Science.gov

Sample records for research association symposia

  1. SUPPORT FOR CHEMISTRY SYMPOSIA AT THE 2011 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF SCIENCE MEETING FEBRUARY 17-21, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Prof. Charles Casey, University of Wisconsin-Madison

    2011-08-20

    This proposal supported Chemistry Symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Meeting in Washington, DC February 17-21, 2011. The Chemistry Section of AAAS presented an unusually strong set of symposia for the 2011 AAAS meeting to help celebrate the 2011 International Year of Chemistry. The AAAS meeting provided an unusual opportunity to convey the excitement and importance of chemistry to a very broad audience and allowed access to a large contingent of the scientific press. Excellent suggestions for symposia were received from AAAS Chemistry Fellows and from the chairs of the American Chemical Society Technical Divisions. The AAAS Chemistry executive committee selected topics that would have wide appeal to scientists, the public, and the press for formal proposals of symposia. The symposia proposals were peer reviewed by AAAS. The Chemistry Section made a strong case to the program selection committee for approval of the chemistry symposia and 6 were approved for the 2011 annual meeting. The titles of the approved symposia were: (1) Powering the Planet: Generation of Clean Fuels from Sunlight and Water, (2) Biological Role and Consequences of Intrinsic Protein Disorder, (3) Chemically Speaking: How Organisms Talk to Each Other, (4) Molecular Self-Assembly and Artificial Molecular Machines, (5) Frontiers in Organic Materials for Information Processing, Energy and Sensors, and (6) Celebrating Marie Curie's 100th Anniversary of Her Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The Chemistry Section of AAAS is provided with funds to support only 1-2 symposia a year. Because of the much greater number of symposia approved in conjunction with observance of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, additional support was sought from DOE to help support the 30 invited speakers and 8 symposia moderators/organizers. Support for the symposia provided the opportunity to highlight the excitement of current chemical research, to educate the public about the

  2. Support for chemistry symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, February 17-21 2011

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Casey

    2011-08-20

    This proposal supported Chemistry Symposia at the 2011 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Meeting in Washington, DC February 17-21, 2011. The Chemistry Section of AAAS presented an unusually strong set of symposia for the 2011 AAAS meeting to help celebrate the 2011 International Year of Chemistry. The AAAS meeting provided an unusual opportunity to convey the excitement and importance of chemistry to a very broad audience and allowed access to a large contingent of the scientific press. Excellent suggestions for symposia were received from AAAS Chemistry Fellows and from the chairs of the American Chemical Society Technical Divisions. The AAAS Chemistry executive committee selected topics that would have wide appeal to scientists, the public, and the press for formal proposals of symposia. The symposia proposals were peer reviewed by AAAS. The Chemistry Section made a strong case to the program selection committee for approval of the chemistry symposia and 6 were approved for the 2011 annual meeting. The titles of the approved symposia were: (1) Powering the Planet: Generation of Clean Fuels from Sunlight and Water, (2) Biological Role and Consequences of Intrinsic Protein Disorder, (3) Chemically Speaking: How Organisms Talk to Each Other, (4) Molecular Self-Assembly and Artificial Molecular Machines, (5) Frontiers in Organic Materials for Information Processing, Energy and Sensors, and (6) Celebrating Marie Curie's 100th Anniversary of Her Nobel Prize in Chemistry. The Chemistry Section of AAAS is provided with funds to support only 1-2 symposia a year. Because of the much greater number of symposia approved in conjunction with observance of the 2011 International Year of Chemistry, additional support was sought from DOE to help support the 30 invited speakers and 8 symposia moderators/organizers. Support for the symposia provided the opportunity to highlight the excitement of current chemical research, to educate the public about the

  3. Environmental Design Research. Volume Two: Symposia and Workshops. Community Development Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preiser, Wolfgang F. E., Ed.

    The contents of this volume represent the invited contributions to the conference and are categorized according to special (invited) addresses, symposia, and workshops. Special addresses were conceptualized to view environmental design research in a holistic way, incorporating changing societal and political conditions. Lynton K. Caldwell spoke on…

  4. Information Sciences: Conferences, Symposia, Reviews, Supporting Research and STINFO Activities. Vol. IV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Documentation Center, Alexandria, VA.

    The bibliography is a compilation of annotated references on information sciences; conferences, symposia, reviews, supporting research, and STINFO (Scientific and Technical Information Project) activities and is volume IV in a four-volume set on information sciences. It is a revision to the unlimited references in the earlier bibliographies,…

  5. Energy Conferences and Symposia; (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Osborne, J.H.; Simpson, W.F. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Energy Conferences and Symposia, a monthly publication, was instituted to keep scientists, engineers, managers, and related energy professionals abreast of meetings sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and by other technical associations. Announcements cover conference, symposia, workshops, congresses, and other formal meetings pertaining to DOE programmatic interests. Complete meeting information, including title, sponsor, and contact, is presented in the main section, which is arranged alphabetically by subject area. Within a subject, citations are sorted by beginning data of the meeting. New listings are indicated by a bullet after the conference number and DOE-sponsored conferences are indicated by a star. Two indexes are provided for cross referencing conference information. The Chronological Index lists conference titles by dates and gives the subject area where complete information they may be found. The Location Index is alphabetically sorted by the city where the conference will be held.

  6. American Chemical Society, Preprints symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The Division of Petroleum Chemistry of the American Chemical Society met August 30-September 4, 1987, in New Orleans and presented symposia on advances in fluid cracking catalysts, advances in naphtha reforming, refinery waste cleanup, hydrocarbon oxidation, and methane conversion. Forty-two abstracts were prepared.

  7. Index of aerospace mechanisms symposia proceedings 1-19

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinaldo, A.; Wilson, J.

    1986-01-01

    This index, organized in five sections (by symposium, by title, by author, by subject, and by project), brings together information on the first 19 Aerospace Mechanisms symposia. Key words are included, cross-referencing all the symposia, and the eighteenth and nineteenth symposia are cross-indexed by project. The Aerospace Mechanisms symposia are devoted to discussions of design, fabrication, test, and operational use of aerospace mechanisms; this is the first index that compiles information on symposia held from 1966 through 1985.

  8. PREFACE: Joint European Magnetic Symposia - JEMS 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spałek, Jozef

    2011-07-01

    Conference banner The Joint European Magnetic Symposia JEMS 2010 took place in the complex Auditorium Maximum of the Jagiellonian University in Kraków, Poland, between 23-28 August 2010. It followed the series of the conferences in Grenoble (2001), Dresden (2004), San Sebastian (2006), and Dublin (2008). The next Symposia will be held in 2012 in Parma (Italy). The Symposia cover a broad range of aspects of magnetism and magnetic materials, as well as providing a forum for the magnetism community to discuss new concepts, properties, and developments in all branches of fundamental and applied magnetism. The JEMS 2010 Symposia were organized by the Institute of Physics of Jagiellonian University, in cooperation with AGH University of Science and Technology (Kraków), Cracow University of Technology, Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków, and the Silesian University in Katowice. I thank the Local Committee, and in particular Professor Krzysztof Tomala, for their hard work long before, during, and after the Conference. We dedicate this volume to Professor Henryk Szymczak from the Institute of Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences for his long lasting service to the magnetism community and the organizational effort in bringing this Conference to our community. Thank you Henryk! The Conference contained Plenary Sessions and 16 Symposia, which are listed below. Most of them had two chairpersons (also listed), one from abroad and one from Poland. I believe that a collective chairmanship of the Symposia is very helpful in both their organization, as well as in the reviewing process of the papers submitted to the Conference Proceedings. I would like to cordially thank all the persons listed below, who have contributed enormously to the success of our meeting. The Proceedings comprises 116 invited and contributed papers. I thank the Co-editors for their continuing work long after the Conference. Arrivederci in Parma! Jozef Spa

  9. A history of the WM Symposia

    SciTech Connect

    Post, R.

    1996-03-01

    This document contains a narrative history of the Waste Management Symposia in the United States. In 1973, a group of engineers active in radioactive waste management met at the Hanford Engineering Works in Richland, Washington, with Frank Pittman, then Director of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. They discussed recent news reports that some of the waste storage tanks containing high-level radioactive wastes were leaking at the Hanford site. One of the major concerns of the news media was that the leaking had been kept secret. As a result of these discussions, it was decided that a credible forum was needed to disseminate sound technical information and for the technical community to interact closely with the public and with the news media. The first Waste Management Symposium was subsequently organized and held in Tucson, Arizona in 1994. This paper goes on to describe the continuation of these annual symposia until the present.

  10. International Symposia on Integrated Exposure Assessment for Hazardous Materials

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Jang; Ha, Mina

    2012-01-01

    Objectives On September 2, 2010 and November 25, 2011, the Korean Research Project on Integrated Exposure Assessment to Hazardous Materials for Food Safety (KRIEFS) organized two international symposia in Seoul, Korea. KRIEFS, established by the Korean Food and Drug Administration in March 2010, envisioned these international symposia as means to obtain advanced experiences from other countries and to reflect on and refine the KRIEFS's survey design and methods. Methods For the first symposium KRIEFS invited human biomonitoring (HBM) experts from Germany, the US, and Canada. The visiting HBM experts shared the details of their national studies while the KRIEFS discussed study design, as well as the methods, results and policymaking processes of the KRIEFS project. The second symposium was organized to share the survey design and results on endocrine disruptors from Taiwan. Results The Speaker from Germany introduced the German Environmental Survey and shared their experiences in HBM design, such as the process of developing reference values, and discussed the new HBM plan in Germany and the European Union. The Representative from Canada shared insights from national HBM approach. In the case of the US, the speaker focused on risk communication with subjects in epidemiological studies. In the second international symposium, the speaker shared the experience of endocrine disruptors'studies from Taiwan. Conclusions KRIEFS was able to better understand previous nationwide HBM research designs, policy making process, and risk communication with research subjects.

  11. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (59th, San Francisco, California, March 28-31, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.; Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    Abstracts of most of the papers, symposia, and poster sessions presented at the 59th conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) are provided. Subject areas addressed include: instructional practices in secondary school science; research on computers in science learning; teacher's professional knowledge and…

  12. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Conference, Abstracts of Presented Papers (61st, Lake of the Ozarks, MO, April 10-13, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.; Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This document contains the abstracts of most of the papers, symposia and poster sessions presented at the 61st Annual Conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). Subject areas addressed include: teacher preparation, science, technology and society; classroom research; elementary science; process skills;…

  13. Indexes of the proceedings for the nine symposia (international) on detonation, 1951--89

    SciTech Connect

    Crane, S.L.; Deal, W.E.; Ramsay, J.B.; Roach, A.M.; Takala, B.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Proceedings of the nine Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal, yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the nine existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

  14. Indexes of the Proceedings for the Ten International Symposia on Detonation 1951-93

    SciTech Connect

    Deal, William E.; Ramsay, John B.; Roach, Alita M.; Takala, Bruce E.

    1998-09-01

    The Proceedings of the ten Detonation Symposia have become the major archival source of information of international research in explosive phenomenology, theory, experimental techniques, numerical modeling, and high-rate reaction chemistry. In many cases, they contain the original reference or the only reference to major progress in the field. For some papers, the information is more complete than the complementary article appearing in a formal journal; yet for others, authors elected to publish only an abstract in the Proceedings. For the large majority of papers, the Symposia Proceedings provide the only published reference to a body of work. This report indexes the ten existing Proceedings of the Detonation Symposia by paper titles, topic phrases, authors, and first appearance of acronyms and code names.

  15. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (25th, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, November 6-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; McCree, Herbert L., Ed.

    This volume contains abstracts of the more than 250 discussion papers, symposia, displays, and training sessions presented at the Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA) 1996 annual meeting. Papers deal with elementary, secondary, and higher education, and cover a broad spectrum of educational issues. Although many papers focus on the…

  16. A Technical Trend Seen in the Latest International EMC Symposia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Osamu

    Based on the survey of the papers and their topics presented at the latest international symposia on electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), a technical trend on EMC technology was described. The major trends include printed circuit board and integrated circuit related EMC problems, numerical modeling, statistical measurement and design, and human exposure, which should be selected as significant topics at the coming EMC international symposia.

  17. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014–2015)

    PubMed Central

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  18. Regular-Fat Dairy and Human Health: A Synopsis of Symposia Presented in Europe and North America (2014-2015).

    PubMed

    Astrup, Arne; Rice Bradley, Beth H; Brenna, J Thomas; Delplanque, Bernadette; Ferry, Monique; Torres-Gonzalez, Moises

    2016-01-01

    In recent history, some dietary recommendations have treated dairy fat as an unnecessary source of calories and saturated fat in the human diet. These assumptions, however, have recently been brought into question by current research on regular fat dairy products and human health. In an effort to disseminate, explore and discuss the state of the science on the relationship between regular fat dairy products and health, symposia were programmed by dairy industry organizations in Europe and North America at The Eurofed Lipids Congress (2014) in France, The Dairy Nutrition Annual Symposium (2014) in Canada, The American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting held in conjunction with Experimental Biology (2015) in the United States, and The Federation of European Nutrition Societies (2015) in Germany. This synopsis of these symposia describes the complexity of dairy fat and the effects regular-fat dairy foods have on human health. The emerging scientific evidence indicates that the consumption of regular fat dairy foods is not associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and inversely associated with weight gain and the risk of obesity. Dairy foods, including regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt, can be important components of an overall healthy dietary pattern. Systematic examination of the effects of dietary patterns that include regular-fat milk, cheese and yogurt on human health is warranted. PMID:27483308

  19. Researching Teacher Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard; Kuchah, Kuchah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue not only for more research "into" English language teacher associations (TAs) but also for research to be carried out "by" and "within" TAs. That is, we advocate their becoming "Researching TAs" themselves. This suggestion derives from our recent collaborative work with/within the…

  20. Fewer invited talks by women in evolutionary biology symposia

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, J; Dugdale, H L; Radersma, R; Hinsch, M; Buehler, D M; Saul, J; Porter, L; Liker, A; De Cauwer, I; Johnson, P J; Santure, A W; Griffin, A S; Bolund, E; Ross, L; Webb, T J; Feulner, P G D; Winney, I; Szulkin, M; Komdeur, J; Versteegh, M A; Hemelrijk, C K; Svensson, E I; Edwards, H; Karlsson, M; West, S A; Barrett, E L B; Richardson, D S; van den Brink, V; Wimpenny, J H; Ellwood, S A; Rees, M; Matson, K D; Charmantier, A; dos Remedios, N; Schneider, N A; Teplitsky, C; Laurance, W F; Butlin, R K; Horrocks, N P C

    2013-01-01

    Lower visibility of female scientists, compared to male scientists, is a potential reason for the under-representation of women among senior academic ranks. Visibility in the scientific community stems partly from presenting research as an invited speaker at organized meetings. We analysed the sex ratio of presenters at the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) Congress 2011, where all abstract submissions were accepted for presentation. Women were under-represented among invited speakers at symposia (15% women) compared to all presenters (46%), regular oral presenters (41%) and plenary speakers (25%). At the ESEB congresses in 2001–2011, 9–23% of invited speakers were women. This under-representation of women is partly attributable to a larger proportion of women, than men, declining invitations: in 2011, 50% of women declined an invitation to speak compared to 26% of men. We expect invited speakers to be scientists from top ranked institutions or authors of recent papers in high-impact journals. Considering all invited speakers (including declined invitations), 23% were women. This was lower than the baseline sex ratios of early-mid career stage scientists, but was similar to senior scientists and authors that have published in high-impact journals. High-quality science by women therefore has low exposure at international meetings, which will constrain Evolutionary Biology from reaching its full potential. We wish to highlight the wider implications of turning down invitations to speak, and encourage conference organizers to implement steps to increase acceptance rates of invited talks. PMID:23786459

  1. Fewer invited talks by women in evolutionary biology symposia.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, J; Dugdale, H L; Radersma, R; Hinsch, M; Buehler, D M; Saul, J; Porter, L; Liker, A; De Cauwer, I; Johnson, P J; Santure, A W; Griffin, A S; Bolund, E; Ross, L; Webb, T J; Feulner, P G D; Winney, I; Szulkin, M; Komdeur, J; Versteegh, M A; Hemelrijk, C K; Svensson, E I; Edwards, H; Karlsson, M; West, S A; Barrett, E L B; Richardson, D S; van den Brink, V; Wimpenny, J H; Ellwood, S A; Rees, M; Matson, K D; Charmantier, A; Dos Remedios, N; Schneider, N A; Teplitsky, C; Laurance, W F; Butlin, R K; Horrocks, N P C

