima, Michio; Matsui, Koji; Hayashi, Dai; Yamamoto, Kunihiko; Goto, Yuya; Akutsu, Hiroaki; Iwasaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The general dexmedetomidine (DEX) concentration required for sedation of intensive care unit patients is considered to be approximately 0.7 ng/mL. However, higher DEX concentrations are considered to be required for sedation and/or pain management after major surgery using remifentanil. We determined the DEX concentration required after major surgery by using a target-controlled infusion (TCI) system for DEX. Methods Fourteen patients undergoing surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) were randomly, double-blindly assigned to two groups and underwent fentanyl- or remifentanil-based anesthetic management. DEX TCI was started at the time of closing the peritoneum and continued for 12 hours after stopping propofol administration (M0); DEX TCI was adjusted according to the sedation score and complaints of pain. The doses and concentrations of all anesthetics and postoperative conditions were investigated. Results Throughout the observation period, the predicted plasma concentration of DEX in the fentanyl group was stable at approximately 0.7 ng/mL. In contrast, the predicted plasma concentration of DEX in the remifentanil group rapidly increased and stabilized at approximately 2 ng/mL. The actual DEX concentration at 540 minutes after M0 showed a similar trend (0.54±0.14 [fentanyl] versus 1.57±0.39 ng/mL [remifentanil]). In the remifentanil group, the dopamine dose required and the duration of intubation decreased, and urine output increased; however, no other outcomes improved. Conclusion The DEX concentration required after AAA surgery with remifentanil was three-fold higher than that required after AAA surgery with fentanyl or the conventional DEX concentration for sedation. High DEX concentration after remifentanil affords some benefits in anesthetic management. PMID:25328395

  13. The Preventive Role of Low-Dose Intravenous Ketamine on Postoperative Shivering in Children: A Placebo Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanie, Mohammad Sadegh; Kalani, Navid; Ghobadifar, Mohamed Amin; Zabetian, Hassan; Hosseini, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative shivering is a major problem in children undergoing general anesthesia. Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of low-dose intravenous ketamine for prevention of shivering after induction of general anesthesia in children who had undergone tonsillectomy. Patients and Methods This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial including 80 children, of American society of anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II, scheduled for tonsillectomy under general anesthesia who were randomly assigned to an intravenous ketamine (0.5 mg/kg, n = 40; group K) group or matched dose placebo (n = 40; group N) group. Surgical and demographic data, unexpected side effects, and the occurrence of shivering for each child were assessed by a blinded observer at the following time points: T0, in the recovery room; T10, at 10 minutes; T20, at 20 minutes; T30, and at 30 minutes. Results With regards to the demographic and surgical data, no significant differences between the two study groups were observed (P ≥ 0.05). Shivering intensity in children who had received ketamine was significantly lower than children who had not received ketamine, at T0, T10, T20, and T30 after arrival (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in hallucination, nausea, vomiting, hemodynamic dysfunction, blurred vision, and seizure in the K group compared with the N group (P ≥ 0.05). Conclusions Administration of intravenous ketamine at a dosage of 0.5 mg/kg immediately after anesthesia induction had a preventive effect on shivering intensity without hemodynamic alterations in children undergoing general anesthesia for tonsillectomy.

  14. Anesthesia for tracheostomy for huge maxillofacial tumor

    PubMed Central

    Arab, Abeer A.; Almarakbi, Waleed A.; Faden, Mazen S.; Bahaziq, Wadeeah K.

    2014-01-01

    Providing sedation for patients with compromised upper airway is challenging. A 19-year-old female patient with huge maxillofacial tumor invading the whole pharynx scheduled for elective tracheostomy under local anesthesia due to compromised airway. The patient had gastrostomy tube for feeding. Venous cannulation was totally refused by the patient after repeated trials for exhausted sclerosed veins. Pre-operative mixture of dexmedetomidine with ketamine was administered through the gastrostomy tube with eutectic mixture of local anesthetics cream application over the planned tracheostomy site. The patient was sedated with eye opening to command. Local infiltration followed by tracheostomy was performed without patient complaints or recall of operative events. PMID:24665253

  15. Is ketamine a lifesaving agent in childhood acute severe asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hendaus, Mohamed A; Jomha, Fatima A; Alhammadi, Ahmed H

    2016-01-01

    Children with acute severe asthma exacerbation are at risk of developing respiratory failure. Moreover, conventional aggressive management might be futile in acute severe asthma requiring intubation and invasive ventilation. The aim of this review is to detail evidence on the use of ketamine in childhood asthma exacerbations. A search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases was performed, using different combinations of the following terms: ketamine, asthma, use, exacerbation, and childhood. In addition, we searched the references of the identified articles for additional articles. We then reviewed titles and included studies that were relevant to the topic of interest. Finally, the search was limited to studies published in English and Spanish from 1918 to June 2015. Due to the scarcity in the literature, we included all published articles. The literature reports conflicting results of ketamine use for acute severe asthma in children. Taking into consideration the relatively good safety profile of the drug, ketamine might be a reasonable option in the management of acute severe asthma in children who fail to respond to standard therapy. Furthermore, pediatricians and pediatric emergency clinicians administering ketamine should be knowledgeable about the unique actions of this drug and its potential side effects. PMID:26955277

  16. Anesthetic and pathological changes following high doses of ketamine and xylazine in Sprague Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    GIROUX, Marie-Chantal; HÉLIE, Pierre; BURNS, Patrick; VACHON, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of ketamine and xylazine in aging rats when coadministered intraperitoneally at high anesthetic doses. Three groups (n=6 rats/group) consisting of rats at 3, 6 and 12 months of age were used. During anesthesia, animals were monitored for heart rate, respiratory frequency, blood oxygen saturation, and rectal temperature. The corneal and paw withdrawal reflex were also examined during anesthesia. During anesthesia, withdrawal and corneal reflexes were absent for progressively longer durations with increasing age. Significant decreases in cardiac and respiratory frequency and, blood oxygen saturation occurred for the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Respiratory frequency and blood oxygen saturation returned to normal at the end of the anesthesia; however, the significant decrease in cardiac frequency persisted in the 6- and 12-month-old animals. Rectal temperature was decreased significantly only in the 3-month-old animals. Pulmonary edema and effusion occurred in 50% of the 12-month-old animals. In conclusion, if ketamine-xylazine are used for anesthesia, the doses should be optimized for the age of the subjects prior to initiation of the research project. PMID:25818316

  17. Ketamine infusion for patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Tellor, Bethany; Shin, Nicole; Graetz, Thomas J.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    The use of ketamine infusion for sedation/analgesia in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) therapy has not been described. The aims of this retrospective cohort study were to explore whether ketamine infusion for patients requiring ECMO therapy was associated with altered RASS scores, decreased concurrent sedative or opioid use, or with changes in vasopressor requirements.  All patients on ECMO who received ketamine infusions in addition to sedative and/or opioid infusions between December 2013 and October 2014 at Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St. Louis were retrospectively identified. Patient characteristics and process of care data were collected. A total of 26 ECMO patients receiving ketamine infusion were identified. The median (inter quartile range [range]) age was 40 years (30-52 [25-66]) with 62% male. The median starting infusion rate of ketamine was 50 mg/hr (30-50 [6-150]) and it was continued for a median duration of 9 days (4-14 [0.2-21]). Prior to ketamine, 14/26 patients were receiving vasopressor infusions to maintain hemodynamic stability. Ketamine initiation was associated with a decrease in vasopressor requirement in 11/26  patients within two hours, and 0/26 required an increase (p<0.001). All patients were receiving sedative and/or opioid infusions at the time of ketamine initiation; 9/26 had a decrease in these infusions within two hours of ketamine initiation, and 1/26 had an increase (p=0.02; odds ratio for decrease to increase = 9; 95% CI, 1.14 to 71.04). The median (IQR[range]) RASS score 24 hours before ketamine initiation was -4 (-3 to -5, [0 to -5]) and after ketamine was -4 (-3 to -4 [-1 to -5]) ( P = 0.614). Ketamine infusion can be used as an adjunctive sedative agent in patients receiving ECMO and may decrease concurrent sedative and/or opioid infusions without altering RASS scores. The hemodynamic effects of ketamine may provide the benefit of decreasing vasopressor requirements. PMID:26309726

  18. Effects of electroejaculation and ketamine-HCI on serum cortisol, progesterone, and testosterone in the male cat.

    PubMed

    Carter, K K; Chakraborty, P K; Bush, M; Wildt, D E

    1984-01-01

    The influence of manual restraint, ketamine-hydrochloride anesthesia and electroejaculation under anesthesia on circulating levels of cortisol, progesterone and testosterone was examined in male domestic cats. In the first experiment, cats were anesthetized with ketamine-HCI (17.5 mg/kg of body weight) and serially bled (controls) or serially bled and electroejaculated. These animals showed signs of recovering from anesthesia within 45 to 60 minutes of ketamine-HCI injection. Average serum cortisol concentrations increased (P less than 0.01) over the 84-minute sampling interval in both the electroejaculated and control groups. Cortisol levels reached their maximum concentration in the electrically stimulated males immediately postelectroejaculation (95.1 ng/ml) and were significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than in the controls (36.1 ng/ml) at a comparable time. Maximal mean cortisol concentrations in the control group (62.8 ng/ml) occurred 54 minutes after the first blood sample and occurred together with the onset of anesthesia recovery. Mean testosterone levels did not differ between electroejaculated and control cats, but did decrease (P less than 0.05) between the first and last blood sampling in both groups. In the second experiment, cats were bled on the same time schedule as in Experiment 1, but were bled while awake and manually restrained, or else during a deeper plane of anesthesia induced and maintained with higher doses of ketamine-HCI (initial dose, 23 mg/kg). Mean serum cortisol levels were greater (P less than 0.05) during manual restraint (range, 36.3-41.1 ng/ml) compared to deep anesthesia (range, 16.7-25.8 ng/ml), but did not change over the 84 minute sampling interval in either group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6511657

  19. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Başak; Aydoğan-Eren, Emel; Canbay, Özgür; Karagöz, Ayşe Heves; Üzümcügil, Filiz; Ankay-Yilbaş, Aysun; Çelebi, Nalan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 µ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 µ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0) and 15 (t1), 60 (t2), 120 (t3), and 360 (t4) minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042) was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044). The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004) were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017). Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034) and the control group (p=0.005). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed. PMID:26739975

  20. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a Ketamine. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains ketamine hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a Ketamine. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains ketamine hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a Ketamine. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains ketamine hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1222a - Ketamine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine. 522.1222a Section 522.1222a Food and..., FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222a Ketamine. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter contains ketamine hydrochloride equivalent to 100 milligrams...

  4. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, encourages research ... 6620 | E-mail: info@sambahq.org Copyright | 2016 Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia Home | Search | Terms | Privacy Policy | ...

  5. Obesity and Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Apnea and Anesthesia Smoking and Anesthesia Outpatient Surgery Obesity and Anesthesia More than one-third of Americans ... Sleep Apnea, a chronic medical problem common with obesity, can present with serious breathing problems before, during, ...

  6. Anesthesia and critical-care delivery in weightlessness: A challenge for research in parabolic flight analogue space surgery studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Chad G.; Keaney, Marilyn A.; Chun, Rosaleen; Groleau, Michelle; Tyssen, Michelle; Keyte, Jennifer; Broderick, Timothy J.; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.

    2010-03-01

    BackgroundMultiple nations are actively pursuing manned exploration of space beyond low-earth orbit. The responsibility to improve surgical care for spaceflight is substantial. Although the use of parabolic flight as a terrestrial analogue to study surgery in weightlessness (0 g) is well described, minimal data is available to guide the appropriate delivery of anesthesia. After studying anesthetized pigs in a 0 g parabolic flight environment, our group developed a comprehensive protocol describing prolonged anesthesia in a parabolic flight analogue space surgery study (PFASSS). Novel challenges included a physically remote vivarium, prolonged (>10 h) anesthetic requirements, and the provision of veterinary operating room/intensive care unit (ICU) equivalency on-board an aircraft with physical dimensions of <1.5 m 2 (Falcon 20). Identification of an effective anesthetic regime is particularly important because inhalant anesthesia cannot be used in-flight. MethodsAfter ethical approval, multiple ground laboratory sessions were conducted with combinations of anesthetic, pre-medication, and induction protocols on Yorkshire-cross specific pathogen-free (SPF) pigs. Several constant rate infusion (CRI) intravenous anesthetic combinations were tested. In each regimen, opioids were administered to ensure analgesia. Ventilation was supported mechanically with blended gradients of oxygen. The best performing terrestrial 1 g regime was flight tested in parabolic flight for its effectiveness in sustaining optimal and prolonged anesthesia, analgesia, and maintaining hemodynamic stability. Each flight day, a fully anesthetized, ventilated, and surgically instrumented pig was transported to the Flight Research Laboratory (FRL) in a temperature-controlled animal ambulance. A modular on-board surgical/ICU suite with appropriate anesthesia/ICU and surgical support capabilities was employed. ResultsThe mean duration of anesthesia (per flight day) was 10.28 h over four consecutive days

  7. Post-Exposure Exercise Fails to Ameliorate Memory Impairment Induced by Propofol and Ketamine in Developing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Li-Hong; Song, Yan-Yan; Shen, Yang; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Ma-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background This aim of this study was to determine the effects of ketamine-propofol combination on learning and memory, as well as exercise, on anesthetic neurotoxicity. Material/Methods A ketamine-propofol combination was administered once (group SKP, Single Ketamine Propofol) on P7 (postnatal day 7) or in 3 treatments on P6, P8, and P10 (group MKP, Multiple Ketamine Propofol). Rat pups in group C (Control) received equivalent volumes of normal saline in 3 injections on P6, P8, and P10. Rats designated MKPR (Multiple Ketamine Propofol and running) and CR (Control and running) began running exercise on P21 on wheels. Learning and memory was assessed by Morris water maze and fear conditioning tests. Hippocampal neurogenesis of rats was detected by BrdU immunofluorescence. Results MKP rats had longer latency to platform than group C during training in the Morris water maze; SKP rats stayed in the target quadrant longer than MKP rats during testing (P<0.05). Rats in running groups had shorter latency than non-running rats, but running had no interaction with anesthesia exposure. Conclusions Repeat ketamine-propofol combination doses increase risk of memory impairment in developing rats. Running has no impact on anesthetic neurotoxicity. PMID:27026302

  8. Comparison of the effects of ketamine or lidocaine on fentanyl-induced cough in patients undergoing surgery: A prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Guler, Gülen; Aksu, Recep; Bicer, Cihangir; Tosun, Zeynep; Boyaci, Adem

    2010-01-01

    Background: Fentanyl-induced cough is common but has not been viewed as a serious anesthetic problem. However, the cough may be explosive at times, may require immediate intervention, and may be associated with undesirable increases in intracranial, intraocular, and intra-abdominal pressures. Prevention of fentanylinduced cough in such situations is of paramount importance. Ketamine, at concentrations achieved with standard clinical doses, has a direct relaxant effect on airway smooth muscle. Objective: This study was designed to assess the effects of ketamine or lidocaine on fentanyl-induced cough. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted at the Erciyes University Medical School, Kayseri, Turkey. Consecutive adult patients aged 18 to 65 years and classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II who were undergoing elective surgery with general anesthesia were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated equally into 3 groups to receive lidocaine 1 mg/kg, ketamine 0.5 μg/kg, or placebo intravenously 1 minute before fentanyl administration. Following intravenous fentanyl (1.5 μg/kg over 2 seconds) injection, an observer, unaware of the type of medication given to the patients, recorded the number of episodes of coughing, if any. Any episode of cough was classified as coughing and graded by investigators blinded to treatment as mild (1–2 coughs), moderate (3–4), or severe (≥5). Blood pressure, heart rate, pulse oximetry oxygen saturation (SpO2), and adverse effects (AEs) were recorded. Results: A total of 368 patients were approached for inclusion; 300 patients met the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in the study. No patients in the ketamine group had cough. The frequency of cough was significantly lower in the lidocaine (11/100 [11%]; P = 0.024) and ketamine (0/100; P = 0.001) groups compared with the placebo group (23/100 [23%]). The intensity of cough was significantly lower in the

  9. A comparison of ketamine versus etomidate for procedural sedation for the reduction of large joint dislocations

    PubMed Central

    Salen, Philip; Grossman, Michelle; Grossman, Michael; Milazzo, Anthony; Stoltzfus, Jill

    2016-01-01

    were myoclonus (1/46, 2.2%, 15/33, 45.5%; P – 0.0001), assisted ventilation with airway manipulation (3/45, 6.7%; 9/33, 27.3%; P – 0.01), and pulsoximetry desaturation < 90% (0/46; 7/34, 20.6%; P – 0.002). There was no significant difference in recovery time from PS between the ketamine and etomidate cohorts (11 min vs. 10 min; P – 0.69). Conclusion: Ketamine produces PS conditions for successful large joint dislocation reduction that are adequate and comparable to etomidate. The increased likelihood of myoclonus, of the requirement for airway assistance, and of hypoxia observed with etomidate suggest potential benefits with the utilization of ketamine for PS for dislocated large joint reduction. PMID:27308256

  10. Effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation of postoperative patients with gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Shuncui; Chen, Zhenyi; Lin, Shaoli

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate the effect of ketamine combined with butorphanol on emergence agitation (EA) in postoperative gastric cancer patients. Materials and methods A total of 150 patients with gastric cancer were included and divided into group B (1 mg butorphanol before anesthesia induction, n=50), group K (1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50), and group C (1 mg butorphanol combined with 1 mg/kg ketamine, n=50). Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) at the end of operation, just before extubation (T0) and at 0 minute (T1), 5 minutes (T2), and 30 minutes (T3) after extubation were compared. Statistical analysis of recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and EA incidence and adverse reactions were performed. Results There were no differences among groups with respect to MAP and HR at T0 and T1 (P>0.05). Compared with patients in group C, significant reduction of MAP and HR were observed in groups K and B at T2 and T3 (P<0.05), while no differences were found between group K and group B (P>0.05). Recovery time, extubation time, time in postanesthesia care unit, and incidence of EA in group C were significantly less than those in groups K and B (P<0.05), but no differences were observed between group K and group B (P>0.05). Total incidence of adverse reactions were significantly increased in group K compared to those in groups C and B (P<0.05). Conclusion Injection of ketamine combined with butorphanol before anesthesia induction was more effective than injection of ketamine or butorphanol separately in the prevention of EA. PMID:27217761

  11. The effect of low-dose dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and anesthetic requirement during bis-spectral index-guided total intravenous anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Yeon; Kim, Jong Yeop; Cho, Sang Hyun; Lee, Dongchul; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of low-dose dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and anesthetic requirements during propofol and remifentanil anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Thirty adult patients were randomly allocated to receive dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/h (dexmedetomidine group, n = 15) or comparable volumes of saline infusion (control group, n = 15). Target controlled infusion of propofol and remifentanil was used for anesthetic induction and maintenance, and adjusted in order to maintain a bispectral index of 40-55 and hemodynamic stability. We measured hemodynamics and recorded total and mean infused dosages of propofol and remifentanil. For anesthesia induction and maintenance, mean infused doses of propofol (121 ± 27 vs. 144 ± 29 μg/kg/min, P = 0.04) and remifentanil (118 ± 27 vs. 150 ± 36 ng/kg/min, P = 0.01) were lower in the dexmedetomidine group than in the control group, respectively. The dexmedetomidine group required 16 % less propofol and 23 % less remifentanil. During anesthetic induction and maintenance, the dexmedetomidine group required fewer total doses of propofol (9.6 ± 2.3 vs. 12.4 ± 3.3 mg/kg, P = 0.01) and remifentanil (9.6 ± 3.4 vs. 12.7 ± 2.6 μg/kg, P = 0.01). The change in mean arterial pressure over time differed between the groups (P < 0.05). Significantly lower mean arterial pressure was observed in the dexmedetomidine group than in the control group at immediately and 5 min after pneumoperitoneum. The time to extubation after completion of drug administration did not differ between the groups (P = 0.25). This study demonstrated that a low-dose dexmedetomidine infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/h reduced propofol and remifentanil requirements as well as hemodynamic change by pneumoperitoneum without delayed recovery during propofol-remifentanil anesthesia for laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:26162785

  12. Anesthesia for fetoscopic intervention

    PubMed Central

    Anwari, Jamil S.; Tareen, Zubair

    2014-01-01

    This is the first case report on anesthesia for fetoscopy performed in Saudi Arabia. Epidural anesthesia was given to the mother in her late second trimester for the fetoscopic intervention. The anesthesia related issues such as physiological and anatomical changes in pregnancy, tocolytic medications and their interactions with anesthesia, anesthetizing/sedating the primary patient are discussed. PMID:25191206

  13. Topical anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  14. Topical anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mritunjay; Chawla, Rajiv; Goyal, Manish

    2015-01-01

    Topical anesthetics are being widely used in numerous medical and surgical sub-specialties such as anesthesia, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, dentistry, urology, and aesthetic surgery. They cause superficial loss of pain sensation after direct application. Their delivery and effectiveness can be enhanced by using free bases; by increasing the drug concentration, lowering the melting point; by using physical and chemical permeation enhancers and lipid delivery vesicles. Various topical anesthetic agents available for use are eutectic mixture of local anesthetics, ELA-max, lidocaine, epinephrine, tetracaine, bupivanor, 4% tetracaine, benzocaine, proparacaine, Betacaine-LA, topicaine, lidoderm, S-caine patch™ and local anesthetic peel. While using them, careful attention must be paid to their pharmacology, area and duration of application, age and weight of the patients and possible side-effects. PMID:26702198

  15. GLYX-13 (rapastinel) ameliorates subchronic phencyclidine- and ketamine-induced declarative memory deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Burgdorf, Jeffrey S.; Moskal, Joseph R.; Meltzer, Herbert Y.

    2016-01-01

    GLYX-13 (rapastinel), a tetrapeptide (Thr-Pro-Pro-Thr-amide), has been reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties in man based upon its N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) glycine site functional partial agonism. Ketamine, a non-competitive NMDAR antagonist, also reported to have fast acting antidepressant properties, produces cognitive impairment in rodents and man, whereas rapastinel has been reported to have cognitive enhancing properties in rodents, without impairing cognition in man, albeit clinical testing has been limited. The goal of this study was to compare the cognitive impairing effects of rapastinel and ketamine in novel object recognition (NOR), a measure of declarative memory, in male C57BL/6J mice treated with phencyclidine (PCP), another NMDAR noncompetitive antagonist known to severely impair cognition, in both rodents and man. C57BL/6J mice given a single dose or subchronic ketamine (30 mg/kg. i.p.) showed acute or persistent deficits in NOR, respectively. Acute i.v. rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg), did not induce NOR deficit. Pre-treatment with rapastinel significantly prevented acute ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Rapastinel (1.0 mg/kg, but not 0.3 mg/kg, iv) significantly reversed both subchronic ketamine- and subchronic PCP-induced NOR deficits. Rapastinel also potentiated the atypical antipsychotic drug with antidepressant properties, lurasidone, to restore NOR in subchronic ketamine-treated mice. These findings indicate that rapastinel, unlike ketamine, does not induce a declarative memory deficit in mice, and can prevent or reverse the ketamine-induced NOR deficit. Further study is required to determine if these differences translate during clinical use of ketamine and rapastinel as fast acting antidepressant drugs and if rapastinel could have non-ionotropic effects as an add-on therapy with antipsychotic/antidepressant medications. PMID:26632337

  16. A comparative study on monitored anesthesia care

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Jayashree; Sen, Bitan

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness, hemodynamic changes and duration of sedation and analgesia between combinations of fortwin-phenergan-midazolam (FPM) and ketamine - midazolam (KM) along with local anesthesia for the surgeries done under the umbrella of monitored anesthesia care. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients undergoing surgeries as tympanoplasty, septoplasty, lip repair, dacrocystectomy and cataract under local anesthesia, randomly received either intravenous (IV) fortwin 0.3 mg/kg over 1 min followed by IV midazolam 0.04 mg/kg plus IV phenergan 12.5 mg (Group FPM) or IV ketamine 0.3 mg/kg over 1 min plus IV midazolam 0.04 mg/kg (Group KM). Sedation was titrated to Ramsay sedation score (RSS) of 3. Patients’ mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), saturation peripheral pulse, duration of sedation and need for intraoperative rescue sedation/analgesic were recorded and compared. Satisfaction of patients (using a 1-7 point Likert verbal rating scale) and readiness for discharge towards (time to Aldrete score of 10) were also determined. Result: Group KM had significant rise in HR (20-25%) and MAP (25-30%) from 30 min after the bolus dose given until the end of the surgery in contrast to Group FPM. The target sedation level (RSS ≥ 3) was higher in Group FPM (n = 23 [92%]) as compared with Group KM (n = 12 [48%]). Time until need for rescue sedation was 66.96 ± 17.19 min in FPM and 32.80 ± 8.90 min in KM group. The patient satisfaction (Likert scale) is more with the FPM group (6.12 ± 0.83 vs. 4.40 ± 1.20). Conclusion: We found that the combination of FPM is superior to the KM combination as per the hemodynamic changes, duration of analgesia, patients’ satisfaction and efficacy of the drugs are concerned. PMID:25886327

  17. NMDAR inhibition-independent antidepressant actions of ketamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Morris, Patrick J; Georgiou, Polymnia; Fischell, Jonathan; Elmer, Greg I; Alkondon, Manickavasagom; Yuan, Peixiong; Pribut, Heather J; Singh, Nagendra S; Dossou, Katina S S; Fang, Yuhong; Huang, Xi-Ping; Mayo, Cheryl L; Wainer, Irving W; Albuquerque, Edson X; Thompson, Scott M; Thomas, Craig J; Zarate, Carlos A; Gould, Todd D

    2016-05-26

    Major depressive disorder affects around 16 per cent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite the availability of numerous monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require several weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive, glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor) antagonist (R,S)-ketamine exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects after a single dose in patients with depression, but its use is associated with undesirable side effects. Here we show that the metabolism of (R,S)-ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant-related actions in mice. These antidepressant actions are independent of NMDAR inhibition but involve early and sustained activation of AMPARs (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors). We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side effects. Our data implicate a novel mechanism underlying the antidepressant properties of (R,S)-ketamine and have relevance for the development of next-generation, rapid-acting antidepressants. PMID:27144355

  18. Ketamine enantiomers in the rapid and sustained antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Muller, John; Pentyala, Sahana; Dilger, James; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2016-06-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine shows significant therapeutic effects in major depression and bipolar disorder. This effect is especially important in treatment-resistant depression and depression with suicidal ideation. In this review we explain the mechanism of action, drug efficacy, and the side effects of ketamine; the antidepressive effects of ketamine; the individual effects of ketamine isomers, R(-) ketamine and S(+) ketamine; the effects of the combination of ketamine with electroconvulsive therapy; and the possible use of ketamine in treating depression. PMID:27354907

  19. Ketamine enantiomers in the rapid and sustained antidepressant effects

    PubMed Central

    Muller, John; Pentyala, Sahana; Dilger, James; Pentyala, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine shows significant therapeutic effects in major depression and bipolar disorder. This effect is especially important in treatment-resistant depression and depression with suicidal ideation. In this review we explain the mechanism of action, drug efficacy, and the side effects of ketamine; the antidepressive effects of ketamine; the individual effects of ketamine isomers, R(–) ketamine and S(+) ketamine; the effects of the combination of ketamine with electroconvulsive therapy; and the possible use of ketamine in treating depression. PMID:27354907

  20. Influence of Ketamine on Early Postoperative Cognitive Function After Orthopedic Surgery in Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki Hwa; Kim, Ji Yeon; Kim, Jeong Won; Park, Jang Su; Lee, Kyu Won; Jeon, Sang Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) is a serious and frequent complication after surgery, especially in elderly patients. Ketamine is an N-methyl D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist with demonstrated neuroprotective effects. An intravenous bolus of a sub-anesthetic dose (0.5 mg/kg) of ketamine can reduce postoperative delirium (POD) and POCD after cardiac surgery. But, the influence of ketamine on early POCD after non-cardiac surgery is unclear. Objectives: The current study aimed to evaluate the influence of ketamine on early postoperative cognitive function after orthopedic surgery in elderly patients. Patients and Methods: Fifty six elderly patients (> 60-years-old), scheduled for elective orthopedic surgery during general anesthesia (duration of anesthesia > two hours) were enrolled. Patients received intravenous bolus, a total of 3 mL mixed with 0.9% normal saline and 0.5 mg/kg ketamine (K group) or 3 mL of 0.9% normal saline (N group). Three neurocognitive function tests (mini-mental status examination, trail-making test, digit substitution test), and c-reactive protein (CRP) concentration were determined before surgery and on postoperative day one (POD 1) and postoperative day six (POD 6). Results: The two groups had similar demographic characteristics except for the gender. Surgical and anesthetic data were not significantly different. A statistically significant difference was observed in comparison of trail-making test score. Trail-making test score increased more in the N group (52.5 points) than the K group (13 points) at POD 1 (P = 0.047) compared with baseline scores. There were no significant differences in the mini-mental status examination, digit substitution test and CRP concentration at POD 1 and POD 6 between the two groups. POCD (the two Z-scores in more than two tests or the combined Z-score was 1.96 or more) was present in one patient (4%) in the K group at POD 6 (P = 0.98). Conclusions: The incidence of POCD was not

  1. Topically applied caffeine induces miosis in the ketamine/xylazine anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Kronschläger, Martin; Yu, Zhaohua; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Meyer, Linda Maren; Söderberg, Per

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine if topically applied caffeine influences pupil size in ketamine/xylazine anesthetized animals. Two experiments were carried out. In the first experiment, caffeine was topically applied to one of the eyes of 10 ketamine/xylazine anesthetized animals, while vehicle only was topically applied to the contralateral eye. In the second experiment, caffeine was topically applied to both eyes in one group of 10 ketamine/xylazine anesthetized rats, while in another group both eyes vehicle only was topically applied to both eyes. In both experiments pupil diameter was measured at 0, 10, 20, 40 and 60 min after topical application. In three of the animals, the pupil was dilated with tropicamide 5 mg/ml at 60 min after the topical application of caffeine and the pupil diameter was measured. The first experiment showed a relative miosis in caffeine treated eyes as compared to the vehicle treated eye, that changed over time. The second experiment in line with the first experiment, also showed that topically applied caffeine causes a relative miosis as compared to vehicle only that changes over time. Eyes treated with caffeine reacted with quick dilatation after tropicamide application. Topical caffeine antagonizes ketamine/xylazine anesthesia induced mydriasis in a time dependent manner. PMID:25107537

  2. Effect of Lidocaine-Ketamine Infusions Combined with Morphine or Fentanyl in Sevoflurane-Anesthetized Pigs.

    PubMed

    Re, Michela; Canfrán, Susana; Largo, Carlota; Gómez de Segura, Ignacioa A

    2016-01-01

    Providing lidocaine, ketamine, and an opioid greatly decreases the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of volatile anesthetics in dogs. However, the efficacy of this combination shows marked interspecies variation, and opioids are likely to be less effective in pigs than in other species. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of constant-rate infusion of lidocaine and ketamine combined with either morphine or fentanyl on the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. In a prospective, randomized, crossover design, 8 healthy crossbred pigs were premedicated with ketamine and midazolam, and anesthesia was induced and maintained with sevoflurane. Pigs then received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) combined with either morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0045 mg/kg/h; FLK) after a loading dose; the control group received Ringers lactate solution. The anesthetic-sparing action of the 2 infusion protocols was calculated according to the MAC, by using dewclaw clamping as the standard noxious stimulus. The sevoflurane MAC (mean ± 1 SD) was 2.0% ± 0.2%, 1.9% ± 0.4%, and 1.8% ± 0.2% in the control, MLK, and FLK groups, respectively. No differences among groups or treatments were found. In conclusion, the administration of MLK or FLK at the studied doses did not reduce the MAC of sevoflurane in pigs. PMID:27177566

  3. Ketamine modulates subgenual cingulate connectivity with the memory-related neural circuit—a mechanism of relevance to resistant depression?

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jing J.; O’Daly, Owen; Mehta, Mitul A.; Young, Allan H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Ketamine has been reported to have efficacy as an antidepressant in several studies of treatment-resistant depression. In this study, we investigate whether an acute administration of ketamine leads to reductions in the functional connectivity of subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sgACC) with other brain regions. Methods. Thirteen right-handed healthy male subjects underwent a 15 min resting state fMRI with an infusion of intravenous ketamine (target blood level = 150 ng/ml) starting at 5 min. We used a seed region centred on the sgACC and assessed functional connectivity before and during ketamine administration. Results. Before ketamine administration, positive coupling with the sgACC seed region was observed in a large cluster encompassing the anterior cingulate and negative coupling was observed with the anterior cerebellum. Following ketamine administration, sgACC activity became negatively correlated with the brainstem, hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, retrosplenial cortex, and thalamus. Discussion. Ketamine reduced functional connectivity of the sgACC with brain regions implicated in emotion, memory and mind wandering. It is possible the therapeutic effects of ketamine may be mediated via this mechanism, although further work is required to test this hypothesis. PMID:26925332

  4. Ketamine and xylazine combinations for short-term immobilization of wild variable flying foxes (Pteropus hypomelanus).

    PubMed

    Sohayati, A R; Zaini, C M; Hassan, L; Epstein, J; Siti Suri, A; Daszak, Peter; Sharifah, S H

    2008-12-01

    Collection of biological samples from pteropid bats requires chemical restraint of the bats to minimize risks to humans and stress to the bat. The effectiveness of an intravenous combination of ketamine and xylazine for short-term restraint of wild-caught variable flying foxes (Pteropus hypomelanus) in a field situation was evaluated. Eight adult male variable flying foxes were injected intravenously with 0.1 ml of ketamine and xylaxine containing 5 mg of ketamine and 1 mg of xylazine. The mean induction time was 80 +/- 20 sec, and mean immobilization time was 26 +/- 10 min. The ketamine-xylazine combination used in this study produced effective short-term immobilization of wild variable flying foxes for the collection of biological samples. PMID:19110718

  5. Mobile anesthesia: Ready, set, pack, and go

    PubMed Central

    Khayata, Issam; Bourque, Jesse

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Although we get into the habit of thinking that anesthesia cannot be safely delivered without the availability of all equipments available in a state of the art Operating room, we find ourselves faced with situations where the availability and mobility of all this equipment is limited ; this results in the impetus to start a thought process of how we can perform mobile anesthesia with less technology. Disaster situations, such as earthquakes, floods, or armed conflicts, might happen in areas where access of a regular operating room might be hours away or not available at all. Golden Hour: Delivering mobile Anesthesia during the golden hour can be a totally different experience from customary anesthesia practices in a regular operating room.It requires setting up a field/forward surgical teams with its organization and structure. Total Intravenous anesthesia gained popularity in crisis and combat situations and has been documented as a safe method in crisis situations.Anesthesia configured medic bag: Is a modified medic bag that can be utilized to contain the most commonly used Anesthesia supply material in a portable way. Conclusion: In reviewing the knowledge of how to provide anesthesia in crisis and disaster situations we conclude that there is evidence that anesthesia can be safely and efficiently delivered in a remote areas with limited tools and technology. PMID:23210021

  6. [Effects of ketamine and urethane on stimulation-induced c-fos expression in neurons of cat visual cortex].

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke; Zhu, Hui; Chen, Cui-Yun; Li, Peng; Jin, Cai-Hong; Wang, Zi-Lu; Jiang, San; Hua, Tian-Miao

    2013-12-01

    The effects of ketamine and urethane on neuronal activities remain in debate. As a member of immediate early genes family, the expression of c-fos is stimulation dependent and could be treated as an index to evaluate the strength of neural activities. In this study, SABC immunohistochemical techniques were applied to compare the c-fos expression in neurons of the primary visual cortex (V1) of cats and therefore, to evaluate the effects of acute anesthesia with ketamine HCl and uethane on inhibiting neural activities. Our results showed that compared with control cats, there were no significant differences with the average densities of Nissl-stained V1 neurons in each cortical layers of either urethane or ketamine anesthetized cats. In urethane anesthetized cats, neither the average densities nor the immunoreactive intensities of c-fos positive V1 neurons showed significant difference with that of control ones. However, both the average densities and immunoreactive intensities of c-fos positive V1 neurons in ketamine anesthetized cats decreased significantly compared with that of control and urethane anesthetized cats. These results suggested that ketamine has strong inhibitory effects on the activities of visual cortical neurons, whereas urethane did not. PMID:24415690

  7. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S S; Wainer, Irving W; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O; Huang, Xi-Ping; Gould, Todd D

    2016-10-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine's antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine's side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1-D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine's enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID:27469513

  8. Effects of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... you or your family member has ever had heat stroke, or suffered from the condition in a previous surgery, be sure to tell the physician anesthesiologist. Regional Anesthesia The potential side effects of regional anesthesia (such as an epidural or ...

  9. Chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse

    PubMed Central

    Al-Nowfal, Ahmed; Al-Abed, Yahya A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Biliary colic is a common clinical presentation, with the majority of cases being related to gallstone disease. However, rarely, patients may present with biliary symptoms without evidence of gallbladder stones – referred to as acalculous gallstone disease. This case report details a rare case of chronic biliary colic associated with ketamine abuse. Case presentation A 24-year-old Caucasian female presented to the emergency department with a history of intermittent right upper quadrant pain associated with nausea and malaise. She had experienced bouts of similar symptoms three times a year for the past 4 years. Various investigations had been conducted during her multiple admissions, which showed possible dilatation of the common bile duct, with no evidence of gallstones. Conclusion Patients can present with a dilated common bile duct and an acalculous cholecystitis. This requires considerable investigation, with an emphasis on drug history, especially with the current rise of recreational hallucinogenic drug abuse. PMID:27330331

  10. Use of ketamine in prolonged entrapment.

    PubMed Central

    Cottingham, R; Thomson, K

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the advantages of ketamine analgesia in the management of trapped patients after serious incidents. Four case histories and a review of the literature lead us to the conclusion that ketamine is the drug of choice in these situations. PMID:7804588

  11. General anesthesia for the provision of dental treatment to adults with developmental disability.

    PubMed Central

    Ananthanarayan, C.; Sigal, M.; Godlewski, W.

    1998-01-01

    The management of the behavior of mentally challenged adults when providing required dental care is often a problem, whether in the dental office or in a hospital setting. Our institution has a designated program to provide required dental care to this group of patients. Because of the high incidence of poor cooperation, which may include aggressive antagonistic behavior, many of these patients are scheduled for dental care under general anesthesia with an incomplete preoperative medical assessment. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact and limitations that an incomplete medical assessment may present in the delivery of dental care under general anesthesia to these adults with developmental disability. After approval from the institutional review board, the medical records of 139 patients treated in this program between 1992 and 1994 were reviewed to determine the patient profiles, anesthesia management, and complications. The charts of these patients, who underwent dental and radiographic examination, scaling and prophylaxis, and restoration and extraction of teeth under general anesthesia, were reviewed. There were 149 procedures performed on these patients, some more than once. The mean age was 29.5 yr. Males predominated females by a ratio of 2:1. All had multiple diagnoses, medical problems, and medications. Twenty-three patients had Down's Syndrome, four had schizophrenia disorders, 42 had seizure disorders, 11 had hypothyroidism, seven had heart disease, and 14 had central nervous system and neuromuscular disorders. The remainder had a variety of diagnoses, including rare syndromes. One hundred had intravenous (i.v.), 25 had mask inhalation, and 24 had intramuscular ketamine (Ketalar) induction. Nasotracheal intubation was uneventful in 139 patients, five had difficult visualization of the larynx and intubation. Ten patients experienced intraoperative complications, including nonfatal ventricular arrhythmia, slight fall in blood pressure and

  12. Radiation safety for anesthesia providers.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Gillian; Monaghan, W Patrick

    2011-06-01

    Many modern diagnostic and surgical procedures rely heavily on the use of ionizing radiation. These procedures include computed tomography, nuclear medicine procedures, interventional radiology, and cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology procedures. Recent trends toward increased patient visits and patients with multiple challenging comorbidities have meant that anesthesia providers are increasingly required to provide services in the ancillary areas using ionizing radiation. As a result, anesthesia providers are at a greater-than-ever risk for excessive radiation doses. An overview of some of the basic principles of radiation biology, radiation physics, and radiation protection and specific guidelines related to radiation exposure and pregnancy are described. The effects of radiation exposure are cumulative and permanent, and an understanding of these principles and practices will help anesthesia providers keep their occupational exposure to a minimum. PMID:21751695

  13. [Ketamine racemate or S-(+)-ketamine and midazolam. The effect on vigilance, efficacy and subjective findings].

    PubMed

    Doenicke, A; Kugler, J; Mayer, M; Angster, R; Hoffmann, P

    1992-10-01

    Ketamine is a racemic mixture containing equal amounts of optical isomers that have almost identical pharmacokinetic properties but different pharmacodynamic effects. The S-(+)-isomer of ketamine has about twice the anaesthetic and analgesic potency of the racemic ketamine preparation and is judged to induce less psychic emergence reactions and to be followed by a more rapid recovery of vigilance. The present study was designed to assess whether the S-(+)-isomer of ketamine is superior to the racemic mixture in cardiovascular characteristics, emergence reactions and cognitive functions, and whether side effects may be reduced or prevented by administration of midazolam prior to injection of S-(+)-ketamine. METHODS. Following ethics committee approval and informed consent, 30 volunteers were randomly allocated in this double-blind study to three groups of 10 each. Group 1 received 2 mg/kg bw racemic ketamine, group 2, 1 mg/kg bw S-(+)-ketamine and group 3, 1 mg/kg bw S-(+)-ketamine after premedication with 0.1 mg/kg midazolam i.v. Cardiovascular changes, state of vigilance, cognitive performance, subjective mood and acceptance of anaesthesia were assessed by means of haemodynamic routine monitoring, electroencephalography (EEG), psychometric tests and interview. RESULTS. The increases in mean arterial pressure and heart rate following the injection of racemic ketamine and S-(+)-ketamine were identical and the differences from baseline values significant after both. Premedication with midazolam ensured stable haemodynamics after injection of S-(+)-ketamine. EEG analysis displayed the characteristic changes well known from ketamine anaesthesia for both racemic and S-(+)-ketamine. The vigilosomnoscript showed an identical profile of vigilance up to 30 min after injection of both drugs. The vigilance status after 125 min was less impaired by S-(+)-ketamine than by racemic ketamine. Psychological assessment showed a prompter recovery of visual attentiveness and

  14. Sedation and general anesthesia for patients with Cornelia De Lange syndrome: A case series.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Alessandra; Scaravilli, Vittorio; Ciceri, Valentina; Bosatra, Mariagrazia; Giannatelli, Federica; Ateniese, Bianca; Mariani, Milena; Cereda, Anna; Sosio, Simone; Zanella, Alberto; Pesenti, Antonio; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia De Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare congenital disease characterized by typical facial dysmorphism, developmental disability, and limb deficiency defects. Various congenital malformations and medical complications have been described with gastroesophageal reflux as the major one. CdLS patients often require multiple high-risk anesthetic procedures. At San Gerardo Hospital (Monza, Italy) the management of CdLS patients is routinely organized through a standard protocol and a dedicated pediatric anesthesia team has been implemented. We report on a retrospective descriptive analysis of the anesthetic records of the CdLS patients admitted to San Gerardo Hospital from January 2010 to December 2015. We retrieved: demographics, genetic profiles, type of procedures, anesthetic approaches, anesthetics usage and complications. Data are reported as median (interquartile range) values. Twenty-seven patients (11 female), with age 12 (7-15) years old, weight 24 (14-35) kg, and severity score of 25 (18-32) were included. NIBPL mutations were the most frequently represented. We analyzed 58 procedures (30 esophagogastroduodenoscopies, 8 evoked auditory potential tests, 5 radiodiagnostics, 5 catheters positioning, 4 bronchoscopies) managed by sedation (36) and general anesthesia (6). Each patient underwent one (1-2) anesthetic procedure. Propofol (59%), sevoflurane (31%), fentanyl (24%), and ketamine (10%) were used. Three out of six endotracheal intubations were difficult. The only documented intraoperative complications were three episodes of desaturation (oxygen saturation <90%) occurring during sedations and were managed without the need for an invasive control of the airways. Implementation of a specific management protocol and a dedicated allowed to provide anesthesia to CdLS patients without the occurrence of major complications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27145336

  15. AAHA anesthesia guidelines for dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Richard; Grimm, Kurt; Harvey, Ralph; Lukasik, Victoria M; Penn, W Sean; Sargent, Brett; Spelts, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Safe and effective anesthesia of dogs and cats rely on preanesthetic patient assessment and preparation. Patients should be premedicated with drugs that provide sedation and analgesia prior to anesthetic induction with drugs that allow endotracheal intubation. Maintenance is typically with a volatile anesthetic such as isoflurane or sevoflurane delivered via an endotracheal tube. In addition, local anesthetic nerve blocks; epidural administration of opioids; and constant rate infusions of lidocaine, ketamine, and opioids are useful to enhance analgesia. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and central nervous system functions are continuously monitored so that anesthetic depth can be modified as needed. Emergency drugs and equipment, as well as an action plan for their use, should be available throughout the perianesthetic period. Additionally, intravenous access and crystalloid or colloids are administered to maintain circulating blood volume. Someone trained in the detection of recovery abnormalities should monitor patients throughout recovery. Postoperatively attention is given to body temperature, level of sedation, and appropriate analgesia. PMID:22058343

  16. Effects of droperidol, pentobarbital, and ketamine on myogenic transcranial magnetic motor-evoked responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, C J; Drummond, J C; Patel, P M; Sano, T; Chesnut, R M

    1994-12-01

    Myogenic motor-evoked responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation of the motor cortex (tcmag-MERs) may become clinically useful for the noninvasive assessment of motor pathway conduction during surgery. However, application is hindered because most anesthetic regimens result in severe depression of tcmag-MER amplitudes. As part of our systematic attempts to identify anesthetic agents and supplements suitable for use during tcmag-MER recording, we studied the effect of bolus doses of pentobarbital (1.5 mg/kg), droperidol (0.07 mg/kg), or ketamine (1 mg/kg), administered intravenously, on compound muscle action potentials to transcranial magnetic stimulation in five healthy volunteers. The doses were chosen to be comparable with doses that might be suitable for supplementation of a nitrous oxide/opioid anesthetic technique. Droperidol administration resulted in sustained amplitude depression of both tibialis and adductor pollicis tc-MERs to 30 +/- 9% and 39 +/- 14% of baseline (P < 0.01). Tcmag-MER amplitude changes after pentobarbital were variable, ranging from no change to substantial amplitude depression (to 20% of baseline) in two subjects. In contrast, ketamine administration did not result in significant amplitude depression. In three subjects, tibialis anterior amplitude increased to 150 to 220% of control values in the first 10 minutes after ketamine. Onset latency was unchanged after any drug. These data indicate that tcmag-MERs are moderately depressed after droperidol and pentobarbital but well preserved after ketamine. Ketamine may be a more suitable supplement to opioid/nitrous oxide anesthesia than droperidol or pentobarbital. PMID:7885550

  17. [Ketamine racemate and S-(+)-ketamine. Cerebrovascular effects and neuroprotection following focal ischemia].

