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Sample records for research varian associates

  1. Status of gyrotron developments at Varian Associates

    SciTech Connect

    Jory, H.

    1984-01-01

    The status of gyrotrons developed by Varian for fusion heating applications will be briefly reviewed. Development work started in 1976 with the goal of 200 kW CW at 28 GHz. A more recent program was to develop 200 kW CW at 60 GHz. Pulsed and CW tubes produced by these programs will be briefly described and the scaling of these designs to other frequencies including 53, 56 and 70 GHz will be discussed. A 35 GHz design will also be described. Future efforts for gyrotrons at 120 and 140 GHz will also be discussed.

  2. Kocuria varians infection associated with brain abscess: A case report

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Kocuria, established by Stackebrandt et al., previously was classified into Micrococcus. Only two species, K. rosea and K. kristinae are reported to be associated as pathogenic and found with catheter-related bacteremia and acute cholecystitis. Case presentation We herein report the first case of brain abscess caused by Kocuria varians, a gram-positive microorganism, in a 52-year-old man. Hematogenous spread is the probable pathogenesis. Conclusions This report presents a case of Kocuria varians brain abscess successfully treated with surgical excision combined with antimicrobial therapy. In addition, Vitek 2 system has been used to identify and differentiate between coagulase-negative staphylococcus. PMID:20423506

  3. The Varian story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A.

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm.

  4. The Varian story.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ray; Morris, Gareth A

    2015-01-01

    This Perspective offers a personal view of the story of Varian NMR, a courageous initiative that began in the 1950s but came to an abrupt end some 60 years later. Without doubt, Varian leaves behind a priceless legacy, particularly in the field of structural chemistry. The highlights are set out in four main sections, named after the four seasons, but not necessarily in strict chronology. How did the accepted business practices influence the evolution, growth, and eventual demise of this exciting venture? How well did management handle an unconventional group of young scientific entrepreneurs? What does it all mean for the future of magnetic resonance? The subject can be viewed on two different levels, the Varian story itself, and the larger picture - the Silicon Valley phenomenon as a whole, with Varian considered as an interesting microcosm. PMID:25532932

  5. Researching Teacher Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Richard; Kuchah, Kuchah

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we argue not only for more research "into" English language teacher associations (TAs) but also for research to be carried out "by" and "within" TAs. That is, we advocate their becoming "Researching TAs" themselves. This suggestion derives from our recent collaborative work with/within the…

  6. Characterization of gamma radiation inducible thioredoxin h from Spirogyra varians.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Yang, Ho-Yeon; Lee, Seung-Sik; Kim, Dong-Ho; Kim, Gwang-Hoon; Choi, Jong-il

    2013-08-15

    In this study, thioredoxin h (Trxh) was isolated and characterized from the fresh water green alga Spirogyra varians, which was one amongst the pool of proteins induced upon gamma radiation treatment. cDNA clones encoding S. varians thioredoxin h were isolated from a pre-constructed S. varians cDNA library. Trxh had a molecular mass of 13.5kDa and contained the canonical WCGPC active site. Recombinant Trxh showed the disulfide reduction activity, and exhibited insulin reduction activity. Also, Trxh had higher 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) reduction activity with Arabidopsis thioredoxin reductase (TR) than with Escherichia coli TR. Specific expression of the Trxh gene was further analyzed at mRNA and protein levels and was found to increase by gamma irradiation upto the absorbed dose of 3kGy, suggesting that Trxh may have potential functions in protection of biomolecules from gamma irradiation. PMID:23830452

  7. Comparison of measured Varian Clinac 21EX and TrueBeam accelerator electron field characteristics.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Samantha A M; Zavgorodni, Sergei; Gagne, Isabelle M

    2015-01-01

    Dosimetric comparisons of radiation fields produced by Varian's newest linear accelerator, the TrueBeam, with those produced by older Varian accelerators are of interest from both practical and research standpoints. While photon fields have been compared in the literature, similar comparisons of electron fields have not yet been reported. In this work, electron fields produced by the TrueBeam are compared with those produced by Varian's Clinac 21EX accelerator. Diode measurements were taken of fields shaped with electron applicators and delivered at 100 cm SSD, as well as those shaped with photon MLCs without applicators and delivered at 70 cm SSD for field sizes ranging from 5 × 5 to 25 × 25 cm² at energies between 6 and 20 MeV. Additionally, EBT2 and EBT3 radio-chromic film measurements were taken of an MLC-shaped aperture with closed leaf pairs delivered at 70 cm SSD using 6 and 20 MeV electrons. The 6 MeV fields produced by the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX were found to be almost indistinguishable. At higher energies, TrueBeam fields shaped by electron applicators were generally flatter and had less photon contamination compared to the Clinac 21EX. Differences in PDDs and profiles fell within 3% and 3 mm for the majority of measurements. The most notable differences for open fields occurred in the profile shoulders for the largest applicator field sizes. In these cases, the TrueBeam and Clinac 21EX data differed by as much as 8%. Our data indicate that an accurate electron beam model of the Clinac 21EX could be used as a starting point to simulate electron fields that are dosimetrically equivalent to those produced by the TrueBeam. Given that the Clinac 21EX shares head geometry with Varian's iX, Trilogy, and Novalis TX accelerators, our findings should also be applicable to these machines. PMID:26219015

  8. NASA/OAI Research Associates program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The intent of this activity was the development of a cooperative program between the Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center with the objective of better preparing recent university graduates for careers in government aerospace research laboratories. The selected individuals were given the title of research associate. To accomplish the aims of this effort: (1) the research associates were introduced to the NASA Lewis Research Center and its mission/programs, (2) the research associates directly participated in NASA research and development programs, and (3) the research associates were given continuing educational opportunities in specialized areas. A number of individuals participated in this project during the discourse of this cooperative agreement. Attached are the research summaries of eight of the research associates. These reports give a very good picture of the research activities that were conducted by the associates.

  9. Photovoltaic concentrator research progress

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper provides a review of progress in the DOE sponsored, Sandia managed Photovoltaic Concentrator Research Project. Research status, project goals and a discussion of concentrator economics is presented. Recent research accomplishments that will be discussed include 21% efficient baseline silicon cells by Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Sandia, 26% efficient GaAs cells by Varian Associates, and near 25% mechanically stacked multijunction GaAs/Si cells by Hughes Research, Applied Solar, and Sandia. In addition, improvements in breadboard module units (i.e. single lens/cell combination) such as a 19% GaAs unit by Varian and a near 17% silicon unit by ENTECH will be reviewed. This paper concludes that the photovoltaic concentrator option is making excellent progress toward competitive cost-effectiveness and provides a strong photovoltaic alternative.

  10. Training needs of clinical research associates.

    PubMed

    Ajay, Samyuktha; Bhatt, Arun

    2010-10-01

    Clinical research is a relatively new field in our country that has seen very rapid growth in the last few years. Availability of personnel appropriately trained to the specific requirements of the role they will perform in clinical research is critical for capacity expansion. Our study attempts to understand the specific areas of knowledge and skills that are important for the role of a clinical research associate. The survey was conducted among clinical research professionals from industry and academia who had more than five years of clinical research experience and held important decision making positions in clinical research (stakeholders). The survey questionnaire was designed as a matrix of various clinical research roles on the y-axis and six knowledge modules and eight skills on the x-axis. Respondents were asked to rate the importance of the knowledge /skills to the role of clinical research associates on a three point scale. In discussing results, a significant response was considered to be 50% or greater positive response from the total group. The significant findings were that general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules were rated as critical for the role of clinical research associate. Regulatory module was rated as important for the role. The other significant responses were that three of the sub-topics in the methodology module - framing a research proposal/protocol and experimental design, designing case report forms and EDCs and conducting PK studies - were rated as important and one sub topic in the data management and statistics module was rated as not important. All the skills except leadership skills were rated as critical for the role. The findings of our survey were in general on the lines of expectations of performance of the role. The general, ethics and clinical trial execution modules are critical knowledge areas for the role of a clinical research associate. No clear trends emerged for some of the other modules. Leadership

  11. Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) is a consortium of educational and other non-profit institutions that operates world-class astronomical observatories. Its members are 29 US institutions and five international affiliates. For the National Science Foundation, the AURA manage the National Optical Astronomy Observatories (NOAO) and THE GEMINI OBSERVATORY. Fo...

  12. Singapore Meeting of Education Research Associations Sets the Stage for Establishing a World Education Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a meeting of education research associations from around the world which achieved a major goal toward establishing a World Education Research Association (WERA) in Singapore on November 24-25, 2008. At the meeting, representatives reaffirmed a commitment to establish WERA and finalized several key documents for its…

  13. Varian HDR surface applicators - commissioning and clinical implementation.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; McKee, Andrea B; Halvorsen, Per H

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the dosimetric performance of Varian surface applicators with the source vertically positioned and develop procedures for clinical implementation. The Varian surface applicators with the source verti-cally positioned provide a wide range of apertures making them clinically advanta-geous, though the steep dose gradient in the region of 3-4 mm prescription depth presents multiple challenges. The following commissioning tests were performed: 1) verification of functional integrity and physical dimensions; and 2) dosimetric measurements to validate data provided by Varian as well as data obtained using the Acuros algorithm for heterogeneity corrected dose calculation. A solid water (SW) phantom was scanned and the Acuros algorithm was used to compute the dose at 5 mm depth and at surface for all applicators. Two sets of reference dose measurements were performed, with the source positioned at (i) -10 mm and (ii) -15 mm from the center of the first nominal dwell position. Measurements were taken at 5 mm depth in a SW phantom and in air at the applicator surface. The results were then compared to the vendor's data and to the Acuros calculated dose. Relative dose measurements using Gafchromic films were taken at a depth of 4 mm in SW. Percent depth ionization (PDI) measurements using ion chamber were performed in SW. The profiles generated from film measurements and the PDI plots were compared with those computed using the Acuros algorithm and vendor's data, when available. Preliminary leakage tests were performed using opti-cally stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) and the results were compared with Acuros predictions. All applicators were found to be functional with physical dimensions within 1 mm of specifications. For scenario (ii) measurements taken in SW at 5 mm depth and in air at the surface of each applicator were within 10% and 4% agreement with vendor's data, respectively. Compared with Acuros predic-tions, these

  14. Spirogyra varians mutant generated by high dose gamma-irradiation shows increased antioxidant properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hak-Jyung; Yoon, Minchul; Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant properties of a Spirogyra varians mutant (Mut) produced by gamma irradiation. Methanol extracts were prepared from Spirogyra varians wild-type and Mut plants, and their antioxidant activities and total phenolic content (TPC) were determined. Antioxidant parameters, including the 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity and ferric-reducing/antioxidant power, were higher in the Mut extract. Moreover, the TPC level was higher (P<0.05) in the Mut methanol extract. Therefore, these results suggest that gamma irradiation-induced S. varians Mut has superior antioxidant properties.

  15. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false The Research Associate Program. 256.2... INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FELLOWSHIPS AND RESEARCH ASSOCIATES RESEARCH ASSOCIATE PROGRAM § 256.2 The Research Associate Program. The Bureau provides its facilities,...

  16. SU-E-T-588: Characterization and Clinical Validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care

    SciTech Connect

    Dewyngaert, K; Jozsef, G; Formenti, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To report on the clinical validation of the Varian Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care: a platform for prone breast radiation therapy. Methods: Patients treated using Breast Conserving Radiation Therapy may benefit from treatment in the prone position with the breast tissue falling freely away from the body. This geometry allows the breast tissue to be treated while avoiding the lung and heart tissue. Eighteen patients simulated and treated using the Varian Medical Systems Pivotal™ Treatment Solution for Prone Breast Care were monitored over the course of treatment for positioning integrity and reproducibility. As this carbon-fiber platform actually replaces a portion of the couch top, indexing is inherent to its design. Patients were positioned on the couch and aligned using fiducial markers and lateral SSD to the breast fiducial point. The daily couch coordinates then serves as indicators for positioning variability with this system. Results: The variations in couch vertical, longitudinal and lateral positions were centered on a mean value of zero with standard deviations of 0.44cm, 0.75cm and 0.79cm respectively. Other factors explored were variations in distance of mid-sternum to table edge and patient rotation into the opening. The median rotation of the chest wall was found to be 11.5 degrees at CT-Simulation with a median distance of 2.5cm from midsternum to support opening. Patient rotation was not associated with either breast size or distance from edge of platform. Conclusion: The Pivotal™ Treatment solution consists of a couch top that replaces the standard top and as such is open from beneath without obstruction. This is a distinction from all other solutions which rely on a platform positioned above and indexed to the treatment couch. We found the reproducibility to be consistent with our historical measures while offering benefits of an integrated solution as stated above. supported by Professional Services Agreeement with

  17. Quality assurance methodology for Varian RapidArc treatment plans.

    PubMed

    Iftimia, Ileana; Cirino, Eileen T; Xiong, Li; Mower, Herbert W

    2010-01-01

    With the commercial introduction of the Varian RapidArc, a new modality for treatment planning and delivery, the need has arisen for consistent and efficient techniques for performing patient-specific quality assurance (QA) tests. In this paper we present our methodology for a RapidArc treatment plan QA procedure. For our measurements we used a 2D diode array (MapCHECK) embedded at 5 cm water equivalent depth in MapPHAN 5 phantom and an Exradin A16 ion chamber placed in six different positions in a cylindrical homogeneous phantom (QUASAR). We also checked the MUs for the RapidArc plans by using independent software (RadCalc). The agreement between Eclipse calculations and MapCHECK/MapPHAN5 measurements was evaluated using both absolute distance-to-agreement (DTA) and gamma index with 10% dose threshold (TH), 3% dose difference (DD), and 3 mm DTA. The average agreement was 94.4% for the DTA approach and 96.3% for the gamma index approach. In high-dose areas, the discrepancy between calculations and ion chamber measurements using the QUASAR phantom was within 4.5% for prostate cases. For the RadCalc calculations, we used the average SSD along the arc; however, for some patients the agreement for the MUs obtained with RadCalc versus Eclipse was inadequate (discrepancy > 5%). In these cases, the plan was divided into partial arc plans so that RadCalc could perform a better estimation of the MUs. The discrepancy was further reduced to within ~4% using this approach. Regardless of the variation in prescribed dose and location of the treated areas, we obtained very good results for all patients studied in this paper. PMID:21081873

  18. Molecular Phylogeny, Laboratory Rearing, and Karyotype of the Bombycid Moth, Trilocha varians

    PubMed Central

    Daimon, Takaaki; Yago, Masaya; Hsu, Yu-Feng; Fujii, Tsuguru; Nakajima, Yumiko; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Abe, Hiroaki; Katsuma, Susumu; Shimada, Toru

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the molecular phylogeny, laboratory rearing, and karyotype of a bombycid moth, Trilocha varians (F. Walker) (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), which feeds on leaves of Ficus spp. (Rosales: Moraceae). The larvae of this species were collected in Taipei city, Taiwan, and the Ryukyu Archipelago (Ishigaki and Okinawa Islands, Japan). Molecular phylogenetic analyses revealed that T. varians belongs to the subfamily Bombycinae, thus showing a close relationship to the domesticated silkworm Bombyx mori (L.), a lepidopteran model insect. A laboratory method was developed for rearing T. varians and the time required for development from the embryo to adult was determined. From oviposition to adult emergence, the developmental zero was 10.47 °C and total effective temperature was 531.2 day—degrees, i.e., approximately 30 days for one generation when reared at 28 °C. The haploid of T. varians consisted of n = 26 chromosomes. In highly polyploid somatic nuclei, females showed a large heterochromatin body, indicating that the sex chromosome system in T. varians is WZ/ZZ (female/male). The results of the present study should facilitate the utilization of T. varians as a reference species for B. mori, thereby leading to a greater understanding of the ecology and evolution of bombycid moths. PMID:22963522

  19. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dirgayussa, I Gde Eka Yani, Sitti; Haryanto, Freddy; Rhani, M. Fahdillah

    2015-09-30

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good

  20. WE-G-BRF-07: Non-Circular Scanning Trajectories with Varian Developer Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A; Pearson, E; Pan, X; Pelizzari, C

    2014-06-15

    testing these and other new scanning trajectories. Support was provided in part by the University of Chicago Research Computing Center, Varian Medical Systems, and NIH Grants 1RO1CA120540, T32EB002103, S10 RR021039 and P30 CA14599. The contents of this work are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the supporting organizations.

  1. Commissioning of a Varian Clinac iX 6 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirgayussa, I. Gde Eka; Yani, Sitti; Rhani, M. Fahdillah; Haryanto, Freddy

    2015-09-01

    Monte Carlo modelling of a linear accelerator is the first and most important step in Monte Carlo dose calculations in radiotherapy. Monte Carlo is considered today to be the most accurate and detailed calculation method in different fields of medical physics. In this research, we developed a photon beam model for Varian Clinac iX 6 MV equipped with MilleniumMLC120 for dose calculation purposes using BEAMnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo system based on the underlying EGSnrc particle transport code. Monte Carlo simulation for this commissioning head LINAC divided in two stages are design head Linac model using BEAMnrc, characterize this model using BEAMDP and analyze the difference between simulation and measurement data using DOSXYZnrc. In the first step, to reduce simulation time, a virtual treatment head LINAC was built in two parts (patient-dependent component and patient-independent component). The incident electron energy varied 6.1 MeV, 6.2 MeV and 6.3 MeV, 6.4 MeV, and 6.6 MeV and the FWHM (full width at half maximum) of source is 1 mm. Phase-space file from the virtual model characterized using BEAMDP. The results of MC calculations using DOSXYZnrc in water phantom are percent depth doses (PDDs) and beam profiles at depths 10 cm were compared with measurements. This process has been completed if the dose difference of measured and calculated relative depth-dose data along the central-axis and dose profile at depths 10 cm is ≤ 5%. The effect of beam width on percentage depth doses and beam profiles was studied. Results of the virtual model were in close agreement with measurements in incident energy electron 6.4 MeV. Our results showed that photon beam width could be tuned using large field beam profile at the depth of maximum dose. The Monte Carlo model developed in this study accurately represents the Varian Clinac iX with millennium MLC 120 leaf and can be used for reliable patient dose calculations. In this commissioning process, the good criteria of dose

  2. Neutron contamination of Varian Clinac iX 10 MV photon beam using Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yani, S.; Tursinah, R.; Rhani, M. F.; Soh, R. C. X.; Haryanto, F.; Arif, I.

    2016-03-01

    High energy medical accelerators are commonly used in radiotherapy to increase the effectiveness of treatments. As we know neutrons can be emitted from a medical accelerator if there is an incident of X-ray that hits any of its materials. This issue becomes a point of view of many researchers. The neutron contamination has caused many problems such as image resolution and radiation protection for patients and radio oncologists. This study concerns the simulation of neutron contamination emitted from Varian Clinac iX 10 MV using Monte Carlo code system. As neutron production process is very complex, Monte Carlo simulation with MCNPX code system was carried out to study this contamination. The design of this medical accelerator was modelled based on the actual materials and geometry. The maximum energy of photons and neutron in the scoring plane was 10.5 and 2.239 MeV, respectively. The number and energy of the particles produced depend on the depth and distance from beam axis. From these results, it is pointed out that the neutron produced by linac 10 MV photon beam in a typical treatment is not negligible.

  3. On variation in Schloenbachia varians (J. Sowerby, 1817) from the Lower Cenomanian of western Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, William James

    2013-12-01

    Kennedy, W.J. 2013. On variation in Schloenbachia varians (J. Sowerby, 1817) from the Lower Cenomanian of western Kazakhstan Acta Geologica Polonica, 63(4), 443-468. Warszawa. An assemblage of 94 specimens of Schloenbachia varians (J. Sowerby, 1817) from the Lower Cenomanian Sharpeiceras schlueteri Subzone of the Mantelliceras mantelli Zone of the Besakty section in the Mangyshlak Mountains of western Kazakhstan includes 26 complete adults that range from to 59-174 mm in diameter. No size-related dimorphism was detected in the assemblage, which shows wide, continuous intraspecific variation. This is described in terms of five formae; from robust to gracile these are: ventriosa, varians sensu stricto, subtuberculata , intermedia, and subplana. The ratio of robust (ventriosa + varians sensu stricto) to gracile (subtuberculata + intermedia + subplana) individuals is 34% to 66%. The reference specimens of the formae and their synonyms are described and illustrated, and related to the Besakty material. The modification of adult body chamber ornament of all formae is documented, and Jakeiceras Cooper and Owen, 2011 is shown to be based on an adult of a passage form between forma subtuberculata and forma intermedia. The differences between Lower Cenomanian S. varians, lower Middle Cenomanian S. coupei (Brongniart, 1822), and upper Middle and lower Upper Cenomanian S. lymensis Spath, 1926b are described and illustrated.

  4. Factors Associated with Research Wrongdoing in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Adeleye, Omokhoa A.; Adebamowo, Clement A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about research wrongdoing in biomedical research are growing in developing countries, where research ethics training and research regulatory systems are just emerging. In a first-time study in Africa, medical/dental researchers (N = 132) in two states in Nigeria were interviewed on a wide range of research wrongdoings and potential predictors. Using multivariate logistic regression, significant predictors of research wrongdoing were identified. Some 22.0% admitted to at least one of fabrication, falsification, and plagiarism, the predictors of which were knowledge gaps in research ethics and pressure to publish enough papers for promotion. Acknowledging inadequate knowledge of research ethics was a predictor of admitting a wrongdoing. Systems that support ethical research, including skilled training and funding, are recommended. PMID:23324199

  5. SU-C-304-02: Robust and Efficient Process for Acceptance Testing of Varian TrueBeam Linacs Using An Electronic Portal Imaging Device (EPID)

    SciTech Connect

    Yaddanapudi, S; Cai, B; Sun, B; Li, H; Noel, C; Goddu, S; Mutic, S; Harry, T; Pawlicki, T

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this project was to develop a process that utilizes the onboard kV and MV electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) to perform rapid acceptance testing (AT) of linacs in order to improve efficiency and standardize AT equipment and processes. Methods: In this study a Varian TrueBeam linac equipped with an amorphous silicon based EPID (aSi1000) was used. The conventional set of AT tests and tolerances was used as a baseline guide, and a novel methodology was developed to perform as many tests as possible using EPID exclusively. The developer mode on Varian TrueBeam linac was used to automate the process. In the current AT process there are about 45 tests that call for customer demos. Many of the geometric tests such as jaw alignment and MLC positioning are performed with highly manual methods, such as using graph paper. The goal of the new methodology was to achieve quantitative testing while reducing variability in data acquisition, analysis and interpretation of the results. The developed process was validated on two machines at two different institutions. Results: At least 25 of the 45 (56%) tests which required customer demo can be streamlined and performed using EPIDs. More than half of the AT tests can be fully automated using the developer mode, while others still require some user interaction. Overall, the preliminary data shows that EPID-based linac AT can be performed in less than a day, compared to 2–3 days using conventional methods. Conclusions: Our preliminary results show that performance of onboard imagers is quite suitable for both geometric and dosimetric testing of TrueBeam systems. A standardized AT process can tremendously improve efficiency, and minimize the variability related to third party quality assurance (QA) equipment and the available onsite expertise. Research funding provided by Varian Medical Systems. Dr. Sasa Mutic receives compensation for providing patient safety training services from Varian Medical

  6. Implicit Measures of Association in Psychopathology Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roefs, Anne; Huijding, Jorg; Smulders, Fren T. Y.; MacLeod, Colin M.; de Jong, Peter J.; Wiers, Reinout W.; Jansen, Anita T. M.

    2011-01-01

    Validity;Measures (Individuals);Studies obtaining implicit measures of associations in "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., Text Revision; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) Axis I psychopathology are organized into three categories: (a) studies comparing groups having a disorder with controls, (b) experimental…

  7. Active heater control and regulation for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, T.E.

    1991-10-01

    The Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron is currently being used in the new 110 GHz 2 MW ECH system installed on D3-D. This new ECH system augments the 60 GHz system which uses Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons. The new 110 GHz system will be used for ECH experiments on D3-D with a pulse width capability of 10 sec. In order to maintain a constant RF outpower level during long pulse operation, active filament-heater control and regulation is required to maintain a constant cathode current. On past D3-D experiments involving the use of Varian VA-8060 gyrotrons for ECH power, significant gyrotron heater-emission depletion was experienced for pulse widths > 300 msec. This decline in heater-emission directly results in gyrotron-cathode current droop. Since RF power from gyrotrons decreases as cathode current decreases, it is necessary to maintain a constant cathode current level during gyrotron pulses for efficient gyrotron operation. Therefore, it was determined that a filament-heater control system should be developed for the Varian VGT-8011 gyrotron which will include cathode-current feed-back. This paper discusses the mechanisms used to regulate gyrotron filament-heater voltage by using cathode-current feed-back. 1 fig.

  8. Genome Sequence of Kocuria varians G6 Isolated from a Slaughterhouse in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Raghupathi, Prem K.; Herschend, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first draft genome sequence of Kocuria varians G6, which was isolated from a meat chopper at a small slaughterhouse in Denmark. The 2.90-Mb genome sequence consists of 95 contigs and contains 2,518 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27034480

  9. Modification of the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer for submilligram natural abundance C-13 analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, D. M.; Olsen, R. W.; Burlingame, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    Quadrature detection modifications and a microcell arrangement are described for the Varian XL-100 NMR spectrometer which routinely improve sensitivity in C-13 Fourier transform sample-limited studies by a factor of 4 to 5. The power requirement of the RF pulse amplifier is relaxed by a factor of 4. Previously attainable resolution is not affected.

  10. Basic dosimetric verification in water of the anisotropic analytical algorithm for Varian, Elekta and Siemens linacs.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Luca; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Clivio, Alessandro; Glashörster, Marco; Schiefer, Hans; Fogliata, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Since early 2007 a new version of the Anisotropic Analytical Algorithm (AAA) for photon dose calculations was released by Varian Medical Systems for clinical usage on Elekta linacs and also, with some restrictions, for Siemens linacs. Basic validation studies were performed and reported for three beams. 4,6 and 15 MV for an Elekta Synergy, 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus and, as a reference, for 6 and 15 MV from a Varian Clinac 2100C/D. Generally AAA calculations reproduced well measured data and small deviations were observed for open and wedged fields. PDD curves showed in average differences between calculation and measurement smaller than 1% or 1.2 mm for Elekta beams, 1% or 1.8 mm for Siemens beams and 1% or 1 mm for Varian beams. Profiles in the flattened region matched measurements with deviations smaller than 1% for Elekta and Varian beams, 2% for Siemens. Percentage differences in Output Factors were observed as small as 1% in average. PMID:18705613

  11. Genome Sequence of Kocuria varians G6 Isolated from a Slaughterhouse in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Raghupathi, Prem K; Herschend, Jakob; Røder, Henriette L; Sørensen, Søren J; Burmølle, Mette

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first draft genome sequence ofKocuria variansG6, which was isolated from a meat chopper at a small slaughterhouse in Denmark. The 2.90-Mb genome sequence consists of 95 contigs and contains 2,518 predicted protein-coding genes. PMID:27034480

  12. The Associability of CVC Pairs. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, William E.; Kiess, Harold O.

    To obtain an a priori estimate of natural language mediators (NLM's) 320 pairs of words with the consonant-vowel-consonant-pattern (CVC's) were broken into four series of 90 pairs and presented to 240 male and female undergraduates. Pairs were shown for 15 seconds while the subjects wrote down any associative device or NLM they could generate that…

  13. Factors Associated with Clinical Dental Faculty Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, James E.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A survey of U.S. and Canadian full-time dental school faculty found that research productivity was associated with the total dollar amount of past research funding, career age, training status, colleague utilization in conducting research, and conducting research from planned goals. (Author/MSE)

  14. Organising Continuity and Quality of the European Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jochems, Wim; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    Research associations tend to be voluntary by nature and therefore unstable in character, and thus are subject to threat for their continuity. History has shown that the European Educational Research Association (EERA) is not an exception to this rule. Because EERA Council and the board members are volunteers with limited time, experience and…

  15. Student Science Research Associates (SSRA) 1996 Research Journal

    SciTech Connect

    Knezovich, J.

    1996-12-01

    The following student projects are reported: SSRA water research projects, various effects on polliwogs` growth and development, effects of Willow Park Golf Course on nitrate and phosphate levels in San Leandro Creek, water quality evaluation using color infrared photography, biochemical analysis of aquatic insects, effects of miracid/calcium chloride/liquid plant food on stringless bush beans, effects of vegetable oil on bean growth, effect of river water on lima beans, effect of storm water runoff on pH and phosphate levels of Dry Creek, acid rain in Modesto, use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to study Egeria Densa, and effect of marination on formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked chicken meat.

  16. Research of Geochemical Associations of Nephelin Ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vulf, M.; Simonov, K.; Sazonov, A.

    The instant paper concerns research of distribution petrogenic chemical members in urtit ore body of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit. Rocks of the deposit are ore for producing alum earth. Actuality of the subject based on outlooks of detection noble metal ore-bearing (Au, Pt, Pd, Rh, Ru) in alkaline rocks of Siberia, including rocks of Kia-Shaltyrsk deposit (Kuznetsk Alatau). The main purpose of analysis of distribution of members is directed to detection of a non-uniformity of distribution of substance and segments enriched with alum earth and noble members. The basic solved problems are following: o Creation regression models of ore body; o Definition of cumulative distribution functions of members in a contour of ore body; o The analysis of the obtained outcomes in geologic terms. For construction regression models the full-scale data was used, which was presented by the results of the spectral and silicate analyses of gold and petrogenic members containing 130 assays arranged in ore body. A non-linear multiparameter model of the ore body based on components of nephelin ore using neural net approach was constructed. For each member the corresponding distribution function is produced. The model is constructed on the following members: Au, Al2O3, SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, MgO, SO3, R2O ((Na2O+K2O) -1) and losses of burning. The error of model forecasting membersS concentrations was from 0.02 up to 20%. Large errors basically connected with assays located near contact of ore body and ad- jacent strata or with very high concentrations of members; also they can be connected with different genesis of rocks or superposition of other processes. The analysis of concentrations of members and normalised absolute errors of the fore- cast has shown, that all members can be sectioned into two groups: first: Al2O3, SiO2, R2O, Fe2O3 and second: Au, losses of burning, CaO, MgO, SO3. The distribution of 1 gold is tightly connected with calcium and losses of burning and spatially linked with zones

  17. Research Administrator Salary: Association with Education, Experience, Credentials and Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shambrook, Jennifer; Roberts, Thomas J.; Triscari, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Research Administrators Stress Perception Survey (2010 RASPerS) collected data from 1,131 research administrators on salary, years experience, educational level, Certified Research Administrator (CRA) status, and gender. Using these data, comparisons were made to show how salary levels are associated with each of these variables. Using…

  18. National Rural Education Association Research Agenda Report. October 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, Keigh

    To obtain rural school superintendents' assessment of research needs, questionnaires were sent in 1986 to 752 superintendents from schools with less than 1,000 K-12 student population. The questionnaires, adapted from the research agenda of the Rural Education Association (REA), consisted of 51 research topics grouped under 9 thematic categories.…

  19. Dose distribution transfer from CyberKnife to Varian treatment planning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osewski, W.; Ślosarek, K.; Karaszewska, B.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this paper was to introduce one of the options of the locally developed DDcon.exe which gives the possibility to transfer the dose distribution from CyberKnife (Accuray) treatment planning system (CK TPS) to Varian treatment planning system (Eclipse TPS, Varian). DICOM format is known as a universal format for medical data. The dose distribution is stored as RTdose file in DICOM format, so there should be a possibility to transfer it between different treatment planning systems. Trying to transfer RTdose file from CK TPS to Eclipse TPS the error message occurs. That's because the RTdose file in CK TPS is connected with Structure_Set_Sequence against Eclipse TPS where it's connected with RT_Plan_Sequence. To make it transferable RTdose file from CK TPS have to be 'disconnected' from Structure_Set_Sequence and 'connected' with RT_Plan_Sequence. This is possible thanks DDcon software which creates new RTdose file by changing proper DICOM tags in original RTdose file. New homemade software gives us an opportunity to transfer dose distribution from CyberKnife TPS to TPS Eclipse. This method opens new possibilities to combine or compare different treatment techniques in Varian TPS.