    2013-09-01

    Lower visibility of female scientists, compared to male scientists, is a potential reason for the under-representation of women among senior academic ranks. Visibility in the scientific community stems partly from presenting research as an invited speaker at organized meetings. We analysed the sex ratio of presenters at the European Society for Evolutionary Biology (ESEB) Congress 2011, where all abstract submissions were accepted for presentation. Women were under-represented among invited speakers at symposia (15% women) compared to all presenters (46%), regular oral presenters (41%) and plenary speakers (25%). At the ESEB congresses in 2001-2011, 9-23% of invited speakers were women. This under-representation of women is partly attributable to a larger proportion of women, than men, declining invitations: in 2011, 50% of women declined an invitation to speak compared to 26% of men. We expect invited speakers to be scientists from top ranked institutions or authors of recent papers in high-impact journals. Considering all invited speakers (including declined invitations), 23% were women. This was lower than the baseline sex ratios of early-mid career stage scientists, but was similar to senior scientists and authors that have published in high-impact journals. High-quality science by women therefore has low exposure at international meetings, which will constrain Evolutionary Biology from reaching its full potential. We wish to highlight the wider implications of turning down invitations to speak, and encourage conference organizers to implement steps to increase acceptance rates of invited talks. PMID:23786459

  2. European Neuroendocrine Association--ninth meeting. 3-7 September 1999, Odense, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Almeida, O F

    1999-12-01

    The Ninth Meeting and Workshops of the European Neuroendocrine Association (ENEA) were held in Odense, Denmark. Training workshops covering topics of interest to basic and clinical neuroendocrinologists occupied the first two days of the meeting; on the remaining 3 days, sessions were organized into meet-the professor sessions, plenary lectures, symposia, and free oral and poster communications. The symposia covered most of the principal areas of neuroendocrinology which have important clinical implications (regulation of growth and metabolism, neuroendocrine tumors, hypogonadism, and hormone resistance syndromes), but some symposia covered more basic research in the field (neuroendocrinology of behavior, mutant mouse models, neuronal plasticity and the molecular biology of pituitary tumors). Papers in the free communication sessions generally interphased well with the themes of the symposia. PMID:16113954

  3. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    The 12th International Symposium on Continuum Models and Discrete Systems (CMDS-12) (http://www.saha.ac.in/cmp/cmds.12/) took place at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kolkata from 21-25 February 2011. Previous CMDS symposia were held in Kielce (Poland, 1975), Mont Gabriel (Canada, 1977), Freudenstadt (Federal Republic of Germany, 1979), Stockholm (Sweden, 1981), Nottingham (United Kingdom, 1985), Dijon (France, 1989), Paderborn (Germany, 1992), Varna (Bulgaria, 1995), Istanbul (Turkey, 1998), Shoresh (Israel, 2003) and Paris (France, 2007). The broad interdisciplinary character, limited number of participants (not exceeding 100) and informal and friendly atmosphere of these meetings has made them a well-acknowledged place to make highly fruitful contacts and exchange ideas, methods and results. The purpose of CMDS is to bring together scientists with different backgrounds who work on continuum theories of discrete mechanical and thermodynamical systems in the fields of mathematics, theoretical and applied mechanics, physics, material science, and engineering. The spirit of the CMDS meetings is to stimulate extensive and active interdisciplinary research. The International Scientific Committee members of this conference were: David J Bergman (Chairman CMDS 10), Tel Aviv University, Israel; Bikas K Chakrabarti (Chairman CMDS 12), Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India; Alex Hansen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Hans Jürgen Herrmann, Institute for Building Materials, ETH, Switzerland; Esin Inan (Chairman CMDS 9), Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; Dominique Jeulin (Chairman CMDS 11), Ecole des Mines de Paris, France; Frank Juelicher, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Germany; Hikaru Kawamura, University of Osaka, Japan; Graeme Milton, University of Utah, USA; Natalia Movchan, University of Liverpool, UK; and Ping Sheng, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong. At CMDS-12 the topics

  4. Not "Pulling up the Ladder": Women Who Organize Conference Symposia Provide Greater Opportunities for Women to Speak at Conservation Conferences.

    PubMed

    Sardelis, Stephanie; Drew, Joshua A

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community faces numerous challenges in achieving gender equality among its participants. One method of highlighting the contributions made by female scientists is through their selection as featured speakers in symposia held at the conferences of professional societies. Because they are specially invited, symposia speakers obtain a prestigious platform from which to display their scientific research, which can elevate the recognition of female scientists. We investigated the number of female symposium speakers in two professional societies (the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) from 1999 to 2015, and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) from 2005 to 2015), in relation to the number of female symposium organizers. Overall, we found that 36.4% of symposia organizers and 31.7% of symposia speakers were women at the Society of Conservation Biology conferences, while 19.1% of organizers and 28% of speakers were women at the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists conferences. For each additional female organizer at the SCB and ASIH conferences, there was an average increase of 95% and 70% female speakers, respectively. As such, we found a significant positive relationship between the number of women organizing a symposium and the number of women speaking in that symposium. We did not, however, find a significant increase in the number of women speakers or organizers per symposium over time at either conference, suggesting a need for revitalized efforts to diversify our scientific societies. To further those ends, we suggest facilitating gender equality in professional societies by removing barriers to participation, including assisting with travel, making conferences child-friendly, and developing thorough, mandatory Codes of Conduct for all conferences. PMID:27467580

  5. Characteristic Images Emerging From Recent Spie Medical Imaging Symposia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Robert F.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this short tutorial is to highlight selected papers from recent SPIE conferences with emphasis on the areas of signal detection theory, statistical decision theory and pattern recognition, image evaluation, and image processing. The selection is biased toward the author's special areas of interest and, as is usual in reviews of this kind, a common set of threads are sought. The papers are referenced in terms of the SPIE volume number and paper number (000-00). The first common thread is that the volume numbers tend to be palindromes, namely, 454, 535, 626, and the present 767, and indicate the non-linear growth of the Society between annual Medical Imaging symposia.

  6. PREFACE: Continuum Models and Discrete Systems Symposia (CMDS-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.

    2011-09-01

    The 12th International Symposium on Continuum Models and Discrete Systems (CMDS-12) (http://www.saha.ac.in/cmp/cmds.12/) took place at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics in Kolkata from 21-25 February 2011. Previous CMDS symposia were held in Kielce (Poland, 1975), Mont Gabriel (Canada, 1977), Freudenstadt (Federal Republic of Germany, 1979), Stockholm (Sweden, 1981), Nottingham (United Kingdom, 1985), Dijon (France, 1989), Paderborn (Germany, 1992), Varna (Bulgaria, 1995), Istanbul (Turkey, 1998), Shoresh (Israel, 2003) and Paris (France, 2007). The broad interdisciplinary character, limited number of participants (not exceeding 100) and informal and friendly atmosphere of these meetings has made them a well-acknowledged place to make highly fruitful contacts and exchange ideas, methods and results. The purpose of CMDS is to bring together scientists with different backgrounds who work on continuum theories of discrete mechanical and thermodynamical systems in the fields of mathematics, theoretical and applied mechanics, physics, material science, and engineering. The spirit of the CMDS meetings is to stimulate extensive and active interdisciplinary research. The International Scientific Committee members of this conference were: David J Bergman (Chairman CMDS 10), Tel Aviv University, Israel; Bikas K Chakrabarti (Chairman CMDS 12), Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, India; Alex Hansen, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway; Hans Jürgen Herrmann, Institute for Building Materials, ETH, Switzerland; Esin Inan (Chairman CMDS 9), Istanbul Technical University, Turkey; Dominique Jeulin (Chairman CMDS 11), Ecole des Mines de Paris, France; Frank Juelicher, Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Germany; Hikaru Kawamura, University of Osaka, Japan; Graeme Milton, University of Utah, USA; Natalia Movchan, University of Liverpool, UK; and Ping Sheng, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong. At CMDS-12 the topics

  7. Virtualization of the Y.E.S. Congress 2009 Roundtable Symposia (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Gaines, S. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Y.E.S. Congress 2009 was the first international conference organized by the Y.E.S. Network, an association of early-career geoscientists who represent professional societies, geoscience companies, geoscience departments, and interested policy makers from across the world, in collaboration with the International Year of Planet Earth (IYPE). The conference, hosted by the China University of Geosciences in Beijing, focused on scientific and career challenges faced by early-career geoscientists, with a particular emphasis on how the Y.E.S. Network can work collaboratively and internationally towards solving these challenges and furthering the IYPE motto of “Earth Sciences for Society”. A key features of the Y.E.S. Congress was the implementation of “virtualized” roundtable symposia which engaged senior and early-career geoscientists via presentations, panel discussions, and working group sessions in which strategies related to scientific challenges (i.e. climate change in the polar regions, natural hazards, natural resource sustainability) and academic and career pathway challenges (i.e. academic-industry linkages, gender parity in the geosciences, geoscience education sustainability, and international licensure issues) were developed. These strategies were then tasked to the Y.E.S. Network for further development and implementation. The virtualization of the roundtable symposia facilitated active discussion between those participants and speakers who were physically located at the conference facilities in Beijing with a wider international audience of virtual participants and speakers. This talk will address the key features of the roundtable virtualization, the successes and challenges faced during the pre-conference set-up as well as during the roundtable sessions, and potential future applications.

  8. The first (almost) half century of the TEXAS Symposia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trimble, Virginia

    2011-09-01

    The Texas Symposia on Relativistic Astrophysics had their origins in a couple of astounding scientific discoveries and a demographic accident. A sequence of additional discoveries over the next 15 or so years (pulsars, X-ray binaries, the microwave background, gamma ray bursts....) perpetuated the series, while the inventory of topics thought appropriate for discussion first expanded and then contracted down to a now fairly rigid set, which is easily discerned from the titles of the rest of the papers in these proceedings, while the past inventory has included complex molecules, large telescopes, and at least a few planets. We explore here portions of what happened from 1st Texas in Dallas in December 1963 to the 25th gathering in Heidelberg in 2010, including the parade of ``hot'' topics, some demographic and scientometric developments, and a few probably authentic anecdotes. Changes in the sources of funding, nationalities of speakers and participants, and gender balance reflect (sometimes with considerable time delay) the larger landscape of science over the years.

  9. Linking Early Brain and Biological Development to Psychiatry: Introduction and Symposia Review

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Mark; Ghali, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This paper introduces the special issue of the Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry on the theme of how multiple factors in early brain and biological development can influence a variety of outcomes in mental health and addictions in childhood, adolescence and adulthood. Method: In Part 1, we preview three papers in this issue. In Part 2, we highlight two recent innovative knowledge-transfer symposia featuring the application of the science in early development and addictions. Results: The papers focus on the subtopics of brain plasticity, mood disorders, and comparative research with monkeys on gene-environment interactions and parent-child attachment. In addition, the research presented at the Early Brain and Biological Development Symposium and the Recovery from Addiction Symposium is also reviewed. Held in 2010 in Banff, Alberta, each five-day program was intended to bridge the gap between scientific and clinical experts and those in the province responsible for policy, programs, and services. Conclusions: The science now links common neurobiological maturation processes, adverse early childhood experiences, and key aspects of the social environment with risks for mental health disorders and addictions later in life. The final paper in this issue examines the clinical and policy implications of this research knowledge. PMID:22114607

  10. Australian Association for Research in Education Annual Conference: Youth Schooling & Employment. Part B. (Sydney, November 6-9, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ian D., Comp.

    This second of the two-part proceedings of an Australian conference on youth schooling and unemployment contains 25 research reports and texts from two symposia on alienation from school to work, and youth in transition. Focus of the papers is on educational practices and specific problems in the area of educational research. Topics covered in…

  11. National Association of Test Directors 1989 Symposia, Paper, and Survey. [Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, March 27-31, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziomek, Robert, Ed.; Wolmut, Peter, Ed.

    The papers in this collection reflect topics of major interest to members of the measurement and testing communities. Symposium 1, "Beyond the Wall Chart: Indicators and School Ranking," includes the following papers: (1) "What Our 17-Year-Olds Know: One District's Assessment" (L. D. Wilkinson and D. L. Galindo); (2) "Indicators of Equity and…

  12. NASA/OAI Research Associates program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The intent of this activity was the development of a cooperative program between the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center with the objective of better preparing recent university graduates for careers in government aerospace research laboratories. The selected individuals were given the title of research associate. To accomplish the aims of this effort: (1) the research associates were introduced to the NASA Lewis Research Center and its mission/programs, (2) the research associates directly participated in NASA research and development programs, and (3) the research associates were given continuing educational opportunities in specialized areas. A number of individuals participated in this project during the discourse of this cooperative agreement. Attached are the research summaries of eight of the research associates. These reports give a very good picture of the research activities that were conducted by the associates.

  13. Not “Pulling up the Ladder”: Women Who Organize Conference Symposia Provide Greater Opportunities for Women to Speak at Conservation Conferences

    PubMed Central

    Sardelis, Stephanie; Drew, Joshua A.

    2016-01-01

    The scientific community faces numerous challenges in achieving gender equality among its participants. One method of highlighting the contributions made by female scientists is through their selection as featured speakers in symposia held at the conferences of professional societies. Because they are specially invited, symposia speakers obtain a prestigious platform from which to display their scientific research, which can elevate the recognition of female scientists. We investigated the number of female symposium speakers in two professional societies (the Society of Conservation Biology (SCB) from 1999 to 2015, and the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists (ASIH) from 2005 to 2015), in relation to the number of female symposium organizers. Overall, we found that 36.4% of symposia organizers and 31.7% of symposia speakers were women at the Society of Conservation Biology conferences, while 19.1% of organizers and 28% of speakers were women at the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists conferences. For each additional female organizer at the SCB and ASIH conferences, there was an average increase of 95% and 70% female speakers, respectively. As such, we found a significant positive relationship between the number of women organizing a symposium and the number of women speaking in that symposium. We did not, however, find a significant increase in the number of women speakers or organizers per symposium over time at either conference, suggesting a need for revitalized efforts to diversify our scientific societies. To further those ends, we suggest facilitating gender equality in professional societies by removing barriers to participation, including assisting with travel, making conferences child-friendly, and developing thorough, mandatory Codes of Conduct for all conferences. PMID:27467580

  14. Black Child in Crisis. Final Report of the Public Forums and Symposia May-October, 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, William E., Ed.

    The negative effects of poverty, alienation, and racism influence the lives of black children most heavily. This report covering Michigan presents information and recommendations concerning the continuing decline in the quality of life for black children. It is the culmination of a series of activities including forums, symposia, and conferences…

  15. Training needs of clinical research associates.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Samyuktha; Bhatt, Arun

    2010-10-01

    Clinical research is a relatively new field in our country that has seen very rapid growth in the last few years. Availability of personnel appropriately trained to the specific requirements of the role they will perform in clinical research is critical for capacity expansion. Our study attempts to understand the specific areas of knowledge and skills that are important for the role of a clinical research associate. The survey was conducted among clinical research professionals from industry and academia who had more than five years of clinical research experience and held important decision making positions in clinical research (stakeholders). The survey questionnaire was designed as a matrix of various clinical research roles on the y-axis and six knowledge modules and eight skills on the x-axis. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of the knowledge /skills to the role of clinical research associates on a three point scale. In discussing results, a significant response was considered to be 50% or greater positive response from the total group. The significant findings were that general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules were rated as critical for the role of clinical research associate. Regulatory module was rated as important for the role. The other significant responses were that three of the sub-topics in the methodology module - framing a research proposal/protocol and experimental design, designing case report forms and EDCs and conducting PK studies - were rated as important and one sub topic in the data management and statistics module was rated as not important. All the skills except leadership skills were rated as critical for the role. The findings of our survey were in general on the lines of expectations of performance of the role. The general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules are critical knowledge areas for the role of a clinical research associate. No clear trends emerged for some of the other modules. Leadership

  16. Essays on the History of Rocketry and Astronautics: Proceedings of the Third through the Sixth History Symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, R. C. (Editor)

    1977-01-01

    This two volume publication presents the proceedings of the third through sixth history symposia of the International Academy of Astronautics. Thirty-nine papers are divided into four categories: (1) Early Solid Propellant Rocketry; (2) Rocketry and Astronautics: Concepts, Theory, and Analyses after 1880; (3) The Development of Liquid and Solid Propellant Rockets from 1880 to 1945; and (4) Rocketry and Astronautics after 1945. Categories 1 and 2 will be found in volume 1 and the remainder in volume 2. Among other diciplines, Rocketry and Astronautics encompasses the physical and engineering sciences including fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, vibration theory, structural mechanics, and celestial mechanics. Papers presented in these two volumes range from those of empirical experimenters who used the time-honored cut and try methods to scientists wielding theoretical principles. The work traces the coupling of the physical and engineering sciences, industrial advances, and state support that produced the awesome progress in rocketry and astronautics for the most part within living memory. The proceedings of the four symposia present in these two volumes contain information on the work of leading investigators and their associates carried out in the first two-thirds of the twentieth century.