    PubMed

    Werner, C; Reeker, W; Engelhard, K; Lu, H; Kochs, E

    1997-03-01

    The phencyclidine derivative ketamine is a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with the thalamo-neocortical projection system as the primary site of action. Racemic ketamine consists of the enantiomers S(+)-ketamine and R(-)-ketamine. Racemic ketamine has never been considered an adequate anaesthetic agent in neurosurgical patients since it produces regionally specific stimulation of cerebral metabolism (CMRO2) and increases cerebral blood flow (CBF) and intracranial pressure (ICP). However, recent experiments suggest that both tracemic ketamine and S(+)-ketamine may reduce infarct size in animal models of incomplete cerebral ischaemia and brain injury. This experimental protective effect appears to be related to decreases in Ca++ influx and maintenance of brain tissue magnesium levels due to NMDA and quisqualate receptor blockade by ketamine. Studies in dogs have shown that racemic ketamine (2.0 mg/kg) increases CBF in the presence of the cerebral vasodilator N2O. In contrast, studies in rats without background anaesthesia showed increases in CBF after racemic ketamine (100 mg/kg i.p.). This suggests that the cerebrovascular effects of racemic ketamine are related to the pre-existing cerebrovascular tone induced by background anaesthetics. Cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity was maintained regardless of the baseline cerebrovascular resistance. There are several mechanisms by which racemic ketamine may increase CBF. It induces dose-dependent respiratory depression with consequent mild hypercapnia in spontaneously ventilating subjects. This produces vasodilation due to the intact cerebrovascular CO2 reactivity. Racemic ketamine also induces regional neuroexcitation, which leads to stimulation of cerebral glucose consumption in the limbic, extrapyramidal, auditory, and sensory-motor systems. This regional neuroexcitation with increased CMRO2 produces increases in CBF that can be blocked by infusion of barbiturates or benzodiazepines. However

  18. [Automated anesthesia record system].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Liu, Jin

    2005-12-01

    Based on Client/Server architecture, a software of automated anesthesia record system running under Windows operation system and networks has been developed and programmed with Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0, Visual Basic 6.0 and SQL Server. The system can deal with patient's information throughout the anesthesia. It can collect and integrate the data from several kinds of medical equipment such as monitor, infusion pump and anesthesia machine automatically and real-time. After that, the system presents the anesthesia sheets automatically. The record system makes the anesthesia record more accurate and integral and can raise the anesthesiologist's working efficiency. PMID:16422117

  19. Overview of anesthesia for primary care physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Potyk, D K; Raudaskoski, P

    1998-01-01

    Primary care physicians are frequently asked to evaluate patients before elective surgery. Familiarity with anesthetic technique and physiologic processes can help primary care physicians identify risk factors for perioperative complications, optimize patient care, and enhance communication with surgeons and anesthesiologists. To this end, we review the physiologic processes accompanying tracheal intubation and general and regional anesthesia. There is no convincing evidence that regional anesthesia is safer than general anesthesia. In addition to replacing fluid losses from the surgical field and insensible losses, intraoperative fluid administration may attenuate the cardiovascular and renal effects of anesthesia. Therefore, recommendations to limit fluids should be made with caution and should be tempered with an understanding of intraoperative fluid requirements. An understanding of the physiologic processes of anesthesia, combined with preoperative risk stratification strategies, will enhance a primary care physician's ability to provide meaningful preoperative evaluations. PMID:9655993

  20. Intramuscular ketamine in acute depression: A report on two cases.

    PubMed

    Harihar, Chilukuri; Dasari, Padmavathy; Srinivas, Jakka Sriramulu

    2013-04-01

    It takes about 2 weeks for the onset of antidepressant action of drugs while electroconvulsive therapy though faster, is a cumbersome procedure requiring an anaesthetist and at least a minor operation theatre. Recent studies have shown that Ketamine, when given to severely depressed patients in the dose of 0.5 mg/kg as a slow intravenous infusion over 40 minutes, brought about acute relief from depression and amelioration of suicidal risk within a few hours. The improvement, however, was transient and lasted for up to a week but could be sustained by further weekly or biweekly injections. As the dose of ketamine administered was found to be safe, it was now tried in the intramuscular route in two severely depressed patients with similar rapid improvement. The cases are reported here which pave way for an easier mode of treating acute depression. PMID:23825857

  1. Intramuscular ketamine in acute depression: A report on two cases

    PubMed Central

    Harihar, Chilukuri; Dasari, Padmavathy; Srinivas, Jakka Sriramulu

    2013-01-01

    It takes about 2 weeks for the onset of antidepressant action of drugs while electroconvulsive therapy though faster, is a cumbersome procedure requiring an anaesthetist and at least a minor operation theatre. Recent studies have shown that Ketamine, when given to severely depressed patients in the dose of 0.5 mg/kg as a slow intravenous infusion over 40 minutes, brought about acute relief from depression and amelioration of suicidal risk within a few hours. The improvement, however, was transient and lasted for up to a week but could be sustained by further weekly or biweekly injections. As the dose of ketamine administered was found to be safe, it was now tried in the intramuscular route in two severely depressed patients with similar rapid improvement. The cases are reported here which pave way for an easier mode of treating acute depression. PMID:23825857

  2. Balanced anesthesia and constant-rate infusions in horses.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    Balanced anesthetic techniques are commonly used in equine patients, and include the combination of a volatile anesthetic with at least one injectable anesthetic throughout the maintenance period. Injectable anesthetics used in balanced anesthesia include the α2-agonists, lidocaine, ketamine, and opioids, and those with muscle-relaxant properties such as benzodiazepines and guaifenesin. Administration of these injectable anesthetics is best using constant-rate infusions based on the pharmacokinetics of the drug, which allows steady-state concentrations and predictable pharmacodynamic actions. This review summarizes the different drug combinations used in horses, and provides calculated recommended doses based on the pharmacokinetics of individual drugs. PMID:23498047

  3. Effect of anesthesia on spontaneous activity and evoked potentials of the cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Ordek, Gokhan; Groth, Jonathan D; Sahin, Mesut

    2012-01-01

    Cerebellum is a highly organized structure with a crystalline morphology that has always intrigued neuroscientists. Much of the cerebellar research has been conducted in anesthetized animals, particularly using ketamine and xylazine combination. It is not clear how the cerebellar cortical circuitry is affected by anesthesia. In this study, we have recorded spontaneous and evoked potentials from the cerebellar surface with chronically implanted, flexible-substrate, multi-electrode arrays. The frequency contents of the spontaneous activity suggest that ketamine/xylazine anesthesia suppresses most of the components except those below 30 Hz. This preliminary study also showed that multi channels of cerebellar cortical activity can be recorded using flexible multi-electrode arrays in behaving animals, which is very challenging task with single microelectrodes. PMID:23366022

  4. The ketamine analogue methoxetamine generalizes to ketamine discriminative stimulus in rats.

    PubMed

    Chiamulera, Cristiano; Armani, Federica; Mutti, Anna; Fattore, Liana

    2016-04-01

    Methoxetamine (MXE) is a chemical analogue of ketamine. Originally proposed as a ketamine-like fast-acting antidepressant, owing to similar N-methyl-D-aspartate blocker properties, it is now scheduled for reports of hallucinations and psychosis similar to ketamine and lysergic acid. As little is known about the addictive properties of MXE, the aim of this study was to investigate the similarity between discriminative stimuli of MXE and ketamine, as well as to provide data and protocols that could be used in the future for the characterization of novel ketamine-like drugs. The paradigm used was a two-lever operant conditioning paradigm in which rats were trained to discriminate ketamine (7.5 mg/kg/ml, intraperitoneal) from vehicle. Generalization tests were performed with MXE (0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0). We also tested the N-methyl-D-aspartate channel blocker MK-801 (0.005-0.1), lysergic acid (0.025-0.30), a serotonergic drug that had similar hallucinogenic effects as ketamine and methamphetamine (0.15-0.60) a drug with no generalization with ketamine, injected intraperitoneally presession (mg/kg). MXE and MK-801 fully generalized to ketamine. Lysergic acid and methamphetamine partially substituted for the ketamine stimulus, although the highest lysergic acid dose showed a 77.7% generalization. The present findings suggest that investigation of 'ketamine-like compounds' should explore not only substances with chemical analogy and common molecular mechanisms with ketamine, but also with similar psychopharmacological effects. PMID:26866970

  5. Hemodynamic Responses to Etomidate Versus Ketamine-Thiopental Sodium Combination for Anesthetic Induction in Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery Patients with Low Ejection Fraction: A Double-Blind, Randomized, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Mohammad Reza; Soleimani, Aria; Zeydi, Amir Emami; Nia, Hamid Sharif; Habibi, Ali; Onagh, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Background: During induction of anesthesia and intubation, hemodynamic changes are very important; especially in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and left ventricular dysfunction. A little information is available on the hemodynamic effects of a combination of ketamine-thiopental for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery, with impaired ventricular function. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the hemodynamic responses to etomidate versus ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for anesthetic induction in CABG surgery patients with low ejection fraction (EF<45%). Materials and Methods: In a double blind randomized clinical trial, a total of 100 patients, scheduled for elective CABG surgery were randomly assigned into two groups. These patients received either etomidate or ketamine-thiopental sodium combination at induction of anesthesia. Hemodynamics variable were measured and recorded at baseline, immediately before and after laryngoscopy and intubation, one, two and three minutes after intubation. Also, muscle twitching incidence among patients in two groups was evaluated. Results: No significant differences between the two groups regarding the changes of hemodynamic variables including systolic and diastolic arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure and heart rate, were notice (p>0.05). Muscle twitching was not observed in the two groups. Conclusion: Hemodynamic stability after administration of ketamine-thiopental sodium combination for induction of anesthesia in patients undergoing CABG surgery, with impaired ventricular function, supports the clinical impression that this combination is safe in CABG surgery patients with low EF. PMID:25478364

  6. Effects of Music Therapy on Anesthesia Requirements and Anxiety in Women Undergoing Ambulatory Breast Surgery for Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bradley Palmer, Jaclyn; Lane, Deforia; Mayo, Diane; Schluchter, Mark; Leeming, Rosemary

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of live and recorded perioperative music therapy on anesthesia requirements, anxiety levels, recovery time, and patient satisfaction in women experiencing surgery for diagnosis or treatment of breast cancer. Patients and Methods Between 2012 and 2014, 207 female patients undergoing surgery for potential or known breast cancer were randomly assigned to receive either patient-selected live music (LM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 69), patient-selected recorded music (RM) preoperatively with therapist-selected recorded music intraoperatively (n = 70), or usual care (UC) preoperatively with noise-blocking earmuffs intraoperatively (n = 68). Results The LM and the RM groups did not differ significantly from the UC group in the amount of propofol required to reach moderate sedation. Compared with the UC group, both the LM and the RM groups had greater reductions (P < .001) in anxiety scores preoperatively (mean changes [and standard deviation: −30.9 [36.3], −26.8 [29.3], and 0.0 [22.7]), respectively. The LM and RM groups did not differ from the UC group with respect to recovery time; however, the LM group had a shorter recovery time compared with the RM group (a difference of 12.4 minutes; 95% CI, 2.2 to 22.5; P = .018). Satisfaction scores for the LM and RM groups did not differ from those of the UC group. Conclusion Including music therapy as a complementary modality with cancer surgery may help manage preoperative anxiety in a way that is safe, effective, time-efficient, and enjoyable. PMID:26282640

  7. Effectiveness of adding ketamine to ropivacaine infusion via femoral nerve catheter after knee anterior cruciate ligament repair

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Faiz, Seyed Hamid Reza; Ziyaeifard, Mohsen; Niknam, Keyvan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Elective knee surgery for repairing anterior cruciate ligament is usually associated with moderate to severe postoperative pain, and, therefore, selecting appropriate analgesia can considerably facilitate pain control and patient's discharge. This study was designed to compare the analgesic effectiveness of administration of ropivacaine or ropivacaine plus ketamine on pain control and improvement of muscle weakness after anterior cruciate ligament repair in adults. Materials and Methods: A double-blind randomized study which performed in Operating room and Sixty six patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists health status I to II that underwent elective knee surgery for repairing anterior cruciate ligament under spinal anesthesia were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either ropivacaine 0.2% or an equivalent volume of ropivacaine 0.1% plus 1.0 mg/kg ketamine via continuous femoral block with pump infusion. The patients were familiarized with a 10-point verbal analog scale. Quadriceps muscle weakness and sedation score were assessed based on relevant scales. Parameters assessment were obtained from all patients immediately after PACU entrance, and postoperative assessment was performed at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 30, 36, 42, and 48 h after the operation. Results: The data of 31 patients who received ropivacaine and of 33 patients in ketamine-ropivacaine group were eligible for analysis. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores differed at various time points after surgery, with higher scores in patients who received concomitant ketamine and ropivacaine (P < 0.05). The degree of quadriceps muscle weakness was similar between the groups at the different time points. Patients in ropivacaine group rated better quality of pain control with appropriate sedation in comparison with the patients in ketamine/ropivacaine group. Conclusion: Our study shows that the addition of a ketamine 1 mg/kg to 0.1% ropivacaine via pump infusion after

  8. Long-Term Ketamine Self-Injections in Major Depressive Disorder: Focus on Tolerance in Ketamine's Antidepressant Response and the Development of Ketamine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Sub-anaesthetic ketamine is of special interest for depression research due to its rapid and potent but short-lived antidepressant response (after-effect). The presented case is the first one in the literature which deals in detail with the transfer from ketamine's antidepressant action to ketamine addiction. A 50-year-old anaesthetic nurse, who had never been treated with antidepressants before, started with self-injecting ketamine racemate 50 mg IM once a week to cope with her major depression. She continuously stole ketamine from hospital stocks. Due to a gradually developing tolerance to ketamine's antidepressant action, she stepwise increased dose and frequency of ketamine self-injections up to daily 2 g IM (three-fold her anaesthetic dose) over six months. This was accompanied by the development of ketamine addiction, loss of consciousness, dissociative immobility, and amnesia. Inpatient detoxification treatment was characterized by a strong craving for ketamine and, later on, by the occurrence of a severe depressive episode remitting on venlafaxine. A 14-week follow-up documented a normal condition without any ketamine sequelae, such as craving, psychosis, depression, or cognitive abnormalities. Thus, awareness of ketamine addiction potential, even in patients who received ketamine for antidepressant purposes, is important. PMID:26317449

  9. Evaluation of sedation and clinical effects of midazolam with ketamine or dexmedetomidine in pet rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bellini, L; Banzato, T; Contiero, B; Zotti, A

    2014-10-18

    The effects of two sedation protocols combining midazolam with ketamine (ketamine group) or dexmedetomidine (dexmedetomidine group) were studied in dwarf companion rabbits undergoing abdominal ultrasound scan. The onset of sedation was faster in the ketamine group; a few rabbits in the dexmedetomidine group required additional doses to lose the righting reflex, although sedation time was not different between groups. A semi-quantitative scale was used to score sedation quality, which was higher in rabbits that received dexmedetomidine rather than ketamine. Pulse rate was lower in the dexmedetomidine group (206 vs 240 bpm), although Doppler blood pressure was higher than in the ketamine group (109 vs 89 mm Hg). Respiratory rate decreased in relation to the baseline values with both protocols but arterial haemoglobin saturation with oxygen was maintained similar to the pre-sedation values throughout the entire procedure, regardless of protocol used and without oxygen supplementation. Both protocols allowed performance of ultrasound scanning, although dexmedetomidine may be preferred if a deep sedation level is required. PMID:24989038

  10. Ketamine use in current clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mei; Rejaei, Damoon; Liu, Hong

    2016-07-01

    After nearly half a century on the market, ketamine still occupies a unique corner in the medical armamentarium of anesthesiologists or clinicians treating pain. Over the last two decades, much research has been conducted highlighting the drug's mechanisms of action, specifically those of its enantiomers. Nowadays, ketamine is also being utilized for pediatric pain control in emergency department, with its anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects being revealed in acute and chronic pain management. Recently, new insights have been gained on ketamine's potential anti-depressive and antisuicidal effects. This article provides an overview of the drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics while also discussing the potential benefits and risks of ketamine administration in various clinical settings. PMID:27018176

  11. Ketamine use in current clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mei; Rejaei, Damoon; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    After nearly half a century on the market, ketamine still occupies a unique corner in the medical armamentarium of anesthesiologists or clinicians treating pain. Over the last two decades, much research has been conducted highlighting the drug's mechanisms of action, specifically those of its enantiomers. Nowadays, ketamine is also being utilized for pediatric pain control in emergency department, with its anti-hyperalgesic and anti-inflammatory effects being revealed in acute and chronic pain management. Recently, new insights have been gained on ketamine's potential anti-depressive and antisuicidal effects. This article provides an overview of the drug's pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics while also discussing the potential benefits and risks of ketamine administration in various clinical settings. PMID:27018176

  12. Can the Anesthetic Ketamine Ease Suicidal Thoughts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ionescu said. For the study, two weekly intravenous infusions of ketamine were given over three weeks. The ... to maintain this reduction three months after the infusion," Baxi said. Second, patients knew they were receiving ...

  13. Ketamine: new indications for an old drug.

    PubMed

    Annetta, Maria Giuseppina; Iemma, Domenico; Garisto, Cristiana; Tafani, Chiara; Proietti, Rodolfo

    2005-11-01

    Ketamine is a non-competitive antagonist to the phencyclidine site of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor for glutamate, though its effects are mediated by interaction with many others receptors. It has been introduced in clinical use since 1960's but today it is not largely employed as a general anaesthetic for its undesired psychic effects (emergence reactions) occurring in approximately 12% of patients. In the last decade, there has been a renewed interest in the use of subanaesthetic doses of ketamine for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In the late 1990's, multiple prospective, randomised, controlled study has shown the efficacy of low dose of ketamine for postoperative pain relief, for analgesia during regional or local anaesthesia, and for opioid-sparing effect. At present, non-definitive conclusion can be drawn. More data are needed to define the possible long term effects and the clinical goal of ketamine use. PMID:16305457

  14. Cardiorespiratory effects of intravenous bolus administration and infusion of ketamine-midazolam in dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J D; Hartsfield, S M

    1993-10-01

    Twelve healthy dogs were used to determine the cardiorespiratory effects of i.v. administered ketamine (10 mg/kg of body weight) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg). Half the dogs received a ketamine-midazolam combination (K-M) as a bolus over 30 seconds and the other half received the K-M as an infusion over 15 minutes. Induction of anesthesia by use of K-M was good in all dogs. Ketamine-midazolam combination as a bolus or infusion induced minimal cardiorespiratory effects, except for significant (P < 0.05) increases in mean heart rate and rate-pressure product. The increase in heart rate was greater in dogs of the infusion group. Mild and transient respiratory depression was observed in dogs of both groups immediately after administration of K-M, but was greater in dogs of the bolus group than in dogs of the infusion group. Duration of action of K-M for chemical restraint was short. Salivation and defecation were observed in a few dogs. Extreme muscular tone developed in 1 dog after K-M bolus administration. PMID:8250397

  15. Upper Extremity Regional Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Joseph M.; Gerancher, J.C.; Hebl, James R.; Ilfeld, Brian M.; McCartney, Colin J.L.; Franco, Carlo D.; Hogan, Quinn H.

    2009-01-01

    Brachial plexus blockade is the cornerstone of the peripheral nerve regional anesthesia practice of most anesthesiologists. As part of the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine’s commitment to providing intensive evidence-based education related to regional anesthesia and analgesia, this article is a complete update of our 2002 comprehensive review of upper extremity anesthesia. The text of the review focuses on (1) pertinent anatomy, (2) approaches to the brachial plexus and techniques that optimize block quality, (4) local anesthetic and adjuvant pharmacology, (5) complications, (6) perioperative issues, and (6) challenges for future research. PMID:19282714

  16. Intravenous dexamethasone versus ketamine gargle versus intravenous dexamethasone combined with ketamine gargle for evaluation of post-operative sore throat and hoarseness: A randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Mohammadreza; Honarmand, Azim; Fariborzifar, Arghavan; Attari, Mohammadali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sore throat and hoarseness are the most frequent subjective complaints after tracheal intubation for general anesthesia. We conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled study to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous (IV) dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle for reducing the incidence and severity of post-operative sore throat (POST) and hoarseness. Materials and Methods: 140 patients (aged 16-65 year) scheduled for elective surgery were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated into four groups of 35 subjects each: Group K, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline; Group D, were infused 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group KD, gargled 40 mg ketamine in 30 ml saline plus 0.2 mg/kg IV dexamethasone; Group P (placebo) that received saline (gargle and IV). POST was graded at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16 and 24 h after operation on a four-point scale (0-3). Results: The incidence and severity of POST were significantly lower in Group KD, compared with the other groups at all times after tracheal extubation for up to 24 h (P < 0.05). Also the incidence and severity of hoarseness were significantly lower in each Groups of KD and K and D compared with group placebo (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The prophylactic use of 0.2 mg/kg of IV dexamethasone plus ketamine gargle significantly reduced the incidence and severity of POST compared with using each of these drugs alone or using placebo. PMID:25371869

  17. The effects of low-dose ketamine on the analgesia nociception index (ANI) measured with the novel PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Laurent; Ortner, Clemens M; Jelacic, Srdjan; Rivat, Cyril; Landau, Ruth; Richebé, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor assesses nociception effects on the autonomic nervous system by analyzing changes in heart rate variability (HRV). This non-invasive device analyses ECG signals and determines the analgesia nociception index (ANI), allowing for quantitative assessment of the analgesia/nociception balance in anesthetized patients. Ketamine, an analgesic adjuvant with sympathomimetic properties, has been shown to improve perioperative pain management. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate whether low-dose ketamine, due to its intrinsic effect on the sino-atrial node, affects HRV and, therefore, interferes with ANI measurements. This pilot study included 20 women undergoing abdominal hysterectomies. Anesthesia and analgesia were maintained with sevoflurane and fentanyl respectively, in a standardized manner. Five minutes after intubation, 0.5 μg kg(-1) of intravenous (i.v.) ketamine was administered. ANI, bispectral index (BIS), heart rate and blood pressure were recorded from the induction of anesthesia until 5 min after skin incision. There was not any significant decrease in mean (±SD) ANI values after intubation (2.11±20.11, p=0.35) or i.v. ketamine administration (1.31±15.26, p=0.28). The mean (±SD) reduction in ANI values after skin incision was statistically significant (13.65±15.44, p=0.01), which is consistent with increased nociception. A single i.v. bolus of 0.5 μg kg(-1) ketamine did not influence the ANI values of 20 women under standardized general anesthesia conditions and absent noxious stimulation. These results suggest that the ANI derived from the PhysioDoloris™ analgesia monitor is feasible under such clinical conditions. PMID:25062948

  18. [Ketamine-associated urinary tract damage].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-hao; Guan, Zhi-chen

    2011-08-18

    Ketamine is widely used as an anesthetic during surgical procedures in both animals and humans. As its unique effects of inducing the dissociative hallucinatory,vivid dreams, out-of-body experiences, and delirium, it has diverted from legitimate uses to the illicit drug market, and abusing ketamine has become a serious social problem. The abusers may use ketamine alone or mixe it with other drugs to get an intense pleasure. There are case reports from all over the world in recent years that abusing ketamine may induce severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), and a variety of anatomical and functional lesions can be found in the urinary tract if further examinations are administrated. There is no universally recognized treatment protocols for this syndrome. Ketamine cessation or even reduction is the most effective treatment to prevent deterioration of the urinary tract, and intravesical instillation of hyaluranic acid (cystitstat) and oral pentosan polysulphate (elmiron) may take effect. The pathogenesis of ketamine-associated urinary tract destruction is unclear, and further study is needed. PMID:21844983

  19. Ketamine Infusion Therapy as an Alternative Pain Control Strategy in Patients with Multi-Trauma including Rib Fracture; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Losing, Ashley K; Jones, Justin M; Keric, Adis; Briggs, Steven E; Leedahl, David D

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a promising alternative agent for pain control that offers benefit to traditional strategies, particularly in the setting of rib fracture. Current pharmacologic therapies have clear adverse effects, and other options may be invasive, cost prohibitive, or marginally effective. We describe three consecutive patients with traumatic injuries including rib fracture for which a ketamine infusion was utilized as part of their pain control strategy.  For each patient, use of a ketamine infusion trended toward reduced opioid requirements with stable pain scores. One patient experienced a dissociative adverse effect prompting decrease and discontinuation of ketamine. No pulmonary complications in the form of emergent intubation or new diagnosis of pneumonia were observed. We believe the addition of ketamine infusion to be a valid alternative strategy for managing pain associated with rib fracture. PMID:27540552

  20. Ketamine Infusion Therapy as an Alternative Pain Control Strategy in Patients with Multi-Trauma including Rib Fracture; Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Losing, Ashley K; Jones, Justin M; Keric, Adis; Briggs, Steven E; Leedahl, David D

    2016-07-01

    Ketamine is a promising alternative agent for pain control that offers benefit to traditional strategies, particularly in the setting of rib fracture. Current pharmacologic therapies have clear adverse effects, and other options may be invasive, cost prohibitive, or marginally effective. We describe three consecutive patients with traumatic injuries including rib fracture for which a ketamine infusion was utilized as part of their pain control strategy.  For each patient, use of a ketamine infusion trended toward reduced opioid requirements with stable pain scores. One patient experienced a dissociative adverse effect prompting decrease and discontinuation of ketamine. No pulmonary complications in the form of emergent intubation or new diagnosis of pneumonia were observed. We believe the addition of ketamine infusion to be a valid alternative strategy for managing pain associated with rib fracture. PMID:27540552

  1. Propofol with ketamine following sedation with xylazine for routine induction of general anaesthesia in horses.

    PubMed

    Posner, L P; Kasten, J I; Kata, C

    2013-12-01

    To document the suitability of intravenous propofol and ketamine following sedation with xylazine for routine anaesthetic induction in horses. Retrospective. 100 client-owned horses. Anaesthetic records were evaluated to determine: signalment, anaesthetic drug and dosages, need for additional induction agents, notation of any adverse events, duration of anaesthesia and recovery characteristics (rough or smooth, and rapid or prolonged). Horses were sedated with xylazine 0.99±(0.2) mg/kg intravenous and 23 horses were also administered butorphanol 0.02±(0.001) mg/kg intravenous. Horses were anaesthetised with a combination of propofol 0.40±(0.1) mg/kg intravenous and ketamine 2.8±(0.3) mg/kg intravenous. Six horses required additional ketamine. None became apnoeic and no adverse events were noted. Anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in 66 horses and a combination of guaifenesin, ketamine and xylazine (GKX) in 34 horses. Total anaesthesia time was 125.4±(46) minutes. Fifty-one horses were administered romifidine 0.016 (±0.008) mg/kg intravenous at recovery. Time from orotracheal extubation to standing was 27.6±(25) minutes. Of the 58 records with recovery characteristics, the number per category was: rapid n=6, prolonged n=3, smooth n=46, rough n=6. Intravenous propofol and ketamine following xylazine provided satisfactory anaesthetic inductions and recoveries in a varied population of horses without any clinically relevant adverse events. PMID:24218416

  2. Comparison of the clinical utility of medetomidine/ketamine and xylazine/ketamine combinations for the ovariectomy of cats.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, J; Fargetton, X; Donnay, I; Ectors, F

    1990-10-27

    A controlled trial was conducted to assess suitability of combinations of medetomidine and ketamine for the ovariectomy of cats, to investigate the possible side effects, and to compare medetomidine/ketamine with a combination of xylazine and ketamine. Three hundred and thirty-seven cats were submitted to surgery; 100 were anaesthetised with 80 micrograms/kg medetomidine and 5 mg/kg ketamine, 137 with 80 micrograms/kg medetomidine and 7.5 mg/kg ketamine, and 100 were anaesthetised with 1 mg/kg xylazine and 10 mg/kg ketamine. The combinations were injected intramuscularly in the same syringe. The anaesthesia provided by the medetomidine/ketamine combinations was characterised by good muscle relaxation, good analgesia and minimal side effects. The only difference between the two doses of ketamine was the length of the period of anaesthesia. The advantages of the medetomidine/ketamine combination in comparison with xylazine/ketamine were the need for a lower dose of ketamine, a longer duration of action and better analgesia. Similar side effects were observed with both medetomidine/ketamine and xylazine/ketamine combinations. PMID:2264244

  3. Ketamine-induced apoptosis in cultured rat cortical neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Takadera, Tsuneo . E-mail: t-takadera@hokuriku-u.ac.jp; Ishida, Akira; Ohyashiki, Takao

    2006-01-15

    Recent data suggest that anesthetic drugs cause neurodegeneration during development. Ketamine is frequently used in infants and toddlers for elective surgeries. The purpose of this study is to determine whether glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis. Ketamine increased apoptotic cell death with morphological changes which were characterized by cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation or fragmentation. In addition, insulin growth factor-1 completely blocked the ketamine-induced apoptotic cell death. Ketamine decreased Akt phosphorylation. GSK-3 is known as a downstream target of Akt. The selective inhibitors of GSK-3 prevented the ketamine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, caspase-3 activation was accompanied by the ketamine-induced cell death and inhibited by the GSK-3 inhibitors. These results suggest that activation of GSK-3 is involved in ketamine-induced apoptosis in rat cortical neurons.

  4. Ketamine

    MedlinePlus

    ... also can have negative effects on users' learning abilities and mental states. Users also might have flashbacks of their ... risk of negative side effects and long-term mental ... mixing it with other drugs or alcohol greatly increases the chances of serious health problems, and even ...

  5. Closed-loop anesthesia.

    PubMed

    LE Guen, Morgan; Liu, Ngai; Chazot, Thierry; Fischler, Marc

    2016-05-01

    Automated anesthesia which may offer to the physician time to control hemodynamic and to supervise neurological outcome and which may offer to the patient safety and quality was until recently consider as a holy grail. But this field of research is now increasing in every component of general anesthesia (hypnosis, nociception, neuromuscular blockade) and literature describes some successful algorithms - single or multi closed-loop controller. The aim of these devices is to control a predefined target and to continuously titrate anesthetics whatever the patients' co morbidities and surgical events to reach this target. Literature contains many randomized trials comparing manual and automated anesthesia and shows feasibility and safety of this system. Automation could quickly concern other aspects of anesthesia as fluid management and this review proposes an overview of closed-loop systems in anesthesia. PMID:26554614

  6. Use of Ketamine in Acute Cases of Suicidality

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae; Narang, Puneet; Enja, Manasa

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is an N-methyl-D- aspartate antagonist with rapid antidepressant effects. Research shows that ketamine has a fast onset of reduction in depressive symptoms and shows sustained remission of suicidal ideation in some patients. This article provides a brief review of the literature on the use of ketamine for depression and in acute cases of suicidality. The authors conclude that, while further investigation is needed, ketamine may be a useful treatment option for acute suicidality in emergency room settings. PMID:25852977

  7. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, Nicole M; Hubbell, John A E; Aarnes, Turi K; Bednarski, Richard M; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-04-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  8. Comparison of cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal oxygen concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Karrasch, Nicole M.; Hubbell, John A.E.; Aarnes, Turi K.; Bednarski, Richard M.; Lerche, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    This study compared cardiorespiratory variables in dorsally recumbent horses anesthetized with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine and spontaneously breathing 50% or maximal (> 90%) oxygen (O2) concentrations. Twelve healthy mares were randomly assigned to breathe 50% or maximal O2 concentrations. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to recumbency with ketamine-diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with guaifenesin-ketamine-xylazine to effect. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, respiratory rate, lithium dilution cardiac output (CO), inspired and expired O2 and carbon dioxide partial pressures, and tidal volume were measured. Arterial and mixed-venous blood samples were collected prior to sedation (baseline), during 30 minutes of anesthesia, 10 minutes after disconnection from O2, and 30 minutes after standing. Shunt fraction, O2 delivery, and alveolar-arterial O2 partial pressures difference [P(A-a)O2] were calculated. Recovery times were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups in cardiorespiratory parameters or in P(A-a)O2 at baseline or 30 minutes after standing. Oxygen partial pressure difference in the 50% group was significantly less than in the maximal O2 group during anesthesia. PMID:25829559

  9. Ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia for a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system undergoing cesarean delivery: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Luo, LinLi; Ni, Juan; Wu, Lan; Luo, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management of patients with preexisting diseases is challenging and individualized approaches need to be determined based on patients’ complications. We report here a case of ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia in combination with low-dose ketamine during cesarean delivery on a parturient with severe malformations of the skeletal system and airway problems. The ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia was performed in the L1–L2 space, followed by an intravenous administration of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) for sedation and analgesia. Satisfactory anesthesia was provided to the patient and spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the surgery. The mother and the baby were discharged 5 days after surgery, no complications were reported for either of them. Our work demonstrated that an ultrasound-guided epidural anesthesia combined with low-dose ketamine can be used to successfully maintain spontaneous ventilation and provide effective analgesia during surgery and reduce the risk of postoperative anesthesia-related pulmonary infection. PMID:25999759

  10. Existence of glia mitigated ketamine-induced neurotoxicity in neuron-glia mixed cultures of neonatal rat cortex and the glia-mediated protective effect of 2-PMPA.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Daiying; Wang, Chengna; Li, Zengqiang; Lin, Li; Duan, Zhenfang; Qi, Huan; Li, Lin; Sun, Feng; Wu, Yingliang

    2014-09-01

    cultures to ketamine-induced neurotoxicity require further investigation. PMID:24931484

  11. Adrenergic support during anesthesia in experimental endotoxin shock: norepinephrine versus dobutamine.

    PubMed

    Van der Linden, P; Gilbart, E; Engelman, E; de Rood, M; Vincent, J L

    1991-02-01

    The effects of norepinephrine and dobutamine were compared during endotoxin shock in dogs anesthetized either with enflurane (E: 1.5%, N = 12) or with i.v. ketamine (K: 5 mg.kg-1 + 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1, N = 12). An i.v. bolus of 1.5 mg.kg-1 E. coli endotoxin was followed by saline infusion to restore left-sided filling pressures at baseline. With E, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and stroke index decreased (P less than 0.01). The decrease in oxygen delivery (DO2) and in oxygen consumption (VO2) was associated with an increase in blood lactate. In contrast, K anesthesia was associated with remarkable hemodynamic stability. DO2 was well maintained, VO2 decreased (P less than 0.01) and blood lactate did not change. Under E anesthesia, mean arterial pressure increased more with norepinephrine and heart rate increased more with dobutamine. Under K anesthesia, cardiac index, stroke index and left ventricular stroke work index increased similarly with both agents. In both groups DO2 and VO2 increased markedly. The amount of fluid infused was higher with dobutamine than with norepinephrine. Thus, enflurane but not ketamine had depressant cardiovascular effects at the doses used in this model. With both anesthetics, norepinephrine and dobutamine could effectively improve cardiac function. Dobutamine could therefore represent a valuable alternative to norepinephrine for cardiovascular support during anesthesia in septic shock. PMID:2024562

  12. Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Caused by Ultrasound Bursts Combined with Microbubbles Depends on Anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDannold, Nathan; Zhang, Yongzhi; Vykhodtseva, Natalia

    2011-09-01

    Prior works on BBB disruption via inter-arterial infusions of osmotic agents have shown a strong dependence on anesthesia. Here, we investigated whether different anesthesia agents can affect ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. A piston transducer fired through a rubber aperture (frequency: 532 kHz, diameter: 4 cm, aperture diameter: 16 mm) was used to generate the ultrasound fields, and sonications combined with an ultrasound contrast agent were performed at 5 power levels. BBB disruption was quantified by measuring the MRI contrast enhancement in T1-weighted MRI, and erythrocyte extravasation characterized in light microscopy. For each exposure level tested, experiments performed with ketamine/xylazine resulted in significantly greater (P<0.05) enhancement than with isoflurane/oxygen. The onset of severe red blood cell extravasation occurred at lower power levels with ketamine/xylazine. These results suggest ultrasound-induced BBB disruption can depend on anesthesia agent, possibly due effects on the vasculature. These results suggest that care is needed in comparing experiments with different anesthesia agents and physiological factors need to be considered with ultrasound-induced BBB disruption.

  13. Determination of hair ketamine cut-off value from Hong Kong ketamine users by LC-MS/MS analysis.

    PubMed

    Leung, K Wing; Wong, Zack C F; Ho, Janet Y M; Yip, Ada W S; Ng, Jenny S C; Ip, Stanley P H; Ng, Winki Y Y; Ho, Karen K L; Duan, Ran; Zhu, Kevin Y; Tsim, Karl W K

    2016-02-01

    Ketamine is one of the most frequent abused drugs in Hong Kong and South-East Asia, and the cases of ketamine abused have been reported worldwide. Hair has been commonly used as a specimen for the proof of chronic drug abused because of its non-invasiveness and long detection windows. The determinations of ketamine in hair with varieties of state-of-the-art instruments and detection methods have been developed in the past decade; however, the cut-off value for ketamine abuser has not been developed according to the international guidelines. The aim of this study is to propose a cut-off value for ketamine in hair by analyzing ketamine and its metabolite norketamine by LC-MS/MS method in a population of ketamine users in Hong Kong. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) for ketamine and norketamine were 20pg/mg and 100pg/mg, respectively. From 977 ketamine abusers, the cut-off value for ketamine in hair was proposed to be 400pg/mg of hair. This proposed cut-off value is the concentration of hair ketamine when over 90% of samples are being detected with the presence of norketamine, which is a proof of ketamine abuse. This value could be applied as a screening or occupational cut-off for reference. PMID:26750989

  14. Repeated ketamine administration alters N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor subunit gene expression: Implication of genetic vulnerability for ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ke; Lipsky, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    For more than 40 years following its approval by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as an anesthetic, ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been used as a tool of psychiatric research. As a psychedelic drug, ketamine induces psychotic symptoms, cognitive impairment, and mood elevation, which resemble some symptoms of schizophrenia. Recreational use of ketamine has been increasing in recent years. However, little is known of the underlying molecular mechanisms responsible for ketamine-associated psychosis. Recent animal studies have shown that repeated ketamine administration significantly increases NMDA receptor subunit gene expression, in particular subunit 1 (NR1 or GluN1) levels. This results in neurodegeneration, supporting a potential mechanism where up-regulation of NMDA receptors could produce cognitive deficits in chronic ketamine abuse patients. In other studies, NMDA receptor gene variants are associated with addictive behavior. Here, we focus on the roles of NMDA receptor gene subunits in ketamine abuse and ketamine psychosis and propose that full sequencing of NMDA receptor genes may help explain individual vulnerability to ketamine abuse and ketamine-associated psychosis. PMID:25245072

  15. Cardiorespiratory and antinociceptive effects of two different doses of lidocaine administered to horses during a constant intravenous infusion of xylazine and ketamine

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of a constant rate infusion (CRI) of lidocaine during xylazine and ketamine anesthesia in horses and aimed to correlate these effects with cardiorespiratory variables, bispectral index (BIS) and plasma lidocaine concentrations. Six adult crossbred mares weighing 320–400 kg were anesthetized on three different occasions. Sedation was performed with xylazine (0.75 mg/kg IV) and anesthetic induction with guaifenesin (75 mg/kg IV) and ketamine (2 mg/kg IV). Anesthesia was maintained with 37.5 μg/kg/min of xylazine and 87.5 μg/kg/min of ketamine both administered intravenously for 75 min. The three treatments consisted of: lidocaine (loading dose: 5 mg/kg, CRI: 100 μg/kg/min; THL); lidocaine (loading dose: 2.5 mg/kg; CRI: 50 μg/kg/min: TLL); and saline (TS); all given 15 min after induction and maintained for 1 h. Antinociception was measured by response to electrical stimulation and bispectral index (BIS) was recorded during anesthesia. Parametric and non-parametric data were compared using ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls and Friedman tests, respectively. Results Plasma lidocaine concentrations peaked at the end of lidocaine loading dose and was greater in THL (9.61 ± 2.75 μg/mL) vs TLL (4.50 ± 3.34 μg/mL). Electrical noxious stimulation caused purposeful movement in all horses from TS, but no response in THL. The BIS was decreased in THL only and was less when compared to the other treatments throughout anesthesia. Blood pressure, PaO2 and PaCO2 increased and heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), pH, total plasma protein and temperature decreased during anesthesia in all treatments. PaCO2 and HR were greater and RR and pH less in THL compared to TLL and TS at 30 min during anesthesia. All recoveries were considered excellent. Time to standing was longer after THL (60 ± 20 min) than following TLL and TS (32 ± 17 and 30 ± 15 min, respectively

  16. Effects of Ketamine on Neuronal Spontaneous Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents and Miniature Excitatory Postsynaptic Currents in the Somatosensory Cortex of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chengdong; Zhang, Yajun; Zhang, Yu; Cao, Song; Wang, Yuan; Fu, Bao; Yu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ketamine is a commonly used intravenous anesthetic which produces dissociation anesthesia, analgesia, and amnesia. The mechanism of ketamine-induced synaptic inhibition in high-level cortical areas is still unknown. We aimed to elucidate the effects of different concentrations of ketamine on the glutamatergic synaptic transmission of the neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex by using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Methods: Sprague-Dawley rats (11–19 postnatal days, n=36) were used to obtain brain slices (300 μM). Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (data from 40 neurons) were recorded at a command potential of -70 mV in the presence of bicuculline (a competitive antagonist of GABAA receptors, 30 μM) and strychnine (glycine receptor antagonist, 30 μM). Miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (data from 40 neurons) were also recorded when 1 μM of tetrodotoxin was added into the artificial cerebrospinal fluid. We used GraphPad Prism5for statistical analysis. Significant differences in the mean amplitude and frequency were tested using the Student paired 2-tailed t test. Values of P<0.05 were considered significant. Results: Different concentrations of ketamine inhibited the frequency and amplitude of the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents as well as the amplitude of the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents in a concentration-dependent manner, but they exerted no significant effect on the frequency of the miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. Conclusion: Ketamine inhibited the excitatory synaptic transmission of the neurons in the primary somatosensory cortex. The inhibition may have been mediated by a reduction in the sensitivity of the postsynaptic glutamatergic receptors. PMID:27365548

  17. A comparison of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Joshiraj, Bandi; Chaudhary, Lalita; Hayaran, Nitin; Kaur, Manpreet; Jain, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: We designed a study to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone in search of an ideal sedation regime, which would achieve better intubating conditions, hemodynamic stability, and sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients of age group 18-60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each in this prospective randomized controlled double-blinded study. Groups I and II patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at 0.5 mcg/kg/h. Upon completion of the dexmedetomidine bolus, Group I patients received 15 mg of ketamine and an infusion of ketamine at 20 mg/h followed by awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation, while Group II patients upon completion of dexmedetomidine bolus received plain normal saline instead of ketamine. Hemodynamic variables like heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram changes, sedation score (modified Observer assessment of alertness/sedation score), intubation score (vocal cord movement and coughing), grimace score, time taken for intubation, amount of lignocaine used were noted during the course of study. Patient satisfaction score and level of recall were assessed during the postoperative visit the next day. Results: Group I patients maintained a stable HR and MAP (<10% fall when compared with the baseline value). Sedation score (3.47 vs. 3.93) and patient satisfaction score were better in Group I patients. There was no significant difference in intubation scores, grimace scores, oxygen saturation and level of recall when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination in awake fiberoptic nasotracheal

  18. ANESTHESIA MANAGEMENT IN AN INFANT WITH GLYCOGEN STORAGE DISEASE TYPE II (POMPE DISEASE).

    PubMed

    Al Atassi, Abdulaleem; Al Zughaibi, Nezar; Naeim, Anas; Al Basha, Abdulatif; Dimitriou, Vassilios

    2015-10-01

    Pompe or Glycogen Storage Disease type II (GSD-II) is a genetic disorder affecting both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Historically, patients with the infantile form usually die within the first year of life due to cardiac and respiratory failure. Recently a promising enzyme replacement therapy has resulted in improved clinical outcomes and a resurgence of elective anesthesia for these patients. Understanding the unique cardiac physiology in patients with GSD-II is essential to providing safe general anesthesia. Additional care in maximizing coronary perfusion pressure and minimizing arrhythmia risk must be given. For these reasons, it is recommended that anesthesia for infantile Pompe patients should specifically avoid propofol or high concentrations of sevoflurane and, instead, use an agent such as ketamine as the cornerstone for induction in order to better support coronary perfusion pressure and to avoid decreasing diastolic blood pressure (DBP) with vasodilatory agents. We present the anesthetic technique in a case of infantile type Pompe disease. PMID:26860026

  19. Types of Anesthesia

    MedlinePlus

    ... some way and can be administered using various methods and different medications. Here's a basic look at each kind: Local anesthesia. An anesthetic drug (which can be given as a shot, spray, or ointment) numbs only a small, specific area ...

  20. [Safety and efficacy of ketamine for pain relief].

    PubMed

    Niesters, Marieke; Dahan, Albert; van Kleef, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous ketamine treatment is frequently used for the management of chronic pain, especially in those patients who do not benefit from other therapies. In this commentary we discuss the efficacy of ketamine for relief of chronic pain and ketamine's safety profile. A review of the literature indicates that only a few studies show that intravenous ketamine has analgesic effects that persist beyond the infusion period, an effect that occurs in about two-thirds of patients. Ketamine has multiple safety issues, ranging from psychotomimetic and schizotypal symptoms, sympathetic stimulation, tachycardia and hypertension, and damage to the liver and the urogenital tract. Damage to the urogenital tract seems to be restricted to individuals who chronically abuse ketamine. We indicate the need for large randomized trials in which ketamine is compared with an 'active' placebo. PMID:27189097

  1. Non-Operating Room Anesthesia in the Endoscopy Unit.

    PubMed

    Bhavani, Sekar

    2016-07-01

    The term, non-operating room anesthesia, describes a location remote from the main operating suites and closer to the patient, including areas that offer specialized procedures, like endoscopy suites, cardiac catheterization laboratories, bronchoscopy suites, and invasive radiology suites. There has been an exponential growth in such procedures and they present challenges in both organizational aspects and administration of anesthesia. This article explores the requirements for the location, preoperative evaluation and patient selection, monitoring, anesthesia technique, and postoperative management at these sites. There is a need to better define the role of the anesthesia personnel at these remote sites. PMID:27372771

  2. [Anesthesia in ophthalmology].