  20. SU-F-BRE-11: Neutron Measurements Around the Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Maglieri, R; Seuntjens, J; Kildea, J; Liang, L; DeBlois, F; Evans, M; Licea, A; Dubeau, J; Witharana, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: With the emergence of flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams, several authors have noted many advantages to their use. One such advantage is the decrease in neutron production by photonuclear reactions in the linac head. In the present work we investigate the reduction in neutrons from a Varian TrueBeam linac using the Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS, Detec). The neutron spectrum, total fluence and source strength were measured and compared for 10 MV with and without flattening filter and the effect of moderation by the room and maze was studied for the 15 MV beam. Methods: The NNS, similar to traditional Bonner sphere detectors but operated in current mode, was used to measure the neutron fluence and spectrum. The NNS was validated for use in high dose rate environments using Monte Carlo simulations and calibrated at NIST and NRC Canada. Measurements were performed at several positions within the treatment room and maze with the linac jaws closed to maximize neutron production. Results: The measurements showed a total fluence reduction between 35-40% in the room and maze when the flattening filter was removed. The neutron source strength Qn was calculated from in-room fluence measurements and was found to be 0.042 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy, 0.026 × 10{sup 2} n/Gy and 0.59 × 101{sup 2} n/Gy for the 10 MV, the 10 MV FFF and 15 MV beams, respectively. We measured ambient equivalent doses of 11 mSv/hr, 7 mSv/hr and 218 mSv/hr for the 10 MV, 10 MV FFF and 15 MV by the head. Conclusion: Our measurements revealed a decrease in total fluence, neutron source strength and equivalent dose of approximately 35-40% across the treatment room for the FFF compared to FF modes. This demonstrates, as expected, that the flattening filter is a major component of the neutron production for the TrueBeam. The authors greatly acknowledge support form the Canadian Nuclear Commission and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada through the CREATE program. Co

  1. The Implications of Temperature-Mediated Plasticity in Larval Instar Number for Development within a Marine Invertebrate, the Shrimp Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Oliphant, Andrew; Hauton, Chris; Thatje, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Variations in larval instar number are common among arthropods. Here, we assess the implications of temperature-mediated variations in larval instar number for larval development time, larval growth rates, and juvenile dry weight within the palaemonid shrimp, Palaemonetes varians. In contrast with previous literature, which focuses on terrestrial arthropods, particularly model and pest species often of laboratory lines, we use wild shrimp, which differ in their life history from previous models. Newly-hatched P. varians larvae were first reared at 5, 10, 17, 25, and 30°C to assess their thermal scope for development. Larvae developed at 17, 25, and 30°C. At higher temperatures, larvae developed through fewer larval instars. Two dominant developmental pathways were observed; a short pathway of four instars and a long pathway of five instars. Longer developmental pathways of six to seven instars were rarely observed (mostly at lower temperatures) and consisted of additional instars as ‘repeat’ instars; i.e. little developmental advance over the preceding instar. To assess the implications of temperature-mediated variation in larval instar number, newly-hatched larvae were then reared at 15, 20, and 25°C. Again, the proportion of larvae developing through four instars increased with temperature. At all temperatures, larval development time and juvenile dry weight were greater for larvae developing through five instars. Importantly, because of the increasing proportion of larvae developing through four instars with increasing temperature, larval traits associated with this pathway (reduced development time and juvenile dry weight) became more dominant. As a consequence of increasing growth rate with temperature, and the shift in the proportion of larvae developing through four instars, juvenile dry weight was greatest at intermediate temperatures (20°C). We conclude that at settlement P. varians juveniles do not follow the temperature-size rule; this is of

  2. SU-E-J-235: Varian Portal Dosimetry Accuracy at Detecting Simulated Delivery Errors

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, J; Bellon, M; Barton, K; Gulam, M; Chetty, I

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To use receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to quantify the Varian Portal Dosimetry (VPD) application's ability to detect delivery errors in IMRT fields. Methods: EPID and VPD were calibrated/commissioned using vendor-recommended procedures. Five clinical plans comprising 56 modulated fields were analyzed using VPD. Treatment sites were: pelvis, prostate, brain, orbit, and base of tongue. Delivery was on a Varian Trilogy linear accelerator at 6MV using a Millenium120 multi-leaf collimator. Image pairs (VPD-predicted and measured) were exported in dicom format. Each detection test imported an image pair into Matlab, optionally inserted a simulated error (rectangular region with intensity raised or lowered) into the measured image, performed 3%/3mm gamma analysis, and saved the gamma distribution. For a given error, 56 negative tests (without error) were performed, one per 56 image pairs. Also, 560 positive tests (with error) with randomly selected image pairs and randomly selected in-field error location. Images were classified as errored (or error-free) if percent pixels with γ<κ was < (or ≥) τ. (Conventionally, κ=1 and τ=90%.) A ROC curve was generated from the 616 tests by varying τ. For a range of κ and τ, true/false positive/negative rates were calculated. This procedure was repeated for inserted errors of different sizes. VPD was considered to reliably detect an error if images were correctly classified as errored or error-free at least 95% of the time, for some κ+τ combination. Results: 20mm{sup 2} errors with intensity altered by ≥20% could be reliably detected, as could 10mm{sup 2} errors with intensity was altered by ≥50%. Errors with smaller size or intensity change could not be reliably detected. Conclusion: Varian Portal Dosimetry using 3%/3mm gamma analysis is capable of reliably detecting only those fluence errors that exceed the stated sizes. Images containing smaller errors can pass mathematical analysis, though

  3. The Creation of the European Social Work Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Brian J.; Sharland, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    As the social work profession matures, the need for robust knowledge becomes more pressing. Greater coordination is required to develop the research community and an infrastructure to support this nationally and internationally. This article discusses the foundation, in 2014, of the European Social Work Research Association and its roots in the…

  4. Research on the History of the American Library Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomison, Dennis

    A researcher on the history of the American Library Association (ALA) describes problems encountered on his project, important trends in ALA, weaknesses and benefits of ALA, and needs in the area of historical research. Some of the problems cited are the inadequacy of organization and housing of the ALA archives, the unevenness of the archival…

  5. Organizational Characteristics of Dental Schools Associated with Research Productivity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Marilyn S.

    1987-01-01

    A study found the ideal combination of characteristics associated with dental research productivity was $420,000 or more in funding from the National Institute of Dental Research, a student/faculty ratio of 4.75 or less, a library with at least 10,000 dental-related books, and medical school faculty teaching basic science. (MSE)

  6. The Characteristics, Roles and Functions of Institutional Research Professionals in the Southern Association for Institutional Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Charles; Chen, HongYu

    A study was done on the variation in characteristics, roles, and functions of institutional research professionals affiliated with the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR). The study examined professional role identity, location of offices in the organizational hierarchy, breadth of institutional research activities undertaken,…

  7. Evaluation of Radiation Dose and Image Quality for the Varian Cone Beam Computed Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Harry C.Y.; Wu, Vincent W.C.; Liu, Eva S.F.; Kwong, Dora L.W.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as 'new' and 'old' protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. Methods and Materials: A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms with diameter of 16 cm (head phantom) and 32 cm (body phantom) were used to measure the weighted cone-beam computed tomography dose index (CBCTDIw) of the Varian CBCT system. The absorbed dose of different organs was measured in a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the total effective dose was estimated according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. The dose measurement and image quality were studied for head-and-neck and pelvic regions, and comparison was made between the new and old protocols. Results: The values of the new CBCTDIw head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 36.6 and 29.4 mGy, respectively. The total effective doses from the new head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 1.7 and 8.2 mSv, respectively. The absorbed doses of lens for the new 200{sup o} and old 360{sup o} head-and-neck protocols were 3.8 and 59.4 mGy, respectively. The additional secondary cancer risk from daily CBCT might be up to 2.8%. Conclusions: The new Varian CBCT provided volumetric information for image guidance with acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose. This imaging tool gave a better standard for patient daily setup verification.

  8. Optimal parameters for clinical implementation of breast cancer patient setup using Varian DTS software.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sook Kien; Zygmanski, Piotr; Jeung, Andrew; Mostafavi, Hassan; Hesser, Juergen; Bellon, Jennifer R; Wong, Julia S; Lyatskaya, Yulia

    2012-01-01

    Digital tomosynthesis (DTS) was evaluated as an alternative to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for patient setup. DTS is preferable when there are constraints with setup time, gantry-couch clearance, and imaging dose using CBCT. This study characterizes DTS data acquisition and registration parameters for the setup of breast cancer patients using nonclinical Varian DTS software. DTS images were reconstructed from CBCT projections acquired on phantoms and patients with surgical clips in the target volume. A shift-and-add algorithm was used for DTS volume reconstructions, while automated cross-correlation matches were performed within Varian DTS software. Triangulation on two short DTS arcs separated by various angular spread was done to improve 3D registration accuracy. Software performance was evaluated on two phantoms and ten breast cancer patients using the registration result as an accuracy measure; investigated parameters included arc lengths, arc orientations, angular separation between two arcs, reconstruction slice spacing, and number of arcs. The shifts determined from DTS-to-CT registration were compared to the shifts based on CBCT-to-CT registration. The difference between these shifts was used to evaluate the software accuracy. After findings were quantified, optimal parameters for the clinical use of DTS technique were determined. It was determined that at least two arcs were necessary for accurate 3D registration for patient setup. Registration accuracy of 2 mm was achieved when the reconstruction arc length was > 5° for clips with HU ≥ 1000; larger arc length (≥ 8°) was required for very low HU clips. An optimal arc separation was found to be ≥ 20° and optimal arc length was 10°. Registration accuracy did not depend on DTS slice spacing. DTS image reconstruction took 10-30 seconds and registration took less than 20 seconds. The performance of Varian DTS software was found suitable for the accurate setup of breast cancer patients

  9. Trophic transfer of trace metals from the polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor to the polychaete N. virens and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rainbow, P.S.; Poirier, L.; Smith, B.D.; Brix, K.V.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    Diet is an important exposure route for the uptake of trace metals by aquatic invertebrates, with trace metal trophic transfer depending on 2 stages - assimilation and subsequent accumulation by the predator. This study investigated the trophic transfer of trace metals from the sediment-dwelling polychaete worm Nereis diversicolor from metal-rich estuarine sediments in southwestern UK to 2 predators - another polychaete N. virens (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe) and the decapod crustacean Palaemonetes varians (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, Fe, Ag, As, Mn). N. virens showed net accumulation of Cu, Zn, Pb and Cd from the prey; accumulation increased with increasing prey concentration, but a coefficient of trophic transfer decreased with increasing prey concentration, probably because a higher proportion of accumulated metal in the prey is bound in less trophically available (insoluble) detoxified forms. The trace metal accumulation patterns of P. varians apparently restricted significant net accumulation of metals from the diet of N. diversicolor to just Cd. There was significant mortality of the decapods fed on the diets of metal-rich worms. Metal-rich invertebrates that have accumulated metals from the rich historical store in the sediments of particular SW England estuaries can potentially pass these metals along food chains, with accumulation and total food chain transfer depending on the metal assimilation efficiencies and accumulation patterns of the animal at each trophic level. This trophic transfer may be significant enough to have ecotoxicological effects. ?? Inter-Research 2006.

  10. Reclassification of strain CCM 132, previously classified as Kocuria varians, as Kocuria carniphila sp. nov.

    PubMed

    Tvrzová, Ludmila; Schumann, Peter; Sedlácek, Ivo; Pácová, Zdena; Spröer, Cathrin; Verbarg, Susanne; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M

    2005-01-01

    A Gram-positive actinobacterium, previously classified as Kocuria varians, was subjected to a polyphasic taxonomic study. The bacterium showed the peptidoglycan type Lys-Ala3 (variation A3alpha), MK-7(H2) was the major menaquinone and anteiso-C(15 : 0) and anteiso-C(17 : 0) were the major fatty acids. On the basis of the phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics of the actinobacterium, a novel species, Kocuria carniphila sp. nov. (type strain, CCM 132T=DSM 16004T), is proposed. PMID:15653866

  11. Recent operating experience with Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect

    Felch, K.; Bier, R.; Fox, L.; Huey, H.; Ives, L.; Jory, H.; Lopez, N.; Shively, J.; Spang, S.

    1985-01-01

    The design features and initial test results of Varian 70 GHz and 140 GHz CW gyrotrons are presented. The first experimental 140 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 102 kW at 24% efficiency under pulsed conditions in the desired TE031 cavity mode. Further tests aimed at achieving the design goal of 100 kW CW are currently underway. The 70 GHz tube has achieved an output power of 200 kW under pulsed conditions and possesses a wide dynamic range for output power variations. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  12. [Research advances in association between pediatric obesity and bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lian; Xu, Zhi-Liang; Cheng, Yan-Yang

    2016-07-01

    This review article introduces the research advances in the pathophysiological mechanism of obesity in inducing pediatric bronchial asthma, including the role of leptin in obesity and asthma, the association of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 with obesity and asthma, the association of adiponectin and interleukins with obesity and asthma, and the influence of neurotransmitter on asthma. In particular, this article introduces the latest research on the inhibition of allergic asthma through targeting at the nociceptor of dorsal root ganglion and blocking the signaling pathway of the nociceptor. PMID:27412555

  13. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey Eddy, F.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program (MURA) encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In this program, undergraduate students work with principal investigators at their universities to perform research projects on solar technology. Then, students are awarded summer internships in industry or at national laboratories, such as NREL, during the summer. Because of its success, the program has been expanded to include additional minority-serving colleges and universities and all solar energy technologies.

  14. Visibility of Diversity within Association of Research Libraries Websites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mestre, Lori S.

    2011-01-01

    Libraries in the United States have worked towards developing more inclusive environments and programs. This inclusiveness should also extend to the online library presence. This article provides results of a web page scan of all Association of Research Libraries (ARL) in the United States to document the visibility of diversity on their pages. A…

  15. Society for melanoma research and american heart association scientific sessions.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Among the featured topics: oncolytic immunotherapy, BRAF/MEK inhibition, and a programmed death-1 inhibitor at the Society for Melanoma Research; and anticoagulation therapy, an alternative to statins, and endocarditis in the absence of dental antibiotic prophylaxis at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. PMID:25628510

  16. Children's understanding of the risks and benefits associated with research

    PubMed Central

    Burke, T; Abramovitch, R; Zlotkin, S

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The objective of the current study was to maximise the amount of information children and adolescents understand about the risks and benefits associated with participation in a biomedical research study. Design: Participants were presented with one of six hypothetical research protocols describing how to fix a fractured thigh using either a "standard" cast or "new" pins procedure. Risks and benefits associated with each of the treatment options were manipulated so that for each one of the six protocols there was either a correct or ambiguous choice. Participants and setting: Two hundred and fifty one children, ages 6–15 (53% boys), and 237 adults (30% men) were interviewed while waiting for a clinic appointment at the Hospital for Sick Children. Results: Using standardised procedures and questionnaires, it was determined that most participants, regardless of age group, were able to understand the basic purpose and procedures involved in the research, and most were able to choose the "correct" operation. The younger children, however, showed an overall preference for a cast operation, whereas the older participants were more likely to choose the pins. Conclusions: By creating age appropriate modules of information, children as young as six years can understand potentially difficult and complex concepts such as the risks and benefits associated with participation in biomedical research. It appears, however, that different criteria were used for treatment preference, regardless of associated risks; older participants tended to opt for mobility (the pins procedure) whereas younger participants stayed with the more familiar cast operation. PMID:16319237

  17. Uptake and depuration of PCB-153 in edible shrimp Palaemonetes varians and human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Grilo, T F; Cardoso, P G; Pato, P; Duarte, A C; Pardal, M A

    2014-03-01

    A medium-term mesocosm exposure study was conducted to elucidate bioaccumulation and depuration of polychlorinated biphenyl congener 153 (PCB-153) in edible shrimp Palaemonetes varians. Over the 15-day exposure period, shrimp under different exposure concentrations exhibited a significant increase in PCB-153 concentration compared with control organisms. Distinct bioaccumulation patterns and uptake rates were observed depending on the exposure concentrations. For low PCB-153 exposure levels (0.25μgL(-1)), accumulation followed a saturation model, reaching an apparent steady state after fifteen days exposure. For intermediate (2.5μgL(-1)) and high PCB-153 levels (25μgL(-1)), accumulation was faster and linear. In addition, the bioaccumulation rate was not proportional to PCB-153 concentration, and the bioaccumulation was higher at intermediate exposure concentrations. Regarding the depuration phase, P. varians lost up to 30% of PCB-153 after 72h and levels continued slowly to decrease until the end of the 30-d experimental period. However, PCB-153 levels in shrimp did not reach background values, and those exposed to moderate and high PCB-153 concentrations presented contamination levels much higher than the regulatory limit for human food consumption (75ngg(-1) ww for Σ6 PCB). PMID:24507133

  18. Experiencing the Full Research Process at Sea Education Association (SEA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.; Joyce, P.; Jaroslow, G.; Graziano, L.; Lea, C.; Witting, J.; Bower, A.

    2003-12-01

    While some undergraduate research experiences include only a small piece of the research process, students attending Sea Education Association's SEA Semester complete all aspects of oceanographic research in an intensive 12 week program that earns a full semester's credit. In the first half of the program, students read and discuss background literature on a subject, ask questions, pose hypotheses, and develop a written research proposal, which they defend orally. The second half of the course takes place at sea on one of SEA's state-of-the-art oceanographic research vessels where students carry out their sampling plans, analyze samples and data, write a final paper and present their results before the vessel reaches port, completing the course. At sea, students participate in sample collection and analysis for all student projects in addition to learning the general oceanography along their cruise track. This structure exposes students to the realities of research from start to finish and allows them to take full ownership of their projects. In addition to honing writing, public speaking, and problem-solving skills, students learn that research requires dedication, flexibility, and creativity, particularly when their results are unexpected or negate their hypothesis. SEA's undergraduate research program has been developing since 1971. Over that time, SEA has collected an extensive historical oceanographic database in the western Atlantic and Caribbean, plus Pacific data since 2001. This database is available to both students and outside research scientists. Collaborations with scientists outside SEA enhance the student experience and help facilitate oceanographic research by providing "ship-of-opportunity" sampling in remote locations. SEA Semester provides an excellent model for undergraduate research experiences with over 5000 alumni, about 30% of whom enter graduate school. About half the students in SEA's undergraduate programs are non-science majors. Although

  19. Proteomic analysis of Spirogyra varians mutant with high starch content and growth rate induced by gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Minchul; Choi, Jong-il; Kim, Gwang Hoon; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Don-Hee

    2013-06-01

    This study was conducted to develop a high-efficiency strain of Spirogyra varians for the production of biomass by radiation breeding. The characteristics of wild-type and mutant S. varians were analyzed through phenomenological and proteomic observations. The results of our phenomenological observations of the S. varians mutant demonstrated increases in growth rate and content of chlorophyll a, b, and a + b; in particular, a significant threefold increase was observed in starch accumulation. Proteomic analysis to investigate the differences in expression between wild-type and mutant proteins identified 18 proteins with significantly different expressions. From the literature review, it was confirmed that the up-regulated proteins were mainly involved in photosynthesis, carbohydrate biosynthesis, and energy metabolism. These results suggest the possibility of algae development by radiation breeding for the production of biofuel. PMID:23370702

  20. Research Dilemmas Associated with Photo Elicitation in Comparative Early Childhood Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkeland, Asta

    2013-01-01

    Photo elicitation has become an important method to produce data in qualitative research. There is quite an extensive literature indicating the benefits of photo elicitation in order to facilitate collaboration in meaning making between researcher and the interviewee. This article addresses dilemmas associated with using photo elicitation in a…

  1. Research Note--Online Dissemination of Research: Are Professional Associations Making the Grade?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borah, Elisa Vinson; Aguiniga, Donna M.

    2013-01-01

    Efficient and practical means of disseminating research to social workers are needed. The authors examined how 10 social work and 10 other helping profession association websites used their sites to disseminate research to their members. A rubric was used to rate the websites in 4 domains: (1) promotion, (2) accessibility, (3) dissemination, and…

  2. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenetics research debate

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Kent R; Cheng, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Will genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ‘work’ for pharmacogenetics research? This question was the topic of a staged debate, with pro and con sides, aimed to bring out the strengths and weaknesses of GWAS for pharmacogenetics studies. After a full day of seminars at the Fifth Statistical Analysis Workshop of the Pharmacogenetics Research Network, the lively debate was held – appropriately – at Goonies Comedy Club in Rochester (MN, USA). The pro side emphasized that the many GWAS successes for identifying genetic variants associated with disease risk show that it works; that the current genotyping platforms are efficient, with good imputation methods to fill in missing data; that its global assessment is always a success even if no significant associations are detected; and that genetic effects are likely to be large because humans have not evolved in a drug-therapy environment. By contrast, the con side emphasized that we have limited knowledge of the complexity of the genome; limited clinical phenotypes compromise studies; the likely multifactorial nature of drug response clouding the small genetic effects; and limitations of sample size and replication studies in pharmacogenetic studies. Lively and insightful discussions emphasized further research efforts that might benefit GWAS in pharmacogenetics. PMID:20235786

  3. Halophilic characterization of starch-binding domain from Kocuria varians α-amylase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Inoue, Yasuhiro; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Sumitani, Jun-ichi; Kawaguchi, Takashi; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-01-01

    The tandem starch-binding domains (KvSBD) located at carboxy-terminal region of halophilic α-amylase from moderate halophile, Kocuria varians, were expressed in E. coli with amino-terminal hexa-His-tag and purified to homogeneity. The recombinant KvSBD showed binding activity to raw starch granules at low to high salt concentrations. The binding activity of KvSBD to starch was fully reversible after heat-treatment at 85°C. Circular dichroism and thermal scanning experiments indicated that KvSBD showed fully reversible refolding upon cooling after complete melting at 70°C in the presence of 0.2-2.0M NaCl. The refolding rate was enhanced with higher salt concentration. PMID:22020156

  4. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R; Meigooni, A Soleimani

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. Secondary neutron spectra from modern Varian, Siemens, and Elekta linacs with multileaf collimators

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Rebecca M.; Kry, Stephen F.; Burgett, Eric; Hertel, Nolan E.; Followill, David S.

    2009-01-01

    Neutrons are a by-product of high-energy x-ray radiation therapy (threshold for [γ,n] reactions in high-Z material ∼7 MeV). Neutron production varies depending on photon beam energy as well as on the manufacturer of the accelerator. Neutron production from modern linear accelerators (linacs) has not been extensively compared, particularly in terms of the differences in the strategies that various manufacturers have used to implement multileaf collimators (MLCs) into their linac designs. However, such information is necessary to determine neutron dose equivalents for different linacs and to calculate vault shielding requirements. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to measure the neutron spectra from the most up-to-date linacs from three manufacturers: Varian 21EX operating at 15, 18, and 20 MV, Siemens ONCOR operating at 15 and 18 MV, and Elekta Precise operating at 15 and 18 MV. Neutron production was measured by means of gold foil activation in Bonner spheres. Based on the measurements, the authors determined neutron spectra and calculated the average energy, total neutron fluence, ambient dose equivalent, and neutron source strength. The shapes of the neutron spectra did not change significantly between accelerators or even as a function of treatment energy. However, the neutron fluence, and therefore the ambient dose equivalent, did vary, increasing with increasing treatment energy. For a given nominal treatment energy, these values were always highest for the Varian linac. The current study thus offers medical physicists extensive information about the neutron production of MLC-equipped linacs currently in operation and provides them information vital for accurate comparison and prediction of neutron dose equivalents and calculation of vault shielding requirements. PMID:19810475

  6. Identical Quality Assurance for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Elekta and Varian Machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazhou; Hu, Weigang; Peng, Jiayuan; Lu, Saiquan; Zhao, Jun; Xiao, Ying; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been adopted by many clinics for its higher delivery efficiency compared to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Currently, the quality assurance (QA) has remained a challenge in that no identical tests are available for accelerators from different vendors. This study is the first attempt to design identical QA tests for the VMAT technique for Varian and Elekta machines. Identical procedures testing MLC positions and movements, dose rate variations, and gantry positions and movement were created for both machines. These included picket fence (PF), dose rate vs. gantry speed (DRGS) and MLC speed vs. dose rate (MLCDR) tests. Deliverable plans for these tests were made with in-house software that was deliverable for linacs from two vendors (Elekta Synergy and Varian Trilogy). The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for these tests. An automated analysis method was established and software was created to quantitatively evaluate the result. The systematic gap position and width errors from PF tests were within 0.5 mm. We evaluated the detectability of this program for introduced errors down to 0.2 mm. Linear relationships existed between the introduced errors and measured errors. In the DRGS test, 99.8% and 100.0% of the intensity deviations from expected profiles were less than 3% for the Synergy and Trilogy, respectively. For the MLCDR, the intensity deviations from expected profiles less than 3% were 100.0% for Synergy and 98.1% for Trilogy. Identical test series were created and implemented for VMAT accelerators from two vendors. Test results were reported from both accelerators. Comparable results were obtained from both vendors, enabling uniform criteria to be established for VMAT quality assurance. PMID:26269610

  7. Identical Quality Assurance for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in Elekta and Varian Machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Hu, W; Peng, J; Lu, S; Zhao, J; Xiao, Y; Zhang, Z

    2014-03-17

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) has been adopted by many clinics for its higher delivery efficiency compared to conventional intensity modulated radiotherapy techniques. Currently, the quality assurance (QA) has remained a challenge in that no identical tests are available for accelerators from different vendors. This study is the first attempt to design identical QA tests for the VMAT technique for Varian and Elekta machines. Identical procedures testing MLC positions and movements, dose rate variations, and gantry positions and movement were created for both machines. These included picket fence (PF), dose rate vs. gantry speed (DRGS) and MLC speed vs. dose rate (MLCDR) tests. Deliverable plans for these tests were made with in-house software that was deliverable for linacs from two vendors (Elekta Synergy and Varian Trilogy). The electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used for these tests. An automated analysis method was established and software was created to quantitatively evaluate the result. The systematic gap position and width errors from PF tests were within 0.5 mm. We evaluated the detectability of this program for introduced errors down to 0.2 mm. Linear relationships existed between the introduced errors and measured errors. In the DRGS test, 99.8% and 100.0% of the intensity deviations from expected profiles were less than 3% for the Synergy and Trilogy, respectively. For the MLCDR, the intensity deviations from expected profiles less than 3% were 100.0% for Synergy and 98.1% for Trilogy. Identical test series were created and implemented for VMAT accelerators from two vendors. Test results were reported from both accelerators. Comparable results were obtained from both vendors, enabling uniform criteria to be established for VMAT quality assurance. PMID:24645748

  8. A novel technique for VMAT QA with EPID in cine mode on a Varian TrueBeam linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Adamson, Justus; Rodrigues, Anna; Zhou, Fugen; Yin, Fang-fang; Wu, Qiuwen

    2013-10-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new treatment modality for dynamic photon radiation therapy. Pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) is necessary and many efforts have been made to apply electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based IMRT QA methods to VMAT. It is important to verify the gantry rotation speed during delivery as this is a new variable that is also modulated in VMAT. In this paper, we present a new technique to perform VMAT QA using an EPID. The method utilizes EPID cine mode and was tested on Varian TrueBeam in research mode. The cine images were acquired during delivery and converted to dose matrices after profile correction and dose calibration. A sub-arc corresponding to each cine image was extracted from the original plan and its portal image prediction was calculated. Several analyses were performed including 3D γ analysis (2D images + gantry angle axis), 2D γ analysis, and other statistical analyses. The method was applied to 21 VMAT photon plans of 3 photon energies. The accuracy of the cine image information was investigated. Furthermore, this method's sensitivity to machine delivery errors was studied. The pass rate (92.8 ± 1.4%) for 3D γ analysis was comparable to those from Delta4 system (99.9 ± 0.1%) under similar criteria (3%, 3 mm, 5% threshold and 2° angle to agreement) at 6 MV. The recorded gantry angle and start/stop MUs were found to have sufficient accuracy for clinical QA. Machine delivery errors can be detected through combined analyses of 3D γ, gantry angle, and percentage dose difference. In summary, we have developed and validated a QA technique that can simultaneously verify the gantry angle and delivered MLC fluence for VMAT treatment.This technique is efficient and its accuracy is comparable to other QA methods.

  9. Benefits associated with nutrigenomics research and their reporting in the scientific literature: researchers' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stenne, R; Hurlimann, T; Godard, B

    2013-01-01

    Nutrigenomics and nutrigenetics (NGx) are fields of research that have raised significant expectations about their potential benefits. This article presents empirical data from an online survey seeking the opinions of NGx researchers (n=126) regarding the achievability of the potential benefits of NGx, the time envisioned for their realization, the motives that may lead to their explicit mention in scientific peer-reviewed articles and the audience(s) targeted by NGx researchers when reporting their results in such articles. Results show that caution should be taken to avoid the risks associated with biohype and the premature dissemination of the potential benefits of NGx among various audiences. PMID:23672589

  10. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, John W.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2002-01-01

    This section includes reports from the American Library Association, Association of American Publishers, American Booksellers Association, Association of Research Libraries, Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), and Council on Library and Information Resources. (LRW)

  11. Association for medical education and research in substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Samet, Jeffrey H; Galanter, Marc; Bridden, Carly; Lewis, David C

    2006-01-01

    The Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse (AMERSA) is a multi-disciplinary organization committed to health professional faculty development in substance abuse. In 1976, members of the Career Teachers Training Program in Alcohol and Drug Abuse, a US federally funded multi-disciplinary faculty development program, formed AMERSA. The organization grew from 59 founding members, who were primarily medical school faculty, to over 300 health professionals from a spectrum of disciplines including physicians, nurses, social workers, dentists, allied health professionals, psychologists and other clinical educators who are responsible for advancing substance abuse education. AMERSA members promote substance abuse education among health professionals by developing curricula, promulgating relevant policy and training health professional faculty to become excellent teachers in this field. AMERSA influences public policy by offering standards for improving substance abuse education. The organization publishes a peer-reviewed, quarterly journal, Substance Abuse, which emphasizes research on the education and training of health professions and also includes original clinical and prevention research. Each year, the AMERSA National Conference brings together researchers and health professional educators to learn about scientific advances and exemplary teaching approaches. In the future, AMERSA will continue to pursue this mission of advancing and supporting health professional faculty who educate students and trainees to address substance abuse in patients and clients. PMID:16393188

  12. The International Permafrost Association: current initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schollaen, Karina; Lewkowicz, Antoni G.; Christiansen, Hanne H.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Lantuit, Hugues; Schrott, Lothar; Sergeev, Dimitry; Wei, Ma

    2015-04-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details the IPA core products, achievements and activities as well as current projects in cryospheric research. One of the most important core products is the circumpolar permafrost map. The IPA also fosters and supports the activities of the Global Terrestrial Network on Permafrost (GTN-P) sponsored by the Global Terrestrial Observing System, GTOS, and the Global Climate Observing System, GCOS, whose long-term goal is to obtain a comprehensive view of the spatial structure, trends, and variability of changes in the active layer thickness and permafrost temperature. A further important initiative of the IPA are the biannually competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Current IPA Action Groups are working on highly topical and interdisciplinary issues, such as the development of a regional Palaeo-map of Permafrost in Eurasia, the integration of multidisciplinary knowledge about the use of thermokarst and permafrost

  13. The physical characteristics of the 15 MV Varian Clinac 2100C unflattened beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, M. A.; Spyrou, N. M.; Podolyák, Z.; Abolaban, F. A.

    2014-02-01

    A 15 MV photon beam of a Varian Clinac 2100C medical linear accelerator operating with and without a flattening filter was simulated using the Monte Carlo code 'FLUKA' in order to calculate differences in their dosimetric properties. These include: the dose rate, the percentage depth dose on the central axis, the beam profile, the out-of-field dose, the surface dose on a 40×40×40 cm3 water phantom and the neutron contamination. The results obtained showed that the unflattened beam has a dose rate 4.86 times higher than the flattened one. The average out-of-field dose from the edge of the field to the edge of the phantom was reduced by 44%, the neutron fluence at the isocentre was reduced by 77% and the surface neutron dose-equivalent was reduced from 2.11±0.05 to 0.40±0.01 mSv(n) Gy-1(X) after normalising both beams to give the same dose at dmax (the depth of maximum dose). However, the photon surface dose of the unflattened beam increased by 13%. From this information, it can be concluded that the unflattened beam can lead to better treatment outcome and may reduce the beam-on time which may be required for specific cases.

  14. A self-sufficient method for calibration of Varian electronic portal imaging device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baozhou; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Goddu, Sreekrishna M.; Mutic, Sasa

    2015-01-01

    Electronic portal imaging device (EPID) is currently used for dosimetric verification of IMRT fields and linac quality assurance (QA). It is critical to understand the dosimetric response and perform an accurate and robust calibration of EPID. We present the implementation of an efficient method for the calibration and the validation of a Varian EPID, which relies only on data collected with that specific device. The calibration method is based on images obtained with five shifts of EPID panel. With this method, the relative gain (sensitivity) of each element of a detector matrix is calculated and applied on top of the calibration determined with the flood-field procedure. The calibration procedure was verified using a physical wedge inserted in the beam line and the corrected profile shows consistent results with the measurements using a calibrated 2D array. This method does not rely on the beam profile used in the flood-field calibration process, which allows EPID calibration in 10 minutes with no additional equipment compared to at least 2 hours to obtain beam profile and scanning beam equipment requirement with the conventional method.

  15. Association of a Biweekly Research Workgroup With Enhanced Resident Research Productivity.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Melissa; Reynolds, R Kevin; Uppal, Shitanshu; McLean, Karen

    2016-09-01

    Almost all residency programs require a resident research project, yet teaching and mentoring of the required skills are often lacking. We established an every-other-week gynecologic oncology research workgroup at our institution for obstetrics and gynecology faculty, fellows, and residents with the goal of increasing resident research education, involvement, and productivity. An informal, discussion-style format was adopted as a forum for brainstorming research ideas, formulating study protocols, and collaborating on institutional review board submissions. Additional aims included editorial feedback on abstracts and manuscripts as well as oral presentation preparation. The academic productivity of trainees mentored by the gynecologic oncology division was queried for 27 months before and 27 months after workgroup initiation, specifically assessing resident involvement in institutional review board submission, abstract presentation, and manuscript preparation. Institution of our workgroup was associated with a dramatic increase in resident research output, including manuscript preparation and presentations at national meetings. We describe our experience because it may benefit other residency programs wishing to improve both resident research education and productivity. PMID:27500350

  16. Landfalling Tropical Cyclones: Forecast Problems and Associated Research Opportunities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marks, F.D.; Shay, L.K.; Barnes, G.; Black, P.; Demaria, M.; McCaul, B.; Mounari, J.; Montgomery, M.; Powell, M.; Smith, J.D.; Tuleya, B.; Tripoli, G.; Xie, Lingtian; Zehr, R.