  17. Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) is a consortium of educational and other non-profit institutions that operates world-class astronomical observatories. Its members are 29 US institutions and five international affiliates. For the National Science Foundation, the AURA manage the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) and THE GEMINI OBSERVATORY. Fo...

  18. Singapore Meeting of Education Research Associations Sets the Stage for Establishing a World Education Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a meeting of education research associations from around the world which achieved a major goal toward establishing a World Education Research Association (WERA) in Singapore on November 24-25, 2008. At the meeting, representatives reaffirmed a commitment to establish WERA and finalized several key documents for its…

  19. Space life sciences: biological research and space radiation. Proceedings of the F1.2, F1.3, F2.2 and F2.6 Symposia of COSPAR Scientific Commission F which were held during the Thirty-third COSPAR Scientific Assembly, Warsaw, Poland, July, 2000.

    PubMed

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research contains a large number of manuscripts in the discipline of Space Life Sciences including papers from the following sessions of the Warsaw COSPAR Assembly: Gravity-related research with animals--past, present, future; The nervous system: space flight environmental factors effects--present results and new perspectives; Investigating space radiation effects at particle accelerators--biology and physics experiments; Perspectives on radiation risks on long space missions: deterministic and stochastic effects. PMID:12528665

  20. Common challenges for ecological modelling: synthesis of facilitated discussions held at the symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada, (October 6-9, 2009)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larocque, Guy R.; Mailly, D.; Yue, T.-X.; Anand, M.; Peng, C.; Kazanci, C.; Etterson, M.; Goethals, P.; Jorgensen, S.E.; Schramski, J.R.; McIntire, E.J.B.; Marceau, D.J.; Chen, B.; Chen, G.Q.; Yang, Z.F.; Novotna, B.; Luckai, N.; Bhatti, Jagtar S.; Liu, J.; Munson, A.; Gordon, Andrew M.; Ascough, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The eleven symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) held in Quebec City, Canada, October 6–9, 2009, included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the subjects could be classified into three broad categories: theoretical development, population dynamics and ecosystem processes. Following discussions with the symposia organizers, which indicated that they all shared similar issues and concerns, the facilitated discussions were task-oriented around four basic questions: (1) key challenges in the research area, (2) generating and sharing new ideas, (3) improving collaboration and networking, and (4) increasing visibility to decision-makers, partners and clients. Common challenges that emerged from the symposia included the need for improved communication and collaboration among different academic disciplines, further progress in both theoretical and practical modelling approaches, and accentuation of technology transfer. Regarding the generation and sharing of new ideas, the main issue that emerged was the type of positive interactions that should be encouraged among potential collaborators. The usefulness of the Internet, particularly for the sharing of open-source software and conducting discussion forums, was highlighted for improving collaboration and networking. Several communication tools are available today, and it is important for modellers to use them more intensively. Visibility can be increased by publishing professional newsletters, maintaining informal contacts with the public, organizing educational sessions in primary and secondary schools, and developing simplified analytical frameworks and pilot studies. Specific issues raised in each symposium are also discussed.

  1. Life sciences and space research XXIV(1) - Gravitational biology; Proceedings of Symposia 10 and 13 of the Topical Meeting of the Interdisciplinary Scientific Commission F (Meetings F1 and F2) of the COSPAR 28th Plenary Meeting, The Hague, Netherlands, June 25-July 6, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. S. (Editor); Cogoli, A. (Editor); Planel, H. (Editor); Ubbels, G. A. (Editor); Sievers, A. (Editor); Oser, H. (Editor); Horneck, G. (Editor); Wagner, H. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    Topics presented include an introduction to theories and models of biological response to gravity, gravity effects on biological systems, the function of calcium in plant graviperception, developmental biology on unmanned spacecraft, and the effect of microgravity on the development of plant protoplasts flown on Biocosmos 9. Also presented are the mechanism by which an asymmetric distribution of plant growth hormone is attained, the perception of gravity by plants, an animal research facility for Space Station Freedom, the long-term effects of microgravity and possible countermeasures, and an experimental system for determining the influence of microgravity on B lymphocyte activation and cell fusion.

  2. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS — 75 years(Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation, 6 April 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesyats, Gennadii A.; Bolotovskii, Boris M.; Kopaev, Yurii V.; Kardashev, Nikolai S.; Zatsepin, Georgii T.; Roganova, Tat'yana M.; Masalov, Anatolii V.; Gubin, Mikhail A.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Dagkesamanskii, Rustam D.

    2009-11-01

    A Joint session of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute Research Council of the Academy of Sciences and the Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the United Physical Society of the Russian Federation was convened on 6 April 2009 to mark the 75th anniversary of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute of the Academy of Sciences (FIAN). The following papers were read to the session: (1) Mesyats G A (P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "75 years of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS which traces back its origin to the Physics Room of Peter the Great's Kunstkamera created 225 years ago"; (2) Bolotovskii B M (Division of Theoretical Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation"; (3) Kopaev Yu V (Division of Solid State Physics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Toroidal states in crystals"; (4) Kardashev N S (Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Science program of the Radioastron mission"; (5) Zatsepin G T (Nuclear Research Institute RAS), Roganova T M (M V Lomonosov Moscow State University, D V Skobeltsyn Nuclear Physics Research Institute) "Cosmic ray studies"; (6) Masalov A V (Optics Division, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Spectroscopy: from atoms to cosmic objects"; (7) Gubin M A, Velichansky V L (Division of Quantum Radiophysics, P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Small-size optical frequency standards"; (8) Dagkesamanskii R D (Radioastronomical Observatory in Pushchino of the Astro-Cosmic Center of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS) "Prospects for radioastronomical research in Pushchino". Articles written on the basis of these talks are printed in this special issue of Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Usp. Fiz. Nauk 179 (11) 1145 - 1256 (2009) [English version: Phys. Usp. 52 (11) (2009] journal. • P N Lebedev Physical Institute RAS: past, present, and future, G A Mesyats Physics-Uspekhi, 2009, Volume 52, Number 11, Pages 1084-1097 • Vavilov

  3. A dedication: Hugh A. Daubeny (1931-2015): A wonderful small fruit legacy including a critical driver of the Rubus-Ribes Symposia.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dr. Hugh Daubeny had a productive career as a strawberry and red raspberry breeder with Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. As part of that career, he could be considered the “patron saint” of the Rubus-Ribes symposia as he was instrumental in the early development, hosted two symposia, attended all o...

  4. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Research Associate Program. 256.2... INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities,...

  5. Teacher Corps Alumni Network. Symposia Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, November 1988) and (St. Louis, Missouri, February 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teacher Corps Alumni Network.

    Selected papers are presented from two symposia addressing the need for recruitment and retention of minority persons into education. The first, by Bess C. Howard, offers an historical perspective on black educators and discusses the need for recruiting Black teachers. In the second paper, Judy Minier discusses the role played by the Teacher Corps…

  6. [Sponsoring of medical conferences, workshops and symposia by pharmaceutical companies. Physicians must be wary of this!].

    PubMed

    Warntjen, M

    2009-12-01

    The longstanding conventional forms of cooperation between medical organizations and physicians on the one hand and the pharmaceutical industry and manufacturers of medical products on the other hand nowadays hold the risk of coming into conflict with the public prosecutor. Typical circumstances which are taken up by the investigating authorities are financial supports of medical conferences, workshops and symposia. To understand the problem under criminal law it is important to become acquainted with the protective aim of the statutory offences of the acceptance of benefits according to section sign 331 of the Penal Code (Strafgesetzbuch, StGB) and of corruption according to section sign 332 of the Penal Code. The "trust of the general public in the objectivity of governmental decisions" must be protected and the "evil appearance of the corruptibility of official acts" must be counteracted. A basic differentiation is made between physicians with and without office-bearing functions. By paying attention to the recommendations and basic principles of cooperation between the medical profession and the healthcare industry presented in this article (transparency principle, equivalence principle, documentation principle and separation principle) the emergence of any suspicious factors can be effectively avoided. PMID:20012247

  7. Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology: Volume 51, Molecular biology of Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen years marked the time between the discovery of the double helix in 1953 and the elucidation of the genetic code in 1966. A similar interval has now passed since the development by Cohen and Boyer of a simple procedure for the cloning of selective DNA fragments. The scientific advances made possible by the subsequent modification and elaboration of these original cloning procedures now amaze, stimulate, and increasingly often overwhelm us. Facts that until recently were virtually unobtainable now flow forth almost effortlessly. Most excitingly, the frenetic pace of these new discoveries, instead of marking the impending end of a glorious moment of learning, give every indication of opening up scientific frontiers that will take hundreds if not thousands of years to explore thoroughly. This new era of enlightenment is nowhere more apparent than in our newfound ability to study ourselves at the molecular level. This volume is the first of two collections of papers submitted by the contributors to the Cold Spring Harbor symposia on quantitative biology for 1986 - molecular biology of Homo sapiens. Contained in this collection are 80 papers grouped into sessions entitled Human Gene Map, Genetic Diagnosis, Human Evolution, and Drugs Made Off Human Genes.

  8. Factors Associated with Research Wrongdoing in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Omokhoa A.; Adebamowo, Clement A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about research wrongdoing in biomedical research are growing in developing countries, where research ethics training and research regulatory systems are just emerging. In a first-time study in Africa, medical/dental researchers (N = 132) in two states in Nigeria were interviewed on a wide range of research wrongdoings and potential predictors. Using multivariate logistic regression, significant predictors of research wrongdoing were identified. Some 22.0% admitted to at least one of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism, the predictors of which were knowledge gaps in research ethics and pressure to publish enough papers for promotion. Acknowledging inadequate knowledge of research ethics was a predictor of admitting a wrongdoing. Systems that support ethical research, including skilled training and funding, are recommended. PMID:23324199

  9. Implicit Measures of Association in Psychopathology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T. Y.; MacLeod, Colin M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Validity;Measures (Individuals);Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental…

  10. The Associability of CVC Pairs. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, William E.; Kiess, Harold O.

    To obtain an a priori estimate of natural language mediators (NLM's) 320 pairs of words with the consonant-vowel-consonant-pattern (CVC's) were broken into four series of 90 pairs and presented to 240 male and female undergraduates. Pairs were shown for 15 seconds while the subjects wrote down any associative device or NLM they could generate that…

  11. Factors Associated with Clinical Dental Faculty Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, James E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of U.S. and Canadian full-time dental school faculty found that research productivity was associated with the total dollar amount of past research funding, career age, training status, colleague utilization in conducting research, and conducting research from planned goals. (Author/MSE)

  12. Organising Continuity and Quality of the European Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochems, Wim; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Research associations tend to be voluntary by nature and therefore unstable in character, and thus are subject to threat for their continuity. History has shown that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) is not an exception to this rule. Because EERA Council and the board members are volunteers with limited time, experience and…

  13. Student Science Research Associates (SSRA) 1996 Research Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.

    1996-12-01

    The following student projects are reported: SSRA water research projects, various effects on polliwogs` growth and development, effects of Willow Park Golf Course on nitrate and phosphate levels in San Leandro Creek, water quality evaluation using color infrared photography, biochemical analysis of aquatic insects, effects of miracid/calcium chloride/liquid plant food on stringless bush beans, effects of vegetable oil on bean growth, effect of river water on lima beans, effect of storm water runoff on pH and phosphate levels of Dry Creek, acid rain in Modesto, use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to study Egeria Densa, and effect of marination on formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked chicken meat.

  14. Program and abstracts of the 28th conference on Great Lakes research

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Abstracts of papers presented at the 28th Conference on Great Lakes Research and the annual meeting of the International Association for Great Lakes Research covered two symposia. The first was a comparison of Great Lakes and Baltic ecosystems, which provided an opportunity for international exchanges of information and insights. The second featured pollution problems in the Green Bay estuary environment that is of particular value to Wisconsin and Michigan. There are 41 separate abstracts selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB). Four of those were also selected for Energy Research Abstracts (ERA), six for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA), and two for INS.

  15. Research of Geochemical Associations of Nephelin Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulf, M.; Simonov, K.; Sazonov, A.

    The instant paper concerns research of distribution petrogenic chemical members in urtit ore body of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit. Rocks of the deposit are ore for producing alum earth. Actuality of the subject based on outlooks of detection noble metal ore-bearing (Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru) in alkaline rocks of Siberia, including rocks of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau). The main purpose of analysis of distribution of members is directed to detection of a non-uniformity of distribution of substance and segments enriched with alum earth and noble members. The basic solved problems are following: o Creation regression models of ore body; o Definition of cumulative distribution functions of members in a contour of ore body; o The analysis of the obtained outcomes in geologic terms. For construction regression models the full-scale data was used, which was presented by the results of the spectral and silicate analyses of gold and petrogenic members containing 130 assays arranged in ore body. A non-linear multiparameter model of the ore body based on components of nephelin ore using neural net approach was constructed. For each member the corresponding distribution function is produced. The model is constructed on the following members: Au, Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, R2O ((Na2O+K2O) -1) and losses of burning. The error of model forecasting membersS concentrations was from 0.02 up to 20%. Large errors basically connected with assays located near contact of ore body and ad- jacent strata or with very high concentrations of members; also they can be connected with different genesis of rocks or superposition of other processes. The analysis of concentrations of members and normalised absolute errors of the fore- cast has shown, that all members can be sectioned into two groups: first: Al2O3, SiO2, R2O, Fe2O3 and second: Au, losses of burning, CaO, MgO, SO3. The distribution of 1 gold is tightly connected with calcium and losses of burning and spatially linked with zones

  16. Overview of magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashour-Abdalla, Maha

    1994-01-01

    During the funding period for NASA Grant NAG5-1480 which prior to December, 1, 1990 was known as NASA Grant NAGW-78, the group has made substantial progress on the various topics originally proposed. The research performed has resulted in two Ph.D. Theses, more than 50 refereed papers in various journals and conference proceedings, and 31 invited and 104 contributed talks at conferences and symposia throughout the world. The main results from this work are summarized in each of the sections outlined in the original proposal, followed by a complete list of the group publications associated with this grant, a list of all invited talks given during the last three years, and finally a listing of the contributed talks. Research topics include global magnetohydrodynamic simulations, structure of the dayside magnetopause, merging at the dayside magnetopause, polar wind, plasma waves in the distant magnetotail, slow shocks in the distant magnetotail, collisionless tearing instabilities in the magnetotail, and other problems.

  17. National Rural Education Association Research Agenda Report. October 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, Keigh

    To obtain rural school superintendents' assessment of research needs, questionnaires were sent in 1986 to 752 superintendents from schools with less than 1,000 K-12 student population. The questionnaires, adapted from the research agenda of the Rural Education Association (REA), consisted of 51 research topics grouped under 9 thematic categories.…

  18. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  19. Research on the History of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomison, Dennis

    A researcher on the history of the American Library Association (ALA) describes problems encountered on his project, important trends in ALA, weaknesses and benefits of ALA, and needs in the area of historical research. Some of the problems cited are the inadequacy of organization and housing of the ALA archives, the unevenness of the archival…

  20. The Creation of the European Social Work Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian J.; Sharland, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    As the social work profession matures, the need for robust knowledge becomes more pressing. Greater coordination is required to develop the research community and an infrastructure to support this nationally and internationally. This article discusses the foundation, in 2014, of the European Social Work Research Association and its roots in the…

  1. Organizational Characteristics of Dental Schools Associated with Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Marilyn S.

    1987-01-01

    A study found the ideal combination of characteristics associated with dental research productivity was $420,000 or more in funding from the National Institute of Dental Research, a student/faculty ratio of 4.75 or less, a library with at least 10,000 dental-related books, and medical school faculty teaching basic science. (MSE)

  2. Stabilizing Indigenous Languages. Perspectives: Center for Excellence in Education Monograph Series. [Proceedings of Two Symposia (Flagstaff, Arizona, November 1994 and May 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantoni, Gina, Ed.

    In November 1994 and May 1995, two symposia on stabilizing indigenous languages were attended by U.S. and Canadian tribal educators and experts on linguistics, language renewal, and language teaching. Participants sought to lay out a blueprint of policy changes, educational reforms, and community initiatives to stabilize and revitalize American…

  3. The Characteristics, Roles and Functions of Institutional Research Professionals in the Southern Association for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Charles; Chen, HongYu

    A study was done on the variation in characteristics, roles, and functions of institutional research professionals affiliated with the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR). The study examined professional role identity, location of offices in the organizational hierarchy, breadth of institutional research activities undertaken,…

  4. [Research advances in association between pediatric obesity and bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lian; Xu, Zhi-Liang; Cheng, Yan-Yang

    2016-07-01

    This review article introduces the research advances in the pathophysiological mechanism of obesity in inducing pediatric bronchial asthma, including the role of leptin in obesity and asthma, the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with obesity and asthma, the association of adiponectin and interleukins with obesity and asthma, and the influence of neurotransmitter on asthma. In particular, this article introduces the latest research on the inhibition of allergic asthma through targeting at the nociceptor of dorsal root ganglion and blocking the signaling pathway of the nociceptor. PMID:27412555

  5. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey Eddy, F.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program (MURA) encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In this program, undergraduate students work with principal investigators at their universities to perform research projects on solar technology. Then, students are awarded summer internships in industry or at national laboratories, such as NREL, during the summer. Because of its success, the program has been expanded to include additional minority-serving colleges and universities and all solar energy technologies.