    PubMed

    Stefăniu, I; Zemba, M; Guţă, C

    1996-01-01

    Some problems of the regional anesthesia are discussed in the first part of the paper: the kind and the length of the needles, the anesthetic substances used, the retrobulbar and parabulbar technique, the complications. In the second part of the paper the effects of the drugs used in general anesthesia on the intraocular pressure and the possibilities of preventing and treating the oculocardiac reflex are show. PMID:8962862

  3. Use of anesthesia dramatically alters the oral glucose tolerance and insulin secretion in C57Bl/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Windeløv, Johanne A; Pedersen, Jens; Holst, Jens J

    2016-06-01

    Evaluation of the impact of anesthesia on oral glucose tolerance in mice. Anesthesia is often used when performing OGTT in mice to avoid the stress of gavage and blood sampling, although anesthesia may influence gastrointestinal motility, blood glucose, and plasma insulin dynamics. C57Bl/6 mice were anesthetized using the following commonly used regimens: (1) hypnorm/midazolam repetitive or single injection; (2) ketamine/xylazine; (3) isoflurane; (4) pentobarbital; and (5) A saline injected, nonanesthetized group. Oral glucose was administered at time 0 min and blood glucose measured in the time frame -15 to +150 min. Plasma insulin concentration was measured at time 0 and 20 min. All four anesthetic regimens resulted in impaired glucose tolerance compared to saline/no anesthesia. (1) hypnorm/midazolam increased insulin concentrations and caused an altered glucose tolerance; (2) ketamine/xylazine lowered insulin responses and resulted in severe hyperglycemia throughout the experiment; (3) isoflurane did not only alter the insulin secretion but also resulted in severe hyperglycemia; (4) pentobarbital resulted in both increased insulin secretion and impaired glucose tolerance. All four anesthetic regimens altered the oral glucose tolerance, and we conclude that anesthesia should not be used when performing metabolic studies in mice. PMID:27255361

  4. Are Anesthesia Providers Ready for Hypnosis? Anesthesia Providers' Attitudes Toward Hypnotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stone, Alexander B; Sheinberg, Rosanne; Bertram, Amanda; Seymour, Anastasia Rowland

    2016-04-01

    This study sought to measure current attitudes toward hypnosis among anesthesia providers using an in-person survey distributed at a single grand rounds at a single academic teaching hospital. One hundred twenty-six anesthesia providers (anesthesiologists and nurse anesthetists) were included in this study. A 10-question Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved questionnaire was developed. One hundred twenty-six (73% of providers at the meeting) anesthesia providers completed the survey. Of the respondents, 54 (43%) were anesthesiologists, 42 (33%) were trainees (interns/residents/fellows) in anesthesia, and 30 (24%) were nurse anesthetists. Over 70% of providers, at each level of training, rated their knowledge of hypnosis as either below average or having no knowledge. Fifty-two (42%) providers agreed or strongly agreed that hypnotherapy has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia, while 103 (83%) believed that positive suggestion has a place in the clinical practice of anesthesia (p < .0001). Common reasons cited against using hypnosis were that it is too time consuming (41%) and requires special training (34%). Only three respondents (2%) believed that there were no reasons for using hypnosis in their practice. These data suggest that there is a self-reported lack of knowledge about hypnosis among anesthesia providers, although many anesthesia providers are open to the use of hypnosis in their clinical practice. Anesthesia providers are more likely to support the use of positive suggestion in their practice than hypnosis. Practical concerns should be addressed if hypnosis and therapeutic verbal techniques are to gain more widespread use. PMID:27003489

  5. Dose regimens, variability, and complications associated with using repeat-bolus dosing to extend a surgical plane of anesthesia in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-11-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine-xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  6. Recovery from desflurane anesthesia in horses with and without post-anesthetic xylazine

    PubMed Central

    Aarnes, Turi K.; Bednarski, Richard M.; Bertone, Alicia L.; Hubbell, John A.E.; Lerche, Phillip

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare recovery from desflurane anesthesia in horses with or without post-anesthetic xylazine. Six adult horses were anesthetized on 2 occasions, 14 d apart using a prospective, randomized crossover design. Horses were sedated with xylazine, induced to lateral recumbency with ketamine and diazepam, and anesthesia was maintained with desflurane. One of 2 treatments was administered intravenously at the end of anesthesia: xylazine [0.2 mg/kg body weight (BW)] or an equivalent volume of saline. Recovery parameters were recorded and assessed by 2 blinded observers. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to analyze recovery data. Heart rate, arterial blood pressures, and arterial blood gas data were analyzed using 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures. Values of P < 0.05 were considered significant. Duration of anesthesia was not different between groups. Administration of xylazine at the end of desflurane anesthesia was associated with significantly longer times to first movement, endotracheal tube removal, first attempt to achieve sternal recumbency, sternal recumbency, first attempt to stand, and standing. Number of attempts to stand and quality of recovery scores were not different between groups. Administering xylazine after desflurane anesthesia resulted in longer recovery times. Recovery scores were not significantly different between groups. PMID:24688171

  7. REVIEWING THE KETAMINE MODEL FOR SCHIZOPHRENIA

    PubMed Central

    Frohlich, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The observation that antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR), such as phencyclidine (PCP) and ketamine, transiently induce symptoms of acute schizophrenia had led to a paradigm shift from dopaminergic to glutamatergic dysfunction in pharmacological models of schizophrenia. The glutamate hypothesis can explain negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia better than the dopamine hypothesis, and has the potential to explain dopamine dysfunction itself. The pharmacological and psychomimetic effects of ketamine, which is safer for human subjects than phencyclidine, are herein reviewed. Ketamine binds to a variety of receptors, but principally acts at the NMDAR, and convergent genetic and molecular evidence point to NMDAR hypofunction in schizophrenia. Furthermore, NMDAR hypofunction can explain connectional and oscillatory abnormalities in schizophrenia in terms of both weakened excitation of inhibitory -aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons that synchronize cortical networks and disinhibition of principal cells. Individuals with prenatal aberrations of NMDAR might experience the onset of schizophrenia towards the completion of synaptic pruning in adolescence, when network connectivity drops below a critical value. We conclude that ketamine challenge is useful for studying the positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms, dopaminergic and GABAergic dysfunction, age of onset, functional dysconnectivity, and abnormal cortical oscillations observed in acute schizophrenia. PMID:24257811

  8. Ketamine alters oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Fábio V.; Cornélio, Alianda M.; Scheffer-Teixeira, Robson; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Tort, Adriano B. L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that higher order oscillatory interactions such as cross-frequency coupling are important for brain functions that are impaired in schizophrenia, including perception, attention and memory. Here we investigated the dynamics of oscillatory coupling in the hippocampus of awake rats upon NMDA receptor blockade by ketamine, a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. Ketamine (25, 50 and 75 mg/kg i.p.) increased gamma and high-frequency oscillations (HFO) in all depths of the CA1-dentate axis, while theta power changes depended on anatomical location and were independent of a transient increase of delta oscillations. Phase coherence of gamma and HFO increased across hippocampal layers. Phase-amplitude coupling between theta and fast oscillations was markedly altered in a dose-dependent manner: ketamine increased hippocampal theta-HFO coupling at all doses, while theta-gamma coupling increased at the lowest dose and was disrupted at the highest dose. Our results demonstrate that ketamine alters network interactions that underlie cognitively relevant theta-gamma coupling. PMID:23907109

  9. Comparison of three different sedative-anaesthetic protocols (ketamine, ketamine-medetomidine and alphaxalone) in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Handling of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) usually requires chemical restraint. Ketamine has been associated with muscle damage in primates, while common marmosets, compared to other primates, additionally display an exceptional high sensitivity to ketamine-associated side-effects. Notably, muscle twitching movements of limbs and hands, and a marked increase in salivation are observed. We investigated two alternative intramuscular (i.m.) immobilisation protocols against ketamine (50 mg/kg; protocol 1) in a double-blind randomised crossover study in ten healthy adult common marmosets for use as a safe reliable, short-term immobilisation and sedation. These protocols comprised: alphaxalone (12 mg/kg; protocol 2) and 25 mg/kg ketamine combined with 0.50 mg/kg medetomidine (reversal with 2.5 mg/kg atipamezole; protocol 3A). Following completion and unblinding, the project was extended with an additional protocol (3B), comprising 25 mg/kg ketamine combined with 0.05 mg/kg medetomidine (reversal with 0.25 mg/kg atipamezole, twice with 35 min interval). Results All protocols in this study provided rapid onset (induction times <5 min) of immobilisation and sedation. Duration of immobilisation was 31.23 ± 22.39 min, 53.72 ± 13.08 min, 19.73 ± 5.74 min, and 22.78 ± 22.37 min for protocol 1, 2, 3A, and 3B, respectively. Recovery times were 135.84 ± 39.19 min, 55.79 ± 11.02 min, 405.46 ± 29.81 min, and 291.91 ± 80.34 min, respectively. Regarding the quality, and reliability (judged by pedal withdrawal reflex, palpebral reflex and muscle tension) of all protocols, protocol 2 was the most optimal. Monitored vital parameters were within clinically acceptable limits during all protocols and there were no fatalities. Indication of muscle damage as assessed by AST, LDH and CK values was most prominent elevated in protocol 1, 3A, and 3B. Conclusions We conclude that intramuscular administration of 12

  10. Potential benefit of lamotrigine in managing ketamine use disorder.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ming-Chyi; Chen, Lian-Yu; Chen, Chih-Ken; Lin, Shih-Ku

    2016-02-01

    Ketamine is an anesthetic derivative of phencyclidine (PCP; 'Angel dust') with dissociative, analgesic and psychedelic properties. Ketamine has become a popular recreational drug of abuse in many parts of the world in recent years. The preclinical studies demonstrate the reinforcing effects of ketamine and long-term ketamine abuse induces a delayed and persistent upregulation of dopamine system. In humans, there have been concerns about its liability to development of addiction. The dilemma of mental professionals in managing the treatment-seeking ketamine abusers comes from a lack of effective pharmacotherapy. Limiting evidence showed that lamotrigine, which inhibits glutamate release, is effective to reduce cocaine craving. We propose that lamotrigine might be beneficial for managing ketamine use disorder clinically. We also reported one case of ketamine use disorder who experienced a great reduction in craving and ketamine use after taking lamotrigine. Although the mechanisms underlying neuroadaptation and reward related to ketamine are not entirely clear, future clinical trials are needed to advance our understanding of the benefit yielded by lamotrigine to treat ketamine use disorder. PMID:26632202

  11. [Anesthesia outside the core operating area].

    PubMed

    Deckert, D; Zecha-Stallinger, A; Haas, T; von Goedecke, A; Lederer, W; Wenzel, V

    2007-10-01

    The number of diagnostic and surgical procedures being performed outside the core operating area is growing disproportionately. Due to the higher perioperative risk for such patients, anesthesia should only be provided by a very experienced anesthesiologist, even for supposedly small interventions. At these locations, timely and direct access to the anesthesia machine and/or the patient is often limited and if additional personnel or supplies are required, substantial time delays usually occur and should be allowed for. Standard operating procedures that are optimized to local requirements and providing a specially equipped anesthesia trolley for diagnostic and surgical procedures outside of the core operating area, may decrease the likelihood of complications induced by poorly equipped anesthesia workplaces. For electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), the standard drugs are methohexital in combination with short-acting opioids, such as remifentanil and succinylcholine. Significant variations in arterial blood pressure and heart rate are possible. Anesthesia induction in children with a known difficult airway or difficult intravascular access should initially be performed in a location with optimal infrastructure with subsequent transfer to the diagnostic or surgical suite outside the core operating area. Before entering the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suite, personal ferromagnetic items (e.g. pens, credit cards, stethoscopes, keys, telephones, USB sticks) should be removed to prevent injury and data loss; a MRI-compatible anesthesia machine and equipment is compulsory. Patients with cardiac pacemakers, cochlea implants, aneurysm or other clips, metallic-based tattoos or make-up are not normally compatible with MRI. General anesthesia should be preferred over conscious sedation for magnetic resonance imaging and ear protection is necessary for anesthetized patients. Gastroscopy in children should be performed under general anesthesia; and when concluding the

  12. Awareness under general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sigalovsky, Natalie

    2003-10-01

    General anesthesia aims to eliminate patients' awareness of excruciating pain during surgery. Nevertheless, rare occurrences of patient awareness continue because the problem is not yet completely preventable. One study puts the incidence of awareness at 0.18% for patients receiving muscle relaxants and at 0.10% for patients not given relaxant drugs. Awareness experiences frighten patients and impact their implicit and explicit memories in ways that can leave a lifetime of residual emotional and psychological problems ranging from sleep disturbances, nightmares, and daytime anxiety that may subside with time to development of post-traumatic stress disorder. Most anesthetists monitor depth of anesthesia by assessing intraoperative hemodynamic responses to surgical stimuli--an approach questioned by some authors. Several depth-of-anesthesia monitors are available, but there is no ideal monitor that is 100% reliable. This review provides an overview of literature that reports findings associated with the monitoring and occurrence of intraoperative awareness. These studies indicate assessment methods that can be trusted when we provide general anesthesia and what measures can be taken to prevent recall by patients under general anesthesia. PMID:14625975

  13. Robotic Anesthesia – A Vision for the Future of Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Hemmerling, Thomas M; Taddei, Riccardo; Wehbe, Mohamad; Morse, Joshua; Cyr, Shantale; Zaouter, Cedrick

    2011-01-01

    Summary This narrative review describes a rationale for robotic anesthesia. It offers a first classification of robotic anesthesia by separating it into pharmacological robots and robots for aiding or replacing manual gestures. Developments in closed loop anesthesia are outlined. First attempts to perform manual tasks using robots are described. A critical analysis of the delayed development and introduction of robots in anesthesia is delivered. PMID:23905028

  14. Sevoflurane-emergence agitation: Effect of supplementary low-dose oral ketamine premedication in preschool children undergoing dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Khattab, Ahmed Metwally; El-Seify, Zeinab Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The use of sevoflurane in pediatric anesthesia, which could enable a more rapid emergence and recovery, is complicated by the frequent occurrence of post-anesthesia agitation. This study aims to test the efficacy of adding a low dose of ketamine orally, as a supplement to the midazolam-based oral premedication for reducing sevoflurane-related emergence agitation. Materials and Methods: Ninety-two preschool children, aged between two and six years, with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, scheduled for elective dental filling and extractions under general anesthesia were included. The patients were allocated into two groups: Group M (46 patients) received oral midazolam 0.5 mg/kg, mixed with ibuprofen 10 mg/kg, while group KM (46 patients) received a similar premedication mixture, in addition to ketamine 2 mg/kg. The acceptance of the drug mixture, the onset of action, and the occurrence of vomiting were monitored over the next 30 minutes. Induction of anesthesia was carried out using sevoflurane 8 Vol% in 100% oxygen via face mask. Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane 1.5-2 Vol% in an oxygen-nitrous oxide mixture. After extubation, the standard scoring scale was used for assessing the quality of emergence. Agitation parameters were measured using a five-point scale. Agitated children were managed by giving intravenous increments of fentanyl 1 μg/ kg. The time of hospital discharge allowance was recorded. Results: Drug palatability, vomiting, and onset of action of premedication; showed no significant differences between both groups. Time of eye opening after discontinuation of sevoflurane showed no significant differences between both groups. Postoperative agitation score and rescue fentanyl consumption were higher in group M than in group KM on admission to the PACU (P < 0.01). The time of hospital discharge allowance in group M was longer than in group KM (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Adding a low dose of

  15. Neurocognitive effects of ketamine and association with antidepressant response in individuals with treatment-resistant depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Murrough, James W; Burdick, Katherine E; Levitch, Cara F; Perez, Andrew M; Brallier, Jess W; Chang, Lee C; Foulkes, Alexandra; Charney, Dennis S; Mathew, Sanjay J; Iosifescu, Dan V

    2015-04-01

    The glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist ketamine displays rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD); however, the potential for adverse neurocognitive effects in this population has not received adequate study. The current study was designed to investigate the delayed neurocognitive impact of ketamine in TRD and examine baseline antidepressant response predictors in the context of a randomized controlled trial. In the current study, 62 patients (mean age = 46.2 ± 12.2) with TRD free of concomitant antidepressant medication underwent neurocognitive assessments using components of the MATRICS Consensus Cognitive Battery (MCCB) before and after a single intravenous infusion of ketamine (0.5 mg/kg) or midazolam (0.045 mg/kg). Participants were randomized to ketamine or midazolam in a 2:1 fashion under double-blind conditions and underwent depression symptom assessments at 24, 48, 72 h, and 7 days post treatment using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Post-treatment neurocognitive assessment was conducted once at 7 days. Neurocognitive performance improved following the treatment regardless of treatment condition. There was no differential effect of treatment on neurocognitive performance and no association with antidepressant response. Slower processing speed at baseline uniquely predicted greater improvement in depression at 24 h following ketamine (t = 2.3, p = 0.027), while controlling for age, depression severity, and performance on other neurocognitive domains. In the current study, we found that ketamine was devoid of adverse neurocognitive effects at 7 days post treatment and that slower baseline processing speed was associated with greater antidepressant response. Future studies are required to further define the neurocognitive profile of ketamine in clinical samples and to identify clinically useful response moderators. PMID:25374095

  16. In vivo ketamine-induced changes in [11C]ABP688 binding to metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5

    PubMed Central

    DeLorenzo, Christine; DellaGioia, Nicole; Bloch, Michael; Sanacora, Gerard; Nabulsi, Nabeel; Abdallah, Chadi; Yang, Jie; Wen, Ruofeng; Mann, J. John; Krystal, John H.; Parsey, Ramin V.; Carson, Richard E.; Esterlis, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Background At subanesthetic doses, ketamine, an N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor antagonist, increases glutamate release. Here, we imaged the acute effect of ketamine on brain metabotropic glutamatergic receptors subtype 5 (mGluR5) with a high affinity PET ligand [11C]ABP688 ((E)-3-((6-methylpyridin-2-yl)ethynyl)-cyclohex-2-enone-O-11C-methyl-oxime), a negative allosteric modulator of mGluR5. Methods Ten healthy nonsmoking human volunteers (34±13 years old) received two [11C]ABP688 PET scans on the same day – before (scan 1) and during i.v. ketamine administration (0.23mg/kg over 1min, then 0.58mg/kg over 1h; scan 2). PET data were acquired for 90 min immediately following [11C]ABP688 bolus injection. Input functions were obtained through arterial blood sampling with metabolite analysis. Results A significant reduction in [11C]ABP688 volume of distribution (VT) was observed in scan 2 relative to scan 1 of 21.3 ± 21.4%, on average, in the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, ventral striatum, parietal lobe, dorsal putamen, dorsal caudate, amygdala, and hippocampus. There was a significant increase in measurements of dissociative state after ketamine initiation (p<0.05) that resolved after completion of the scan. Discussion This study provides first evidence that ketamine administration decreases [11C]ABP688 binding in vivo in human subjects. Results suggest that [11C]ABP688 binding is sensitive to ketamine-induced effects, although the high individual variation in ketamine response requires further examination. PMID:25156701

  17. Detecting ketamine in beverage residues: Application in date rape detection.

    PubMed

    Albright, Jessica A; Stevens, Sarah A; Beussman, Douglas J

    2012-05-01

    Ketamine can be used to facilitate date-rape when unknowingly spiked into a victim's beverage. If a biological sample is not available from the victim, the beverage container might be the only remaining source of forensic evidence. We present a rapid, simple analysis method for the detection of ketamine in wet or dry beverage residues based on liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Wet residues consist of the final few drops (<1 ml) in a container while dry residues are the remains once all liquid has evaporated. By using LC-MS, which readily handles aqueous samples, often no derivatization or sample extraction is needed, thus reducing analysis time and lab technician involvement. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) provides an enhancement in both selectivity and sensitivity. We have studied a range of beverages and determined limits of detection between 1.2 × 10-3 and 1.3 × 10-4 mg/ml, compared to 0.21-0.85 mg/ml used in most date-rape scenarios. This paper represents the first published report of using LC-MS/MS for the analysis of beverage residues for the presence of a date-rape drug. This method could replace the current gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods and provide a faster, more selective method for the analysis of date-rape drugs, requiring virtually no sample preparation. PMID:22114065

  18. Antidepressant-like effect of low dose ketamine and scopolamine co-treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Petryshen, Tracey L; Lewis, Michael C; Dennehy, Kelly A; Garza, Jacob C; Fava, Maurizio

    2016-05-01

    Current medications for depression typically require weeks of treatment before significant clinical improvement is observed, and are only effective in a relatively small subset of patients. Recent human clinical studies have demonstrated that ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, and scopolamine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, produce rapid antidepressant responses within hours of administration, and are effective in treatment-resistant patients. We hypothesize that efficacy and tolerability may be improved by combining lower doses of both drugs in the treatment of depression. We therefore conducted a preclinical study in mice to assess whether co-treatment of low doses of scopolamine and ketamine that alone are ineffective has antidepressant-like effects in the forced swim test (FST), an assay with predictive validity for antidepressant drugs. Whereas single administration of ketamine (3mg/kg intraperitoneal [i.p.]) or scopolamine (0.1mg/kg i.p.) did not reduce immobility time in the FST, co-administration of both drugs at these doses significantly reduced immobility time by 45% compared to vehicle treated controls. These results suggest that the combination of subeffective doses of ketamine and scopolamine may prove efficacious for the treatment of depression and should be evaluated in human clinical trials. PMID:27033002

  19. Effects of medetomidine and ketamine on the regional cerebral blood flow in cats: a SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Waelbers, T; Peremans, K; Vermeire, S; Piron, K; Doom, M; Boer, V O; de Leeuw, H; Vente, M A D; Dobbeleir, A; Gielen, I; Audenaert, K; Polis, I

    2012-04-01

    Brain perfusion can be investigated using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and the intravenous injection of (99m)technetium ethyl cysteinate dimer ((99m)Tc-ECD). However, sedation using medetomidine, an α(2)-agonist, or anaesthesia using medetomidine and ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate-(NMDA)-antagonist, may be required for SPECT studies in cats but can affect the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). The effects of medetomidine, with or without ketamine, on regional brain perfusion were therefore investigated in six cats under three conditions. Injection of tracer occurred before sedation or anaesthesia (condition A), following intramuscular (IM) sedation with medetomidine (condition M) or after IM anaesthesia with medetomidine and ketamine (condition MK). Medetomidine and medetomidine with ketamine caused a significantly higher total tracer uptake in all brain regions. Semi-quantification of brain perfusion gave lower perfusion indices in several sub-cortical regions in conditions M and MK, compared to A. Left-right differences were observed in the temporal cortex (A), the temporal, parietal cortex and the thalamus (M) and the frontal cortex (MK). A significantly higher perfusion index in the sub-cortical regions, compared to the whole cortex, was only present in condition A. This study showed that caution is needed when quantifying brain perfusion indices when using sedative or anaesthetic agents that may affect rCBF. PMID:21636298

  20. Longitudinal Trajectories of Ketamine Use among Young Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Shin, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Background Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that became increasing popular in the club and rave scene in the 1980s and 1990s. Reports surfaced in the late 1990s indicating that ketamine was being injected in several U.S. cities by young injection drug users (IDUs). Since all studies on ketamine injection were cross-sectional, a longitudinal study was undertaken in 2005 to determine: characteristics of young IDUs who continue to inject ketamine; frequency of ketamine injection over an extended time period; risks associated with ongoing ketamine injection; and environmental factors that impact patterns of ketamine use. Methods Young IDUs aged 16 to 29 with a history of injecting ketamine (n=101) were recruited from public locations in Los Angeles and followed during a two-year longitudinal study. A semi-structured instrument captured quantitative and qualitative data on patterns of ketamine injection and other drug use. A statistical model sorted IDUs who completed three or more interviews (n=66) into three groups based upon patterns of ketamine injection at baseline and follow-up. Qualitative analysis focused on detailed case studies within each group. Results IDUs recruited at baseline were typically in their early 20s, male, heterosexual, white, and homeless. Longitudinal injection trajectories included: “Moderates,” who injected ketamine several times per year (n=5); “Occasionals,” who injected ketamine approximately once per year (n=21); and “Abstainers,” who did not inject any ketamine during follow-up (n=40). Findings suggest that ketamine is infrequently injected compared to other drugs such as heroin, cocaine, and methamphetamine. Most IDUs who begin injecting ketamine will stop or curb use due to: negative or ambivalent experiences associated with ketamine; an inability to find the drug due to declining supply; or maturing out of injecting drugs more generally. Conclusion Reducing ketamine injection among young IDUs may best be accomplished

  1. Prehospital Use of IM Ketamine for Sedation of Violent and Agitated Patients

    PubMed Central

    Scheppke, Kenneth A.; Braghiroli, Joao; Shalaby, Mostafa; Chait, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Violent and agitated patients pose a serious challenge for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. Rapid control of these patients is paramount to successful prehospital evaluation and also for the safety of both the patient and crew. Sedation is often required for these patients, but the ideal choice of medication is not clear. The objective is to demonstrate that ketamine, given as a single intramuscular injection for violent and agitated patients, including those with suspected excited delirium syndrome (ExDS), is both safe and effective during the prehospital phase of care, and allows for the rapid sedation and control of this difficult patient population. Methods We reviewed paramedic run sheets from five different catchment areas in suburban Florida communities. We identified 52 patients as having been given intramuscular ketamine 4mg/kg IM, following a specific protocol devised by the EMS medical director of these jurisdictions, to treat agitated and violent patients, including a subset of which would be expected to suffer from ExDS. Twenty-six of 52 patients were also given parenteral midazolam after medical control was obtained to prevent emergence reactions associated with ketamine. Results Review of records demonstrated that almost all patients (50/52) were rapidly sedated and in all but three patients no negative side effects were noted during the prehospital care. All patients were subsequently transported to the hospital before ketamine effects wore off. Conclusion Ketamine may be safely and effectively used by trained paramedics following a specific protocol. The drug provides excellent efficacy and few clinically significant side effects in the prehospital phase of care, making it an attractive choice in those situations requiring rapid and safe sedation especially without intravenous access. PMID:25493111

  2. The effects of small-dose ketamine on propofol sedation: respiration, postoperative mood, perception, cognition, and pain.

    PubMed

    Mortero, R F; Clark, L D; Tolan, M M; Metz, R J; Tsueda, K; Sheppard, R A

    2001-06-01

    We compared the effects of coadministration of propofol and small-dose ketamine to propofol alone on respiration during monitored anesthesia care. In addition, mood, perception, and cognition in the recovery room, and pain after discharge were evaluated. In the Propofol group (n = 20), patients received propofol 38 +/- 24 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1). The Coadministration group (n = 19) received propofol 33 +/- 13 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1) and ketamine 3.7 +/- 1.5 microg x kg(-1) x min(-1). Respiration was assessed by using end-expiratory PCO(2) measurements at nasal prongs. After surgeries, mood, perception, and thought were assessed by using visual analog scales, and cognition was assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Pain after discharge was assessed by a five-point rating scale in the evening for 5 days. End-expiratory PCO(2) was lower in the Coadministration group (P < 0.0001). Mood and MMSE scores were higher in the Coadministration group (P < 0.004 and P = 0.001, respectively). Pain scores and analgesic consumption after discharge were less in the Coadministration group (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively). We conclude that coadministration of small-dose ketamine attenuates propofol-induced hypoventilation, produces positive mood effects without perceptual changes after surgery, and may provide earlier recovery of cognition. PMID:11375826

  3. Ketamine protects hippocampal neurons from anoxia in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rothman, S M; Thurston, J H; Hauhart, R E; Clark, G D; Solomon, J S

    1987-06-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative, general anesthetic, blocks the excitation produced by activating one class of excitatory amino acid receptors, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in the rat. We have found that ketamine can protect hippocampal neurons in culture and slice from anoxia. When added to cultures immediately prior to anoxic exposure, ketamine prevented the neuronal destruction seen after a day of anoxia. Neurons appeared undamaged and had normal resting and action potentials. Adenosine triphosphate levels in ketamine-protected anoxic cultures were approximately two-thirds of normal controls. Ketamine also prevented the irreversible loss of the population spike seen in hippocampal slices after prolonged perfusion with anoxic buffer. These results suggest that ketamine may have therapeutic potential in preventing anoxic damage from stroke in man. PMID:2819768

  4. Anesthesia for fetal surgery.

    PubMed

    Cauldwell, Charles B

    2002-03-01

    Fetal surgery is the antenatal treatment of fetal malformations that cannot be adequately corrected after birth. Anesthesia for fetal surgery involves two patients, and issues of maternal safety, avoidance of fetal asphyxia, adequate fetal anesthesia and monitoring, and uterine relaxation are important. Communication with the surgeon to determine the surgical approach and need for uterine relaxation allows the anesthesiologist the ability to vary the anesthetic technique. Lessons learned from fetal surgery may help other neonates with life-threatening anomalies and may help understand the complex issues related to preterm labor. PMID:11892506

  5. Anaesthesia recovery quality after racemic ketamine or S-ketamine administration to male cats undergoing neutering surgery.

    PubMed

    Larenza, M P; Althaus, H; Conrot, A; Balmer, C; Schatzmann, U; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, R

    2008-12-01

    Postoperative anaesthesia recovery and analgesia qualities were compared in cats anaesthetised with racemic ketamine (RS-ket) or S-ketamine (S-ket) undergoing orchiectomy. Twenty client-owned male cats received medetomidine (0.03 mg/kg) and S-ket (6 mg/kg; n = 10) or RS-ket (10 mg/kg; n = 10), all intramuscularly. After routine orchiectomy, animals received atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) intramuscularly. Thirty and 60 min after atipamezole administration, one observer unaware of the treatment identity evaluated analgesia using a visual analogue scale (VAS) and, by means of four points scales, sedation, unprovoked behaviour and behavioural reactions to external stimuli. Cats with a VAS > or = 15 mm were to receive butorphanol. Times to sternal and standing positions were recorded. After 60 min, cats were given carprofen (4 mg/kg) subcutaneously. Anaesthesia with S-ket, at 60% of the RS-ket dose, provided faster recoveries. At 60 min, undisturbed cats in S-ket group had a trend towards fewer behavioural changes. Cats in RS-ket group were more sedate at 30 min and responded with a lower intensity to external stimulation. Immediate postoperative analgesia was considered adequate for both groups and no cat required butorphanol administration. PMID:19034844

  6. Ketamine inhibits human sperm function by Ca(2+)-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanqiao; Zou, Qianxing; Li, Bingda; Chen, Houyang; Du, Xiaohong; Weng, Shiqi; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Xuhui

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, which was widely used in human and animal medicine, has become a popular recreational drug, as it can induce hallucinatory effects. Ketamine abuse can cause serious damage to many aspects of the organism, mainly reflected in the nervous system and urinary system. It has also been reported that ketamine can impair the male genital system. However, the detailed effect of ketamine on human spermatozoa remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vitro effects of ketamine on human sperm functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were treated in vitro with different concentrations of ketamine (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 g/L). The results showed that 0.25-1 g/L ketamine inhibited sperm total motility, progressive motility and linear velocity, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the sperm's ability to penetrate viscous medium and the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were significantly inhibited by ketamine. Ketamine did not affect sperm viability, capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is a central factor in the regulation of human sperm function, was decreased by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the currents of the sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel, CatSper, which modulates Ca(2+) influx in sperm, were inhibited by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ketamine induces its toxic effects on human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca(2+)]i through inhibition of CatSper channel. PMID:27143628

  7. Cardiopulmonary effects of an intravenous infusion of guaifenesin, ketamine, and xylazine in dogs.

    PubMed

    Benson, G J; Thurmon, J C; Tranquilli, W J; Smith, C W

    1985-09-01

    A 5% solution of dextrose in water containing 50 mg of guaifenesin, 0.25 mg of xylazine, and 1 mg of ketamine/ml was infused IV at the rate of 2.2 ml X kg-1 X hour-1 in dogs. Heart rate, systemic vascular resistance, mean arterial blood pressure, rate-pressure product, and arterial oxygen tension were not altered significantly from baseline values during 2 hours of anesthesia. Cardiac index was significantly (P less than 0.05) decreased from base-line values. Hypoventilation resulted in increased arterial carbon dioxide tension and decreased arterial pH. After the dogs were given glycopyrrolate, cardiac index returned to base line, and heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and rate-pressure product were significantly greater (P less than 0.05) than base-line values. PMID:3931517

  8. Patterns of Ketamine Use Among Young Injection Drug Users†

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine is a dissociative anesthetic that has emerged as an increasingly popular choice among young drug users. Recent research indicates the presence of hidden populations of young people who inject ketamine in New York and other U.S. cities. Applying an ethno-epidemiological approach, the authors recruited 40 young injection drug users (IDUs) (< 25 years old) in New York City to explore health risks associated with ketamine use. This analysis looks at the varying patterns and frequencies of ketamine injection by examining personal, social, and cultural aspects of these young people’s lives. We learned that drug-using histories, experiential dimensions, sociocultural characteristics, and associations with other young people help account for the different patterns of injecting ketamine within the sample. In particular, these findings indicate that young people who were more frequent ketamine injectors had the following characteristics: initiated injection drug use with ketamine; enjoyed the effects of ketamine, were stably housed; lived in the vicinity of New York City; and associated with others who also injected ketamine. PMID:17523582

  9. Immobilization of Norwegian reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) and Svalbard Reindeer (R. t. platyrhynchus) with medetomidine and medetomidine-ketamine and reversal of immobilization with atipamezole.

    PubMed

    Tyler, N J; Hotvedt, R; Blix, A S; Sørensen, D R

    1990-01-01

    The sedative action of medetomidine (-ketamine) was studied in 12 captive Norwegian semidomesticated reindeer (NR), including 4 newborn calves, and in 7 free-living Svalbard reindeer (SR). Medetomidine, with or without ketamine, caused effective, reliable immobilization in NR. Doses of 50-200 micrograms/kg medetomidine alone or 30-125 micrograms/kg medetomidine combined with greater than or equal to 300 micrograms/kg ketamine induced complete immobilization, good muscle relaxation and persistent, deep sedation with little respiratory depression in NR; SR required higher doses. Atipamezole successfully antagonized medetomidine (-ketamine) resulting in rapid and persistent reversal of immobilization in all cases (NR and SR). Both medetomidine and atipamezole had wide safety margins and no conspicuous lasting side effects after reversal. PMID:1983084

  10. Rapid label-free determination of ketamine in whole blood using secondary ion mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hua-Yang; Chen, Jung-Hsuan; Shyue, Jing-Jong; Shun, Chia-Tung; Chen, Huei-Wen; Liao, Su-Wei; Hong, Chih-Kang; Chen, Pai-Shan

    2015-10-01

    A fast and accurate drug screening to identify the possible presence of a wide variety of pharmaceutical and illicit drugs is increasingly requested in forensic and clinical toxicology. The current first-line screening relies on immunoassays. They determine only certain common drugs of which antibodies are commercially available. To address the issue, a rapid screening using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been developed. In the study, SIMS directly analyzed ketamine in whole blood without any pretreatment. While the untreated blood has a complicated composition, principal-components analysis (PCA) is used to detect unknown specimens by building up an analytical model from blank samples which were spiked with ketamine at 100 ng mL(-1), to simulate the presence of ketamine. Each characteristics m/z is normalized and scaled by multiplying the root square of intensity and square of corresponding m/z, developed by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Using linear regression and the result of PCA, this study enables to correctly distinguish ketamine positive and negative groups in an unknown set of specimens. The quantity of ketamine in an unknown set was determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as the reference methodology. Instead limited by commercially available antibodies, SIMS detects target molecules straight despite the label-free detection capabilities of SIMS, additional data processing (here, PCA) can be used to fully analyse the produced data, which extends the range of analytes of interest on drug screening. Furthermore, extremely low sample volume, 5 µL, is required owing to the high spatial resolution of SIMS. In addition, while the whole blood is analyzed within 3 min, the whole analysis has been shortened significantly and high throughput can be achieved. PMID:26078127

  11. [Patron saints of anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, K

    2014-12-01

    Patron saints act as facilitators between God and humans. Humans appeal to patron saints for support in devastating, often futile situations in life. Patron saints may intercede for trade and professional guilds, every so often they hold a protective hand over objects. Saint Barbara is venerated as the patron saint of surgeons. In anesthesia she also oversees barbiturates, protects anesthetized patients, anesthetists and anesthesia nursing personnel. Within the Anglo-American language area Saint René is venerated by anesthetists and anesthesia nursing personnel. During anesthesia or critical care treatment patient safety and welfare are entirely in the hands of anesthetists and intensivists. Especially in the borderland of critical illness and imminent death, it may be reassuring for religiously or spiritually orientated physicians and nurses that they can turn to "their" patron saints to intercede so that upcoming anesthetic procedures or intensive care interventions will meet with success. Hereby, the heavy burden of responsibility may be borne more easily and equanimously. PMID:25468256

  12. The Develoment of Anesthesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Audrey B.

    1982-01-01

    Until the eighteenth century, doctors were reluctant to use chemicals to alleviate pain because they accepted the religious/moral beliefs of their day, claiming that pain was beneficial for the body. Traces technical developments in the control of pain, discussing relationships of anesthesia to social, cultural, and scientific factors and…

  13. The Relationship Between Creatine and Whey Protein Supplements Consumption and Anesthesia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Kianoush; Gorji Mahlabani, Mohammad Amin; Tashayoie, Mohammad; Nasiri Nejad, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Because the trend of pharmacotherapy is toward controlling diet rather than administration of drugs, in our study we examined the probable relationship between Creatine (Cr) or Whey (Wh) consumption and anesthesia (analgesia effect of ketamine). Creatine and Wh are among the most favorable supplements in the market. Whey is a protein, which is extracted from milk and is a rich source of amino acids. Creatine is an amino acid derivative that can change to ATP in the body. Both of these supplements result in Nitric Oxide (NO) retention, which is believed to be effective in N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor analgesia. Objectives: The main question of this study was whether Wh and Cr are effective on analgesic and anesthetic characteristics of ketamine and whether this is related to NO retention or amino acids’ features Materials and Methods: We divided 30 male Wistar rats to three (n = 10) groups; including Cr, Wh and sham (water only) groups. Each group was administered (by gavage) the supplements for an intermediate dosage during 25 days. After this period, they became anesthetized using a Ketamine-Xylazine (KX) and their time to anesthesia and analgesia, and total sleep time were recorded. Results: Data were analyzed twice using the SPSS 18 software with Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test; first time we expunged the rats that didn’t become anesthetized and the second time we included all of the samples. There was a significant P-value (P < 0.05) for total anesthesia time in the second analysis. Bonferroni multiple comparison indicated that the difference was between Cr and Sham groups (P < 0.021). Conclusions: The data only indicated that there might be a significant relationship between Cr consumption and total sleep time. Further studies, with rats of different gender and different dosage of supplement and anesthetics are suggested. PMID:27110533

  14. Rectal Thiopental versus Intramuscular Ketamine in Pediatric Procedural Sedation and Analgesia; a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Azizkhani, Reza; Esmailian, Mehrdad; shojaei, Azadeh; Golshani, Keihan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Physicians frequently deal with procedures which require sedation of pediatric patients. Laceration repair is one of them. No study has been performed regarding the comparison between induction of sedation with sodium thiopental and ketamine in laceration repair. Therefore, the present study was aimed to comparison of induced sedation by rectal sodium thiopental and muscular injection of hydrochloride ketamine in pediatric patients need laceration repair. Methods: The presented study is a single-blinded clinical trial performed through 2013 to 2014 in Ayatollah Kashani and Alzahra Hospitals, Isfahan, Iran. Patients from 3 months to 14 years, needed sedation for laceration repair, were entered. Patients were sequentially evaluated and randomly categorized in two groups of hydrochloride ketamine with dose of 2-4 milligram per kilogram and sodium thiopental with dose of 25 milligram per kilogram. Demographic data and vital signs before drug administration and after induction of sedation, Ramsey score, time to onset of action, and sedation recovery time were evaluated. Chi-squared, Mann-Whitney, and Non-parametric analysis of covariance tests were used. P<0.05 was considered as a significant level. Results: In this study 60 pediatric patients were entered. 30 patients with mean age of 42.8±18.82 months were received sodium thiopental and the rest with mean age of 30.08±16.88 months given ketamine. Mann-Whitney test was showed that time to onset of action in sodium thiopental group (28.23±5.18 minutes) was significantly higher than ketamine (7.77±4.13 minutes), (p<0.001). The sedation recovery time in ketamine group (29.83±7.70) was higher than sodium thiopental. Depth of sedation had no significant difference between two groups based on Ramsey score (p=0.87). No significant difference was seen between two groups in the respiratory rate (df=1, 58; F=0.002; P=0.96) and heart rate (df=1, 58; F=0.98; P=0.33). However, arterial oxygen saturation level (df

  15. Vital signs monitoring during injectable and inhalant anesthesia in mice.

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Atsushi; Serizawa, Kazuya; Sato, Reiichiro; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Inomata, Tomo

    2015-01-01

    Selecting the appropriate anesthetic protocol for the individual animal is an essential part of laboratory animal experimentation. The present study compared the characteristics of four anesthetic protocols in mice, focusing on the vital signs. Thirty-two male ddY mice were divided into four groups and administered anesthesia as follows: pentobarbital sodium monoanaesthesia; ketamine and xylazine combined (K/X); medetomidine, midazolam, and butorphanol combined (M/M/B); and isoflurane. In each group, rectal temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate, and O2 saturation (SPO2) were measured, and the changes over time and instability in these signs were compared. The anesthetic depth was also evaluated in each mouse, and the percentage of mice achieving surgical anesthesia was calculated. K/X anesthesia caused remarkable bradycardia, while the respiratory rate and SPO2 were higher than with the others, suggesting a relatively strong cardiac influence and less respiratory depression. The M/M/B group showed a relatively lower heart rate and SPO2, but these abnormalities were rapidly reversed by atipamezole administration. The pentobarbital group showed a lower SPO2, and 62.5% of mice did not reach a surgical anesthetic depth. The isoflurane group showed a marked decrease in respiratory rate compared with the injectable anesthetic groups. However, it had the most stable SPO2 among the groups, suggesting a higher tidal volume. The isoflurane group also showed the highest heart rate during anesthesia. In conclusion, the present study showed the cardiorespiratory characteristics of various anesthetic protocols, providing basic information for selecting an appropriate anesthetic for individual animals during experimentation. PMID:25312399

  16. Awareness during general anesthesia: new technology for an old problem.

    PubMed

    Halliburton, J R

    1998-05-01

    The possibility of awareness during general anesthesia causes apprehension for the patient and the Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetist (CRNA). The goals of general anesthesia are to prevent the sensation of pain and produce a state of sedation, hypnosis, and unconsciousness so the patient will not remember the surgical procedure. An inadequate level of anesthesia can result in patient awareness during surgery. The current practice of anesthesia relies on indirect hemodynamic measurements such as blood pressure and heart rate to monitor the sedative hypnotic state of the patient's brain during general anesthesia. Hemodynamic responses are not reliable for predicting awareness just as blood pressure and heart rate are not indicative of consciousness. Electroencephalogram (EEG) waveforms are known to be affected by anesthetics. Characteristic EEG waveforms are a direct indication of the patient's level of consciousness. Unprocessed and computer-processed EEG recordings have been used in an attempt to monitor the patient's level of consciousness during general anesthesia. A raw or unprocessed EEG recording to monitor the level of consciousness during general anesthesia is problematic. The EEG signal is complex, affected by artifact, and it requires a dedicated interpreter. Conventional processed EEG monitoring systems are problematic because of the complexity of the equipment and technical difficulty of reading the EEG recording. The purpose of this article is to describe the history of awareness during anesthesia and introduce a new processed EEG monitor, the Bispectral Index (BIS) (Aspect Medical Systems, Inc., Natick, MA) with implications for future clinical use and research. PMID:9726194

  17. Anesthesia Methods in Laser Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Gaitan, Sergio; Markus, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Laser resurfacing technology offers the ability to treat skin changes that are the result of the aging process. One of the major drawbacks of laser resurfacing technologies is the pain associated with the procedure. The methods of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to help minimize the pain include both noninvasive and invasive procedures. The noninvasive procedures can be divided into topical, cryoanesthesia, and a combination of both. The invasive methods of anesthesia include injected forms (infiltrative, nerve blocks, and tumescent anesthesia) and supervised anesthesia (monitored anesthesia care and general anesthesia). In this review, the authors summarize the types of anesthesia used in laser resurfacing to aid the provider in offering the most appropriate method for the patient to have as painless a procedure as possible. PMID:23904819

  18. After Anesthesia: The Patient's Active Role Assists in Recovery

    MedlinePlus

    ... each year. The nurse anesthesia specialty has a history of nearly 150 years. CRNAs represent a commitment to high standards in a demanding field. The educational requirements to become a CRNA are extensive. Prior ...

  19. Comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine for premedication in pediatrics patients: A randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ravi; Santhosh, M.C.B.; Annigeri, Venkatesh M.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Goal of premedication in pediatric anesthesia are relieving pre and postoperative anxiety, good parental separation, and smooth induction of anesthesia. Anxiety can produce aggressive reactions, increased distress, increased postoperative pain and postoperative agitation. The benzodiazepine, midazolam, is the most frequently used premedication in pediatric anesthesia. Midazolam has a number of beneficial effects when used as premedication in children: Sedation, fast onset, and limited duration of action. Though midazolam has a number of beneficial effects, it is far from an ideal premedicant having untoward side effects such as paradoxical reaction, respiratory depression, cognitive impairment, amnesia, and restlessness. Dexmedetomidine is a newer α-2-agonist, which can be used as premedicant. Aims: To compare the level of sedation, parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative recovery of intranasal premedication with dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine combination in pediatric patients. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blind study. Subjects and Methods: After written informed consent from the patient's parents or legal guardian, 54 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged between 1 and 6 years, scheduled to undergo elective minor surgery were enrolled. In group D patient received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intranasally and in group DK received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine intranasally. Patients were assessed every 10 min for the level of sedation, parenteral separation, heart rate, and oxygen saturation by an independent observer. Mask acceptance and postoperative agitation were noted using an appropriate scale. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson Chi-square analysis to determine differences between two groups with respect to separation anxiety and acceptance of the anesthesia mask. Percentages used to represent frequencies. The level of significance was set at P< 0

  20. General anesthesia plus ilioinguinal nerve block versus spinal anesthesia for ambulatory inguinal herniorrhapy

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaíno-Martínez, Lucía; Gómez-Ríos, Manuel Ángel; López-Calviño, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate general anesthesia (GA) plus ilioinguinal nerve block (IIB) versus spinal anesthesia (SA) in patients scheduled for ambulatory inguinal hernia repair regarding pain management, anesthesia recovery and reducing potential complications. Materials and Methods: A double-blind, prospective, randomized, controlled study in patients American Society of Anesthesiologists I-III randomized into two groups: GA plus IIB group, induction of anesthesia with propofol, maintenance with sevoflurane, airway management with laryngeal mask allowing spontaneous ventilation and ultrasound-guided IIB; SA group, patients who underwent spinal block with 2% mepivacaine. The study variables were pain intensity, assessed by visual analog scale, analgesic requirements until hospital discharge, time to ambulation and discharge, postoperative complications-related to both techniques and satisfaction experienced. Results: Thirty-two patients were enrolled; 16 patients in each group. The differences regarding pain were statistically significant at 2 h of admission (P < 0.001) and at discharge (P < 0.001) in favor of the GA plus ilioinguinal block group. In addition in this group, analgesic requirements were lower than SA group (P < 0.001), with times of ambulation and discharge significantly shorter. The SA group had a higher tendency to develop complications and less satisfaction. Conclusion: General anesthesia plus IIB is better than SA regarding postoperative analgesia, time to mobilization and discharge, side-effect profile and satisfaction experienced by the patients. PMID:25422612

  1. Immobilization of free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed and brown-throated three-toed sloths using ketamine and medetomidine: a comparison of physiologic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher S; Siudak-Campfield, Joanna; Paul-Murphy, Joanne; Vaughan, Christopher; Ramirez, Oscar; Keuler, Nicholas S; Sladky, Kurt K

    2008-10-01

    Free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed sloths (Choloepus hoffmanni; n=26) and brown-throated three-toed sloths (Bradypus variegatus; n=15) were manually captured and immobilized with 2.5 mg/kg ketamine + 0.02 mg/kg medetomidine administered intramuscularly. Physical examinations were conducted on each sloth 10 min after initial injection, and blood, fecal, and ectoparasite samples were collected. Heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, indirect systolic blood pressure, and indirect peripheral oxygen saturation were monitored every 5 min for the duration of anesthesia. After 45 min, atipamazole (0.1 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, as an antagonist to medetomidine, in order to facilitate recovery. All recoveries were smooth, rapid, and uneventful. Physiologic parameters were compared across time, gender, and species. All sloths, regardless of species and gender, demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in heart rate and blood pressure, and an increase in respiratory rate, during the course of anesthesia. Peripheral oxygen saturation was similar for all sloths over time. There were significant species differences for heart rate (Choloepus > Bradypus), respiratory rate (Choloepus > Bradypus), and systolic blood pressure (Bradypus > Choloepus), while there were significant gender differences for body temperature (males > females) and blood pressure (males > females). Results of this study suggest that the ketamine-medetomidine mixture, as described above, is a safe and effective anesthetic combination in free-ranging two- and three-toed sloths, although peripheral blood pressure should be monitored during anesthesia. PMID:18957650

  2. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  3. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  4. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  5. 21 CFR 522.1222 - Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms. 522.1222 Section 522.1222 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1222 Ketamine hydrochloride injectable dosage forms....