    1998-01-01

    The Fifth Prospectus Development Team of the U.S. Weather Research Program was charged to identify and delineate emerging research opportunities relevant to the prediction of local weather, flooding, and coastal ocean currents associated with landfalling U.S. hurricanes specifically, and tropical cyclones in general. Central to this theme are basic and applied research topics, including rapid intensity change, initialization of and parameterization in dynamical models, coupling of atmospheric and oceanic models, quantitative use of satellite information, and mobile observing strategies to acquire observations to evaluate and validate predictive models. To improve the necessary understanding of physical processes and provide the initial conditions for realistic predictions, a focused, comprehensive mobile observing system in a translating storm-coordinate system is required. Given the development of proven instrumentation and improvement of existing systems, three-dimensional atmospheric and oceanic datasets need to be acquired whenever major hurricanes threaten the United States. The spatial context of these focused three-dimensional datasets over the storm scales is provided by satellites, aircraft, expendable probes released from aircraft, and coastal (both fixed and mobile), moored, and drifting surface platforms. To take full advantage of these new observations, techniques need to be developed to objectively analyze these observations, and initialize models aimed at improving prediction of hurricane track and intensity from global-scale to mesoscale dynamical models. Multinested models allow prediction of all scales from the global, which determine long- term hurricane motion to the convective scale, which affect intensity. Development of an integrated analysis and model forecast system optimizing the use of three-dimensional observations and providing the necessary forecast skill on all relevant spatial scales is required. Detailed diagnostic analyses of these

  17. Small field detector correction factors: effects of the flattening filter for Elekta and Varian linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Madelaine K; Liu, Paul Z Y; Lee, Christopher; McKenzie, David R; Suchowerska, Natalka

    2016-01-01

    Flattening filter-free (FFF) beams are becoming the preferred beam type for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), as they enable an increase in dose rate and a decrease in treatment time. This work assesses the effects of the flattening filter on small field output factors for 6 MV beams generated by both Elekta and Varian linear accelerators, and determines differences between detector response in flattened (FF) and FFF beams. Relative output factors were measured with a range of detectors (diodes, ionization cham-bers, radiochromic film, and microDiamond) and referenced to the relative output factors measured with an air core fiber optic dosimeter (FOD), a scintillation dosimeter developed at Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Sydney. Small field correction factors were generated for both FF and FFF beams. Diode measured detector response was compared with a recently published mathematical relation to predict diode response corrections in small fields. The effect of flattening filter removal on detector response was quantified using a ratio of relative detector responses in FFF and FF fields for the same field size. The removal of the flattening filter was found to have a small but measurable effect on ionization chamber response with maximum deviations of less than ± 0.9% across all field sizes measured. Solid-state detectors showed an increased dependence on the flattening filter of up to ± 1.6%. Measured diode response was within ± 1.1% of the published mathematical relation for all fields up to 30 mm, independent of linac type and presence or absence of a flattening filter. For 6 MV beams, detector correction factors between FFF and FF beams are interchangeable for a linac between FF and FFF modes, providing that an additional uncertainty of up to ± 1.6% is accepted. PMID:27167280

  18. Progress on Establishing a World Education Research Association Continues at Third International Meeting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of 28 education research associations from around the world convened in New York on March 29-30, 2008 at a third meeting to advance the goal of establishing a world education research association (informally called "WERA"). The agenda centered on the nature and form of a world education research association, with discussions…

  19. Implicit measure for yoga research: Yoga implicit association test

    PubMed Central

    Ilavarasu, Judu V; Rajesh, Sasidharan K; Hankey, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Context: The implicit association test (IAT), a new tool for yoga research is presented. Implicit measures could be used in those situations where (1) The construct is difficult to self-report, (2) there is a threat of social desirability. Clinically, we can assess cognitive dissonance by evaluating incongruence between implicit and explicit measures. Explicit preferences are self-reported. Implicit preferences are what we inherently believe, often without our conscious awareness. Aims: The primary objective of this study is to provide a bird's eye view of the field, implicit cognition, with emphasis on the IAT and the secondary objective is to illustrate through an example of our study to develop an implicit tool to assess implicit preference toward yoga. Settings and Design: A total of 5 independent samples of total 69 students undergoing short and long-term yoga courses in a Yoga University were assessed for their implicit and explicit preferences towards yoga. Materials and Methods: The yoga-IAT (Y-IAT), explicit self-rating scale was administered through computers using the Inquisit program by Millisecond Software. Experimental and scoring materials are provided. Results: A moderate preference toward yoga was detected, with a lower implicit-explicit congruence, reflecting possible confound of social desirability in the self-report of preference toward yoga. Conclusions: Implicit measures may be used in the yoga field to assess constructs, which are difficult to self-report or may have social desirability threat. Y-IAT may be used to evaluate implicit preference toward yoga. PMID:25035621

  20. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  1. Factors Associated with Research Productivity of Agricultural Education Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotrlik, Joe W.; Bartlett, James E., II; Higgins, Chadwick C.; Williams, Heather A.

    2002-01-01

    Factors influencing the research productivity of full-time agriculture professors (n=114) included the following: number of doctoral students advised to completion, self-perceptions of research confidence, and number of graduate assistant hours allocated. Not influential were percent of time on research, salary, age, gender, rank, or years in…

  2. Calculation of size specific dose estimates (SSDE) value at cylindrical phantom from CBCT Varian OBI v1.4 X-ray tube EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, M.; Pratama, D.; Anam, C.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this research was to calculate Size Specific Dose Estimates (SSDE) generated by the varian OBI CBCT v1.4 X-ray tube working at 100 kV using EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulations. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo code used in this simulation was divided into two parts. Phase space file data resulted by the first part simulation became an input to the second part. This research was performed with varying phantom diameters of 5 to 35 cm and varying phantom lengths of 10 to 25 cm. Dose distribution data were used to calculate SSDE values using trapezoidal rule (trapz) function in a Matlab program. SSDE obtained from this calculation was compared to that in AAPM report and experimental data. It was obtained that the normalization of SSDE value for each phantom diameter was between 1.00 and 3.19. The normalization of SSDE value for each phantom length was between 0.96 and 1.07. The statistical error in this simulation was 4.98% for varying phantom diameters and 5.20% for varying phantom lengths. This study demonstrated the accuracy of the Monte Carlo technique in simulating the dose calculation. In the future, the influence of cylindrical phantom material to SSDE would be studied.

  3. Sea Education Association's sailing research vessels as innovative platforms for long-term research and education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, P.; Carruthers, E. A.; Engels, M.; Goodwin, D.; Lavender Law, K. L.; Lea, C.; Schell, J.; Siuda, A.; Witting, J.; Zettler, E.

    2012-12-01

    Sea Education Association's (SEA) two research vessels, the SSV Corwith Cramer and the SSV Robert C. Seamans are unique in the research world. Not only do these ships perform advanced research using state of the art equipment, they do so under sail with high school, undergraduate, and graduate students serving as both the science team and the crew. Because of SEA's educational mission and reliance on prevailing winds for sailing, the vessels have been studying repeated tracks for decades, providing valuable long-term data sets while educating future marine scientists. The Corwith Cramer has been collecting data in the North Atlantic between New England, the Sargasso Sea, Bermuda, and the Caribbean since 1987 while the Robert C. Seamans has been operating in the Eastern Pacific between the US West Coast, Hawaii, and French Polynesia since 2001. The ships collect continuous electronic data from hull mounted ADCP, chirp, and a clean flowing seawater system logging temperature, salinity, in-vivo chlorophyll and CDOM fluorescence, and beam attenuation. The ships also periodically collect data from profiling CTDs with chlorophyll and CDOM fluorometers, transmissometers, and dissolved oxygen and PAR sensors. In addition to electronic data, archived long term data sets include physical samples from net tows such as marine plastic debris and tar, and plankton including Halobates (a marine insect), leptocephali (eel larvae), and phyllosoma (spiny lobster larvae). Both vessels are 134' brigantine rig tall ships and are designated sailing school vessels (SSV) by the US Coast Guard, and both have received instrumentation grants from NSF to provide high quality, reliable data that is submitted to the NSF R2R archives. Students sailing on these ships spend time on shore at the SEA campus in Woods Hole, MA taking classes in oceanography, nautical science, maritime studies and public policy. Each student is required to write a proposal for their research before heading to sea, and

  4. Pelagimonas varians gen. nov., sp. nov., isolated from the southern North Sea.

    PubMed

    Hahnke, Sarah; Tindall, Brian J; Schumann, Peter; Simon, Meinhard; Brinkhoff, Thorsten

    2013-03-01

    A heterotrophic, Gram-stain-negative, aerobic bacterium, designated strain SH4-1(T), was obtained from a seawater sample collected from the southern North Sea during a phytoplankton bloom. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparison revealed affiliation to the Roseobacter clade (class Alphaproteobacteria) with Sulfitobacter marinus SW-265(T) as the most closely related characterized strain, showing 97.2 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity. Calculation of phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated, however, that members of the genus Roseobacter, Roseobacter denitrificans Och 114(T) and Roseobacter litoralis Och 149(T) (95 % and 96 % sequence similarity, respectively) fall between strain SH4-1(T) and the Sulfitobacter cluster including Oceanibulbus indolifex HEL-45(T) (≥95.4 % sequence similarity). Cells of strain SH4-1(T) are irregular rods with at least one flagellum. Optimal growth occurred between 28 and 32 °C and at a pH between 7.0 and 8.5. Cells require the vitamin nicotinic acid amide as well as sodium ions for growth. The DNA G+C content was 55.1 mol%. The fatty acids (>1 %) comprised C10 : 0 3-OH, C12 : 1, C14 : 1 3-OH, C16 : 0, C18 : 0, C18 : 2, C18 : 1ω7c and 11-methyl C18 : 1ω7c. The polar lipid pattern indicated the presence of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylmonomethylethanolamine, an unidentified aminolipid, one unidentified phospholipid and one other unidentified lipid. On the basis of phenotypic, chemotaxonomic and phylogenetic differences, strain SH4-1(T) represents a novel species in a new genus within the family Rhodobacteraceae, for which we propose the name Pelagimonas varians gen. nov., sp. nov. The type strain of the type species is SH4-1(T) ( = DSM 23678(T) = LMG 26343(T) = CIP 110297(T)). PMID:22611199

  5. Commissioning of the Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator: A multi-institutional study

    SciTech Connect

    Glide-Hurst, C.; Bellon, M.; Wen, N.; Zhao, B.; Chetty, I. J.; Foster, R.; Speiser, M.; Solberg, T.; Altunbas, C.; Westerly, D.; Miften, M.; Altman, M.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Latest generation linear accelerators (linacs), i.e., TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) and its stereotactic counterpart, TrueBeam STx, have several unique features, including high-dose-rate flattening-filter-free (FFF) photon modes, reengineered electron modes with new scattering foil geometries, updated imaging hardware/software, and a novel control system. An evaluation of five TrueBeam linacs at three different institutions has been performed and this work reports on the commissioning experience. Methods: Acceptance and commissioning data were analyzed for five TrueBeam linacs equipped with 120 leaf (5 mm width) MLCs at three different institutions. Dosimetric data and mechanical parameters were compared. These included measurements of photon beam profiles (6X, 6XFFF, 10X, 10XFFF, 15X), photon and electron percent depth dose (PDD) curves (6, 9, 12 MeV), relative photon output factors (Scp), electron cone factors, mechanical isocenter accuracy, MLC transmission, and dosimetric leaf gap (DLG). End-to-end testing and IMRT commissioning were also conducted. Results: Gantry/collimator isocentricity measurements were similar (0.27-0.28 mm), with overall couch/gantry/collimator values of 0.46-0.68 mm across the three institutions. Dosimetric data showed good agreement between machines. The average MLC DLGs for 6, 10, and 15 MV photons were 1.33 {+-} 0.23, 1.57 {+-} 0.24, and 1.61 {+-} 0.26 mm, respectively. 6XFFF and 10XFFF modes had average DLGs of 1.16 {+-} 0.22 and 1.44 {+-} 0.30 mm, respectively. MLC transmission showed minimal variation across the three institutions, with the standard deviation <0.2% for all linacs. Photon and electron PDDs were comparable for all energies. 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beam quality, %dd(10){sub x} varied less than 0.3% for all linacs. Output factors (Scp) and electron cone factors agreed within 0.27%, on average; largest variations were observed for small field sizes (1.2% coefficient of variation, 10 MV, 2

  6. SU-E-T-06: A Comparison of IMRT Treatment of Esophageal Carcinoma in Elekta-Precise and Varian23EX Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, W; Fan, X; Qiu, R; Qiao, X; Zhang, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare and analyze the characteristics of static intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans designed on Elekta and Varian Linac in different esophageal cancer(EC), exploring advantages and disadvantages of different vendor Linac, thus can be better serve for clinical. Methods: Twenty-four patients with EC were selected, including 6 cases located in the cervical, upper, middle and the lower thorax, respectively. Two IMRT plans were generated with the Oncentra planning system: in Elekta and Varian Linac, prescription dose of 60Gy in 30 fractions to the PTV. We examined the dose-volume histogram parameters of PTV and the organs at risk (OAR) such as lungs, spinal cord and heart, and additional Monitor units(MU), treatment time, Homogeneity index(HI), Conformity index(CI) and Gamma index comparisons were performed. Results: All plans resulted in abundant dose coverage of PTV for EC of different locations. The doses to PTV, HI and OAR in Elekta plans were not statistically different in comparison with Varian plans, with the following exceptions: in cervical, upper and lower thoracic EC the PTV's CI, and in middle thorax EC PTV's D2, D50, V105 and PTV-average were better in Elekta plans than in Varian plans. In the cervical, upper and the middle thorax EC, treatment time were significantly decreased in Varian plans as against Elekta plans, while in the lower thoracic EC treatment time were no striking difference. MUs and gamma index were similar between the two Linac plans. Conclusion: For the the middle thorax EC Varian plans is better than Elekta plans, not only in treatment time but in the PTV dose; while for the lower thorax EC Elekta plans is the first choice for better CI; for the other part of the EC usually Elekta plans can increase the CI, while Varian plans can reduce treatment time, can be selected according to the actual situation of the patient treatment.

  7. Backgrounder. Rethinking Science and Society: Public Survey by EKOS Research Associates. Canadians See Clear-Cut Benefits to University Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Between August and September 2004, EKOS Research Associates conducted the first round of a study entitled, Rethinking Science and Society. The aim of this study is to assess Canadians' attitudes toward science and research, particularly since research and innovation policies have become increasingly important for the federal government. The…

  8. The CRC Contribution to Research Training: Report of a Scoping Study for the Cooperative Research Centres Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    This report summarises findings from a scoping study conducted for the Cooperative Research Centres Association (CRCA) by the Centre for the Study of Higher Education. The purpose of the scoping study is to inform the research training activities of Cooperative Research Centres (CRCs). While previous studies have focussed on the outcomes supported…

  9. Poster — Thur Eve — 55: An automated XML technique for isocentre verification on the Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Asiev, Krum; Mullins, Joel; DeBlois, François; Liang, Liheng; Syme, Alasdair

    2014-08-15

    Isocentre verification tests, such as the Winston-Lutz (WL) test, have gained popularity in the recent years as techniques such as stereotactic radiosurgery/radiotherapy (SRS/SRT) treatments are more commonly performed on radiotherapy linacs. These highly conformal treatments require frequent monitoring of the geometrical accuracy of the isocentre to ensure proper radiation delivery. At our clinic, the WL test is performed by acquiring with the EPID a collection of 8 images of a WL phantom fixed on the couch for various couch/gantry angles. This set of images is later analyzed to determine the isocentre size. The current work addresses the acquisition process. A manual WL test acquisition performed by and experienced physicist takes in average 25 minutes and is prone to user manipulation errors. We have automated this acquisition on a Varian TrueBeam STx linac (Varian, Palo Alto, USA). The Varian developer mode allows the execution of custom-made XML script files to control all aspects of the linac operation. We have created an XML-WL script that cycles through each couch/gantry combinations taking an EPID image at each position. This automated acquisition is done in less than 4 minutes. The reproducibility of the method was verified by repeating the execution of the XML file 5 times. The analysis of the images showed variation of the isocenter size less than 0.1 mm along the X, Y and Z axes and compares favorably to a manual acquisition for which we typically observe variations up to 0.5 mm.

  10. Ability of Kocuria varians LTH 1540 To Degrade Putrescine: Identification and Characterization of a Novel Amine Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Callejón, Sara; Sendra, Ramón; Ferrer, Sergi; Pardo, Isabel

    2015-04-29

    This work describes the identification and characterization of an amine oxidase from Kocuria varians LTH 1540 (syn. Micrococcus varians) primarily acting on putrescine. Data from MALDI-TOF MS/MS and the identification of Δ(1)-pyrroline as degradation product from putrescine indicate that the enzyme is a flavin-dependent putrescine oxidase (PuO). Properties of partially purified enzyme have been determined. The enzyme oxidizes diamines, putrescine and cadaverine, and, to a lesser extent, polyamines, such as spermidine, but not monoamines. The kinetic constants (Km and Vmax) for the two major substrates were 94 ± 10 μM and 2.3 ± 0.1 μmol/min·mg for putrescine and 75 ± 5 μM and 0.15 ± 0.02 μmol/min·mg for cadaverine. Optimal temperature and pH were 45 °C and 8.5, respectively. Enzyme was stable until 50 °C. K. varians PuO is sensitive to human flavin-dependent amine oxidase inhibitors and carboxyl-modifying compounds. The new enzyme has been isolated from a bacterial starter used in the manufacture of fermented meat. One of the problems of fermented foods or beverages is the presence of toxic biogenic amines produced by bacteria. The importance of this works lies in the description of a new enzyme able to degrade two of the most abundant biogenic amines (putrescine and cadaverine), the use of which could be envisaged to diminish biogenic amines content in foods in the future. PMID:25817823

  11. Absorbed dose and dose rate using the Varian OBI 1.3 and 1.4 CBCT system.

    PubMed

    Palm, Asa; Nilsson, Elisabeth; Herrnsdorf, Lars

    2010-01-01

    According to published data, the absorbed dose used for a CBCT image acquisition with Varian OBI v1.3 can be as high as 100 mGy. In 2008 Varian released a new OBI version (v1.4), which promised to reduce the imaging dose. In this study, absorbed doses used for CBCT image acquisitions with the default irradiation techniques of Varian OBI v1.3 and v1.4 are measured. TLDs are used to derive dose distributions at three planes inside an anthropomorphic phantom. In addition, point doses and dose profiles inside a 'stack' of three CTDI body phantoms are measured using a new solid state detector, the CT Dose Profiler. With the CT Dose Profiler, the individual pulses from the X-ray tube are also studied. To verify the absorbed dose measured with the CT Dose Profiler, it is compared to TLD. The image quality is evaluated using a Catphan phantom. For OBI v1.3, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 64 mGy and 144 mGy. The average dose is around 100 mGy. For OBI v1.4, doses measured in transverse planes of the Alderson phantom range between 1 mGy and 51 mGy. Mean doses range between 3-35 mGy depending on CBCT mode. CT Dose Profiler data agree with TLD measurements in a CTDI phantom within the uncertainty of the TLD measurements (estimated SD +/- 10%). Instantaneous dose rate at the periphery of the phantom can be higher than 20 mGy/s, which is 10 times the dose rate at the center. The spatial resolution in v1.4 is not as high as in v1.3. In conclusion, measurements show that the imaging doses for default modes in Varian OBI v1.4 CBCT system are significantly lower than in v1.3. The CT Dose Profiler is proven fast and accurate for CBCT applications. PMID:20160695

  12. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-01-01

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases. PMID:27455499

  13. Monitor backscatter factors for the Varian 21EX and TrueBeam linear accelerators: measurements and Monte Carlo modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavgorodni, Sergei; Alhakeem, Eyad; Townson, Reid

    2014-02-01

    Linac backscattered radiation (BSR) into the monitor chamber affects the chamber's signal and has to be accounted for in radiotherapy dose calculations. In Monte Carlo (MC) calculations, the BSR can be modelled explicitly and accounted for in absolute dose. However, explicit modelling of the BSR becomes impossible if treatment head geometry is not available. In this study, monitor backscatter factors (MBSFs), defined as the ratio of the charge collected in the monitor chamber for a reference field to that of a given field, have been evaluated experimentally and incorporated into MC modelling of linacs with either known or unknown treatment head geometry. A telescopic technique similar to that by Kubo (1989 Med. Phys. 16 295-98) was used. However, instead of lead slits, a 1.8 mm diameter collimator and a small (2 mm diameter) detector positioned at extended source to detector distance were used. This setup provided a field of view to the source of less than 3.1 mm and allowed for MBSF measurements of open fields from 1 × 1 to 40 × 40 cm2. For the fields with both X and Y dimensions exceeding 15 cm, a diode detector was used. A pinpoint ionization chamber was used for smaller fields. MBSFs were also explicitly modelled in MC calculations using BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc codes for 6 and 18 MV beams of a Varian 21EX linac. A method for deriving the D_ch^forward values that are used in MC absolute dose calculations was demonstrated. These values were derived from measured MBSFs for two 21EX and four TrueBeam energies. MBSFs were measured for 6 and 18 MV beams from Varian 21EX, and for 6 MV, 10 MV-FFF, 10 MV, and 15 MV beams from Varian TrueBeam linacs. For the open field sizes modelled in this study for the 21EX, the measured MBSFs agreed with MC calculated values within combined statistical (0.4%) and experimental (0.2%) uncertainties. Variation of MBSFs across field sizes was about a factor of two smaller for the TrueBeam compared to 21EX Varian linacs. Measured MBSFs

  14. The History of the American Vocational Education Research Association. The First 25 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, J. David; And Others

    This book records the history of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA), which was organized in 1966 as a professional association for scholars and others with research interests in the relationship between education and work. The purposes of AVERA are as follows: stimulate research and development (R&D) activities related…

  15. 75 FR 44266 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... the Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: Under the provisions of Section 3507(a)(1)(D) of... valid OMB control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology Research.... Need and Use of Information Collection: The Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT) Program will use...

  16. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  17. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  18. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  19. 15 CFR 256.2 - The Research Associate Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... performed or to be undertaken by NIST under its statutory mission and authority. The Sponsors pay the... reimburse NIST for the cost of research equipment, services, or materials obtained for the...

  20. Professional issues associated with the clinical research nurse role.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Juliet; Hill, Gordon; Callister, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Clinical research nurses (CRNs) have a vital role in the conduct and governance of clinical trials. This article compares findings of an online survey conducted in 2012 by the Scottish Research Nurse and Coordinator's Network with two surveys undertaken ten years previously in a single Scottish Health Board, permitting analysis of the development of the CRN role. The findings show that CRNs are highly qualified and experienced. Many had access to professional development and support, while others continued to feel isolated. There is a need for a clear, flexible career structure for CRNs, with appropriate induction, training and continuous professional development. PMID:25467360

  1. NIH Researchers Identify New Gene Mutation Associated with ALS and Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIH researchers identify new gene mutation associated with ALS and dementia April 7, 2014 A rare mutation ... cell, has been linked with development of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). This finding, from a research team led ...

  2. The neutron dose equivalent evaluation and shielding at the maze entrance of a Varian Clinac 23EX treatment room

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xudong; Esquivel, Carlos; Nes, Elena; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Charlton, Michael

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rate (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}) at the outer maze entrance and the adjacent treatment console area after the installation of a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator with a higher beam energy than its predecessor. The evaluation was based on measurements and comparison with several empirical calculations. The effectiveness of borated polyethylene (BPE) boards, as a maze wall lining material, on neutron dose and photon dose reduction is also reported. Methods: A single energy Varian 6 MV photon linear accelerator (linac) was replaced with a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator capable of producing 18 MV photons in a vault originally designed for the former accelerator. In order to evaluate and redesign the shielding of the vault, the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} was measured using an Andersson-Braun neutron Rem meter and the photon dose equivalent H{sub G} was measured using a Geiger Mueller and an ion chamber {gamma}-ray survey meter at the outer maze entrance. The measurement data were compared to semiempirical calculations such as the Kersey method, the modified Kersey method, and a newly proposed method by Falcao et al. Additional measurements were taken after BPE boards were installed on the maze walls as a neutron absorption lining material. Results: With the gantry head tilted close to the inner maze entrance and with the jaws closed, both neutron dose equivalent and photon dose equivalent reached their maximum. Compared to the measurement results, the Kersey method overestimates the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} by about two to four times (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}2.4-3.8). Falcao's method largely overestimates the H{sub n,D} (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}3.9-5.5). The modified Kersey method has a calculation to measurement ratio about 0.6-0.9. The photon dose equivalent calculation including McGinley's capture gamma dose equivalent equation estimates about 77%-98% of the

  3. Standards for Reporting on Humanities-Oriented Research in AERA Publications: "American Educational Research Association"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2009

    2009-01-01

    "Standards for Reporting on Humanities-Oriented Research in AERA Publications" has been developed to complement AERA's "Standards for Reporting on Empirical Social Science Research in AERA Publications." The purpose of providing standards for humanities-oriented research in education is to assist researchers who are preparing manuscripts that are…

  4. The Practice of Institutional Research. Proceedings of a Joint Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Charlotte, North Carolina, October 29-30, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Mary P., Ed.; Staman, E. Michael, Ed.

    Proceedings of a 1981 joint conference sponsored by the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) and the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research are presented. The conference theme was the practice of institutional research. Contents include preconference workshop reports, speeches, abstracts of papers, and reports of…

  5. Defining Educational Research: A Perspective of/on Presidential Addresses and the Australian Association for Research in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lingard, Bob; Gale, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the definition of the field of educational research and the changing and developing role of the Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) in representing and constituting this field. The evidence for the argument is derived from AARE Presidential Addresses across its 40-year history. The paper documents…

  6. Progress in research into the genes associated with venous thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lian-xing; Liu, Bo; Li, Chun-sheng

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Venous thromboembolism (VTE), including both deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), is a common, lethal disorder that affects hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients. This study aimed to review the progress in the research into VTE. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed the studies about VTE and verified different genetic polymoriphisms of VTE. RESULTS: The pathogenesis of VTE involves hereditary and acquired factors. Many studies indicated that the disorder of coagulation and fibirnolytic system is of utmost importance to this disease. Genetic polymoriphism-related VTE demonstrated significant differences among geographies and ethnicities. CONCLUSION: VTE has many risk factors, but genetic factors play an important role. PMID:26056539

  7. HIV research productivity and structural factors associated with HIV research output in European Union countries: a bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uusküla, A; Toompere, K; Laisaar, K T; Rosenthal, M; Pürjer, M L; Knellwolf, A; Läärä, E; Des Jarlais, D C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess HIV/AIDS research productivity in the 27 countries of the European Union (EU), and the structural level factors associated with levels of HIV/AIDS research productivity. Methods A bibliometric analysis was conducted with systematic search methods used to locate HIV/AIDS research publications (period of 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2011; search databases: MEDLINE (Ovid, PubMed), EMBASE, ISI-Thomson Web of Science; no language restrictions). The publication rate (number of HIV/AIDS research publications per million population in 10 years) and the rate of articles published in HIV/AIDS journals and selected journals with moderate to very high (IF ≥3) 5-year impact factors were used as markers for HIV research productivity. A negative binomial regression model was fitted to assess the impact of structural level factors (sociodemographic, health, HIV prevalence and research/development indicators) associated with the variation in HIV research productivity. Results The total numbers of HIV/AIDS research publications in 2002–2011 by country ranged from 7 to 9128 (median 319). The median publication rate (per million population in 10 years) was 45 (range 5–150) for all publications. Across all countries, 16% of the HIV/AIDS research was published in HIV/AIDS journals and 7% in selected journals with IF ≥3. Indicators describing economic (gross domestic product), demographic (size of the population) and epidemiological (HIV prevalence) conditions as well as overall scientific activity (total research output) in a country were positively associated with HIV research productivity. Conclusions HIV research productivity varies noticeably across EU countries, and this variation is associated with recognisable structural factors. PMID:25649212

  8. Photovoltaic concentrator research status

    SciTech Connect

    Arvizu, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the most important developments in concentrator research and development since the fifth E.C. Photovoltaic Energy Conference in October 1983. Within the Sandia managed Photovoltaic Concentrator Research Project several record cell efficiencies have been reported. Applied Solar Energy Corporation has fabricated a concentrator silicon cell with 20.9% peak efficiency, at 90X concentration. Varian Associates has demonstrated a 26.0% efficient GaAs cell at 700X concentration. Hughes Research Labs together with Applied Solar Energy Corporation and Sandia has demonstrated a 24.7% efficient, at 70X concentration, mechanically-stacked multijunction device using GaAs on silicon. In addition, a record efficiency for silicon technology has been demonstrated with the Sandia developed 200X silicon module. The module has been measured to have 17% peak efficiency. This paper will review these accomplishments, other research progress, and current research directions in concentrator cells, modules, and arrays. A brief economic assessment is also presented which indicates the potential of concentrator technology.

  9. Preventive strategies and research for ultraviolet-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, H K

    1995-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-associated cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. Approximately 90% of nonmelanoma skin cancer and 65% of melanoma are attributable to UV exposure and theoretically could be eliminated by primary prevention measures. Safe sun strategy includes use of sunscreens, use of protective clothing, minimization of exposure from 10 A.M. to 3 P.M., and avoidance of tanning parlors. Although more definitive data in human populations on the effectiveness of sunscreens to prevent melanoma and skin cancer are needed, sunscreens are thought to reduce risk. Safe sun prevention must start in childhood and adolescence when people receive most of their UV exposure. Secondary prevention through professional and public education and early detection may further reduce melanoma mortality. PMID:8741794

  10. A Retrospective Appraisal of 15 Years' Proceedings of the Hungarian Research Student Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revesz, Tamas; Olah, Mate

    2013-01-01

    In 1996 the Hungarian Research Student Association (HRSA) was founded. Since then more than 6000 young, talented researchers have belonged to the Association. The founders set two principal aims: (1) to support the gifted and the most promising high school students and (2) to establish an active community. The movement has grown through the work…

  11. 76 FR 23537 - Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations and Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Importer Associations... announces an updated computation for assessments received by importer associations under the Hass Avocado... Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 2000 (7 U.S.C. 7801-7813). The Order covers...

  12. 75 FR 27789 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Application for the Pharmacology Research Associate Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-18

    ... Pharmacology Research Associate Program SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of Section 3506(c)(2)(A) of... and Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Application for the Pharmacology... and Use of Information Collection: The Pharmacology Research Associate (PRAT) Program will use...

  13. SU-E-T-386: A Monte Carlo Dose Calculation Framework for Electron Beams On Varian TrueBeam

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, A; Yin, F; Wu, Q; Sawkey, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The design of the linac head is different for TrueBeam than Clinac, and there are differences in measured dose distributions in water phantoms between TrueBeam and Clinac for electron beams. Therefore, MC models for Clinac may not be applied directly to the Truebeam linac. The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation framework for electron beams on Varian TrueBeam with phase space files provided by Varian. Methods: The particle histories from the phase space file were used as input for the down-stream simulation including jaws, applicators, and water phantom. MC packages BEAMnrc/DOSYXZnrc were used. The down-stream beam components were modeled according to manufacturer specifications and the dose distributions were compared with the measured data of standard cones. The measurements were performed in a water phantom with a p-type electron field diode (diameter 0.2cm) and ion chamber (CC13). Depth dose and orthogonal profiles at depths defined by R{sub 1} {sub 0} {sub 0}, R{sub 5} {sub 0}, Rp were compared. Results: Preliminary results for a 16 MeV phase space and 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator are presented. Simulations were run for a statistical uncertainty of <2% at depth of maximum dose for a voxel resolution of 0.5x0.5x0.2cm{sup 2}. Dose and range differences for the PDD profiles were within 2% and 1 mm, respectively. Dose differences within the central 80% of the beam width for the orthogonal profiles at depth of maximum dose were less than 2% for the 10x10, 15x15, and 20x20 cm{sup 2} applicator, respectively. Conclusion: Varian electron phase space files simulations are in agreement with measured commissioning data. These phase space files can be used in the simulation of TrueBeam linacs, and will provide reproducibility across publications. Analyses for all electron energies and standard applicators are under way and results will be included in the presentation.