  6. Society for melanoma research and american heart association scientific sessions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Among the featured topics: oncolytic immunotherapy, BRAF/MEK inhibition, and a programmed death-1 inhibitor at the Society for Melanoma Research; and anticoagulation therapy, an alternative to statins, and endocarditis in the absence of dental antibiotic prophylaxis at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. PMID:25628510

  7. Visibility of Diversity within Association of Research Libraries Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestre, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    Libraries in the United States have worked towards developing more inclusive environments and programs. This inclusiveness should also extend to the online library presence. This article provides results of a web page scan of all Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in the United States to document the visibility of diversity on their pages. A…

  8. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research

    PubMed Central

    Burke, T; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Design: Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Participants and setting: Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6–15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Results: Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. Conclusions: By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation. PMID:16319237

  9. Experiencing the Full Research Process at Sea Education Association (SEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.; Joyce, P.; Jaroslow, G.; Graziano, L.; Lea, C.; Witting, J.; Bower, A.

    2003-12-01

    While some undergraduate research experiences include only a small piece of the research process, students attending Sea Education Association's SEA Semester complete all aspects of oceanographic research in an intensive 12 week program that earns a full semester's credit. In the first half of the program, students read and discuss background literature on a subject, ask questions, pose hypotheses, and develop a written research proposal, which they defend orally. The second half of the course takes place at sea on one of SEA's state-of-the-art oceanographic research vessels where students carry out their sampling plans, analyze samples and data, write a final paper and present their results before the vessel reaches port, completing the course. At sea, students participate in sample collection and analysis for all student projects in addition to learning the general oceanography along their cruise track. This structure exposes students to the realities of research from start to finish and allows them to take full ownership of their projects. In addition to honing writing, public speaking, and problem-solving skills, students learn that research requires dedication, flexibility, and creativity, particularly when their results are unexpected or negate their hypothesis. SEA's undergraduate research program has been developing since 1971. Over that time, SEA has collected an extensive historical oceanographic database in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, plus Pacific data since 2001. This database is available to both students and outside research scientists. Collaborations with scientists outside SEA enhance the student experience and help facilitate oceanographic research by providing "ship-of-opportunity" sampling in remote locations. SEA Semester provides an excellent model for undergraduate research experiences with over 5000 alumni, about 30% of whom enter graduate school. About half the students in SEA's undergraduate programs are non-science majors. Although

  10. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  11. Research Note--Online Dissemination of Research: Are Professional Associations Making the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borah, Elisa Vinson; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and practical means of disseminating research to social workers are needed. The authors examined how 10 social work and 10 other helping profession association websites used their sites to disseminate research to their members. A rubric was used to rate the websites in 4 domains: (1) promotion, (2) accessibility, (3) dissemination, and…

  12. Occupational Safety and Health Symposia (37th American Medical Association Congress on Occupational Health. St. Louis, Missouri, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Bruce E.; And Others

    The papers compiled here were presented at the fourth symposium in a series designed to provide a continuing introduction to current aspects of occupational safety and health. The papers represent eight topics: (1) special health programs, (2) degenerative disease and injury of the back, (3) job stress and work performance, (4) role of industry in…

  13. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  14. Common Challenges for Ecological Modelling: Synthesis of Facilitated Discussions Held at the Symposia Organized for the Conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada (October 6-9, 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposia organized for the conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the subjects could be classified into three b...

  15. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  16. Benefits associated with nutrigenomics research and their reporting in the scientific literature: researchers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stenne, R; Hurlimann, T; Godard, B

    2013-01-01

    Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics (NGx) are fields of research that have raised significant expectations about their potential benefits. This article presents empirical data from an online survey seeking the opinions of NGx researchers (n=126) regarding the achievability of the potential benefits of NGx, the time envisioned for their realization, the motives that may lead to their explicit mention in scientific peer-reviewed articles and the audience(s) targeted by NGx researchers when reporting their results in such articles. Results show that caution should be taken to avoid the risks associated with biohype and the premature dissemination of the potential benefits of NGx among various audiences. PMID:23672589

  17. Association for medical education and research in substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jeffrey H; Galanter, Marc; Bridden, Carly; Lewis, David C

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) is a multi-disciplinary organization committed to health professional faculty development in substance abuse. In 1976, members of the Career Teachers Training Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse, a US federally funded multi-disciplinary faculty development program, formed AMERSA. The organization grew from 59 founding members, who were primarily medical school faculty, to over 300 health professionals from a spectrum of disciplines including physicians, nurses, social workers, dentists, allied health professionals, psychologists and other clinical educators who are responsible for advancing substance abuse education. AMERSA members promote substance abuse education among health professionals by developing curricula, promulgating relevant policy and training health professional faculty to become excellent teachers in this field. AMERSA influences public policy by offering standards for improving substance abuse education. The organization publishes a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal, Substance Abuse, which emphasizes research on the education and training of health professions and also includes original clinical and prevention research. Each year, the AMERSA National Conference brings together researchers and health professional educators to learn about scientific advances and exemplary teaching approaches. In the future, AMERSA will continue to pursue this mission of advancing and supporting health professional faculty who educate students and trainees to address substance abuse in patients and clients. PMID:16393188

  18. Recent advances in sterol research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1970, the AOCS has been a regular host to the sterol symposia. The 2008 Sterol Symposium, “Recent Advances in Sterol Research,” was held at the AOCS Annual Meeting in Seattle, Washington. This year the symposium held special significance, for it hosted the presentation of the fourth G.J. Schro...

  19. The International Permafrost Association: current initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Lantuit, Hugues; Schrott, Lothar; Sergeev, Dimitry; Wei, Ma

    2015-04-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details the IPA core products, achievements and activities as well as current projects in cryospheric research. One of the most important core products is the circumpolar permafrost map. The IPA also fosters and supports the activities of the Global Terrestrial Network on Permafrost (GTN-P) sponsored by the Global Terrestrial Observing System, GTOS, and the Global Climate Observing System, GCOS, whose long-term goal is to obtain a comprehensive view of the spatial structure, trends, and variability of changes in the active layer thickness and permafrost temperature. A further important initiative of the IPA are the biannually competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Current IPA Action Groups are working on highly topical and interdisciplinary issues, such as the development of a regional Palaeo-map of Permafrost in Eurasia, the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge about the use of thermokarst and permafrost

  20. IAHS Workshops and Symposia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. Ivan

    The Workshop on Remote Data Transmission was sponsored on August 20, 1987, by the International Committee on Remote Sensing and Data Transmission (ICRSDT). Coconvenors of the workshop were Ivan Johnson (A. Ivan Johnson, Inc., Arvada, Colo.), president of ICRSDT, and Richard Paulson (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Reston, Va.), chairman, ICRSDT Division on Remote Data Transmission.The purpose of the workshop was to present information on remote data transmission techniques — the transmission of hydrologic and climatological data by satellite or reflection from meteor trails — and to relate experiences with such techniques to the needs of potential users, especially those in developing countries. An attempt was made, through a series of papers and an open discussion period evaluating the pros and cons of the various systems, to relate the state of the technology to the needs of the users. The workshop attendees represented 18 countries.

  1. Association of a Biweekly Research Workgroup With Enhanced Resident Research Productivity.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Melissa; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu; McLean, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Almost all residency programs require a resident research project, yet teaching and mentoring of the required skills are often lacking. We established an every-other-week gynecologic oncology research workgroup at our institution for obstetrics and gynecology faculty, fellows, and residents with the goal of increasing resident research education, involvement, and productivity. An informal, discussion-style format was adopted as a forum for brainstorming research ideas, formulating study protocols, and collaborating on institutional review board submissions. Additional aims included editorial feedback on abstracts and manuscripts as well as oral presentation preparation. The academic productivity of trainees mentored by the gynecologic oncology division was queried for 27 months before and 27 months after workgroup initiation, specifically assessing resident involvement in institutional review board submission, abstract presentation, and manuscript preparation. Institution of our workgroup was associated with a dramatic increase in resident research output, including manuscript preparation and presentations at national meetings. We describe our experience because it may benefit other residency programs wishing to improve both resident research education and productivity. PMID:27500350

  2. 67 th annual meeting of the American Diabetes Association.

    PubMed

    Colca, Jerry R

    2007-10-01

    The 67 th meeting of the American Diabetes Association was held in Chicago on 22 - 26 June. This annual meeting continues to grow in size and scope and is a unique combination of basic science and medical science but also incorporates all aspects of healthcare and pharmaceutical business relating to the treatment of diabetes. The meeting was composed of general sessions, symposia summarizing the status of various fields of study and medical practice, together with both oral and poster presentations of new, previously unpublished research. The abstracts are published in Diabetes and a collection of the information can be found online with very useful summaries from the final day. These contain personalized summaries of key findings of the meetings as seen by key researches in the field. In this Meeting Highlights article, the key take-away messages are summarized from the author's point of view. PMID:17922635

  3. Travel Grants to IUGGA-Associated Meetings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shea, M. A.

    The procedures and policies for AGU travel grants to attend IUGG-associated symposia is presented, including information on the nomination of the reviewing committee, the selection criteria, and examples of a few of the headaches and problems encountered in the selection process. A suggested “application etiquette” is also given.

  4. Landfalling Tropical Cyclones: Forecast Problems and Associated Research Opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, F.D.; Shay, L.K.; Barnes, G.; Black, P.; Demaria, M.; McCaul, B.; Mounari, J.; Montgomery, M.; Powell, M.; Smith, J.D.; Tuleya, B.; Tripoli, G.; Xie, Lingtian; Zehr, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Fifth Prospectus Development Team of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged to identify and delineate emerging research opportunities relevant to the prediction of local weather, flooding, and coastal ocean currents associated with landfalling U.S. hurricanes specifically, and tropical cyclones in general. Central to this theme are basic and applied research topics, including rapid intensity change, initialization of and parameterization in dynamical models, coupling of atmospheric and oceanic models, quantitative use of satellite information, and mobile observing strategies to acquire observations to evaluate and validate predictive models. To improve the necessary understanding of physical processes and provide the initial conditions for realistic predictions, a focused, comprehensive mobile observing system in a translating storm-coordinate system is required. Given the development of proven instrumentation and improvement of existing systems, three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic datasets need to be acquired whenever major hurricanes threaten the United States. The spatial context of these focused three-dimensional datasets over the storm scales is provided by satellites, aircraft, expendable probes released from aircraft, and coastal (both fixed and mobile), moored, and drifting surface platforms. To take full advantage of these new observations, techniques need to be developed to objectively analyze these observations, and initialize models aimed at improving prediction of hurricane track and intensity from global-scale to mesoscale dynamical models. Multinested models allow prediction of all scales from the global, which determine long- term hurricane motion to the convective scale, which affect intensity. Development of an integrated analysis and model forecast system optimizing the use of three-dimensional observations and providing the necessary forecast skill on all relevant spatial scales is required. Detailed diagnostic analyses of these

  5. Progress on Establishing a World Education Research Association Continues at Third International Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of 28 education research associations from around the world convened in New York on March 29-30, 2008 at a third meeting to advance the goal of establishing a world education research association (informally called "WERA"). The agenda centered on the nature and form of a world education research association, with discussions…

  6. Implicit measure for yoga research: Yoga implicit association test

    PubMed Central

    Ilavarasu, Judu V; Rajesh, Sasidharan K; Hankey, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Context: The implicit association test (IAT), a new tool for yoga research is presented. Implicit measures could be used in those situations where (1) The construct is difficult to self-report, (2) there is a threat of social desirability. Clinically, we can assess cognitive dissonance by evaluating incongruence between implicit and explicit measures. Explicit preferences are self-reported. Implicit preferences are what we inherently believe, often without our conscious awareness. Aims: The primary objective of this study is to provide a bird's eye view of the field, implicit cognition, with emphasis on the IAT and the secondary objective is to illustrate through an example of our study to develop an implicit tool to assess implicit preference toward yoga. Settings and Design: A total of 5 independent samples of total 69 students undergoing short and long-term yoga courses in a Yoga University were assessed for their implicit and explicit preferences towards yoga. Materials and Methods: The yoga-IAT (Y-IAT), explicit self-rating scale was administered through computers using the Inquisit program by Millisecond Software. Experimental and scoring materials are provided. Results: A moderate preference toward yoga was detected, with a lower implicit-explicit congruence, reflecting possible confound of social desirability in the self-report of preference toward yoga. Conclusions: Implicit measures may be used in the yoga field to assess constructs, which are difficult to self-report or may have social desirability threat. Y-IAT may be used to evaluate implicit preference toward yoga. PMID:25035621

  7. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  8. The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education's Associates Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chance, William

    2009-01-01

    The author conducted annual evaluations of the Associates Program from its inception. He attended one or more of the national symposia for Associates each year, interviewed each of the Associates and submitted reports to the National Center. As the number of participants in the Associates Program approached 100 and in 2008 the National Center…

  9. Factors Associated with Research Productivity of Agricultural Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; Bartlett, James E., II; Higgins, Chadwick C.; Williams, Heather A.

    2002-01-01

    Factors influencing the research productivity of full-time agriculture professors (n=114) included the following: number of doctoral students advised to completion, self-perceptions of research confidence, and number of graduate assistant hours allocated. Not influential were percent of time on research, salary, age, gender, rank, or years in…

  10. Chemistry without Borders: Careers, Research, and Entrepreneurship

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book is based on two symposia of the American Chemical Society (ACS): 1) “The Transnational Practice of Chemistry and Allied Sciences and Engineering: Study, Research and Careers without Borders” held at the Spring National Meeting in Denver in March 2015, and 2) “International Entrepreneurship...

  11. Sea Education Association's sailing research vessels as innovative platforms for long-term research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, P.; Carruthers, E. A.; Engels, M.; Goodwin, D.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Lea, C.; Schell, J.; Siuda, A.; Witting, J.; Zettler, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sea Education Association's (SEA) two research vessels, the SSV Corwith Cramer and the SSV Robert C. Seamans are unique in the research world. Not only do these ships perform advanced research using state of the art equipment, they do so under sail with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students serving as both the science team and the crew. Because of SEA's educational mission and reliance on prevailing winds for sailing, the vessels have been studying repeated tracks for decades, providing valuable long-term data sets while educating future marine scientists. The Corwith Cramer has been collecting data in the North Atlantic between New England, the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda, and the Caribbean since 1987 while the Robert C. Seamans has been operating in the Eastern Pacific between the US West Coast, Hawaii, and French Polynesia since 2001. The ships collect continuous electronic data from hull mounted ADCP, chirp, and a clean flowing seawater system logging temperature, salinity, in-vivo chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, and beam attenuation. The ships also periodically collect data from profiling CTDs with chlorophyll and CDOM fluorometers, transmissometers, and dissolved oxygen and PAR sensors. In addition to electronic data, archived long term data sets include physical samples from net tows such as marine plastic debris and tar, and plankton including Halobates (a marine insect), leptocephali (eel larvae), and phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae). Both vessels are 134' brigantine rig tall ships and are designated sailing school vessels (SSV) by the US Coast Guard, and both have received instrumentation grants from NSF to provide high quality, reliable data that is submitted to the NSF R2R archives. Students sailing on these ships spend time on shore at the SEA campus in Woods Hole, MA taking classes in oceanography, nautical science, maritime studies and public policy. Each student is required to write a proposal for their research before heading to sea, and

  12. The CRC Contribution to Research Training: Report of a Scoping Study for the Cooperative Research Centres Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This report summarises findings from a scoping study conducted for the Cooperative Research Centres Association (CRCA) by the Centre for the Study of Higher Education. The purpose of the scoping study is to inform the research training activities of Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs). While previous studies have focussed on the outcomes supported…

  13. Backgrounder. Rethinking Science and Society: Public Survey by EKOS Research Associates. Canadians See Clear-Cut Benefits to University Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Between August and September 2004, EKOS Research Associates conducted the first round of a study entitled, Rethinking Science and Society. The aim of this study is to assess Canadians' attitudes toward science and research, particularly since research and innovation policies have become increasingly important for the federal government. The…

  14. 75 FR 44266 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... the Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of... valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology Research.... Need and Use of Information Collection: The Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT) Program will use...