  6. Analgesic effects of ketamine infusion therapy in korean patients with neuropathic pain: A 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jin Gu; Lee, Chul Joong; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Sim, Woo Seok; Shin, Byung Seop; Lee, Sang Hyun; Nahm, Francis Sahngun; Lee, Pyung Bok; Kim, Yong Chul; Lee, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    Background: The overexcitation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor complex appears to play a critical role in the development of neuropathic pain, and ketamine acts as an antagonist to that receptor. Some publications have reported on the prominent relief of neuropathic pain with intravenous or subcutaneous ketamine infusions or a single-dose intravenous ketamine injection despite adverse effects. Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of intravenous ketamine infusion therapy for neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatments. Secondary objectives included identifying the variables related to the analgesic effect and the pain descriptors susceptible to ketamine infusion. Methods: This 2-week, open-label, uncontrolled study was conducted in Korean patients with neuropathic pain recruited from the Samsung Seoul Hospital (Seoul, Republic of Korea) outpatient pain management unit. Patients were required to have a pain severity score >5 (visual analog scale [VAS], where 0 = no pain and 10 = worst pain imaginable) over a period of ≥1 month while on standard treatment. The patients were required to have shown no benefit from standard treatment and no pain relief lasting over 1 month. The ketamine infusion therapy was composed of 3 sessions performed consecutively every other day. Midazolam was administered concomitantly to reduce the occurrence of central nervous system-related adverse events (AEs) secondary to ketamine. Each session was as follows: ketamine 0.2 mg/kg and midazolam 0.1 mg/kg were administered intravenously for 5 minutes as a loading dose, followed by a continuous infusion of ketamine 0.5 mg/kg/h and midazolam 0.025 mg/kg/h for 2 hours. AEs were assessed in the following ways: close monitoring of ECG, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and evaluating the need for treatment of AEs during infu- sion and until discharge by an attending anesthesiologist; an open question about discomfort at the end of

  7. Intravenous sub-anesthetic ketamine for perioperative analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Gorlin, Andrew W; Rosenfeld, David M; Ramakrishna, Harish

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate antagonist, blunts central pain sensitization at sub-anesthetic doses (0.3 mg/kg or less) and has been studied extensively as an adjunct for perioperative analgesia. At sub-anesthetic doses, ketamine has a minimal physiologic impact though it is associated with a low incidence of mild psychomimetic symptoms as well as nystagmus and double vision. Contraindications to its use do exist and due to ketamine's metabolism, caution should be exercised in patients with renal or hepatic dysfunction. Sub-anesthetic ketamine improves pain scores and reduces perioperative opioid consumption in a broad range of surgical procedures. In addition, there is evidence that ketamine may be useful in patients with opioid tolerance and for preventing chronic postsurgical pain. PMID:27275042

  8. Anesthesia for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end stage liver disease (ESLD) have complex problems such as cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, coronary artery disease, hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS), portopulmonary hypertension (POPH), hepatic encephalopathy, intracranial hypertension, (ICP), left ventricular outflow tract obstruction (LVOTO), high Model of end liver disease (MELD) scores, hyponatremia, and coagulopathies. The anesthesia management for liver transplantation can be very complex, dynamic and challenging. Anesthesia agents affect hepatic blood flow and anesthetic drug distribution, metabolism and elimination maybe altered in end stage liver disease. Other non-anesthetic agents such as nitric oxide, epoprosterenol, THAM, hypertonic saline, fibrinogen concentrates, fresh frozen plasma, platelets, packed red blood cells, recombinant plasminogen activator, calcium chloride, epinephrine etc. may play a vital role in the perioperative management of these patients. Intraoperative hemostasis and coagulation management can be very arduous as these patients may bleed or be at risk for thrombosis. Monitoring modalities such as Thromboelastography (TEG), Transcranial Doppler (TCD), Transesophageal Echocardiography (TEE), Bispectral Index (BIS) and Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter (ONSD) ultrasound play a significant role in various circumstances. Surgical techniques include complete or partial occlusion of the inferior vena cava (IVC) with or without use of venovenous bypass (VVBP) or portocaval shunts. Post reperfusion syndrome (PRS) is a crucial event in this procedure, where patients may experience arrhythmia and/or cardiac arrest. Anesthetic handling of this phase has been recapitulated in detail. Provision of anesthesia services to the living liver transplant donor and pain management has been outlined. PMID:26118926

  9. Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Insertion Under Monitored Anesthesia Care in a Patient With Severe Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Burbridge, Mark A; Brodt, Jessica; Jaffe, Richard A

    2016-07-15

    A 32-year-old man with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension and Eisenmenger syndrome secondary to congenital ventricular septal defects presented for ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion. Consultation between surgical and anesthesia teams acknowledged the extreme risk of performing this case, but given ongoing symptoms related to increased intracranial pressure from a large third ventricle colloid cyst, the case was deemed urgent. After a full discussion with the patient, including an explanation of anesthetic expectations and perioperative risks, the case was performed under monitored anesthesia care. Anesthetic management included high-flow nasal cannula oxygen with capnography and arterial blood pressure monitoring, dexmedetomidine infusion, boluses of midazolam and ketamine, and local anesthetic infiltration of the cranial and abdominal incisions as well as the catheter track. Hemodynamic support was provided with an epinephrine infusion, small vasopressin boluses, and inhaled nitric oxide. The patient recovered without any significant problems and was discharged home on postoperative day 3. PMID:27224039

  10. Caudal anesthesia in a patient with severe pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ly, Doanh T

    2010-06-01

    Delivery of anesthesia to patients with severe pulmonary hypertension can be extremely challenging. The profound hemodynamic alterations of the disease can often be exacerbated by alterations in circulatory function brought about by anesthetic and surgical interventions. High perioperative morbidity and mortality rates have been reported. Minimizing adverse outcomes in these patients requires careful perioperative evaluation and planning. Selection of an anesthetic technique suitable for the surgery without causing major hemodynamic alterations, which can lead to cardiac failure and death, is a unique consideration of the anesthesia provider. As shown in this case report, caudal anesthesia, when appropriate, can offer a safe anesthetic for these patients. PMID:20572406

  11. Nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bei

    2014-01-01

    Nonintubated thoracic surgery has been used in procedures including pleura, lungs and mediastinum. Appropriate anesthesia techniques with or without sedation allow thoracic surgery patients to avoid the potential risks of intubated general anesthesia, particularly for the high-risk patients. However, nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery has some benefits as well as problems. In this review, the background, indication, perioperative anesthetic consideration and management, and advantages and disadvantages are discussed and summarized. PMID:25589994

  12. Repetitive Pediatric Anesthesia in a Non-Hospital Setting

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Douglas, James G.; Jackson, Jeffrey L.; Simoneaux, R. Victor; Hines, Matthew; Bratton, Jennifer; Kerstiens, John; Johnstone, Peter A.S.

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Repetitive sedation/anesthesia (S/A) for children receiving fractionated radiation therapy requires induction and recovery daily for several weeks. In the vast majority of cases, this is accomplished in an academic center with direct access to pediatric faculty and facilities in case of an emergency. Proton radiation therapy centers are more frequently free-standing facilities at some distance from specialized pediatric care. This poses a potential dilemma in the case of children requiring anesthesia. Methods and Materials: The records of the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center were reviewed for patients requiring anesthesia during proton beam therapy (PBT) between June 1, 2008, and April 12, 2012. Results: A total of 138 children received daily anesthesia during this period. A median of 30 fractions (range, 1-49) was delivered over a median of 43 days (range, 1-74) for a total of 4045 sedation/anesthesia procedures. Three events (0.0074%) occurred, 1 fall from a gurney during anesthesia recovery and 2 aspiration events requiring emergency department evaluation. All 3 children did well. One aspiration patient needed admission to the hospital and mechanical ventilation support. The other patient returned the next day for treatment without issue. The patient who fell was not injured. No patient required cessation of therapy. Conclusions: This is the largest reported series of repetitive pediatric anesthesia in radiation therapy, and the only available data from the proton environment. Strict adherence to rigorous protocols and a well-trained team can safely deliver daily sedation/anesthesia in free-standing proton centers.

  13. Two cellular hypotheses explaining the initiation of ketamine's antidepressant actions: Direct inhibition and disinhibition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Oliver H; Moran, Jacqueline T; Hall, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    A single, low dose of ketamine evokes antidepressant actions in depressed patients and in patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD). Unlike classic antidepressants, which regulate monoamine neurotransmitter systems, ketamine is an antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) family of glutamate receptors. The effectiveness of NMDAR antagonists in TRD unveils a new set of targets for therapeutic intervention in major depressive disorder (MDD) and TRD. However, a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms underlying these effects is required for guiding future therapeutic strategies, in order to minimize side effects and prolong duration of efficacy. Here we review the evidence for and against two hypotheses that have been proposed to explain how NMDAR antagonism initiates protein synthesis and increases excitatory synaptic drive in corticolimbic brain regions, either through selective antagonism of inhibitory interneurons and cortical disinhibition, or by direct inhibition of cortical pyramidal neurons. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Synaptopathy--from Biology to Therapy'. PMID:26211972

  14. [Ketamine--anticonvulsive and proconvulsive actions].

    PubMed

    Kugler, J; Doenicke, A

    1994-11-01

    Animal experimentation has revealed that ketamine has anticonvulsive properties. Changes in the EEG have also been reported in animals; these have been designated non-convulsive generalized electrographic seizures because of their similarities to epileptiform potentials, even though there are no recognizable signs of seizures. The cataleptic condition of the cats in which these changes were observed led to the conclusion that ketamine could cause petit mal seizures, which took the course of petit mal status. Ketamine was therefore also seen as a dangerous anaesthetic agent predisposing to convulsions, the use of which could lead to status epilepticus and irreversible brain damage. These conflicts of opinion should be resolved, as they are based on various misconceptions. (1) The terminology used for epilepsy by specialized clinicians is not always correctly applied in the context of animal experimentation. (2) The activation of epileptiform potentials in the EEG of animals cannot be interpreted as a reliable sign of epileptogenic efficiency in humans. (3) Too little regard is paid to the different actions of anaesthetic agents in various sites of the brain, at different doses and with different routes of administration. (4) The statistical significance and biological relevance of the study results are inadequate because the numbers of observations are too small. Epileptologists regret the insufficiency of animal models as paradigma for the study of efficiency of antiepileptic drugs in humans. The degree by which extensor spasms in the front paw of Gerbils of rats induced by pentylentetrazol or electric current are reduced after application of an anticonvulsive drug is no reliable measure of its anticonvulsive effect in humans.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7840410

  15. Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery En Español Read in Chinese What kinds of anesthesia are available for children having eye surgery? There are two main types of anesthesia: local ...

  16. Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Adults Having Eye Surgery En Español What kinds of anesthesia are available for adults having eye surgery? A “general”, “local”, or “topical” anesthesia is necessary ...

  17. General Anesthesia for a Patient With Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease.

    PubMed

    Kamekura, Nobuhito; Nitta, Yukie; Takuma, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Toshiaki

    2016-01-01

    We report the successful management of general anesthesia for a patient with Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD). PMD is one of a group of progressive, degenerative disorders of the cerebral white matter. The typical clinical manifestations of PMD include psychomotor retardation, nystagmus, abnormal muscle tone, seizures, and cognitive impairment. General anesthesia for a patient with PMD may be difficult mainly because of seizures and airway complications related to poor pharyngeal muscle control. In addition, the possibility of exacerbation of spasticity should be considered. A 20-year-old man with PMD required removal of impacted wisdom teeth under general anesthesia. General anesthesia was induced with thiamylal, fentanyl, and desflurane. Anesthesia was maintained with desflurane and continuous intravenous remifentanil under bispectral index and train-of-4 monitoring. Anesthesia lasted 1 hour 20 minutes and was completed uneventfully. Airway complications, seizures, and exacerbation of spasticity did not occur postoperatively. Preoperatively, our patient had no history of epilepsy attacks or aspiration pneumonia, and no clinical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Therefore, exacerbation of spasticity was one of the most likely potential complications. Identification of these associated conditions and evaluation of risk factors during preoperative examination is important for performing safe anesthesia in these patients. PMID:27269667

  18. Anesthesia and the quantitative evaluation of neurovascular coupling

    PubMed Central

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia has broad actions that include changing neuronal excitability, vascular reactivity, and other baseline physiologies and eventually modifies the neurovascular coupling relationship. Here, we review the effects of anesthesia on the spatial propagation, temporal dynamics, and quantitative relationship between the neural and vascular responses to cortical stimulation. Previous studies have shown that the onset latency of evoked cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes is relatively consistent across anesthesia conditions compared with variations in the time-to-peak. This finding indicates that the mechanism of vasodilation onset is less dependent on anesthesia interference, while vasodilation dynamics are subject to this interference. The quantitative coupling relationship is largely influenced by the type and dosage of anesthesia, including the actions on neural processing, vasoactive signal transmission, and vascular reactivity. The effects of anesthesia on the spatial gap between the neural and vascular response regions are not fully understood and require further attention to elucidate the mechanism of vascular control of CBF supply to the underlying focal and surrounding neural activity. The in-depth understanding of the anesthesia actions on neurovascular elements allows for better decision-making regarding the anesthetics used in specific models for neurovascular experiments and may also help elucidate the signal source issues in hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques. PMID:22510601

  19. Ketamine anaesthesia for medical procedures in children.

    PubMed

    Elliott, E; Hanid, T K; Arthur, L J; Kay, B

    1976-01-01

    Ketamine hydrochloride 2 mg/kg, together with atropine 0.2 mg, has been given intravenously on 100 occasions on a general paediatric ward. No serious side effects occurred. Dreams followed in 4 children but did not reduce acceptability of the drug. In our hands it has greatly reduced the pain and distress of children undergoing many routine medical procedures, particularly the dread which builds up when these have to be repeated in the same child. It has also produced close to ideal conditions for the operator, and probably increased his efficiency by reducing the emotional strain which occurs when doing painful things to a frightened patient. PMID:942230

  20. Nail surgery: best way to obtain effective anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, Nathaniel J; Vélez, Nicole F

    2015-04-01

    Nail procedures require an effective and reliable approach to anesthesia of the distal digit. Several techniques have been described in the literature. Herein, the relevant anatomy of the nail unit, pain pathways, anesthetic options, and several injection approaches to achieve complete anesthesia are reviewed. Also considered are the potential pitfalls and complications and their management. Ultimately, the physician's approach must be individualized to the patient, procedure, and setting. PMID:25828716

  1. Interactive effects of subanesthetic ketamine and haloperidol in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Krystal, J H; D'Souza, D C; Karper, L P; Bennett, A; Abi-Dargham, A; Abi-Saab, D; Cassello, K; Bowers, M B; Vegso, S; Heninger, G R; Charney, D S

    1999-07-01

    Ketamine is an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist with prominent psychoactive effects in humans. This study evaluated whether the oral administration of haloperidol 5 mg would block the effects of an intravenous ketamine infusion (bolus of 0.26 mg/kg followed by 0.65 mg/kg per hour). Twenty healthy subjects completed 4 test days involving the oral administration of haloperidol or matched placebo 2 h prior to the intravenous infusion of ketamine or saline. Ketamine produced cognitive, behavioral, neuroendocrine, and physiologic effects in the healthy subjects that were similar to previous reports. Haloperidol pretreatment reduced impairments in executive cognitive functions produced by ketamine as measured by proverb interpretations and the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test. However, it failed to block the capacity of ketamine to produce psychosis, perceptual changes, negative symptoms, or euphoria in healthy subjects. These data outline an important, but functionally delineated modulation of ketamine effects by dopamine2 receptors and other sites of haloperidol action. PMID:10463321

  2. INTRAVENOUS ETHER ANESTHESIA

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Edmond I.; Johnson, Edward A.

    1963-01-01

    From a study of intravenous ether anesthesia, it was concluded that ether diluted to a 5 per cent solution in 5 per cent dextrose and water may be used to induce and maintain a smooth and easily controlled anesthetic state similar to that obtained with inhalation ether but without the dependence of the latter technique on ventilation. Cough and laryngospasm were absent. Adequate spontaneous respiration can be maintained with this technique. The technique is particularly useful in endoscopy during which the airway is often not available for anesthetic administration. PMID:14051486

  3. Anesthesia for bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Abdelmalak, Basem B; Gildea, Thomas R; Doyle, D John

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoscopic procedures are at times intricate and the patients often very ill. These factors and an airway shared with the pulmonologist present a clear challenge to anesthesiologists. The key to success lies in the understanding of both the underlying pathology and procedure being performed combined with frequent two-way communication between the anesthesiologist and the pulmonologist. Above all, vigilance and preparedness are paramount. Topics discussed in this review include anesthesia for advanced diagnostic procedures as well as for interventional/ therapeutic procedures. The latter includes bronchoscopic tracheal balloon dilation, tracheobronchial stenting, endobronchial electrocautery, bronchoscopic cryotherapy and other techniques. Special situations, such as tracheoesophageal fistula and mediastinal masses, are also considered. PMID:22762465

  4. [Emergence agitation in pediatric anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Kuratani, Norifumi

    2007-05-01

    Emergence agitation following general anesthesia in children is an evolving problem, since sevoflurane has become a popular anesthetic for pediatric anesthesia. Several studies comparing incidence of emergence agitation between halothane and sevoflurane showed that sevoflurane anesthesia would result in higher chance of emergence agitation. The reasons of higher incidence of emergence agitation following sevoflurane anesthesia remain unknown. Other risk factors of emergence agitation include age of patients, operative procedure, pain, preoperative anxiety and so on. Several methods are advocated to prevent emergence agitation. The aggressive treatment of surgical pain is essential to avoid screaming on emergence. In addition, varieties of medication, including opioid, sedatives and alpha-2 agonist, have been tried with various success. The avoidance of sevoflurane use for maintenance of anesthesia could be a major contributing factor to reduce the risk of emergence agitation. In the light of quality of emergence, propofol anesthesia seems to be favorable for sedation in imaging procedures. Emergence agitation should be treated appropriately, since it could injure the patient him/herself or caregiver. The calm wake-up from general anesthesia will greatly enhance the parental satisfaction to anesthesia and surgery. PMID:17515094

  5. Unilateral Spinal Anesthesia Experience in a Supercentenarian.

    PubMed

    Tosun, Fadime; Ozen, Metehan; Tatar, Cihad; Alakus, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Improvement of living and socioeconomic conditions, developments, and innovations in medicine and technology has prolonged of life expectancy. We provided spinal anesthesia for a 111-year-old woman requiring internal fixation of a fractured femur. The operation lasted 75 minutes. After surgery, the patient was monitored in the intensive care unit overnight. The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit after 24-hour monitoring without any complications. She was discharged from the hospital on postoperative day 2. PMID:26402023

  6. Single ketamine infusion and neurocognitive performance in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Permoda-Osip, A; Kisielewski, J; Bartkowska-Sniatkowska, A; Rybakowski, J K

    2015-03-01

    We estimated neurocognitive performance using the trail making test (TMT) and the Stroop color-word interference test before, and on the 3(rd) day after a single infusion of ketamine, in 18 bipolar depressed patients receiving mood-stabilizing drugs. The performance on all tests significantly improved on the 3(rd) day after ketamine infusion which correlated positively with baseline intensity of neuropsychological impairment and was not associated either with baseline intensity of depression or reduction of depressive symptoms after 3 or 7 days. The results suggest that in such population of patients, single ketamine infusion may improve neuropsychological performance independently of antidepressant effect. PMID:25347227

  7. Autoerotic accident associated with self-applied ketamine.

    PubMed

    Breitmeier, D; Passie, T; Mansouri, F; Albrecht, K; Kleemann, W J

    2002-04-01

    We present a rare case of an autoerotic accident involving a fatal combination of asphyxia by suffocation and intoxication with self-administered intravenous ketamine. Of note in this case is the fact that the victim was an emergency medical technician. Ketamine causes complete analgesia with superficial unconciousness and amnesia called "dissociative anasthesia". Futhermore low anaesthetic doses of ketamine induce alterations in mood, cognition and body image and the substance is an emerging drug of abuse. We discuss the death scene investigation, findings at autopsy and the toxicological report. PMID:12056518

  8. Role of Endogenous Sleep-Wake and Analgesic Systems in Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    LU, JUN; NELSON, LAURA E.; FRANKS, NICK; MAZE, MERVYN; CHAMBERLIN, NANCY L.; SAPER, CLIFFORD B.

    2016-01-01

    Classical anesthetics of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAA)-enhancing class (e.g., pentobarbital, chloral hydrate, muscimol, and ethanol) produce analgesia and unconsciousness (sedation). Dissociative anesthetics that antagonize the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (e.g., ketamine, MK-801, dextromethorphan, and phencyclidine) produce analgesia but do not induce complete loss of consciousness. To understand the mechanisms underlying loss of consciousness and analgesia induced by general anesthetics, we examined the patterns of expression of c-Fos protein in the brain and correlated these with physiological effects of systemically administering GABAergic agents and ketamine at dosages used clinically for anesthesia in rats. We found that GABAergic agents produced predominantly delta activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and sedation. In contrast, anesthetic doses of ketamine induced sedation, followed by active arousal behaviors, and produced a faster EEG in the theta range. Consistent with its behavioral effects, ketamine induced Fos expression in cholinergic, monoaminergic, and orexinergic arousal systems and completely suppressed Fos immunoreactivity in the sleep-promoting ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). In contrast, GABAergic agents suppressed Fos in the same arousal-promoting systems but increased the number of Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the VLPO compared with waking control animals. All anesthetics tested induced Fos in the spinally projecting noradrenergic A5–7 groups. 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the A5–7 groups or ibotenic acid lesions of the ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter (vlPAG) attenuated antinociceptive responses to noxious thermal stimulation (tail-flick test) by both types of anesthetics. We hypothesize that neural substrates of sleep-wake behavior are engaged by low-dose sedative anesthetics and that the mesopontine descending noradrenergic cell groups contribute to the analgesic effects of both NMDA

  9. [Demand for cleanliness of anesthesia machines and apparatus].

    PubMed

    Kasuda, Haruyuki; Ozawa, Yoshiko; Miyake, Satoshi; Ohkubo, Takashi

    2010-05-01

    (1) Outer surface of anesthesia machines and patient monitors, and breathing bags are exposed to the contaminated anesthetists' hands and fingers. Disinfection by wiping surface of anesthesia machines with alcohol, and disinfecting hands and fingers with rubbing-type, alcohol-based antiseptics are encouraged. (2) Anesthesia equipments' breathing circuit part is contaminated by patients' breath and respiratory secretions. It is necessary to set rules for exchange of breathing circuit tubes and breathing bags, periodical cleansing and disinfection of canisters as well as inhalation and exhalation valves, and usage of bacteria filters. (3) Anesthesia apparatus (laryngoscope, tracheal tube and suction tube) contact with patients' oral cavity and airway, and thus they are categorized as semi-critical items that require high-level disinfection. PMID:20486566

  10. Efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Shiwaku, Hironari; Ohmiya, Toshihiro; Shimaoka, Hideki; Okada, Hiroki; Nakashima, Ryo; Beppu, Richiko; Kato, Daisuke; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Hoshino, Seiichiro; Nimura, Satoshi; Yamaura, Ken; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) under general anesthesia. METHODS: From January 2011 to July 2014, 206 consecutive patients had undergone ESD under general anesthesia for neoplasms of the stomach, esophagus, and colorectum were enrolled in this retrospective study. The efficacy and safety of ESD under general anesthesia were assessed. RESULTS: The en bloc resection rate of esophageal, gastric, and colorectal lesions was 100.0%, 98.3%, and 96.1%, respectively. The complication rate of perforation and bleeding were 0.0% and 0.0% in esophageal ESD, 1.7% and 1.7% in gastric ESD, and 3.9% and 2.0% in colorectal ESD, respectively. No cases of aspiration pneumonia were observed. All complications were managed by conservative treatment, with no surgical intervention required. CONCLUSION: With the cooperation of an anesthesiologist, ESD under general anesthesia appears to be a useful method, decreasing the risk of complications. PMID:27433293

  11. Ketamine use in Taiwan: Moral panic, civilizing processes, and democratization.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Liang-Yin

    2014-07-01

    Ketamine use among young people in Taiwan has increased in recent years. Believing ketamine users to be a threat to social order and harsh punishment to be a deterrent, some legislators have called for upgrading ketamine use to a more serious criminal offence. These calls have been repeatedly rebuffed by the advisory council which sets drug policy, suggesting that the perceived problem does not correlate to the actual one. In this commentary, I argue that the calls of legislators constitute a 'moral panic,' and follow Rohloff (2011) in connecting the phenomenon to Elias' (2000) concept of civilizing and decivilizing processes. In addition, I demonstrate that moral panic - in the ketamine case at least - is shaped by the legacy of authoritarianism. PMID:24975444

  12. Morphine with adjuvant ketamine versus higher dose of morphine alone for acute pain: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Xibing; Jin, Shuqing; Niu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Tingting; Zhao, Xiang; Ren, Hao; Tong, Yao; Li, Quan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Ketamine is currently the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel blocker in clinical use. Morphine in pain management is usually limited by adverse effect such as nausea and vomiting. Adjuvant treatment with ketamine may be value in giving better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the differences when patients received morphine with adjuvant ketamine (MK) compared with higher dose of morphine (MO) for acute pain. Methods: The PubMed, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library databases were searched (Last search performed on July 1, 2014) by two reviewers independently. Data were extracted independently by the same two individuals who searched the studies. Results: A total of 7 trials involving 492 patients were included in the current analysis. We found pain scores were lower in the MK group compared to the MO group [MD 2.19, 95% CI (1.24, 3.13) P<0.00001]. And more patients in the MO required diclofenac [OR 1.97, 95% CI (1.06, 3.67) P=0.03]. Furthermore, morphine plus ketamine can reduced post-operative nausea and vomiting (PONV) [OR 3.71, 95% CI (2.37, 5.80) P<0.00001]. Importantly, the wakefulness scores for the MK group were consistently and significantly better than those for the MO group [MD -1.53, 95% CI (-2.67, -0.40) P=0.008]. Conclusion: The use of ketamine plus 1/4~2/3 the dose of morphine is better than higher dose of morphine alone in reducing pain scores, and rescuing analgesic requirement. It also improved PONV and wakefulness. PMID:25356103

  13. Predictors of failure of awake regional anesthesia for neonatal hernia repair: data from the General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study: comparing apnoea and neurodevelopmental outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Frawley, Geoff; Bell, Graham; Disma, Nicola; Withington, Davinia E.; de Graaff, Jurgen C.; Morton, Neil S.; McCann, Mary Ellen; Arnup, Sarah J.; Bagshaw, Oliver; Wolfler, Andrea; Bellinger, David; Davidson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Awake regional anesthesia (RA) is a viable alternative to general anesthesia (GA) for infants undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Benefits include lower incidence of postoperative apnea and avoidance of anesthetic agents that may increase neuroapoptosis and worsen neurocognitive outcomes. The General Anesthesia compared to Spinal anesthesia (GAS) study compares neurodevelopmental outcomes following awake RA or GA in otherwise healthy infants. Our aim was to describe success and failure rates of RA in this study and report factors associated with failure. Methods This was a nested cohort study within a prospective randomized, controlled, observer blind, equivalence trial. Seven hundred twenty two infants ≤ 60 weeks postmenstrual age, scheduled for herniorrhaphy under anesthesia were randomly assigned to receive RA (spinal, caudal epidural or combined spinal caudal anesthetic) or GA with sevoflurane. The data of 339 infants, where spinal or combined spinal caudal anesthetic was attempted, was analyzed. Possible predictors of failure were assessed including: patient factors, technique, experience of site and anesthetist and type of local anesthetic. Results RA was sufficient for the completion of surgery in 83.2% of patients. Spinal anesthesia was successful in 86.9% of cases and combined spinal caudal anesthetic in 76.1%. Thirty four patients required conversion to GA and an additional 23 (6.8%) required brief sedation. Bloody tap on the first attempt at lumbar puncture was the only risk factor significantly associated with block failure (OR = 2.46). Conclusions The failure rate of spinal anesthesia was low. Variability in application of combined spinal caudal anesthetic limited attempts to compare the success of this technique to spinal alone. PMID:26001028

  14. Cardiovascular effects of intravenous bolus administration and infusion of ketamine-midazolam in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, J D; Hartsfield, S M

    1993-10-01

    Cardiovascular effects of IV administered ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) were determined in 12 healthy isoflurane-anesthetized (1.7% end-tidal concentration) dogs. Six dogs received a ketamine-midazolam combination (K-M) as a bolus over 30 seconds and 6 dogs received K-M as an infusion over 15 minutes. Ketamine-midazolam combination as a bolus and an infusion caused early significant (P < 0.05) reductions in mean systemic blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke index, which returned to baseline values near the end of the study. Heart rate decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in dogs of the infusion group and returned to the baseline value near the end of the study. One dog died after K-M bolus administration. Mean maximal decreases from baseline for systemic blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke index were significantly (P < 0.05) greater in dogs of the bolus group than in dogs of the infusion group; therefore, cardiovascular effects of K-M after infusion were less severe than those after bolus. Base excess and pHa decreased significantly (P < 0.05) in the infusion group, although similar changes occurred in both groups. Four dogs were maintained with 1.7% end-tidal isoflurane to determine temporal effects of isoflurane; these dogs did not receive K-M. Increases in heart rate, cardiac index, stroke index, and left and right ventricular stroke work indexes were significant (P < 0.05) at various sample collection intervals, particularly during the later stages of the study. Isoflurane anesthesia effectively blocked the cardiostimulatory properties of K-M.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8250398

  15. Delayed emergence after anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tzabazis, Alexander; Miller, Christopher; Dobrow, Marc F; Zheng, Karl; Brock-Utne, John G

    2015-06-01

    In most instances, delayed emergence from anesthesia is attributed to residual anesthetic or analgesic medications. However, delayed emergence can be secondary to unusual causes and present diagnostic dilemmas. Data from clinical studies is scarce and most available published material is comprised of case reports. In this review, we summarize and discuss less common and difficult to diagnose reasons for delayed emergence and present cases from our own experience or reference published case reports/case series. The goal is to draw attention to less common reasons for delayed emergence, identify patient populations that are potentially at risk and to help anesthesiologists identifying a possible cause why their patient is slow to wake up. PMID:25912729

  16. Physiologic and serum biochemistry values in free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed (Choloepus hoffmanni) and brown-throated three-toed (Bradypus variegatus) sloths immobilized using dexmedetomidine and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Cole, Gretchen A; Vaughan, Christopher; Sladky, Kurt K

    2013-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist and dextrorotary enantiomer of medetomidine, was combined with ketamine and used to immobilize 14 free-ranging Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloths) and 11 Bradypus variegatus (brown-throated three-toed sloths) in Upala, Costa Rica. Following intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (11 microg/kg), heart rate, respiratory rate, and indirect systolic blood pressure were measured every 5 min for a total of 25 min. An iStat (CG8+) was used to evaluate serum biochemical and hematologic values during anesthesia. After 30 min of anesthesia, atipamezole (0.13 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, which resulted in rapid and smooth recoveries. Mean heart rate and respiratory rate remained unchanged in both C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus over time. Progressive decreases in mean indirect systolic blood pressure were documented in both species. Results of this study suggest a combination of dexmedetomidne and ketamine is a safe and effective anesthetic protocol for use in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. Similar to other alpha-2 adrenergic agonist-based immobilization protocols, close monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters are recommended. This study also provides serum biochemical and hematologic data in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. PMID:24063084

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of ketamine in children with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Elkomy, Mohammed H; Drover, David R; Hammer, Gregory B; Galinkin, Jeffery L; Ramamoorthy, Chandra

    2015-01-15

    This study aims at developing a population pharmacokinetic model for ketamine in children with cardiac diseases in order to rationalize an effective 2-h anesthetic medication, personalized based on cardiac function and age. Twenty-one children (6 months to 18 years old) were enrolled in this prospective, open label study. Ketamine 2mg/kg IV was administered and blood samples were then collected over 8h for ketamine assay. Pharmacokinetic data analysis using NONMEM, was undertaken. Ketamine pharmacokinetics was adequately described by a two-compartment linear disposition model. Typical population parameters were: total clearance: 60.6 ×(weight/70)(0.75)L/h, intercompartmental clearance: 73.2 ×(weight/70)(0.75)L/h, central distribution volume: 57.3 ×(weight/70)L, and peripheral distribution volume: 152 ×(weight/70)L. Ketamine clearance in children with pre-existing congenital heart disease was comparable to values reported in healthy subjects. Computer simulations indicated that an initial loading dose of ketamine 2mg/kg IV over 1 min followed by a constant rate infusion of 6.3mg/kg/h for 29 min, 4.5mg/kg/h from 30 to 80 min, and 3.9 mg/kg/h from 80 to 120 min achieves and maintains anesthetic plasma level for 2h in children 1 year or older (weight ≥ 10 kg). PMID:25448584

  18. All about ketamine premedication for children undergoing ophtalmic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altiparmak, Başak; Akça, Başak; Yilbaş, Aysun Ankay; Çelebi, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a non-barbiturate cyclohexamine derivative which produces a state of sedation, immobility, analgesia, amnesia, and dissociation from the environment. One of the most important advantages of ketamine premedication is production of balanced sedation with less respiratory depression and less changes in blood pressure or heart rate. As its effects on intracranial pressure, the possible effect of ketamine on intraocular pressure has been controversial overtime. In this study, we aimed to demostrate all the advantages and possible side effects of ketamine premedication in 100 children with retinablastoma undergoing ophthalmic surgery. All the children were premedicated with ketamine 5 mg kg-1 15 minutes before the examination orally and peroperative complications, reaction to intravenous catheter insertion, need for additive dose and intraocular pressures of children were recorded. We showed that ketamine administration orally is a safe and effective way of premedication for oncologic patients undergoing examination under general anaesthesia. The incidence of agitation, anxiety at parental separation and reaction to insertion of intravenous catheter was very low while adverse side effects were seen rarely. Intraocular pressure which is very important for most of the ophthalmic surgery patients remained in normal ranges. PMID:26885101

  19. George Bernard Shaw on Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Alston, Theodore A; Carr, Daniel B

    2016-04-01

    Recipient of the 1925 Nobel Prize in Literature, George Bernard Shaw (1856-1950) was an influential critic of the health care establishment in the United Kingdom. Although skeptical of many medical and surgical procedures of the early 20th century, he respected the value of anesthesia, and he advocated its administration by Frederick W. Axham, a medical doctor whose registration was suspended as punishment for providing anesthesia for a bonesetting procedure. In 1924, when a friend needed surgery, Shaw offered to pay the extra fee for the optional anesthesia. PMID:27080502

  20. Ventricular arrhythmogenic dose of adrenaline during sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane anaesthesia either with or without ketamine or thiopentone in cats.

    PubMed

    Hikasa, Y; Okabe, C; Takase, K; Ogasawara, S

    1996-03-01

    The doses of adrenaline required to induce ventricular arrhythmia during sevoflurane, isoflurane and halothane anaesthesia, either with or without infusions of ketamine (76 micrograms kg-1 min-1) or thiopentone (0.5 mg kg-1 min-1), were determined in cats. Groups of six to eight cats were maintained at end-tidal concentrations equivalent to 1.25 times the minimal alveolar concentration of each anaesthetic. The mean dose of adrenaline required to induce arrhythmia during sevoflurane anaesthesia (19.0 micrograms kg-1) was approximately 11 times higher than that required during halothane anaesthesia (1.66 micrograms kg-1) and the same as that required during isoflurane anaesthesia (19.0 micrograms kg-1). Ketamine tended to decrease the requirement of adrenaline during halothane anaesthesia, but not significantly, and did not change the requirement during isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia. Thiopentone did not change the requirement for adrenaline during halothane, isoflurane or sevoflurane anaesthesia. It was concluded that either with or without ketamine or thiopentone, the effect of sevoflurane on the sensitisation of the feline myocardium to the arrhythmogenic effects of adrenaline was significantly less than that of halothane and not different from that of isoflurane. PMID:8685534

  1. Monitored anesthesia care in and outside the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Hye-min

    2016-01-01

    Monitored anesthesia care (MAC) is an anesthesia technique combining local anesthesia with parenteral drugs for sedation and analgesia. The use of MAC is increasing for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in and outside of the operating room due to the rapid postoperative recovery with the use of relatively small amounts of sedatives and analgesics compared to general anesthesia. The purposes of MAC are providing patients with safe sedation, comfort, pain control and satisfaction. Preoperative evaluation for patients with MAC is similar to those of general or regional anesthesia in that patients should be comprehensively assessed. Additionally, patient cooperation with comprehension of the procedure is an essential component during MAC. In addition to local anesthesia by operators or anesthesiologists, systemic sedatives and analgesics are administered to provide patients with comfort during procedures performed with MAC. The discretion and judgment of an experienced anesthesiologist are required for the safety and efficacy profiles because the airway of the patients is not secured. The infusion of sedatives and analgesics should be individualized during MAC. Many procedures in and outside of the operating room, including eye surgery, otolaryngologic surgery, cardiovascular procedures, pain procedures, and endoscopy are performed with MAC to increase patient and operator satisfaction. PMID:27482307

  2. Intravenous acetaminophen is superior to ketamine for postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy: results of a prospective, randomized, double-blind, multicenter clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Faiz, Hamid Reza; Rahimzadeh, Poupak; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Behzadi, Behzad; Ghodraty, Mohammad Reza; Nader, Nader D

    2014-01-01

    Background In recent years, intravenously (IV) administered acetaminophen has become one of the most common perioperative analgesics. Despite its now-routine use, IV acetaminophen’s analgesic comparative efficacy has never been compared with that of ketamine, a decades-old analgesic familiar to obstetricians, gynecologists, and anesthesiologists alike. This doubleblind clinical trial aimed to evaluate the analgesic effects of ketamine and IV acetaminophen on postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. Methods Eighty women aged 25–70 years old and meeting inclusion and exclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups of 40 to receive either IV acetaminophen or ketamine intraoperatively. Postoperatively, each patient had patient-controlled analgesia. Pain and sedation (Ramsay Sedation Scale) were documented based on the visual analog scale in the recovery room and at 4 hours, 6 hours, 12 hours, and 24 hours after the surgery. Hemodynamic changes, adverse medication effects, and the need for breakthrough meperidine were also recorded for both groups. Data were analyzed by repeated-measures analysis of variance. Results Visual analog scale scores were significantly lower in the IV acetaminophen group at each time point (P<0.05), and this group required significantly fewer doses of breakthrough analgesics compared with the ketamine group (P=0.039). The two groups had no significant differences in terms of adverse effects. Conclusion Compared with ketamine, IV acetaminophen significantly improved postoperative pain after abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:24465135

  3. Comparison of isomers of ketamine on catalepsy in the rat and electrical activity of the brain and behavior in the cat.

    PubMed

    Benthuysen, J L; Hance, A J; Quam, D D; Winters, W D

    1989-10-01

    The present study compared the relative potency and efficacy of the two isomers of ketamine on the duration of catalepsy (loss of righting reflex) in female rats and on the behavior and electroencephalogram of cats. In the rat, at small doses, the S(+) isomer was more potent than the R(-) isomer or racemic ketamine, while at larger doses, the S(+) isomer and the racemate were equipotent and the R(-) isomer was significantly less potent. Tolerance developed rapidly to the effects of either isomer and both were equally cross-tolerant to racemic ketamine. Sub-effective doses of morphine significantly increased the potency of S(+), R(-) and racemic ketamine on the duration of catalepsy. Sub-effective doses of either isomer augmented the duration of catalepsy, induced by small doses of morphine, but reduced that of large doses. In cats, there was a parallel time course and progression of behavioral and electroencephalographic states in response to equal total doses of either racemic ketamine, an artificial 50:50 mixture of S(+) and R(-) isomers, or the S(+) isomer alone; approximately equivalent effects required twice the dose of the R(-) isomer. It is concluded that there is a common site of action for the two isomers, but there is also a stereospecific difference in potency, as regards the induction of catalepsy in the rat and behavioral and electroencephalographic effects in the cat. Stereospecificity was not apparent in the development of tolerance, cross-tolerance or the augmentation of the response to morphine. PMID:2812279

  4. [Chronic pain and regional anesthesia in children].

    PubMed

    Dadure, C; Marec, P; Veyckemans, F; Beloeil, H

    2013-10-01

    Chronic pain is usually underestimated in children, due to lack of knowledge and its specific signs. In addition to suffering, chronic pain causes a physical, psychological, emotional, social, and financial burden for the child and his family. Practitioners may find themselves in a situation of failure with depletion of medical resources. Some types of chronic pain are refractory to conventional systemic treatment and may require the use of regional anesthesia. Cancer pain is common in children and its medical management is sometimes insufficient. It is accessible to neuroaxial or peripheral techniques of regional anesthesia if it is limited to an area accessible to one of these techniques and no contraindications (e.g., thrombopenia) are present. Complex regional pain syndrome 1 is not rare in children and adolescents, but it often goes undiagnosed. Regional anesthesia may contribute to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome 1, mainly in case of recurrence, because it provides rapid effective analgesia and allows rapid implementation of intensive physiotherapy. These techniques have also shown interest in phantom limb pain after limb amputation, but they remain controversial for erythromelalgia pain or chronic abdominopelvic pain. Finally, the treatment of postdural puncture headache due to cerebrospinal fluid leak can be treated by performing an epidural injection of the patient's blood, called a blood-patch. Finally, the management of children with chronic pain should be multidisciplinary (pediatrician, physiotherapist, psychologist, surgeon, anesthesiologist) to support the child and her problem in its entirety. PMID:23953871

  5. Dose Regimens, Variability, and Complications Associated with Using Repeat-Bolus Dosing to Extend a Surgical Plane of Anesthesia in Laboratory Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Samer M; Hankenson, F Claire; Heng, Kathleen; McKinstry-Wu, Andrew; Kelz, Max B; Marx, James O

    2014-01-01

    Extending a surgical plane of anesthesia in mice by using injectable anesthetics typically is accomplished by repeat-bolus dosing. We compared the safety and efficacy of redosing protocols administered either during an anesthetic surgical plane (maintaining a continuous surgical plane, CSP), or immediately after leaving this plane (interrupted surgical plane, ISP) in C57BL/6J mice. Anesthesia was induced with ketamine, xylazine, and acepromazine (80, 8, and 1 mg/kg IP, respectively), and redosing protocols included 25% (0.25K), 50% (0.5K), or 100% (1.0K) of the initial ketamine dose or 25% (0.25KX) or 50% (0.5KX) of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose. In the ISP group, the surgical plane was extended by 13.8 ± 2.1 min (mean ± SEM) after redosing for the 0.25K redose with 50% returning to a surgical plane, 42.7 ± 4.5 min for the 0.5K redose with 88% returning to a surgical plane, and 44.3 ± 15.4 min for the 1.0K redose, 52.8 ± 7.2 min for the 0.25KX redose, and 45.9 ± 2.9 min for the 0.5KX redose, with 100% of mice returning to a surgical plane of anesthesia in these 3 groups. Mortality rates for ISP groups were 0%, 12%, 33%, 12%, and 18%, respectively. Mice in CSP groups had 50% mortality, independent of the repeat-dosing protocol. We recommend redosing mice with either 50% of the initial ketamine dose or 25% of the initial ketamine–xylazine dose immediately upon return of the pedal withdrawal reflex to extend the surgical plane of anesthesia in mice, optimize the extension of the surgical plane, and minimize mortality. PMID:25650976

  6. Regional Anesthesia in Trauma Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Janice J.; Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Regional anesthesia is an established method to provide analgesia for patients in the operating room and during the postoperative phase. While regional anesthesia offers unique advantages, as shown by the recent military experience, it is not commonly utilized in the prehospital or emergency department setting. Most often, regional anesthesia techniques for traumatized patients are first utilized in the operating room for procedural anesthesia or for postoperative pain control. While infiltration or single nerve block procedures are often used by surgeons or emergency medicine physicians in the preoperative phase, more advanced techniques such as plexus block procedures or regional catheter placements are more commonly performed by anesthesiologists for surgery or postoperative pain control. These regional techniques offer advantages over intravenous anesthesia, not just in the perioperative phase but also in the acute phase of traumatized patients and during the initial transport of injured patients. Anesthesiologists have extensive experience with regional techniques and are able to introduce regional anesthesia into settings outside the operating room and in the early treatment phases of trauma patients. PMID:22162684

  7. Consciousness fluctuation during general anesthesia: a theoretical approach to anesthesia awareness and memory modulation.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Marco; Schiavone, Vincenzo; Muzio, Maria Rosaria; Cuomo, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    With anesthesia awareness as a model of study we debate the both fascinating and dangerous phenomenon called consciousness fluctuation that takes place during surgical anesthesia. In accordance with current scientific knowledge this paradox is the consequence of our limits in both precise knowledge of anesthesia mechanisms and our inability to accurately assess the level of anesthesia with brain monitoring. We also focus on the relationships between memory and anesthesia, as well as the possibility of interfering with memory during general anesthesia. PMID:27046232

  8. To use or not to use: an update on licit and illicit ketamine use

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jih-Heng; Vicknasingam, Balasingam; Cheung, Yuet-Wah; Zhou, Wang; Nurhidayat, Adhi Wibowo; Jarlais, Don C Des; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Ketamine, a derivative of phencyclidine that was developed in the 1960s, is an anesthetic and analgesic with hallucinogenic effects. In this paper, the pharmacological and toxicological effects of ketamine are briefly reviewed. Ketamine possesses a wide safety margin but such a therapeutic benefit is somewhat offset by its emergence phenomenon (mind-body dissociation and delirium) and hallucinogenic effects. The increasing abuse of ketamine, initially predominantly in recreational scenes to experience a “k-hole” and other hallucinatory effects but more recently also as a drug abused during the workday or at home, has further pushed governments to confine its usage in many countries. Recently, urinary tract dysfunction has been associated with long-term ketamine use. In some long-term ketamine users, such damage can be irreversible and could result in renal failure and dialysis. Although ketamine has not yet been scheduled in the United Nations Conventions, previous studies using different assessment parameters to score the overall harms of drugs indicated that ketamine may cause more harm than some of the United Nations scheduled drugs. Some countries in Southeast and East Asia have reported an escalating situation of ketamine abuse. Dependence, lower urinary tract dysfunction, and sexual impulse or violence were the most notable among the ketamine-associated symptoms in these countries. These results implied that the danger of ketamine may have been underestimated previously. Therefore, the severity levels of the ketamine-associated problems should be scrutinized more carefully and objectively. To prevent ketamine from being improperly used and evolving into an epidemic, a thorough survey on the prevalence and characteristics of illicit ketamine use is imperative so that suitable policy and measures can be taken. On the other hand, recent findings that ketamine could be useful for treating major depressive disorder has given this old drug a new impetus. If

  9. R-ketamine: a rapid-onset and sustained antidepressant without psychotomimetic side effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, C; Shirayama, Y; Zhang, J-c; Ren, Q; Yao, W; Ma, M; Dong, C; Hashimoto, K

    2015-01-01

    Although the efficacy of racemate ketamine, a rapid onset and sustained antidepressant, for patients with treatment-resistant depression was a serendipitous finding, clinical use of ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability. Behavioral and side-effect evaluation tests were applied to compare the two stereoisomers of ketamine. To elucidate their potential therapeutic mechanisms, we examined the effects of these stereoisomers on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-TrkB signaling, and synaptogenesis in selected brain regions. In the social defeat stress and learned helplessness models of depression, R-ketamine showed a greater potency and longer-lasting antidepressant effect than S-ketamine (esketamine). Furthermore, R-ketamine induced a more potent beneficial effect on decreased dendritic spine density, BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus from depressed mice compared with S-ketamine. However, neither stereoisomer affected these alterations in the nucleus accumbens of depressed mice. In behavioral tests for side effects, S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, precipitated behavioral abnormalities, such as hyperlocomotion, prepulse inhibition deficits and rewarding effects. In addition, a single dose of S-ketamine, but not R-ketamine, caused a loss of parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells in the prelimbic region of the medial PFC and DG. These findings suggest that, unlike S-ketamine, R-ketamine can elicit a sustained antidepressant effect, mediated by increased BDNF-TrkB signaling and synaptogenesis in the PFC, DG and CA3. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safe antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine, as R-ketamine appears to be free of psychotomimetic side effects and abuse liability. PMID:26327690

  10. Effects of low-dose ketamine on succinylcholine-induced postoperative myalgia in outpatient surgeries: a randomized, double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Nasseri, Karim; Arvien, Sanaz

    2016-01-01

    Objective Despite the many complications of succinylcholine, it is still widely used as a superior muscle relaxant for rapid sequence induction. One of these complications is postoperative myalgia (POM). The aim of this study was to investigate the prophylactic effect of low-dose ketamine on the incidence and severity of POM. Materials and methods In this double-blind clinical study, a total of 148 patients scheduled for general anesthesia were randomly divided into two equal groups. Initially, in Group K, 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine was injected intravenously, whereas in Group N, the same volume (5 mL) of normal saline was injected. Thereafter, anesthesia was induced in all patients, by injecting 1.5 mg/kg of fentanyl and 2 mg/kg of propofol intravenously. Following the loss of eyelid reflex, 1.5 mg/kg of succinylcholine was injected intravenously as a muscle relaxant and then the patients were intubated. POM was defined as a pain with no surgical interferences, and its intensity was graded based on a four-point scale. The incidence and severity of myalgia were assessed by a blinded observer 24 hours after surgery. Results In terms of demographic data, the results of this study showed that there is no significant difference between patients in both groups (P>0.05). Overall, the incidence of POM in Group K was significantly less, when compared with Group N (P<0.05), but both groups were comparable based on the grade 2 of POM. After the induction of anesthesia, the systolic and diastolic blood pressure values were found to reduce in both groups (P<0.05). However, the changes were somehow similar, and repeated measures of variance analysis showed no significant difference in the two study groups (P>0.05). Conclusion The addition of 0.5 mg/kg of ketamine to propofol for the induction of anesthesia can be effective in reducing the incidence of low-grade POM. PMID:27462175

  11. GAPDH in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Seidler, Norbert W

    2013-01-01

    Thus far, two independent laboratories have shown that inhaled anesthetics directly affect GAPDH structure and function. Additionally, it has been demonstrated that GAPDH normally regulates the function of GABA (type A) receptor. In light of these literature observations and some less direct findings, there is a discussion on the putative role of GAPDH in anesthesia. The binding site of inhaled anesthetics is described from literature reports on model proteins, such as human serum albumin and apoferritin. In addition to the expected hydrophobic residues that occupy the binding cavity, there are hydrophilic residues at or in very close proximity to the site of anesthetic binding. A putative binding site in the bacterial analog of the human GABA (type A) receptor is also described. Additionally, GAPDH may also play a role in anesthetic preconditioning, a phenomenon that confers protection of cells and tissues to future challenges by noxious stimuli. The central thesis regarding this paradigm is that inhaled anesthetics evoke an intra-molecular protein dehydration that is recognized by the cell, eliciting a very specific burst of chaperone gene expression. The chaperones that are implicated are associated with conferring protection against dehydration-induced protein aggregation. PMID:22851453

  12. Mechanisms of general anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Franks, N P; Lieb, W R

    1990-01-01

    Although general anesthetics are often said to be nonspecific agents, it is likely that they act at a much more restricted set of target sites than commonly believed. The traditional view has been that the primary targets are lipid portions of nerve membranes, but recent evidence shows that the effects on lipid bilayers of clinically relevant levels of anesthetics are very small. Effects on most proteins are also small, but there are notable examples of proteins that are extremely sensitive to anesthetics and mimic the pharmacological profile of anesthetic target sites in animals. Such target sites are amphiphilic in nature, having both hydrophobic and polar components. The polar components appear to behave as good hydrogen-bond acceptors but poor hydrogen-bond donors. Although the targets can accept molecules with a wide variety of shapes and chemical groupings, they are unaffected by molecules exceeding a certain size. Overall, the data can be explained by supposing that the primary target sites underlying general anesthesia are amphiphilic pockets of circumscribed dimensions on particularly sensitive proteins in the central nervous system. PMID:2269226

  13. Losing control under ketamine: suppressed cortico-hippocampal drive following acute ketamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Jones, Matthew W; Blockeel, Anthony J; Adams, Rick A; Stephan, Klaas E; Friston, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Systemic doses of the psychotomimetic ketamine alter the spectral characteristics of hippocampal and prefrontal cortical network activity. Using dynamic causal modeling (DCM) of cross-spectral densities, we quantify the putative synaptic mechanisms underlying ketamine effects in terms of changes in directed, effective connectivity between dorsal hippocampus and medial prefrontal (dCA1-mPFC) cortex of freely moving rats. We parameterize dose-dependent changes in spectral signatures of dCA1-mPFC local field potential recordings, using neural mass models of glutamatergic and GABAergic circuits. Optimizing DCMs of theta and gamma frequency range responses, model comparisons suggest that both enhanced gamma and depressed theta power result from a reduction in top-down connectivity from mPFC to the hippocampus, mediated by postsynaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs). This is accompanied by an alteration in the bottom-up pathway from dCA1 to mPFC, which exhibits a distinct asymmetry: here, feed-forward drive at AMPA receptors increases in the presence of decreased NMDAR-mediated inputs. Setting these findings in the context of predictive coding suggests that NMDAR antagonism by ketamine in recurrent hierarchical networks may result in the failure of top-down connections from higher cortical regions to signal predictions to lower regions in the hierarchy, which consequently fail to respond consistently to errors. Given that NMDAR dysfunction has a central role in pathophysiological theories of schizophrenia and that theta and gamma rhythm abnormalities are evident in schizophrenic patients, the approach followed here may furnish a framework for the study of aberrant hierarchical message passing (of prediction errors) in schizophrenia-and the false perceptual inferences that ensue. PMID:25053181

  14. Gradual emergence of spontaneous correlated brain activity during fading of general anesthesia in rats: Evidences from fMRI and local field potentials

    PubMed Central

    Bettinardi, Ruggero G.; Tort-Colet, Núria; Ruiz-Mejias, Marcel; Sanchez-Vives, Maria V.; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic brain activity is characterized by the presence of highly structured networks of correlated fluctuations between different regions of the brain. Such networks encompass different functions, whose properties are known to be modulated by the ongoing global brain state and are altered in several neurobiological disorders. In the present study, we induced a deep state of anesthesia in rats by means of a ketamine/medetomidine peritoneal injection, and analyzed the time course of the correlation between the brain activity in different areas while anesthesia spontaneously decreased over time. We compared results separately obtained from fMRI and local field potentials (LFPs) under the same anesthesia protocol, finding that while most profound phases of anesthesia can be described by overall sparse connectivity, stereotypical activity and poor functional integration, during lighter states different frequency-specific functional networks emerge, endowing the gradual restoration of structured large-scale activity seen during rest. Noteworthy, our in vivo results show that those areas belonging to the same functional network (the default-mode) exhibited sustained correlated oscillations around 10 Hz throughout the protocol, suggesting the presence of a specific functional backbone that is preserved even during deeper phases of anesthesia. Finally, the overall pattern of results obtained from both imaging and in vivo-recordings suggests that the progressive emergence from deep anesthesia is reflected by a corresponding gradual increase of organized correlated oscillations across the cortex. PMID:25804643

  15. Anesthesia and sedation outside of the operating room

    PubMed Central

    Youn, Ann Misun; Kim, Yoon-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Due to rapid evolution and technological advancements, medical personnel now require special training outside of their safe zones. Anesthesiologists face challenges in practicing in locations beyond the operating room. New locations, inadequate monitoring devices, poor assisting staff, unfamiliarity of procedures, insufficient knowledge of basic standards, and lack of experience compromise the quality of patient care. Therefore, anesthesiologists must recognize possible risk factors during anesthesia in nonoperating rooms and familiarize themselves with standards to improve safe practice. This review article emphasizes the need for standardizing hospitals and facilities requiring nonoperating room anesthesia, and encourages anesthesiologists to take the lead in applying these practice guidelines to improve patient outcomes and reduce adverse events. PMID:26257843

  16. Serial bronchoscopic lung lavage in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis under local anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Davis, K Rennis; Vadakkan, D Thomas; Krishnakumar, E V; Anas, A Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is a rare disease, characterized by alveolar accumulation of surfactant composed of proteins and lipids due to defective surfactant clearance by alveolar macrophages. Mainstay of treatment is whole lung lavage, which requires general anesthesia. Herein, we report a case of primary PAP, successfully treated with serial bronchoscopic lung lavages under local anesthesia. PMID:25814803

  17. High-dose ketamine hydrochloride maintains somatosensory and magnetic motor evoked potentials in primates.

    PubMed

    Ghaly, R F; Ham, J H; Lee, J J

    2001-12-01

    Monitoring the descending neural motor volleys (MEPs), in comparison to muscle action potentials, allows sensitive motor assessment under anesthesia irrespective of the use of muscular blockade and status of skeletal musculature. Ketamine hydrochloride (KH) had preserved muscle MEPs on a pre-established primate model. The present work examines the effect of incremental hypnotic KH dosages thoracic neural on somatosensory (SEP) and MEPs recorded epidurally in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Through a small thoracic T11-T12 laminotomy, an insulated double bipolar electrode was inserted epidurally and cephalad in seven cynomolgus monkeys. Thoracic spinal TMS-MEPs, and SEPs, were tested against graded increase of KH doses (0.01, 0.018, 0.032, 0.056, 0.1, and 0.18 mg kg(-1) min(-1) i.v. infusion). The direct (D-) and indirect (I-) epidural MEP peaks were well-defined under sole KH infusion. The waveforms were consistent at various dosages. At the highest cumulative dose (0.18 mg kg(-1) min(-1), total 6.5 mg kg(-1) over 150 min), I5 was host and I3 and I4 latencies were delayed. The scalp and spinal SEP showed no significant change. Recording of both neural D- and I- MEPs and SEPs is feasible under high sole i.v. KH. It is the first agent to maintain up to four later I1 peaks. The reproducibility of both modalities is unquestionable under KH-based deep anesthesia. This reflects the maintenance of state of neural excitability under KH. PMID:11760882

  18. [Characteristics of general anesthesia in the investigation of heart electrophysiology].