  14. SU-E-T-370: Measurement of Conical Cone Output Factors for the Varian Edge Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wang, S; Zhong, H; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the impact of detector type, SSD/depth, and intermediate reference on conical cone output factor (OF) measurements for the Varian Edge linac. Methods: OF's for 4, 5, 7.5, 10, 12.5, 15, and 17.5 mm diameter cones relative to 10cmx10cm field were measured for the 6X FFF and 10X FFF energies, with jaws set to 5cmx5cm. Measurements were performed with an Edge diode (0.8mmx0.8mmx0.03mm WxLxT), stereotatic diode SFD, photon diode, CC01 and pinpoint chambers (2mm diameter for both). 95cm SSD/5cm depth were used in a water tank. For the measurement with diodes, OF's were cross-referred to CC13 ion chamber measurements with 3cmx3cm field, as recommended, to help mitigate the energy variation in diode response with field size. Results were compared to the representative data from Varian measured with Edge detector. With SFD, OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth and 90cm SSD/10cm depth were also measured. Results: OF's measured with the Edge detector matched within 1.3% (max diff) with the representative data from Varian. For the SFD, OF's matched within 1.3% for the 4, 5 and 17.5 mm cones and within 3.7% for the other cones. OF's with photon diode were within 1.3% except for the 4 and 5 mm cones where they were 8.1% and 3.7%, respectively. OF's for the CC01 and pinpoint chamber deviated up to 36% and 44%, respectively for the 4 mm cone. OF's after intermediate reference with 3cmx3cm field changed by 3.7% for SFD, 0.8% for photon diode, and 0.6% for Edge detector. OF's at 98.5cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 10.8% higher than that at 95cm SSD/5cm depth, and OF's at 90cm SSD/1.5cm depth were 7.5% lower. Conclusion: OF's measured with the Edge detector appear to be reliable. CC01 and pinpoint chambers do not appear suitable for measuring the small cone OF's. SSD/depth affects OF measurements significantly.

  15. Association of Learning Styles with Research Self-Efficacy: Study of Short-Term Research Training Program for Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Dumbauld, Jill; Black, Michelle; Depp, Colin A.; Daly, Rebecca; Curran, Maureen A.; Winegarden, Babbi; Jeste, Dilip V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose With a growing need for developing future physician scientists, identifying characteristics of medical students who are likely to benefit from research training programs is important. This study assessed if specific learning styles of medical students, participating in federally funded short-term research training programs, were associated with research self-efficacy, a predictor of research career success. Method Seventy-five first-year medical students from 28 medical schools, selected to participate in two competitive NIH-supported summer programs for research training in aging, completed rating scales to evaluate learning styles at baseline, and research self-efficacy before and after training. We examined associations of individual learning styles (visual-verbal, sequential-global, sensing-intuitive, and active-reflective) with students’ gender, ranking of medical school, and research self-efficacy. Results Research self-efficacy improved significantly following the training programs. Students with a verbal learning style reported significantly greater research self-efficacy at baseline, while visual, sequential, and intuitive learners demonstrated significantly greater increases in research self-efficacy from baseline to post-training. No significant relationships were found between learning styles and students’ gender or ranking of their medical school. Conclusions Assessments of learning styles may provide useful information to guide future training endeavors aimed at developing the next generation of physician-scientists. PMID:25079678

  16. Relationships between Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Statistics and Bibliometric Indicators: A Principal Components Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrix, Dean

    2010-01-01

    This study analyzed 2005-2006 Web of Science bibliometric data from institutions belonging to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and corresponding ARL statistics to find any associations between indicators from the two data sets. Principal components analysis on 36 variables from 103 universities revealed obvious associations between…

  17. Characterization of the radiation environment at the UNLV accelerator facility during operation of the Varian M6 linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, M.; Barzilov, A.; Chen, Y.; Lowe, D.

    2016-10-01

    The bremsstrahlung photon flux from the UNLV particle accelerator (Varian M6 model) was determined using MCNP5 code for 3 MeV and 6 MeV incident electrons. Human biological equivalent dose rates due to accelerator operation were evaluated using the photon flux with the flux-to-dose conversion factors. Dose rates were computed for the accelerator facility for M6 linac use under different operating conditions. The results showed that the use of collimators and linac internal shielding significantly reduced the dose rates throughout the facility. It was shown that the walls of the facility, in addition to the earthen berm enveloping the building, provide equivalent shielding to reduce dose rates outside to below the 2 mrem/h limit.

  18. AERA Code of Ethics: American Educational Research Association Approved by the AERA Council February 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Code of Ethics of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) articulates a common set of values upon which education researchers build their professional and scientific work. The Code is intended to provide both the principles and the rules to cover professional situations encountered by education researchers. It has as its primary…

  19. Exploring Ethical Issues Associated with Using Online Surveys in Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Lynne D.; Allen, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Online surveys are increasingly used in educational research, yet little attention has focused on ethical issues associated with their use in educational settings. Here, we draw on the broader literature to discuss 5 key ethical issues in the context of educational survey research: dual teacher/researcher roles; informed consent; use of…

  20. Transforming Catholic Education through Research: The American Educational Research Association Catholic Education Special Interest Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Catholic schools in the United States and abroad face numerous financial, cultural, and structural challenges due to contemporary education policies and economic trends. Within this climate, research about Catholic education is often conducted and leveraged in efforts to serve schools' most immediate needs. To be certain, research aimed at…

  1. Becoming a Researcher: Forms of Capital Associated with "Research Capacity" Trajectories of Young British Social Anthropologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The paper privileges the "voices" of British social anthropologists examining their perceptions of how their research expertise was acquired. Reference is made to the case of education research in Britain, which, by comparison with social anthropology, reveals limited capacity as measured through performance audits of scientific research…

  2. SU-E-T-406: Use of TrueBeam Developer Mode and API to Increase the Efficiency and Accuracy of Commissioning Measurements for the Varian EDGE Stereotactic Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S; Gulam, M; Song, K; Li, H; Huang, Y; Zhao, B; Qin, Y; Snyder, K; Kim, J; Gordon, J; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2014-06-01

    hours). The scripting also allowed for creation of the files in advance without requiring access to TPS. The API scripting functionality enabled efficient creation/mining of TPS data. Finally, automation reduces the potential for human error in entering linac values at the machine console,and the script provides a log of measurements acquired for each session. This research was supported in part by a grant from Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA.

  3. Female sex pheromone and male behavioral responses of the bombycid moth Trilocha varians: comparison with those of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daimon, Takaaki; Fujii, Takeshi; Yago, Masaya; Hsu, Yu-Feng; Nakajima, Yumiko; Fujii, Tsuguru; Katsuma, Susumu; Ishikawa, Yukio; Shimada, Toru

    2012-03-01

    Analysis of female sex pheromone components and subsequent field trap experiments demonstrated that the bombycid moth Trilocha varians uses a mixture of ( E, Z)-10,12-hexadecadienal (bombykal) and ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienyl acetate (bombykyl acetate) as a sex pheromone. Both of these components are derivatives of ( E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol (bombykol), the sex pheromone of the domesticated silkmoth Bombyx mori. This finding prompted us to compare the antennal and behavioral responses of T. varians and B. mori to bombykol, bombykal, and bombykyl acetate in detail. The antennae of T. varians males responded to bombykal and bombykyl acetate but not to bombykol, and males were attracted only when lures contained both bombykal and bombykyl acetate. In contrast, the antennae of B. mori males responded to all the three components. Behavioral analysis showed that B. mori males responded to neither bombykal nor bombykyl acetate. Meanwhile, the wing fluttering response of B. mori males to bombykol was strongly inhibited by bombykal and bombykyl acetate, thereby indicating that bombykal and bombykyl acetate act as behavioral antagonists for B. mori males. T. varians would serve as a reference species for B. mori in future investigations into the molecular mechanisms underlying the evolution of sex pheromone communication systems in bombycid moths.

  4. Efficacy evaluation of retrospectively applying the Varian normal breathing predictive filter for volume definition and artifact reduction in 4D CT lung patients.

    PubMed

    Malone, Ciaran; Rock, Luke; Skourou, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Phase-based sorting of four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT) datasets is prone to image artifacts due to patient's breathing irregularities that occur during the image acquisition. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the Varian normal breathing predictive filter (NBPF) as a retrospective phase-sorting parameter in 4D CT. Ten 4D CT lung cancer datasets were obtained. The volumes of all tumors present, as well as the total lung volume, were calculated on the maximum intensity projection (MIP) images as well as each individual phase image. The NBPF was varied retrospectively within the available range, and changes in volume and image quality were recorded. The patients' breathing trace was analysed and the magnitude and location of any breathing irregularities were correlated to the behavior of the NBPF. The NBPF was found to have a considerable effect on the quality of the images in MIP and single-phase datasets. When used appropriately, the NBPF is shown to have the ability to account for and correct image artifacts. However, when turned off (0%) or set above a critical level (approximately 40%), it resulted in erroneous volume reconstructions with variations in tumor volume up to 26.6%. Those phases associated with peak inspiration were found to be more susceptible to changes in the NBPF. The NBPF settings selected prior to exporting the breathing trace for patients evaluated using 4D CT directly affect the accuracy of the targeting and volume estimation of lung tumors. Recommendations are made to address potential errors in patient anatomy introduced by breathing irregularities, specifically deep breath or cough irregularities, by implementing the proper settings and use of this tool. PMID:24892327

  5. 78 FR 20664 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... Society of Clinical Research Associates (SOCRA). The conference on FDA's clinical trial requirements is... relationships among FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards...

  6. Understanding factors associated with the translation of cardiovascular research: a multinational case study approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Funders of health research increasingly seek to understand how best to allocate resources in order to achieve maximum value from their funding. We built an international consortium and developed a multinational case study approach to assess benefits arising from health research. We used that to facilitate analysis of factors in the production of research that might be associated with translating research findings into wider impacts, and the complexities involved. Methods We built on the Payback Framework and expanded its application through conducting co-ordinated case studies on the payback from cardiovascular and stroke research in Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom. We selected a stratified random sample of projects from leading medical research funders. We devised a series of innovative steps to: minimize the effect of researcher bias; rate the level of impacts identified in the case studies; and interrogate case study narratives to identify factors that correlated with achieving high or low levels of impact. Results Twenty-nine detailed case studies produced many and diverse impacts. Over the 15 to 20 years examined, basic biomedical research has a greater impact than clinical research in terms of academic impacts such as knowledge production and research capacity building. Clinical research has greater levels of wider impact on health policies, practice, and generating health gains. There was no correlation between knowledge production and wider impacts. We identified various factors associated with high impact. Interaction between researchers and practitioners and the public is associated with achieving high academic impact and translation into wider impacts, as is basic research conducted with a clinical focus. Strategic thinking by clinical researchers, in terms of thinking through pathways by which research could potentially be translated into practice, is associated with high wider impact. Finally, we identified the complexity of

  7. Opportunities and challenges associated with engaging immigrant women in participatory action research.

    PubMed

    Ganann, Rebecca

    2013-04-01

    With increasing recognition of the importance of knowledge exchange between researchers and research stakeholders, community member involvement remains poorly accessed. A promising community-based research methodology for knowledge exchange is participatory action research (PAR). This review examines opportunities and challenges associated with using PAR to examine issues related to community health, specifically that of immigrant women. The literature search included published and grey literature relevant to immigrant women and PAR. PAR actively engages community members of the study population throughout the research process. The involvement of immigrant women in research that explores issues pertinent to their health is essential to conducting relevant research to subsequently inform policies and programs. There are numerous advantages to using a PAR approach, including enhanced research relevance and utilization; notwithstanding, there are challenges to overcome in order to engage community based immigrant women in research. Ultimately, policies that have contextual grounding through PAR have better likelihood of effectively addressing priority issues for immigrant women. PMID:22491996

  8. Self-Regulation of a Chiropractic Association through Participatory Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheppard, Lorraine A.; Jorgensen, Anna Maria S.; Crowe, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Participatory action research (PAR) can be used in the health professions to redefine their roles. This study investigated a small health professional group, the members of The Chiropractic Association Singapore (TCAS), by using a PAR method; researchers and participants gained insights into the self-regulation of a health profession. A…

  9. Longitudinal Associations among Undergraduates' Research Experience, Self-Efficacy, and Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robnett, Rachael D.; Chemers, Martin M.; Zurbriggen, Eileen L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior research shows that undergraduates tend to identify more strongly with the field of science after participating in scientific research. However, mediators that might account for this association are not well understood. In the current study, we propose that science self-efficacy may serve this mediational function. Specifically, data from a…

  10. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Proceedings (New Orleans, Louisiana, December 10-13, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Vocational Education Research Association.

    This document contains 14 research paper presentations and 5 "mini-tips" from the 1998 American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The first section includes three papers on international and distance education: "Determining Success of Vocational Students Enrolled in Distance Education Courses" (Michael K. Swan,…

  11. A Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations using Varian phase space files for TrueBeam Linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qiuwen; Sawkey, Daren

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a framework for accurate electron Monte Carlo dose calculation. In this study, comprehensive validations of vendor provided electron beam phase space files for Varian TrueBeam Linacs against measurement data are presented. Methods: In this framework, the Monte Carlo generated phase space files were provided by the vendor and used as input to the downstream plan-specific simulations including jaws, electron applicators, and water phantom computed in the EGSnrc environment. The phase space files were generated based on open field commissioning data. A subset of electron energies of 6, 9, 12, 16, and 20 MeV and open and collimated field sizes 3 × 3, 4 × 4, 5 × 5, 6 × 6, 10 × 10, 15 × 15, 20 × 20, and 25 × 25 cm{sup 2} were evaluated. Measurements acquired with a CC13 cylindrical ionization chamber and electron diode detector and simulations from this framework were compared for a water phantom geometry. The evaluation metrics include percent depth dose, orthogonal and diagonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, R{sub p}, and R{sub p+} for standard and extended source-to-surface distances (SSD), as well as cone and cut-out output factors. Results: Agreement for the percent depth dose and orthogonal profiles between measurement and Monte Carlo was generally within 2% or 1 mm. The largest discrepancies were observed within depths of 5 mm from phantom surface. Differences in field size, penumbra, and flatness for the orthogonal profiles at depths R{sub 100}, R{sub 50}, and R{sub p} were within 1 mm, 1 mm, and 2%, respectively. Orthogonal profiles at SSDs of 100 and 120 cm showed the same level of agreement. Cone and cut-out output factors agreed well with maximum differences within 2.5% for 6 MeV and 1% for all other energies. Cone output factors at extended SSDs of 105, 110, 115, and 120 cm exhibited similar levels of agreement. Conclusions: We have presented a Monte Carlo simulation framework for electron beam dose calculations for

  12. GeneRanker: An Online System for Predicting Gene-Disease Associations for Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Graciela; Uribe, Juan C.; Armstrong, Brock; McDonough, Wendy; Berens, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    With the overwhelming volume of genomic and molecular information available on many databases nowadays, researchers need from bioinformaticians more than encouragement to refine their searches. We present here GeneRanker, an online system that allows researchers to obtain a ranked list of genes potentially related to a specific disease or biological process by combining gene-disease (or genebiological process) associations with protein-protein interactions extracted from the literature, using computational analysis of the protein network topology to more accurately rank the predicted associations. GeneRanker was evaluated in the context of brain cancer research, and is freely available online at http://www.generanker.org. PMID:21347122

  13. Varian 2100C/D Clinac 18 MV photon phase space file characterization and modeling by using MCNP Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezzati, Ahad Ollah

    2015-07-01

    Multiple points and a spatial mesh based surface source model (MPSMBSS) was generated for 18MV Varian 2100 C/D Clinac phase space file (PSF) and implemented in MCNP code. The generated source model (SM) was benchmarked against PSF and measurements. PDDs and profiles were calculated using the SM and original PSF for different field sizes from 5 × 5 to 20 × 20 cm2. Agreement was within 2% of the maximum dose at 100cm SSD for beam profiles at the depths of 4cm and 15cm with respect to the original PSF. Differences between measured and calculated points were less than 2% of the maximum dose or 2mm distance to agreement (DTA) at 100 cm SSD. Thus it can be concluded that the modified MCNP code can be used for radiotherapy calculations including multiple source model (MSM) and using the source biasing capability of MPSMBSS can increase the simulation speed up to 3600 for field sizes smaller than 5 × 5 cm2.

  14. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians.

    PubMed

    Morris, J P; Thatje, S; Cottin, D; Oliphant, A; Brown, A; Shillito, B; Ravaux, J; Hauton, C

    2015-11-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms' thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts. PMID:26716003

  15. The potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts: sustained temperature and pressure exposures on a marine ectotherm, Palaemonetes varians

    PubMed Central

    Morris, J. P.; Thatje, S.; Cottin, D.; Oliphant, A.; Brown, A.; Shillito, B.; Ravaux, J.; Hauton, C.

    2015-01-01

    Range shifts are of great importance as a response for species facing climate change. In the light of current ocean-surface warming, many studies have focused on the capacity of marine ectotherms to shift their ranges latitudinally. Bathymetric range shifts offer an important alternative, and may be the sole option for species already at high latitudes or those within enclosed seas; yet relevant data are scant. Hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature have wide ranging effects on physiology, importantly acting in synergy thermodynamically, and therefore represent key environmental constraints to bathymetric migration. We present data on transcriptional regulation in a shallow-water marine crustacean (Palaemonetes varians) at atmospheric and high HP following 168-h exposures at three temperatures across the organisms’ thermal scope, to establish the potential physiological limit to bathymetric migration by neritic fauna. We observe changes in gene expression indicative of cellular macromolecular damage, disturbances in metabolic pathways and a lack of acclimation after prolonged exposure to high HP. Importantly, these effects are ameliorated (less deleterious) at higher temperatures, and exacerbated at lower temperatures. These data, alongside previously published behavioural and heat-shock analyses, have important implications for our understanding of the potential for climate-driven bathymetric range shifts PMID:26716003

  16. Ion recombination correction factors (P(ion)) for Varian TrueBeam high-dose-rate therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Kry, Stephen F; Popple, Richard; Molineu, Andrea; Followill, David S

    2012-01-01

    Ion recombination is approximately corrected for in the Task Group 51 protocol by Pion, which is calculated by a two-voltage measurement. This measurement approach may be a poor estimate of the true recombination, particularly if Pion is large (greater than 1.05). Concern exists that Pion in high-dose-per-pulse beams, such as flattening filter free (FFF) beams, may be unacceptably high, rendering the two-voltage measurement technique inappropriate. Therefore, Pion was measured for flattened beams of 6, 10, 15, and 18 MV and for FFF beams of 6 and 10 MV. The values for the FFF beams were verified with 1/V versus 1/Q curves (Jaffé plots). Pion was also measured for electron beams of 6, 12, 16, 18, and 20 MeV on a traditional accelerator, as well as on the high-dose-rate Varian TrueBeam accelerator. The measurements were made at a range of depths and with PTW, NEL, and Exradin Farmer-type chambers. Consistent with the increased dose per pulse, Pion was higher for FFF beams than for flattening filter beams. However, for all beams, measurement locations, and chambers examined, Pion never exceeded 1.018. Additionally, Pion was always within 0.3% of the recombination calculated from the Jaffé plots. We conclude that ion recombination can be adequately accounted for in high-dose-rate FFF beams using Pion determined with the standard two-voltage technique. PMID:23149774

  17. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1999-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective manner. The program began on June 1, 1980 with funding to support several Research Associates each year. 113 awards, plus 1 from an independently supported minority component were made for the Research Associates program. The program was changed from a one year award with a possibility for renewal to a two year award. In 1999, the decision was made by NASA to discontinue the program due to development of new priorities for funding. This grant was discontinued because of the move of the Program Director to a new institution; a new grant was provided to that new institution to allow completion of the training of the remaining 2 research associates in 1999. After 1999, the program will be discontinued.

  18. Unpacking capacity to utilize research: A tale of the Burkina Faso public health association.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Nadia; Schrecker, Ted

    2011-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in addressing global health is for institutions to monitor and use research in policy-making. In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), civil society organizations such as health professional associations can be key contributors to effective national health systems. However, there is little empirical data on their capacity to use research. This case study was used to gain insight into the factors that affect the knowledge translation performance of health professional associations in LMICs by describing the organizational elements and processes constituting capacity to use research, and examining the potential determinants of this capacity. Case study methodology was chosen for its flexibility to capture the multiple and often tacit processes within organizational routines. The Burkina Faso Public Health Association (ABSP) was studied, using in-depth, semi-structured interviews and key documents review. Five key dimensions that affect the association's capacity to use research to influence health policy emerged: organizational motivation; catalysts; organizational capacity to acquire and organizational capacity to transform research findings; moderating organizational factors. Also examined were the dissemination strategies used by ABSP and its abilities to enhance its capacity through networking, to advocate for more relevant research and to develop its potential role as knowledge broker, as well as limitations due to scarce resources. We conclude that a better understanding of the organizational capacity to use research of health professional associations in LMICs is needed to assess, improve and reinforce such capacity. Increased knowledge translation potential may leverage research resources and promote knowledge-sharing. PMID:21074923

  19. A Survey of the Barriers Associated with Academic-based Cancer Research Commercialization

    PubMed Central

    Vanderford, Nathan L.; Weiss, L. Todd; Weiss, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Commercialization within the academic setting is associated with many challenges and barriers. Previous studies investigating these challenges/barriers have, in general, broadly focused on multiple disciplines and, oftentimes, several institutions simultaneously. The goal of the study presented here was to analyze a range of barriers that may be broadly associated with commercializing academic-based cancer research. This goal was addressed via a study of the barriers associated with cancer research commercialization at the University of Kentucky (UK). To this end, a research instrument in the form of an electronic survey was developed. General demographic information was collected on study participants and two research questions were addressed: 1) What are the general barriers inhibiting cancer research commercialization at UK? and 2) Would mitigation of the barriers potentially enhance faculty engagement in commercialization activities? Descriptive and statistical analysis of the data reveal that multiple barriers likely inhibit cancer research commercialization at UK with expense, time, infrastructure, and lack of industry partnerships being among the most commonly cited factors. The potential alleviation of these factors in addition to revised University policies/procedures, risk mitigation, more emphasis on commercialization by academia research field, and increased information on how to commercialize significantly correlated with the potential for increased commercialization activity. Furthermore, multivariate logistic regression modeling demonstrated that research commercialization would incrementally increase as barriers to the process are removed and that PhD-holding respondents and respondents in commercialization-supportive research fields would be more likely to commercialize their research upon barrier removal. Overall, as with other disciplines, these data suggest that for innovations derived from academic cancer-research to move more effectively and

  20. Proceedings from the 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Zachary S; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary F; Cillo, Joseph E; Hale, Robert G; Le, Anh D; Lee, Janice S; Kademani, Deepak

    2014-02-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation, and the International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons sponsored the fifth research summit, which convened on May 2 and 3 in Rosemont, Illinois. The Research Summits are convened biennially to facilitate the discussion and collaboration of oral and maxillofacial surgeons with clinical and basic science researchers in fields affecting the specialty. The goal is to advance the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery through exposure and education in topics that ultimately benefit the oral and maxillofacial surgical patient. This edition of the research summit included the topics of robotic surgery and antiresorptive-related osteonecrosis of the jaws (ARONJ). Most importantly, this research summit saw the development of research interest groups (RIGs) in the fields of anesthesia, maxillofacial oncology and reconstructive surgery, obstructive sleep apnea and orthognathic surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, and trauma. These RIGs developed specific research goals with a plan to continue working on potential projects at the AAOMS Clinical Trials Course on May 7 to 9, 2013 at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. The summit program was developed by the AAOMS Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment. The charge of the committee is to encourage and promote research within the specialty and to encourage interdisciplinary collaboration. The research summit serves as a platform for oral and maxillofacial surgeons to lead the goal of advancement of research relevant to the specialty. This article provides an overview of the presentations that were made in the sessions on robotic surgery and ARONJ. The research summit keynote address and two additional presentations on patient registries are summarized and updates from the RIGs that were formed at the 2013 research summit are highlighted. PMID:24438595

  1. Misconduct in research: a descriptive survey of attitudes, perceptions and associated factors in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Misconduct in research tarnishes the reputation, credibility and integrity of research institutions. Studies on research or scientific misconduct are still novel in developing countries. In this study, we report on the attitudes, perceptions and factors related to the work environment thought to be associated with research misconduct in a group of researchers in Nigeria - a developing country. Method A survey of researchers attending a scientific conference was done using an adapted Scientific Misconduct Questionnaire-Revised (SMQ-R). Initial descriptive analysis of individual items using frequencies and proportions for all quantitative data was performed. Thereafter, Likert scale responses were transformed into dichotomous responses. Fisher exact test was performed for associations as appropriate. A two-tailed p-value of less than 0.05 was accepted as significant. Result Half of the respondents (50.4%) were aware of a colleague who had committed misconduct, defined as “non-adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms”. Over 88% of the researchers were concerned about the perceived amount of misconduct prevalent in their institution and 96.2% believed that one or more forms of scientific misconduct had occurred in their workplace. More than half (52.7%) rated the severity of penalties for scientific misconduct in their work environment as low. Furthermore¸ the majority (56.1%) were of the view that the chance of getting caught for scientific misconduct in their work environment was low. Conclusion Researchers in Nigeria perceive that scientific misconduct is commonplace in their institutions, but are however worried about the negative effects of scientific misconduct on the credibility of scientific research. We recommend that researchers be empowered with the knowledge and virtues necessary for self-regulation that advance research integrity. Research institutions should however also step into their

  2. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  3. Factors associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen research among Chinese Americans.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wanzhen; Ma, Grace X; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-04-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  4. Factors Associated with Willingness to Participate in Biospecimen Research Among Chinese Americans

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wanzhen; Tan, Yin; Fang, Carolyn; Weaver, JoEllen; Jin, Ming; Lai, Philip

    2014-01-01

    A paucity of information exists on the recruitment of Asian Americans for biospecimen research. Although studies show that Chinese Americans are at high risk for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, little is known about their willingness to participate in HBV-related biospecimen research and how knowledge, attitudes, and cultural factors impact their willingness to participate. The study was guided by Community-Based Participatory Research principles. Data were derived from an assessment study on HBV-related biospecimen research participation among Chinese Americans in the Philadelphia region. The assessment was conducted with 415 Chinese Americans recruited from eight Chinese community-based organizations. Cultural beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes toward biospecimen research were examined for associations with their willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Overall, 192 (46.3%) of 415 participants who completed the assessment indicated they were willing to participate if they were invited to donate blood to be frozen and stored for future HBV biospecimen studies. Cultural variables significant in bivariate analysis included collectivism, knowledge about biospecimen research, and Yin-Yang beliefs. Fatalism and individualism were not associated with participation willingness. In multivariate analysis, age, health care attitudes, and trust were significantly associated with willingness to participate in biospecimen banking research. Asian American communities have little knowledge of biospecimen banking and will benefit from educational campaigns that emphasize collective benefits and attitudes towards and trust in the health care system. Understanding cultural factors is important for improving Chinese Americans' knowledge, awareness, and intentions of participation in biospecimen research. Similar efforts need to be undertaken to develop culturally appropriate educational intervention programs to increase participation in biospecimen research

  5. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons 2015 Research Summit.

    PubMed

    Cillo, Joseph E; Basi, David; Peacock, Zachary; Aghaloo, Tara; Bouloux, Gary; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Biennial Research Summit of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois on May 6 and 7, 2015. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the most recent clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. The proceedings of the events of that summit are presented in this report. PMID:26707430

  6. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  7. Overview of innovative PMI research on NSTX-U and associated PMI facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono; Jaworski, M.; Kaita, R.; Skinner, C. N.; Allain, J. P.; Maingi, R.; Scotti, F.; Soukhanovskii, V. A.

    2013-05-01

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTX-U, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. Moreover, with ˜15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2.

  8. SU-F-BRE-10: Methods to Simulate and Measure the Attenuation for Modeling a Couch Top with Rails for FFF Treatment Delivery On the Varian Edge Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Gulam, M; Gardner, S; Zhao, B; Snyder, K; Song, K; Li, H; Gordon, J; Wen, N; Chetty, I; Kearns, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To measure attenuation for modelling of the KVue Couchtop for 6X and 10X FFF SRS/SBRT treatment Methods: Treatment planning simulation studies were done using 6X FFF beams to estimate the dosimetric impact of KVue couchtops (including the Q-Fix IGRT [carbon fiber] and Calypso [nonconductive Kevlar material]) with a structure model obtained from a research workstation (Eclipse, advanced planning interface (API) v13). Prior to installation on the Varian Edge linac, the couchtop along with (Kevlar) rails were CT scanned with the rails at various positions. An additional scan with the couchtop 15cm above the CT table top was obtained with 20cm solid water to facilitate precised/indexed data acquisition. Measurements for attenuation were obtained for field sizes of 2, 4 and 10 cm{sup 2} at 42 gantry angles including 6 pairs of opposing fields and other angles for oblique delivery where the beams traversed the couchtop and or rails. The delivery was fully automated with xml scripts running in developer mode. The results were then used to determine an accurate structure model for AAA (Eclipse v11) planning of IMRT and RapidArc delivery. Results: The planning simulation relative dose attenuation for oblique entry was not significantly different than the Exact IGRT or BrainLab iBeam couch except that the rails added 6% additional attenuation. The relative attenuation measurements for PA, PA (rails: inner position), oblique, oblique (rails: outer position), oblique (rails: inner position) were: −2.0%, −2.5%, −15.6%, −2.5%, −5.0% for 6X FFF and −1.4%, −1.5%, −12.2%, − 2.5%, −5.0% for 10X FFF with slight decrease in attenuation versus field size. A Couch structure model (with HU values) was developed. Calculation compared to measurement showed good agreement except for oblique (rails: outer position) where differences approached a magnitude of 6%. Conclusion: A model of the couch structures has been developed accounting for attenuation for FFF

  9. A Research on the Association of Pavement Surface Damages Using Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Ching-Tsung; Chang, Jia-Ray; Chen, Jian-Da; Chou, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Shih-Huang

    The association of pavement surface damages used to rely on the judgments of the experts. However, with the accumulation of data in the pavement surface maintenance database and the improvement of Data Mining, there are more and more methods available to explore the association of pavement surface damages. This research adopts Apriori algorithm to conduct association analysis on pavement surface damages. From the experience of experts, it has been believed that the association of road damages is complicated. However, through case studies, it has been found that pavement surface damages are caused among longitudinal cracking, alligator cracking and pen-holes, and they are unidirectional influence. In addition, with the help of association rules, it has been learned that, in pavement surface preventative maintenance, the top priority should be the repair of longitudinal cracking and alligator cracking, which can greatly reduce the occurrence of pen-holes and the risk of state compensations.

  10. NASA Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2000-01-01

    The Space Biology Research Associate Program for the 21st Century provided a unique opportunity to train individuals to conduct biological research in hypo- and hyper-gravity, and to conduct ground-based research. This grant was developed to maximize the potential for Space Biology as an emerging discipline and to train a cadre of space biologists. The field of gravitational and space biology is rapidly growing at the future of the field is reflected in the quality and education of its personnel. Our chief objective was to train and develop these scientists rapidly and in a cost effective model.

  11. Advances in the prevention of oral disease; the role of the International Association for Dental Research

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Since its foundation in 1920, prevention of oral disease has been a priority for the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and the commitment of the organisation to the subject area is clearly expressed in its mission to improve oral health worldwide. The IADR has a current global membership of almost 11,000 people who share an interest in oral and craniofacial research. Contribution of IADR This paper provides an overview of the contribution of IADR to supporting research and associated activities in disease prevention, in disseminating knowledge and in advocating for better oral health for all citizens of the world. It looks back over time and summarises current supports. Two more recent initiatives in disease prevention are described in more detail, the Global Oral Health Inequalities Research Agenda (GOHIRA) and the proceedings at the 2013 World Conference on Preventive Dentistry (WCPD, 2013), a joint initiative between IADR and WHO. Through organisational structure, meetings, publications, scientific groups and networks and external relations, IADR has been at the forefront of advancing research for the prevention of oral diseases. Conclusions IADR is committed to ensuring research advances get disseminated and implemented and at the same time encourages and advocates for basic, clinical and translational research across disciplines so that we may uncover the major breakthrough in prevention of oral disease. PMID:26391001

  12. Simple methods to reduce patient dose in a Varian cone beam CT system for delivery verification in pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Roxby, P; Kron, T; Foroudi, F; Haworth, A; Fox, C; Mullen, A; Cramb, J

    2009-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a three-dimensional imaging modality that has recently become available on linear accelerators for radiotherapy patient position verification. It was the aim of the present study to implement simple strategies for reduction of the dose delivered in a commercial CBCT system. The dose delivered in a CBCT procedure (Varian, half-fan acquisition, 650 projections, 125 kVp) was assessed using a cylindrical Perspex phantom (diameter, 32 cm) with a calibrated Farmer type ionisation chamber. A copper filter (thickness, 0.15 mm) was introduced increasing the half value layer of the beam from 5.5 mm Al to 8 mm Al. Image quality and noise were assessed using an image quality phantom (CatPhan) while the exposure settings per projection were varied from 25 ms/80 mA to 2 ms/2 mA per projection. Using the copper filter reduced the dose to the phantom from approximately 45 mGy to 30 mGy at standard settings (centre/periphery weighting 1/3 to 2/3). Multiple CBCT images were acquired for six patients with pelvic malignancies to compare CBCTs with and without a copper filter. Although the reconstructed image is somewhat noisier with the filter, it features similar contrast in the centre of the patient and was often preferred by the radiation oncologist because of greater image uniformity. The X-ray shutters were adjusted to the minimum size required to obtain the desired image volume for a given patient diameter. The simple methods described here reduce the effective dose to patients undergoing daily CBCT and are easy to implement, and initial evidence suggests that they do not affect the ability to identify soft tissue for the purpose of treatment verification. PMID:19289401

  13. AERA 2010 Web Communications Survey Report: "American Educational Research Association" January 2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Researcher, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report is intended to provide information to facilitate revision of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) website. All AERA members were invited to participate in an electronic survey to respond to questions about their assessments of the current website and their use of technology to access it. This report presents findings…

  14. Factors Associated with Research Anxiety of University Human Resource Education Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Chadwick C.; Kotrlik, Joe W.