  15. The History of the American Vocational Education Research Association. The First 25 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, J. David; And Others

    This book records the history of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA), which was organized in 1966 as a professional association for scholars and others with research interests in the relationship between education and work. The purposes of AVERA are as follows: stimulate research and development (R&D) activities related…

  16. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  17. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  18. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  19. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  20. Professional issues associated with the clinical research nurse role.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Juliet; Hill, Gordon; Callister, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) have a vital role in the conduct and governance of clinical trials. This article compares findings of an online survey conducted in 2012 by the Scottish Research Nurse and Coordinator's Network with two surveys undertaken ten years previously in a single Scottish Health Board, permitting analysis of the development of the CRN role. The findings show that CRNs are highly qualified and experienced. Many had access to professional development and support, while others continued to feel isolated. There is a need for a clear, flexible career structure for CRNs, with appropriate induction, training and continuous professional development. PMID:25467360

  1. NIH Researchers Identify New Gene Mutation Associated with ALS and Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH researchers identify new gene mutation associated with ALS and dementia April 7, 2014 A rare mutation ... cell, has been linked with development of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This finding, from a research team led ...

  2. Common challenges for ecological modelling: Synthesis of facilitated discussions held at the symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling in Quebec City, Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The eleven symposia organized for the 2009 conference of the International Society for Ecological Modelling (ISEM 2009) held in Quebec City, Canada, October 6-9, 2009, included facilitated discussion sessions following formal presentations. Each symposium focused on a specific subject, and all the s...

  3. Standards for Reporting on Humanities-Oriented Research in AERA Publications: "American Educational Research Association"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Standards for Reporting on Humanities-Oriented Research in AERA Publications" has been developed to complement AERA's "Standards for Reporting on Empirical Social Science Research in AERA Publications." The purpose of providing standards for humanities-oriented research in education is to assist researchers who are preparing manuscripts that are…

  4. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  5. Defining Educational Research: A Perspective of/on Presidential Addresses and the Australian Association for Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the definition of the field of educational research and the changing and developing role of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) in representing and constituting this field. The evidence for the argument is derived from AARE Presidential Addresses across its 40-year history. The paper documents…

  6. Progress in research into the genes associated with venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-xing; Liu, Bo; Li, Chun-sheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, lethal disorder that affects hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. This study aimed to review the progress in the research into VTE. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed the studies about VTE and verified different genetic polymoriphisms of VTE. RESULTS: The pathogenesis of VTE involves hereditary and acquired factors. Many studies indicated that the disorder of coagulation and fibirnolytic system is of utmost importance to this disease. Genetic polymoriphism-related VTE demonstrated significant differences among geographies and ethnicities. CONCLUSION: VTE has many risk factors, but genetic factors play an important role. PMID:26056539

  7. HIV research productivity and structural factors associated with HIV research output in European Union countries: a bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uusküla, A; Toompere, K; Laisaar, K T; Rosenthal, M; Pürjer, M L; Knellwolf, A; Läärä, E; Des Jarlais, D C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess HIV/AIDS research productivity in the 27 countries of the European Union (EU), and the structural level factors associated with levels of HIV/AIDS research productivity. Methods A bibliometric analysis was conducted with systematic search methods used to locate HIV/AIDS research publications (period of 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011; search databases: MEDLINE (Ovid, PubMed), EMBASE, ISI-Thomson Web of Science; no language restrictions). The publication rate (number of HIV/AIDS research publications per million population in 10 years) and the rate of articles published in HIV/AIDS journals and selected journals with moderate to very high (IF ≥3) 5-year impact factors were used as markers for HIV research productivity. A negative binomial regression model was fitted to assess the impact of structural level factors (sociodemographic, health, HIV prevalence and research/development indicators) associated with the variation in HIV research productivity. Results The total numbers of HIV/AIDS research publications in 2002–2011 by country ranged from 7 to 9128 (median 319). The median publication rate (per million population in 10 years) was 45 (range 5–150) for all publications. Across all countries, 16% of the HIV/AIDS research was published in HIV/AIDS journals and 7% in selected journals with IF ≥3. Indicators describing economic (gross domestic product), demographic (size of the population) and epidemiological (HIV prevalence) conditions as well as overall scientific activity (total research output) in a country were positively associated with HIV research productivity. Conclusions HIV research productivity varies noticeably across EU countries, and this variation is associated with recognisable structural factors. PMID:25649212

  8. Preventive strategies and research for ultraviolet-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, H K

    1995-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-associated cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Approximately 90% of nonmelanoma skin cancer and 65% of melanoma are attributable to UV exposure and theoretically could be eliminated by primary prevention measures. Safe sun strategy includes use of sunscreens, use of protective clothing, minimization of exposure from 10 A.M. to 3 P.M., and avoidance of tanning parlors. Although more definitive data in human populations on the effectiveness of sunscreens to prevent melanoma and skin cancer are needed, sunscreens are thought to reduce risk. Safe sun prevention must start in childhood and adolescence when people receive most of their UV exposure. Secondary prevention through professional and public education and early detection may further reduce melanoma mortality. PMID:8741794

  9. 76 FR 23537 - Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations and Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations... announces an updated computation for assessments received by importer associations under the Hass Avocado... Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7801-7813). The Order covers...

  10. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  11. 75 FR 27789 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of... and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology... and Use of Information Collection: The Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT) Program will use...

  12. Pennsylvania Adult and Continuing Education Research Conference Annual Proceedings (2nd, Indiana, Pennsylvania, September 30, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferro, Trenton R., Ed.; Dean, Gary J., Ed.

    These proceedings contain 11 refereed papers and 2 symposia in which researchers and practitioners share research findings focusing on the link between research and practice in adult, continuing, and community education. "Literacy Skill Standards for the Workplace" (Eunice N. Askov) summarizes efforts leading toward voluntary industry skill…

  13. Association of Learning Styles with Research Self-Efficacy: Study of Short-Term Research Training Program for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A.; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a predictor of research career success. Method Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students’ gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Results Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to post-training. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students’ gender or ranking of their medical school. Conclusions Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. PMID:25079678

  14. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  15. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Adult Education Research Conference (22nd, DeKalb, Illinois, April 1-3, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb. Office of Education Research.

    These proceedings contain 40 presentation papers, four alternate papers, and seven symposia from the Twenty-Second Adult Education Research Conference. The 44 papers report on research, research problems, and research possibilities, including comparison of student performance in two curricular approaches, trust in small groups, overcoming…

  17. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  18. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  19. Transforming Catholic Education through Research: The American Educational Research Association Catholic Education Special Interest Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Catholic schools in the United States and abroad face numerous financial, cultural, and structural challenges due to contemporary education policies and economic trends. Within this climate, research about Catholic education is often conducted and leveraged in efforts to serve schools' most immediate needs. To be certain, research aimed at…

  20. Becoming a Researcher: Forms of Capital Associated with "Research Capacity" Trajectories of Young British Social Anthropologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The paper privileges the "voices" of British social anthropologists examining their perceptions of how their research expertise was acquired. Reference is made to the case of education research in Britain, which, by comparison with social anthropology, reveals limited capacity as measured through performance audits of scientific research…

  1. Research at the Stanford Center for Radar Astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental radio and radar studies are presented concerning lunar and planetary atmospheres and surfaces; the sun and interplanetary medium; and software and hardware conceived while doing research. Emphasis is given to probe and radio accumulation measurements of planetary atmospheres. A list is included of recent publications, technical and scientific reports, and symposia with papers.

  2. The 159th national meeting of the American Association for the advancement of science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This volume is the program/abstracts for the 1993 national meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The meeting was held in Boston from 11-16 February 1993. Symposia dealt with works on the following topics; perspectives on human genetics; confronting AIDS; biology, cells bugs; medical research society; social psychology neuroscience; future chemistry, from carbon to silicon; measuring the matter energy of the universe; earth's ever-changing atmosphere; causing coping with environmental change; agricultural biotechnology, plant protection production; science corporate enterprise; examining reforming the economic system; science, ethics the law; communicating science to the public; information technology the changing face of science; mathematics, concepts computations; international cooperation human survival; science for everyone; science religion, examining both; anthropology, dynamics of human history; international science issues; improving formal science education; and science education reform in America. Separate abstracts have been prepared for articles from this volume.

  3. Abstracts of Research Papers 1991, Presented at the Annual Convention of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance in the Research Consortium Meetings (San Francisco, California, April 3-7, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell, Ed.

    The research consortium program of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance is comprised of free papers, posters, symposia, and invited lectures. Of the approximately 450 research abstracts submitted for the 1991 research symposium, those recommended for presentation are included in this volume. The topics covered…

  4. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  5. Understanding factors associated with the translation of cardiovascular research: a multinational case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Funders of health research increasingly seek to understand how best to allocate resources in order to achieve maximum value from their funding. We built an international consortium and developed a multinational case study approach to assess benefits arising from health research. We used that to facilitate analysis of factors in the production of research that might be associated with translating research findings into wider impacts, and the complexities involved. Methods We built on the Payback Framework and expanded its application through conducting co-ordinated case studies on the payback from cardiovascular and stroke research in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. We selected a stratified random sample of projects from leading medical research funders. We devised a series of innovative steps to: minimize the effect of researcher bias; rate the level of impacts identified in the case studies; and interrogate case study narratives to identify factors that correlated with achieving high or low levels of impact. Results Twenty-nine detailed case studies produced many and diverse impacts. Over the 15 to 20 years examined, basic biomedical research has a greater impact than clinical research in terms of academic impacts such as knowledge production and research capacity building. Clinical research has greater levels of wider impact on health policies, practice, and generating health gains. There was no correlation between knowledge production and wider impacts. We identified various factors associated with high impact. Interaction between researchers and practitioners and the public is associated with achieving high academic impact and translation into wider impacts, as is basic research conducted with a clinical focus. Strategic thinking by clinical researchers, in terms of thinking through pathways by which research could potentially be translated into practice, is associated with high wider impact. Finally, we identified the complexity of

  6. Opportunities and challenges associated with engaging immigrant women in participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Ganann, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    With increasing recognition of the importance of knowledge exchange between researchers and research stakeholders, community member involvement remains poorly accessed. A promising community-based research methodology for knowledge exchange is participatory action research (PAR). This review examines opportunities and challenges associated with using PAR to examine issues related to community health, specifically that of immigrant women. The literature search included published and grey literature relevant to immigrant women and PAR. PAR actively engages community members of the study population throughout the research process. The involvement of immigrant women in research that explores issues pertinent to their health is essential to conducting relevant research to subsequently inform policies and programs. There are numerous advantages to using a PAR approach, including enhanced research relevance and utilization; notwithstanding, there are challenges to overcome in order to engage community based immigrant women in research. Ultimately, policies that have contextual grounding through PAR have better likelihood of effectively addressing priority issues for immigrant women. PMID:22491996

  7. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses" (Michael K. Swan,…

  8. Longitudinal Associations among Undergraduates' Research Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robnett, Rachael D.; Chemers, Martin M.; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that undergraduates tend to identify more strongly with the field of science after participating in scientific research. However, mediators that might account for this association are not well understood. In the current study, we propose that science self-efficacy may serve this mediational function. Specifically, data from a…

  9. Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

  10. GeneRanker: An Online System for Predicting Gene-Disease Associations for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Graciela; Uribe, Juan C.; Armstrong, Brock; McDonough, Wendy; Berens, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    With the overwhelming volume of genomic and molecular information available on many databases nowadays, researchers need from bioinformaticians more than encouragement to refine their searches. We present here GeneRanker, an online system that allows researchers to obtain a ranked list of genes potentially related to a specific disease or biological process by combining gene-disease (or genebiological process) associations with protein-protein interactions extracted from the literature, using computational analysis of the protein network topology to more accurately rank the predicted associations. GeneRanker was evaluated in the context of brain cancer research, and is freely available online at http://www.generanker.org. PMID:21347122

  11. [Proceeding and Abstracts of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigsby, Michael, Ed.; Tooker, Lisa, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This bulletin contains the proceedings and 54 abstracts for symposia, workshops and contributed papers of the 1994 National Marine Educators Association Conference (Knoxville, Tennessee, August 8-11, 1994). Some of the topics covered in conference abstracts include: (1) elementary physical, chemical, and biological labs and curriculum; (2)…

  12. Chemoreception scientists gather under the Florida sun: The 31st Annual Association for Chemoreception Sciences meeting.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Donald A; Baker, Harriet; Brunjes, Peter; Gilbertson, Timothy A; Hermer, Linda; Hill, David L; Matsunami, Hiroaki; Meredith, Michael; Mistretta, Charlotte M; Smeets, Monique A M; Stowers, Lisa; Zhuang, Hanyi

    2009-08-01

    The 31st Annual Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS) met in Sarasota, Florida April 22-26, 2009, attracting approximately 600 registrants and nearly 400 abstracts. In addition to poster and platform presentations, the program offered symposia, special lectures, and various National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored workshops, including one on computational approaches to olfaction. PMID:19712224

  13. Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research: Interdisciplinary research and educational activities in pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Innocenti, Federico; van Schaik, Ron H.; Lezhava, Alexander; Tzimas, Giannis; Kollia, Panagoula; Macek, Milan; Fortina, Paolo; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    The Golden Helix Institute of Biomedical Research is an international non-profit scientific organization with interdisciplinary research and educational activities in the field of genome medicine in Europe, Asia and Latin America. These activities are supervised by an international scientific advisory council, consisting of world leaders in the field of genomics and translational medicine. Research activities include the regional coordination of the Pharmacogenomics for Every Nation Initiative in Europe, in an effort to integrate pharmacogenomics in developing countries, the development of several National/Ethnic Genetic databases and related web services and the critical assessment of the impact of genetics and genomic medicine to society in various countries. Also, educational activities include the organization of the Golden Helix Symposia®, which are high profile scientific research symposia in the field of personalized medicine, and the Golden Helix Pharmacogenomics Days, an international educational activity focused on pharmacogenomics, as part of its international pharmacogenomics education and outreach efforts. PMID:22379996

  14. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective manner. The program began on June 1, 1980 with funding to support several Research Associates each year. 113 awards, plus 1 from an independently supported minority component were made for the Research Associates program. The program was changed from a one year award with a possibility for renewal to a two year award. In 1999, the decision was made by NASA to discontinue the program due to development of new priorities for funding. This grant was discontinued because of the move of the Program Director to a new institution; a new grant was provided to that new institution to allow completion of the training of the remaining 2 research associates in 1999. After 1999, the program will be discontinued.

  15. Unpacking capacity to utilize research: A tale of the Burkina Faso public health association.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Nadia; Schrecker, Ted

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in addressing global health is for institutions to monitor and use research in policy-making. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), civil society organizations such as health professional associations can be key contributors to effective national health systems. However, there is little empirical data on their capacity to use research. This case study was used to gain insight into the factors that affect the knowledge translation performance of health professional associations in LMICs by describing the organizational elements and processes constituting capacity to use research, and examining the potential determinants of this capacity. Case study methodology was chosen for its flexibility to capture the multiple and often tacit processes within organizational routines. The Burkina Faso Public Health Association (ABSP) was studied, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and key documents review. Five key dimensions that affect the association's capacity to use research to influence health policy emerged: organizational motivation; catalysts; organizational capacity to acquire and organizational capacity to transform research findings; moderating organizational factors. Also examined were the dissemination strategies used by ABSP and its abilities to enhance its capacity through networking, to advocate for more relevant research and to develop its potential role as knowledge broker, as well as limitations due to scarce resources. We conclude that a better understanding of the organizational capacity to use research of health professional associations in LMICs is needed to assess, improve and reinforce such capacity. Increased knowledge translation potential may leverage research resources and promote knowledge-sharing. PMID:21074923

  16. A Survey of the Barriers Associated with Academic-based Cancer Research Commercialization

    PubMed Central

    Vanderford, Nathan L.; Weiss, L. Todd; Weiss, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization within the academic setting is associated with many challenges and barriers. Previous studies investigating these challenges/barriers have, in general, broadly focused on multiple disciplines and, oftentimes, several institutions simultaneously. The goal of the study presented here was to analyze a range of barriers that may be broadly associated with commercializing academic-based cancer research. This goal was addressed via a study of the barriers associated with cancer research commercialization at the University of Kentucky (UK). To this end, a research instrument in the form of an electronic survey was developed. General demographic information was collected on study participants and two research questions were addressed: 1) What are the general barriers inhibiting cancer research commercialization at UK? and 2) Would mitigation of the barriers potentially enhance faculty engagement in commercialization activities? Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data reveal that multiple barriers likely inhibit cancer research commercialization at UK with expense, time, infrastructure, and lack of industry partnerships being among the most commonly cited factors. The potential alleviation of these factors in addition to revised University policies/procedures, risk mitigation, more emphasis on commercialization by academia research field, and increased information on how to commercialize significantly correlated with the potential for increased commercialization activity. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that research commercialization would incrementally increase as barriers to the process are removed and that PhD-holding respondents and respondents in commercialization-supportive research fields would be more likely to commercialize their research upon barrier removal. Overall, as with other disciplines, these data suggest that for innovations derived from academic cancer-research to move more effectively and

  17. Proceedings: Eighteenth Annual Conference on Research in Medical Education, Washington, D.C., November 6-7, 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah L., Comp.