    PubMed

    Narbutas, Kestutis; Lekas, Raimundas; Rimkiene, Aldona; Civinskiene, Genuvaite

    2002-01-01

    Investigating electrophysiological properties of the heart under acute experimental conditions, dogs are affected by operative stress because of traumatic surgical manipulations, so investigations are performed under general anaesthesia. Many anaesthetics together with their main function have desintegrating influence on autonomic regulation mechanisms. That is why anaesthetics used during experiments must fullfil such requirement--have minimal influence on autonomic nervous system (ANS) and heart conductivity system (HCS) interaction parameters or to make this influence insignificant. We did not found common anaesthesia methodics that can fullfil that requirements, so we decided to prepare new common anaesthesia methodics, which could fullfil requirements mentioned above. We choose medicaments according to their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics action. For methodics optimization we've used 2 groups of dogs (mongrel dogs males weight 7-15 kg) (n = 10). We've applied different anaesthesia schemas on each group. Premedication in the I-st group was performed with intramuscle (i.m.) combination of diazepam, ketamine and phentanyl and for anaesthesia continuous intravenous (i.v.) infusion of thiopental and ketamine. In II-nd group premedication was performed with i.m. injection of ketamine/phentanyl combination and for anaesthesia--continuous i.v. infusion of thiopental. Induction in both groups was performed with i.v. thiopental injection. Suitability of premedication and anaesthesia was valued by adequativity of haemodynamics (heart rate 1/min) and surgical manipulations during experiments. Our conclusion is: investigating interaction of ANS and HCS methodics used in the I-st group of dogs is more suitable. PMID:12474758

  19. KETAMINE: A POTENTIAL RAPID-ACTING ANTISUICIDAL AGENT?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Samuel T; Sanacora, Gerard

    2016-08-01

    Ketamine has attracted widespread attention as a potential rapid-acting antidepressant. There is also considerable interest in its use for the rapid treatment of patients deemed at risk for suicide. Here, we review the available evidence (open-label and randomized controlled trials) that examine the effects of ketamine on suicidal ideation (SI). Overall, data suggest that ketamine has a rapid albeit transient effect in reducing SI, though some studies had mixed results at different time points or using different assessments. Weaknesses to the existing literature include the small sample sizes of the studies, the exclusion of patients with significant SI at baseline from many of the studies, and the potential functional unblinding when participants are randomized to saline as placebo. The evidence supporting the clinical use of ketamine for SI is very preliminary. Although ketamine appears to a promising therapeutic option in a context where there is a great unmet need (i.e., patients at imminent risk of suicide), further controlled trials are needed to allow for meaningful clinical recommendations. PMID:27082101

  20. Urine metabolomics in rats after administration of ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Congcong; Zhang, Meiling; Ma, Jianshe; Hu, Lufeng; Wang, Xianqin; Lin, Guanyang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we developed a urine metabonomic method, based on gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS), to evaluate the effect of ketamine on rats. Pattern recognition analysis, including both principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminate analysis revealed that ketamine (50 mg/kg) induced metabolic perturbations. Compared with the control group, at day 7, the level of alanine, butanoic acid, glutamine, butanedioic, trimethylsiloxy, L-aspartic acid, D-glucose, cholesterol, acetamide, and oleic acid of the ketamine group was increased, while the level of 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, benzeneacetic acid, threitol, ribitol, xylitol, and glycine decreased. At day 14, the level of alanine, ethanedioic acid, L-proline, glycerol, tetradecanoic acid, l-serine, l-phenylalanine, L-aspartic acid, d-glucose, cholesterol, heptadecanoic acid, and acetamide in rat urine of the ketamine group was increased, while the 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyric acid, benzeneacetic acid, d-ribose, threitol, ribitol, glycine, pyrazine, and oleic acid levels decreased. Our results indicate that metabonomic methods based on GC-MS may be useful to elucidate ketamine abuse, through the exploration of biomarkers. PMID:25678776

  1. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on vascular conductance are unaffected by anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Bouder, T.G.; Huffman, L.J.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-12-01

    In rats anesthetized with ketamine and pentobarbital (KET/PB), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) increases vascular conductance (VC) in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, whereas no changes in VC are observed in a number of other organs. Because anesthesia may alter the responsiveness of physiological systems, we compared the effects of VIP on organ VC in conscious or anesthetized rats. Chronically catheterized rats were studied in the conscious state or 30 min after induction of anesthesia with KET/PB, isoflurane, or Inactin. Blood flows were measured by the reference sample version of the radioactive microsphere (MS) technique using two MS injections ({sup 141}Ce-MS/{sup 85}Sr-MS). Mean arterial blood pressure was monitored and used in the calculation of VC. Organ VCs were similar under basal conditions in conscious and anesthetized rats. VIP infusion caused systemic hypotension and increased VCs in the salivary gland, pancreas, and thyroid gland, and these responses were largely unaffected by anesthesia. These results indicate that the anesthetics used do not alter basal VC or the responsiveness of the vasculature to exogenous VIP.

  2. Effect of General Anesthesia in Infancy on Long-Term Recognition Memory in Humans and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Stratmann, Greg; Lee, Joshua; Sall, Jeffrey W; Lee, Bradley H; Alvi, Rehan S; Shih, Jennifer; Rowe, Allison M; Ramage, Tatiana M; Chang, Flora L; Alexander, Terri G; Lempert, David K; Lin, Nan; Siu, Kasey H; Elphick, Sophie A; Wong, Alice; Schnair, Caitlin I; Vu, Alexander F; Chan, John T; Zai, Huizhen; Wong, Michelle K; Anthony, Amanda M; Barbour, Kyle C; Ben-Tzur, Dana; Kazarian, Natalie E; Lee, Joyce YY; Shen, Jay R; Liu, Eric; Behniwal, Gurbir S; Lammers, Cathy R; Quinones, Zoel; Aggarwal, Anuj; Cedars, Elizabeth; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ghetti, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Anesthesia in infancy impairs performance in recognition memory tasks in mammalian animals, but it is unknown if this occurs in humans. Successful recognition can be based on stimulus familiarity or recollection of event details. Several brain structures involved in recollection are affected by anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration in animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. Twenty eight children ages 6–11 who had undergone a procedure requiring general anesthesia before age 1 were compared with 28 age- and gender-matched children who had not undergone anesthesia. Recollection and familiarity were assessed in an object recognition memory test using receiver operator characteristic analysis. In addition, IQ and Child Behavior Checklist scores were assessed. In parallel, thirty three 7-day-old rats were randomized to receive anesthesia or sham anesthesia. Over 10 months, recollection and familiarity were assessed using an odor recognition test. We found that anesthetized children had significantly lower recollection scores and were impaired at recollecting associative information compared with controls. Familiarity, IQ, and Child Behavior Checklist scores were not different between groups. In rats, anesthetized subjects had significantly lower recollection scores than controls while familiarity was unaffected. Rats that had undergone tissue injury during anesthesia had similar recollection indices as rats that had been anesthetized without tissue injury. These findings suggest that general anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. In rats, this effect is independent of underlying disease or tissue injury. PMID:24910347

  3. Effect of general anesthesia in infancy on long-term recognition memory in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Greg; Lee, Joshua; Sall, Jeffrey W; Lee, Bradley H; Alvi, Rehan S; Shih, Jennifer; Rowe, Allison M; Ramage, Tatiana M; Chang, Flora L; Alexander, Terri G; Lempert, David K; Lin, Nan; Siu, Kasey H; Elphick, Sophie A; Wong, Alice; Schnair, Caitlin I; Vu, Alexander F; Chan, John T; Zai, Huizhen; Wong, Michelle K; Anthony, Amanda M; Barbour, Kyle C; Ben-Tzur, Dana; Kazarian, Natalie E; Lee, Joyce Y Y; Shen, Jay R; Liu, Eric; Behniwal, Gurbir S; Lammers, Cathy R; Quinones, Zoel; Aggarwal, Anuj; Cedars, Elizabeth; Yonelinas, Andrew P; Ghetti, Simona

    2014-09-01

    Anesthesia in infancy impairs performance in recognition memory tasks in mammalian animals, but it is unknown if this occurs in humans. Successful recognition can be based on stimulus familiarity or recollection of event details. Several brain structures involved in recollection are affected by anesthesia-induced neurodegeneration in animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. Twenty eight children ages 6-11 who had undergone a procedure requiring general anesthesia before age 1 were compared with 28 age- and gender-matched children who had not undergone anesthesia. Recollection and familiarity were assessed in an object recognition memory test using receiver operator characteristic analysis. In addition, IQ and Child Behavior Checklist scores were assessed. In parallel, thirty three 7-day-old rats were randomized to receive anesthesia or sham anesthesia. Over 10 months, recollection and familiarity were assessed using an odor recognition test. We found that anesthetized children had significantly lower recollection scores and were impaired at recollecting associative information compared with controls. Familiarity, IQ, and Child Behavior Checklist scores were not different between groups. In rats, anesthetized subjects had significantly lower recollection scores than controls while familiarity was unaffected. Rats that had undergone tissue injury during anesthesia had similar recollection indices as rats that had been anesthetized without tissue injury. These findings suggest that general anesthesia in infancy impairs recollection later in life in humans and rats. In rats, this effect is independent of underlying disease or tissue injury. PMID:24910347

  4. How hospital leaders can bend the anesthesia cost curve.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hugh

    2014-11-01

    Factors to consider in evaluating a hospital's anesthesia cost curve include: The efficiency of services provided by anesthesiologists and certified registered nurse anesthetists. Cost-effectiveness of anesthesia staffing. Anesthesia billing performance. Patient satisfaction with anesthesia services. PMID:25647919

  5. Brief anesthesia, but not voluntary locomotion, significantly alters cortical temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shirey, Michael J.; Kudlik, D'Anne E.; Huo, Bing-Xing; Greene, Stephanie E.; Drew, Patrick J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in brain temperature can alter electrical properties of neurons and cause changes in behavior. However, it is not well understood how behaviors, like locomotion, or experimental manipulations, like anesthesia, alter brain temperature. We implanted thermocouples in sensorimotor cortex of mice to understand how cortical temperature was affected by locomotion, as well as by brief and prolonged anesthesia. Voluntary locomotion induced small (∼0.1°C) but reliable increases in cortical temperature that could be described using a linear convolution model. In contrast, brief (90-s) exposure to isoflurane anesthesia depressed cortical temperature by ∼2°C, which lasted for up to 30 min after the cessation of anesthesia. Cortical temperature decreases were not accompanied by a concomitant decrease in the γ-band local field potential power, multiunit firing rate, or locomotion behavior, which all returned to baseline within a few minutes after the cessation of anesthesia. In anesthetized animals where core body temperature was kept constant, cortical temperature was still >1°C lower than in the awake animal. Thermocouples implanted in the subcortex showed similar temperature changes under anesthesia, suggesting these responses occur throughout the brain. Two-photon microscopy of individual blood vessel dynamics following brief isoflurane exposure revealed a large increase in vessel diameter that ceased before the brain temperature significantly decreased, indicating cerebral heat loss was not due to increased cerebral blood vessel dilation. These data should be considered in experimental designs recording in anesthetized preparations, computational models relating temperature and neural activity, and awake-behaving methods that require brief anesthesia before experimental procedures. PMID:25972579

  6. Cardiovascular and behavioral responses of gray wolves to ketamine-xylazine immobilization and antagonism by yohimbine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kreeger, T.J.; Faggella, A.M.; Seal, U.S.; Mech, L.D.; Callahan, M.; Hall, B.

    1987-01-01

    Adult wolves (Canis lupus) were immobilized with 6.6 mg/kg ketamine hydrochloride (KET) and 2.2 mg/kg xylazine hydrochloride (XYL) administered intramuscularly. Induction time was 4.6 +/- 0.3 min (mean +/- SE). Immobilization resulted in significant bradycardia and hypertension (P less than 0.05). Twenty min after induction, the wolves were given 0.05-0.60 mg/kg yohimbine hydrochloride (YOH). Yohimbine given intravenously produced dose-related increases in heart rate (HR) with doses greater than 0.15 mg/kg resulting in extreme tachycardia (greater than 300 bpm). All doses of YOH caused a temporary decrease in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) with some individual animals manifesting profound hypotension (less than 30 torr) at doses greater than 0.15 mg/kg. Increasing the dose of YOH above 0.15 mg/kg did not significantly decrease either arousal or ambulation times. Administering YOH at 40 or 60 min after induction resulted in decreased arousal and ambulation times. Stimulation by weighing and taking repeated blood samples during anesthesia did not shorten arousal times. We recommend that wolves immobilized with XYL-KET be antagonized with doses of YOH less than 0.15 mg/kg.

  7. An evaluation of medetomidine/ketamine and other drug combinations for anaesthesia in cats.

    PubMed

    Verstegen, J; Fargetton, X; Donnay, I; Ectors, F

    1991-01-12

    The anaesthesia induced by cyclohexylamine derivatives in cats was studied by comparing the effects induced by four pairs of agents: acepromazine/ketamine, xylazine/ketamine, zolazepam/tiletamine and medetomidine/ketamine. Acepromazine/ketamine was free of undesirable side effects but provided inadequate anaesthetic cover. The other combinations differed only in the dosage, the quality of the anaesthesia and the importance of the side effects. Medetomidine/ketamine was the best combination; it induced a good degree of anaesthesia with small doses and was free of major side effects. PMID:2017841

  8. Ketamine and phencyclidine: the good, the bad and the unexpected

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, D; Mercier, M S

    2015-01-01

    The history of ketamine and phencyclidine from their development as potential clinical anaesthetics through drugs of abuse and animal models of schizophrenia to potential rapidly acting antidepressants is reviewed. The discovery in 1983 of the NMDA receptor antagonist property of ketamine and phencyclidine was a key step to understanding their pharmacology, including their psychotomimetic effects in man. This review describes the historical context and the course of that discovery and its expansion into other hallucinatory drugs. The relevance of these findings to modern hypotheses of schizophrenia and the implications for drug discovery are reviewed. The findings of the rapidly acting antidepressant effects of ketamine in man are discussed in relation to other glutamatergic mechanisms. PMID:26075331

  9. Myocardial depression by ketamine. Haemodynamic and metabolic observations in animals.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, J H; Seed, R G; Undre, N

    1981-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of ketamine on myocardial function. In dogs the drug was infused directly into the left main coronary artery. The concentration chosen was similar to the peak concentration found following a bolus intravenous injection. A mild depression of inotropic state was found which recovered completely after stopping the infusion. Myocardial depression was confirmed in a guinea pig Langendorff preparation. No changes in high energy phosphates were found in these hearts after 45-60 minutes of perfusion with ketamine in the perfusion medium. This study confirms that myocardial depression occurs with ketamine but suggests that it is unlikely to be of clinical significance. Depletion of high energy phosphates did not seem to be the cause of the depression. PMID:7246986

  10. Opioid and non-opioid central cardiovascular effects of ketamine.

    PubMed

    Seth, S; Mukherjee, D; Choudhary, A K; Sinha, J N; Gurtu, S

    1990-11-01

    The cardiovascular responses to ketamine injected intracisternally were examined in chloralose anaesthetized cats. Blood pressure and heart rate were recorded at different time intervals after intracisternal injection of drug or saline vehicle. The low doses of ketamine (0.5 or 1.0 mg) elicited dose dependent increase in blood pressure and heart rate. In contrast the high dose of ketamine (4 mg), produced a fall in blood pressure and heart rate. The cardiovascular response elicited by the low dose was naloxone insensitive and completely blocked by haloperidol, but not by dopamine antagonist pimozide. The vasodepressor and bradycardiac effect of the 4 mg dose was naloxone antagonizable. These data show that excitatory cardiovascular effects of the low dose result from a naloxone resistant site while in high doses an inhibitory effect is elicited by action at naloxone sensitive opiate receptors. PMID:1965327

  11. Marsupial, insectivore, and chiropteran anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Pye, G W

    2001-01-01

    This article covers the manual restraint and anesthesia of marsupials, insectivores, and chiroptera. Marsupials commonly kept as pets in the U.S. [e.g., eastern gray kangaroos (Macropus giganteus), Bennett's wallabies (Macropus rufogriseus), and sugar gliders (Petaurus breviceps)] are covered in detail. Marsupial species kept in zoological parks [e.g., Tasmanian devils, koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus), and common wombats (Vombatus ursinus)] are covered in less detail. Of the insectivores, only the African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) and the European hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus) are commonly kept as pets and, consequently, the insectivore section concentrates on discussing these two species. The section on chiropteran anesthesia is divided into two broad categories: the megachiropterans (flying foxes and fruit bats) and the microchiropterans (insectivorous bats). Most of the information on the species covered in this article is anecdotal, and this should be kept in mind when using the anesthesia protocols described. PMID:11217462

  12. fMRI and Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheuk Ying; Ramani, Ramachandran

    2016-01-01

    BOLD activation studies discussed vary in the anesthetic agent studied (propofol, sevoflurane, and isoflurane), the concentration of the anesthetic (mostly under 0.5MAC or equivalent doses), and the activation paradigm/functional activation. The data analysis technique also differs between the studies. Notwithstanding these variations, the results can be summarized as follows: Higher order association cortices are more sensitive to anesthesia. Higher order regions processing language and semantics (regions in the frontal cortex) are affected at a lower concentration of anesthetic as compared with regions processing auditory stimuli. Whereas primary visual activation regions in the visual cortex and the thalamus are less sensitive, higher order visual spatial attention regions in the parietal cortex are more sensitive to anesthesia. In most studies, the loss of consciousness (no response to call) is achieved at or below 0.5MAC of anesthesia. PMID:26655513

  13. Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Anesthesia for Children Having Eye Surgery En Español Read in Chinese What kinds of anesthesia are available for children ...

  14. Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... or federal policy. More Health News on: Anesthesia Child Development Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Anesthesia Child Development About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  15. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000184.htm Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... with your child's doctor about the type of anesthesia that will be best for your child. Below ...

  16. Diabetes alters the blood glucose response to ketamine in streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huayong; Li, Li; Xia, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a commonly used short-acting anesthetic and recently attempted to treat pain which is a complication of diabetes. In this study we investigated the effect of ketamine on glucose levels of normal rats and diabetic rats. The results showed that no significance between the glucose levels in ketamine treatment group and saline treatment group at all time points was observed in normal rats. Ketamine did not produce hyperglycemia in normal fasted rats. However, ketamine dose dependently elevated glucose in diabetic rats from 80 mg/kg to 120 mg/kg at 1 hour after injection. The glucose did not return to the levels before treatment in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Insulin revealed a powerful potency in decreasing glucose levels in diabetic rats. Ketamine did not induce acute hyperglycemia any more after diabetic rats pretreated with insulin. Serum corticosterone was significantly increased in all treatment groups including saline group after 1 hour treatment compared with baseline values. Then the corticosterone declined in both saline treatment groups. However, ketamine induced a more significant increase in corticosterone at 1 hour after injection compared with that of saline control group of diabetic rats. And no decline trend of corticosterone was observed after ketamine treatment 2 hours. Insulin did not reduce the elevated corticosterone level induced by ketamine either. The results suggested that the diabetic rats had a risk of hyperglycaemia when they were treated with ketamine. Pretreatment with insulin is a good symptomatic treatment for hyperglycaemia induced by ketamine. PMID:26379948

  17. Diabetes alters the blood glucose response to ketamine in streptozotocin-diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Huayong; Li, Li; Xia, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine is a commonly used short-acting anesthetic and recently attempted to treat pain which is a complication of diabetes. In this study we investigated the effect of ketamine on glucose levels of normal rats and diabetic rats. The results showed that no significance between the glucose levels in ketamine treatment group and saline treatment group at all time points was observed in normal rats. Ketamine did not produce hyperglycemia in normal fasted rats. However, ketamine dose dependently elevated glucose in diabetic rats from 80 mg/kg to 120 mg/kg at 1 hour after injection. The glucose did not return to the levels before treatment in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetic rats. Insulin revealed a powerful potency in decreasing glucose levels in diabetic rats. Ketamine did not induce acute hyperglycemia any more after diabetic rats pretreated with insulin. Serum corticosterone was significantly increased in all treatment groups including saline group after 1 hour treatment compared with baseline values. Then the corticosterone declined in both saline treatment groups. However, ketamine induced a more significant increase in corticosterone at 1 hour after injection compared with that of saline control group of diabetic rats. And no decline trend of corticosterone was observed after ketamine treatment 2 hours. Insulin did not reduce the elevated corticosterone level induced by ketamine either. The results suggested that the diabetic rats had a risk of hyperglycaemia when they were treated with ketamine. Pretreatment with insulin is a good symptomatic treatment for hyperglycaemia induced by ketamine. PMID:26379948

  18. Back Pain and Neuraxial Anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Benzon, Honorio T; Asher, Yogen G; Hartrick, Craig T

    2016-06-01

    The incidence of back pain after neuraxial anesthesia in the adult population is not different from that after general anesthesia. The pain is usually mild, localized in the low back, rarely radiates to the lower extremities, and has a duration of only a few days. The risk factors for development of back pain include the lithotomy position, multiple attempts at block placement, duration of surgery longer than 2.5 hours, body mass index ≥32 kg/m, and a history of back pain. However, there is no permanent worsening of preexisting back pain after neuraxial anesthesia. The back pain has been attributed to tears in the ligaments, fascia, or bone with localized bleeding; immobility of the spine; relaxation of the paraspinal muscles under anesthesia; flattening of the normal lumbar convexity; and stretching and straining of the lumbosacral ligaments and joint capsules. The addition of an anti-inflammatory drug to the local anesthetic used for skin infiltration may decrease the incidence and severity of back pain. The use of spinal or epidural anesthesia in the adult, non-obstetric and obstetric populations should depend on the advantages offered by the technique and not on the occurrence of back pain after the procedure. Additional studies are needed to confirm the efficacy of epidural dexamethasone, or other steroids, or the addition of an anti-inflammatory drug to the local anesthetic infiltration for the prevention of back pain after neuraxial anesthesia. Future studies should involve a physician with expertise in the evaluation of chronic low back pain to help identify the cause of the back pain and institute appropriate treatment(s). PMID:27195644

  19. Advances in Anesthesia Delivery in the Deployed Setting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, John E; Barras, William P

    2016-01-01

    Lessons learned over the past decade and a half of combat casualty management has brought about numerous advances in trauma anesthesia practice. In the post-Vietnam era, deployable anesthesia equipment centered on the capability to provide a balanced anesthetic technique, utilizing a combination of volatile gas and intravenous anesthetic adjuncts. The evolution of the modern battlefield has forced anesthesia providers across the military to adapt to mission requirements that often dictate a surgical capability that is more rapidly mobile and less reliant on logistical support. Institutional medical equipment development has focused on fielding a lighter, more mobile volatile gas delivery method. Despite numerous advances in anesthetic gas delivery, many veteran anesthesia providers have come to recognize the value of alternative anesthetic techniques in the deployed setting. One of the most appealing advances in combat anesthesia practice is the emergence of total intravenous anesthetics (TIVA) for trauma management and resuscitation. Although there have been numerous developments in anesthetic equipment for use in the deployed setting, TIVA has many advantages over volatile gas administration. Future research, development, and education should focus on TIVA and the ability to provide this as an alternative safe anesthetic for patients in austere environments. It is imperative to retain the lessons we have learned in order to adapt more effectively in future conflicts. This accumulation of knowledge must inform future innovative solutions to the challenges of casualty management in a deployed setting. PMID:27215869

  20. Implementation of an Anesthesia Information Management System (AIMS)

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, James R.; Ritter, Melody J.

    2011-01-01

    During the administration of anesthesia, the anesthesia provider has historically created a paper record, charted manually, that included extensive patient care–related data (vital signs, other parameters, etc) and commentaries. DocuSys, a proprietary anesthesia information management system (AIMS), creates an electronic version of the anesthesia record and provides additional information. It electronically captures data from clinical monitors and other sources, including scheduling applications and laboratory computers. The AIMS facilitates chart entries such as drug doses and case narratives. Benefits of an AIMS include improved legibility of the anesthesia record and greater efficiency in documentation efforts. Use of the AIMS assists the practitioner with decision support logic, such as the timing of antibiotic administration and the inclusion of legally required documentation. Upon case completion, the AIMS data are immediately available to other information systems, such as billing and medical records. Data can be made available from a single case or, more important, from thousands of cases to analyze variables such as efficiency of services, adherence to best practices, patient outcomes, and clinical research. The AIMS was deployed at the main campus of the Ochsner Health System on March 26, 2009. In this article, we discuss the issues involved in the AIMS implementation process: the successes, surprises, and continued challenges. PMID:21734847

  1. Memantine Reverses Social Withdrawal Induced by Ketamine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Landaeta, José; Wix, Richard; Eblen, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of memantine on schizophrenia-like symptoms in a ketamine-induced social withdrawal model in rats. We examined therapeutic effects of memantine, an NMDA antagonist, and haloperidol, a classic antipsychotic drug, on this behavioral model. Administration of memantine (10 or 15 mg·kg-1) significantly reduced ketamine-induced social withdrawal, and this effect was more effective than that of haloperidol (0.25 mg·kg-1) by restoring the social interaction between rats with no modification in general motor activity. These results suggest that memantine could have a therapeutic potential for schizophrenia. PMID:23585718

  2. EEG entropy measures in anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Sun, Xue; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan J.; Sleigh, Jamie W.; Hagihira, Satoshi; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: ► Twelve entropy indices were systematically compared in monitoring depth of anesthesia and detecting burst suppression.► Renyi permutation entropy performed best in tracking EEG changes associated with different anesthesia states.► Approximate Entropy and Sample Entropy performed best in detecting burst suppression. Objective: Entropy algorithms have been widely used in analyzing EEG signals during anesthesia. However, a systematic comparison of these entropy algorithms in assessing anesthesia drugs' effect is lacking. In this study, we compare the capability of 12 entropy indices for monitoring depth of anesthesia (DoA) and detecting the burst suppression pattern (BSP), in anesthesia induced by GABAergic agents. Methods: Twelve indices were investigated, namely Response Entropy (RE) and State entropy (SE), three wavelet entropy (WE) measures [Shannon WE (SWE), Tsallis WE (TWE), and Renyi WE (RWE)], Hilbert-Huang spectral entropy (HHSE), approximate entropy (ApEn), sample entropy (SampEn), Fuzzy entropy, and three permutation entropy (PE) measures [Shannon PE (SPE), Tsallis PE (TPE) and Renyi PE (RPE)]. Two EEG data sets from sevoflurane-induced and isoflurane-induced anesthesia respectively were selected to assess the capability of each entropy index in DoA monitoring and BSP detection. To validate the effectiveness of these entropy algorithms, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling and prediction probability (Pk) analysis were applied. The multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MDFA) as a non-entropy measure was compared. Results: All the entropy and MDFA indices could track the changes in EEG pattern during different anesthesia states. Three PE measures outperformed the other entropy indices, with less baseline variability, higher coefficient of determination (R2) and prediction probability, and RPE performed best; ApEn and SampEn discriminated BSP best. Additionally, these entropy measures showed an advantage in computation

  3. Neonatal anesthesia: how we manage our most vulnerable patients

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neonates undergoing surgery are at higher risk than older children for anesthesia-related adverse events. During the perioperative period, the maintenance of optimal hemodynamics in these patients is challenging and requires a thorough understanding of neonatal physiology and pharmacology. Data from animals and human cohort studies have shown relation of the currently used anesthetics may associate with neurotoxic brain injury that lead to later neurodevelopmental impairment in the developing brain. In this review, the unique neonatal physiologic and pharmacologic features and anesthesia-related neurotoxicity will be discussed. PMID:26495052

  4. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  5. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  6. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  7. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  8. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public..., AND RESIDENTS IN CERTAIN SETTINGS Physician Services in Teaching Settings § 415.178 Anesthesia... schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia procedure involving...

  9. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  10. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  11. 42 CFR 415.178 - Anesthesia services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Anesthesia services. 415.178 Section 415.178 Public... Anesthesia services. (a) General rule. (1) For services furnished prior to January 1, 2010, an unreduced physician fee schedule payment may be made if a physician is involved in a single anesthesia...

  12. 21 CFR 868.6700 - Anesthesia stool.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anesthesia stool. 868.6700 Section 868.6700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Miscellaneous § 868.6700 Anesthesia stool. (a) Identification. An anesthesia stool is a device intended for use as a stool for the anesthesiologist in the operating room....

  13. Subanesthetic, Subcutaneous Ketamine Infusion Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Nonmalignant Pain.

    PubMed

    Zekry, Olfat; Gibson, Stephen B; Aggarwal, Arun

    2016-06-01

    This study was designed to describe the efficacy and toxicity of subcutaneous ketamine infusions and sublingual ketamine lozenges for the treatment of chronic nonmalignant pain. Data were collected prospectively on 70 subjects managed in an academic, tertiary care hospital between 2007 and 2012 who received between 3 and 7 days of subanesthetic, subcutaneous ketamine infusion. Data were analyzed for efficacy, adverse effects, and reduction in use of opioid medication. We also analyzed whether subsequent treatment with sublingual ketamine lozenges resulted in longer-term efficacy of the beneficial effects of the initial ketamine infusion. There was a significant reduction in pain intensity measured by numerical rating scale (NRS) from mean of 6.38 before ketamine to 4.60 after ketamine (P < .005) that was sustained for between 3 months and 6 years. In subjects on opioids, there was a significant reduction in opioid use at the end of the ketamine infusion from a mean morphine equivalent dose (MMED) of 216 mg/day before ketamine to 89 mg/day after ketamine (P < .005). The overall reduction in opioid use after ketamine infusion was 59%. No subjects increased their use of opioids during their hospitalization for the ketamine infusion. A small proportion of subjects who responded to the infusion were continued on ketamine lozenges. This group was followed for between 3 months and 2 years. The use of ketamine lozenges after the infusion resulted in 31% of these subjects being able to cease their use of opioids compared with only 6% who did not receive ketamine lozenges. Eleven percent of subjects who received lozenges subsequently increased their opioid usage. Adverse effects were fairly common, but only mild, with 46% of patients experiencing light-headedness and dizziness, 25% tiredness and sedation, 12% headaches, 12% hallucinations, and 8% vivid dreams. Adverse effects were easily managed by reducing the rate of the ketamine infusion. The administration of

  14. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Y.; Filippi, A.; Geiger, G.; Kirschner, H.; Boll, M.

    1996-01-01

    Dental treatment using endotracheal anesthesia is indicated where acute odontogenic infections, accidental injuries, or multiple caries and periodontitis marginalis require surgical and/or restorative treatment. It is also indicated where it is not possible to use psychological support during local anesthesia or during premedication or analgosedation. Dental treatment of handicapped patients using endotracheal anesthesia is described, along with indication and frequency of such treatment. The state of the dentition is illustrated, along with its relationship to the oral hygiene the handicapped patients receive. The main points of the intraoperative dental procedures and the follow-up of patient care are reported. Postoperative dental or general medical complications have not occurred within the patient population under study. PMID:10323121

  15. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    SciTech Connect

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-04-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of /sub 86/Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with /sup 141/Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO/sub 2/) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines.

  16. History of anesthesia in Germany.

    PubMed

    Wawersik, J

    1991-01-01

    The first ether anesthetic was administered in Germany by J.F. Heyfelder (1798-1869) at the Erlangen University Hospital on January 24, 1847. Thereafter, famous discoveries occurred in the field of pharmacology. Albert Niemann isolated cocaine from the coca shrub in 1860; Emil Fischer synthesized the first barbiturate, Veronal, in 1902; and Helmut Weese promoted the first ultra-short-acting barbiturate, hexobarbital (Evipan), in 1932. The local anesthetic effect of cocaine was reported by Koller at the Congress of the German Society for Ophthalmology on September 15, 1884, in Heidelberg. Many new techniques were tried first in German hospitals. Friedrich Trendelenburg carried out, by tracheotomy, the first operation with endotracheal intubation in 1869, and Franz Kuhn promoted and clinically practiced endotracheal intubation in Heidelberg beginning in 1900. August Bier performed the first operation under spinal anesthesia at the Kiel University Hospital on August 16, 1898. Carl Ludwig Schleich (1859-1922) standardized the methods of infiltration anesthesia by using a cocaine solution in sufficient dilution. The development of anesthesia machines was greatly influenced by Heinrich Dräger (1847-1917) and his son Bernhard Dräger (1870-1928). The Dräger Company in Lübeck built the first anesthesia machine with a carbon dioxide (CO2) absorber and circle system in 1925. Paul Sudeck and Helmut Schmidt worked with this system at the Hamburg University Hospital and reported their results in 1926. The first Dräger anesthesia machine was produced in 1902 and introduced into clinical use by Otto Roth (1863-1944) in Lübeck. Before the Second World War, three universities in Germany carried out research in the field of anesthesia: the University of Freiburg with H. Killian, the University of Hamburg with P. Sudeck and H. Schmidt, and the University of Würzburg with C.G. Gauss. Killian and Gauss established the first journals, Der Schmerz and Narkose und Anaesthesie, in

  17. Focused review: spinal anesthesia in severe preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Henke, Vanessa G; Bateman, Brian T; Leffert, Lisa R

    2013-09-01

    Spinal anesthesia is widely regarded as a reasonable anesthetic option for cesarean delivery in severe preeclampsia, provided there is no indwelling epidural catheter or contraindication to neuraxial anesthesia. Compared with healthy parturients, those with severe preeclampsia experience less frequent, less severe spinal-induced hypotension. In severe preeclampsia, spinal anesthesia may cause a higher incidence of hypotension than epidural anesthesia; however, this hypotension is typically easily treated and short lived and has not been linked to clinically significant differences in outcomes. In this review, we describe the advantages and limitations of spinal anesthesia in the setting of severe preeclampsia and the evidence guiding intraoperative hemodynamic management. PMID:23868886

  18. General anesthesia and chronic amphetamine use: should the drug be stopped preoperatively?

    PubMed

    Fischer, Stephen P; Schmiesing, Clifford A; Guta, Cosmin G; Brock-Utne, John G

    2006-07-01

    Prescription amphetamines are being used more often for several medical conditions. Anesthesia concerns focus on the cardiovascular stability of patients who may be catecholamine-depleted and thus have a blunted response to intraoperative hypotension. Previously we reported one case of a patient receiving chronic amphetamine therapy who had a stable intraoperative course. We now report eight additional patients taking chronic prescription amphetamines who underwent a safe general anesthesia and outcome. Predominantly prescribed for narcolepsy and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, amphetamine drugs had been given to these 8 patients for 2 to 10 yr. Ages ranged from 22 to 77 yr and genders were equally divided. All required general anesthesia for their surgical procedures and 6 of the 8 patients were tracheally intubated. Anesthesia operating room times ranged from 30 min to 4.25 h. The authors conclude that amphetamine use need not be stopped before surgery and anesthesia. PMID:16790654

  19. Ketamine administration reduces amygdalo-hippocampal reactivity to emotional stimulation.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Milan; Henning, Anke; Walter, Martin; Lehmann, Mick; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Boeker, Heinz; Seifritz, Erich; Grimm, Simone

    2016-05-01

    Increased amygdala reactivity might lead to negative bias during emotional processing that can be reversed by antidepressant drug treatment. However, little is known on how N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonism with ketamine as a novel antidepressant drug target might modulate amygdala reactivity to emotional stimulation. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and resting-state fMRI (rsfMRI), we assessed amygdalo-hippocampal reactivity at baseline and during pharmacological stimulation with ketamine (intravenous bolus of 0.12 mg/kg, followed by a continuous infusion of 0.25 mg/kg/h) in 23 healthy subjects that were presented with stimuli from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). We found that ketamine reduced neural reactivity in the bilateral amygdalo-hippocampal complex during emotional stimulation. Reduced amygdala reactivity to negative pictures was correlated to resting-state connectivity to the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex. Interestingly, subjects experienced intensity of psychedelic alterations of consciousness during ketamine infusion predicted the reduction in neural responsivity to negative but not to positive or neutral stimuli. Our findings suggest that the pharmacological modulation of glutamate-responsive cerebral circuits, which is associated with a shift in emotional bias and a reduction of amygdalo-hippocampal reactivity to emotional stimuli, represents an early biomechanism to restore parts of the disrupted neurobehavioral homeostasis in MDD patients. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1941-1952, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26915535

  20. Brain damages in ketamine addicts as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunmei; Zheng, Dong; Xu, Jie; Lam, Waiping; Yew, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    Ketamine, a known antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA) glutamate receptors, had been used as an anesthetic particularly for pediatric or for cardiac patients. Unfortunately, ketamine has become an abusive drug in many parts of the world while chronic and prolonged usage led to damages of many organs including the brain. However, no studies on possible damages in the brains induced by chronic ketamine abuse have been documented in the human via neuroimaging. This paper described for the first time via employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) the changes in ketamine addicts of 0.5–12 years and illustrated the possible brain regions susceptible to ketamine abuse. Twenty-one ketamine addicts were recruited and the results showed that the lesions in the brains of ketamine addicts were located in many regions which appeared 2–4 years after ketamine addiction. Cortical atrophy was usually evident in the frontal, parietal or occipital cortices of addicts. Such study confirmed that many brain regions in the human were susceptible to chronic ketamine injury and presented a diffuse effect of ketamine on the brain which might differ from other central nervous system (CNS) drugs, such as cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamine. PMID:23882190

  1. Longitudinal Effects of Ketamine on Dendritic Architecture In Vivo in the Mouse Medial Frontal Cortex123

    PubMed Central

    Phoumthipphavong, Victoria; Barthas, Florent; Hassett, Samantha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A single subanesthetic dose of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, leads to fast-acting antidepressant effects. In rodent models, systemic ketamine is associated with higher dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex, reflecting structural remodeling that may underlie the behavioral changes. However, turnover of dendritic spines is a dynamic process in vivo, and the longitudinal effects of ketamine on structural plasticity remain unclear. The purpose of the current study is to use subcellular resolution optical imaging to determine the time course of dendritic alterations in vivo following systemic ketamine administration in mice. We used two-photon microscopy to visualize repeatedly the same set of dendritic branches in the mouse medial frontal cortex (MFC) before and after a single injection of ketamine or saline. Compared to controls, ketamine-injected mice had higher dendritic spine density in MFC for up to 2 weeks. This prolonged increase in spine density was driven by an elevated spine formation rate, and not by changes in the spine elimination rate. A fraction of the new spines following ketamine injection was persistent, which is indicative of functional synapses. In a few cases, we also observed retraction of distal apical tuft branches on the day immediately after ketamine administration. These results indicate that following systemic ketamine administration, certain dendritic inputs in MFC are removed immediately, while others are added gradually. These dynamic structural modifications are consistent with a model of ketamine action in which the net effect is a rebalancing of synaptic inputs received by frontal cortical neurons. PMID:27066532

  2. Opposing effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the serotonergic system of zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a pediatric anesthetic, is a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist. Studies show that ketamine is neurotoxic in developing mammals and zebrafish. In both mammals and zebrafish, acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) has been shown to be protective against ketamine toxicity. Ketamine is known to modulate the serotonergic system in mammals. Here, we measured the levels of serotonin (5-HT) and its metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses, did not produce significant changes in the 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels in 3 dpf (day post-fertilization) embryos. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels comparable to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced 5-HT level, and 5-HIAA was not detectable indicating that 5-HT metabolism was abolished. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR by itself did not significantly alter 5-HT or 5-HIAA levels compared to the control. Ratios of metabolite/5-HT indicated that 2 mM ketamine inhibited 5-HT metabolism to 5-HIAA whereas lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM) of ketamine did not have any effect. ALCAR reversed the effects of 2 mM ketamine not only by restoring 5-HT and 5-HIAA levels but also 5-HT turnover rate to control levels. Whole mount immunohistochemical studies showed that 2 mM ketamine reduced the serotonergic area in the brain whereas ALCAR expanded it with increased axonal sprouting and branching. These results indicate that ketamine and ALCAR have opposing effects on the zebrafish serotonergic system. PMID:26365406

  3. Comparison of Oral and Intranasal Midazolam/Ketamine Sedation in 3-6-year-old Uncooperative Dental Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fallahinejad Ghajari, Masoud; Ansari, Ghassem; Soleymani, Ali Asghar; Shayeghi, Shahnaz; Fotuhi Ardakani, Faezeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. There are several known sedative drugs, with midazolam and ketamine being the most commonly used drugs in children. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of intranasal and oral midazolam plus ketamine in children with high levels of dental anxiety. Materials and methods.A crossover double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 23 uncooperative children aged 3-6 (negative or definitely negative by Frankel scale), who required at least two similar dental treatment visits. Cases were randomly given ketamine (10 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) through oral or intranasal routes in each visit. The sedative efficacy of the agents was assessed by an overall success rate judged by two independent pediatric dentists based on Houpt’s scale for sedation. Data analysis was carried out using Wilcoxon test and paired t-test. Results. Intranasal administration was more effective in reduction of crying and movement during dental procedures compared to oral sedation (P<0.05). Overall behavior control was scored higher in nasal compared to oral routes at the time of LA injection and after 15 minutes (P<0.05). The difference was found to be statistically significant at the start and during treatment. However, the difference was no longer significant after 30 minutes, with the vital signs remaining within physiological limits. Recovery time was longer in the intranasal group (P<0.001) with a more sleepy face (P=0.004). Conclusion.. Intranasal midazolam/ketamine combination was more satisfactory and effective than the oral route when sedating uncooperative children. PMID:26236429

  4. Electroencephalographic coherence and cortical acetylcholine during ketamine-induced unconsciousness

    PubMed Central

    Pal, D.; Hambrecht-Wiedbusch, V. S.; Silverstein, B. H.; Mashour, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is limited understanding of cortical neurochemistry and cortical connectivity during ketamine anaesthesia. We conducted a systematic study to investigate the effects of ketamine on cortical acetylcholine (ACh) and electroencephalographic coherence. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats (n=11) were implanted with electrodes to record electroencephalogram (EEG) from frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices, and with a microdialysis guide cannula for simultaneous measurement of ACh concentrations in prefrontal cortex before, during, and after ketamine anaesthesia. Coherence and power spectral density computed from the EEG, and ACh concentrations, were compared between conscious and unconscious states. Loss of righting reflex was used as a surrogate for unconsciousness. Results Ketamine-induced unconsciousness was associated with a global reduction of power (P=0.02) in higher gamma bandwidths (>65 Hz), a global reduction of coherence (P≤0.01) across a broad frequency range (0.5–250 Hz), and a significant increase in ACh concentrations (P=0.01) in the prefrontal cortex. Compared with the unconscious state, recovery of righting reflex was marked by a further increase in ACh concentrations (P=0.0007), global increases in power in theta (4–10 Hz; P=0.03) and low gamma frequencies (25–55 Hz; P=0.0001), and increase in power (P≤0.01) and coherence (P≤0.002) in higher gamma frequencies (65–250 Hz). Acetylcholine concentrations, coherence, and spectral properties returned to baseline levels after a prolonged recovery period. Conclusions Ketamine-induced unconsciousness is characterized by suppression of high-frequency gamma activity and a breakdown of cortical coherence, despite increased cholinergic tone in the cortex. PMID:25951831

  5. Ketamine Strengthens CRF-Activated Amygdala Inputs to Basal Dendrites in mPFC Layer V Pyramidal Cells in the Prelimbic but not Infralimbic Subregion, A Key Suppressor of Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong-Jian; Ota, Kristie T; Dutheil, Sophie; Duman, Ronald S; Aghajanian, George K

    2015-08-01

    A single sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine, a short-acting NMDA receptor blocker, induces a rapid and prolonged antidepressant effect in treatment-resistant major depression. In animal models, ketamine (24 h) reverses depression-like behaviors and associated deficits in excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) generated in apical dendritic spines of layer V pyramidal cells of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). However, little is known about the effects of ketamine on basal dendrites. The basal dendrites of layer V cells receive an excitatory input from pyramidal cells of the basolateral amygdala (BLA), neurons that are activated by the stress hormone CRF. Here we found that CRF induces EPSCs in PFC layer V cells and that ketamine enhanced this effect through the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 synaptogenic pathway; the CRF-induced EPSCs required an intact BLA input and were generated primarily in basal dendrites. In contrast to its detrimental effects on apical dendritic structure and function, chronic stress did not induce a loss of CRF-induced EPSCs in basal dendrites, thereby creating a relative imbalance in favor of amygdala inputs. The effects of ketamine were complex: ketamine enhanced apical EPSC responses in all mPFC subregions, anterior cingulate (AC), prelimbic (PL), and infralimbic (IL) but enhanced CRF-induced EPSCs only in AC and PL-responses were unchanged in IL, a critical area for suppression of stress responses. We propose that by restoring the strength of apical inputs relative to basal amygdala inputs, especially in IL, ketamine would ameliorate the hypothesized disproportional negative influence of the amygdala in chronic stress and major depression. PMID:25759300

  6. Ketamine Alters Outcome-Related Local Field Potentials in Monkey Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Skoblenick, Kevin J; Womelsdorf, Thilo; Everling, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    A subanesthetic dose of the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine is known to induce a schizophrenia-like phenotype in humans and nonhuman primates alike. The transient behavioral changes mimic the positive, negative, and cognitive symptoms of the disease but the neural mechanisms behind these changes are poorly understood. A growing body of evidence indicates that the cognitive control processes associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) regions relies on groups of neurons synchronizing at narrow-band frequencies measurable in the local field potential (LFP). Here, we recorded LFPs from the caudo-lateral PFC of 2 macaque monkeys performing an antisaccade task, which requires the suppression of an automatic saccade toward a stimulus and the initiation of a goal-directed saccade in the opposite direction. Preketamine injection activity showed significant differences in a narrow 20-30 Hz beta frequency band between correct and error trials in the postsaccade response epoch. Ketamine significantly impaired the animals' performance and was associated with a loss of the differences in outcome-specific beta-band power. Instead, we observed a large increase in high-gamma-band activity. Our results suggest that the PFC employs beta-band synchronization to prepare for top-down cognitive control of saccades and the monitoring of task outcome. PMID:26045564

  7. Drawover anesthesia. A review of equipment, capabilities, and utility under austere conditions.

    PubMed

    Olson, K W; Kingsley, C P

    1990-01-01

    Anesthesia care may be required under austere conditions during military operations and natural disasters. Drawover anesthesia devices that provide inhalational anesthetic agents in air or an air/oxygen mixture are useful in these circumstances. This equipment must be portable, rugged, lightweight, and capable of functioning with an absolute requirement for compressed gas supplies. The historical experience, available equipment and literature on this subject are reviewed. PMID:10148883

  8. In the United States, "Opt-Out" States Show No Increase in Access to Anesthesia Services for Medicare Beneficiaries Compared with Non-"Opt-Out" States.