    2006-01-01

    Factors associated with research anxiety of university faculty members in human resource educations fields were examined. Most of the participating faculty members were male and half were full professors. The mean age was 52 and all but one held a doctorate. Relationships between selected demographic characteristics and The Higgins-Kotrlik…

  15. The Association of Research Libraries Statistics and Measurement Program: From Descriptive Data to Performance Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C.

    The Association of Research Libraries (ARL) has collected descriptive data from its members for the better part of the 20th century. This data shows that as libraries' environments change to reflect increased interest in accountability and institutional outcomes. To account for this, an ARL New Measures Initiative has been established to develop…

  16. The Human Ecology of the American Educational Research Association. Report No. 261.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, James M., Jr.

    The concepts and methods of human ecology are applied to the geographic distribution of members of the American Educational Research Association. State characteristics are measured by five factors: (1) large-scale agriculture; (2) population size; (3) affluence-urbanization; (4) white predominance; (5) emphasis on specialized agriculture. City…

  17. Development of a research platform for dissecting phenotype-genotype associations in rice (Oryza spp.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We present an overview of a research platform that provides essential germplasm, genotypic and phenotypic data and analytical tools for dissecting phenotye-genotype associations in rice. These resources include a diversity panel of 400 O. sativa and 100 O. rufipogon accessions that have been purifie...

  18. DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates Program FY 2005 Accomplishments

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy, F. P.

    2005-11-01

    The DOE-NREL Minority University Research Associates (MURA) Program encourages minority students to pursue careers in science and technology. In 2003, eight minority-serving institutions were awarded 3-year subcontracts that began in the summer/fall of FY 2004. This paper lists accomplishments made in the project's first phase.

  19. History and Culture of Alara--The Action Learning and Action Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuber-Skerritt, Ortrun; Passfield, Ron

    2016-01-01

    As co-founders of the Action Learning and Action Research Association (ALARA), we tell the story of this international network organisation through our personal experience. Our history traces the evolution of ALARA from origins at the first World Congress in 1990 in Brisbane, Australia, through development over two and a half decades, to its…

  20. Association for Counselor Education and Supervision Guidelines for Research Mentorship: Development and Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borders, L. DiAnne; Wester, Kelly L.; Granello, Darcy Haag; Chang, Catherine Y.; Hays, Danica G.; Pepperell, Jennifer; Spurgeon, Shawn L.

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe guidelines endorsed by the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision for research mentorship, including characteristics of mentors and mentees. Suggestions for implementing the guidelines at the individual, program, institution, and professional levels are focused on enhancing mentoring relationships as well as…

  1. Recruitment Strategies and Costs Associated with Community-Based Research in a Mexican-Origin Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendez-Luck, Carolyn A.; Trejo, Laura; Miranda, Jeanne; Jimenez, Elizabeth; Quiter, Elaine S.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We describe the recruitment strategies and personnel and materials costs associated with two community-based research studies in a Mexican-origin population. We also highlight the role that academic-community partnerships played in the outreach and recruitment process for our studies. We reviewed study documents using case study…

  2. Governing by Network in Europe: Associations, Educational Research and Social Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin

    2007-01-01

    The coincident arrival of a European policy space in education and a European Educational Research Association [EERA], and their subsequent relation, will be the subject of this paper. EERA is a hybrid organization--it supports scientific networking, it is a social partner in EU policy, it is a first level social space for networking, and…

  3. A Report on the Peace Education Commission Program, International Peace Research Association Conference 2010, Sydney, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toh, Swee-Hin

    2010-01-01

    From July 6th to 10th, 2010, International Peace Research Association (IPRA) held its biennial conference at the University of Sydney in Australia. Hosted by the University's Centre for Peace & Conflict Studies and coordinated by Jake Lynch and a team of dedicated staff and volunteers, the conference featured seven plenary panels and many papers…

  4. American Vocational Education Research Association Members' Perceptions of Statistical Significance Tests and Other Statistical Controversies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Howard R. D.

    A random sample of 113 members of the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) was surveyed to obtain baseline information regarding AVERA members' perceptions of statistical significance tests. The Psychometrics Group Instrument was used to collect data from participants. Of those surveyed, 67% were male, 93% had earned a…

  5. Expanding the Epistemological Terrain: Increasing Equity and Diversity within the American Educational Research Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    2016-01-01

    During the civil rights movement of the 1960s and 1970s, the quest for civil rights by African Americans and other groups of color reverberated throughout the United States and the world, including within educational professional and research organizations, such as the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, the National Council of…

  6. Balancing Needs and Resources. The Association for Institutional Research Annual Forum Proceedings No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staskey, Paul J., Ed.

    The abbreviated proceedings of the 18th Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research on balancing needs and resources are presented. Three of the five major addresses are presented in their entirety; the other two are summarized. The invited general session addresses included: "Talent for the 1980's" (Russell Edgerton); "If You Don't…

  7. Competence for Children's Sake: Summary Report of a Research Project on the Child Development Associate Credential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pettygrove, Willa Bowman

    This report summarizes a research project on the Child Development Associate (CDA) assessment and credentialing system. The issues covered in the report fall under two general categories: validity (the ability of the CDA assessment/credential system to identify competent child care staff) and career development potential (the benefits of the CDA…

  8. Factors influencing clinical students' perceptions of an embedded research project and associated publication output.

    PubMed

    Weller, Renate; May, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe student perceptions of the value of a short, compulsory research project embedded in a clinical degree program, the research output in terms of publications, and the factors influencing this. It was hypothesized that student attitudes toward the project, student perceptions of how much the project contributed to their generic skills, and the number of publications submitted or prepared for submission would be associated with perceived quality of supervision, perceived difficulty of the project, career plans, and attitude before commencement of the project. We explored this using a questionnaire comprising 30 questions that included demographics, Likert scales, and categorical responses. Student attitudes toward research were found to be associated with student attitude before the start of the project, perceived difficulty of the project, perceived quality of supervision, and perceived relevance to the profession. Students thought that the research project contributed most to the skills of "information gathering" and "critical evaluation" and the least to "teamwork," "problem solving," and "oral communication." Research output was significantly linked to perceived quality of supervision and the help students received with data analysis and data collection, though not with the project report itself. In conclusion, although the success of the research project was influenced by many factors, the perceived quality of supervision influenced all three outcome measures. Therefore it is clear that optimization of this aspect offers the most scope for enhancing the student learning experience. PMID:23709108

  9. US Department of Energy Teacher Research Associates Program: Profile and survey of 1990--1991 participants

    SciTech Connect

    Vivio, F.M.; Stevenson, W.L.

    1992-11-01

    Through its laboratories, facilities, and technology centers, the United States Department of Energy supports the development and training of scientists and engineers to meet the nation`s future human resource needs in energy science and technology. This mission is accomplished, in part, through summer programs of active participation by precollege teachers in laboratory research. Since 1989, the Teacher Research Associates (TRAC) program has provided outstanding 7th- through 12th-grade science, mathematics, and technology teachers from across the nation the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects at DOE laboratories. The TRAC program encourages participants, upon returning to their home institution, to share with their students and colleagues the experience and knowledge gained through their research endeavors.

  10. Overview of Innovative PMI Research on NSTX-U and Associated PMI Facilities at PPPL

    SciTech Connect

    M. Ono, M. Jaworski, R. Kaita, C. N. Skinner, J.P. Allain, R. Maingi, F. Scotti, V.A. Soukhanovskii, and the NSTX-U Team

    2012-09-19

    Developing a reactor compatible divertor and managing the associated plasma material interaction (PMI) has been identified as a high priority research area for magnetic confinement fusion. Accordingly on NSTXU, the PMI research has received a strong emphasis. With ~ 15 MW of auxiliary heating power, NSTX-U will be able to test the PMI physics with the peak divertor plasma facing component (PFC) heat loads of up to 40-60 MW/m2 . To support the PMI research, a comprehensive set of PMI diagnostic tools are being implemented. The snow-flake configuration can produce exceptionally high divertor flux expansion of up to ~ 50. Combined with the radiative divertor concept, the snow-flake configuration has reduced the divertor heat flux by an order of magnitude in NSTX. Another area of active PMI investigation is the effect of divertor lithium coating (both in solid and liquid phases). The overall NSTX lithium PFC coating results suggest exciting opportunities for future magnetic confinement research including significant electron energy confinement improvements, Hmode power threshold reduction, the control of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), and high heat flux handling. To support the NSTX-U/PPPL PMI research, there are also a number of associated PMI facilities implemented at PPPL/Princeton University including the Liquid Lithium R&D facility, Lithium Tokamak Experiment, and Laboratories for Materials Characterization and Surface Chemistry.

  11. Research priorities in the evolving demographic landscape of Alzheimer disease and associated dementias.

    PubMed

    Valle, Ramón; Lee, Brason

    2002-01-01

    The rapid increase of ethnically diverse late onset dementia-affected persons is bringing a special urgency to Alzheimer disease and associated disorders research. By this decade's end, non-European heritage ethnically diverse persons will account for 25% of the dementia-affected cohort and 33% by mid-century. These populations have received some attention in both dementia-focused basic biomedical and social-behavioral research. However, studies differ greatly with regard to the constructs of culture used, the methodologies used, and representativeness of the populations sampled. Moreover, social status factors are often confounded with cultural variables. Therefore, several clarifying research approaches are suggested. In biomedical research, categorically ascribed (US census type) definitions, or assumed (self-reported) ethnic group designators will not suffice where actual biophysiological sampling precision is needed. A strategy for the phenotypic sampling of cohorts is therefore suggested for this research domain. In social-behavioral research, the acceptance of a common operational definition of culture is urged. And, with reference to a specific social status confound, namely literacy, a neuroimaging research strategy is proposed to determine whether non-literates might not be misclassified relative to the determination of their actual cognitive functioning status. Additionally, two conceptual models for addressing and are briefly presented. PMID:12351917

  12. Marijuana Use and Its Association with Participation, Navigation, and Enrollment in Health Research among African Americans.

    PubMed

    Webb, Fern J; Striley, Catherine W; Cottler, Linda B

    2015-01-01

    This analysis examined the association between marijuana (Mj) use, willingness to participate, navigation and enrollment in health research among African Americans. Data from HealthStreet, a community-engagement model implemented in North Central Florida that reduces health disparities by engaging and linking community members to medical and social services and health research opportunities, were analyzed to determine willingness of African American Mj users to participate, be navigated to and enroll in health research studies. Among 1,496 African American community members, 8.0% were current Mj users, 30.3% were past Mj users and 61.7% reported never using Mj. Current and past Mj users were more willing to volunteer for a research study that only involved the use of medical records, required an overnight stay in a hospital or clinic, or might require use of medical equipment compared to those who never used Mj. Current Mj users were significantly less likely to be navigated (95% CI: 0.21-0.58) to health research studies while past Mj users (95% CI: 1.05-2.64) were significantly more likely to be enrolled in health research studies. Navigating and enrolling Mj users into health research studies could help decrease health disparities and increase health equity for the entire community since study findings would undoubtedly be more representative of the entire community rather than a select few. PMID:26213328

  13. Historical Research: A Thematic Analysis of Convention and Conference Themes for Selected Professional Health Education Associations from 1975 to 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jill M.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    2009-01-01

    Many professional organizations and associations hold conventions and conferences on an annual basis. Health Education professional associations take part in this process. Using a historical research perspective, this article delineates conference themes for four prominent professional Health Education associations: the American Association for…

  14. A treatment planning study comparing Elekta VMAT and fixed field IMRT using the varian treatment planning system eclipse

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The newest release of the Eclipse (Varian) treatment planning system (TPS) includes an optimizing engine for Elekta volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this new algorithm and to compare it to intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for various disease sites by creating single- and double-arc VMAT plans. Methods A total of 162 plans were evaluated in this study, including 38 endometrial, 57 head and neck, 12 brain, 10 breast and 45 prostate cancer cases. The real-life IMRT plans were developed during routine clinical cases using the TPS Eclipse. VMAT plans were generated using a preclinical version of Eclipse with tumor-region-specific optimizing templates without interference of the operator: with one full arc (1A) and with two full arcs (2A), and with partial arcs for breast and prostate with hip implant cases. All plans were evaluated based on target coverage, homogeneity and conformity. The organs at risk (OARs) were analyzed according to plan objectives, such as the mean and maximum doses. If one or more objectives were exceeded, the plan was considered clinically unacceptable, and a second VMAT plan was created by adapting the optimization penalties once. Results Compared to IMRT, single- and double-arc VMAT plans showed comparable or better results concerning the target coverage: the maximum dose in the target for 1A is the same as that for IMRT; for 2A, an average reduction of 1.3% over all plans was observed. The conformity showed a statistically significant improvement for both 1A (+3%) and 2A (+6%). The mean total body dose was statistically significant lower for the considered arc techniques (IMRT: 16.0 Gy, VMAT: 15.3 Gy, p < 0.001). However, the sparing of OARs shows individual behavior that depends strongly on the different tumor regions. A clear difference is found in the number of monitor units (MUs) per plan: VMAT shows a reduction of 31%. Conclusion These findings

  15. The site of the Varian Temple of Elagabal in Rome: topographical and astronomical approach to the question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Arrizabalaga y Prado, L.; de La Fuente Marcos, R.

    2005-03-01

    Ancient historians refer to a temple in Rome, dedicated to the Syrian sun god Elagabal, by his high priest, the Roman emperor called Varius (204-222AD, commonly called Elagabalus or Heliogabalus). On the basis of their texts, it has been thought that Varius either built a new temple, or rededicated an existing one, expropriated from some other deity, in order to house his god's principal cult object: a large black meteorite, or baetyl, which Varius brought from its temple at Emesa, in Syria, to Rome. In this paper we analyze the hypothesis that the site of the Varian Temple of Elagabal may have been that now known as the Vigna Barberini. A stratigraphic analysis shows that the Vigna Barberini is an artificial platform, built on the rubble of earlier hillside structures, dating from prehistoric times to the Julio-Claudian period. The platform, with more or less its present shape, is of Flavian date, and at that time contained a portico surrounding a central garden. On top of these, a Severan level corresponds to the base of the foundations of a temple that are very solid and go very deep. The azimuth of the temple wall oriented south-east is about 113°. Using a computer program, we have thoroughly scan ned the night sky in AD 1-250, looking for celestial objects that may have been worshipped in the temple. After taking into account the effects of precession, the main candidate for a celestial body worshipped from this site appears to be the star Sirius. In several Mediterranean cultures, the heliacal ortus, or earliest pre-dawn sighting of Sirius (when Sirius again rises into visibility after being hidden by the Sun's light for about 70 days) was thought to have astrological significance. We have compiled the relevant astronomical data for the heliacal ortus of Sirius in the time span 0-250 AD. During that period of time, it falls between 18th and 20th July. The azimuth angle of Sirius, when rising on the heliacal ortus day ci rca 150 AD, is about 111°. Being

  16. Utility of genome-wide association study findings: prostate cancer as a translational research paradigm.

    PubMed

    Turner, A R; Kader, A K; Xu, J

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified thousands of consistently replicated associations between genetic markers and complex disease risk, including cancers. Alone, these markers have limited utility in risk prediction; however, when several of these markers are used in combination, the predictive performance appears to be similar to that of many currently available clinical predictors. Despite this, there are divergent views regarding the clinical validity and utility of these genetic markers in risk prediction. There are valid concerns, thus providing a direction for new lines of research. Herein, we outline the debate and use the example of prostate cancer to highlight emerging evidence from studies that aim to address potential concerns. We also describe a translational framework that could be used to guide the development of a new generation of comprehensive research studies aimed at capitalizing on these exciting new discoveries. PMID:22272820

  17. Using the associative imagery technique in qualitative health research: the experiences of homecare workers and consumers.

    PubMed

    Gong, Fang; Castaneda, Diego; Zhang, Xu; Stock, Laura; Ayala, Linda; Baron, Sherry

    2012-10-01

    The associative imagery technique is a qualitative tool with which researchers use carefully selected photographs or images to trigger participants' responses to explain difficult behavioral and social concepts. In this article, we describe the development and implementation of the associative imagery method in focus groups to understand the complex relationships between homecare workers and their clients as part of a larger health and safety intervention project conducted by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. A total of 116 homecare workers and clients were recruited for the study. We found that participants used images mainly in two ways. First, the images served to remind participants of specific persons, events, and/or objects. Second, the images facilitated recollections and reflections that allowed participants to metaphorically describe their experiences, feelings, and emotions. Both usages of imagery generated comments that answered the research question in a more relevant, descriptive, and vivid way. PMID:22851495

  18. [Transparency in biomedical research: about the risks associated with the use of Avandia].

    PubMed

    Salas, Sofía P; Russo, Moisés

    2010-09-01

    The question of how and when to communicate potential risks associated with new drugs has remained an important focus of tension between the pharmaceutical industry and regulatory entities, such as the American Food and Drug Administration. Recently there has been widespread concern related to the cardiovascular risks associated with the use of Avandia, a rosiglitazone produced by Glaxo Smith Kline. In fact, several metaanalyses involving rosiglitazone provided a relatively consistent message that rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial ischemic events. In the present article, we review the controversy regarding the way the pharmaceutical company handled this issue, and we describe examples of inappropriate conduct regarding an industry-sponsored clinical trial with this drug. We raise several important ethical questions related to the way researchers handle conflicts of interest when they are employees of the pharmaceutical industry. Finally, we discuss the requirements to conduct biomedical research funded by the pharmaceutical industry in Chile. PMID:21249291

  19. Associations between personal exposures and ambient concentrations of nitrogen dioxide: A quantitative research synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Q. Y.; Svendsgaard, D.; Kotchmar, D. J.; Pinto, J. P.

    2012-09-01

    Although positive associations between ambient NO2 concentrations and personal exposures have generally been found by exposure studies, the strength of the associations varied among studies. Differences in results could be related to differences in study design and in exposure factors. However, the effects of study design, exposure factors, and sampling and measurement errors on the strength of the personal-ambient associations have not been evaluated quantitatively in a systematic manner. A quantitative research synthesis was conducted to examine these issues based on peer-reviewed publications in the past 30 years. Factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations across the studies were also examined with meta-regression. Ambient NO2 was found to be significantly associated with personal NO2 exposures, with estimates of 0.42, 0.16, and 0.72 for overall pooled, longitudinal and daily average correlation coefficients based on random-effects meta-analysis. This conclusion was robust after correction for publication bias with correlation coefficients of 0.37, 0.16 and 0.45. We found that season and some population characteristics, such as pre-existing disease, were significant factors affecting the strength of the personal-ambient associations. More meaningful and rigorous comparisons would be possible if greater detail were published on the study design (e.g. local and indoor sources, housing characteristics, etc.) and data quality (e.g., detection limits and percent of data above detection limits).

  20. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - A Model for Young Researcher Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2000 members from approximately 45 countries, APECS represents a body of undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research activities. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. APECS can serve as a model for other groups looking to encourage the next generation of researchers. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach

  1. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document

    PubMed Central

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-01-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap. The EHA Roadmap identifies nine ‘sections’ in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders. The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  2. The European Hematology Association Roadmap for European Hematology Research: a consensus document.

    PubMed

    Engert, Andreas; Balduini, Carlo; Brand, Anneke; Coiffier, Bertrand; Cordonnier, Catherine; Döhner, Hartmut; de Wit, Thom Duyvené; Eichinger, Sabine; Fibbe, Willem; Green, Tony; de Haas, Fleur; Iolascon, Achille; Jaffredo, Thierry; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Salles, Gilles; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2016-02-01

    The European Hematology Association (EHA) Roadmap for European Hematology Research highlights major achievements in diagnosis and treatment of blood disorders and identifies the greatest unmet clinical and scientific needs in those areas to enable better funded, more focused European hematology research. Initiated by the EHA, around 300 experts contributed to the consensus document, which will help European policy makers, research funders, research organizations, researchers, and patient groups make better informed decisions on hematology research. It also aims to raise public awareness of the burden of blood disorders on European society, which purely in economic terms is estimated at €23 billion per year, a level of cost that is not matched in current European hematology research funding. In recent decades, hematology research has improved our fundamental understanding of the biology of blood disorders, and has improved diagnostics and treatments, sometimes in revolutionary ways. This progress highlights the potential of focused basic research programs such as this EHA Roadmap.The EHA Roadmap identifies nine 'sections' in hematology: normal hematopoiesis, malignant lymphoid and myeloid diseases, anemias and related diseases, platelet disorders, blood coagulation and hemostatic disorders, transfusion medicine, infections in hematology, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These sections span 60 smaller groups of diseases or disorders.The EHA Roadmap identifies priorities and needs across the field of hematology, including those to develop targeted therapies based on genomic profiling and chemical biology, to eradicate minimal residual malignant disease, and to develop cellular immunotherapies, combination treatments, gene therapies, hematopoietic stem cell treatments, and treatments that are better tolerated by elderly patients. PMID:26819058

  3. SU-E-T-325: The New Evaluation Method of the VMAT Plan Delivery Using Varian DynaLog Files and Modulation Complexity Score (MCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Tateoka, K; Fujimomo, K; Hareyama, M; Saitou, Y; Nakazawa, T; Abe, T; Nakata, A; Yano, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of Varian DynaLog files to verify VMAT plans delivery and modulation complexity score (MCS) of VMAT. Methods: Delivery accuracy of machine performance was quantified by multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors, gantry angle errors and fluence delivery accuracy for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The relationship between machine performance and plan complexity were also investigated using the modulation complexity score (MCS). Plan and Actual MLC positions, gantry angles and delivered fraction of monitor units were extracted from Varian DynaLog files. These factors were taken from the record and verify system of MLC control file. Planned and delivered beam data were compared to determine leaf position errors and gantry angle errors. Analysis was also performed on planned and actual fluence maps reconstructed from those of the DynaLog files. This analysis was performed for all treatment fractions of 5 prostate VMAT plans. The analysis of DynaLog files have been carried out by in-house programming in Visual C++. Results: The root mean square of leaf position and gantry angle errors were about 0.12 and 0.15, respectively. The Gamma of planned and actual fluence maps at 3%/3 mm criterion was about 99.21. The gamma of the leaf position errors were not directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Therefore, the gamma of the gantry angle errors were directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Conclusion: This study shows Varian dynalog files for VMAT plan can be diagnosed delivery errors not possible with phantom based quality assurance. Furthermore, the MCS of VMAT plan can evaluate delivery accuracy for patients receiving of VMAT. Machine performance was found to be directly related to plan complexity but this is not the dominant determinant of delivery accuracy.

  4. Output factor comparison of Monte Carlo and measurement for Varian TrueBeam 6 MV and 10 MV flattening filter-free stereotactic radiosurgery system.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jason Y; Ning, Holly; Arora, Barbara C; Zhuge, Ying; Miller, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    The dose measurements of the small field sizes, such as conical collimators used in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), are a significant challenge due to many factors including source occlusion, detector size limitation, and lack of lateral electronic equilibrium. One useful tool in dealing with the small field effect is Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. In this study, we report a comparison of Monte Carlo simulations and measurements of output factors for the Varian SRS system with conical collimators for energies of 6 MV flattening filter-free (6 MV) and 10 MV flattening filter-free (10 MV) on the TrueBeam accelerator. Monte Carlo simulations of Varian's SRS system for 6 MV and 10 MV photon energies with cones sizes of 17.5 mm, 15.0 mm, 12.5 mm, 10.0 mm, 7.5 mm, 5.0 mm, and 4.0 mm were performed using EGSnrc (release V4 2.4.0) codes. Varian's version-2 phase-space files for 6 MV and 10 MV of TrueBeam accelerator were utilized in the Monte Carlo simulations. Two small diode detectors Edge (Sun Nuclear) and Small Field Detector (SFD) (IBA Dosimetry) were applied to measure the output factors. Significant errors may result if detector correction factors are not applied to small field dosimetric measurements. Although it lacked the machine-specific kfclin,fmsrQclin,Qmsr correction factors for diode detectors in this study, correction factors were applied utilizing published studies conducted under similar conditions. For cone diameters greater than or equal to 12.5 mm, the differences between output factors for the Edge detector, SFD detector, and MC simulations are within 3.0% for both energies. For cone diameters below 12.5 mm, output factors differences exhibit greater variations. PMID:27167266

  5. Biological measures to minimize the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer: A research perspective.

    PubMed

    Imaoka, Tatsuhiko; Ishii, Nobuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Isao; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Doi, Kazutaka; Daino, Kazuhiro; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Tagami, Keiko; Kokubo, Toshiaki; Morioka, Takamitsu; Hosoki, Ayaka; Takabatake, Masaru; Yoshinaga, Shinji

    2016-06-01

    Purpose Second cancers are among the most serious sequelae for cancer survivors who receive radiotherapy. This article aims to review current knowledge regarding how the risk of radiotherapy-associated second cancer can be minimized by biological measures and to discuss relevant research needs. Results The risk of second cancer can be reduced not only by physical measures to decrease the radiation dose to normal tissues but also by biological means that interfere with the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Requirements for such biological means include the targeting of tumor types relevant to radiotherapy-associated risk, concrete safety and efficacy evidence and feasibility and minimal invasiveness. Mechanistic insights into the process of radiation carcinogenesis provide rational approaches to minimize the risk. Five mechanism-based strategies are proposed herein based on the current state of knowledge. Epidemiological studies on the joint effects of radiation and lifestyle or other factors can provide evidence for factors that modify radiation-associated risks if deliberately controlled. Conclusions Mechanistic and epidemiological evidence indicates that it is possible to develop interventional measures to minimize the second cancer risk associated with radiotherapy. Research is needed regarding the critical determinants of radiation-induced carcinogenesis available for intervention and joint effects of radiation and controllable factors. PMID:26967256

  6. The Association of Polar Early Career Scientists - Developing a Continuum of Polar Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pope, A.; Baeseman, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Established in 2006 by young researchers in the early stages of the International Polar Year (IPY), the Association of Polar Early Career Scientists (APECS) has evolved into the pre-eminent international organization for polar researchers at early stages of their careers. Now comprising around 2600 members from approximately 74 countries, APECS represents a body of students, postdoctoral researchers, early faculty members, educators and others with interests in Polar Regions and the cryosphere with the key aim of raising the profile of polar research by providing a continuum of leadership that is both international and interdisciplinary in focus, and stimulating collaborative projects in research, education and outreach. APECS provides a strong voice for young researchers, enabling information sharing between early-career and more established professionals, promoting and organizing science, education and outreach events, and being actively involved with other organizations in the support of polar research. These activities are guided by three overarching goals: *Facilitate international and interdisciplinary networking to share ideas and experiences and to develop new research directions and collaborations; *Provide opportunities for professional career development; and *Promote education and outreach as integral components of polar research and to stimulate future generations of polar researchers. This presentation highlights the major achievements of APECS since its inception as well as future steps that APECS plans to take to ensure its sustainability. Since its founding, APECS has strived to develop strong partnerships with international organizations and scientific bodies. This network has not only facilitated early-career representation on an international level but has also furthered many education and outreach opportunities for young polar researchers. APECS core programs that include career development workshops and panels (including several associated

  7. Resources for Research Libraries. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (98th, New York, New York, May 7-8, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    The management of research libraries and national resources for the funding of research library activities were the major topics addressed by the speakers and discussion sessions at this meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Included are transcripts of the addresses and discussions on higher education's turbulent environment,…

  8. Institutional Research: New Challenges to an Evolving Role. Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (13th, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 26-28, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylis, Bayard, Comp.

    New challenges facing the institutional research profession are covered in these 1986 conference proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Paper titles and authors include: "Institutional Research at Mercer County Community College: The Changing Role in the Eighties" (F. L. Edwards); "Course Placement and Academic…

  9. Publishing Your Music Education Research: A Seminar for Future Authors--A Summary of the 2009 Ohio Music Education Association Research Forum Presented By Dr. Wendy Sims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schatt, Matthew D.

    2009-01-01

    The Ohio Music Education Association (OMEA) Research Committee annually hosts a Graduate Research Forum in conjunction with the OMEA's Professional Development Conference. In 2009, the guest speaker was Dr. Wendy Sims, Director of Music Education at the University of Missouri--Columbia and Editor of the Journal of Research in Music Education. An…

  10. Production of 5′ Nucleotide by Using Halophilic Nuclease H Preferentially Adsorbed on Flocculated Cells of the Halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus

    PubMed Central

    Onishi, Hiroshi; Kamekura, Masahiro; Yokoi, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Takekazu

    1988-01-01

    A bioreactor with a column of flocculated cells of the moderate halophile Micrococcus varians subsp. halophilus which adsorbed the halophilic nuclease H was designed to be used in the production of 5′ nucleotides from RNA. A remarkable characteristic of the flocculated cells was that they preferentially adsorbed much exogenous nuclease, excluding adsorbed 5′ nucleotidase. Furthermore, desalting treatment of the flocculated cells in the presence of 2% MgSO4 · 7H2O gave rise to selective inactivation of 5′ nucleotidase without the loss of nuclease H activity, and 5′-guanylic acid was produced with the bioreactor. PMID:16347767

  11. The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA): Online Research Data, Tools, and References

    PubMed Central

    Finke, Roger; Adamczyk, Amy

    2014-01-01

    The Association of Religion Data Archives (ARDA) currently archives over 400 local, national, and international data files, and offers a wide range of research tools to build surveys, preview data on-line, develop customized maps and reports of U.S. church membership, and examine religion differences across nations and regions of the world. The ARDA also supports reference and teaching tools that draw on the rich data archive. This research note offers a brief introduction to the quantitative data available for exploration or download, and a few of the website features most useful for research and teaching. Supported by the Lilly Endowment, the John Templeton Foundation, the Pennsylvania State University, and the Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion, all data downloads and online services are free of charge. PMID:25484914

  12. Publication: Presentation rate in the Latin American region of the International Association for Dental Research.

    PubMed

    Jara-Tracchia, Lilian; Aromando, Romina F; Itoiz, María E

    2010-01-01

    Most research conducted by the dental scientific community is presented at the Annual Meetings of the different Divisions and Sections of IADR. This research acquires real value when the results are published in peer-reviewed journals. A useful indicator of the publication efficiency of research work is the rate of publication (PR), i.e., the ratio between the quantity of presentations and subsequent publications in peer-reviewed journals. The aim of this study was to analyze the PR of the presentations at the Sections and Divisions of the Latin American Region of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR). We considered the presentations at the Annual Meetings of Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Peru held in 2002 and 2003 and their corresponding publications indexed in PubMed from 2002 to 2009. For Venezuela, we analyzed the meetings held in 2002 and 2005, because they did not hold consecutive annual meetings. Presentation periods were selected based on previous data that report an interval of up to five years between presentation and publication. The number of presentations and the PR are related to the number of years that Sections and Divisions have existed. In Brazil and Argentina, PR (expressed as 1 publication: x presentations) is 1:3. The amount of research in Brazil is almost 8 times higher than in Argentina. Newer Sections and Divisions have produced fewer presentations, and the PR is also lower. We hope that this type of analysis will encourage the promotion of dental research at the different institutions and in the different vacancy areas of research, and facilitate exchange among researchers in the Region, enabling greater use to be made of their scientific activities. PMID:21053689

  13. Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology (GAME-ON): A Network of Consortia for Post-Genome Wide Association (Post-GWA) Research

    Cancer.gov

    The Genetic Associations and Mechanisms in Oncology's (GAME-ON) overall goal is to foster an intra-disciplinary and collaborative approach to the translation of promising research leads deriving from the initial wave of cancer GWAS.