    The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee's selections for program materials for the eighteenth annual conference on Research in Medical Education are contained in this volume. The agenda consisted of poster sessions, presentation of papers, and presentation of symposia. Poster sessions examined such topics as student…

  18. Misconduct in research: a descriptive survey of attitudes, perceptions and associated factors in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Misconduct in research tarnishes the reputation, credibility and integrity of research institutions. Studies on research or scientific misconduct are still novel in developing countries. In this study, we report on the attitudes, perceptions and factors related to the work environment thought to be associated with research misconduct in a group of researchers in Nigeria - a developing country. Method A survey of researchers attending a scientific conference was done using an adapted Scientific Misconduct Questionnaire-Revised (SMQ-R). Initial descriptive analysis of individual items using frequencies and proportions for all quantitative data was performed. Thereafter, Likert scale responses were transformed into dichotomous responses. Fisher exact test was performed for associations as appropriate. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was accepted as significant. Result Half of the respondents (50.4%) were aware of a colleague who had committed misconduct, defined as “non-adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms”. Over 88% of the researchers were concerned about the perceived amount of misconduct prevalent in their institution and 96.2% believed that one or more forms of scientific misconduct had occurred in their workplace. More than half (52.7%) rated the severity of penalties for scientific misconduct in their work environment as low. Furthermore¸ the majority (56.1%) were of the view that the chance of getting caught for scientific misconduct in their work environment was low. Conclusion Researchers in Nigeria perceive that scientific misconduct is commonplace in their institutions, but are however worried about the negative effects of scientific misconduct on the credibility of scientific research. We recommend that researchers be empowered with the knowledge and virtues necessary for self-regulation that advance research integrity. Research institutions should however also step into their

  19. Proceedings from the 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Zachary S; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary F; Cillo, Joseph E; Hale, Robert G; Le, Anh D; Lee, Janice S; Kademani, Deepak

    2014-02-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, and the International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons sponsored the fifth research summit, which convened on May 2 and 3 in Rosemont, Illinois. The Research Summits are convened biennially to facilitate the discussion and collaboration of oral and maxillofacial surgeons with clinical and basic science researchers in fields affecting the specialty. The goal is to advance the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery through exposure and education in topics that ultimately benefit the oral and maxillofacial surgical patient. This edition of the research summit included the topics of robotic surgery and antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (ARONJ). Most importantly, this research summit saw the development of research interest groups (RIGs) in the fields of anesthesia, maxillofacial oncology and reconstructive surgery, obstructive sleep apnea and orthognathic surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, and trauma. These RIGs developed specific research goals with a plan to continue working on potential projects at the AAOMS Clinical Trials Course on May 7 to 9, 2013 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The summit program was developed by the AAOMS Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment. The charge of the committee is to encourage and promote research within the specialty and to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. The research summit serves as a platform for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to lead the goal of advancement of research relevant to the specialty. This article provides an overview of the presentations that were made in the sessions on robotic surgery and ARONJ. The research summit keynote address and two additional presentations on patient registries are summarized and updates from the RIGs that were formed at the 2013 research summit are highlighted. PMID:24438595

  20. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  1. Factors Associated with Willingness to Participate in Biospecimen Research Among Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wanzhen; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  2. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report. PMID:26707430

  3. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  4. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  5. Presidential Symposia and Events: Boston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-08-01

    In keeping with the theme “Biotechnology for Health and Wellness” for the National Meeting in Boston, ACS President Catherine T. (Katie) Hunt will host a keynote symposium, “Material Innovations: from Nanotech to Biotech and Beyond!” on Sunday, August 19. The symposium features five world-renowned scientists and leaders in innovation, covering a broad range of topics on interdisciplinary material from nanotechnology to biotechnology and beyond. A panel discussion follows, moderated by Hunt.

  6. Annual Adult Education Research Conference. Proceedings (20th, Ann Arbor, Michigan, April 4-6, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Papers from numerous research areas in the adult education field are presented. The proceedings contain thirty-five papers, five symposia, one alternate symposium, and eighteen alternate papers. Among the papers included are "A Comparison of Approaches to Measuring Outcomes in Adult Basic Education,""A Critical Analysis of Hill's 'Cognitive Style…

  7. Lifelong Learning Research Conference Proceedings (4th, College Park, Maryland, February 12-13, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whaples, Gene C., Comp.; Rivera, William M., Comp.

    These conference proceedings contain 55 papers and symposia presented at the conference whose focus was on nonformal adult education. Papers deal with adult/continuing education concerns such as participatory research, ABLE (Adult Basic Level Education) parenting, army basic skills educational development, learning contracts, volunteerism,…

  8. A Research on the Association of Pavement Surface Damages Using Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Tsung; Chang, Jia-Ray; Chen, Jian-Da; Chou, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Huang

    The association of pavement surface damages used to rely on the judgments of the experts. However, with the accumulation of data in the pavement surface maintenance database and the improvement of Data Mining, there are more and more methods available to explore the association of pavement surface damages. This research adopts Apriori algorithm to conduct association analysis on pavement surface damages. From the experience of experts, it has been believed that the association of road damages is complicated. However, through case studies, it has been found that pavement surface damages are caused among longitudinal cracking, alligator cracking and pen-holes, and they are unidirectional influence. In addition, with the help of association rules, it has been learned that, in pavement surface preventative maintenance, the top priority should be the repair of longitudinal cracking and alligator cracking, which can greatly reduce the occurrence of pen-holes and the risk of state compensations.

  9. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective model.

  10. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  11. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  12. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  13. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated with Community-Based Research in a Mexican-Origin Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Quiter, Elaine S.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the recruitment strategies and personnel and materials costs associated with two community-based research studies in a Mexican-origin population. We also highlight the role that academic-community partnerships played in the outreach and recruitment process for our studies. We reviewed study documents using case study…

  14. Governing by Network in Europe: Associations, Educational Research and Social Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The coincident arrival of a European policy space in education and a European Educational Research Association [EERA], and their subsequent relation, will be the subject of this paper. EERA is a hybrid organization--it supports scientific networking, it is a social partner in EU policy, it is a first level social space for networking, and…

  15. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  16. Balancing Needs and Resources. The Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum Proceedings No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staskey, Paul J., Ed.

    The abbreviated proceedings of the 18th Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research on balancing needs and resources are presented. Three of the five major addresses are presented in their entirety; the other two are summarized. The invited general session addresses included: "Talent for the 1980's" (Russell Edgerton); "If You Don't…

  17. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  18. Factors Associated with Research Anxiety of University Human Resource Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chadwick C.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2006-01-01

    Factors associated with research anxiety of university faculty members in human resource educations fields were examined. Most of the participating faculty members were male and half were full professors. The mean age was 52 and all but one held a doctorate. Relationships between selected demographic characteristics and The Higgins-Kotrlik…

  19. The Association of Research Libraries Statistics and Measurement Program: From Descriptive Data to Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C.

    The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has collected descriptive data from its members for the better part of the 20th century. This data shows that as libraries' environments change to reflect increased interest in accountability and institutional outcomes. To account for this, an ARL New Measures Initiative has been established to develop…

  20. The Human Ecology of the American Educational Research Association. Report No. 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, James M., Jr.

    The concepts and methods of human ecology are applied to the geographic distribution of members of the American Educational Research Association. State characteristics are measured by five factors: (1) large-scale agriculture; (2) population size; (3) affluence-urbanization; (4) white predominance; (5) emphasis on specialized agriculture. City…

  1. Development of a research platform for dissecting phenotype-genotype associations in rice (Oryza spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present an overview of a research platform that provides essential germplasm, genotypic and phenotypic data and analytical tools for dissecting phenotye-genotype associations in rice. These resources include a diversity panel of 400 O. sativa and 100 O. rufipogon accessions that have been purifie...

  2. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program FY 2005 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, F. P.

    2005-11-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In 2003, eight minority-serving institutions were awarded 3-year subcontracts that began in the summer/fall of FY 2004. This paper lists accomplishments made in the project's first phase.

  3. Competence for Children's Sake: Summary Report of a Research Project on the Child Development Associate Credential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettygrove, Willa Bowman

    This report summarizes a research project on the Child Development Associate (CDA) assessment and credentialing system. The issues covered in the report fall under two general categories: validity (the ability of the CDA assessment/credential system to identify competent child care staff) and career development potential (the benefits of the CDA…

  4. American Vocational Education Research Association Members' Perceptions of Statistical Significance Tests and Other Statistical Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    A random sample of 113 members of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) was surveyed to obtain baseline information regarding AVERA members' perceptions of statistical significance tests. The Psychometrics Group Instrument was used to collect data from participants. Of those surveyed, 67% were male, 93% had earned a…

  5. A Report on the Peace Education Commission Program, International Peace Research Association Conference 2010, Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin

    2010-01-01

    From July 6th to 10th, 2010, International Peace Research Association (IPRA) held its biennial conference at the University of Sydney in Australia. Hosted by the University's Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies and coordinated by Jake Lynch and a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, the conference featured seven plenary panels and many papers…

  6. Factors influencing clinical students' perceptions of an embedded research project and associated publication output.

    PubMed

    Weller, Renate; May, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe student perceptions of the value of a short, compulsory research project embedded in a clinical degree program, the research output in terms of publications, and the factors influencing this. It was hypothesized that student attitudes toward the project, student perceptions of how much the project contributed to their generic skills, and the number of publications submitted or prepared for submission would be associated with perceived quality of supervision, perceived difficulty of the project, career plans, and attitude before commencement of the project. We explored this using a questionnaire comprising 30 questions that included demographics, Likert scales, and categorical responses. Student attitudes toward research were found to be associated with student attitude before the start of the project, perceived difficulty of the project, perceived quality of supervision, and perceived relevance to the profession. Students thought that the research project contributed most to the skills of "information gathering" and "critical evaluation" and the least to "teamwork," "problem solving," and "oral communication." Research output was significantly linked to perceived quality of supervision and the help students received with data analysis and data collection, though not with the project report itself. In conclusion, although the success of the research project was influenced by many factors, the perceived quality of supervision influenced all three outcome measures. Therefore it is clear that optimization of this aspect offers the most scope for enhancing the student learning experience. PMID:23709108

  7. National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). Annual Meeting (65th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, March 21-25, 1992). Abstracts of Presented Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Govindarajan, Girish, Ed.

    This product of an annual meeting presents abstracts of symposia, contributed papers, paper sets, discussion groups, reports, poster sessions, and panel presentations. Topics include: science teaching, gender differences, science education reform, constructivism, biological concepts, concept mapping, attitude/behavior change, conceptual…

  8. US Department of Energy Teacher Research Associates Program: Profile and survey of 1990--1991 participants

    SciTech Connect

    Vivio, F.M.; Stevenson, W.L.

    1992-11-01

    Through its laboratories, facilities, and technology centers, the United States Department of Energy supports the development and training of scientists and engineers to meet the nation`s future human resource needs in energy science and technology. This mission is accomplished, in part, through summer programs of active participation by precollege teachers in laboratory research. Since 1989, the Teacher Research Associates (TRAC) program has provided outstanding 7th- through 12th-grade science, mathematics, and technology teachers from across the nation the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects at DOE laboratories. The TRAC program encourages participants, upon returning to their home institution, to share with their students and colleagues the experience and knowledge gained through their research endeavors.

  9. Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

    2012-09-19

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

  10. Marijuana Use and Its Association with Participation, Navigation, and Enrollment in Health Research among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Webb, Fern J; Striley, Catherine W; Cottler, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    This analysis examined the association between marijuana (Mj) use, willingness to participate, navigation and enrollment in health research among African Americans. Data from HealthStreet, a community-engagement model implemented in North Central Florida that reduces health disparities by engaging and linking community members to medical and social services and health research opportunities, were analyzed to determine willingness of African American Mj users to participate, be navigated to and enroll in health research studies. Among 1,496 African American community members, 8.0% were current Mj users, 30.3% were past Mj users and 61.7% reported never using Mj. Current and past Mj users were more willing to volunteer for a research study that only involved the use of medical records, required an overnight stay in a hospital or clinic, or might require use of medical equipment compared to those who never used Mj. Current Mj users were significantly less likely to be navigated (95% CI: 0.21-0.58) to health research studies while past Mj users (95% CI: 1.05-2.64) were significantly more likely to be enrolled in health research studies. Navigating and enrolling Mj users into health research studies could help decrease health disparities and increase health equity for the entire community since study findings would undoubtedly be more representative of the entire community rather than a select few. PMID:26213328

  11. Research priorities in the evolving demographic landscape of Alzheimer disease and associated dementias.

    PubMed

    Valle, Ramón; Lee, Brason

    2002-01-01

    The rapid increase of ethnically diverse late onset dementia-affected persons is bringing a special urgency to Alzheimer disease and associated disorders research. By this decade's end, non-European heritage ethnically diverse persons will account for 25% of the dementia-affected cohort and 33% by mid-century. These populations have received some attention in both dementia-focused basic biomedical and social-behavioral research. However, studies differ greatly with regard to the constructs of culture used, the methodologies used, and representativeness of the populations sampled. Moreover, social status factors are often confounded with cultural variables. Therefore, several clarifying research approaches are suggested. In biomedical research, categorically ascribed (US census type) definitions, or assumed (self-reported) ethnic group designators will not suffice where actual biophysiological sampling precision is needed. A strategy for the phenotypic sampling of cohorts is therefore suggested for this research domain. In social-behavioral research, the acceptance of a common operational definition of culture is urged. And, with reference to a specific social status confound, namely literacy, a neuroimaging research strategy is proposed to determine whether non-literates might not be misclassified relative to the determination of their actual cognitive functioning status. Additionally, two conceptual models for addressing and are briefly presented. PMID:12351917

  12. Proceedings of the Annual Adult Education Research Conference (23rd, Lincoln, Nebraska, April 1-3, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska Univ., Lincoln. Dept. of Adult and Continuing Education.

    These proceedings of a conference on research in the field of adult education contain the texts of 40 conference papers and 4 symposia. Included among the areas examined in the individual reports are the following: education participation scale factor structure and correlates for 12,000 learners, a comparative analysis of adult education research…

  13. A Retrospective Analysis of the Annual Conference of the New England Educational Research Organization: 1969-1988.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Libby G.; Citron, Heather B.

    The annual conference programs of the New England Educational Research Organization (NEERO) were examined from 1969 through 1988 to determine their content, the number of presenters, and their geographical locations as indicators of scholarly productivity. Two judges created categories for titles of papers and symposia. Merging the lists created…

  14. Historical Research: A Thematic Analysis of Convention and Conference Themes for Selected Professional Health Education Associations from 1975 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jill M.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    Many professional organizations and associations hold conventions and conferences on an annual basis. Health Education professional associations take part in this process. Using a historical research perspective, this article delineates conference themes for four prominent professional Health Education associations: the American Association for…

  15. Utility of genome-wide association study findings: prostate cancer as a translational research paradigm.

    PubMed

    Turner, A R; Kader, A K; Xu, J

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of consistently replicated associations between genetic markers and complex disease risk, including cancers. Alone, these markers have limited utility in risk prediction; however, when several of these markers are used in combination, the predictive performance appears to be similar to that of many currently available clinical predictors. Despite this, there are divergent views regarding the clinical validity and utility of these genetic markers in risk prediction. There are valid concerns, thus providing a direction for new lines of research. Herein, we outline the debate and use the example of prostate cancer to highlight emerging evidence from studies that aim to address potential concerns. We also describe a translational framework that could be used to guide the development of a new generation of comprehensive research studies aimed at capitalizing on these exciting new discoveries. PMID:22272820

  16. Using the associative imagery technique in qualitative health research: the experiences of homecare workers and consumers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fang; Castaneda, Diego; Zhang, Xu; Stock, Laura; Ayala, Linda; Baron, Sherry

    2012-10-01

    The associative imagery technique is a qualitative tool with which researchers use carefully selected photographs or images to trigger participants' responses to explain difficult behavioral and social concepts. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of the associative imagery method in focus groups to understand the complex relationships between homecare workers and their clients as part of a larger health and safety intervention project conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. A total of 116 homecare workers and clients were recruited for the study. We found that participants used images mainly in two ways. First, the images served to remind participants of specific persons, events, and/or objects. Second, the images facilitated recollections and reflections that allowed participants to metaphorically describe their experiences, feelings, and emotions. Both usages of imagery generated comments that answered the research question in a more relevant, descriptive, and vivid way. PMID:22851495

  17. [Transparency in biomedical research: about the risks associated with the use of Avandia].