    PubMed

    Sun, Eric C; Miller, Thomas R; Halzack, Nicholas M

    2016-05-01

    In the United States, anesthesia care can be provided by anesthesiologists or nurse anesthetists. Since 2001, 17 states have exercised their right to "opt-out" of the federal requirement that a physician supervise the administration of anesthesia by a nurse anesthetist, with the majority citing increased access to anesthesia care as the rationale for their decision. By using Medicare data, we found that most (4 of 5) cohorts of "opt-out" states likely experienced smaller growth in anesthesia utilization rates compared with non-"opt-out" states, suggesting that opt-out was not associated with an increase in access to anesthesia care. PMID:26895523

  9. Effect of buprenorphine on total intravenous anesthetic requirements during spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Khelemsky, Yury; Schauer, Jacob; Loo, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is a partial mu receptor agonist and kappa/delta antagonist commonly used for the treatment of opioid dependence or as an analgesic. It has a long plasma half-life and a high binding affinity for opioid receptors. This affinity is so high, that the effects are not easily antagonized by competitive antagonists, such as naloxone. The high affinity also prevents binding of other opioids, at commonly used clinical doses, to receptor sites - preventing their analgesic and likely minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) reducing benefits. This case report contrasts the anesthetic requirements of a patient undergoing emergency cervical spine surgery while taking buprenorphine with anesthetic requirements of the same patient undergoing a similar procedure after weaning of buprenorphine. Use of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring prevented use of paralytics and inhalational anesthetics during both cases, therefore total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) was maintained with propofol and remifentanil infusions. During the initial surgery, intraoperative patient movement could not be controlled with very high doses of propofol and remifentanil. The patient stopped moving in response to surgical stimulation only after the addition of a ketamine. Buprenorphine-naloxone was discontinued postoperatively. Five days later the patient underwent a similar cervical spine surgery. She had drastically reduced anesthetic requirements during this case, suggesting buprenorphine's profound effect on anesthetic dosing. This case report elegantly illustrates that discontinuation of buprenorphine is likely warranted for patients who present for major spine surgery, which necessitates the avoidance of volatile anesthetic and paralytic agents. The addition of ketamine may be necessary in patients maintained on buprenorphine in order to ensure a motionless surgical field. PMID:25794231

  10. Evaluation of efficacy of regional and local anesthesia techniques in arteriovenous fistula criation for dialysis.

    PubMed

    Shoshiashvili, V; Tataradze, A; Beglarishvili, L; Managadze, L; Chkhotua, A

    2014-11-01

    Both, regional and local anesthesia are used for dialysis arterio-venous fistula (AVF) formation in end-stage renal disease patients. There are no prospective, randomized clinical trials comparing effectiveness of these types of anesthesia in these patients. It was a prospective, randomized study. 103 patients with ESRD underwent dialysis AVF operations on upper limb. The patients have been randomly divided in two groups. Group I: 49 patients in whom the operations have been done under the local anesthesia; and Group II: 54 patients in whom the operation has been performed under the vertical infraclavicular block. Radio-Cefalic, Brachio-Cefalic and Brachio-Basilic(I stage transposition) fistulas have been created in all patients.Influence of the type of anesthesia on intra- and postoperative pain has been evaluated and compared between the groups. The mean follow-up was 359.5 days in Group I and 340.5 days in Group II (p-NS).The mean patients age was 59.7±13.1 years and 60.1±14 years in local and regional anesthesia groups, respectively (p=NS). For the whole group, significantly less number of patients with regional anesthesia required additional perioperative analgesics as compared with the local anesthesia group (p=0.0363). Time to postoperative pain initiation was significantly higher in Group II (2.3 hours) as compared with the Group I (1.7 hours, p=0.0477). The need for postoperative pain killers was significantly less in regional as compared with the local anesthesia (p=0.0318). Duration of operation was significantly less in regional (67.5 min.) as compared with local anesthesia (134.7 min. p=0.0007) group. This difference has been detected in Brachio-Cefalic and Brachio-Basilic fistulas (p=0.0257 and 0.001, respectively) but not in Radio-Cefalic one. No anesthesia related complications have been detected. Insufficiency of regional anesthesia has been identified in 3 cases (5.5%).In 5 patients from regional anesthesia group (9.4%) as a result of

  11. Regional anesthesia alone for pediatric free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, Kim A; Venkatramani, Hari; Venkateshwaran, Govindaswamy; Boopathi, Vadivel; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular surgery plays an important reconstructive role in the pediatric population. Successful outcomes rely on surgical technique as well as anesthesia. Regional anesthesia contributes to successful free tissue transfer through sympathetic blockade, postoperative pain control, and elimination of risks and costs associated with general anesthesia. While regional anesthesia in microsurgery is discussed in the literature for adult and elderly patients, no studies focus on the pediatric population. Accordingly, this paper reviews 20 pediatric patients undergoing microvascular surgery (anterolateral thigh, n = 9; gracilis, n = 3; toe transfer, n = 6; and fibula, n = 2) with regional anesthesia and sedation. All patients underwent spinal epidural anesthesia, and seven also received brachial plexus blocks. The average duration of anesthesia was 3-4 h (anterolateral thigh (ALT) and gracilis) and 6-8 h (toe transfer and fibula). No anesthesia-related complications or flap failures occurred. We conclude that regional anesthesia has important benefits in pediatric microsurgery and it is a safe and cost-effective alternative to general anesthesia. PMID:25858275

  12. Adverse Drug Effects and Preoperative Medication Factors Related to Perioperative Low-Dose Ketamine Infusions.

    PubMed

    Schwenk, Eric S; Goldberg, Stephen F; Patel, Ronak D; Zhou, Jon; Adams, Douglas R; Baratta, Jaime L; Viscusi, Eugene R; Epstein, Richard H

    2016-01-01

    High-dose opioid administration is associated with significant adverse events. Evidence suggests that low-dose ketamine infusions improve perioperative analgesia over conventional opioid management, but usage is highly variable. Ketamine's adverse drug effects (ADEs) are well known, but their prevalence during low-dose infusions in a clinical setting and how often they lead to infusion discontinuation are unknown. The purposes of this study were 3-fold: (1) to identify patient factors associated with initiation of ketamine infusions during spine surgery, (2) to identify specific spine procedures in which ketamine has been used most frequently, and (3) to identify ADEs associated with postoperative ketamine infusions and which ADEs most frequently led to discontinuation. Spine surgery was chosen because of its association with moderate to severe pain and a relatively high use of ketamine infusions in this population at our hospital. PMID:27281730

  13. Ketamine Injection among High Risk Youth: Preliminary Findings from New York City

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Clatts, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine, a synthetic drug commonly consumed by high risk youth, produces a range of experiences, including sedation, dissociation, and hallucinations. While ketamine is more typically sniffed, we describe a small sample of young ketamine injectors (n=25) in New York City and highlight risks associated with this emerging type of injection drug use. Our findings indicate that the injection practices, injection groups, and use norms surrounding ketamine often differ from other injection drug use: intramuscular injections were more common than intravenous injections; injection groups were often large; multiple injections within a single episode were common; bottles rather than cookers were shared; and the drug was often obtained for free. Our findings suggest that the drug injection practices exercised by ketamine injectors place them at risk for bloodborne pathogens, such as HIV, HBV, and HCV. We conclude that ketamine injectors represent an emerging, though often hidden, population of injection drug users, particularly among high risk, street-involved youth. PMID:17440604

  14. Ketamine for Treatment of Suicidal Ideation and Reduction of Risk for Suicidal Behavior.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Faryal; McCullumsmith, Cheryl B

    2016-06-01

    Ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist with efficacy as a rapid anti-depressant, has early evidence for action to reduce suicidal ideation. This review will explore several important questions that arise from these studies. First, how do we measure reductions in suicidal ideation that occur over minutes to hours? Second, are the reductions in suicidal ideation after ketamine treatment solely a result of its rapid anti-depressant effect? Third, is ketamine only effective in reducing suicidal ideation in patients with mood disorders? Fourth, could ketamine's action lead us to a greater understanding of the neurobiology of suicidal processes? Last, do the reductions in depression and suicidal ideation after ketamine treatment translate into decreased risk for suicidal behavior? Our review concludes that ketamine treatment can be seen as a double-edged sword, clinically to help provide treatment for acutely suicidal patients and experimentally to explore the neurobiological nature of suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior. PMID:27194043

  15. The use of injectable alphaxalone as a single agent and in combination with ketamine, xylazine, and morphine in the Chilean rose tarantula, Grammostola rosea.

    PubMed

    Gjeltema, Jenessa; Posner, Lysa P; Stoskopf, Michael

    2014-12-01

    This study evaluated the use of the injectable anesthetic, alphaxalone, as a single agent and in combination with ketamine, xylazine, and morphine in the Chilean rose tarantula, Grammostola rosea. Between two and four animals were evaluated for each anesthetic protocol, and two unanesthetized animals were evaluated for comparative purposes. Anesthetic duration, depth, and quality were assessed by scoring responses to tactile and trichobothria stimulation, muscle tone, purposeful movement, righting response, and heart rate throughout each anesthetic event. Alphaxalone administered into the dorsal opisthosoma in the location of the heart at 200 mg/kg produced moderate anesthetic effect with a median duration of 28 min (n = 3; range 25-50). A combination of 200 mg/kg of alphaxalone and 20 mg/kg of ketamine induced a deep anesthetic state with a median anesthetic duration of 27 min (n = 4; range 16-42). The combination of 200 mg/kg of alphaxalone and 20 mg/kg of xylazine produced deep anesthesia with a median duration of 70 min (n = 4; range 37-207). Morphine administered at 5 mg/kg 30 min prior to injection with 200 mg/kg alphaxalone had anesthetic durations of 9 and 30 min (n = 2). Heartbeats could not be detected for periods of 7-27 min following anesthetic induction for the majority of animals receiving the alphaxalone/ketamine and alphaxalone/xylazine anesthetic combinations. No mortality was associated with any of the anesthetic protocols used; however, ambient temperature and ecdysis were identified as important factors that may alter response to anesthetics in these animals. PMID:25632665

  16. PERI-ANESTHESIA ANAPHYLAXIS (PAA): WE STILL HAVE NOT STARTED POST-PAA TESTING FOR INCITING ANESTHESIA-RELATED ALLERGENS.

    PubMed

    Alshaeri, Taghreed; Gupta, Deepak; Nagabhushana, Ananthamurthy

    2016-02-01

    Anaphylaxis during anesthesia is uncommon. Diagnosis of peri-anesthesia anaphylaxis (PAA) requires anesthesia providers' vigilance for prompt diagnosis and treatment. In this case report, we present a challenging case with suspected PAA including its perioperative management, intensive care unit (ICU) course, and post-discharge follow-up. A 44-year-old female (body mass index = 26) presented for elective abdominal panniculectomy. Post-intubation, severe bronchospasm occurred that was non-responsive to nebulized albuterol and intravenous epinephrine. Continuous infusion of epinephrine was initiated. After aborting surgical procedure, the patient was transferred to ICU on continuous intravenous infusion of epinephrine. Venous blood sampling showed elevated troponin level. Echocardiography revealed ejection fraction of 25% suspicious of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (mid cavitary variant). Tracheal extubation was only possible after three days. Subsequently, patient was discharged home with a cardiology follow-up appointment and a referral to an allergy specialist. Unfortunately at our institution (an academic university hospital in United States) along with neighboring institutions in near-by areas, the only allergy skin tests available are for local anesthetics and antibiotics, while neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) cannot be tested (the suspected anaphylactic agent in our case was presumably rocuronium). In summary, PAA requires and responds to emergent diagnosis and immediate treatment; however there is still a long way to go to ensure post-PAA testing for inciting anesthesia-related allergens. PMID:27382817

  17. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl L-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Bonnie L; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G; Ali, Syed F; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1-0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  18. Distinct effects of ketamine and acetyl l-carnitine on the dopamine system in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Bonnie L.; Dumas, Melanie; Cuevas, Elvis; Gu, Qiang; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonist is commonly used as a pediatric anesthetic. We have previously shown that acetyl L-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents ketamine toxicity in zebrafish embryos. In mammals, ketamine is known to modulate the dopaminergic system. NMDA receptor antagonists are considered as promising anti-depressants, but the exact mechanism of their function is unclear. Here, we measured the levels of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the zebrafish embryos exposed to ketamine in the presence and absence of 0.5 mM ALCAR. Ketamine, at lower doses (0.1–0.3 mM), did not produce significant changes in DA, DOPAC or HVA levels in 52 h post-fertilization embryos treated for 24 h. In these embryos, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression remained unchanged. However, 2 mM ketamine (internal embryo exposure levels equivalent to human anesthetic plasma concentration) significantly reduced DA level and TH mRNA indicating that DA synthesis was adversely affected. In the presence or absence of 2 mM ketamine, ALCAR showed similar effects on DA level and TH mRNA, but increased DOPAC level compared to control. ALCAR reversed 2 mM ketamine-induced reduction in HVA levels. With ALCAR alone, the expression of genes encoding the DA metabolizing enzymes, MAO (monoamine oxidase) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), was not affected. However, ketamine altered MAO mRNA expression, except at the 0.1 mM dose. COMT transcripts were reduced in the 2 mM ketamine-treated group. These distinct effects of ketamine and ALCAR on the DA system may shed some light on the mechanism on how ketamine can work as an anti-depressant, especially at sub-anesthetic doses that do not affect DA metabolism and suppress MAO gene expression. PMID:26898327

  19. Cerebral mechanisms of general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Uhrig, L; Dehaene, S; Jarraya, B

    2014-02-01

    How does general anesthesia (GA) work? Anesthetics are pharmacological agents that target specific central nervous system receptors. Once they bind to their brain receptors, anesthetics modulate remote brain areas and end up interfering with global neuronal networks, leading to a controlled and reversible loss of consciousness. This remarkable manipulation of consciousness allows millions of people every year to undergo surgery safely most of the time. However, despite all the progress that has been made, we still lack a clear and comprehensive insight into the specific neurophysiological mechanisms of GA, from the molecular level to the global brain propagation. During the last decade, the exponential progress in neuroscience and neuro-imaging led to a significant step in the understanding of the neural correlates of consciousness, with direct consequences for clinical anesthesia. Far from shutting down all brain activity, anesthetics lead to a shift in the brain state to a distinct, highly specific and complex state, which is being increasingly characterized by modern neuro-imaging techniques. There are several clinical consequences and challenges that are arising from the current efforts to dissect GA mechanisms: the improvement of anesthetic depth monitoring, the characterization and avoidance of intra-operative awareness and post-anesthesia cognitive disorders, and the development of future generations of anesthetics. PMID:24368069

  20. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianli; Yu, Yang; Wang, Bei; Wu, Honghai; Xue, Gai; Hou, Yanning

    2016-02-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  1. Long-Term Heavy Ketamine Use is Associated with Spatial Memory Impairment and Altered Hippocampal Activation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Celia J. A.; Dodds, Chris M.; Furby, Hannah; Pepper, Fiona; Fam, Johnson; Freeman, Tom P.; Hughes, Emer; Doeller, Christian; King, John; Howes, Oliver; Stone, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist, is rising in popularity as a drug of abuse. Preliminary evidence suggests that chronic, heavy ketamine use may have profound effects on spatial memory but the mechanism of these deficits is as yet unclear. This study aimed to examine the neural mechanism by which heavy ketamine use impairs spatial memory processing. In a sample of 11 frequent ketamine users and 15 poly-drug controls, matched for IQ, age, years in education. We used fMRI utilizing an ROI approach to examine the neural activity of three regions known to support successful navigation; the hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, and the caudate nucleus during a virtual reality task of spatial memory. Frequent ketamine users displayed spatial memory deficits, accompanied by and related to, reduced activation in both the right hippocampus and left parahippocampal gyrus during navigation from memory, and in the left caudate during memory updating, compared to controls. Ketamine users also exhibited schizotypal and dissociative symptoms that were related to hippocampal activation. Impairments in spatial memory observed in ketamine users are related to changes in medial temporal lobe activation. Disrupted medial temporal lobe function may be a consequence of chronic ketamine abuse and may relate to schizophrenia-like symptomatology observed in ketamine users. PMID:25538631

  2. Selective regulation of neurosteroid biosynthesis under ketamine-induced apoptosis of cortical neurons in vitro

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIANLI; YU, YANG; WANG, BEI; WU, HONGHAI; XUE, GAI; HOU, YANNING

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have suggested that ketamine administration can induce neuroapoptosis in primary cultured cortical neurons. Neurosteroids modulate neuronal function and serve important roles in the central nervous system, however the role of neurosteroids in neuroapoptosis induced by ketamine remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to explore whether neurosteroidogenesis was a pivotal mechanism for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis, and whether it may be selectively regulated under ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis conditions in primary cultured cortical neurons. To study this hypothesis, the effect of ketamine exposure on neurosteroidogenesis in primary cultured cortical neurons was investigated. Cholesterol, a substrate involved in the synthesis of neurosteroids, was added to the culture medium, and neurosteroids were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis. The data demonstrated that cholesterol blocked ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis by promoting the synthesis of various neurosteroids, and the pathway of neurosteroid testosterone conversion into estradiol was inhibited by ketamine exposure. These data suggest that endogenous neurosteroids biosynthesis is critical for neuroprotection against ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis and inhibiting the biosynthesis of neuroprotective-neurosteroid estradiol is of notable importance for ketamine-induced neuroapoptosis. PMID:26709052

  3. Chronic ketamine exposure induces permanent impairment of brain functions in adolescent cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Li, Qi; Li, Qing; Zhang, Yuzhe; Liu, Dexiang; Jiang, Hong; Pan, Fang; Yew, David T

    2014-03-01

    Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist, has emerged as an increasingly popular drug among young drug abusers worldwide. Available evidence suggests that ketamine produces acute impairments of working, episodic and semantic memory along with psychotogenic and dissociative effects when a single dose is given to healthy volunteers. However, understanding of the possible chronic effects of ketamine on behavior, cognitive anomalies and neurochemical homeostasis is still incomplete. Although previous human studies demonstrate that ketamine could impair a range of cognitive skills, investigation using non-human models would permit more precise exploration of the neurochemical mechanisms which may underlie the detrimental effects. The current study examined the abnormalities in behavior (move, walk, jump and climb) and apoptosis of the prefrontal cortex using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated biotinylated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) and apoptotic markers, including Bax, Bcl-2 and caspase-3 in adolescent male cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) after 1 or 6 months of sub-anesthetic ketamine administration (1 mg/kg, i.v.). Results showed that ketamine decreased locomotor activity and increased cell death in the prefrontal cortex of monkeys with 6 months of ketamine treatment when compared with the control monkeys. Such decreases were not found in the 1-month ketamine-treated group. Our study suggested that ketamine administration of recreational dose in monkeys might produce permanent and irreversible deficits in brain functions due to neurotoxic effects, involving the activation of apoptotic pathways in the prefrontal cortex. PMID:23145560

  4. Mutual enhancement of central neurotoxicity induced by ketamine followed by methamphetamine

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, J.-J.; Chen, H.-I.; Jen, C.J.; Kuo, Y.-M.; Cherng, C.G.; Tsai, Y.-P.N.; Ho, M.-C.; Tsai, C.-W.; Lung Yu

    2008-03-01

    We hereby report that repeated administration of ketamine (350 mg/kg in total) and methamphetamine (30 mg/kg in total) causes specific glutamatergic and dopaminergic neuron deficits, respectively, in adult mouse brain. Acute ketamine did not affect basal body temperature or the later methamphetamine-induced hyperthermia. However, pretreatment with repeated doses of ketamine aggravated methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic terminal loss as evidenced by a drastic decrease in the levels of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and dopamine transporter density as well as poor gait balance performance. In contrast, methamphetamine-induced serotonergic depletion was not altered by ketamine pretreatment. Likewise, the subsequent treatment with methamphetamine exacerbated the ketamine-induced glutamatergic damage as indicated by reduced levels of the vesicular glutamate transporter in hippocampus and striatum and poor memory performance in the Morris water maze. Finally, since activation of the D1 and AMPA/kainate receptors has been known to be involved in the release of glutamate and dopamine, we examined the effects of co-administration of SCH23390, a D1 antagonist, and CNQX, an AMPA/kainate antagonist. Intraventricular CNQX infusion abolished ketamine's potentiation of methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity, while systemic SCH23390 mitigated methamphetamine's potentiation of ketamine-induced glutamatergic toxicity. We conclude that repeated doses of ketamine potentiate methamphetamine-induced dopamine neurotoxicity via AMPA/kainate activation and that conjunctive use of methamphetamine aggravates ketamine-induced glutamatergic neurotoxicity possibly via D1 receptor activation.

  5. CHALLENGES OF OBSTETRIC ANESTHESIA: DIFFICULT LARYNGEAL VISUALIZATION.

    PubMed

    Alanoğlu, Zekeriyya; Erkoç, Süheyla Karadağ; Güçlü, Çiğdem Yildirim; Meço, Başak Ceyda Orbey; Baytaş, Volkan; Can, Özlem Selvi; Alkiş, Neslihan

    2016-03-01

    Obstetric anesthesia is one of the high risk subspecialties of anesthesia practice. Anesthesia related complications are the sixth leading cause of maternal mortality. Difficult or failed intubation following induction of general anesthesia for CS remains the major contributory factor to anesthesia-related maternal complications. The airway management of obstetric patients is a challenging issue for several reasons. Anatomic and physiologic changes related to pregnancy may increase the difficult and failed intubation rates compared to the general surgical population. Proper evaluation of the airway anatomy and airway structures is vital to prevent airway management related catastrophes. In addition to basic airway and intubation equipment, each anesthesia department must have difficult intubation equipment cart including fiber optic laryngoscope, video laryngoscopes, and different types of laryngeal masks. It is essential that all anesthesiologists have a preconceived and well thought-out algorithm and emergency airway equipment to deal with airway emergencies during difficult or failed intubation of a parturient. PMID:27276775

  6. Non-operating Room Anesthesia: The Principles of Patient Assessment and Preparation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Beverly; Urman, Richard D

    2016-03-01

    A significant number of anesthetics are performed outside of the operating room (OR). Despite the increased requirement for anesthesia services, the framework to perform the necessary preprocedural anesthesia assessments to optimize patients has not been uniformly developed. Performing anesthesia in non-OR locations poses significant and distinct challenges compared with the procedures in the OR. Anesthesiologists are faced with patients with increasingly complicated comorbidities undergoing novel, complex interventional procedures. With unique training in preoperative triaging, and an expertise in intraoperative and postoperative management of complex patients, anesthesiologists can contribute to greater efficiency and patient safety in the non-OR setting. PMID:26927750

  7. Beware of "black swans" and "perfect storms:" the principle of plenitude and office-based anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Treasure, Trevor E

    2014-08-01

    A paradigm shift in the training, practice, and study of office-based anesthesia is necessary for our specialty. Practice improvement plans are required to prevent low-probability-high-consequence anesthesia mishaps in our offices. A scarcity of statistical data exists regarding the true risk of office-based anesthesia in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Effective proactive risk management mandates accurate data to correctly outline the problem before solutions can be implemented. Only by learning from our mistakes, will we be able to reduce errors and improve patient safety: "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing"--John Powell. PMID:25037181

  8. Pupil Size in Relation to Cortical States during Isoflurane Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Kum, Jeung Eun; Han, Hio-Been

    2016-01-01

    In neuronal recording studies on anesthetized animals, reliable measures for the transitional moment of consciousness are frequently required. Previous findings suggest that pupil fluctuations reflect the neuronal states during quiet wakefulness, whose correlation was unknown for the anesthetized condition. Here, we investigated the pupillary changes under isoflurane anesthesia simultaneously with the electroencephalogram (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG). The pupil was tracked by using a region-based active contour model. The dose was given to the animal in a stepwise increasing mode (simulating induction of anesthesia) or in a stepwise decreasing mode (simulating emergence of anesthesia). We found that the quickly widening pupil action (mydriasis) characterizes the transitional state in anesthesia. Mydriasis occurred only in the light dose in the emergence phase, and the events were accompanied by an increase of burst activity in the EEG followed by EMG activity in 47% of the mydriasis events. Our findings suggest that recording such pupil changes may offer a noncontact monitoring tool for indexing the transitional state of the brain, particularly when a lower threshold dose is applied. PMID:27122995

  9. [OPIOID-FREE ANESTHESIA, ANALGESIA AND SEDATION IN SURGERY OF HEAD AND NECK TUMOR].

    PubMed

    Balandin, V V; Gorobec, E S

    2015-01-01

    62 adult patients had highly traumatic cancer head and neck surgery under multimodal non-opioid general anesthesia consisted of dexmedetomidine, lidocane, nefopam and sevoflurane. 18 patients had been intubatedwith fiber optic bronchoscope because of II-IV grade trismus. 10 patients with laryngeal stenosis had been tracheotomizedfor intubation. All these 28 patients had been sedated with dexmedetomidine, lidocane and small doses (10-20 mg) ketamine additionally to local anesthesia. All these patients maintained consciousness and breathed spontaneously. Propofol and rocuronium preceded tracheal intubation. I.V. infusion of dexmedetomidine and lidocane proceeded additionally to sevoflurane (1-1.5MAC) .during the main surgery procedure course. All 62 cases went and finished uneventfully. Awakening and spontaneous breathing recovered just after the end of the surgery. During two first postoperative days all the patients had persistent i.v. analgesia with 1% lidocaine, nefopam and tenoxycam. On the day. 3 analgesia proceeded with nefopam and tenoxycam i.m. The quality of analgesia was good, with no complications. Only 3 patients had one promedol (trimeperidine) or tramadol iniection at the start-up of this new method of analgesia. PMID:27025133

  10. Regional anesthesia for major vascular surgery.

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, D. P.; Cunningham, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The relative merits of general vs regional anesthesia for patients undergoing major vascular surgery has been the subject of debate over the past decade. Previous studies of regional vs general anesthesia often were deficient in experimental design and, therefore, did not produce definitive answers. Some of these deficiencies related to non-standardized, poorly conducted, and/or described general anesthetic techniques, nonstandardized methods of postoperative analgesia in the general anesthesia groups, and variations in preoperative cardiac status in the study groups. Furthermore, most studies did not conclusively demonstrate a cause and effect relationship between the proposed mechanisms of the beneficial effect of regional anesthesia and outcome. Recent studies, however, have claimed improvements in outcome following regional anesthesia in patients undergoing peripheral vascular procedures. The reported beneficial effects have included amelioration of the neuroendocrine stress response to surgery, improvement in pulmonary function, cardiovascular stability, enhancement of lower limb blood flow, reduction in the incidence of graft thrombosis, and a reduction in the thrombic response to surgery. Skeptics still question whether recent studies have the power to determine whether regional anesthesia decreases the incidence of cardiac and pulmonary complications following major vascular surgery. Furthermore, the issue of whether the beneficial effects of regional anesthesia on the incidence of graft thrombosis and the thrombotic response to surgery relating to intraoperative or postoperative regional anesthesia/analgesia, to regional anesthesia per se, or to the systemic effects of absorbed local anesthetics remains unresolved. PMID:7825346

  11. Fully Automated Anesthesia, Analgesia and Fluid Management

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-05

    General Anesthetic Drug Overdose; Adverse Effect of Intravenous Anesthetics, Sequela; Complication of Anesthesia; Drug Delivery System Malfunction; Hemodynamic Instability; Underdosing of Other General Anesthetics

  12. Assessing pain responses during general anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Stomberg, M W; Sjöström, B; Haljamäe, H

    2001-06-01

    Major technical and pharmacological achievements in recent years have greatly influenced the practice of anesthesia. Clinical signs related to the main aspects of anesthesia, i.e., hypnosis, analgesia, and muscular relaxation, are increasingly obtainable from variables supplied by the monitoring equipment. It is not known, however, to what extent more indirect, patient-associated clinical signs of pain/depth of anesthesia are still considered of importance and relied on in the intraoperative management of surgical patients. The aims of the present study were to assess what clinical signs, indirect as well as monitor-derived, are considered indicative of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia by nurse anesthetists during general anesthesia. In connection with anesthetic management of surgical patients, Swedish nurse anesthetists (N = 40) were interviewed about clinical signs that they routinely assessed and were asked if the observed signs were considered indicative mainly of intraoperative pain or depth of anesthesia. It was found that skin-associated responses (temperature, color, moisture/stickiness) were commonly considered to indicate intraoperative pain rather than depth of anesthesia. Respiratory movements, eye reactions, and circulatory responses were considered to be indicative of either pain or insufficient depth of anesthesia. The present data indicate that indirect physiological signs are still considered of major importance by anesthesia nurses during the anesthetic management of surgical patients. PMID:11759565

  13. Propofol alternatives in gastrointestinal endoscopy anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Goudra, Basavana Gouda; Singh, Preet Mohinder

    2014-01-01

    Although propofol has been the backbone for sedation in gastrointestinal endoscopy, both anesthesiologists and endoscopists are faced with situations where an alternative is needed. Recent national shortages forced many physicians to explore these options. A midazolam and fentanyl combination is the mainstay in this area. However, there are other options. The aim of this review is to explore these options. The future would be, invariably, to move away from propofol. The reason is not in any way related to the drawbacks of propofol as a sedative. The mandate that requires an anesthesia provider to administer propofol has been a setback in many countries. New sedative drugs like Remimazolam might fill this void in the future. In the meantime, it is important to keep an open eye to the existing alternatives. PMID:25422614

  14. [Low dose ketamine for pediatric procedure-related pain].

    PubMed

    Annequin, D

    2012-07-01

    For painful procedures in children, national recommendations are now available in France. When sedation-analgesia with nitrous oxide/oxygen mixture fails, in order to perform a painful procedure under good conditions, low dose ketamine (IV bolus titration 0.5 mg/kg but not more than 2 mg/kg) is the only drug potentially used by a trained physician, without the presence of an anaesthesiologist (Grade A). With these dosages without drug combination, the highest level of security depends largely on the quality of the hospital environment (Grade A). Intramuscular (<4 mg/kg) is an alternative route, but the recovery time is delayed (Grade B). The optimal management is performed by an anesthesiologist, it is necessary to facilitate access to the operating room for children undergoing this type of procedure (Professional consensus). Mainly IV ketamine can be used by pediatric intensive care and emergency physicians who currently have medical skills to detect and treat side effects. PMID:22595625

  15. Impact of Anesthesia and Euthanasia on Metabolomics of Mammalian Tissues: Studies in a C57BL/6J Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Overmyer, Katherine A.; Thonusin, Chanisa; Qi, Nathan R.; Burant, Charles F.; Evans, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    A critical application of metabolomics is the evaluation of tissues, which are often the primary sites of metabolic dysregulation in disease. Laboratory rodents have been widely used for metabolomics studies involving tissues due to their facile handing, genetic manipulability and similarity to most aspects of human metabolism. However, the necessary step of administration of anesthesia in preparation for tissue sampling is not often given careful consideration, in spite of its potential for causing alterations in the metabolome. We examined, for the first time using untargeted and targeted metabolomics, the effect of several commonly used methods of anesthesia and euthanasia for collection of skeletal muscle, liver, heart, adipose and serum of C57BL/6J mice. The data revealed dramatic, tissue-specific impacts of tissue collection strategy. Among many differences observed, post-euthanasia samples showed elevated levels of glucose 6-phosphate and other glycolytic intermediates in skeletal muscle. In heart and liver, multiple nucleotide and purine degradation metabolites accumulated in tissues of euthanized compared to anesthetized animals. Adipose tissue was comparatively less affected by collection strategy, although accumulation of lactate and succinate in euthanized animals was observed in all tissues. Among methods of tissue collection performed pre-euthanasia, ketamine showed more variability compared to isoflurane and pentobarbital. Isoflurane induced elevated liver aspartate but allowed more rapid initiation of tissue collection. Based on these findings, we present a more optimal collection strategy mammalian tissues and recommend that rodent tissues intended for metabolomics studies be collected under anesthesia rather than post-euthanasia. PMID:25658945

  16. Efficacy of preanesthetic intramuscular administration of ephedrine for prevention of anesthesia-induced hypotension in cats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Egger, Christine; McCrackin, Mary-Ann; Hofmeister, Erik; Touzot-Jourde, Gwenola; Rohrbach, Bart

    2009-02-01

    To determine if the preanesthetic administration of ephedrine would prevent anesthesia-induced hypotension in dogs and cats, 10 cats were anesthetized with acepromazine, butorphanol, ketamine, and isoflurane, and 8 dogs were anesthetized with acepromazine, morphine, propofol, and halothane. Cats received ephedrine or saline 10 minutes after premedication. Dogs received ephedrine or saline at the time of premedication. Systolic arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, heart rate, end-tidal CO2, O2 saturation, cardiac rhythm, and rectal temperature were recorded.The systolic arterial pressure in cats receiving saline was significantly lower than baseline at 10 minutes after premedication, and systolic arterial pressure was < 80 mmHg for the duration of anesthesia. In cats receiving ephedrine, the systolic arterial pressure was significantly lower than baseline for the duration of anesthesia, but systolic arterial pressure was not < 80 mmHg until 25 min after induction. In dogs, systolic arterial pressure was significantly lower than baseline by 5 and 40 min after pre-medication in dogs receiving saline and ephedrine, respectively. There was no difference in heart rate, respiratory rate, end-tidal CO2, rectal temperature, O2 saturation, or cardiac rhythm among treatment groups. Prophylactic ephedrine delayed, but did not prevent, the onset of hypotension. PMID:19412398

  17. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y; Sun, Mu

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer's disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs' therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  18. NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine impairs feature integration in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Julia D I; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans. PMID:24223927

  19. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine Impairs Feature Integration in Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Julia D. I.; van Loon, Anouk M.; Scholte, H. Steven; Lirk, Philipp B.; Vulink, Nienke C. C.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Lamme, Victor A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans. PMID:24223927

  20. Ketamine Protects Gamma Oscillations by Inhibiting Hippocampal LTD

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lanting; Yang, Xiu-Juan; Huang, Ying; Sun, Eve Y.

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors have been widely reported to be involved in the regulation of synaptic plasticity through effects on long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). LTP and LTD have been implicated in learning and memory processes. Besides synaptic plasticity, it is known that the phenomenon of gamma oscillations is critical in cognitive functions. Synaptic plasticity has been widely studied, however it is still not clear, to what degree synaptic plasticity regulates the oscillations of neuronal networks. Two NMDA receptor antagonists, ketamine and memantine, have been shown to regulate LTP and LTD, to promote cognitive functions, and have even been reported to bring therapeutic effects in major depression and Alzheimer’s disease respectively. These compounds allow us to investigate the putative interrelationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity and to learn more about the mechanisms of their therapeutic effects. In the present study, we have identified that ketamine and memantine could inhibit LTD, without impairing LTP in the CA1 region of mouse hippocampus, which may underlie the mechanism of these drugs’ therapeutic effects. Our results suggest that NMDA-induced LTD caused a marked loss in the gamma power, and pretreatment with 10 μM ketamine prevented the oscillatory loss via its inhibitory effect on LTD. Our study provides a new understanding of the role of NMDA receptors on hippocampal plasticity and oscillations. PMID:27467732

  1. Intact urothelial barrier function in a mouse model of ketamine-induced voiding dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Rajandram, Retnagowri; Ong, Teng Aik; Razack, Azad H A; MacIver, Bryce; Zeidel, Mark; Yu, Weiqun

    2016-05-01

    Ketamine is a popular choice for young drug abusers. Ketamine abuse causes lower urinary tract symptoms, with the underlying pathophysiology poorly understood. Disruption of urothelial barrier function has been hypothesized to be a major mechanism for ketamine cystitis, yet the direct evidence of impaired urothelial barrier function is still lacking. To address this question, 8-wk-old female C57BL/6J mice were injected intraperitoneally with 30 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) ketamine for 12 wk to induce ketamine cystitis. A spontaneous voiding spot assay showed that ketamine-treated mice had increased primary voiding spot numbers and smaller primary voiding spot sizes than control mice (P < 0.05), indicating a contracted bladder and bladder overactivity. Consistently, significantly increased voiding frequency was observed in ketamine-treated mice on cystometrograms. These functional experiments indicate that ketamine induces voiding dysfunction in mice. Surprisingly, urothelial permeability in ketamine-treated mice was not changed when measured using an Ussing chamber system with isotopic urea and water. Mouse urothelial structure was also not altered, and intact umbrella cell structure was observed by both transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, immunostaining and confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of a well-defined distribution of zonula occuldens-1 in tight junctions and uroplakin in umbrella cells. In conclusion, these data indicate that ketamine injection induces voiding dysfunction in mice but does not necessarily disrupt mouse bladder barrier function. Disruption of urothelial barrier function may not be the major mechanism in ketamine cystitis. PMID:26911853

  2. Repeated Ketamine Exposure Induces an Enduring Resilient Phenotype in Adolescent and Adult Rats

    PubMed Central

    Parise, Eric M.; Alcantara, Lyonna F.; Warren, Brandon L.; Wright, Katherine N.; Hadad, Roey; Sial, Omar K.; Kroeck, Kyle G.; Iñiguez, Sergio D.; Bolaños-Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) afflicts up to 10% of adolescents. However, nearly 50% of those afflicted are considered non-responsive to available treatments. Ketamine, a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist has shown potential as a rapid-acting and long-lasting treatment for MDD in adults. Thus, the effectiveness and functional consequences of ketamine exposure during adolescence were explored. Methods Adolescent male rats (postnatal day [PD] 35) received two ketamine (0, 5, 10 or 20 mg/kg) injections, 4 hours apart, after exposure to day 1 of the forced swim test (FST). The next day, rats were re-exposed to the FST to assess ketamine-induced antidepressant-like responses. Separate groups were exposed to chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) to confirm findings from the FST. After these initial experiments, adolescent naïve rats were exposed to either 1 or 15 consecutive days (PD35–49) of ketamine (20 mg/kg) twice/daily. Ketamine's influence on behavioral reactivity to rewarding (i.e., sucrose preference) and aversive (i.e., elevated plus-maze, FST) circumstances was then assessed 2 months after treatment. To control for age-dependent effects, adult rats (PD75–89) were exposed to identical experimental conditions. Results Ketamine (20 mg/kg) reversed the CUS-induced depression-like behaviors in the FST. Repeated ketamine exposure resulted in anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like responses 2 months after drug exposure. None of the ketamine doses used were capable of inducing drug-seeking behaviors as measured by place preference conditioning. Conclusions Repeated ketamine exposure induces enduring resilient-like responses regardless of age of exposure. These findings point to ketamine, and its repeated exposure, as a potentially useful antidepressant during adolescence. PMID:23790225

  3. Evaluation of urinary bladder fibrogenesis in a mouse model of long-term ketamine injection

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Shou-Chieh; Wang, Shou-Tsung; Lin, Shu-Mei; Wu, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chang-Te; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Long-term ketamine abuse has been shown to affect the lower urinary tract and result in interstitial cystitis-like syndrome. However, the causative mechanism of ketamine-induced dysfunction remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the physiological, histological and molecular changes on ketamine-associated cystitis (KC) in a mouse model. Both male and female Balb/c mice were separately distributed into the control group (normal saline) and ketamine group, which received ketamine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) daily by intraperitoneal injection for a total period of 20 weeks. In each group, the urine was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to measure the concentration of ketamine and its metabolites. Urinary frequency and urine volume were examined to investigate the urinary voiding functions. Mice bladders were excised for cDNA microarray and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ketamine and metabolites were detected only in ketamine-treated mice urine. The voiding interval was reduced in the male mice group after 20 week ketamine administration. Additionally, the result of cDNA array analysis revealed a number of gene expression levels involved in chronic wound healing response and collagen accumulation, which were closely associated with fibrosis progression in the connective tissue. In HE staining of the bladder tissue, the ketamine-injected mice exhibited prominently denser blood vessel distribution in the submucosal layer. Based on the evidence in the present study, a mechanism that delineates fibrosis formation of urinary bladder induced by the pathogenesis of ketamine abuse can be constructed. PMID:27431428

  4. Practical application of the neuroregenerative properties of ketamine: real world treatment experience

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Theodore A.