  14. Navigating the Thin Line between Education and Incarceration: An Action Research Case Study on Gang-Associated Latino Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rios, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines data collected from an ethnographic research project conducted with 56 gang-associated Latino youths ages 15 to 21 from 2007 to 2009. The objectives of the study were to examine how poor Latino gang-associated youths perceived schooling and policing and to find out if the research process could promote educational aspirations…

  15. Federated Search and the Library Web Site: A Study of Association of Research Libraries Member Web Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Sarah C.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how federated search engines are incorporated into the Web sites of libraries in the Association of Research Libraries. In 2009, information was gathered for each library in the Association of Research Libraries with a federated search engine. This included the name of the federated search service and…

  16. Images of Illness: How Causal Claims and Racial Associations Influence Public Preferences toward Diabetes Research Spending

    PubMed Central

    Gollust, Sarah E.; Lantz, Paula M.; Ubel, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the salience of health disparities in media and policy discourse, little previous research has investigated if imagery associating an illness with a certain racial group influences public perceptions. This study evaluated the influence of the media’s presentation of the causes of type 2 diabetes and its implicit racial associations on attitudes toward people with diabetes and preferences toward research spending. Survey participants who viewed an article on genetic causation or social determinants of diabetes were more likely to support increased government spending on research than those viewing an article with no causal language, while participants viewing an article on behavioral choices were more likely to attribute negative stereotypes to people with diabetes. Participants who viewed a photo of a black woman accompanying the article were less likely to endorse negative stereotypes than those viewing a photo of a white woman, but those who viewed a photo of a glucose-testing device expressed the lowest negative stereotypes. The effect of social determinants language was significantly different for blacks and whites, lowering stereotypes only among blacks. Emphasizing the behavioral causes of diabetes, as is common in media coverage, may perpetuate negative stereotypes. While drawing attention to the social determinants that shape these behaviors could mitigate stereotypes, this strategy is unlikely to influence the public uniformly. PMID:21451158

  17. A Content Analysis of College Reading Association/Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers Teacher Education Publications: Past, Present, and Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schumm, Jeanne Shay; Lewis-Spector, Jill; Price, Debra; Doorn, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to conduct a content analysis of the publications of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER), previously known as College Reading Association (CRA), in the area of preservice teacher education in literacy. As a service to the organization, 71 articles published in ALER's flagship…

  18. Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators a statement on relationships between physicians and industry.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael A; Black, Henry R; Fonseca, Rafael; Garber, Jeffrey; Gonzalez-Campoy, J Michael; Kimmelstiel, Carey; Markowitz, Avi B; Nakayama, Don; Stell, Lance K; Stossel, Thomas P

    2012-01-01

    Collaborations between physicians, particularly those in academic medicine, and industries that develop pharmaceutical products, medical devices, and diagnostic tests have led to substantial advances in patient care. At the same time, there is a strong awareness that these relationships, however beneficial they may be, should conform to established principles of ethical professional practice. Through a writing committee drawn from diverse disciplines across several institutions, the Association of Clinical Researchers and Educators (ACRE) has written a code of conduct to provide guidance to physicians in observing these principles. Our recommendations are not intended to be prescriptive or inflexible, but rather to be of assistance to physicians in making their own personal decisions on whether, or how, to be involved in research, education, or other collaborations with industry. PMID:22982801

  19. Factors Associated with Past Research Participation Among Low-Income Persons Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M.; Williams, Mark L.; Vidrine, Damon J.; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, “trigger” influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified “other” as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a ‘guinea pig’ showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model ‘age’ and level of certainty regarding ‘keeping yourself from being a guinea pig’ showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants. PMID:22686261

  20. Research Opportunities for Cancer Associated with Indoor Air Pollution from Solid-Fuel Combustion

    PubMed Central

    Ghazarian, Armen A.; DeMarini, David M.; Sapkota, Amir; Jack, Darby; Lan, Qing; Winn, Deborah M.; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Indoor air pollution (IAP) derived largely from the use of solid fuels for cooking and heating affects about 3 billion people worldwide, resulting in substantial adverse health outcomes, including cancer. Women and children from developing countries are the most exposed populations. A workshop was held in Arlington, Virginia, 9–11 May 2011, to better understand women’s and children’s potential health effects from IAP in developing countries. Workshop participants included international scientists, manufacturers, policy and regulatory officials, community leaders, and advocates who held extensive discussions to help identify future research needs. Objectives: Our objective was to identify research opportunities regarding IAP and cancer, including research questions that could be incorporated into studies of interventions to reduce IAP exposure. In this commentary, we describe the state of the science in understanding IAP and its associations with cancer and suggest research opportunities for improving our understanding of the issues. Discussion: Opportunities for research on IAP and cancer include studies of the effect of IAP on cancers other than lung cancer; studies of genetic factors that modify susceptibility; studies to determine whether the effects of IAP are mediated via germline, somatic, and/or epigenetic changes; and studies of the effects of IAP exposure via dermal and/or oral routes. Conclusions: IAP from indoor coal use increases the risk of lung cancer. Installing chimneys can reduce risk, and some genotypes, including GSTM1-null, can increase risk. Additional research is needed regarding the effects of IAP on other cancers and the effects of different types of solid fuels, oral and dermal routes of IAP exposure, genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, and genetic susceptibility. PMID:22846419

  1. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial and Its Associated Research Resource

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial is a large-scale research effort conducted by the National Cancer Institute. PLCO offers an example of coordinated research by both the extramural and intramural communities of the National Institutes of Health. The purpose of this article is to describe the PLCO research resource and how it is managed and to assess the productivity and the costs associated with this resource. Such an in-depth analysis of a single large-scale project can shed light on questions such as how large-scale projects should be managed, what metrics should be used to assess productivity, and how costs can be compared with productivity metrics. A comprehensive publication analysis identified 335 primary research publications resulting from research using PLCO data and biospecimens from 2000 to 2012. By the end of 2012, a total of 9679 citations (excluding self-citations) have resulted from this body of research publications, with an average of 29.7 citations per article, and an h index of 45, which is comparable with other large-scale studies, such as the Nurses’ Health Study. In terms of impact on public health, PLCO trial results have been used by the US Preventive Services Task Force in making recommendations concerning prostate and ovarian cancer screening. The overall cost of PLCO was $454 million over 20 years, adjusted to 2011 dollars, with approximately $37 million for the collection, processing, and storage of biospecimens, including blood samples, buccal cells, and pathology tissues. PMID:24115361

  2. Factors associated with past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn; Kypriotakis, Georgios; Atkinson, John; Diamond, Pamela M; Williams, Mark L; Vidrine, Damon J; Andrade, Roberto; Arduino, Roberto

    2012-08-01

    We described influences on past research participation among low-income persons living with HIV (PLWH) and examined whether such influences differed by study type. We analyzed a convenience sample of individuals from a large, urban clinic specializing in treating low-income PLWH. Using a computer-assisted survey, we elicited perceptions of research and participating in research, barriers, benefits, "trigger" influences, and self-efficacy in participating in research. Of 193 participants, we excluded 14 who did not identify any type of study participation, and 17 who identified "other" as study type, resulting in 162 cases for analysis. We compared results among four groups (i.e., 6 comparisons): past medical participants (n=36, 22%), past behavioral participants (n=49, 30%), individuals with no past research participation (n=52, 32%), and persons who had participated in both medical and behavioral studies (n=25, 15%). Data were analyzed using chi-square tests for categorical variables and ANOVA for continuous variables. We employed a multinomial probit (MNP) model to examine the association of multiple factors with the outcome. Confidence in ability to keep appointments, and worry about being a 'guinea pig' showed statistical differences in bivariate analyses. The MNP regression analysis showed differences between and across all 6 comparison groups. Fewer differences were seen across groupings of medical participants, behavioral participants, and those with no past research experience, than in comparisons with the medical-behavioral group. In the MNP regression model 'age' and level of certainty regarding 'keeping yourself from being a guinea pig' showed significant differences between past medical participants and past behavioral participants. PMID:22686261

  3. Assessment of Capacity to Consent to Research Among Psychiatric Outpatients: Prevalence and Associated Factors.

    PubMed

    Morán-Sánchez, Inés; Luna, Aurelio; Pérez-Cárceles, Maria D

    2016-03-01

    Mental capacity is an emerging ethical legal concept in psychiatric settings but its relation to clinical parameters remains yet uncertain. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between capacity to consent research and different psychiatric disorders and to characterize predictors of impairments in research decision-making capacity across diagnostic groups in a cross-sectional study. 139 consecutively referred outpatients with DSM-IV TR diagnoses of psychotic, mood and anxiety disorders were interviewed and a binary judgment of incapacity was made guided by the MacArthur competence assessment tool for consent research (MacCAT-CR). Demographics and clinical information were assessed by cases notes. Patients with anxiety disorders performed the best on the MacCAT-CR, and patients with psychotic disorders had the worst performance, however, there was considerable heterogeneity within each group. Cognitive impairment and global functioning were strongly correlated with MacCAT-CR subscales scores. 30.6% participants lacked research-related decisional capacity. Low Understanding score OR 0.07 (IC 95% 0.01-0.32) and Low Reasoning score OR 0.30 (IC 95% 0.11-0.82) were the factors most closely associated with lack of capacity. No absolute statements about decisional capacity can be driven merely due to the diagnosis. We found several risk factors which may be considered to decide which populations may require more thorough capacity assessments. The issues under consideration in the present study are by no means unique to people with psychiatric conditions. Ignoring this caveat, risks further inappropriate stigmatization of those with serious mental illness. PMID:25952945

  4. Challenges of Implementing the NIH Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a Minority-Serving University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The impacts and challenges of implementing an NIH/NICHD Extramural Associate Research Development Award (EARDA) at a private Minority-Serving-Institution (MSI) are examined. This article outlines efforts to gain institutional buy-in and challenges encountered in creating a functioning Office of Sponsored Research and implementing research policies…

  5. Towards Creating an Inclusive Community of Researchers: The First Three Years of the North American Association for Environmental Education Research Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Ronald B.; Brody, Michael; Dillon, Justin; Hart, Paul; Krasny, Marianne; Monroe, Martha; Russell, Constance; Wals, Arjen

    2007-01-01

    This article uses a series of interlinked, personal vignettes to discuss the first three years of the North American Association for Environmental Education research symposium, from the perspectives of the key organizers. Seven challenges in the field of environmental education research are identified in a recent historical context, and we…

  6. Research Libraries: Measurement, Management, Marketing. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (108th, Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 1-2, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Program presentations on issues related to the use of statistics by research libraries and business meeting minutes are combined in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The full text is provided for the three papers on the program theme that were presented at the meeting: (1) "Information to Manage--The Economics of…

  7. Arts and Learning Research, 1994. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie, Ed.; Morbey, Mary Leigh, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    The research papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1994 meeting of the American Educational Research Association as part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group program. Papers collected in the volume represent an eclectic view of arts education and include music education. Following an editorial, papers are: "Arts and…

  8. Issues/Higher Education/Institutional Research. NCAIR Proceedings. Fifth Annual Meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (Asheville, North Carolina, November 2-3, 1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Charles I., Ed.

    Proceedings from the fifth annual meeting of the North Carolina Association for Institutional Research (NCAIR) focus on issues affecting higher education and the relationship of these issues to the institutional research function. Included are general session addresses by Charles A. Lyons and Dick Robinson that discuss the implications of Judge…

  9. The Future of Institutional Research. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Orlando, Florida, October 24-26, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salley, Charles D., Ed.; And Others

    Proceedings of the 1979 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) are presented. The conference theme was the future of institutional research. Contents include reports of preconference workshops, speeches, panel reports, abstracts of papers, and reports pertaining to the affairs of the SAIR. Documents and authors…

  10. The 1984 Research Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators. Junior and Community College Research: Texas, 1983-84.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association of Junior and Community Coll. Instructional Administrators.

    Reports and abstracts of research studies conducted by members of the Research Committee of the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators are provided. Section I presents the following reports: "A Learner Analysis Experiment: Cognitive Style versus Learning Style in Undergraduate Nursing Education," by Charles…

  11. Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (28th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 17-20, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The theme of the 2001 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research was Institutional Research: Leadership through Excellence. These proceedings represent the intellectual content and insights shared during the conference. The papers are: (1) The Rocky Road to Graduation: An Academic Career Flow Model for Tracking…

  12. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K.; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E. Yoko; Mis, Frederick W.; Larson, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution’s admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  13. Challenges Associated With Using Large Data Sets for Quality Assessment and Research in Clinical Settings.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Bevin; Vawdrey, David K; Liu, Jianfang; Caplan, David; Furuya, E Yoko; Mis, Frederick W; Larson, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    The rapidly expanding use of electronic records in health-care settings is generating unprecedented quantities of data available for clinical, epidemiological, and cost-effectiveness research. Several challenges are associated with using these data for clinical research, including issues surrounding access and information security, poor data quality, inconsistency of data within and across institutions, and a paucity of staff with expertise to manage and manipulate large clinical data sets. In this article, we describe our experience with assembling a data-mart and conducting clinical research using electronic data from four facilities within a single hospital network in New York City. We culled data from several electronic sources, including the institution's admission-discharge-transfer system, cost accounting system, electronic health record, clinical data warehouse, and departmental records. The final data-mart contained information for more than 760,000 discharges occurring from 2006 through 2012. Using categories identified by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge initiative as a framework, we outlined challenges encountered during the development and use of a domain-specific data-mart and recommend approaches to overcome these challenges. PMID:26351216

  14. Population based allele frequencies of disease associated polymorphisms in the Personalized Medicine Research Project

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is a lack of knowledge regarding the frequency of disease associated polymorphisms in populations and population attributable risk for many populations remains unknown. Factors that could affect the association of the allele with disease, either positively or negatively, such as race, ethnicity, and gender, may not be possible to determine without population based allele frequencies. Here we used a panel of 51 polymorphisms previously associated with at least one disease and determined the allele frequencies within the entire Personalized Medicine Research Project population based cohort. We compared these allele frequencies to those in dbSNP and other data sources stratified by race. Differences in allele frequencies between self reported race, region of origin, and sex were determined. Results There were 19544 individuals who self reported a single racial category, 19027 or (97.4%) self reported white Caucasian, and 11205 (57.3%) individuals were female. Of the 11,208 (57%) individuals with an identifiable region of origin 8337 or (74.4%) were German. 41 polymorphisms were significantly different between self reported race at the 0.05 level. Stratification of our Caucasian population by self reported region of origin revealed 19 polymorphisms that were significantly different (p = 0.05) between individuals of different origins. Further stratification of the population by gender revealed few significant differences in allele frequencies between the genders. Conclusions This represents one of the largest population based allele frequency studies to date. Stratification by self reported race and region of origin revealed wide differences in allele frequencies not only by race but also by region of origin within a single racial group. We report allele frequencies for our Asian/Hmong and American Indian populations; these two minority groups are not typically selected for population allele frequency detection. Population wide allele frequencies are

  15. Who Shares? Who Doesn't? Factors Associated with Openly Archiving Raw Research Data

    PubMed Central

    Piwowar, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%–35% in 2007–2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  16. Who shares? Who doesn't? Factors associated with openly archiving raw research data.

    PubMed

    Piwowar, Heather A

    2011-01-01

    Many initiatives encourage investigators to share their raw datasets in hopes of increasing research efficiency and quality. Despite these investments of time and money, we do not have a firm grasp of who openly shares raw research data, who doesn't, and which initiatives are correlated with high rates of data sharing. In this analysis I use bibliometric methods to identify patterns in the frequency with which investigators openly archive their raw gene expression microarray datasets after study publication. Automated methods identified 11,603 articles published between 2000 and 2009 that describe the creation of gene expression microarray data. Associated datasets in best-practice repositories were found for 25% of these articles, increasing from less than 5% in 2001 to 30%-35% in 2007-2009. Accounting for sensitivity of the automated methods, approximately 45% of recent gene expression studies made their data publicly available. First-order factor analysis on 124 diverse bibliometric attributes of the data creation articles revealed 15 factors describing authorship, funding, institution, publication, and domain environments. In multivariate regression, authors were most likely to share data if they had prior experience sharing or reusing data, if their study was published in an open access journal or a journal with a relatively strong data sharing policy, or if the study was funded by a large number of NIH grants. Authors of studies on cancer and human subjects were least likely to make their datasets available. These results suggest research data sharing levels are still low and increasing only slowly, and data is least available in areas where it could make the biggest impact. Let's learn from those with high rates of sharing to embrace the full potential of our research output. PMID:21765886

  17. Association of Race, Ethnicity and Language with Participation in Mental Health Research Among Adult Patients in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Chang, Trina E; Brill, Charlotte D; Traeger, Lara; Bedoya, C Andres; Inamori, Aya; Hagan, Patrick N; Flaherty, Katherine; Hails, Katherine; Yeung, Albert; Trinh, Nhi-Ha

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic minorities remain underrepresented in clinical psychiatric research, but the reasons are not fully understood and may vary widely between minority groups. We used the Z-test of independent proportions and binary logistic regression to examine the relationship between race, ethnicity or primary language and participation in screening as well as interest in further research participation among primary care patients being screened for a depression study. Minorities were less likely than non-Hispanic Whites to complete the initial screening survey. Latinos and Blacks were more likely to agree to be contacted for research than non-Hispanic Whites. Among Latinos, primary language was associated with willingness to be contacted for research. Associations between research participation and race, ethnicity and language are complex and vary across different enrollment steps. Future research should consider stages of the research enrollment process separately to better understand barriers and identify targets for intervention. PMID:25398517

  18. The real-time learning mechanism of the Scientific Research Associates Advanced Robotic System (SRAARS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Alexander Y.

    1990-01-01

    Scientific research associates advanced robotic system (SRAARS) is an intelligent robotic system which has autonomous learning capability in geometric reasoning. The system is equipped with one global intelligence center (GIC) and eight local intelligence centers (LICs). It controls mainly sixteen links with fourteen active joints, which constitute two articulated arms, an extensible lower body, a vision system with two CCD cameras and a mobile base. The on-board knowledge-based system supports the learning controller with model representations of both the robot and the working environment. By consecutive verifying and planning procedures, hypothesis-and-test routines and learning-by-analogy paradigm, the system would autonomously build up its own understanding of the relationship between itself (i.e., the robot) and the focused environment for the purposes of collision avoidance, motion analysis and object manipulation. The intelligence of SRAARS presents a valuable technical advantage to implement robotic systems for space exploration and space station operations.

  19. American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) Annual Research Meeting in Conjunction with the Annual Convention of the Association for Career and Technical Education. Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, December 11-13, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, William G., Ed.

    This document contains 14 research papers presented at the American Vocational Education Research Association (AVERA) annual meeting. The following papers are included: "Factors that Influence Students to Attend 4-Year Automotive Programs" (Gregory G. Belcher, Robert L. Frisbee); "The Training Needs of Vocational Teachers for Working with Special…

  20. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  1. Opportunities in multi dimensional trace metal imaging: Taking copper associated disease research to the next level

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Stefan; Ralle, Martina

    2012-01-01

    Copper plays an important role in numerous biological processes across all living systems predominantly because of its versatile redox behavior. Cellular copper homeostasis is tightly regulated and disturbances lead to severe disorders such as Wilson disease (WD) and Menkes disease. Age related changes of copper metabolism have been implicated in other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The role of copper in these diseases has been topic of mostly bioinorganic research efforts for more than a decade, metal-protein interactions have been characterized and cellular copper pathways have been described. Despite these efforts, crucial aspects of how copper is associated with AD, for example, is still only poorly understood. To take metal related disease research to the next level, emerging multi dimensional imaging techniques are now revealing the copper metallome as the basis to better understand disease mechanisms. This review will describe how recent advances in X-ray fluorescence microscopy and fluorescent copper probes have started to contribute to this field specifically WD and AD. It furthermore provides an overview of current developments and future applications in X-ray microscopic methodologies. PMID:23079951

  2. Poster — Thur Eve — 36: Implementation of constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) for thoracic esophageal carcinoma on Varian 23EX

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ruohui; Fan, Xiaomei; Bai, Wenwen; Han, Chun

    2014-08-15

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to propose an alternative planning approach for VMAT using constant dose rate and gantry speed arc therapy(CDR-CAS-IMAT) implementation on conventional Linac Varian 23EX and used IMRT as a benchmark to evaluate the performance. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients with thoracic esophageal carcinoma who were previously treated with IMRT on Varian 23EX were retrospectively planned for CDR-CAS-IMAT plans. Dose prescription was set to 60 Gy to PTVs in 30 fractions. The planning objectives for PTVs and OAR were corresponding with the IMRT plans. Dose to the PTVs and OAR were compared to IMRT with respect to plan quality, MU, treatment time and delivery accuracy. Results: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans led to equivalent or superior plan quality as compared to IMRT, PTV's CI relative increased 16.2%, while small deviations were observed on minimum dose for PTV. Volumes in the cord receiving 40Gy were increased from 3.6% with IMRT to 7.0%. Treatment times were reduced significantly with CDR-CAS-IMAT(mean 85.7s vs. 232.1s, p < .05), however, MU increased by a factor of 1.3 and lung V10/5/3.5/aver were relative increase 6.7%,12%,17.9%,4.2%, respectively. And increased the E-P low dose area volume decreased the hight dose area. There were no significant difference in Delta4 measurements results between both planning techniques. Conclusion: CDR-CAS-IMAT plans can be implemented smoothly and quickly into a busy cancer center, which improved PTV CI and reduces treatment time but increased the MU and low dose irradiated area. An evaluation of weight loss must be performed during treatment for CDR-CAS-IMAT patients.

  3. Salt-dependent thermo-reversible α-amylase: cloning and characterization of halophilic α-amylase from moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Masao

    2011-02-01

    A moderately halophilic bacterium, Kocuria varians, was found to produce active α-amylase (K. varians α-amylase (KVA)). We have observed at least six different forms of α-amylase secreted by this bacterium into the culture medium. Characterization of these KVA forms and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that KVA comprises pre-pro-precursor form of α-amylase catalytic domain followed by the tandem repeats, which show high similarity to each other and to the starch binding domain (SBD) of other α-amylases. The observed six forms were most likely derived by various processing of the protein product. Recombinant KVA protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein and was purified with affinity chromatography after cleavage from fusion partner. The highly acidic amino acid composition of KVA and the highly negative electrostatic potential surface map of the modeled structure strongly suggested its halophilic nature. Indeed, KVA showed distinct salt- and time-dependent thermal reversibility: when α-amylase was heat denatured at 85°C for 3 min in the presence of 2 M NaCl, the activity was recovered upon incubation on ice (50% recovery after 15 min incubation). Conversely, KVA denatured in 0.1 M NaCl was not refolded at all, even after prolonged incubation. KVA activity was inhibited by proteinaceous α-amylase inhibitor from Streptomyces nitrosporeus, which had been implicated to inhibit only animal α-amylases. KVA with putative SBD regions was found to digest raw starch. PMID:20871989

  4. American Diabetes Association and JDRF Research Symposium: Diabetes and the Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Semenkovich, Clay F; Danska, Jayne; Darsow, Tamara; Dunne, Jessica L; Huttenhower, Curtis; Insel, Richard A; McElvaine, Allison T; Ratner, Robert E; Shuldiner, Alan R; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-12-01

    From 27-29 October 2014, more than 100 people gathered in Chicago, IL, to participate in a research symposium titled "Diabetes and the Microbiome," jointly sponsored by the American Diabetes Association and JDRF. The conference brought together international scholars and trainees from multiple disciplines, including microbiology, bioinformatics, endocrinology, metabolism, and immunology, to share the current understanding of host-microbe interactions and their influences on diabetes and metabolism. Notably, this gathering was the first to assemble specialists with distinct expertise in type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, immunology, and microbiology with the goal of discussing and defining potential pathophysiologies linking the microbiome and diabetes. In addition to reviewing existing evidence in the field, speakers presented their own original research to provide a comprehensive view of the current understanding of the topics under discussion.Presentations and discussions throughout the conference reflected a number of important concepts. The microbiota in any host represent a complex ecosystem with a high degree of interindividual variability. Different microbial communities, comprising bacteria, archaea, viruses, and fungi, occupy separate niches in and on the human body. Individually and collectively, these microbes provide benefits to the host-including nutrient harvest from food and protection against pathogens. They are dynamically regulated by both host genes and the environment, and they critically influence both physiology and lifelong health. The objective of the symposium was to discuss the relationship between the host and the microbiome-the combination of microbiota and their biomolecular environment and ecology-specifically with regard to metabolic and immunological systems and to define the critical research needed to understand and potentially target the microbiome in the prevention and treatment of diabetes. In this report, we present meeting

  5. Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infections in Research and Community Settings

    PubMed Central

    Seidlitz, Jakob; Kovacevic, Miro; Latimer, M. Elizabeth; Hommer, Rebecca; Lougee, Lorraine; Grant, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: The first cases of pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) were described>15 years ago. Since that time, the literature has been divided between studies that successfully demonstrate an etiologic relationship between Group A streptococcal (GAS) infections and childhood-onset obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and those that fail to find an association. One possible explanation for the conflicting reports is that the diagnostic criteria proposed for PANDAS are not specific enough to describe a unique and homogeneous cohort of patients. To evaluate the validity of the PANDAS criteria, we compared clinical characteristics of PANDAS patients identified in two community practices with a sample of children meeting full research criteria for PANDAS. Methods: A systematic review of clinical records was used to identify the presence or absence of selected symptoms in children evaluated for PANDAS by physicians in Hinsdale, Illinois (n=52) and Bethesda, Maryland (n=40). Results were compared against data from participants in National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) research investigations of PANDAS (n=48). Results: As described in the original PANDAS cohort, males outnumbered females (95:45) by ∼ 2:1, and symptoms began in early childhood (7.3±2.7 years). Clinical presentations were remarkably similar across sites, with all children reporting acute onset of OCD symptoms and multiple comorbidities, including separation anxiety (86–92%), school issues (75–81%), sleep disruptions (71%), tics (60–65%), urinary symptoms (42–81%), and others. Twenty of the community cases (22%) failed to meet PANDAS criteria because of an absence of documentation of GAS infections. Conclusions: The diagnostic criteria for PANDAS can be used by clinicians to accurately identify patients with common clinical features and shared etiology of symptoms. Although difficulties in documenting an association

  6. Trends in health sciences library and information science research: an analysis of research publications in the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association from 1991 to 2007*

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Sally A.; Nordberg, Judith M.; Palmer, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed trends in research activity as represented in the published research in the leading peer-reviewed professional journal for health sciences librarianship. Methodology: Research articles were identified from the Bulletin of the Medical Library Association and Journal of the Medical Library Association (1991–2007). Using content analysis and bibliometric techniques, data were collected for each article on the (1) subject, (2) research method, (3) analytical technique used, (4) number of authors, (5) number of citations, (6) first author affiliation, and (7) funding source. The results were compared to a previous study, covering the period 1966 to 1990, to identify changes over time. Results: Of the 930 articles examined, 474 (51%) were identified as research articles. Survey (n = 174, 37.1%) was the most common methodology employed, quantitative descriptive statistics (n = 298, 63.5%) the most used analytical technique, and applied topics (n = 332, 70%) the most common type of subject studied. The majority of first authors were associated with an academic health sciences library (n = 264, 55.7%). Only 27.4% (n = 130) of studies identified a funding source. Conclusion: This study's findings demonstrate that progress is being made in health sciences librarianship research. There is, however, room for improvement in terms of research methodologies used, proportion of applied versus theoretical research, and elimination of barriers to conducting research for practicing librarians. PMID:19626146

  7. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1999-2000: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Blixrud, Julia, Comp.

    This document presents data from 122 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1999-2000 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  8. ARL Preservation Statistics, 2000-01: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Blixrud, Julia, Comp.

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2000-01 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  9. ARL Preservation Statistics, 1997-98: A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blixrud, Julia C., Comp.; Hipps, Kaylyn, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; O'Connor, Michael, Comp.

    This document presents data from 118 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 1997-98 fiscal year. Since 1987-88, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown irregularly from 66 to around 80 in more recent years. A fluctuating growth…

  10. Digitization as a Method of Preservation? Final Report of a Working Group of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Association).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Hartmut; Dorr, Marianne

    The German Research Association (DFG) is actively involved in preservation of research materials; it takes the view that in preservation, the enormous potential of digitization for access should be combined with the stability of microfilm for long-term storage. A working group was convened to investigate the technical state of digitization of…

  11. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (29th, Annapolis, Maryland, November 16-19, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 2002 annual conference of the Northeast Association for Institutional Research, a meeting devoted to assessment in the 21st century and the challenges that face institutional research. The papers are: (1) "Putting Community College Enrollment Trends in Perspective by the Use of Census Data and Market…

  12. ARL Preservation Statistics 2003-04. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2005-01-01

    This document presents data from 123 U.S. and Canadian research libraries that were members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) during the 2003-2004 fiscal year. Since 1987-1988, the number of preservation programs managed by a preservation administrator has grown 66 to as many as 80 in more recent years, with 77 in 2003-2004. Rapidly…

  13. The European Safeguards Research and Development Association Addresses Safeguards and Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Janssens-Maenhout, Greet; Kusumi, R.; Daures, Pascal A.; Janssens, Willem; Dickman, Deborah A.

    2010-06-16

    The renaissance of efforts to expand the use of nuclear energy requires the parallel development of a renewed and more sophisticated work force. Growth in the nuclear sector with high standard of safety, safeguards and security requires skilled staff for design, operations, inspections etc. High-quality nuclear technology educational programs are diminished from past years, and the ability of universities to attract students and to meet future staffing requirements of the nuclear industry is becoming seriously compromised. Thus, education and training in nuclear engineering and sciences is one of the cornerstones for the nuclear sector. Teaching in the nuclear field still seems strongly influenced by national history but it is time to strengthen resources and collaborate. Moreover with the current nuclear security threats it becomes critical that nuclear technology experts master the basic principles not only of safety, but also of nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation and nuclear security. In Europe the European Nuclear Education Network (ENEN) Association has established the certificate 'European Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering (EMSNE)' as the classic nuclear engineering program covering reactor operation and nuclear safety. However, it does not include courses on nonproliferation, safeguards, or dual-use technologies. The lack of education in nuclear safeguards was tackled by the European Safeguards Research and Development Association (ESARDA), through development and implementation of safeguards course modules. Since 2005 the ESARDA Working Group, called the Training and Knowledge Management Working Group, (TKMWG) has worked with the Joint Research Centre (JRC) in Ispra, Italy to organize a Nuclear Safeguards and Nonproliferation course. This five-day course is held each spring at the JRC, and continues to show increasing interest as evidenced by the positive responses of international lecturers and students. The standard set of lectures covers a broad

  14. Shaping the Politics of Education Association and Division L of the American Educational Research Association: Another William Lowe Boyd Legacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Bruce S.; Layton, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    William Lowe Boyd was there, making a difference in the study of politics of education, both intellectually and organizationally, at key moments in the development of the field. In fact, the field and study of the subject itself were linked politically, as scholars interested in research on the political science of how schools operate were…

  15. Stress- and PTSD-associated obesity and metabolic dysfunction: A growing problem requiring further research and novel treatments

    PubMed Central

    Farr, Olivia M.; Sloan, Denise M.; Keane, Terence M.; Mantzoros, Christos S.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a growing public health concern. More recently, evidence has indicated that PTSD leads to obesity and associated metabolic dysfunction. Possible mechanisms of this link are through dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and related moderation of appetite hormones and neural activity, leading to changes in consumptive behaviors. Although research has been examining associations between PTSD and obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome, future research should delineate potential mechanisms for these associations and develop targeted treatments to reduce these metabolic outcomes. PMID:25267015

  16. Research guidelines in the era of large-scale collaborations: an analysis of Genome-wide Association Study Consortia.

    PubMed

    Austin, Melissa A; Hair, Marilyn S; Fullerton, Stephanie M

    2012-05-01

    Scientific research has shifted from studies conducted by single investigators to the creation of large consortia. Genetic epidemiologists, for example, now collaborate extensively for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The effect has been a stream of confirmed disease-gene associations. However, effects on human subjects oversight, data-sharing, publication and authorship practices, research organization and productivity, and intellectual property remain to be examined. The aim of this analysis was to identify all research consortia that had published the results of a GWAS analysis since 2005, characterize them, determine which have publicly accessible guidelines for research practices, and summarize the policies in these guidelines. A review of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies identified 55 GWAS consortia as of April 1, 2011. These consortia were comprised of individual investigators, research centers, studies, or other consortia and studied 48 different diseases or traits. Only 14 (25%) were found to have publicly accessible research guidelines on consortia websites. The available guidelines provide information on organization, governance, and research protocols; half address institutional review board approval. Details of publication, authorship, data-sharing, and intellectual property vary considerably. Wider access to consortia guidelines is needed to establish appropriate research standards with broad applicability to emerging forms of large-scale collaboration. PMID:22491085

  17. Research Guidelines in the Era of Large-scale Collaborations: An Analysis of Genome-wide Association Study Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Melissa A.; Hair, Marilyn S.; Fullerton, Stephanie M.

    2012-01-01

    Scientific research has shifted from studies conducted by single investigators to the creation of large consortia. Genetic epidemiologists, for example, now collaborate extensively for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The effect has been a stream of confirmed disease-gene associations. However, effects on human subjects oversight, data-sharing, publication and authorship practices, research organization and productivity, and intellectual property remain to be examined. The aim of this analysis was to identify all research consortia that had published the results of a GWAS analysis since 2005, characterize them, determine which have publicly accessible guidelines for research practices, and summarize the policies in these guidelines. A review of the National Human Genome Research Institute’s Catalog of Published Genome-Wide Association Studies identified 55 GWAS consortia as of April 1, 2011. These consortia were comprised of individual investigators, research centers, studies, or other consortia and studied 48 different diseases or traits. Only 14 (25%) were found to have publicly accessible research guidelines on consortia websites. The available guidelines provide information on organization, governance, and research protocols; half address institutional review board approval. Details of publication, authorship, data-sharing, and intellectual property vary considerably. Wider access to consortia guidelines is needed to establish appropriate research standards with broad applicability to emerging forms of large-scale collaboration. PMID:22491085

  18. Minerals associated with biofilms occurring on exposed rock in a granitic underground research laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, D A; Kamineni, D C; Sawicki, J A; Beveridge, T J

    1994-09-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. PMID:16349374

  19. Systematic Review: The Association and Impact of Financial Conflicts of Interest in Basic Science Research

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Charles L.; Boyle, Simone N.; Kuykendal, Adam; Fisher, Matthew J.; Samaras, Athena T.; Barnato, Sara E.; Wagner, Robin L.; Goldstein, Carolyn E.; Tallman, Jacob; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Henke, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background No prior study has evaluated financial relationships of investigators with pharmaceutical manufacturers for basic science. An example of the importance and impact of such relationships is in the evaluation of erythropoietin receptors’(EpoRs) effects on cancer cell lines, since studies have reported increased mortality when cancer patients receive erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESAs). Purpose To assess the disclosed association that exist between pharmaceutical industry support and EpoRs effects on solid cancer cell lines. Data Sources MEDLINE and EMBASE (1988- July 2008) and two EpoR conferences sponsored by the National Institutes of Health. Study Selection All publications investigating EpoRs that met inclusion criteria were identified and included. Data Extraction Data were extracted on detection of EpoRs, presence of erythropoietin-induced signaling events, presence of erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function, nature of qualitative conclusions, and sources of funding for all 74 studies. Data Synthesis In comparison to studies of academic investigators with no disclosed funding support from ESA manufacturers (n=64), the studies from academic investigators with funding support from ESA manufacturers (n= 7) and the laboratories directed by investigators employed by ESA manufacturers (n=3) were both less likely to identify: EpoR presence on solid tumor cells; erythropoietin-induced signaling events; erythropoietin-induced changes in cellular function; and less likely to conclude that their research had identified potentially harmful effects of erythropoietin on cancer cells. Additionally, presentations from industry-based investigator teams at NIH conferences were less likely to report EpoRs on cancer cell lines, downstream effects of erythropoietin, and cell proliferation and migration effects following EpoR administration. Conclusion Financial conflicts of interest impact the outcomes and presentation of basic science research data as

  20. Minerals Associated with Biofilms Occurring on Exposed Rock in a Granitic Underground Research Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Brown, D. Ann; Kamineni, D. Choudari; Sawicki, Jerzy A.; Beveridge, Terry J.