    PubMed

    Salas, Sofía P; Russo, Moisés

    2010-09-01

    The question of how and when to communicate potential risks associated with new drugs has remained an important focus of tension between the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory entities, such as the American Food and Drug Administration. Recently there has been widespread concern related to the cardiovascular risks associated with the use of Avandia, a rosiglitazone produced by Glaxo Smith Kline. In fact, several metaanalyses involving rosiglitazone provided a relatively consistent message that rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial ischemic events. In the present article, we review the controversy regarding the way the pharmaceutical company handled this issue, and we describe examples of inappropriate conduct regarding an industry-sponsored clinical trial with this drug. We raise several important ethical questions related to the way researchers handle conflicts of interest when they are employees of the pharmaceutical industry. Finally, we discuss the requirements to conduct biomedical research funded by the pharmaceutical industry in Chile. PMID:21249291

  18. Associations between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide: A quantitative research synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Q. Y.; Svendsgaard, D.; Kotchmar, D. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Although positive associations between ambient NO2 concentrations and personal exposures have generally been found by exposure studies, the strength of the associations varied among studies. Differences in results could be related to differences in study design and in exposure factors. However, the effects of study design, exposure factors, and sampling and measurement errors on the strength of the personal-ambient associations have not been evaluated quantitatively in a systematic manner. A quantitative research synthesis was conducted to examine these issues based on peer-reviewed publications in the past 30 years. Factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations across the studies were also examined with meta-regression. Ambient NO2 was found to be significantly associated with personal NO2 exposures, with estimates of 0.42, 0.16, and 0.72 for overall pooled, longitudinal and daily average correlation coefficients based on random-effects meta-analysis. This conclusion was robust after correction for publication bias with correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.16 and 0.45. We found that season and some population characteristics, such as pre-existing disease, were significant factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations. More meaningful and rigorous comparisons would be possible if greater detail were published on the study design (e.g. local and indoor sources, housing characteristics, etc.) and data quality (e.g., detection limits and percent of data above detection limits).

  19. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - A Model for Young Researcher Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2000 members from approximately 45 countries, APECS represents a body of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research activities. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. APECS can serve as a model for other groups looking to encourage the next generation of researchers. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach

  20. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  1. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  2. In-Situ Measurements of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup Process Gas Piping at K-25 - Paper for Waste Management Symposia 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen B.

    2010-01-01

    This document is the final version of a paper submitted to the Waste Management Symposia, Phoenix, 2010, abstract BJC/OR-3280. The primary document from which this paper was condensed is In-Situ Measurement of Low Enrichment Uranium Holdup in Process Gas Piping at K-25 Using NaI/HMS4 Gamma Detection Systems, BJC/OR-3355. This work explores the sufficiency and limitations of the Holdup Measurement System 4 (HJVIS4) software algorithms applied to measurements of low enriched uranium holdup in gaseous diffusion process gas piping. HMS4 has been used extensively during the decommissioning and demolition project of the K-25 building for U-235 holdup quantification. The HMS4 software is an integral part of one of the primary nondestructive assay (NDA) systems which was successfully tested and qualified for holdup deposit quantification in the process gas piping of the K-25 building. The initial qualification focused on the measurement of highly enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits. The purpose of this work was to determine if that qualification could be extended to include the quantification of holdup in UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits of lower enrichment. Sample field data are presented to provide evidence in support of the theoretical foundation. The HMS4 algorithms were investigated in detail and found to sufficiently compensate for UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} source self-attenuation effects, over the range of expected enrichment (4-40%), in the North and East Wings of the K-25 building. The limitations of the HMS4 algorithms were explored for a described set of conditions with respect to area source measurements of low enriched UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} deposits when used in conjunction with a 1 inch by 1/2 inch sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector. The theoretical limitations of HMS4, based on the expected conditions in the process gas system of the K-25 building, are related back to the required data quality objectives (DQO) for the NBA measurement system established for the K-25

  3. Biological measures to minimize the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer: A research perspective.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Doi, Kazutaka; Daino, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Tagami, Keiko; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Morioka, Takamitsu; Hosoki, Ayaka; Takabatake, Masaru; Yoshinaga, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Second cancers are among the most serious sequelae for cancer survivors who receive radiotherapy. This article aims to review current knowledge regarding how the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer can be minimized by biological measures and to discuss relevant research needs. Results The risk of second cancer can be reduced not only by physical measures to decrease the radiation dose to normal tissues but also by biological means that interfere with the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Requirements for such biological means include the targeting of tumor types relevant to radiotherapy-associated risk, concrete safety and efficacy evidence and feasibility and minimal invasiveness. Mechanistic insights into the process of radiation carcinogenesis provide rational approaches to minimize the risk. Five mechanism-based strategies are proposed herein based on the current state of knowledge. Epidemiological studies on the joint effects of radiation and lifestyle or other factors can provide evidence for factors that modify radiation-associated risks if deliberately controlled. Conclusions Mechanistic and epidemiological evidence indicates that it is possible to develop interventional measures to minimize the second cancer risk associated with radiotherapy. Research is needed regarding the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis available for intervention and joint effects of radiation and controllable factors. PMID:26967256

  4. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - Developing a Continuum of Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2600 members from approximately 74 countries, APECS represents a body of students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach opportunities for young polar researchers. APECS core programs that include career development workshops and panels (including several associated

  5. Resources for Research Libraries. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (98th, New York, New York, May 7-8, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    The management of research libraries and national resources for the funding of research library activities were the major topics addressed by the speakers and discussion sessions at this meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Included are transcripts of the addresses and discussions on higher education's turbulent environment,…

  6. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  7. Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors--A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented By Dr. Wendy Sims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatt, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri--Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An…

  8. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA): Online Research Data, Tools, and References

    PubMed Central

    Finke, Roger; Adamczyk, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) currently archives over 400 local, national, and international data files, and offers a wide range of research tools to build surveys, preview data on-line, develop customized maps and reports of U.S. church membership, and examine religion differences across nations and regions of the world. The ARDA also supports reference and teaching tools that draw on the rich data archive. This research note offers a brief introduction to the quantitative data available for exploration or download, and a few of the website features most useful for research and teaching. Supported by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, the Pennsylvania State University, and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion, all data downloads and online services are free of charge. PMID:25484914

  9. Publication: Presentation rate in the Latin American region of the International Association for Dental Research.

    PubMed

    Jara-Tracchia, Lilian; Aromando, Romina F; Itoiz, María E

    2010-01-01

    Most research conducted by the dental scientific community is presented at the Annual Meetings of the different Divisions and Sections of IADR. This research acquires real value when the results are published in peer-reviewed journals. A useful indicator of the publication efficiency of research work is the rate of publication (PR), i.e., the ratio between the quantity of presentations and subsequent publications in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study was to analyze the PR of the presentations at the Sections and Divisions of the Latin American Region of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). We considered the presentations at the Annual Meetings of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru held in 2002 and 2003 and their corresponding publications indexed in PubMed from 2002 to 2009. For Venezuela, we analyzed the meetings held in 2002 and 2005, because they did not hold consecutive annual meetings. Presentation periods were selected based on previous data that report an interval of up to five years between presentation and publication. The number of presentations and the PR are related to the number of years that Sections and Divisions have existed. In Brazil and Argentina, PR (expressed as 1 publication: x presentations) is 1:3. The amount of research in Brazil is almost 8 times higher than in Argentina. Newer Sections and Divisions have produced fewer presentations, and the PR is also lower. We hope that this type of analysis will encourage the promotion of dental research at the different institutions and in the different vacancy areas of research, and facilitate exchange among researchers in the Region, enabling greater use to be made of their scientific activities. PMID:21053689

  10. Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON): A Network of Consortia for Post-Genome Wide Association (Post-GWA) Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology's (GAME-ON) overall goal is to foster an intra-disciplinary and collaborative approach to the translation of promising research leads deriving from the initial wave of cancer GWAS.

  11. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  12. Navigating the Thin Line between Education and Incarceration: An Action Research Case Study on Gang-Associated Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines data collected from an ethnographic research project conducted with 56 gang-associated Latino youths ages 15 to 21 from 2007 to 2009. The objectives of the study were to examine how poor Latino gang-associated youths perceived schooling and policing and to find out if the research process could promote educational aspirations…

  13. Images of Illness: How Causal Claims and Racial Associations Influence Public Preferences toward Diabetes Research Spending

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Lantz, Paula M.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the salience of health disparities in media and policy discourse, little previous research has investigated if imagery associating an illness with a certain racial group influences public perceptions. This study evaluated the influence of the media’s presentation of the causes of type 2 diabetes and its implicit racial associations on attitudes toward people with diabetes and preferences toward research spending. Survey participants who viewed an article on genetic causation or social determinants of diabetes were more likely to support increased government spending on research than those viewing an article with no causal language, while participants viewing an article on behavioral choices were more likely to attribute negative stereotypes to people with diabetes. Participants who viewed a photo of a black woman accompanying the article were less likely to endorse negative stereotypes than those viewing a photo of a white woman, but those who viewed a photo of a glucose-testing device expressed the lowest negative stereotypes. The effect of social determinants language was significantly different for blacks and whites, lowering stereotypes only among blacks. Emphasizing the behavioral causes of diabetes, as is common in media coverage, may perpetuate negative stereotypes. While drawing attention to the social determinants that shape these behaviors could mitigate stereotypes, this strategy is unlikely to influence the public uniformly. PMID:21451158

  14. A Content Analysis of College Reading Association/Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers Teacher Education Publications: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumm, Jeanne Shay; Lewis-Spector, Jill; Price, Debra; Doorn, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a content analysis of the publications of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER), previously known as College Reading Association (CRA), in the area of preservice teacher education in literacy. As a service to the organization, 71 articles published in ALER's flagship…

  15. Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators a statement on relationships between physicians and industry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Black, Henry R; Fonseca, Rafael; Garber, Jeffrey; Gonzalez-Campoy, J Michael; Kimmelstiel, Carey; Markowitz, Avi B; Nakayama, Don; Stell, Lance K; Stossel, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    Collaborations between physicians, particularly those in academic medicine, and industries that develop pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and diagnostic tests have led to substantial advances in patient care. At the same time, there is a strong awareness that these relationships, however beneficial they may be, should conform to established principles of ethical professional practice. Through a writing committee drawn from diverse disciplines across several institutions, the Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators (ACRE) has written a code of conduct to provide guidance to physicians in observing these principles. Our recommendations are not intended to be prescriptive or inflexible, but rather to be of assistance to physicians in making their own personal decisions on whether, or how, to be involved in research, education, or other collaborations with industry. PMID:22982801

  16. Factors Associated with Past Research Participation Among Low-Income Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M.; Williams, Mark L.; Vidrine, Damon J.; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, “trigger” influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified “other” as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a ‘guinea pig’ showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model ‘age’ and level of certainty regarding ‘keeping yourself from being a guinea pig’ showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants. PMID:22686261

  17. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Armen A.; DeMarini, David M.; Sapkota, Amir; Jack, Darby; Lan, Qing; Winn, Deborah M.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most exposed populations. A workshop was held in Arlington, Virginia, 9–11 May 2011, to better understand women’s and children’s potential health effects from IAP in developing countries. Workshop participants included international scientists, manufacturers, policy and regulatory officials, community leaders, and advocates who held extensive discussions to help identify future research needs. Objectives: Our objective was to identify research opportunities regarding IAP and cancer, including research questions that could be incorporated into studies of interventions to reduce IAP exposure. In this commentary, we describe the state of the science in understanding IAP and its associations with cancer and suggest research opportunities for improving our understanding of the issues. Discussion: Opportunities for research on IAP and cancer include studies of the effect of IAP on cancers other than lung cancer; studies of genetic factors that modify susceptibility; studies to determine whether the effects of IAP are mediated via germline, somatic, and/or epigenetic changes; and studies of the effects of IAP exposure via dermal and/or oral routes. Conclusions: IAP from indoor coal use increases the risk of lung cancer. Installing chimneys can reduce risk, and some genotypes, including GSTM1-null, can increase risk. Additional research is needed regarding the effects of IAP on other cancers and the effects of different types of solid fuels, oral and dermal routes of IAP exposure, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:22846419

  18. Factors associated with past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M; Williams, Mark L; Vidrine, Damon J; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, "trigger" influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified "other" as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a 'guinea pig' showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model 'age' and level of certainty regarding 'keeping yourself from being a guinea pig' showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants. PMID:22686261

  19. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and Its Associated Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues. PMID:24115361

  20. Assessment of Capacity to Consent to Research Among Psychiatric Outpatients: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Morán-Sánchez, Inés; Luna, Aurelio; Pérez-Cárceles, Maria D

    2016-03-01

    Mental capacity is an emerging ethical legal concept in psychiatric settings but its relation to clinical parameters remains yet uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between capacity to consent research and different psychiatric disorders and to characterize predictors of impairments in research decision-making capacity across diagnostic groups in a cross-sectional study. 139 consecutively referred outpatients with DSM-IV TR diagnoses of psychotic, mood and anxiety disorders were interviewed and a binary judgment of incapacity was made guided by the MacArthur competence assessment tool for consent research (MacCAT-CR). Demographics and clinical information were assessed by cases notes. Patients with anxiety disorders performed the best on the MacCAT-CR, and patients with psychotic disorders had the worst performance, however, there was considerable heterogeneity within each group. Cognitive impairment and global functioning were strongly correlated with MacCAT-CR subscales scores. 30.6% participants lacked research-related decisional capacity. Low Understanding score OR 0.07 (IC 95% 0.01-0.32) and Low Reasoning score OR 0.30 (IC 95% 0.11-0.82) were the factors most closely associated with lack of capacity. No absolute statements about decisional capacity can be driven merely due to the diagnosis. We found several risk factors which may be considered to decide which populations may require more thorough capacity assessments. The issues under consideration in the present study are by no means unique to people with psychiatric conditions. Ignoring this caveat, risks further inappropriate stigmatization of those with serious mental illness. PMID:25952945

  1. Development of an Expert Resource Network for Students and Advisors Engaging in Authentic Scientific Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danch, J. M.; Aker-bolin, K.

    2011-12-01

    In an effort to increase the the number of secondary students engaging in authentic scientific research and to improve the quality of that research, an online network of scientists and educators is being established. The Network will be assessable to students and advisors participating in the 2012 Monmouth Junior Science Symposium (MJSS), a scientific forum for New Jersey students, but is intended to serve as a model for use by participants in the additional 47 regional science symposia of which the MJSS is part. Hosted on the MJSS website, the Network will consist of contact information and profiles of scientists, educators and other research professionals willing to assist secondary students and their teacher/advisors perform authentic scientific research. Profiles will include area(s) of expertise and level of participation to which the individual is capable. The set of participating experts will have the potential to expand continually as additional professionals with a variety of backgrounds are recruited over time. The Network will also be made available to members of the New Jersey Science Supervisors Association to encourage school districts not currently participating in the MJSS to involve secondary students in conducting authentic scientific research. The Network's effectiveness will be evaluated by surveys completed by MJSS participants and their teacher/advisors included with their research paper submissions.

  2. Proceedings of the Annual Midwest Research Conference on Adult and Continuing Education (1st, DeKalb, IL, October 8-9, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czisny, Ken, Ed.

    These proceedings contain 19 papers and 3 symposia from a research conference on adult and continuing education. Topics of the presentations are staff development needs of Indiana adult basic and secondary instructional staff, the advocate counseling model as a teaching tool for self-advocacy, needs assessment of three age groups of adult…

  3. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  4. The Future of Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Orlando, Florida, October 24-26, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D., Ed.; And Others

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) are presented. The conference theme was the future of institutional research. Contents include reports of preconference workshops, speeches, panel reports, abstracts of papers, and reports pertaining to the affairs of the SAIR. Documents and authors…

  5. Arts and Learning Research, 1994. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie, Ed.; Morbey, Mary Leigh, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The research papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1994 meeting of the American Educational Research Association as part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group program. Papers collected in the volume represent an eclectic view of arts education and include music education. Following an editorial, papers are: "Arts and…

  6. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  7. The 1984 Research Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators. Junior and Community College Research: Texas, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association of Junior and Community Coll. Instructional Administrators.