    2016-01-01

    While controversial, ketamine has emerged as an effective treatment for refractory depression. Serial infusions have been performed 3 times per week, but our practical experience has challenged this precept concerning infusion frequency. Depression is associated with neuron loss, reduced synapse numbers, and dearborization of dendrites. Ketamine appears to potently induce mechanisms which reverse these neurodegenerative processes. Ketamine not only blocks the glutamate receptor, it activates eukaroyotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This, in turn, activates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein synthesis. This is thought to underlie ketamine's enduring benefits. In addition, ketamine alters glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) phosphorylation, probably responsible for its rapid antidepressant effect. Notably, inhibition of the BDNF receptor does not block the immediate benefits of ketamine, but does prevent the enduring effects. Neuro-Luminance Ketamine Infusion Centers have been treating patients with serial ketamine infusions for over three years. Our methods differ from what is often reported, as we perform infusions only once per week and generally do not perform more than five infusions. Data from 100 patients showed that 80% of the patients responded. The baseline Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report (QIDS-SR) score was 17.8 ± 2.8. Responders to ketamine showed a drop in QIDS-SR score of 10.8 ± 3.5, while non-responders showed a 0.8 ± 1.8 change. Moreover, they often had persistent benefits over several months. Recently, it was proposed that psychotomimetic effects are necessary during a ketamine infusion to yield effective antidepressant benefits. Yet, only one patient in our clinic has experienced hallucinations in three years. Nevertheless, 80% of our patients show clinical improvement. Further studies of clinical methods for ketamine infusion therapy are encouraged. PMID:27073354

  5. Practical application of the neuroregenerative properties of ketamine: real world treatment experience.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Theodore A

    2016-02-01

    While controversial, ketamine has emerged as an effective treatment for refractory depression. Serial infusions have been performed 3 times per week, but our practical experience has challenged this precept concerning infusion frequency. Depression is associated with neuron loss, reduced synapse numbers, and dearborization of dendrites. Ketamine appears to potently induce mechanisms which reverse these neurodegenerative processes. Ketamine not only blocks the glutamate receptor, it activates eukaroyotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). This, in turn, activates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein synthesis. This is thought to underlie ketamine's enduring benefits. In addition, ketamine alters glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) phosphorylation, probably responsible for its rapid antidepressant effect. Notably, inhibition of the BDNF receptor does not block the immediate benefits of ketamine, but does prevent the enduring effects. Neuro-Luminance Ketamine Infusion Centers have been treating patients with serial ketamine infusions for over three years. Our methods differ from what is often reported, as we perform infusions only once per week and generally do not perform more than five infusions. Data from 100 patients showed that 80% of the patients responded. The baseline Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self Report (QIDS-SR) score was 17.8 ± 2.8. Responders to ketamine showed a drop in QIDS-SR score of 10.8 ± 3.5, while non-responders showed a 0.8 ± 1.8 change. Moreover, they often had persistent benefits over several months. Recently, it was proposed that psychotomimetic effects are necessary during a ketamine infusion to yield effective antidepressant benefits. Yet, only one patient in our clinic has experienced hallucinations in three years. Nevertheless, 80% of our patients show clinical improvement. Further studies of clinical methods for ketamine infusion therapy are encouraged. PMID:27073354

  6. Roadside detection of impairment under the influence of ketamine--evaluation of ketamine impairment symptoms with reference to its concentration in oral fluid and urine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wing-Chi; Ng, Kin-Man; Chan, Ka-Keung; Mok, Vincent King-Kuen; Cheung, Ben Kin-Leung

    2007-07-20

    Although there are many roadside testing devices available for the screening of abused drugs, none of them can be used for the detection of ketamine, a popular abused drug in Hong Kong. In connection to local drug driving legislation, effective roadside detection of ketamine in suspected drug-impaired drivers has to be established. According to the drug evaluation and classification program (DEC), ketamine is classified in the phencyclidine (PCP) category. However, no study has been performed regarding the signs and symptoms exhibited by users under the influence of ketamine. In a study to develop a protocol for effective roadside detection of drug-impaired drivers, 62 volunteers exiting from discos were assessed using field impairment tests (FIT) that included measurements of three vital signs (i.e. body temperature, pulse rate and blood pressure), three eye examinations [pupil size, lack of convergence (LOC) and horizontal gaze nystagmus (HGN)] and four divided attention tests (Romberg, one-leg stand, finger-to-nose and walk-and-turn tests). Subsequent laboratory analysis of oral fluid and urine samples from the participants revealed the presence of common abused drugs in both the urine and oral fluid samples of 55 subjects. The remaining 7 subjects with no drug in their oral fluid samples were used as drug-free subjects. In addition, 10 volunteers from the laboratory who were regarded as drug-free subjects were also assessed using the same FIT. Among the 62 volunteers, 39 of them were detected with ketamine in their oral fluid. Of these ketamine users, 21 of them (54%) with only ketamine found in their oral fluid samples while the rest (18 subjects) of them had other drugs (i.e. MA, MDMA, benzodiazepines and/or THC) in addition to ketamine. Of the 21 ketamine-only users, 15 of them (71%) were successfully identified by FIT. It was found that when salivary ketamine concentrations were greater than 300 ng/mL, signs of impairment became evident, with over 90

  7. Comparative study for better adjuvant with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Pramila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Better adjuvants for epidural analgesia are still evolving. Dexmedetomidine that is alpha-2 agonist can be used as an adjuvant in epidural analgesia and anesthesia. Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine versus clonidine in combination with ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia on intraoperative and postoperative analgesia, to find out the better adjuvant for regional anesthesia. Settings and Design: Randomized control trial. Materials and Methods: Sixty adult patients (18–60 years) with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1/ASA 2 grade and undergoing lower abdominal and lower limbs surgeries were included and randomized into three groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 - received ropivacaine with normal saline. Group 2 - received ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine. Group 3 - received ropivacaine with clonidine. Statistical Analysis: Mean and Standard deviation were calculated. All the data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Chi-square test. The value of P< 0.05 was considered significant. Results: All the three groups were comparable with respect to age, sex, and ASA grade. There was statistically significant mean time to reach T10 sensory block level (15.8, 5.7, 9.6 min in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively). The maximum duration of analgesia was statistically higher in Group 2 patients (383.7 vs. 365.3 and 280.5 min in Group 3 and Group 1, respectively). The mean time to reach motor block was significantly shorter in Group 2. Side effects were comparable in all groups with statistically insignificant fall in mean arterial pressure and hypotension was noted with Group 2. Conclusion: We concluded that the patients receiving the addition of dexmedetomidine to ropivacaine in epidural anesthesia had a faster onset and longer duration of sensory and motor blockade. Dexmedetomidine in comparison to clonidine had acceptable sedation and hemodynamic stability and minimal dose requirement make very effective adjuvant

  8. Neurological infections after neuraxial anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2008-03-01

    Infection is the commonest cause of serious neurologic sequelae of neuraxial anesthesia. The incidence depends on operator skill and patient population. Meningitis, a complication of dural puncture, is usually caused by viridans streptococci. The risk factors are dural puncture during labor, no mask and poor aseptic technique, vaginal infection and bacteremia. Epidural abscess is a complication of epidural catheterization, route of entry the catheter track and the organism usually the staphylococcus. Principal risk factors are prolonged catheterization, poor aseptic technique and traumatic insertion. Prevention includes wearing a mask, using a full sterile technique, avoiding prolonged catheterization and prescribing antibiotics in a high-risk situation. PMID:18319178

  9. Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, S C; Lascola, K M; Schaeffer, D J

    2015-12-01

    Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine were evaluated. Thirty tigers received either dexmedetomidine (0.025 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DK) or dexmedetomidine (0.0125 mg/kg), midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DMK). Heart rate, SPO2 and blood pressure were measured at five-minute intervals. Arterial pH, PO2, PCO2, glucose, K+ and arterial and venous lactate were measured at 15 and 45 minutes after immobilisation. A generalised linear mixed model was used for statistical comparison. There was no difference within or between groups at any time point for any measured variable. Measured PO2 was 73.2±17.5 mm Hg and SPO2 was 88.9±10.8 per cent. Systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressures were 170.5±48.4, 138.9±41.8 and 121.8±37.2 mm Hg, respectively. Venous lactate was higher than arterial lactate within groups at each time point. Seizure-like behaviour was observed in 25 per cent of tigers in group DK but not in group DMK. The addition of midazolam into a protocol for immobilisation of tigers did not result in a difference in any of the measured variables but may have prevented the development of seizure-like behaviour. PMID:26626504

  10. Anesthesia in swine : optimizing a laboratory model to optimize translational research.

    PubMed

    Pehböck, D; Dietrich, H; Klima, G; Paal, P; Lindner, K H; Wenzel, V

    2015-01-01

    In order to extrapolate novel therapies from the bench to the bedside (translational research), animal experiments are scientifically necessary. Swine are popular laboratory animals as their cardiorespiratory physiology is very similar to humans. Every study has to be approved by the local and/or national animal ethical committees. As swine are extremely sensitive to stress the primary goal is therefore to provide a calm, stress-free environment in both housing and experimental facilities. Swine should be properly sedated for transport and normothermia needs to be ensured. It is recommended to commence anesthesia by injecting ketamine and propofol followed by endotracheal intubation during spontaneous breathing. After intubation, anesthesia maintenance is performed with morphine or piritramide, propofol and rocuronium and routine monitoring is applied analogue to a clinical operating theater for humans. Normothermia (38.5 °C) needs to be ensured. While surgical procedures can be readily extrapolated from a human operating theater to swine, non-anesthesiologist scientists may lose the animal rapidly due to airway management problems. Vascular access can be secured by cut-downs or ultrasound-guided techniques in the inguinal and the neck region. For humane euthanasia of pigs, morphine, followed by propofol, rocuronium and potassium chloride are recommended. As radical animal right groups may threaten scientists, it is prudent that animal laboratories have unmarked entrance doors, are located in buildings that are not accessible to the public and strictly controlled access of laboratory staff is enforced. In conclusion, swine are an excellent laboratory animal for bench to bedside research and can be managed properly when basic knowledge and adequate skills on careful handling, anesthesia and surgical considerations are present. PMID:25384955

  11. Brief Isoflurane Anesthesia Produces Prominent Phosphoproteomic Changes in the Adult Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kohtala, Samuel; Theilmann, Wiebke; Suomi, Tomi; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Elo, Laura L; Rokka, Anne; Rantamäki, Tomi

    2016-06-15

    Anesthetics are widely used in medical practice and experimental research, yet the neurobiological basis governing their effects remains obscure. We have here used quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the protein phosphorylation changes produced by a 30 min isoflurane anesthesia in the adult mouse hippocampus. Altogether 318 phosphorylation alterations in total of 237 proteins between sham and isoflurane anesthesia were identified. Many of the hit proteins represent primary pharmacological targets of anesthetics. However, findings also enlighten the role of several other proteins-implicated in various biological processes including neuronal excitability, brain energy homeostasis, synaptic plasticity and transmission, and microtubule function-as putative (secondary) targets of anesthetics. In particular, isoflurane increases glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylation at the inhibitory Ser(9) residue and regulates the phosphorylation of multiple proteins downstream and upstream of this promiscuous kinase that regulate diverse biological functions. Along with confirmatory Western blot data for GSK3β and p44/42-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase; reduced phosphorylation of the activation loop), we observed increased phosphorylation of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) on residues (Thr(1620,1623)) that have been shown to render its dissociation from microtubules and alterations in microtubule stability. We further demonstrate that diverse anesthetics (sevoflurane, urethane, ketamine) produce essentially similar phosphorylation changes on GSK3β, p44/p42-MAPK, and MAP2 as observed with isoflurane. Altogether our study demonstrates the potential of quantitative phosphoproteomics to study the mechanisms of anesthetics (and other drugs) in the mammalian brain and reveals how already a relatively brief anesthesia produces pronounced phosphorylation changes in multiple proteins in the central nervous system. PMID:27074656

  12. The impact of anesthesia providers on major morbidity following screening colonoscopies

    PubMed Central

    Lubarsky, David A; Guercio, Jason R; Hanna, John W; Abreu, Maria T; Ma, Qianli; Uribe, Claudia; Birnbach, David J; Sinclair, David R; Candiotti, Keith A

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Few studies evaluate the impact of anesthesia providers during procedures, such as colonoscopy, on low-risk patients. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of anesthesia providers on several outcome variables, including major morbidity, following screening colonoscopies. Methods A propensity-matched cohort study of 14,006 patients who enrolled with a national insurer offering health maintenance organization (HMO), preferred provider organization (PPO), and Medicare Advantage plans for a screening colonoscopy between July 1, 2005 and June 30, 2007 were studied. Records were evaluated for completion of the colonoscopy, new cancer diagnosis (colon, anal, rectal) within 6 months of the colonoscopy, new primary diagnosis of myocardial infarction (MI), new primary diagnosis of stroke, hospital admission within 7 days of the colonoscopy, and adherence to guidelines for use of anesthesia providers. Results The presence of an anesthesia provider did not affect major morbidity or the percent of completed exams. Overall morbidity within 7 days was very low. When an anesthesia provider was present, a nonsignificant trend toward greater cancer detection within 6 months of the procedure was observed. Adherence to national guidelines regarding the use of anesthesia providers for low-risk patients was poor. Conclusion A difference in outcome associated with the presence or absence of an anesthesia provider during screening colonoscopy in terms of MI, stroke, or hospital admission within 7 days of the procedure was not observed. Adherence to published guidelines for the use of anesthesia providers is low. The incidence of completed exams was unaffected by the presence of an anesthesia provider. However, a nonstatistically significant trend toward increased cancer detection requires further study. PMID:26060404

  13. Flying blind in anesthesia: A safety concern

    PubMed Central

    Aqil, Mansoor; Khan, Mueenullah; Saeed, Abdulhamid Al; Alzahrani, Tariq

    2014-01-01

    We describe two cases of sudden loss of display of all the monitors of Zeus anesthesia work station during operation, which is a major safety concern. Flying blind in anesthesia could be devastating. These cases attempt to highlight the need for greater vigilance by anesthesiologists and have implications for improvement in technology. PMID:25191208

  14. Acupuncture: History from the Yellow Emperor to Modern Anesthesia Practice.

    PubMed

    Faircloth, Amanda

    2015-08-01

    Acupuncture and acupressure are components of Oriental medicine that have been in existence for thousands of years. These practices have transcended from Asia into Western culture. In the context of anesthesia practice, acupuncture and acupressure have demonstrated clinical usefulness in the perioperative setting. Acupuncture and acupressure can successfully decrease preoperative anxiety, decrease intraoperative anesthetic requirements, assuage postoperative pain, decrease the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting, and support chronic pain management. PMID:26390748

  15. Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES): implications for anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery (NOTES) has recently evolved as a novel approach for abdominal surgery with great potential to further improve the advantages of laparoscopy over laparotomy. The first patients undergoing NOTES cholecystectomy or appendectomy reported no or only minimal pain, required no narcotic analgesics, and were discharged early from the hospital and immediately resumed daily activities. If this is confirmed by randomized controlled clinical trials, what are the potential implications for anesthesia? PMID:20948698

  16. Subdural Hematoma as a Consequence of Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tracy M.; Elsayed, Kareem S.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Regional spinal and epidural anesthesia are used commonly in operative procedures. While the most frequent complication, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is a clinically diagnosed positional headache that is usually self-limited, subdural hemorrhage (SDH) is a potentially fatal complication that cannot be missed. We report a case of an otherwise healthy female who presented with persistent positional headache and was ultimately found to have a large subdural hematoma with midline shift requiring surgical evacuation. PMID:26697237

  17. Differences between Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Inhalation Anesthesia in Free Flap Surgery of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Wu, Chih-Chen; Tang, Tsung-Yung; Lu, Chun-Te; Lai, Chih-Sheng; Shen, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated risk factors associated with complications after free flap surgery, but these studies did not evaluate the impact of anesthesia management. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the differences between patients who received inhalation and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in free flap surgery. Methods One hundred and fifty-six patients who underwent free flap surgery for head and neck cancer were retrospectively divided into the TIVA (96 patients) and the inhalation group (87 patients). Perioperative hemodynamic data and postoperative medical complications were determined by documented medical records. Results Ninety-six patients in the TIVA group were compared with 87 patients who received inhalation anesthesia. There were no differences in gender, age, classification of physical status based on American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and cormobidities between the two groups. Patients in the TIVA group required less perioperative crystalloid (4172.46 ± 1534.95 vs. 5183.91 ± 1416.40 ml, p < 0.0001) and colloid (572.46 ± 335.14 vs. 994.25 ± 434.65 ml, p < 0.0001) to maintain hemodynamic stability. Although the mean anesthesia duration was shorter in the TIVA group (11.02 ± 2.84 vs. 11.70± 1.96 hours, p = 0.017), the blood loss was similar between groups (p = 0.71). There was no difference in surgical complication rate, but patients in the TIVA group developed fewer pulmonary complications (18 vs. 47, p = 0.0008). After multivariate regression, patients in the TIVA group had a significantly reduced risk of pulmonary complication compared with the inhalation group (Odds ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.18–0.92). Conclusions Total intravenous anesthesia was associated with significantly fewer pulmonary complications in patients who received free flap reconstruction. PMID:26849439

  18. Delayed emergence of behavioral and electrophysiological effects following juvenile ketamine exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L R; Featherstone, R E; Hahn, C G; Siegel, S J

    2015-01-01

    Frequent ketamine abuse in adulthood correlates with increased risk of psychosis, as well as cognitive deficits, including disruption of higher-order executive function and memory formation. Although the primary abusers of ketamine are adolescents and young adults, few studies have evaluated its effects on juvenile cognition. Therefore, the current study analyzes the effect of adolescent ketamine exposure on cognitive development. Juvenile mice (4 weeks of age) were exposed to chronic ketamine (20 mg kg(-1), i.p. daily) for 14 days. Mice were tested immediately after exposure in the juvenile period (7 weeks of age) and again as adults (12 weeks of age). Measures included electroencephalography (EEG) in response to auditory stimulation, the social choice test, and a 6-arm radial water maze task. Outcome measures include low-frequency EEG responses, event-related potential (ERP) amplitudes, indices of social behavior and indices of spatial working memory. Juvenile exposure to ketamine was associated with electrophysiological abnormalities in adulthood, particularly in induced theta power and the P80 ERP. The social choice test revealed that ketamine-exposed mice failed to exhibit the same age-related decrease in social interaction time as controls. Ketamine-exposed mice outperformed control mice as juveniles on the radial water maze task, but did not show the same age-related improvement as adult controls. These data support the hypothesis that juvenile exposure to ketamine produces long-lasting changes in brain function that are characterized by a failure to progress along normal developmental trajectories. PMID:26371763

  19. Cognitive effects of intramuscular ketamine and oral triazolam in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Lawrence P.; Kleykamp, Bethea A.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Several studies have documented impairments in memory processes as a result of ketamine administration; however, few studies have compared the profile of cognitive effects of ketamine to other drugs. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the cognitive effects of ketamine with those of triazolam in healthy volunteers. Methods Doses of ketamine (0.2, 0.4 mg/kg intramuscular (i.m.)), triazolam (0.2, 0.4 mg/70 kg p.o.), and double-dummy placebos were administered to 20 volunteers under repeated measures, counterbalanced, double-blind conditions. Peak physiological, psychomotor, subjective, and cognitive effects were examined. Results Ketamine impaired balance when balance was assessed early in the task order, whereas triazolam impaired psychomotor coordination and divided attention irrespective of task order. Triazolam also tended to produce greater effects on working memory and episodic memory tasks than ketamine at doses that produced lower subjective effects and higher estimates of performance. Conclusions Ketamine produces less cognitive impairment than triazolam at doses that produced greater subjective effects. Thus ketamine does not produce the underestimation of cognitive impairment typically seen with triazolam. PMID:23096769

  20. Profiling the psychotic, depressive and anxiety symptoms in chronic ketamine users

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ni; Xu, Ke; Ning, Yuping; Rosenheck, Robert; Wang, Daping; Ke, Xiaoyin; Ding, Yi; Sun, Bin; Zhou, Chao; Deng, Xuefeng; Tang, Waikwong; He, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Although concern about chronic ketamine abuse has grown, the characteristic symptomatology of chronic ketamine users has yet to be examined. This study aims to measure the psychotic, depressive and anxiety symptoms in chronic ketamine users. Methods A group of chronic ketamine users in Guangzhou, China were evaluated. The socio-demographic and drug use characteristics of subjects were documented. Symptoms of psychosis, depression, anxiety were evaluated by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). The severity of the symptoms was identified by standard severity cutoffs. Results The PANSS total score, positive symptom, negative symptom, general psychopathology subscale score were 45.3±8.4, 8.0±1.7, 13.2± 3.9 and 24.2± 4.9 respectively. BDI and BAI score was 13.1±6.5 and 15.7±9.6 respectively. 77.5% and 46.0% of the subjects showed moderate to severe depressive symptoms and anxiety symptoms respectively. The BDI score was positively correlated with ketamine use frequency. The BAI score was positively correlated with ketamine use frequency. Conclusions Depressive symptoms were commonly presented in chronic ketamine users. The higher ketamine use frequency and dosage were associated with more severe depressive symptoms. PMID:26805565

  1. First injection of ketamine among young injection drug users (IDUs) in three U.S. cities

    PubMed Central

    Lankenau, Stephen E.; Sanders, Bill; Bloom, Jennifer Jackson; Hathazi, Dodi; Alarcon, Erica; Tortu, Stephanie; Clatts, Michael C.

    2007-01-01

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, has emerged as an increasingly common drug among subgroups of young injection drug users (IDUs) in cities across the United States. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with 213 young IDUs aged 16–28 years recruited in New York, New Orleans, and Los Angeles between 2004 and 2006. While some initiated injection drug use with ketamine, the drug was more frequently injected by IDUs with extensive polydrug using histories. IDUs initiating with ketamine commonly self-injected via an intramuscular mode of administration. The injection group provided crucial knowledge and material resources that enabled the injection event to occur, including ketamine, syringes, and injection skills. Injection paraphernalia was commonly shared during the first injection of ketamine, particularly vials of pharmaceutically-packaged liquid ketamine. Injection events infrequently occurred in a rave or club and more typically in a private home, which challenges ketamine’s designation as a ‘club’ drug. The first injection of ketamine was a noteworthy event since it introduced a novel drug or new mode of administration to be further explored by some, or exposed others to a drug to be avoided in the future. Risk reduction messages directed towards young IDUs should be expanded to include ketamine. PMID:16979848

  2. Subchronic administration of (R,S)-ketamine induces ketamine ring hydroxylation in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Moaddel, R; Sanghvi, M; Ramamoorthy, A; Jozwiak, K; Singh, N; Green, C; O'Loughlin, K; Torjman, M; Wainer, I W

    2016-08-01

    Subchronic administration of (R,S)-ketamine, (R,S)-Ket, is used in the treatment of neuropathic pain, in particular Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, but the effect of this protocol on the metabolism of (R,S)-Ket is unknown. In this study, daily administration of a low dose of (R,S)-Ket for 14-days to Wistar rats was conducted to determine the impact of sub-chronic dosing on the pharmacokinetics of (R,S)-Ket and its major metabolites. The data indicate that, relative to a single administration of (R,S)-Ket, subchronic administration resulted in increased clearance of (R,S)-Ket and the N-demethylated metabolite norketamine measured as elimination half-life (t1/2) and decreased plasma concentrations of these compounds. Subchronic administration produced a slight decrease in t1/2 and an increase in plasma concentration of the major metabolite, (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine, and produced significant increases in the plasma concentrations of the (2S,6R;2R,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2S,4R;2R,4S)-hydroxynorketamine metabolites. The metabolism of (R,S)-Ket predominately occurs via two microsomal enzyme-mediated pathways: (R,S)-Ket⇒(R,S)-norketamine⇒(2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine and (2S,4R;2R,4S)-hydroxynorketamine and the (R,S)-Ket⇒(2S,6R;2R,6S)-hydroxyketamine⇒(2S,6R;2R,6S)-hydroxynorketamine and (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine. The results indicate that the activity of both metabolic pathways are increased by subchronic administration of (R,S)-Ket producing new metabolite patterns and potential differences in clinical effects. PMID:27017097

  3. [Voluntary interruption of pregnancy: anesthesia or sophrology].

    PubMed

    Ferragut, E

    1979-10-01

    General anesthesia during induced abortion has the great advantage of eliminating any physical pain; it does not do anything, however, for anxiety, guilt feeling, emotional upheaval, and postoperative depression. This study investigate sophrology, a form of anesthesia without medication, which diminishes psychic tension through comforting and sympathetic words, and corporal tension through relaxation. At the beginning of the study, which observed 7547 patients, general anesthesia was routinely used for all induced abortion patients; after 4 years of observation, general anesthesia was used on about 1.9% of patients. Judging from a questionnaire given to patients after intervention 75% of patients were completely satisfied from an emotional point of view; the same percentage judged the procedure a bit painful, but bearable; only 3.5% of patients regretted not to have opted for general anesthesia. PMID:12158285

  4. Enantioselective inhibition of D-serine transport by (S)-ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nagendra S; Bernier, Michel; Camandola, Simonetta; Khadeer, Mohammed A; Moaddel, Ruin; Mattson, Mark P; Wainer, Irving W

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Patients with major depressive disorder receiving racemic ketamine, (R,S)-ketamine, experience transient increases in Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale scores and a coincident drop in plasma d-serine levels. The results suggest that (R,S)-ketamine produces an immediate, concentration-dependent pharmacological effect on d-serine plasma concentrations. One potential source of this effect is (R,S)-ketamine-induced inhibition of the transporter ASCT2, which regulates intracellular d-serine concentrations. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by examining the effect of (S)- and (R)-ketamine on ASCT2-mediated transport of d-serine in PC-12 and 1321N1 cells and primary neuronal cells in culture. Experimental Approach Intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels were determined using capillary electrophoresis–laser-induced fluorescence and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry respectively. Expression of ASCT2, Asc-1 and serine racemase was determined utilizing Western blotting. Key Results (S)-Ketamine produced a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular d-serine and reduced extracellular d-serine accumulation. In contrast, (R)-ketamine decreased both intracellular and extracellular d-serine levels. The ASCT2 inhibitor, benzyl-d-serine (BDS), and ASCT2 gene knockdown mimicked the action of (S)-ketamine on d-serine in PC-12 cells, while the Asc-1 agonist d-isoleucine reduced intracellular d-serine and increased extracellular d-serine accumulation. This response to d-isoleucine was not affected by BDS or (S)-ketamine. Primary cultures of rat neuronal cells expressed ASCT2 and were responsive to (S)-ketamine and BDS. (S)- and (R)-ketamine increased the expression of monomeric serine racemase in all the cells studied, with (S)-ketamine having the greatest effect. Conclusions and Implications (S)-Ketamine decreased cellular export of d-serine via selective inhibition of ASCT2, and this could represent a possible source

  5. The promise of ketamine for treatment-resistant depression: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    DeWilde, Kaitlin E.; Levitch, Cara F.; Murrough, James W.; Mathew, Sanjay J.; Iosifescu, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most disabling diseases worldwide and is a significant public health threat. Current treatments for MDD primarily consist of monoamine-targeting agents and have limited efficacy. However, the glutamate neurotransmitter system has recently come into focus as a promising alternative for novel antidepressant treatments. We review the current data on the glutamate NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, which has been shown in clinical trials to act as a rapid antidepressant in MDD. We also examine ketamine efficacy on dimensions of psychopathology, including anhedonia, cognition, and suicidality, consistent with the NIMH Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative. Other aspects of ketamine reviewed in this paper include safety and efficacy, different administration methods, and the risks of misuse of ketamine outside of medical settings. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of other glutamatergic agents other than ketamine currently being tested as novel antidepressants. PMID:25649308

  6. Rapid Resolution of Grief with IV Infusion of Ketamine: A Unique Phenomenological Experience

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Mahesh Ramanna; Srinivasa, Preethi; Kumbar, Prabha S.; Ramalingaiah, Vinay Hosagavi; Muthyalappa, Chandrashekar; Durgoji, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a primarily FDA-approved anaesthetic agent is also used as recreational drug. Based on preclinical findings and later the clinical observations it is noted to have rapid antidepressant effect due to its mechanisms related to NMDA antagonism. In spite of established evidence of ketamine being effective in depression with significant role in treatment resistant cases as well, there was absolute dearth of literature regarding its utility in grief-related disorders. In this context we present a case of 28-year-old graduate male who presented to us in complicated grief following death of his wife due to obstetric complications. With the patient and immediate family members consenting for use of ketamine as off-label use, patient had single IV infusion of ketamine following which he had unique phenomenological experience ultimately resolving his grief in few minutes. Through this case we highlight the enormous therapeutic promise of ketamine in complicated grief. PMID:27011405

  7. Rapid Resolution of Grief with IV Infusion of Ketamine: A Unique Phenomenological Experience.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Mahesh Ramanna; Srinivasa, Preethi; Kumbar, Prabha S; Ramalingaiah, Vinay Hosagavi; Muthyalappa, Chandrashekar; Durgoji, Sumit

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine, a primarily FDA-approved anaesthetic agent is also used as recreational drug. Based on preclinical findings and later the clinical observations it is noted to have rapid antidepressant effect due to its mechanisms related to NMDA antagonism. In spite of established evidence of ketamine being effective in depression with significant role in treatment resistant cases as well, there was absolute dearth of literature regarding its utility in grief-related disorders. In this context we present a case of 28-year-old graduate male who presented to us in complicated grief following death of his wife due to obstetric complications. With the patient and immediate family members consenting for use of ketamine as off-label use, patient had single IV infusion of ketamine following which he had unique phenomenological experience ultimately resolving his grief in few minutes. Through this case we highlight the enormous therapeutic promise of ketamine in complicated grief. PMID:27011405

  8. Ketamine as a primary predictor of out-of-body experiences associated with multiple substance use.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Leanne K; Girard, Todd A; Cheyne, J Allan

    2011-09-01

    Investigation of "out-of-body experiences" (OBEs) has implications for understanding both normal bodily-self integration and its vulnerabilities. Beyond reported associations between OBEs and specific brain regions, however, there have been few investigations of neurochemical systems relevant to OBEs. Ketamine, a drug used recreationally to achieve dissociative experiences, provides a real-world paradigm for investigating neurochemical effects. We investigate the strength of the association of OBEs and ketamine use relative to other common drugs of abuse. Self-report data (N=192) from an online survey indicate that both lifetime frequency of ketamine use and OBEs during ketamine intoxication were more strongly related to the frequency of OBEs and related phenomena than other drugs. Moreover, the apparent effects of other drugs could largely be explained by associated ketamine use. The present results, consistent with the role of NMDA receptors in OBEs, should encourage future studies of the role of neurochemical systems in OBEs. PMID:21324714

  9. Studies of the biotransformation and pharmacology of ketamine and its metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The first part of the research is concerned with the synthesis, resolution and metabolism of norketamine, the primary metabolite of ketamine. Incubations of racemic norketamine, individual enantiomers of norketamine and the pseudoracemates in rat liver microsomes revealed stereoselectivity and enantiomeric interactions during the metabolism of norketamine. The second part of the research describes the synthesis of 6-OH-norketamine, the major secondary metabolite of ketamine, and reports on its pharmacological activity and cerebral distribution in the rat. Primary deuterium isotope effects associated with the metabolism and pharmacological activity of ketamine-N-CD/sub 3/ were examined in the third part of this research. The last part of the research deals with the effect of diazepam on the metabolic transformation of ketamine to norketamine in the rat. The fractions of ketamine metabolized to norketamine were found not to be different in the presence or the absence of diazepam.

  10. Serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor decreased in chronic ketamine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ni; Zhang, Minling; Xu, Ke; Ke, Xiaoyin; Ding, Yi; Wang, Daping; Liu, Yuping; Ning, Yuping; Deng, Xuefeng; He, Hongbo

    2016-01-01

    Aims To evaluate the serum level of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in a group of chronic ketamine abusers in comparison to healthy controls. Methods Eighty-one ketamine abusers who were hospitalized for the treatment of ketamine dependence and 39 healthy controls were recruited. Serum VEGF level was measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Psychopathological symptoms were assessed using Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). Results Serum level of VEGF was significantly lower in chronic ketamine abusers compared to healthy controls (64.6 ± 42.1 vs. 92.4 ± 59.4 pg/ml, F = 7.243, p = 0.008). Conclusions Serum level of VEGF decreased in chronic ketamine abusers compared to healthy controls. PMID:26003336

  11. Preoperative low-dose ketamine has no preemptive analgesic effect in opioid-naïve patients undergoing colon surgery when nitrous oxide is used - a randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Nistal-Nuño, Beatriz; Freire-Vila, Enrique; Castro-Seoane, Francisco; Camba-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background: The analgesic properties of ketamine are associated with its non-competitive antagonism of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor; these receptors exhibit an excitatory function on pain transmission and this binding seems to inhibit or reverse the central sensitization of pain. In the literature, the value of this anesthetic for preemptive analgesia in the control of postoperative pain is uncertain. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether preoperative low-dose ketamine reduces postoperative pain and morphine consumption in adults undergoing colon surgery. Methods: In a double-blind, randomized trial, 48 patients were studied. Patients in the ketamine group received 0.5 mg/kg intravenous ketamine before surgical incision, while the control group received normal saline. The postoperative analgesia was achieved with a continuous infusion of morphine at 0.015 mg∙kgˉ¹∙hˉ¹ with the possibility of 0.02 mg/kg bolus every 10 min. Pain was assessed using the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), morphine consumption, and hemodynamic parameters at 0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 24 hours postoperatively. We quantified times to rescue analgesic (Paracetamol), adverse effects and patient satisfaction. Results: No significant differences were observed in VAS scores between groups (P>0.05), except at 4 hours postoperatively (P=0.040). There were no differences in cumulative consumption of morphine at any time point (P>0.05). We found no significant differences in incremental postoperative doses of morphine consumption in bolus, except at 12 h (P =0.013) and 24 h (P =0.002). The time to first required rescue analgesia was 70 ± 15.491 min in the ketamine group and 44 ± 19.494 min in the control (P>0.05). There were no differences in hemodynamic parameters or patient satisfaction (P>0.05). Conclusions: Preoperative low-dose-ketamine did not show a preemptive analgesic effect or efficacy as an adjuvant for decreasing opioid requirements for postoperative pain in

  12. Effects of ketamine and propofol on motor evoked potentials elicited by intracranial microstimulation during deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Furmaga, Havan; Park, Hyun-Joo; Cooperrider, Jessica; Baker, Kenneth B.; Johnson, Matthew; Gale, John T.; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    Few preclinical or clinical studies have evaluated the effect of anesthetics on motor evoked potentials (MEPs), either alone or in the presence of conditioning stimuli such as deep brain stimulation (DBS). In this study we evaluated the effects of two commonly used anesthetic agents, propofol and ketamine (KET), on MEPs elicited by intra-cortical microstimulation of the motor cortex in a rodent model with and without DBS of the dentatothalamocortical (DTC) pathway. The effects of propofol anesthesia on MEP amplitudes during DTC DBS were found to be highly dose dependent. Standard, but not high, dose propofol potentiated the facilitatory effects of 30 Hz DTC DBS on MEPs. This facilitation was sustained and phase-dependent indicating that, compared to high dose propofol, standard dose propofol has a beta-band excitatory effect on cortical networks. In contrast, KET anesthetic demonstrated a monotonic relationship with increasing frequencies of stimulation, such that the highest frequency of stimulation resulted in the greatest MEP amplitude. KET also showed phase dependency but less pronounced than standard dose propofol. The results underscore the importance of better understanding the complex effects of anesthetics on cortical networks and exogenous stimuli. Choice of anesthetic agents and dosing may significantly confound or even skew research outcomes, including experimentation in novel DBS indications and paradigms. PMID:24904312

  13. Loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactivity in mouse brain regions after repeated intermittent administration of esketamine, but not R-ketamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Han, Mei; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-05-30

    Clinical use of the rapid antidepressant drug ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safer antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine (esketamine), since it is free of psychotomimetic side effects. Repeated, intermittent administration of esketamine (10mg/kg, once per week for 8-weeks), but not R-ketamine, caused loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains, regions associated with psychosis. This study suggests that repeated intermittent use of R-ketamine is safer than esketamine in the treatment of depression. PMID:27043274

  14. Ketamine Causes Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Tokujiro; Makita, Koshi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Ketamine toxicity has been demonstrated in nonhuman mammalian neurons. To study the toxic effect of ketamine on human neurons, an experimental model of cultured neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) was examined, and the mechanism of its toxicity was investigated. Methods Human iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons were treated with 0, 20, 100 or 500 μM ketamine for 6 and 24 h. Ketamine toxicity was evaluated by quantification of caspase 3/7 activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, mitochondrial membrane potential, ATP concentration, neurotransmitter reuptake activity and NADH/NAD+ ratio. Mitochondrial morphological change was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy and confocal microscopy. Results Twenty-four-hour exposure of iPSC-derived neurons to 500 μM ketamine resulted in a 40% increase in caspase 3/7 activity (P < 0.01), 14% increase in ROS production (P < 0.01), and 81% reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential (P < 0.01), compared with untreated cells. Lower concentration of ketamine (100 μM) decreased the ATP level (22%, P < 0.01) and increased the NADH/NAD+ ratio (46%, P < 0.05) without caspase activation. Transmission electron microscopy showed enhanced mitochondrial fission and autophagocytosis at the 100 μM ketamine concentration, which suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction preceded ROS generation and caspase activation. Conclusions We established an in vitro model for assessing the neurotoxicity of ketamine in iPSC-derived neurons. The present data indicate that the initial mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagy may be related to its inhibitory effect on the mitochondrial electron transport system, which underlies ketamine-induced neural toxicity. Higher ketamine concentration can induce ROS generation and apoptosis in human neurons. PMID:26020236

  15. Different dosing regimens of repeated ketamine administration have opposite effects on novelty processing in rats.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anett; Sivanandan, Brindan; Tolledo, Edgor Cole; Woldegabriel, Jacob; Ito, Rutsuko

    2016-08-01

    Repeated exposure to sub-anesthetic doses of ketamine in rats has been shown to induce cognitive deficits, as well as behavioral changes akin to the negative symptoms of schizophrenia, giving much face validity to the use of ketamine administration as a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. This study sought to further characterize the behavioral effects of two different ketamine pre-treatment regimens, focusing primarily on the effects of repeated ketamine administration on novelty processing, a capacity that is disrupted in schizophrenia. Rats received 5 or 14 intra-peritoneal injections of 30mg/kg ketamine or saline across 5 or 7days, respectively. They were then tested in an associative mismatch detection task to examine their ability to detect novel configurations of familiar audio-visual sequences. Furthermore, rats underwent a sequential novel object and novel object location exploration task. Subsequently, rats were also tested on the delayed matching to place T-maze task, sucrose preference task and locomotor tests involving administering a challenge dose of amphetamine (AMPH). The high-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen elicited impairments in mismatch detection and working memory. In contrast, the low-dose ketamine pre-treatment regimen improved performance of novelty detection. In addition, low-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed locomotor sensitization following an AMPH challenge, while the high-dose ketamine pre-treated rats showed an attenuated locomotor response to AMPH, compared to control rats. These findings demonstrate that different regimens of repeated ketamine administration induce alterations in novelty processing in opposite directions, and that differential neural adaptations occurring in the mesolimbic dopamine system may underlie these effects. PMID:27064663

  16. Ketamine Inhalation Ameliorates Ovalbumin-Induced Murine Asthma by Suppressing the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

    PubMed Central

    Song, Li; Sen, Shi; Sun, Yuhong; Zhou, Jun; Mo, Liqun; He, Yanzheng

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma accounts for 0.4% of all deaths worldwide, a figure that increases annually. Ketamine induces bronchial smooth muscle relaxation, and increasing evidence suggests that its anti-inflammatory properties might protect against lung injury and ameliorate asthma. However, there is a lack of evidence of the usefulness and mechanism of ketamine in acute asthma exacerbation. This study aimed to analyze the therapeutic effects and mechanism of action of ketamine on acute ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma. Material/Methods In vivo, BALB/c mice with OVA-induced asthma were treated with or without ketamine (25 or 50 mg/mL). Serum, lung sections, and mononuclear cell suspensions from the lung were collected for histological, morphometric, immunofluorescence, microRNA, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, regulatory T cell identification, cytokine, and Western blotting analyses. In vitro, bronchial epithelial cells were cultured to analyze the effect and mechanism of ketamine on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. Results The inhalation of ketamine 25 or 50 mg/mL markedly suppressed OVA-induced airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation, significantly increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells, and significantly decreased OVA-induced up-regulation of TGF-β1 and the EMT. MiR-106a was present at higher amounts in OVA-induced lung samples and was suppressed by ketamine treatment. The in vitro results showed that TGF-β1-induced EMT was suppressed by ketamine via miR-106a level regulation. Conclusions Ketamine ameliorates lung fibrosis in OVA-induced asthmatic mice by suppressing EMT and regulating miR-106a level, while ketamine inhalation might be a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:27418244

  17. Potential involvement of serotonergic signaling in ketamine's antidepressant actions: A critical review.

    PubMed

    du Jardin, Kristian Gaarn; Müller, Heidi Kaastrup; Elfving, Betina; Dale, Elena; Wegener, Gregers; Sanchez, Connie

    2016-11-01

    A single i.v. infusion of ketamine, classified as an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, may alleviate depressive symptoms within hours of administration in treatment resistant depressed patients, and the antidepressant effect may last for several weeks. These unique therapeutic properties have prompted researchers to explore the mechanisms mediating the antidepressant effects of ketamine, but despite many efforts, no consensus on its antidepressant mechanism of action has been reached. Recent preclinical reports have associated the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) with the antidepressant-like action of ketamine. Here, we review the current evidence for a serotonergic role in ketamine's antidepressant effects. The pharmacological profile of ketamine may include equipotent activity on several non-NMDA targets, and the current hypotheses for the mechanisms responsible for ketamine's antidepressant activity do not appear to preclude the possibility that non-glutamate neurotransmitters are involved in the antidepressant effects. At multiple levels, the serotonergic and glutamatergic systems interact, and such crosstalk could support the notion that changes in serotonergic neurotransmission may impact ketamine's antidepressant potential. In line with these prospects, ketamine may increase 5-HT levels in the prefrontal cortex of rats, plausibly via hippocampal NMDA receptor inhibition and activation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. In addition, a number of preclinical studies suggest that the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine may depend on endogenous activation of 5-HT receptors. Recent imaging and behavioral data predominantly support a role for 5-HT1A or 5-HT1B receptors, but the full range of 5-HT receptors has currently not been systematically investigated in this context. Furthermore, the nature of any 5-HT dependent mechanism in ketamine's antidepressant effect is currently not

  18. Ketamine Inhalation Ameliorates Ovalbumin-Induced Murine Asthma by Suppressing the Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Sen, Shi; Sun, Yuhong; Zhou, Jun; Mo, Liqun; He, Yanzheng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Asthma accounts for 0.4% of all deaths worldwide, a figure that increases annually. Ketamine induces bronchial smooth muscle relaxation, and increasing evidence suggests that its anti-inflammatory properties might protect against lung injury and ameliorate asthma. However, there is a lack of evidence of the usefulness and mechanism of ketamine in acute asthma exacerbation. This study aimed to analyze the therapeutic effects and mechanism of action of ketamine on acute ovalbumin (OVA)-induced murine asthma. MATERIAL AND METHODS In vivo, BALB/c mice with OVA-induced asthma were treated with or without ketamine (25 or 50 mg/mL). Serum, lung sections, and mononuclear cell suspensions from the lung were collected for histological, morphometric, immunofluorescence, microRNA, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, regulatory T cell identification, cytokine, and Western blotting analyses. In vitro, bronchial epithelial cells were cultured to analyze the effect and mechanism of ketamine on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. RESULTS The inhalation of ketamine 25 or 50 mg/mL markedly suppressed OVA-induced airway hyper-responsiveness and airway inflammation, significantly increased the percentage of CD4+CD25+ T cells, and significantly decreased OVA-induced up-regulation of TGF-β1 and the EMT. MiR-106a was present at higher amounts in OVA-induced lung samples and was suppressed by ketamine treatment. The in vitro results showed that TGF-β1-induced EMT was suppressed by ketamine via miR-106a level regulation. CONCLUSIONS Ketamine ameliorates lung fibrosis in OVA-induced asthmatic mice by suppressing EMT and regulating miR-106a level, while ketamine inhalation might be a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of allergic asthma. PMID:27418244

  19. Left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses to ketamine and TEE in chronically instrumented monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, S. C.; Ludwig, D. A.; Reister, C.; Fanton, J. W.; Ewert, D.; Convertino, V. A.

    2001-01-01

    Effects of prescribed doses of ketamine five minutes after application and influences of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) on left ventricular, systemic arterial, and baroreflex responses were investigated to test the hypothesis that ketamine and/or TEE probe insertion alter cardiovascular function. Seven rhesus monkeys were tested under each of four randomly selected experimental conditions: (1) intravenous bolus dose of ketamine (0.5 ml), (2) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min), (3) continuous infusion of ketamine (500 mg/kg/min) with TEE, and (4) control (no ketamine or TEE). Monkeys were chronically instrumented with a high fidelity, dual-sensor micromanometer to measure left ventricular and aortic pressure and a transit-time ultrasound probe to measure aortic flow. These measures were used to calculate left ventricular function. A 4-element Windkessel lumped-parameter model was used to estimate total peripheral resistance and systemic arterial compliance. Baroreflex response was calculated as the change in R-R interval divided by the change in mean aortic pressure measured during administration of graded concentrations of nitroprusside. The results indicated that five minutes after ketamine application heart rate and left ventricular diastolic compliance decreased while TEE increased aortic systolic and diastolic pressure. We conclude that ketamine may be administered as either a bolus or continuous infusion without affecting cardiovascular function 5 minutes after application while the insertion of a TEE probe will increase aortic pressure. The results for both ketamine and TEE illustrate the classic "Hawthorne Effect," where the observed values are partly a function of the measurement process. Measures of aortic pressure, heart rate, and left ventricular diastolic pressure should be viewed as relative, as opposed to absolute, when organisms are sedated with ketamine or instrumented with a TEE probe.