    1994-01-01

    The concept of disposal of nuclear fuel waste in crystalline rock requires the effects of microbial action to be investigated. The Underground Research Laboratory excavated in a pluton of the Canadian Shield provides a unique opportunity to study these effects. Three biofilms kept moist by seepage through fractures in granitic rock faces of the Underground Research Laboratory have been examined. The biofilms contained a variety of gram-negative and gram-positive morphotypes held together by an organic extracellular matrix. Nutrient levels in the groundwater were low, but energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy has shown biogeochemical immobilization of several elements in the biofilms; some of these elements were concentrated from extremely dilute environmental concentrations, and all elements were chemically complexed together to form amorphous or crystalline fine-grained minerals. These were seen by transmission electron microscopy to be both associated with the surfaces of the bacteria and scattered throughout the extracellular matrix, suggesting their de novo development through bacterial surface-mediated nucleation. The biofilm consortia are thought to concentrate elements both by passive sorption and by energy metabolism. By Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, one of the biofilms showed that iron was both oxidized and precipitated as ferrihydrite or hematite aerobically and reduced and precipitated as siderite anaerobically. We believe that some Archean banded-iron formations could have been formed in a manner similar to this, as it would explain the deposition of hematite and siderite in close proximity. This biogeochemical development of minerals may also affect the transport of material in waste disposal sites. Images PMID:16349374

  1. The role of Water Resources Users Associations in hydrological research: experiences from Lake Naivasha Basin, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agol, D.

    2012-04-01

    This paper is based on recent studies in Lake Naivasha Basin that explored the ways in which locally based institutions namely the Water Resources Users Associations (WRUAs) are contributing to hydrological knowledge for decision-making processes. Lake Naivasha is a shallow freshwater body which is situated on the floor of Kenya's Rift Valley. It covers approximately 140 Km2 and supports a rich diversity of plants and animals. The Lake Naivasha Basin faces several challenges associated with over- population, urbanization and intensive agricultural activities. For example, the large-scale floricultural and horticultural export industries around the Lake have attracted thousands of migrants from different parts of Kenya who have settled around the Lake and exert a lot of pressure on its resources. The Lake Naivasha is one of the best examples in Kenya where the WRUAs development process has shown some progress. There are 12 WRUAS across the Lake Basin representing its various sub-catchments. In recent years, the role of WRUAs in the Lake has changed rapidly as they are no longer restricted to just resolving conflicts and fostering cooperation between water users. They now have an additional responsibility of collecting hydrological data within their respective sub-catchments. The majority of WRUA officials have been trained on how to collect data such as reading rain gauges, measuring stream flows, turbidity and sediment loads. The data collected are sent to the relevant government authorities for validation and interpretation and the information derived from this process is used to formulate important strategies such as water allocation plans. Using secondary data analysis, interviews and focus group discussions the study investigated how this new role of the WRUAs is changing the water resource management landscape in the Lake Naivasha Basin. In particular it presents key challenges and opportunities associated with attempts to build capacities of lower level

  2. Research misconduct and its federal regulation: the origin and history of the Office of Research Integrity--with personal views by ORI's former associate director for investigative oversight.

    PubMed

    Price, Alan R

    2013-01-01

    Misconduct in science and research became the subject of significant public attention and Congressional scrutiny beginning in the 1970s and 1980s, which led to public statements, policies, and finally formal federal regulations being promulgated by Government agency officials. The Office of Research Integrity (ORI) in the Department of Health and Human Services was a major and very visible component of this process. This article provides a detailed history of the first two decades of federal research misconduct regulations and of ORI's history (under extremely difficult and unfair challenges), including personal views by the former ORI chief investigator and associate director. PMID:24028479

  3. Assessment of the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University Photovoltaic Research Associates Program

    SciTech Connect

    Posey-Eddy, F.; McConnell, R. D.

    2002-08-01

    This report details the DOE/NREL Historically Black College and University (HBCU) Photovoltaic Research Associates Program, a small but remarkable program that directly affected dozens of minority undergraduate students in ways that changed many of their lives. The progress and accomplishments of undergraduates within the nine participating universities were monitored and assessed through their presentations at an annual NREL-sponsored HBCU conference. Although the funding was small, typically $400,000 per year, the money made a significant impact. The best students sometimes went on to the nation's top graduate schools (e.g., MIT) or important management positions in large companies. Other students had opportunities to learn how renewable energy could positively affect their lives and their neighbors' lives. A few were lucky enough to install photovoltaic lighting and water-pumping systems in Africa, and to see and feel firsthand the technical and emotional benefits of this technology for families and villages. Two of the schools, Texas Southern University and Central State University, were particularly successful in leveraging their DOE/NREL funding to obtain additional funding for expanded programs.

  4. The association between alcohol and breast cancer: popular press coverage of research.

    PubMed Central

    Houn, F; Bober, M A; Huerta, E E; Hursting, S D; Lemon, S; Weed, D L

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This study was undertaken to examine popular press reports of the association between alcohol and breast cancer. METHODS. Articles from scientific journals and stories from newspapers and magazines published from January 1, 1985, to July 1, 1992, were retrieved from six on-line databases. Lay press stories were analyzed to determine which medical articles were publicized and what information was reported. RESULTS. Fifty-eight scientific articles on the relationship of alcohol and breast cancer were found, and 64 newspaper and 23 magazine stories were retrieved. The press cited 11 studies, 19% of those published during the study period. Three studies were featured in 77% of popular press stories. No scientific review articles were reported. Behavioral recommendations were given to the public in 63% of stories. CONCLUSIONS. The vast majority of scientific studies on alcohol and breast cancer were ignored in press reports. We encourage researchers and the popular press to give the public a broader understanding of public health issues. PMID:7625500

  5. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives.

  6. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research.

    PubMed

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M; Fuller, Mark R; Kie, John G; Bates, Kirk K

    2010-07-27

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS 'rapid fixing' technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  7. Global positioning system and associated technologies in animal behaviour and ecological research

    PubMed Central

    Tomkiewicz, Stanley M.; Fuller, Mark R.; Kie, John G.; Bates, Kirk K.

    2010-01-01

    Biologists can equip animals with global positioning system (GPS) technology to obtain accurate (less than or equal to 30 m) locations that can be combined with sensor data to study animal behaviour and ecology. We provide the background of GPS techniques that have been used to gather data for wildlife studies. We review how GPS has been integrated into functional systems with data storage, data transfer, power supplies, packaging and sensor technologies to collect temperature, activity, proximity and mortality data from terrestrial species and birds. GPS ‘rapid fixing’ technologies combined with sensors provide location, dive frequency and duration profiles, and underwater acoustic information for the study of marine species. We examine how these rapid fixing technologies may be applied to terrestrial and avian applications. We discuss positional data quality and the capability for high-frequency sampling associated with GPS locations. We present alternatives for storing and retrieving data by using dataloggers (biologging), radio-frequency download systems (e.g. very high frequency, spread spectrum), integration of GPS with other satellite systems (e.g. Argos, Globalstar) and potential new data recovery technologies (e.g. network nodes). GPS is one component among many rapidly evolving technologies. Therefore, we recommend that users and suppliers interact to ensure the availability of appropriate equipment to meet animal research objectives. PMID:20566494

  8. Arts and Learning Research, 1998-1999. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, April 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bresler, Liora, Ed.; Ellis, Nancy C., Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This volume highlights thought-provoking issues in visual arts, drama, and music education presented at the 1998 meeting of the American Educational Research Association. Following a message from the Special Interest Group Chair, Larry Kantner, and an editorial, articles in section 1 are: "Art Beginnings" (L. A. Kantner); "Teachers' Conceptions of…

  9. Bridges to the Future: Building Linkages for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (27th, Pittsburgh, PA, November 4-7, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This document contains papers, summaries of panel presentations, and work share meetings from the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "The Influence of Personality Traits, Pre-College Characteristics, and Co-Curricular Experiences on College Outcomes" (Karen W. Bauer); (2) "Threading the…

  10. Arts and Learning Research, 1997-1998. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (Chicago, Illinois, March 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Sheri R., Ed.; Jeffers, Carol S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the 1997 meeting of the American Educational Research Association; many were presented as part of Arts and Learning programs. The papers gathered in the volume explore in a variety of ways the notions of space: artistic, cultural, domestic, personal, political, public, private, and virtual and how spaces…

  11. Environmental Design: Research, Theory, and Application. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association (10th).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Andrew D., Ed.; Danford, Scott, Ed.

    The assembled collection contains research reports (with an abstract) and, in many cases, abstracts only of unpublished papers grouped under the following topics in environmental design: (1) perception and preference, (2) social-environmental issues, (3) urban environments, (4) housing and residential environments, (5) theory, (6) research…

  12. Factors Associated with Research Productivity among Oral Healthcare Educators in an Asian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Bernardo E., Jr.; Clerigo, Maria Eloisa C.

    2013-01-01

    Research writing confidence and organizational support toward research activities are two essential factors that may affect research productivity among higher educational institutions. This study investigated the possible relationships of these two factors to research productivity among faculty members of the College of Dentistry at Lyceum of the…

  13. The International Permafrost Association: new structure and initiatives for cryospheric research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, I.; Lewkowicz, A. G.; Christiansen, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Lantuit, H.; Schrott, L.; Sergeev, D.; Wei, M.

    2012-12-01

    The International Permafrost Association (IPA), founded in 1983, has as its objectives to foster the dissemination of knowledge concerning permafrost and to promote cooperation among persons and national or international organizations engaged in scientific investigation and engineering work on permafrost. The IPA's primary responsibilities are convening International Permafrost Conferences, undertaking special projects such as preparing databases, maps, bibliographies, and glossaries, and coordinating international field programs and networks. Membership is through adhering national or multinational organizations or as individuals in countries where no Adhering Body exists. The IPA is governed by its Executive Committee and a Council consisting of representatives from 26 Adhering Bodies having interests in some aspect of theoretical, basic and applied frozen ground research, including permafrost, seasonal frost, artificial freezing and periglacial phenomena. This presentation details recent and ongoing changes in the functioning of the IPA that will influence the way cryospheric research is conducted under its auspices. One of the most important is the development of competitively-funded Action Groups which work towards the production of well-defined products over a period of two years. Since the first call, four proposals have been accepted by the Executive Committee and the teams are currently working on high topical issues, such as the assessment of the deep permafrost organic carbon pools and the mapping of subsea permafrost, as well as fundamental questions such as the extent of permafrost during the Last Permafrost Maximum. The IPA also decided to put additional effort into facilitating the study of the significance of permafrost to the global climate systems, with human aspects playing a very important role. To achieve this goal, the IPA will encourage and assist the climate modeling community in improving the representation of perennially frozen ground

  14. Factors associated with biosafety level-2 research workers' laboratory exit handwashing behaviors and glove removal compliance.

    PubMed

    Johnston, James D; Merrill, Ray M; Zimmerman, Grant C; Collingwood, Scott C; Reading, James C

    2016-04-01

    Biosafety level-2 laboratories are designated for work with human-derived samples or moderate-risk microorganisms that transmit primarily by direct contact exposures. Many laboratory procedures generate unseen droplets that contaminate workers' hands, equipment, and work surfaces. Workers' strict adherence to glove removal and handwashing is required prior to laboratory exit to prevent inadvertent transmission of pathogens to self or others. However, little is known about biosafety level-2 workers' compliance with these behaviors. In this article, glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were measured by direct observation of 93 biosafety level-2 research workers from 21 university laboratories. Participants completed a 41-item survey measuring social cognitive theory-based variables related to handwashing, self-reported compliance, and demographic factors. Survey items, observed exit frequency, and laboratory characteristics were evaluated for associations with handwashing compliance. Overall, observed glove removal and handwashing compliance upon laboratory exit were 43.0% (Standard Error [SE] = 2.3%), and 8.2% (SE = 1.2%), respectively, while workers' self-reported glove removal and handwashing compliance were 73.7% (SE = 3.6%) and 35.5% (SE = 4.1%), respectively. The average number of observed laboratory exits per hour was 2.8 for workers with any handwashing compliance vs. 5.4 for workers with no handwashing compliance (p = 0.0013). Among the cognitive variables, behavioral modeling by supervisors and coworkers had the strongest association with workers' compliance (slope = 3.5, SE = 1.3, p = 0.0113). Workers in laboratories with a written handwashing policy had higher compliance (Mean = 14.1%, SE = 5.9%) than workers in laboratories with no written policy (Mean = 1.1%, SE = 1.0%; p = 0.0488). Multi-faceted interventions that encourage modeling of the behavior by supervisors and coworkers, implementation of written handwashing policies

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of TrueBeam flattening-filter-free beams using Varian phase-space files: Comparison with experimental data

    SciTech Connect

    Belosi, Maria F.; Fogliata, Antonella E-mail: afc@iosi.ch; Cozzi, Luca; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Vanetti, Eugenio; Rodriguez, Miguel; Sempau, Josep; Krauss, Harald; Khamphan, Catherine; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Puxeu, Josep; Fedele, David; Mancosu, Pietro; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Phase-space files for Monte Carlo simulation of the Varian TrueBeam beams have been made available by Varian. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of the distributed phase-space files for flattening filter free (FFF) beams, against experimental measurements from ten TrueBeam Linacs. Methods: The phase-space files have been used as input in PRIMO, a recently released Monte Carlo program based on thePENELOPE code. Simulations of 6 and 10 MV FFF were computed in a virtual water phantom for field sizes 3 × 3, 6 × 6, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} using 1 × 1 × 1 mm{sup 3} voxels and for 20 × 20 and 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} with 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3} voxels. The particles contained in the initial phase-space files were transported downstream to a plane just above the phantom surface, where a subsequent phase-space file was tallied. Particles were transported downstream this second phase-space file to the water phantom. Experimental data consisted of depth doses and profiles at five different depths acquired at SSD = 100 cm (seven datasets) and SSD = 90 cm (three datasets). Simulations and experimental data were compared in terms of dose difference. Gamma analysis was also performed using 1%, 1 mm and 2%, 2 mm criteria of dose-difference and distance-to-agreement, respectively. Additionally, the parameters characterizing the dose profiles of unflattened beams were evaluated for both measurements and simulations. Results: Analysis of depth dose curves showed that dose differences increased with increasing field size and depth; this effect might be partly motivated due to an underestimation of the primary beam energy used to compute the phase-space files. Average dose differences reached 1% for the largest field size. Lateral profiles presented dose differences well within 1% for fields up to 20 × 20 cm{sup 2}, while the discrepancy increased toward 2% in the 40 × 40 cm{sup 2} cases. Gamma analysis resulted in an agreement of 100% when a 2%, 2 mm criterion

  16. National Association and Organization Reports. American Library Association; Association of American Publishers; American Booksellers Association; Association of Research Libraries; Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC); Council on Library and Information Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Maurice J.; Platt, Judith; Hoynes, Michael; Webster, Duane E.; Johnson, Richard; Smith, Kathlin

    2003-01-01

    Includes six reports from national associations and organizations. Highlights include annual meetings; government affairs; copyright; administration; diversity; new technologies; international programs; scholarly communication; information policy; access to information; preservation; statistics and measurement; digital libraries; economics of…

  17. SU-E-T-128: Dosimetric Evaluation of MLC Modeling in Pinnacle V9.2 for Varian TrueBeam STx

    SciTech Connect

    Otageri, P; Grant, E; Maricle, S; Mathews, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of MLC modeling after commissioning the Varian TrueBeam LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2. Methods: Stepand-shoot IMRT QAs were investigated when we observed our measured absolute dose results using ion chamber (Capintec PR-05P) were uncharacteristically low; about 4–5% compared to doses calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} (Phillips, Madison, WI). This problem was predominant for large and highly modulated head and neck (HN) treatments. Intuitively we knew this had to be related to shortcomings in the MLC modeling in Pinnacle. Using film QA we were able to iteratively adjust the MLC parameters. We confirmed results by re-testing five failed IMRT QA patients; and ion chamber measurements were verified in Quasar anthropomorphic phantom. Results: After commissioning the LINAC in Pinnacle version 9.2, the MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X were 2.0%, 1.7% and 2.0%, respectively, and additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies was 0.5%. These parameters were obtained from profiles scanned with an Edge detector (Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL) during machine commissioning. A Verification testing with radiographic EDR2 film (Kodak, Rochester, NY) measurement was performed by creating a closed MLC leaf pattern and analyzing using RIT software (RIT, Colorado Springs, CO). This reduced MLC transmission for 6X, 10X and 15X to 0.7%, 0.9% and 0.9%, respectively; while increasing additional Interleaf leakage for all three energies to 1.0%. Conclusion: Radiographic film measurements were used to correct MLC transmission values for step and shoot IMRT fields used in Pinnacle version 9.2. After adjusting the MLC parameters to correlate with the film QA, there was still very good agreement between the Pinnacle model and commissioning data. Using the same QA methodology, we were also able to improve the beam models for the Varian C-series linacs, Novalis-Tx, and TrueBeam M-120 linacs.

  18. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project.

    PubMed

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-06-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  19. Priorities for mental health research in Europe: A survey among national stakeholders' associations within the ROAMER project

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Andrea; Luciano, Mario; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Sampogna, Gaia; Obradors-Tarragó, Carla; Maj, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Within the ROAMER project, funded by the European Commission, a survey was conducted with national associations/organizations of psychiatrists, other mental health professionals, users and/or carers, and psychiatric trainees in the 27 countries of the European Union, aiming to explore their views about priorities for mental health research in Europe. One hundred and eight associations/organizations returned the questionnaire. The five most frequently selected research priorities were early detection and management of mental disorders, quality of mental health services, prevention of mental disorders, rehabilitation and social inclusion, and new medications for mental disorders. All these areas, except the last one, were among the top ten research priorities according to all categories of stakeholders, along with stigma and discrimination. These results seem to support the recent argument that some rebalancing in favor of psychosocial and health service studies may be needed in psychiatric research. PMID:23737426

  20. Entertainers or Education Researchers? The Challenges Associated with Presenting While Black

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGee, Ebony O.; Kazembe, Lasana

    2016-01-01

    How black faculty experience presenting their research in educational venues within the context of historical objectification of black people as sources of entertainment is an underexplored topic in higher education research. Presenting research has far-reaching implications for black academics' advancement, such as future employment and…

  1. Factors Associated with Research Management in Australian Commerce and Business Faculties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macgregor, Rob; Rix, Mark; Aylward, David; Glynn, John

    2006-01-01

    Measurable research outputs have become part of the overall research management structure within Australian universities over the past ten years. As such, policy makers and administrators alike have come to regard effective management structures and mechanisms as fundamental components of a research environment capable of generating desired…

  2. Future Research, Research Futures. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) (3rd, Canberra, Australia, March 23-24, 2000).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    These proceedings consist of 66 conference papers on these themes: changing nature of work; emerging technologies; internationalization of vocational education and training (VET); enterprise and educational innovation; flexible delivery approaches; and research and technology and using technology in research. The papers are "Training Needs of…

  3. Abstracts of Research in Rehabilitation; The Top Twenty Research Selections by the 1969 Research Awards Committee of the American Rehabilitation Counseling Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R., Ed.; And Others

    This monograph has been prepared and published to disseminate the results of recent scientific research in rehabilitation counseling and related areas. The twenty abstracts in this volume reflect the quality and variety of research which is currently underway throughout the country. Topics included are: (1) counselor orientation; (2) mental…

  4. Infection of a ventriculoatrial shunt with phenotypically variable Staphylococcus epidermidis masquerading as polymicrobial bacteremia due to various coagulase-negative Staphylococci and Kocuria varians.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwartz, David; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2003-06-01

    The diagnosis of bloodstream infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci is frequently based on the isolation of the same organism from more than one blood culture. Phenotypic variation is a common characteristic of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis which may affect species identification by the microbiology laboratory. We describe a patient with a new onset of nephritis and gram-positive bacteremia. Gram-positive cocci grew in multiple blood cultures and were identified by the Vitek 2 system as Kocuria varians, Staphylococcus hyicus, and S. epidermidis. Bacterial isolates grew on blood agar and Congo red agar plates as two distinct morphotypes and exhibited phenotypic variation. Neither morphotype could be identified by the API-Staph assay. Cellular fatty acid analysis identified one of the morphotypes as S. epidermidis but could not identify the other morphotype. All isolates were found to be identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and both colonial morphotypes were identified as S. epidermidis by 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. Phenotypic variation of S. epidermidis may affect identification to the species level by phenotype-based identification systems. Caution should be exercised when differentiating between true infection and contamination based on strain identification. PMID:12791862

  5. Infection of a Ventriculoatrial Shunt with Phenotypically Variable Staphylococcus epidermidis Masquerading as Polymicrobial Bacteremia Due to Various Coagulase-Negative Staphylococci and Kocuria varians

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ami, Ronen; Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Schwartz, David; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    The diagnosis of bloodstream infection with coagulase-negative staphylococci is frequently based on the isolation of the same organism from more than one blood culture. Phenotypic variation is a common characteristic of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus epidermidis which may affect species identification by the microbiology laboratory. We describe a patient with a new onset of nephritis and gram-positive bacteremia. Gram-positive cocci grew in multiple blood cultures and were identified by the Vitek 2 system as Kocuria varians, Staphylococcus hyicus, and S. epidermidis. Bacterial isolates grew on blood agar and Congo red agar plates as two distinct morphotypes and exhibited phenotypic variation. Neither morphotype could be identified by the API-Staph assay. Cellular fatty acid analysis identified one of the morphotypes as S. epidermidis but could not identify the other morphotype. All isolates were found to be identical by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and both colonial morphotypes were identified as S. epidermidis by 16S ribosomal gene sequencing. Phenotypic variation of S. epidermidis may affect identification to the species level by phenotype-based identification systems. Caution should be exercised when differentiating between true infection and contamination based on strain identification. PMID:12791862

  6. Organizational and Institutional Factors Associated with National Institutes of Health Research Grant Awards to Social Work Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corvo, Kenneth; Zlotnik, Joan; Chen, Wan-Yi

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the organizational and institutional factors that may be associated with the success of schools of social work (SOSWs) in securing research grant awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and constituent agencies. Using data from the CRISP database on NIH grant funding, the Lombardi Program on Measuring University…

  7. Research and Development for a Course in Ethics in Nursing Practice for Community College Associate Degree Nursing Students. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Jeanette

    A project was undertaken to research and acquire the instructional sources needed for a course in ethics for community college associate degree nursing students and to develop such a course. Addressed in the individual units of the course were the following topics: bioethics and ethical decision making, basic ethical concepts and principles,…

  8. Performance Assessment & KERA. Proceedings of a Conference of the Kentucky Educational Research Association (Lexington, Kentucky, April 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Center for Professional Development.

    In April 1991, members of the Kentucky Educational Research Association (KERA), held a conference to discuss performance assessment and its use in Kentucky schools. The following papers from the conference are included: (1) "Our Conference and the Performance Assessment Committee" (S. Kifer); (2) "Performance Assessment: A National…

  9. A Test of the Association of Class Size to Students' Attitudes Toward Science. Research Paper No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, William H.

    Analysis of data, collected by the Minnesota Research and Evaluation Project during 1972, on high school biology, chemistry, and physics classes from 12 states in 3 regions of the United States showed no association between class size and student attitude toward science. Potential effects of teachers' attitudes toward science and students'…

  10. ARL Supplementary Statistics, 2001-02. A Compilation of Statistics from the Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Mark, Comp.; Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.

    2003-01-01

    This report presents statistics on how Association of Research Libraries (ARL) member libraries spend money on electronic resources. This report indicates that expenditures for electronic resources account for 19.6%, on average, of ARL institutions' library materials budgets. ARL libraries reported spending more than $171 million on electronic…

  11. Research among Learners of Chinese as a Foreign Language. Chinese Language Teachers Association Monograph Series. Volume IV

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Michael E., Ed.; Shen, Helen H., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Cutting-edge in its approach and international in its authorship, this fourth monograph in a series sponsored by the Chinese Language Teachers Association features eight research studies that explore a variety of themes, topics, and perspectives important to a variety of stakeholders in the Chinese language learning community. Employing a wide…

  12. Literacy Promises. The Thirty-Third Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Timothy, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    For its 54th annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers met in Omaha, Nebraska at the Hilton Omaha. This year's conference theme was "Literacy Promises", which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 33. This organization has long been the home of some of the nation's most notable literacy experts. At the…

  13. State Library Agencies and Member Libraries of the Association of Research Libraries. Final Report of Two Surveys.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chobot, Mary C.

    State Library Agencies (SLAs) and library members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) were surveyed to collect data from potential audiences for American Memory products to assist the planners for this Library of Congress (LC) project. This summary report briefly explains the purpose of the surveys; describes the survey methodology and…

  14. HIV Genome-Wide Protein Associations: a Review of 30 Years of Research.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangdi; De Clercq, Erik

    2016-09-01

    The HIV genome encodes a small number of viral proteins (i.e., 16), invariably establishing cooperative associations among HIV proteins and between HIV and host proteins, to invade host cells and hijack their internal machineries. As a known example, the HIV envelope glycoprotein GP120 is closely associated with GP41 for viral entry. From a genome-wide perspective, a hypothesis can be worked out to determine whether 16 HIV proteins could develop 120 possible pairwise associations either by physical interactions or by functional associations mediated via HIV or host molecules. Here, we present the first systematic review of experimental evidence on HIV genome-wide protein associations using a large body of publications accumulated over the past 3 decades. Of 120 possible pairwise associations between 16 HIV proteins, at least 34 physical interactions and 17 functional associations have been identified. To achieve efficient viral replication and infection, HIV protein associations play essential roles (e.g., cleavage, inhibition, and activation) during the HIV life cycle. In either a dispensable or an indispensable manner, each HIV protein collaborates with another viral protein to accomplish specific activities that precisely take place at the proper stages of the HIV life cycle. In addition, HIV genome-wide protein associations have an impact on anti-HIV inhibitors due to the extensive cross talk between drug-inhibited proteins and other HIV proteins. Overall, this study presents for the first time a comprehensive overview of HIV genome-wide protein associations, highlighting meticulous collaborations between all viral proteins during the HIV life cycle. PMID:27357278

  15. Design and Analysis Problems Associated with Qualitative Data in Educational Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fienberg, Stephen E.; Larntz, Kinley

    This research project addresses a series of methodological and theoretical statistical problems in the analysis of categorical data using loglinear and logistic response models, which grow directly out of problems in the study of the American educational system, and in basic educational research. The project focuses on the adaptation and…

  16. Directory of Human Sciences Research Organizations and Professional Associations in South Africa. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Berg, Henda, Ed.; Prinsloo, Roelf, Ed.; Pienaar, Drienie, Ed.

    This directory is intended to be a comprehensive reference source for identifying research organizations and institutions, and for promoting research cooperation and facilitating networking. This second edition provides a broad background to the development of the human sciences as well as an overview of existing and emerging science and…

  17. Dealing with Data: Science Librarians' Participation in Data Management at Association of Research Libraries Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antell, Karen; Foote, Jody Bales; Turner, Jaymie; Shults, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As long as empirical research has existed, researchers have been doing "data management" in one form or another. However, funding agency mandates for doing formal data management are relatively recent, and academic libraries' involvement has been concentrated mainly in the last few years. The National Science Foundation implemented a new…

  18. Metasynthesis of In-Service Professional Development Research: Features Associated with Positive Educator and Student Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Bruder, Mary Beth; Hamby, Deborah W.

    2015-01-01

    Findings from a metasynthesis of 15 research reviews of in service professional development to improve or change teacher content knowledge and practice and student/child knowledge and behavior are described. The research reviews included 550 studies of more than 50,000 early intervention, preschool, elementary, and secondary education teachers,…

  19. Relationships Matter: Some Benefits, Challenges and Tensions Associated with Forming a Collaborative Educational Researcher Group

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Sandie; Murray, E.; Rivalland, C.; Monk, H.; Piazza-McFarland, L.; Daniel, G.

    2014-01-01

    Growing recognition of the complexity of children's lives has led to strong advocacy in education research literature for greater collaboration between researchers from different paradigms to address the "wicked" problems that face contemporary children and families. There is little literature, however, exploring how collaboration…

  20. Social Science Theory and Research on Participation and Voluntary Associations: A Bibliographic Essay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Lois Saxelby

    This literature review is intended for policymakers and researchers concerned with citizen participation in the educational decision-making process. The study examines (1) the functions of interest groups in social science analysis of the political process; (2) the dominant theories employed in social research on interest group processes; (3) the…

  1. Ethical issues associated with the use of animal experimentation in behavioral neuroscience research.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Frauke; Meijboom, Franck

    2015-01-01

    This chapter briefly explores whether there are distinct characteristics in the field of Behavioral Neuroscience that demand specific ethical reflection. We argue that although the ethical issues in animal-based Behavioral Neuroscience are not necessarily distinct from those in other research disciplines using animal experimentation, this field of endeavor makes a number of specific, ethically relevant, questions more explicit and, as a result, may expose to discussion a series of ethical issues that have relevance beyond this field of science. We suggest that innovative research, by its very definition, demands out-of-the-box thinking. At the same time, standardization of animal models and test procedures for the sake of comparability across experiments inhibits the potential and willingness to leave well-established tracks of thinking, and leaves us wondering how open minded research is and whether it is the researcher's established perspective that drives the research rather than the research that drives the researcher's perspective. The chapter finishes by introducing subsequent chapters of this book volume on Ethical Issues in Behavioral Neuroscience. PMID:25023419

  2. Behavioral Outcomes of Supervisory Education in the Association for Clinical Pastoral Education: A Qualitative Research Study.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Judith R; Orme-Rogers, Charles; Bush, Johnny C; Stowman, Sheryl Lyndes; Seeger, Rodney W

    2016-03-01

    This study advances the work of developing a theory for educating Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) Supervisors by describing the behaviors which result from the successful completion of CPE supervisory education. Twenty-eight Association for Clinical Pastoral Education (ACPE) Certification Commissioners were interviewed to identify the behaviors demonstrated by Supervisory Education Students (Candidates) which influenced the decision to certify them at the level of Associate Supervisor. Specific behavioral descriptors are listed for each ACPE supervisory competency. PMID:26956745

  3. An Associative Memory Model for Integration of Fragmented Research Data and Identification of Treatment Correlations in Breast Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Ashis Gopal; Khan, Mridul; Higgins, John; Giani, Annarita; Das, Amar K.

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in advancing scientific discoveries using data-driven clinical research is the fragmentation of relevant data among multiple information systems. This fragmentation requires significant data-engineering work before correlations can be found among data attributes in multiple systems. In this paper, we focus on integrating information on breast cancer care, and present a novel computational approach to identify correlations between administered drugs captured in an electronic medical records and biological factors obtained from a tumor registry through rapid data aggregation and analysis. We use an associative memory (AM) model to encode all existing associations among the data attributes from both systems in a high-dimensional vector space. The AM model stores highly associated data items in neighboring memory locations to enable efficient querying operations. The results of applying AM to a set of integrated data on tumor markers and drug administrations discovered anomalies between clinical recommendations and derived associations. PMID:26958161

  4. Future research needs associated with the assessment of potential human health risks from exposure to toxic ambient air pollutants.

    PubMed Central

    Möller, L; Schuetzle, D; Autrup, H

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents key conclusions and future research needs from a Workshop on the Risk Assessment of Urban Air, Emissions, Exposure, Risk Identification, and Quantification, which was held in Stockholm during June 1992 by 41 participants from 13 countries. Research is recommended in the areas of identification and quantification of toxics in source emissions and ambient air, atmospheric transport and chemistry, exposure level assessment, the development of improved in vitro bioassays, biomarker development, the development of more accurate epidemiological methodologies, and risk quantification techniques. Studies are described that will be necessary to assess and reduce the level of uncertainties associated with each step of the risk assessment process. International collaborative research efforts between industry and government organizations are recommended as the most effective way to carry out this research. PMID:7529703

  5. US Department of Energy Teacher Research Associates Program: Profile and survey of 1990--1991 participants. [Contains a bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Vivio, F.M. ); Stevenson, W.L. )

    1992-11-01

    Through its laboratories, facilities, and technology centers, the United States Department of Energy supports the development and training of scientists and engineers to meet the nation's future human resource needs in energy science and technology. This mission is accomplished, in part, through summer programs of active participation by precollege teachers in laboratory research. Since 1989, the Teacher Research Associates (TRAC) program has provided outstanding 7th- through 12th-grade science, mathematics, and technology teachers from across the nation the opportunity to participate in ongoing research projects at DOE laboratories. The TRAC program encourages participants, upon returning to their home institution, to share with their students and colleagues the experience and knowledge gained through their research endeavors.