    Reports and abstracts of research studies conducted by members of the Research Committee of the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators are provided. Section I presents the following reports: "A Learner Analysis Experiment: Cognitive Style versus Learning Style in Undergraduate Nursing Education," by Charles…

  8. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  9. Research Libraries: Measurement, Management, Marketing. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (108th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 1-2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Program presentations on issues related to the use of statistics by research libraries and business meeting minutes are combined in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The full text is provided for the three papers on the program theme that were presented at the meeting: (1) "Information to Manage--The Economics of…

  10. Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (28th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 17-20, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The theme of the 2001 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research was Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. These proceedings represent the intellectual content and insights shared during the conference. The papers are: (1) The Rocky Road to Graduation: An Academic Career Flow Model for Tracking…

  11. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K.; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E. Yoko; Mis, Frederick W.; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution’s admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  12. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  13. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are

  14. Who Shares? Who Doesn't? Factors Associated with Openly Archiving Raw Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%–35% in 2007–2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  15. Who shares? Who doesn't? Factors associated with openly archiving raw research data.

    PubMed

    Piwowar, Heather A

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%-35% in 2007-2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  16. Adult Education and the Contested Terrain of Public Policy. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (21st, Toronto, Ontario May 30-31 and June 1, 2002). = L'Education des Adultes et le Domaine Controverse des Affaires Publiques. Actes Annuel de L'Association Canadienne pour L'Etude de L'Education des Adultes (21eme, Toronto, Ontario, 30-31 Mai et 1 Juin, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mojab, Shahrzad, Ed.; McQueen, William, Ed.

    This document contains the texts of 57 papers, 10 roundtables, and 7 symposia from a Canadian conference on adult education and public policy. The following are among the papers included: "Childhood, Schooling Family and Community" (Margarida Aguiar); "Voices Inside" (Irene C. Baird); "Beyond Personal Agency" (Rose Barg); "Participatory Research,…

  17. Association of Race, Ethnicity and Language with Participation in Mental Health Research Among Adult Patients in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Chang, Trina E; Brill, Charlotte D; Traeger, Lara; Bedoya, C Andres; Inamori, Aya; Hagan, Patrick N; Flaherty, Katherine; Hails, Katherine; Yeung, Albert; Trinh, Nhi-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in clinical psychiatric research, but the reasons are not fully understood and may vary widely between minority groups. We used the Z-test of independent proportions and binary logistic regression to examine the relationship between race, ethnicity or primary language and participation in screening as well as interest in further research participation among primary care patients being screened for a depression study. Minorities were less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to complete the initial screening survey. Latinos and Blacks were more likely to agree to be contacted for research than non-Hispanic Whites. Among Latinos, primary language was associated with willingness to be contacted for research. Associations between research participation and race, ethnicity and language are complex and vary across different enrollment steps. Future research should consider stages of the research enrollment process separately to better understand barriers and identify targets for intervention. PMID:25398517

  18. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  19. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for Working with Special…

  20. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  1. Opportunities in multi dimensional trace metal imaging: Taking copper associated disease research to the next level

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Stefan; Ralle, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Copper plays an important role in numerous biological processes across all living systems predominantly because of its versatile redox behavior. Cellular copper homeostasis is tightly regulated and disturbances lead to severe disorders such as Wilson disease (WD) and Menkes disease. Age related changes of copper metabolism have been implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The role of copper in these diseases has been topic of mostly bioinorganic research efforts for more than a decade, metal-protein interactions have been characterized and cellular copper pathways have been described. Despite these efforts, crucial aspects of how copper is associated with AD, for example, is still only poorly understood. To take metal related disease research to the next level, emerging multi dimensional imaging techniques are now revealing the copper metallome as the basis to better understand disease mechanisms. This review will describe how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence microscopy and fluorescent copper probes have started to contribute to this field specifically WD and AD. It furthermore provides an overview of current developments and future applications in X-ray microscopic methodologies. PMID:23079951

  2. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  3. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  4. Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007*

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Sally A.; Nordberg, Judith M.; Palmer, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Methodology: Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991–2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Results: Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n = 174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n = 298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n = 332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n = 264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n = 130) of studies identified a funding source. Conclusion: This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians. PMID:19626146

  5. Abstracts of Research Papers 1988. Papers presented at the Annual Convention of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance (Kansas City, MO, April 7-10, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Diane L., Ed.; Clark, Jane E., Ed.

    Abstracts of papers accepted for presentation in the Research Consortium sessions of the 1988 American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance Convention in Kansas City, Missouri, are published in this volume. Abstracts of presentations made in the symposia are presented first, followed by those in the free communication…

  6. Savannah River Ecology Laboratory. Annual technical progress report of ecological research

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.H.

    1996-07-31

    The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. The Laboratory`s research mission was fulfilled with the publication of two books and 143 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical and students, and visiting scientists. An additional three books and about 80 journal articles currently are in press. Faculty, technician and students presented 193 lectures, scientific presentations, and posters to colleges and universities, including minority institutions. Dr. J Vaun McArthur organized and conducted the Third Annual SREL Symposium on the Environment: New Concepts in Strewn Ecology: An Integrative Approach. Dr. Michael Newman conducted a 5-day course titled Quantitative Methods in Ecotoxicology, and Dr. Brian Teppen of The Advanced Analytical Center for Environmental Sciences (AACES) taught a 3-day short course titled Introduction to Molecular Modeling of Environmental Systems. Dr. I. Lehr Brisbin co-hosted a meeting of the Crocodile Special Interest Group. Dr. Rebecca Sharitz attended four symposia in Japan during May and June 1996 and conducted meetings of the Executive Committee and Board of the International Association for Ecology (ENTECOL).

  7. ARL Preservation Statistics 2003-04. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2003-2004 fiscal year. Since 1987-1988, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown 66 to as many as 80 in more recent years, with 77 in 2003-2004. Rapidly…

  8. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1997-98: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.; Hipps, Kaylyn, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; O'Connor, Michael, Comp.

    This document presents data from 118 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1997-98 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  9. Digitization as a Method of Preservation? Final Report of a Working Group of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Association).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Hartmut; Dorr, Marianne

    The German Research Association (DFG) is actively involved in preservation of research materials; it takes the view that in preservation, the enormous potential of digitization for access should be combined with the stability of microfilm for long-term storage. A working group was convened to investigate the technical state of digitization of…

  10. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1999-2000: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Blixrud, Julia, Comp.

    This document presents data from 122 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1999-2000 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  11. ARL Preservation Statistics, 2000-01: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Blixrud, Julia, Comp.

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2000-01 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  12. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (29th, Annapolis, Maryland, November 16-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 2002 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research, a meeting devoted to assessment in the 21st century and the challenges that face institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Putting Community College Enrollment Trends in Perspective by the Use of Census Data and Market…

  13. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  14. Shaping the Politics of Education Association and Division L of the American Educational Research Association: Another William Lowe Boyd Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Bruce S.; Layton, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    William Lowe Boyd was there, making a difference in the study of politics of education, both intellectually and organizationally, at key moments in the development of the field. In fact, the field and study of the subject itself were linked politically, as scholars interested in research on the political science of how schools operate were…

  15. Stress- and PTSD-associated obesity and metabolic dysfunction: A growing problem requiring further research and novel treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Sloan, Denise M.; Keane, Terence M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a growing public health concern. More recently, evidence has indicated that PTSD leads to obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms of this link are through dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and related moderation of appetite hormones and neural activity, leading to changes in consumptive behaviors. Although research has been examining associations between PTSD and obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, future research should delineate potential mechanisms for these associations and develop targeted treatments to reduce these metabolic outcomes. PMID:25267015

  16. Research guidelines in the era of large-scale collaborations: an analysis of Genome-wide Association Study Consortia.

    PubMed

    Austin, Melissa A; Hair, Marilyn S; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2012-05-01

    Scientific research has shifted from studies conducted by single investigators to the creation of large consortia. Genetic epidemiologists, for example, now collaborate extensively for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The effect has been a stream of confirmed disease-gene associations. However, effects on human subjects oversight, data-sharing, publication and authorship practices, research organization and productivity, and intellectual property remain to be examined. The aim of this analysis was to identify all research consortia that had published the results of a GWAS analysis since 2005, characterize them, determine which have publicly accessible guidelines for research practices, and summarize the policies in these guidelines. A review of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies identified 55 GWAS consortia as of April 1, 2011. These consortia were comprised of individual investigators, research centers, studies, or other consortia and studied 48 different diseases or traits. Only 14 (25%) were found to have publicly accessible research guidelines on consortia websites. The available guidelines provide information on organization, governance, and research protocols; half address institutional review board approval. Details of publication, authorship, data-sharing, and intellectual property vary considerably. Wider access to consortia guidelines is needed to establish appropriate research standards with broad applicability to emerging forms of large-scale collaboration. PMID:22491085

  17. Research Guidelines in the Era of Large-scale Collaborations: An Analysis of Genome-wide Association Study Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Melissa A.; Hair, Marilyn S.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific research has shifted from studies conducted by single investigators to the creation of large consortia. Genetic epidemiologists, for example, now collaborate extensively for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The effect has been a stream of confirmed disease-gene associations. However, effects on human subjects oversight, data-sharing, publication and authorship practices, research organization and productivity, and intellectual property remain to be examined. The aim of this analysis was to identify all research consortia that had published the results of a GWAS analysis since 2005, characterize them, determine which have publicly accessible guidelines for research practices, and summarize the policies in these guidelines. A review of the National Human Genome Research Institute’s Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies identified 55 GWAS consortia as of April 1, 2011. These consortia were comprised of individual investigators, research centers, studies, or other consortia and studied 48 different diseases or traits. Only 14 (25%) were found to have publicly accessible research guidelines on consortia websites. The available guidelines provide information on organization, governance, and research protocols; half address institutional review board approval. Details of publication, authorship, data-sharing, and intellectual property vary considerably. Wider access to consortia guidelines is needed to establish appropriate research standards with broad applicability to emerging forms of large-scale collaboration. PMID:22491085

  18. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  19. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. PMID:16349374

  20. Systematic Review: The Association and Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Basic Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Boyle, Simone N.; Kuykendal, Adam; Fisher, Matthew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Barnato, Sara E.; Wagner, Robin L.; Goldstein, Carolyn E.; Tallman, Jacob; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Henke, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background No prior study has evaluated financial relationships of investigators with pharmaceutical manufacturers for basic science. An example of the importance and impact of such relationships is in the evaluation of erythropoietin receptors’(EpoRs) effects on cancer cell lines, since studies have reported increased mortality when cancer patients receive erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Purpose To assess the disclosed association that exist between pharmaceutical industry support and EpoRs effects on solid cancer cell lines. Data Sources MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988- July 2008) and two EpoR conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Study Selection All publications investigating EpoRs that met inclusion criteria were identified and included. Data Extraction Data were extracted on detection of EpoRs, presence of erythropoietin-induced signaling events, presence of erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function, nature of qualitative conclusions, and sources of funding for all 74 studies. Data Synthesis In comparison to studies of academic investigators with no disclosed funding support from ESA manufacturers (n=64), the studies from academic investigators with funding support from ESA manufacturers (n= 7) and the laboratories directed by investigators employed by ESA manufacturers (n=3) were both less likely to identify: EpoR presence on solid tumor cells; erythropoietin-induced signaling events; erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function; and less likely to conclude that their research had identified potentially harmful effects of erythropoietin on cancer cells. Additionally, presentations from industry-based investigator teams at NIH conferences were less likely to report EpoRs on cancer cell lines, downstream effects of erythropoietin, and cell proliferation and migration effects following EpoR administration. Conclusion Financial conflicts of interest impact the outcomes and presentation of basic science research data as

  1. Research papers and publications (1981-1987): Workload research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    An annotated bibliography of the research reports written by participants in NASA's Workload Research Program since 1981 is presented, representing the results of theoretical and applied research conducted at Ames Research Center and at universities and industrial laboratories funded by the program. The major program elements included: 1) developing an understanding of the workload concept; 2) providing valid, reliable, and practical measures of workload; and 3) creating a computer model to predict workload. The goal is to provide workload-related design principles, measures, guidelines, and computational models. The research results are transferred to user groups by establishing close ties with manufacturers, civil and military operators of aerospace systems, and regulatory agencies; publishing scientific articles; participating in and sponsoring workshops and symposia; providing information, guidelines, and computer models; and contributing to the formulation of standards. In addition, the methods and theories developed have been applied to specific operational and design problems at the request of a number of industry and government agencies.

  2. The role of Water Resources Users Associations in hydrological research: experiences from Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is based on recent studies in Lake Naivasha Basin that explored the ways in which locally based institutions namely the Water Resources Users Associations (WRUAs) are contributing to hydrological knowledge for decision-making processes. Lake Naivasha is a shallow freshwater body which is situated on the floor of Kenya's Rift Valley. It covers approximately 140 Km2 and supports a rich diversity of plants and animals. The Lake Naivasha Basin faces several challenges associated with over- population, urbanization and intensive agricultural activities. For example, the large-scale floricultural and horticultural export industries around the Lake have attracted thousands of migrants from different parts of Kenya who have settled around the Lake and exert a lot of pressure on its resources. The Lake Naivasha is one of the best examples in Kenya where the WRUAs development process has shown some progress. There are 12 WRUAS across the Lake Basin representing its various sub-catchments. In recent years, the role of WRUAs in the Lake has changed rapidly as they are no longer restricted to just resolving conflicts and fostering cooperation between water users. They now have an additional responsibility of collecting hydrological data within their respective sub-catchments. The majority of WRUA officials have been trained on how to collect data such as reading rain gauges, measuring stream flows, turbidity and sediment loads. The data collected are sent to the relevant government authorities for validation and interpretation and the information derived from this process is used to formulate important strategies such as water allocation plans. Using secondary data analysis, interviews and focus group discussions the study investigated how this new role of the WRUAs is changing the water resource management landscape in the Lake Naivasha Basin. In particular it presents key challenges and opportunities associated with attempts to build capacities of lower level

  3. Research misconduct and its federal regulation: the origin and history of the Office of Research Integrity--with personal views by ORI's former associate director for investigative oversight.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Misconduct in science and research became the subject of significant public attention and Congressional scrutiny beginning in the 1970s and 1980s, which led to public statements, policies, and finally formal federal regulations being promulgated by Government agency officials. The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in the Department of Health and Human Services was a major and very visible component of this process. This article provides a detailed history of the first two decades of federal research misconduct regulations and of ORI's history (under extremely difficult and unfair challenges), including personal views by the former ORI chief investigator and associate director. PMID:24028479

  4. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M; Fuller, Mark R; Kie, John G; Bates, Kirk K

    2010-07-27

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  5. The association between alcohol and breast cancer: popular press coverage of research.

    PubMed Central

    Houn, F; Bober, M A; Huerta, E E; Hursting, S D; Lemon, S; Weed, D L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study was undertaken to examine popular press reports of the association between alcohol and breast cancer. METHODS. Articles from scientific journals and stories from newspapers and magazines published from January 1, 1985, to July 1, 1992, were retrieved from six on-line databases. Lay press stories were analyzed to determine which medical articles were publicized and what information was reported. RESULTS. Fifty-eight scientific articles on the relationship of alcohol and breast cancer were found, and 64 newspaper and 23 magazine stories were retrieved. The press cited 11 studies, 19% of those published during the study period. Three studies were featured in 77% of popular press stories. No scientific review articles were reported. Behavioral recommendations were given to the public in 63% of stories. CONCLUSIONS. The vast majority of scientific studies on alcohol and breast cancer were ignored in press reports. We encourage researchers and the popular press to give the public a broader understanding of public health issues. PMID:7625500

  6. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  7. Assessment of the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University Photovoltaic Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey-Eddy, F.; McConnell, R. D.

    2002-08-01

    This report details the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Photovoltaic Research Associates Program, a small but remarkable program that directly affected dozens of minority undergraduate students in ways that changed many of their lives. The progress and accomplishments of undergraduates within the nine participating universities were monitored and assessed through their presentations at an annual NREL-sponsored HBCU conference. Although the funding was small, typically $400,000 per year, the money made a significant impact. The best students sometimes went on to the nation's top graduate schools (e.g., MIT) or important management positions in large companies. Other students had opportunities to learn how renewable energy could positively affect their lives and their neighbors' lives. A few were lucky enough to install photovoltaic lighting and water-pumping systems in Africa, and to see and feel firsthand the technical and emotional benefits of this technology for families and villages. Two of the schools, Texas Southern University and Central State University, were particularly successful in leveraging their DOE/NREL funding to obtain additional funding for expanded programs.

  8. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  9. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2) "Threading the…

  10. Arts and Learning Research, 1998-1999. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, April 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Liora, Ed.; Ellis, Nancy C., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This volume highlights thought-provoking issues in visual arts, drama, and music education presented at the 1998 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Following a message from the Special Interest Group Chair, Larry Kantner, and an editorial, articles in section 1 are: "Art Beginnings" (L. A. Kantner); "Teachers' Conceptions of…