  20. Safer obstetric anesthesia through education and mentorship: a model for knowledge translation in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Livingston, Patricia; Evans, Faye; Nsereko, Etienne; Nyirigira, Gaston; Ruhato, Paulin; Sargeant, Joan; Chipp, Megan; Enright, Angela

    2014-11-01

    High rates of maternal mortality remain a widespread problem in the developing world. Skilled anesthesia providers are required for the safe conduct of Cesarean delivery and resuscitation during obstetrical crises. Few anesthesia providers in low-resource settings have access to continuing education. In Rwanda, anesthesia technicians with only three years of post-secondary training must manage complex maternal emergencies in geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this special article is to describe implementation of the SAFE (Safer Anesthesia From Education) Obstetric Anesthesia course in Rwanda, a three-day refresher course designed to improve obstetrical anesthesia knowledge and skills for practitioners in low-resource areas. In addition, we describe how the course facilitated the knowledge-to-action (KTA) cycle whereby a series of steps are followed to promote the uptake of new knowledge into clinical practice. The KTA cycle requires locally relevant teaching interventions and continuation of knowledge post intervention. In Rwanda, this meant carefully considering educational needs, revising curricula to suit the local context, employing active experiential learning during the SAFE Obstetric Anesthesia course, encouraging supportive relationships with peers and mentors, and using participant action plans for change, post-course logbooks, and follow-up interviews with participants six months after the course. During those interviews, participants reported improvements in clinical practice and greater confidence in coordinating team activities. Anesthesia safety remains challenged by resource limitations and resistance to change by health care providers who did not attend the course. Future teaching interventions will address the need for team training. PMID:25145938

  1. Closed-loop control of anesthesia: a primer for anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Guy A; Ansermino, J Mark

    2013-11-01

    Feedback control is ubiquitous in nature and engineering and has revolutionized safety in fields from space travel to the automobile. In anesthesia, automated feedback control holds the promise of limiting the effects on performance of individual patient variability, optimizing the workload of the anesthesiologist, increasing the time spent in a more desirable clinical state, and ultimately improving the safety and quality of anesthesia care. The benefits of control systems will not be realized without widespread support from the health care team in close collaboration with industrial partners. In this review, we provide an introduction to the established field of control systems research for the everyday anesthesiologist. We introduce important concepts such as feedback and modeling specific to control problems and provide insight into design requirements for guaranteeing the safety and performance of feedback control systems. We focus our discussion on the optimization of anesthetic drug administration. PMID:23835456

  2. Anesthesia in a patient with Stiff Person Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Yagan, Ozgur; Özyilmaz, Kadir; Özmaden, Ahmet; Sayin, Özgür; Hanci, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Stiff Person Syndrome (SPS), typified by rigidity in muscles of the torso and extremities and painful episodic spasms, is a rare autoimmune-based neurological disease. Here we present the successful endotracheal intubation and application of TIVA without muscle relaxants on an SPS patient. A 46 years old male patient was operated with ASA-II physical status because of lumber vertebral compression fracture. After induction of anesthesia using lidocaine, propofol and remifentanil tracheal intubation was completed easily without neuromuscular blockage. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol, remifentanil and O2/air mixture. After a problem-free intraoperative period the patient was extubated and seven days later was discharged walking with aid. Though the mechanism is not clear neuromuscular blockers and volatile anesthetics may cause prolonged hypotonia in patients with SPS. We think the TIVA technique, a general anesthetic practice which does not require neuromuscular blockage, is suitable for these patients. PMID:27591471

  3. Mechanism of action of ketamine in the current and voltage clamped myelinated nerve fibre of the frog.

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, E.; Carratù, M. R.; Dubois, J. M.; Mitolo-Chieppa, D.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the general anaesthetic ketamine, on the frog isolated node of Ranvier, were studied under current and voltage clamp conditions. Ketamine (0.5 and 1 mM) reversibly decreased the amplitude of the action potential and increased both the duration of the action potential and the threshold potential. When the K current was blocked, spontaneous action potentials appeared after washout of the drug. Ketamine rapidly blocked the Na current and more slowly modified a fraction of Na channels (about 10%) to give rise to a non-inactivatable (late) Na current. After washout of the drug, the block reversed more rapidly than the ketamine-induced late Na current disappeared. Steady-state outward, peak Na and ketamine-induced late Na currents were rapidly and reversibly blocked by ketamine with an apparent dissociation constant of 0.7 mM. Both peak Na and ketamine-induced late Na currents were reversibly blocked by procaine. PMID:2420405

  4. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Preoperative preparation should improve the likelihood of successful trabeculectomy surgery. The team can reconsider the appropriateness of the proposed surgery, and steps can be taken to maximize the chance of a good outcome. For example, adjustments to anti-hypertensive or anti-coagulant medications may be made, and topical ocular medications adjusted. Choice of anesthesia technique is of particular relevance to the trabeculectomy patient. Some anesthesia techniques are more likely to have serious complications, and glaucoma patients may be at higher risk of some sight-threatening complications, because the optic nerve is already damaged and vulnerable. Posterior placement of local anesthesia (retrobulbar, peribulbar, posterior sub-Tenon’s techniques) could potentially damage the optic nerve, and thereby cause “wipe-out” of vision. Anesthesia technique may influence the likelihood of vitreous bulge and surgical difficulty. Regarding long-term control of intraocular pressure, there is no good evidence to indicate that any particular anesthesia technique is better than another. There is little high-quality evidence on this topic. The author’s preferred technique for trabeculectomy is subconjunctival-intracameral anesthesia without sedation. How to cite this article: Eke T. Preoperative Preparation and Anesthesia for Trabeculectomy. J Curr Glaucoma Pract 2016; 10(1):21-35. PMID:27231416

  5. Assessment of adrenocortical and gonadal hormones in male spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) following capture, restraint and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Rodas-Martínez, Alba Zulema; Canales, Domingo; Brousset, Dulce María; Swanson, William F; Romano, Marta C

    2013-01-01

    The spider monkey (SM) (Ateles geoffroyi) a New World primate species native to Mexican forests, has become endangered in the wild due to environmental perturbations. Little is known about adrenal function and its relationship to reproduction in this species. Our objectives were to assess serum glucocorticoid (GC), mineralocorticoid (MC) and testosterone concentrations in captive SM and evaluate adrenal and testicular responses to potentially stressful animal handling procedures. Seven adult males, housed in a single mixed gender group in an off-exhibit enclosure at the University Park were captured for anesthesia every 2 months over a 1-year period. Blood samples were collected from each male at three time points: (1) ∼5-10 min after ketamine injection in the outdoor enclosure; (2) ∼2 hr later following animal transport to the laboratory and immediately after tiletamine-zolazepam injection; and (3) ∼20-30 min following the second anesthetic injection. Serum samples were frozen and later analyzed for cortisol, corticosterone, aldosterone and testosterone via radioimmunoassay. Cortisol was the primary GC detected in SM serum with much higher mean concentrations than for corticosterone. Capture, restraint and anesthesia resulted in significant increases in both cortisol and corticosterone concentrations. Whereas aldosterone concentrations were unchanged by animal handling procedures, testosterone concentrations significantly declined under anesthesia over time. In summary, these results provide data for the main adrenocortical hormones in male SM and characterize their acute adrenal responses to potentially stressful handling and anesthesia procedures. Our findings also suggest an interaction between acute increases in corticosteroids and decreased concentrations of serum testosterone. PMID:24167044

  6. A PK-PD model of ketamine-induced high-frequency oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Francisco J.; Ching, ShiNung; Hartnack, Katharine; Fath, Amanda B.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Wilson, Matthew A.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. Ketamine is a widely used drug with clinical and research applications, and also known to be used as a recreational drug. Ketamine produces conspicuous changes in the electrocorticographic (ECoG) signals observed both in humans and rodents. In rodents, the intracranial ECoG displays a high-frequency oscillation (HFO) which power is modulated nonlinearly by ketamine dose. Despite the widespread use of ketamine there is no model description of the relationship between the pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamics (PK-PDs) of ketamine and the observed HFO power. Approach. In the present study, we developed a PK-PD model based on estimated ketamine concentration, its known pharmacological actions, and observed ECoG effects. The main pharmacological action of ketamine is antagonism of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which in rodents is accompanied by an HFO observed in the ECoG. At high doses, however, ketamine also acts at non-NMDAR sites, produces loss of consciousness, and the transient disappearance of the HFO. We propose a two-compartment PK model that represents the concentration of ketamine, and a PD model based in opposing effects of the NMDAR and non-NMDAR actions on the HFO power. Main results. We recorded ECoG from the cortex of rats after two doses of ketamine, and extracted the HFO power from the ECoG spectrograms. We fit the PK-PD model to the time course of the HFO power, and showed that the model reproduces the dose-dependent profile of the HFO power. The model provides good fits even in the presence of high variability in HFO power across animals. As expected, the model does not provide good fits to the HFO power after dosing the pure NMDAR antagonist MK-801. Significance. Our study provides a simple model to relate the observed electrophysiological effects of ketamine to its actions at the molecular level at different concentrations. This will improve the study of ketamine and rodent models of schizophrenia to better understand the wide and divergent

  7. Historical development of modern anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Daniel H; Toledo, Alexander H

    2012-06-01

    Of all milestones and achievements in medicine, conquering pain must be one of the very few that has potentially affected every human being in the world. It was in 1846 that one of mankind's greatest fears, the pain of surgery, was eliminated. This historical review article describes how the various elements of anesthesiology (gasses, laryngoscopes, endotracheal tubes, intravenous medications, masks, and delivery systems) were discovered and how some brilliant entrepreneurs and physicians of the past two centuries have delivered them to humanity. One name stands out amongst all others when the founder of modern anesthesia is discussed, William T.G. Morton (1819-1868). A young Boston Dentist, Dr. Morton had been in the search for a better agent than what had been used by many dentists: nitrous oxide. With Dr. Morton's tenacity driven by enthusiasm and discovery, he and renowned surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital, John Collins Warren (1778-1856) made history on October 16, 1846 with the first successful surgical procedure performed with anesthesia. Dr. Morton had single-handedly proven to the world that ether is a gas that when inhaled in the proper dose, provided safe and effective anesthesia. One of the first accounts of an endotracheal tube being used for an airway comes from the pediatrician Joseph O'Dwyer (1841-1898). He used the metal "O'dwyer" tubes in diphtheria cases and passed them into the trachea blindly. Adding a cuff to the tube is credited to Arthur Guedel (1883-1956) and Ralph M. Waters (1883-1979) in 1932. This addition suddenly gave the practitioner the ability to provide positive pressure ventilation. The anesthesiologist Chevalier Jackson (1865-1958) promoted his handheld laryngoscope for the insertion of endotracheal tubes and its popularity quickly caught hold. Sir Robert Reynolds Macintosh's (1897-1989) breakthrough technique of direct laryngoscopy came after being appointed Nuffield professor of anesthetics at the University of Oxford

  8. Risks Associated With Anesthesia Services During Colonoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wernli, Karen J.; Brenner, Alison T.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Inadomi, John M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS We aimed to quantify the difference in complications from colonoscopy with vs without anesthesia services. METHODS We conducted a prospective cohort study and analyzed administrative claims data from Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases from 2008 through 2011. We identified 3,168,228 colonoscopy procedures in men and women, aged 40–64 years old. Colonoscopy complications were measured within 30 days, including colonic (ie, perforation, hemorrhage, abdominal pain), anesthesia-associated (ie, pneumonia, infection, complications secondary to anesthesia), and cardiopulmonary outcomes (ie, hypotension, myocardial infarction, stroke), adjusted for age, sex, polypectomy status, Charlson comorbidity score, region, and calendar year. RESULTS Nationwide, 34.4% of colonoscopies were conducted with anesthesia services. Rates of use varied significantly by region (53% in the Northeast vs 8% in the West; P < .0001). Use of anesthesia service was associated with a 13% increase in the risk of any complication within 30 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–1.14), and was associated specifically with an increased risk of perforation (odds ratio [OR], 1.07; 95% CI, 1.00–1.15), hemorrhage (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.27–1.30), abdominal pain (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.05–1.08), complications secondary to anesthesia (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.05–1.28), and stroke (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00–1.08). For most outcomes, there were no differences in risk with anesthesia services by polypectomy status. However, the risk of perforation associated with anesthesia services was increased only in patients with a polypectomy (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.09–1.52). In the Northeast, use of anesthesia services was associated with a 12% increase in risk of any complication; among colonoscopies performed in the West, use of anesthesia services was associated with a 60% increase in risk. CONCLUSIONS The overall risk of complications after colonoscopy increases when individuals

  9. Hypotensive Anesthesia versus Normotensive Anesthesia during Major Maxillofacial Surgery: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Yoav, Leiser; Abu el-Naaj, Imad

    2015-01-01

    Steady blood pressure within normal limits during surgery is one of the markers of the ideal and skillful anesthesia. Yet, reduced blood pressure is advantageous in some settings because it can contribute to a reduction in overall blood loss and improve the surgical field conditions. Controlled hypotension during anesthesia or hypotensive anesthesia is often used in major maxillofacial operations. Since hypotensive anesthesia carries the risk of hypoperfusion to important organs and tissues, mainly the brain, heart, and kidneys, it cannot be applied safely in all patients. In this paper we review the medical literature regarding hypotensive anesthesia during major maxillofacial surgery, the means to achieve it, and the risks and benefits of this technique, in comparison to normotensive anesthesia. PMID:25811042

  10. The effects of ketamine on the canine coronary circulation.

    PubMed

    Smith, G; Thorburn, J; Vance, J P; Brown, D M

    1979-06-01

    Systemic and coronary haemodynamic measurements have been made in six healthy greyhounds anaesthetized with trichloroethylene. The administration of ketamine in bolus doses of 5 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg followed by an infusion 0.1 mg/kg/min was found to be accompanied by a decrease in arterial pressure and an increase in cardiac output produced by an increase (84%) in stroke volume. Coronary blood flow increased greatly as did myocardial oxygen consumption and there was no change in myocardial oxygen extraction. PMID:484816

  11. LOEYS-DIETZ SYNDROME: PERIOPERATIVE ANESTHESIA CONSIDERATIONS.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Judy G; Bray, Jacob P; Risher, William H; Kaye, Alan David

    2016-06-01

    Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease related to genetic mutations in receptors for the cytokine transforming growth factor-receptor type 1 (TGFB-R1) or 2 gene (TGFB-R2) on the cell surface. LDS results in abnormal protein synthesis and dysfunctional connective tissue, which can result in unique cardiovascular anesthesia challenges related to perioperative management. Patients with LDS may manifest hypertelorism, bifid uvula or cleft palate, and arterial tortuosity. Virtually all LDS patients show some type of abnormal skin findings and bleeding tendency. These patients may show a rapid progression of aortic dilation, regurgitation, and a propensity towards rupture and/or dissection at a much earlier age and smaller aneurysm size. LDS patients who require surgical intervention require meticulous vigilance from the anesthesiologist. We describe a 26 year old patient with documented LDS type 1 who presented for repair of an ascending/root aneurysm in this case report. Recognition of LDS and intra-operative management of the cardiovascular manifestations of this disease is paramount in ensuring successful surgical outcome and to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27487644

  12. INFLUENCE OF TYPE OF ANESTHESIA ON HEMODYNAMIC PARAMETERS AND OUTCOME OF DIALYSIS ARTERIOVENOUS FISTULA OPERATIONS.

    PubMed

    Shoshiashvili, V; Tataradze, A; Beglarishvili, L; Managadze, L; Chkhotua, A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of the study was to compare effectiveness of regional and local anesthesia in dialysis arterio-venous fistula (AVF) operations. It was a prospective, randomized study. 103 patients with end stage renal disease underwent AVF operations on upper limb. The patients have been randomly divided in two groups. Group I: 49 patients in whom the operations have been done under the local anesthesia; and Group II: 54 patients in whom the operation has been performed under the vertical infraclavicular block. Duplex sonography evaluation of upper arm vessels was performed pre-operatively and at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Following parameters were measured on duplex scan: vessel diameter, blood flow rates (PSV and EDV), resistive index (RI) and pulsatility index (PI). Significantly less number of patients with regional anesthesia required additional perioperative analgesics as compared with the local anesthesia group. Time to postoperative pain initiation, need for postoperative pain killers was significantly better in Group II as compared with the Group I. Duration of operation was significantly less in regional as compared with local anesthesia. Postoperative PSV and EDVs were negatively correlated with patient age. The fistula maturation time was positively correlated with age. The vein diameter, postoperative PSV and EDV have been significantly increased in Group I as compared with Group II. The postoperative PI has significantly increased and RI has significantly decreased in Group I as compared with Group II. The total number of dialysis punctures was higher in regional as compared with the local anesthesia. Regional anesthesia provides significantly better analgesia as compared with the local anesthesia in AVF operations. It significantly improves the duplex sonography parameters after AVF formation. It can be a method of choice for some forms of fistulas. PMID:26719545

  13. Hemodynamic monitoring and care of the patient of high risk for anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Pietak, S P; Teasdale, S J

    1979-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring and care of the patient at high risk for anesthesia require a careful and systematic approach. During preoperative evaluation the patient at increased risk must be identified and correctable problems must be solved. The patient's current medications must be reviewed because they may influence the choice of anesthetic approach and may alter the physiologic response to the stresses commonly associated with anesthesia. In addition to conventional clinical and electrocardiographic monitoring, perioperative hemodynamic monitoring may be desirable for patients at special risk, who are likely to have significant associated medical problems or to undergo complicated surgical procedures. No ideal induction agent exists, and hypotension secondary to peripheral vasodilation or myocardial depression, or both, is a potential problem. Patients with an inordinately high risk may benefit from mechanical circulatory assistance prior to induction of anesthesia. Attention to oxygenation, blood volume replacement and the prevention of hypertensive episodes are particularly important during anesthesia so that optimal cardiac performance is ensured and ischemia avoided. The stresses during emergence from anesthesia contribute to lability of the cardiovascular status and hypoxemia. The period of risk does not conclude with immediate recovery from anesthesia but extends through the postoperative phase. Careful monitoring and attention to the control of pain, prevention of hypotension and hypertension, adequate oxygenation, early mobilization and resumption of the administration of cardiac medications are important factors in a successful outcome. PMID:497983

  14. Patterns of Polydrug Use Among Ketamine Injectors in New York City

    PubMed Central

    LANKENAU, STEPHEN E.; CLATTS, MICHAEL C.

    2007-01-01

    Polydrug use is an important public health issue since it has been linked to significant adverse health outcomes. Recently, club drugs, including ketamine and other drugs used in dance/rave scenes, have been identified as key substances in new types of polydrug using patterns. While seemingly a self-explanatory concept, “polydrug” use constitutes multiple drug using practices that may impact upon health risks. Ketamine, a club drug commonly administered intranasally among youth for its disassociative properties, has emerged as a drug increasingly prevalent among a new hidden population of injection drug users (IDUs). Using an ethno-epidemiological methodology, we interviewed 40 young (<25 years old) ketamine injectors in New York during 2000–2002 to describe the potential health risks associated with ketamine and polydrug use. Findings indicate that ketamine was typically injected or sniffed in the context of a polydrug using event. Marijuana, alcohol, PCP, and speed were among the most commonly used drugs during recent ketamine using events. Polydrug using events were often quite variable regarding the sequencing of drug use, the drug combinations consumed, the forms of the drug utilized, and the modes of administrating the drug combinations. Future research should be directed towards developing a more comprehensive description of the risks associated with combining ketamine with other drugs, such as drug overdoses, the transmission of bloodborne pathogens, such as HIV and HCV, the short- and long-term effects of drug combinations on cognitive functioning, and other unanticipated consequences associated with polydrug use. PMID:16048823

  15. Memories reactivated under ketamine are subsequently stronger: A potential pre-clinical behavioral model of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Honsberger, Michael J.; Taylor, Jane R.; Corlett, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sub-anesthetic doses of the NMDA antagonist ketamine have been shown to model the formation and stability of delusion in human subjects. The later has been predicted to be due to aberrant prediction error resulting in enhanced destabilization of beliefs. To extend the scope of this model, we investigated the effect of administration of low dose systemic ketamine on memory in a rodent model of memory reconsolidation. Methods Systemic ketamine was administered either prior to or immediately following auditory fear memory reactivation in rats. Memory strength was assessed by measuring freezing behavior 24 hours later. Follow up experiments were designed to investigate an effect of pre-reactivation ketamine on short-term memory (STM), closely related memories, and basolateral amygdala (BLA) specific destabilization mechanisms. Results Rats given pre-reactivation, but not post-reactivation, ketamine showed larger freezing responses 24 hours later compared to vehicle. This enhancement was not observed 3 hours after the memory reactivation, nor was it seen in a closely related contextual memory. Prior inhibition of a known destabilization mechanism in the BLA blocked the effect of pre-reactivation ketamine. Conclusions Pre- but not post-reactivation ketamine enhances fear memory. These data together with recent data in human subjects supports a model of delusion fixity that proposes that aberrant prediction errors result in enhanced destabilization and strengthening of delusional belief. PMID:25728834

  16. Ketamine disrupts theta modulation of gamma in a computer model of hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Neymotin, Samuel A.; Lazarewicz, Maciej T.; Sherif, Mohamed; Contreras, Diego; Finkel, Leif H.; Lytton, William W.

    2011-01-01

    Abnormalities in oscillations have been suggested to play a role in schizophrenia. We studied theta-modulated gamma oscillations in a computer model of hippocampal CA3 in vivo with and without simulated application of ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist and psychotomimetic. Networks of 1200 multi-compartment neurons (pyramidal, basket and oriens-lacunosum moleculare, OLM, cells) generated theta and gamma oscillations from intrinsic network dynamics: basket cells primarily generated gamma and amplified theta, while OLM cells strongly contributed to theta. Extrinsic medial septal inputs paced theta and amplified both theta and gamma oscillations. Exploration of NMDA receptor reduction across all location combinations demonstrated that the experimentally-observed ketamine effect occurred only with isolated reduction of NMDA receptors on OLMs. In the ketamine simulations, lower OLM activity reduced theta power and disinhibited pyramidal cells, resulting in increased basket cell activation and gamma power. Our simulations predict: ketamine increases firing rates;oscillations can be generated by intrinsic hippocampal circuits;medial septum inputs pace and augment oscillations;pyramidal cells lead basket cells at the gamma peak but lag at trough;basket cells amplify theta rhythms;ketamine alters oscillations due to primary blockade at OLM NMDA receptors;ketamine alters phase relationships of cell firing;ketamine reduces network responsivity to the environmentketamine effect could be reversed by providing a continuous inward current to OLM cells. We suggest that this last prediction has implications for a possible novel treatment for cognitive deficits of schizophrenia by targeting OLM cells. PMID:21832203

  17. Role of Ketamine in Acute Postoperative Pain Management: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Brian M.; Shah, Khushbu; Parikh, Anant; Sifonios, Anthony N.; Le, Vanny; Eloy, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. The objective of this narrative review was to examine the usage of ketamine as a postoperative analgesic agent across a wide variety of surgeries. Design. A literature search was performed using the phrases “ketamine” and “postoperative pain.” The authors analyzed the studies that involved testing ketamine's effectiveness at controlling postoperative pain. Effectiveness was assessed through various outcomes such as the amount of opiate consumption, visual analog scale (VAS) pain scores, and persistent postoperative pain at long-term follow-up. Results. While many different administration protocols were evaluated, delivering ketamine both as a pre- or perioperative bolus and postoperative infusion for up to 48 hours appeared to be the most effective. These effects are dose-dependent. However, a number of studies analyzed showed no benefit in using ketamine versus placebo for controlling postoperative pain. While ketamine is a safe and well-tolerated drug, it does have adverse effects, and there are concerns for possible neurotoxicity and effects on memory. Conclusions. In a number of limited situations, ketamine has shown some efficacy in controlling postoperative pain and decreasing opioid consumption. More randomized controlled trials are necessary to determine the surgical procedures and administrations (i.e., intravenous, epidural) that ketamine is best suited for. PMID:26495312

  18. Comparative Investigation of Protective Effects of Metyrosine and Metoprolol Against Ketamine Cardiotoxicity in Rats.

    PubMed

    Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Ince, Ilker; Aksoy, Mehmet; Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Comez, Mehmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Celik, Mine; Alp, Hamit Hakan; Coskun, Resit; Taghizadehghalehjoughi, Ali; Suleyman, Bahadir

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of metyrosine against ketamine-induced cardiotoxicity in rats and compared the results with the effect of metoprolol. In this study, rats were divided into groups A, B and C. In group A, we investigated the effects of a single dose of metyrosine (150 mg/kg) and metoprolol (20 mg/kg) on single dose ketamine (60 mg/kg)-induced cardiotoxicity. In group B, we investigated the effect of metyrosine and metoprolol, which were given together with ketamine for 30 days. In group C, we investigated the effect of metyrosine and metoprolol given 15 days before ketamine and 30 days together with ketamine on ketamine cardiotoxicity. By the end of this process, we evaluated the effects of the levels of oxidant-antioxidant parameters such as MDA, MPO, 8-OHGua, tGSH, and SOD in addition to CK-MB and TP I on cardiotoxicity in rat heart tissue. The experimental results show that metyrosine prevented ketamine cardiotoxicity in groups A, B and C and metoprolol prevented it in only group C. PMID:25503950

  19. A case of anesthesia mumps after sacral laminectomy under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Ali; Karam, Karima; Rashid, Saima

    2015-01-01

    Acute transient parotid gland enlargement in association with general anesthesia is a rare complication and has also been called anesthesia mumps. Unilateral or bilateral parotid or submandibular swelling usually develops during surgery under anesthesia or, a few hours later and usually resolves in a few days with no sequelae. It has been reported as a complication after general anesthesia in patients undergoing spinal surgeries in prone and lateral decubitus position, even after cesarean section in the supine position and also reported in Intensive Care Unit patients. We present a case of a unilateral parotid swelling noticed in immediate postoperative course, in a patient who underwent spine surgery. PMID:26240559

  20. Use of paravertebral block anesthesia in the surgical management of breast cancer: experience in 156 cases.

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, E; Weltz, C R; Greengrass, R; Iglehart, J D; Leight, G S; Steele, S M; Lyerly, H K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess safety and efficacy of the regional anesthetic technique paravertebral block for operative treatment of breast cancer, and to compare postoperative pain, nausea, vomiting, and length of hospital stay in patients undergoing breast surgery using paravertebral block and general anesthesia. BACKGROUND: General anesthesia is currently the standard technique used for surgical treatment of breast cancer. Increasing hospital costs have focused attention on reducing the length of hospital stay for these patients. However, the side effects and complications of general anesthesia preclude ambulatory surgery for most patients undergoing breast surgery. In April 1994, the authors initiated the use of paravertebral block anesthesia for patients undergoing primary breast cancer surgery. A review of our early experience revealed that this regional anesthetic technique enables effective anesthesia for operative procedures of the breast and axilla, reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting, and provides prolonged postoperative sensory block that minimizes narcotic requirements. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 145 consecutive patients undergoing 156 breast cancer operations using paravertebral block and 100 patients undergoing general anesthesia during a 2-year period was performed. Anesthetic effectiveness and complications, inpatient experience with postoperative pain, nausea, vomiting, and length of stay were measured. RESULTS: Surgery was successfully completed in 85% of the cases attempted by using paravertebral block alone, and in 91% of the cases, surgery was completed by using paravertebral block supplemented with local anesthetic. There was a 2.6% incidence of complications associated with block placement. Twenty percent of patients in the paravertebral group required medication for nausea and vomiting during their hospital stay compared with 39% in the general anesthesia group. Narcotic analgesia was required in 98% of general anesthesia patients

  1. Antidepressant effects of ketamine: mechanisms underlying fast-acting novel antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Browne, Caroline A; Lucki, Irwin

    2013-01-01

    Newer antidepressants are needed for the many individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD) that do not respond adequately to treatment and because of a delay of weeks before the emergence of therapeutic effects. Recent evidence from clinical trials shows that the NMDA antagonist ketamine is a revolutionary novel antidepressant because it acts rapidly and is effective for treatment-resistant patients. A single infusion of ketamine alleviates depressive symptoms in treatment-resistant depressed patients within hours and these effects may be sustained for up to 2 weeks. Although the discovery of ketamine's effects has reshaped drug discovery for antidepressants, the psychotomimetic properties of this compound limit the use of this therapy to the most severely ill patients. In order to develop additional antidepressants like ketamine, adequate preclinical behavioral screening paradigms for fast-acting antidepressants need to be established and used to identify the underlying neural mechanisms. This review examines the preclinical literature attempting to model the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine. Acute administration of ketamine has produced effects in behavioral screens for antidepressants like the forced swim test, novelty suppression of feeding and in rodent models for depression. Protracted behavioral effects of ketamine have been reported to appear after a single treatment that last for days. This temporal pattern is similar to its clinical effects and may serve as a new animal paradigm for rapid antidepressant effects in humans. In addition, protracted changes in molecules mediating synaptic plasticity have been implicated in mediating the antidepressant-like behavioral effects of ketamine. Current preclinical studies are examining compounds with more specific pharmacological effects at glutamate receptors and synapses in order to develop additional rapidly acting antidepressants without the hallucinogenic side effects or abuse potential of ketamine

  2. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Intranasal Ketamine in Major Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Kyle A.B.; Levitch, Cara F.; Perez, Andrew M.; Brallier, Jess W.; Parides, Michael K.; Soleimani, Laili; Feder, Adriana; Iosifescu, Dan V.; Charney, Dennis S.; Murrough, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Background The N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist ketamine, delivered via an intravenous route, has shown rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression. The current study was designed to test the safety, tolerability and efficacy of intranasal ketamine in patients with depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial. Methods Twenty patients with major depression were randomized and 18 completed two treatment days with intranasal ketamine hydrochloride (50 mg) or saline solution in a randomized, double-blind, crossover study. The primary efficacy outcome measure was change in depression severity 24 hours following ketamine or placebo, measured using the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes included persistence of benefit, changes in self-reports of depression, changes in anxiety, and proportion of responders. Potential psychotomimetic, dissociative, hemodynamic, and general adverse effects associated with ketamine were also measured. Results Patients showed significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 24 hours following ketamine compared to placebo [t=4.39, p<0.001; estimated mean MADRS score difference of 7.6 ± 3.7 (95% CI: 3.9 – 11.3)]. Eight of 18 patients (44%) met response criteria 24 hours following ketamine administration, compared to 1 of 18 (6%) following placebo (p=0.033). Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with minimal psychotomimetic or dissociative effects and was not associated with clinically significant changes in hemodynamic parameters. Conclusions This study provides the first controlled evidence for the rapid antidepressant effects of intranasal ketamine. Treatment was associated with minimal adverse effects. If replicated, these findings may lead to novel approaches to the pharmacologic treatment of patients with major depression. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01304147 PMID:24821196

  3. Evaluation of urinary bladder fibrogenesis in a mouse model of long-term ketamine injection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Cheng-Huang; Wang, Shou-Chieh; Wang, Shou-Tsung; Lin, Shu-Mei; Wu, Jiann-Der; Lin, Chang-Te; Liu, Yi-Wen

    2016-09-01

    Long-term ketamine abuse has been shown to affect the lower urinary tract and result in interstitial cystitis-like syndrome. However, the causative mechanism of ketamine-induced dysfunction remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate the physiological, histological and molecular changes on ketamine‑associated cystitis (KC) in a mouse model. Both male and female Balb/c mice were separately distributed into the control group (normal saline) and ketamine group, which received ketamine hydrochloride (100 mg/kg/day) daily by intraperitoneal injection for a total period of 20 weeks. In each group, the urine was analyzed by gas chromatography‑mass spectrometry to measure the concentration of ketamine and its metabolites. Urinary frequency and urine volume were examined to investigate the urinary voiding functions. Mice bladders were excised for cDNA microarray and hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. The ketamine and metabolites were detected only in ketamine‑treated mice urine. The voiding interval was reduced in the male mice group after 20 week ketamine administration. Additionally, the result of cDNA array analysis revealed a number of gene expression levels involved in chronic wound healing response and collagen accumulation, which were closely associated with fibrosis progression in the connective tissue. In HE staining of the bladder tissue, the ketamine-injected mice exhibited prominently denser blood vessel distribution in the submucosal layer. Based on the evidence in the present study, a mechanism that delineates fibrosis formation of urinary bladder induced by the pathogenesis of ketamine abuse can be constructed. PMID:27431428

  4. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine transiently decrease serotonin transporter activity: a PET study in conscious monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Shigeyuki; Ohba, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Shingo; Harada, Norihiro; Kakiuchi, Takeharu; Tsukada, Hideo; Domino, Edward F

    2013-12-01

    Subanesthetic doses of ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist, have a rapid antidepressant effect which lasts for up to 2 weeks. However, the neurobiological mechanism regarding this effect remains unclear. In the present study, the effects of subanesthetic doses of ketamine on serotonergic systems in conscious monkey brain were investigated. Five young monkeys underwent four positron emission tomography measurements with [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethyl-phenylsulfanyl)benzonitrile ([(11)C]DASB) for the serotonin transporter (SERT), during and after intravenous infusion of vehicle or ketamine hydrochloride in a dose of 0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg for 40 min, and 24 h post infusion. Global reduction of [(11)C]DASB binding to SERT was observed during ketamine infusion in a dose-dependent manner, but not 24 h later. The effect of ketamine on the serotonin 1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) and dopamine transporter (DAT) was also investigated in the same subjects studied with [(11)C]DASB. No significant changes were observed in either 5-HT1A-R or DAT binding after ketamine infusion. Microdialysis analysis indicated that ketamine infusion transiently increased serotonin levels in the extracellular fluid of the prefrontal cortex. The present study demonstrates that subanesthetic ketamine selectively enhanced serotonergic transmission by inhibition of SERT activity. This action coexists with the rapid antidepressant effect of subanesthetic doses of ketamine. Further studies are needed to investigate whether the transient combination of SERT and NMDA reception inhibition enhances each other's antidepressant actions. PMID:23880871

  5. Repeated ketamine treatment induces sex-specific behavioral and neurochemical effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Thelen, Connor; Sens, Jonathon; Mauch, Joseph; Pandit, Radhika; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M

    2016-10-01

    One of the most striking discoveries in the treatment of major depression was the finding that infusion of a single sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine induces rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in treatment-resistant depressed patients. However, ketamine's antidepressant-like actions are transient and can only be sustained by repeated drug treatment. Despite the fact that women experience major depression at roughly twice the rate of men, research regarding the neurobiological antidepressant-relevant effects of ketamine has focused almost exclusively on the male sex. Importantly, knowledge regarding the sex-differentiated effects, the frequency and the dose on which repeated ketamine administration stops being beneficial, is limited. In the current study, we investigated the behavioral, neurochemical and synaptic molecular effects of repeated ketamine treatment (10mg/kg; 21days) in male and female C57BL/6J mice. We report that ketamine induced beneficial antidepressant-like effects in male mice, but induced both anxiety-like (i.e., decreased time spent in the center of the open field arena) and depressive-like effects (i.e., enhanced immobility duration in the forced swim test; FST) in their female counterparts. Moreover, repeated ketamine treatment induced sustained sex-differentiated neurochemical and molecular effects, as it enhanced hippocampal synapsin protein levels and serotonin turnover in males, but attenuated glutamate and aspartate levels in female mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that repeated ketamine treatment induces opposite behavioral effects in male and female mice, and thus, present data have far-reaching implications for the sex-oriented use of ketamine in both experimental and clinical research settings. PMID:27343934

  6. Neural correlates of rapid antidepressant response to ketamine in bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Nugent, Allison C; Diazgranados, Nancy; Carlson, Paul J; Ibrahim, Lobna; Luckenbaugh, David A; Brutsche, Nancy; Herscovitch, Peter; Drevets, Wayne C; Zarate, Carlos A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Ketamine, an N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist, has rapid antidepressant effects in depressed subjects with bipolar disorder (BD). Evidence supports a role for the glutamatergic system in the pathophysiology of BD. This double-blind, randomized, cross-over study sought to determine cerebral metabolic correlates of antidepressant response to ketamine. Methods Twenty-one subjects with BD currently in a depressed state underwent [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging after receiving a placebo infusion as well as after receiving a ketamine infusion. Metabolism was compared between ketamine and placebo infusions, and correlated with clinical response. Regional metabolic rate of glucose (rMRGlu) in regions-of-interest (ROIs) and Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores were the main outcome measures. Results The study found that change in metabolism between sessions was significantly correlated with percentage change in MADRS scores in the right ventral striatum; subjects who showed the greatest improvement had the largest metabolic increase after ketamine infusion compared to placebo. In a voxel-wise analysis, subjects with BD had significantly lower glucose metabolism in the left hippocampus following the ketamine infusion than the placebo infusion. In addition, metabolism in the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) following the placebo infusion was positively correlated with percentage improvement in MADRS score following the ketamine infusion. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that higher activity in the subgenual ACC may predict antidepressant response to ketamine. Ketamine administration altered glucose metabolism in areas known to be involved in mood disorders; these alterations may partially underlie ketamine’s mechanism of action. PMID:24103187

  7. Demonstration of the direct impact of ketamine on urothelium using a tissue engineered bladder model

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Michel; Pelletier, Jérôme; Rousseau, Alexandre; Bernard, Geneviève; Chabaud, Stéphane; Bolduc, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Ketamine is a common recreational drug. Severe lower urinary tract symptoms associated with its consumption have been reported, but little is known about the involved mechanisms. The effect of ketamine, which is excreted in urine, was evaluated by its application on an in vitro three-dimensional human tissue-engineered bladder model composed of an urothelium and a submucosa. Methods: Human urothelial cells were cultured with medium containing various concentrations of ketamine and harvested at different times to obtain growth curves. Using this model, specific activity of caspase-3 was measured to assess the level of apoptosis induced by ketamine. Finally, a human tissue-engineered bladder model was used. Urothelial cells were plated on a stromal layer made of dermal fibroblasts and incubated at the air/liquid interface to allow their differentiation. Ketamine was then put on the mature urothelium using paper or agarose vectors for 48 hours. Results: The presence of ketamine increased cells’ doubling times from 1.26 days for control to 1.38 days (p = 0.14) and 1.78 days (p < 0.01) for the 0.5 mM and 1.5 mM concentrations, respectively. 5 mM and 10 mM of ketamine led to decline in the major cell population. Exposure to 5 mM ketamine induced apoptosis, confirmed by a 2.5-fold increase in capase-3 specific activity from control (p = 0.03). The structure and cellular cohesion of the urothelium on the three-dimensional model, especially in the intermediate layers, were severely affected in a concentration dependant fashion with both vectors. Conclusion: The presence of ketamine in the bladder directly damages the urothelium through the induction of apoptosis. PMID:26425223

  8. Anesthesia - what to ask your doctor - adult

    MedlinePlus

    ... to relax my nerves before going into the operating room? After I receive the anesthesia: Will I ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  9. Sources of Anesthesia Literature for Medical Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sim, Patrick P.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses various sources of anesthesia literature that warrants the attention of medical librarians in their services of acquisition and reference and includes a list of serials in anesthesiology and related fields. (FM)

  10. Anesthesia Safe for Infants, Toddlers, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Child Development Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Anesthesia Child Development About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  11. A Comparison of the Effectiveness of Oral Midazolam –N2O Versus Oral Ketamine – N2O in Pediatric Patients-An in–Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Kotha, Ravichandrasekhar; Vasa, Aron Arun Kumar; Sahana, Suzan; Jadadoddi, Raghavendra Kumar; Bezawada, Sushma

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Most children are casual and moderately agreeable in the dental treatment environment, however some of them show practices that upset the professional and make the protected conveyance of worthy treatment extremely troublesome. For such cases dental practitioner utilizes behavior management techniques. At the point when behavioral administration procedures come up short, some type of pharmacologic sedation or anesthesia may be an important and vital option. Dental sedation is a strategy in which the utilization of a medication or drugs produce(s) a condition of depression of the central sensory system empowering treatment to be completed during which verbal contact with the patient is kept up all through the time of sedation. Aim This study was designed to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of oral midazolam and oral ketamine in combination with N2O-O2 in children undergoing dental treatment. Materials and Methods This study involved a sample of 30 pediatric dental patients (age range is 3-9 years), whose selection criteria included ASA I & II health status, cooperative but apprehensive behavior and a need for multiple dental extractions. The patients were assigned to receive oral midazolam on their first visit and on the follow up visit they received oral ketamine. Nitrous oxide (30%) was used during each sedation visit. Physiological parameters like Respiratory Rate (RR), pulse rate, and oxygen saturation were evaluated for each procedure, followed by the use of modified Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test to evaluate psychomotor effects. Data were analyzed using Independent sample student t –test. Results Analysis of the data showed statistically no significant difference (p >0.05) on comparison of effectiveness of oral midazolam-N2O with oral ketamine-N2O when pulse rate, oxygen saturation and respiratory rate were taken into consideration. Psychomotor performance was found to be marginally better with oral midazolam-N2O compared to oral

  12. Sedation or general anesthesia for transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    PubMed

    Mayr, N Patrick; Michel, Jonathan; Bleiziffer, Sabine; Tassani, Peter; Martin, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    Transfemoral transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) is nowadays a routine therapy for elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) and high perioperative risk. With growing experience, further development of the devices, and the expansion to "intermediate-risk" patients, there is increasing interest in performing this procedure under conscious sedation (TAVI-S) rather than the previously favoured approach of general anesthesia (TAVI-GA). The proposed benefits of TAVI-S include; reduced procedure time, shorter intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay, reduced need for intraprocedural vasopressor support, and the potential to perform the procedure without the direct presence of an anesthetist for cost-saving reasons. To date, no randomized trial data exists. We reviewed 13 non-randomized studies/registries reporting data from 6,718 patients undergoing TAVI (3,227 performed under sedation). Patient selection, study methods, and endpoints have differed considerably between published studies. Reported rates of in-hospital and longer-term mortality are similar for both groups. Up to 17% of patients undergoing TAVI-S require conversion to general anesthesia during the procedure, primarily due to vascular complications, and urgent intubation is frequently associated with hemodynamic instability. Procedure related factors, including hypotension, may compound preexisting age-specific renal impairment and enhance the risk of acute kidney injury. Hypotonia of the hypopharyngeal muscles in elderly patients, intraprocedural hypercarbia, and certain anesthetic drugs, may increase the aspiration risk in sedated patients. General anesthesia and conscious sedation have both been used successfully to treat patients with severe AS undergoing TAVI with similar reported short and long-term mortality outcomes. The authors believe that the significant incidence of complications and unplanned conversion to general anesthesia during TAVI-S mandates the start-to-finish presence

  13. Nonintubated anesthesia in thoracic surgery: general issues

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Anesthetic management for awake thoracic surgery (ATS) is more difficult than under general anesthesia (GA), being technically extremely challenging for the anesthesiologist. Therefore, thorough preparation and vigilance are paramount for successful patient management. In this review, important considerations of nonintubated anesthesia for thoracic surgery are discussed in view of careful patient selection, anesthetic preparation, potential perioperative difficulties and the management of its complications. PMID:26046051

  14. 2020 Glimpses Through the Anesthesia Retroprospectroscope

    PubMed Central

    Fink, B. Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The Department of Anesthesiology at the University of Washington has grown steadily throughout its first 25 years. Personal reminiscences of old-fashioned anesthesia induction lead to philosophizing on the role of the larynx in the evolution of the human mind and the limited future of computerized administration of anesthesia. Machines will never substitute for the alliance between science and the humane that characterizes modern anesthesiology. PMID:3962306

  15. A Comparative pO2 Probe and [18F]-Fluoro-Azomycinarabino-Furanoside ([18F]FAZA) PET Study Reveals Anesthesia-Induced Impairment of Oxygenation and Perfusion in Tumor and Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mahling, Moritz; Fuchs, Kerstin; Thaiss, Wolfgang M.; Maier, Florian C.; Feger, Martina; Bukala, Daniel; Harant, Maren; Eichner, Martin; Reutershan, Jörg; Lang, Florian; Reischl, Gerald; Pichler, Bernd J.; Kneilling, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia can be identified by [18F]FAZA positron emission tomography, or invasively using oxygen probes. The impact of anesthetics on tumor hypoxia remains controversial. The aim of this comprehensive study was to investigate the impact of isoflurane and ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on [18F]FAZA uptake and partial oxygen pressure (pO2) in carcinoma and muscle tissue of air- and oxygen-breathing mice. Methods CT26 colon carcinoma-bearing mice were anesthetized with isoflurane (IF) or ketamine/xylazine (KX) while breathing air or oxygen (O2). We performed 10 min static PET scans 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection and calculated the [18F]FAZA-uptake and tumor-to-muscle ratios (T/M). In another experimental group, we placed a pO2 probe in the tumor as well as in the gastrocnemius muscle to measure the pO2 and perfusion. Results Ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice yielded up to 3.5-fold higher T/M-ratios compared to their isoflurane-anesthetized littermates 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after [18F]FAZA injection regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen (3 h, KX-air: 7.1 vs. IF-air: 1.8, p = 0.0001, KX-O2: 4.4 vs. IF-O2: 1.4, p < 0.0001). The enhanced T/M-ratios in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice were mainly caused by an increased [18F]FAZA uptake in the carcinomas. Invasive pO2 probe measurements yielded enhanced intra-tumoral pO2 values in air- and oxygen-breathing ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice compared to isoflurane-anesthetized mice (KX-air: 1.01 mmHg, IF-air: 0.45 mmHg; KX-O2 9.73 mmHg, IF-O2: 6.25 mmHg). Muscle oxygenation was significantly higher in air-breathing isoflurane-anesthetized (56.9 mmHg) than in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice (33.8 mmHg, p = 0.0003). Conclusion [18F]FAZA tumor uptake was highest in ketamine/xylazine-anesthetized mice regardless of whether the mice breathed air or oxygen. The generally lower [18F]FAZA whole-body uptake in isoflurane-anesthetized mice could be due to the higher muscle pO2-values in these mice

  16. Effect of ketamine on control of breathing in cats.

    PubMed

    Jaspar, N; Mazzarelli, M; Tessier, C; Milic-Emili, J

    1983-09-01

    We studied minute ventilation, breathing pattern, end-tidal CO2 partial pressure (PACO2), and tracheal occlusion pressure in cats anesthetized with ketamine (40 and 80 mg/kg) before and after CO2 inhalation. Before CO2 administration ventilation was reduced and PACO2 increased relative to unanesthetized cats at both ketamine doses. Breathing pattern was of the "apneustic" type, being characterized by 1) prolonged inspiratory duration and relatively short expiratory time and 2) markedly curvilinear (convex upward) inspiratory volume-time profile. The latter reflected a similar curvilinearity in the tracheal occlusion pressure waveform. During CO2 inhalation, the ventilatory response to CO2 was similar to that in unanesthetized cats in spite of a depressed tracheal occlusion pressure response. This discrepancy was due to the fact that in the presence of a convex upward inspiratory volume-time profile, the shortening of inspiratory duration with increasing CO2 results in a marked increase of mean inspiratory flow, and hence the ventilatory response to CO2 remains high. PMID:6415013

  17. Nonconventional interventions for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder: Ketamine, repetitive trans-cranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and alternative approaches.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Basant; Kluewer D'Amico, Jessica; Makani, Ramkrishna; Parikh, Tapan

    2016-01-01

    It is alarming that only 59% of those who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Many existing treatments, both pharmacological and nonpharmacological, do not directly target trauma memories that lay at the core of the PTSD pathogenesis. Notable exceptions are medications like ketamine and propranolol and trauma-focused psychotherapies like eye-movement desensitization and reprocessing therapy (developed by Shapiro) and Trauma Interventions using Mindfulness Based Extinction and Reconsolidation (TIMBER) for trauma memories (developed by Pradhan). Although the antidepressant effects of ketamine are no longer news, ketamine's effects on treatment refractory PTSD (TR-PTSD) is a recent concept. As TR-PTSD has a marked public health burden and significant limitations in terms of treatment interventions, a thorough assessment of current strategies is required. Research to bring clarity to the underlying pathophysiology and neurobiology of TR-PTSD delineating the chemical, structural, and circuitry abnormalities will take time. In the interim, in the absence of a 1-size-fits-all therapeutic approach, pragmatically parallel lines of research can be pursued using the pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatments that have a strong theoretical rationale for efficacy. This article aims to review the current literature on interventions for PTSD, most notably ketamine, trans-cranial magnetic stimulation treatment, yoga and mindfulness interventions, and TIMBER. We present an outline for their future use, alone as well as in combination, with a hope of providing additional insights as well as advocating for developing more effective therapeutic intervention for this treatment-resistant and debilitating condition. PMID:26162001

  18. Determination of ketamine and its major metabolite, norketamine, in urine and plasma samples using microextraction by packed sorbent and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Ivo; Barroso, Mário; Martinho, Ana; Cruz, Angelines; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2015-11-01

    Ketamine is a club drug widely abused for its hallucinogenic effects, being also used as a "date-rape" drug in recent years. We have developed an analytical method using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) for the identification and quantification of ketamine and its major metabolite in urine and plasma. No derivatization step is needed to accomplish analysis. The compounds were extracted from 0.25mL of sample using microextraction by packed sorbent on mixed mode (M1) cartridges. Calibration curves were linear in the range of 10-250ng/mL for urine and 10-500ng/mL for plasma, with determination coefficients higher than 0.99. The limit of detection (LOD) was 5ng/mL for both compounds in both specimens. Recoveries ranged from 63 to 101%, while precision and accuracy were below 14% and 15%, respectively. These low limits of detection and the quite high recoveries obtained, in very low sample amounts, allow detecting small quantities of the compounds, making this procedure suitable for those laboratories performing routine analysis in the field of forensic toxicology. Compared with existing methods, the herein described procedure is fast, since no derivatization step is required, and cost effective for the quantification of ketamine and norketamine in biological specimens by gas chromatography. PMID:26447937

  19. Inhalational anesthesia for organ procurement: potential indications for administering inhalational anesthesia in the brain-dead organ donor.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Laurie J

    2010-08-01

    Organs needed for transplantation far outweigh their availability. There is minimal research regarding perioperative care of the brain-dead organ donor during the procurement procedure. Current research attributes a great deal of organ damage to autonomic or sympathetic storm that occurs during brain death. Literature searches were performed with the terms brain death, organ donor, organ procurement, anesthesia and organ donor, anesthesia and brain death, anesthesia and organ procurement, inhalational anesthetics and organ procurement, and inhalational anesthetics and brain dead. Additional resources were obtained from reference lists of published articles. The literature review showed there is a lack of published studies researching the use of inhalational anesthetics in organ procurement. No studies have been published evaluating the effect of preconditioning with inhalational agents (administering 1.3 minimal alveolar concentration of an inhalational agent for the 20 minutes before periods of ischemia) in the brain-dead organ donor population. Further studies are required to determine if administration of inhalational anesthetics reduces catecholamine release occurring with surgical stimulation during the organ procurement procedure and whether this technique increases viability of transplanted organs. Anesthetic preconditioning before the ischemic period may reduce ischemia-reperfusion injury in transplanted organs, further increasing viability of transplanted organs. PMID:20879630

  20. [Anesthesia in thymectomy. Experience with 115 cases].

    PubMed

    Villani, A; Primieri, P; Adducci, G; Mennella, M; Lattanzi, A; De Cosmo, G

    1993-03-01

    The authors have conducted a retrospective study on 115 patients with myasthenia gravis undergoing transsternal or transcervical thymectomy at the Policlinico A. Gemelli of Rome in the period June 1984- to June 1991. A prolonged postoperative mechanical ventilation immediately and a few days following surgery was required respectively in 7 and 3 patients, while atelectasia and broncopneumonia have developed in 10 patients. No relationship could be established between the incidence of respiratory complications and factors such as preoperative symptomatology and treatment anesthetic agents, the surgical approach to the thymus and thymic pathology. However a significantly greater postoperative morbidity has been observed in the group of patients receiving suxametonium as compared to the patients receiving non-depolarizing muscle relaxants. Vecuronium and atracurium very frequently allowed ad adequate resumption of spontaneous respiration after anesthesia and made possible a safe early extubation of patients before leaving the operating room. The authors also stressed that all patients, irrespective of their clinical conditions, must be transferred after thymectomy. Oto the surgical ICU where anticholinesterase therapy can be safely restarted and cardiorespiratory status carefully monitored. PMID:8515858

  1. Michael Faraday and his contribution to anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, N A

    1992-10-01

    Michael Faraday (1791-1867) was a protégé of Humphry Davy. He became one of Davy's successors as Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution of Great Britain. Of Faraday's many brilliant discoveries in chemistry and physics, probably the best remembered today is his work on electromagnetic induction. Faraday's contribution to introduction of anesthesia was his published announcement in 1818 that inhalation of the vapor of ether produced the same effects on mentation and consciousness as the breathing of nitrous oxide. He most likely became familiar with the central nervous system effects of nitrous oxide through his association with Davy, an avid user of the gas. Sulfuric ether was a common, convenient, cheap, and easily available substance, in contrast to nitrous oxide, which required expensive, cumbersome, and probably not widely available apparatus for its production and administration. The capability for inhaling intoxicating vapors eventually became commonly available with the use of ether instead of the gas. The first surgical anesthetics were a consequence of the resulting student "ether frolics." The 1818 announcement on breathing ether vapor was published anonymously; however, notations in Faraday's handwriting in some of his personal books clearly establish Michael Faraday as the author of this brief communication. PMID:1416178

  2. [Application of Non-intubated Anesthesia in VATS].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaotan; Song, Pingping; Zhang, Baijiang

    2016-05-20

    Tracheal intubation general anesthesia technique is widely used in video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) because it can improve the safety of VATS, but the complications of tracheal intubation can not be avoided. How to develop a "minimally invasive" surgery (including micro anesthesia) has become a hot topic in the field of minimally invasive surgery. Along with the progress of the anesthesia management technology and the risk management in the operation, the technology of non-intubated anesthesia was successfully applied to VATS, namely using local anesthesia to maintain patients intraoperative independent ventilation and intraoperative only mild sedation or fully conscious state of implementation of thoracoscope surgery, therefore is also called awake VATS. The anesthesia method not only reduces the anesthesia injury of tracheal intubation, but also conforms to the idea of rapid rehabilitation surgery. Based on non-intubated anesthesia in VATS in the brief history of development, the anesthesia selection, operation advantages and risks are reviewed in this paper. PMID:27215461

  3. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess. PMID:18831298

  4. Radiation treatment for the right naris in a pediatric anesthesia patient using an adaptive oral airway technique

    SciTech Connect

    Sponseller, Patricia Pelly, Nicole; Trister, Andrew; Ford, Eric; Ermoian, Ralph

    2015-10-01

    Radiation therapy for pediatric patients often includes the use of intravenous anesthesia with supplemental oxygen delivered via the nasal cannula. Here, we describe the use of an adaptive anesthesia technique for electron irradiation of the right naris in a preschool-aged patient treated under anesthesia. The need for an intranasal bolus plug precluded the use of standard oxygen supplementation. This novel technique required the multidisciplinary expertise of anesthesiologists, radiation therapists, medical dosimetrists, medical physicists, and radiation oncologists to ensure a safe and reproducible treatment course.