  6. Epidemiologic Research on Malformations Associated with Cleft Lip and Cleft Palate in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroshi; Iida, Koichi; Maeda, Tomoki; Takahashi, Mizuho; Fukushima, Naoki; Goshi, Terufumi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate malformations associated with cleft lip and cleft palate, we conducted surveys at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and other non-NICU facilities and to determine whether there are differences among facilities. The regional survey investigated NICU facilities located in Oita Prefecture, including 92 patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) or cleft palate (CP) that occurred between 2004 and 2013, and the national survey investigated oral surgery, plastic surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology facilities located in Japan, including 16,452 patients with cleft lip (CL), CLP, or CP that occurred since 2000. The incidence per 10,000 births was 4.2, 6.2, and 2.8 for CL, CLP, and CP, respectively, according to the national survey, and 6.3 and 2.9 for CLP and CP, respectively according to the regional survey. These results indicated comparable incidences between the two surveys. In contrast, when the survey results on malformations associated with CLP and CP according to the ICD-10 classification were compared between the national survey conducted at oral surgery or plastic surgery facilities and the regional survey conducted at NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was 19.8% vs. 41.3% for any types of associated malformation, 6.8% vs. 21.7% for congenital heart disease, and 0.5% vs. 16.3% for chromosomal abnormalities. These results indicated that the incidences of all of these associated malformations were significantly greater in the survey conducted at NICU facilities and similar to the findings from international epidemiological surveys. When comparing the survey conducted at obstetrics facilities vs. NICU facilities, the occurrence of associated malformations was similar results as above. The incidence of CLP and CP was not different between surveys conducted at NICU facilities vs. non-NICU facilities; however, when conducting surveys on associated malformations, it is possible to obtain accurate epidemiological data by

  7. Helmet-mounted display and associated research activities recently conducted by the NASA Johnson Space Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1994-06-01

    To enhance manned extravehicular activity (EVA) utilizing an extravehicular mobility unit (EMU)(i.e., a space suit and portable life support backpack), NASA has conducted research into implementing helmet mounted display (HMD) and related technology within its next generation of space suits. The NASA/Johnson Space Center has completed four feasibility development programs for the design and development of an EMU HMD, each resulting in the delivery of a binocular or biocular HMD breadboard unit utilizing conventional optical elements (i.e., glass lenses and beamsplitters) and/or holographic optics. Additional research into combining the use of voice recognition for astronaut 'hands- free' access to information via the HMD has also been conducted. Research conducted since 1983 will be summarized along with current shuttle EMU display enhancements. In addition, recommendations for the design of the next generation of displays for use within the EMU will be presented.

  8. SU-E-J-11: Measurement of Eye Lens Dose for Varian On-Board Imaging with Different CBCT Acquisition Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Deshpande, S; Dhote, D; Kumar, R; Thakur, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To measure actual patient eye lens dose for different cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) acquisition protocol of Varian’s On Board Imagining (OBI) system using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dosimeter and study the eye lens dose with patient geometry and distance of isocenter to the eye lens Methods: OSL dosimeter was used to measure eye lens dose of patient. OSL dosimeter was placed on patient forehead center during CBCT image acquisition to measure eye lens dose. For three different cone beam acquisition protocol (standard dose head, low dose head and high quality head) of Varian On-Board Imaging, eye lens doses were measured. Measured doses were correlated with patient geometry and distance between isocenter to eye lens. Results: Measured eye lens dose for standard dose head was in the range of 1.8 mGy to 3.2 mGy, for high quality head protocol dose was in range of 4.5mGy to 9.9 mGy whereas for low dose head was in the range of 0.3mGy to 0.7mGy. Dose to eye lens is depends upon position of isocenter. For posterioraly located tumor eye lens dose is less. Conclusion: From measured doses it can be concluded that by proper selection of imagining protocol and frequency of imaging, it is possible to restrict the eye lens dose below the new limit set by ICRP. However, undoubted advantages of imaging system should be counter balanced by careful consideration of imaging protocol especially for very intense imaging sequences for Adoptive Radiotherapy or IMRT.

  9. SU-E-T-317: The Development of a DIBH Technique for Left Sided Breast Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy Utilizing Varians RPM System in a Community Hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Hasson, B; Young, M; Workie, D; Geraghty, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a Deep Inhalation Breath Hold program (DIBH) for treatment of patients with Left-sided breast cancer in a community hospital. Methods: All patients with left sided breast cancer underwent a screening free breathing CT. Evaluation of the conventional tangent treatment fields and the heart was conducted. If the heart would not be excluded using tangents, the patient then received DIBH breathe coaching. The patients returned for a 4D CT simulation. The patients breathing cycle was monitored using the Varian Real-Time position ManagementTM (RPM) system to assess duration of DIBH, amplitude, phase and recovery time to normal breathing. Then a DIBH CT was obtained at the desired amplitude. Duplicate plans were developed for both free breathing and DIBH on the Eclipse planning system and comparison DVH's were created. The plan that provided the prescribed treatment coverage and the least doses to the OAR (heart, Lt. Lung) was determined. Those patients selected to receive treatment with DIBH were set up for treatment, and breathing was monitored using the RPM system. Practice trials were used to confirm that the amplitude, phase and recovery were consistent with findings from simulation. Results: 10 patients have been treated using the DIBH procedure in our clinic. The DIBH patients had an average increase of 80% lung volume on DIBH, decreased lung volume receiving 50% of the dose, and decreases in the V20 dose. Significant reduction in the maximum and mean dose to the heart, as well as the dose to 1CC of the volume for the DIBH plans. Conclusion: Using the RPM system already available in the clinic, staff training, and patient coaching a simple DIBH program was setup. The use of DIBH has shown promise in reducing doses to the critical organs while maintaining PTV coverage for left sided breast treatments.

  10. Energy spectra, angular spread, fluence profiles and dose distributions of 6 and 18 MV photon beams: results of Monte Carlo simulations for a Varian 2100EX accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, George X.

    2002-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide detailed characteristics of incident photon beams for different field sizes and beam energies. This information is critical to the future development of accurate treatment planning systems. It also enhances our knowledge of radiotherapy photon beams. The EGS4 Monte Carlo code, BEAM, has been used to simulate 6 and 18 MV photon beams from a Varian Clinac-2100EX accelerator. A simulated realistic beam is stored in a phase space data file, which contains details of each particle's complete history including where it has been and where it has interacted. The phase space files are analysed to obtain energy spectra, angular distribution, fluence profile and mean energy profiles at the phantom surface for particles separated according to their charge and history. The accuracy of a simulated beam is validated by the excellent agreement between the Monte Carlo calculated and measured dose distributions. Measured depth-dose curves are obtained from depth-ionization curves by accounting for newly introduced chamber fluence corrections and the stopping-power ratios for realistic beams. The study presents calculated depth-dose components from different particles as well as calculated surface dose and contribution from different particles to surface dose across the field. It is shown that the increase of surface dose with the increase of the field size is mainly due to the increase of incident contaminant charged particles. At 6 MV, the incident charged particles contribute 7% to 21% of maximum dose at the surface when the field size increases from 10 × 10 to 40 × 40 cm2. At 18 MV, their contributions are up to 11% and 29% of maximum dose at the surface for 10 × 10 cm2 and 40 × 40 cm2 fields respectively. However, the fluence of these incident charged particles is less than 1% of incident photon fluence in all cases.

  11. Distinct characteristics of single starch-binding domain SBD1 derived from tandem domains SBD1-SBD2 of halophilic Kocuria varians alpha-amylase.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Rui; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tokunaga, Hiroko; Ishibashi, Matsujiro; Tokunaga, Masao

    2012-03-01

    Kocuria varians alpha-amylase contains tandem starch-binding domains SBD1-SBD2 (SBD12) that possess typical halophilic characteristics. Recombinant tandem domains SBD12 and single domain SBD1, both with amino-terminal hexa-His tag, were expressed in and purified to homogeneity from Escherichia coli. The circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of His-SBD12 was characterized by a positive peak at 233 nm ascribed to the aromatic stacking. Although the signal occurred in the far UV region, it is an indication of tertiary structure folding. CD spectrum of single domain His-SBD1 exhibited the same peak position, signal intensity and spectral shape as those of His-SBD12, suggesting that the aromatic stacking must occur within the domain, and that two SBD domains in SBD12 and SBD1 has a similar folded structure. This structural observation was consistent with the biological activity that His-SBD1 showed binding activity against raw starch granules and amylose resin with 70-80% efficiency compared with binding of equimolar His-SBD12. Although the thermal unfolding rate of SBD12 and SBD1 were similar, the refolding rates of SBD12 and SBD1 from thermal melting were greatly different: His-SBD12 refolded slowly (T(1/2) = ~84 min), while refolding of single domain His-SBD1 was found to be 20-fold faster (T(1/2) = 4.2 min). The possible mechanism of this large difference in refolding rate was discussed. Maltose at 20 mM showed 5-6 °C increase in thermal melting of both His-SBD12 and His-SBD1, while its effects on the time course of unfolding and refolding were insignificant. PMID:22388479

  12. Reduction of the effect of non-uniform backscatter from an E-type support arm of a Varian a-Si EPID used for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowshanfarzad, Pejman; Sabet, Mahsheed; O'Connor, Daryl J.; Greer, Peter B.

    2010-11-01

    Backscatter from the metallic components in the support arm is one of the sources of inaccuracy in dosimetry with Varian amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging devices (a-Si EPIDs). In this study, the non-uniform arm backscatter is blocked by adding lead sheets between the EPID and an E-type support arm. By comparing the EPID responses on and off the arm, with and without lead and considering the extra weight on the imager, 2 mm of lead was determined as the optimum thickness for both 6 and 18 MV beam energies. The arm backscatter at the central axis with the 2 mm lead in place decreased to 0.1% and 0.2% for the largest field size of 30 × 30 cm2 using 6 and 18 MV beams, from 2.3% and 1.3% without lead. Changes in the source-to-detector distance (SDD) did not affect the backscatter component more than 1%. The symmetry of the in-plane profiles improved for all field sizes for both beam energies. The addition of lead decreased the contrast-to-noise ratio and resolution by 1.3% and 0.84% for images taken in 6 MV and by 0.5% and 0.38% for those in 18 MV beams. The displacement of the EPID central pixel was measured during a 360° gantry rotation with and without lead which was 1 pixel different. While the backscatter reduces with increasing lead thickness, a 2 mm lead sheet seems sufficient for acceptable dosimetry results without any major degradation to the routine performance of the imager. No increase in patient skin dose was detected.

  13. An Examination of the Navy's Associate Degree Completion Program; A Research Report Submitted to the Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornsley, John T.

    The present Associate Degree Completion Program (ADCOP), which enrolls approximately 2,700 senior enlisted personnel in 14 junior colleges for full-time vocational/technical study at Navy expense, is costly and of little tangible benefit to the Navy. The ADCOP was designed in 1966 as a method of retraining career enlisted personnel and encouraging…

  14. The Associate Degree Nursing Program at Rio Hondo College: A Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Joseph

    During 1975-76, an evaluation of the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program at Rio Hondo College was undertaken which involved: (1) surveying all nursing graduates in the classes of 1973, 1974, and 1975, and all fourth semester students currently enrolled in the program; (2) surveying or interviewing all instructional staff for the ADN program;…

  15. National University Consortium on Microwave Research (NUCOMR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, Robert J.; Agee, Forrest J.

    1995-09-01

    This paper introduces a new cooperative research program of national scale that is focused on crucial research issues in the development of high energy microwave sources. These have many applications in the DOD and industry. The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), in coopertaion with the Phillips Laboratory, the Naval Research Laboratory, and the Army Research Laboratory, has established a tri-service research consortium to investigate novel high energy microwave sources. The program is part of the DODs 'Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative' and will be funded at a rate of $DLR3.0M per year for up to five years. All research performed under this program will be unclassified. Under its auspices, HPM scientists at nine US universities will be attacking twenty-two separate research projects under the leadership of Neville Luhmann at UC-Davis, Victor Granatstein at Maryland, Magne Kristiansen at Texas Tech, Edl Schamiloglu at New Mexico, John Nation at Cornell, Ned Birdsall at UC-Berkeley, George Caryotakis at Standord, Ronald Gilgenbach at Michigan, and Anthony Lin at UCLA. To facilitate the rapid transition of research results into the industrial community, formal collaborative subcontracts are already in place with James Benford at Physics International, Carter Armstrong at Northrop, and Glen Huffman at Varian Associates. Although this new program officially only came into existence in mid-March of this year, it builds on over a decade of microwave research efforts funded by the plasma physics office at AFOSR. It also is synergistic with the ongoing Tri-Service Vacuum Electronics Initiative led by Robert Parker of NRL as well as with the AFOSR's and Rome Laboratory's long standing Advanced Thermionic Research Initiative. An overview will be given of the broad spectrum of research objectives encompassed by NUCOMR. Areas of collaboration and technology transfer will be highlighted. The areas in which the three university consortia will conduct

  16. Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO)--2010 Annual Meeting. For Sight: The Future of Eye and Vision Research--part 2.

    PubMed

    Hookes, Livia

    2010-07-01

    The 2010 Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology (ARVO), held in Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of eye and vision research. This conference report highlights selected presentations on the development of OT-440 (Othera Pharmaceuticals Inc) for the potential treatment of glaucoma, an extended-release implant of brimonidine (pSivida Corp) for ocular hypertension, AR-12286 (Aerie Pharmaceuticals Inc) for ocular hypertension or glaucoma, AC-8 (Calmune Corp/RiboVax Biotechnologies SA) for ocular diseases following HSV infection, and fidarestat (Sanwa Kagaku Kenkyusho Co Ltd) and the recombinant proteins NOV and NOVCter (INSERM/University Rene Descartes) for corneal neovascularization. PMID:20582863

  17. A Report on the Activities, Publications, and Pending Research of DHS/DOD Sponsored Post-doctoral Research Associate at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, Floyd E.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-04-26

    Since beginning at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February of 2012, I have been working as a DHS./DNDO Postdoctoral Research Associate under the mentorship of Lav Tandon and Khalil Spencer (NA-22 and mass spectrometry). The focus of my efforts, in addition to pursuing needed training and qualifications, has been the application of various instrumental approaches (e.g. Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry; TIMS) to a range of systems of interest in materials characterization and nuclear forensics. Research to be pursued in the coming months shall include the continued use of such approaches to advance current methods for: modified total evaporation, monitoring critical minor isotope systems, and chronometry. Each of the above points will be discussed.

  18. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracey, Gerald W.

    1984-01-01

    This potpourri surveys research on various topics: neurologically based curricula, midafternoon slumps in student attention, accounting for contexts in research, feelings of powerlessness among students and teachers, further equity implications of computers in schools, misreporting of research findings, and accounting for media transfer in…

  19. A Scientometric Study of Research Papers Published by Visiting Associates of IUCAA, Pune, India during 2003-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, V. K.; Senger, K. P. S.; Pathak, S. K.

    2015-04-01

    The Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics (IUCAA) is set up by the University Grants Commission (UGC) to promote the development and growth of active groups in astronomy and astrophysics at Indian universities. To highlight the IUCAA Associates program and associates' output during their tenure in the program, we decided to study the academic scientific output of IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013. This paper is an Informetric analysis of 1009 papers published by IUCAA associates from 2003 to 2013, compiled and downloaded from the institute's website, annual reports, and the ADS. There is no doubt that collaboration is a common phenomenon in research. This paper examines the collaborative strength and patterns of authorship among IUCAA associates, covering a period of 10 years. The results of the data were analyzed based on the number of articles published per year, patterns of authorship, and the degree and strength of collaboration of authors. Further, the study investigated highly prolific authors and highly preferred journals by the IUCAA associates during the study period.

  20. Vita Mathematica: Historical Research and Integration with Teaching. Mathematical Association of America Notes Series, No. 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calinger, Ronald, Ed.

    This book brings together papers by scholars from around the globe on the historiography and history of mathematics and their integration with mathematical pedagogy. Of the three articles in Part 1, "Historiography and Sources", one identifies research trends in the history of mathematics, the second discusses the centrality of problems, and the…

  1. Treatment Integrity in Psychotherapy Research: Analysis of the Studies and Examination of the Associated Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perepletchikova, Francheska; Treat, Teresa A.; Kazdin, Alan E.

    2007-01-01

    Treatment integrity refers to the degree to which an intervention is delivered as intended. Two studies evaluated the adequacy of treatment integrity procedures (including establishing, assessing, evaluating, and reporting integrity; therapist treatment adherence; and therapist competence) implemented in psychotherapy research, as well as…

  2. Propagation Research Results for Actaea racemosa L. (black cohosh) and analysis of Associated Triterpene Glycosides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Actaea racemosa L. (black cohosh), is a native North American medicinal plant traditionally wild-harvested for its roots. Due to increasing international demand it is at risk of extirpation from its native habitat. There subsequently exists a large void of accessible research on specifics of propa...

  3. Research and Teaching: Association of Summer Bridge Program Outcomes with STEM Retention of Targeted Demographic Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasko, David L.; Ridgway, Judith S.; Waller, Rocquel J.; Olesik, Susan V.

    2016-01-01

    Retention of students to science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) major has been studied for four cohorts participating in a summer bridge program supported by the National Science Foundation. Students participated in a 6-week program prior to their first term of enrollment at a research-intensive land grant university. Comparisons…

  4. Cross-Sector Research Associated with Nutrition: Comparison of Private and Public Schools on Health Indicators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz, Marco A.

    Healthy People 2010 is the initiative that defines the U.S. health agenda and guides policy. The initiative provides direction for individuals to change personal behaviors and for organizations and communities to support good health through health promotion policies. The objective of this research was to compare public and private schools on…

  5. A Quantitative Assessment of the Research Chefs Association Core Competencies for the Practicing Culinologist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bissett, Rachel L.; Cheng, Michael S. H.; Brannan, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Professional organizations have linked core competency to professional success and competitive strategy. The Research Chefs Assn. (RCA) recently released 43 core competencies for practicing culinologists. Culinology[R] is a profession that links skills of culinary arts and food science and technology in the development of food products. An online…

  6. Education, Science, and the Politics of Knowledge: The American Educational Research Association, 1915-1940

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mershon, Sherie; Schlossman, Steven

    2008-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, a new alliance formed between university-based scholars who dedicated themselves to the scientific study of education and public school officials. This alliance centered on the proposition that applied research could advance the professionalization of schooling and become a prestigious academic specialty in its own…

  7. 78 FR 55728 - Society of Clinical Research Associates-Food and Drug Administration: Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-11

    ... Administration: Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... workshop regarding FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research professional... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  8. The Information Search Process: A Study of Elements Associated with Meaningful Research Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Kathleen

    1995-01-01

    Describes a study at a Michigan high school that investigated elements that contributed to a meaningful library research task. Highlights include information literacy; students' feelings of satisfaction and achievement; student questionnaires and student and teacher interviews; group work; and process instruction. (LRW)

  9. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the rubber and plastics research association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. American Vocational Education Research Association Proceedings (Cincinnati, Ohio, December 5-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redmann, Donna H., Ed.

    The following papers are included: "Research and Teaching from the Web/Multimedia" (Swan); "Vocational Teachers' Attitude toward, Knowledge of, and Use of National Skill Standards" (Belcher, McCaslin); "Predicting the Leadership Effectiveness of Vocational Education Administrators" (Daughtry, Finch); "Coping Behaviors and Transitions of Managerial…

  12. [Treatment research progress on the treatment of neurofibromatosis type 2-associated vestibular schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingchao; Yang, Qin; Jiang, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2) is a dominantly inherited genetic condition. Bilateral vestibular schwannoma, which are benign tumors, composed of neoplastic Schwann cells that arise from the eighth cranial nerve, are the hallmark of NF2. Standard approaches for treatment of growing vestibular schwannoma include observation, surgical removal and radiation therapy. Molecular targeted therapies also present great prosperity in recent years. In this review, we summarize the latest progresses on the treatment of NF2-associated vestibular schwannoma. PMID:26596021

  13. Use of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Cancer Research and Drug Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jizhun; Jiang, Kewei; Lv, Liang; Wang, Hui; Shen, Zhanlong; Gao, Zhidong; Wang, Bo; Yang, Yang; Ye, Yingjiang; Wang, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Although genome-wide association studies have identified many risk loci associated with colorectal cancer, the molecular basis of these associations are still unclear. We aimed to infer biological insights and highlight candidate genes of interest within GWAS risk loci. We used an in silico pipeline based on functional annotation, quantitative trait loci mapping of cis-acting gene, PubMed text-mining, protein-protein interaction studies, genetic overlaps with cancer somatic mutations and knockout mouse phenotypes, and functional enrichment analysis to prioritize the candidate genes at the colorectal cancer risk loci. Based on these analyses, we observed that these genes were the targets of approved therapies for colorectal cancer, and suggested that drugs approved for other indications may be repurposed for the treatment of colorectal cancer. This study highlights the use of publicly available data as a cost effective solution to derive biological insights, and provides an empirical evidence that the molecular basis of colorectal cancer can provide important leads for the discovery of new drugs. PMID:25803826

  14. Evaluation of Strategies to Separate Root-Associated Microbial Communities: A Crucial Choice in Rhizobiome Research

    PubMed Central

    Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Eickhorst, Thilo; Knauth, Stefan; Friedrich, Michael W.; Schmidt, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Plants shape distinct, species-specific microbiomes in their rhizospheres. A main premise for evaluating microbial communities associated with root-soil compartments is their successful separation into the rhizosphere (soil-root interface), the rhizoplane (root surface), and the endosphere (inside roots). We evaluated different approaches (washing, sonication, and bleaching) regarding their efficiency to separate microbial cells associated with different root compartments of soil-grown rice using fluorescence microscopy and community fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes. Vigorous washing detached 45% of the rhizoplane population compared to untreated roots. Additional sonication reduced rhizoplane-attached microorganisms by up to 78% but caused various degrees of root tissue destruction at all sonication intensities tested. Treatment with sodium hypochlorite almost completely (98%) removed rhizoplane-associated microbial cells. Community fingerprinting revealed that microbial communities obtained from untreated, washed, and sonicated roots were not statistically distinguishable. Hypochlorite-treated roots harbored communities significantly different from all other samples, likely representing true endospheric populations. Applying these procedures to other root samples (bean and clover) revealed that treatment efficiencies were strongly affected by root morphological parameters such as root hair density and rigidity of epidermis. Our findings suggest that a careful evaluation of separation strategies prior to molecular community analysis is indispensable, especially when endophytes are the subject of interest. PMID:27252690

  15. Evaluation of Strategies to Separate Root-Associated Microbial Communities: A Crucial Choice in Rhizobiome Research.

    PubMed

    Richter-Heitmann, Tim; Eickhorst, Thilo; Knauth, Stefan; Friedrich, Michael W; Schmidt, Hannes

    2016-01-01

    Plants shape distinct, species-specific microbiomes in their rhizospheres. A main premise for evaluating microbial communities associated with root-soil compartments is their successful separation into the rhizosphere (soil-root interface), the rhizoplane (root surface), and the endosphere (inside roots). We evaluated different approaches (washing, sonication, and bleaching) regarding their efficiency to separate microbial cells associated with different root compartments of soil-grown rice using fluorescence microscopy and community fingerprinting of 16S rRNA genes. Vigorous washing detached 45% of the rhizoplane population compared to untreated roots. Additional sonication reduced rhizoplane-attached microorganisms by up to 78% but caused various degrees of root tissue destruction at all sonication intensities tested. Treatment with sodium hypochlorite almost completely (98%) removed rhizoplane-associated microbial cells. Community fingerprinting revealed that microbial communities obtained from untreated, washed, and sonicated roots were not statistically distinguishable. Hypochlorite-treated roots harbored communities significantly different from all other samples, likely representing true endospheric populations. Applying these procedures to other root samples (bean and clover) revealed that treatment efficiencies were strongly affected by root morphological parameters such as root hair density and rigidity of epidermis. Our findings suggest that a careful evaluation of separation strategies prior to molecular community analysis is indispensable, especially when endophytes are the subject of interest. PMID:27252690

  16. Big data challenges in bone research: genome-wide association studies and next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Nerea; Lucas, Gavin; Hysi, Pirro

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been developed as a practical method to identify genetic loci associated with disease by scanning multiple markers across the genome. Significant advances in the genetics of complex diseases have been made owing to advances in genotyping technologies, the progress of projects such as HapMap and 1000G and the emergence of genetics as a collaborative discipline. Because of its great potential to be used in parallel by multiple collaborators, it is important to adhere to strict protocols assuring data quality and analyses. Quality control analyses must be applied to each sample and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). The software package PLINK is capable of performing the whole range of necessary quality control tests. Genotype imputation has also been developed to substantially increase the power of GWAS methodology. Imputation permits the investigation of associations at genetic markers that are not directly genotyped. Results of individual GWAS reports can be combined through meta-analysis. Finally, next-generation sequencing (NGS) has gained popularity in recent years through its capacity to analyse a much greater number of markers across the genome. Although NGS platforms are capable of examining a higher number of SNPs compared with GWA studies, the results obtained by NGS require careful interpretation, as their biological correlation is incompletely understood. In this article, we will discuss the basic features of such protocols. PMID:25709812

  17. Water Footprint Assessment and the Panta Rhei research initiative of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenije, H.

    2014-12-01

    "Panta Rhei - Everything Flows" is the new scientific decade, 2013-2022, of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). It is dedicated to understanding issues linked with the interactions between hydrology and society in the context of change. The purpose of Panta Rhei is to reach an improved interpretation of the processes governing the water cycle in the Anthropocene, an improved prediction of such systems, and where possible to provide input for policy and practice, aimed at water security, human wellbeing and development. This talk discusses the research initiative, explores the possibility of research innovations offered by the research initiative and how water footprint assessment is a valuable tool to understand and assess human impacts on the water cycle in the Anthropocene.

  18. Spatial Implications Associated with Using Euclidean Distance Measurements and Geographic Centroid Imputation in Health Care Research

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Stephen G; Ashby, Avery J; Momin, Soyal R; Naidoo, Allen

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of using Euclidean measurements and zip-code centroid geo-imputation versus more precise spatial analytical techniques in health care research. Data Sources Commercially insured members from a southeastern managed care organization. Study Design Distance from admitting inpatient facility to member's home and zip-code centroid (geographic placement) was compared using Euclidean straight-line and shortest-path drive distances (measurement technique). Data Collection Administrative claims from October 2005 to September 2006. Principal Findings Measurement technique had a greater impact on distance values compared with geographic placement. Drive distance from the geocoded address was highly correlated (r=0.99) with the Euclidean distance from the zip-code centroid. Conclusions Actual differences were relatively small. Researchers without capabilities to produce drive distance measurements and/or address geocoding techniques could rely on simple linear regressions to estimate correction factors with a high degree of confidence. PMID:19780852

  19. Recycling rubber wastes. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and innovations in the recycling of rubber wastes. Recycling methods and equipment, applications of recycled rubber, and energy recovery systems and performance are among the topics discussed. Recycling methods compared and contrasted with various rubber waste disposal techniques are also included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  20. The opinion and response of health professionals associated with academics about the research design and methods: A study

    PubMed Central

    Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Kujan, Omar Bashar

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to survey the opinions and responses of health professionals in academics about their interest and experience in research, knowledge over study designs, and application of a common study design to find out the objectives behind any research study. Materials and Methods: A semi-structured questionnaire containing three variables with 15 questions were sent to 300 health professionals associated with academics in the category of Bachelor/Master/Doctorate working at Al-Farabi Colleges campuses located in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected manually, descriptive frequencies were generated and the variables were statistically analyzed using Chi-square test. The knowledge scores between the qualification and gender were carried out using ANOVA and t-test. The final response rate was in conjuction to the statistician to exclude the uncompleted responses from the statistical analysis. Results: The results showed a discrepancy in the participation; of 95 health professionals, (40) were females and (55) were males. Bachelor (16), Masters (61) and Doctorate holders (18) gave their opinion. For the first variable (research experience), all the surveyed categories showed the same response. However, for the second variable (study design and research criteria) bachelor holders showed poor, but equal performance was reported to the master and doctorate holders. In the third variable (objectives and common designs), bachelor holders showed a poor response in contrast to the master and doctorate holders whose have mixed opinions. For knowledge scores, no significance was present between the master and doctorate holders. Conclusion: There is a lack of understanding of the research objectives and common designs frequently used in research studies particularly among the bachelor holders. Additional postgraduate education on research methods is recommended to improve the knowledge and practices of research. PMID:27114956

  1. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF)

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H.; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the

  2. [Research advances of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness and its association with myopia].

    PubMed

    Kang, M T; Ran, A R; Wang, N L; Li, S M

    2016-05-11

    Recently, the distribution characteristics of retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in myopic population have raised scholars' attention. The retinal nerve fiber layer thickness is varied with different refractive statuses, and is correlated to many factors like age, eye elongation, and fundus changes. Further exploration of the relationship between myopia and retinal structure and function will promote our understanding and knowledge of the pathogenesis of myopia. The article reviews the structure characteristics of the retinal nerve fiber layer, its associations with demographic characteristics, its characteristics in myopia, and the structural-functional relationship.(Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 396-400). PMID:27220715

  3. Avian use of introduced plants: ornithologist records illuminate interspecific associations and research needs.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Clare E; Rejmánek, Marcel

    2010-06-01

    Introduced species have the potential to impact processes central to the organization of ecological communities. Although hundreds of nonnative plant species have naturalized in the United States, only a small percentage of these have been studied in their new biotic communities. Their interactions with resident (native and introduced) bird species remain largely unexplored. As a group, citizen scientists such as ornithologists possess a wide range of experiences. They may offer insights into the prevalence and form of bird interactions with nonnative plants on a broad geographic scale. We surveyed 173 ornithologists from four U.S. states, asking them to report observations of bird interactions with nonnative plants. The primary goal of the survey was to obtain information useful in guiding future empirical research. In all, 1143 unique bird-plant interactions were reported, involving 99 plant taxa and 168 bird species. Forty-seven percent of reported interactions concerned potential dispersal (feeding on seeds or fruits). Remaining "habitat interactions" involved bird use of plants for nesting, perching, woodpecking, gleaning, and other activities. We utilized detrended correspondence analysis to ordinate birds with respect to the plants they reportedly utilize. Results illuminate the new guilds formed by these interactions. We assessed the existing level of knowledge about invasiveness of those plants reported most often in feeding interactions, identifying information gaps for biological invasions research priority. To exemplify the usefulness of citizen science data, we utilized survey results to guide field research on invasiveness in some of these plant species and observed both qualitatively and quantitatively strong agreement between survey reports and our empirical data. Questionnaire reports are therefore heuristically informative for the fields of both avian ecology and invasion biology. PMID:20597286

  4. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  5. Study of costs associated with alternative fuels development: A case study. Research report

    SciTech Connect

    Lede, N.W.

    1995-07-01

    The primary objective of the study was to conduct a case study of large-scale fuel conversion project to assess selected costs and related issues. An inventory of public transit agencies engaged in demonstration projects involving alternative fuels as conducted with representative sample of large public transit systems in the nation. Included in the survey were questions pertaining to fuel supply arrangements, fuel reserve storage requirements and/or deficiencies; future plans for managing energy resources and costs associated with fuel conversion/alternative fuels use -- whether planned or currently in operation. The case study approach was used to document the methodological and logistical problems encountered during the course of projects involving alternative fuels use compared with a control sample using diesel fuel. Monthly status reports on the alternative fuel project included data on accumulated mileage, road calls/unscheduled maintenance, fuel consumption, fuel cost per mile, alternative fuel purchases, schedule of activities, personnel, safety , and diesel emission test results. The data collected indicate several conclusions and future implications about technical and safety issues associated with the testing and use of liquefied natural gas (LNG).

  6. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  7. A Global Perspective on Using Implementation Research to Address Hypertension-Associated Target Organ Damage.

    PubMed

    Peprah, Emmanuel; Lopez-Class, Maria; Shero, Susan; John-Sowah, Joylene; Engelgau, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension, a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, imposes a significant public health burden and challenge to address it worldwide. Scaling up delivery of proven, effective interventions for hypertension could significantly advance the goal of reducing the global burden. Although significant progress has been made in many countries, some lament that large-scale initiatives focused on reducing blood pressure in global populations have not effectively addressed this challenge. Late-stage implementation research plays a critical role in determining effective and sustainable scale-up of these initiatives. In this article, we briefly discuss some of the global initiatives that have been funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the US National Institutes of Health. Intervention delivery strategies in low resource settings must have demonstrated effectiveness and consideration for the social, cultural and physical context (eg, access, affordability, and availability of medications) in which a program is being delivered in order to be sustainable nationally and globally. Hence, the use of implementation research is central to determining sustainable delivery of evidence-based and tailored interventions focused on hypertension control. The sustained control of hypertension in global populations holds tremendous potential for reducing morbidity, premature mortality, and the adverse economic impact of cardiovascular disease in all regions. PMID:27440980

  8. Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raudenbush, Stephen

    In May of 1999, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences hosted a conference on ways to improve the scientific quality of educational research. In medicine, thanks to work 40 years ago by 2 researchers, Howard Hyatt and Frederick Mosteller, the commitment of medical professionals to base their diagnoses and prescriptions on clinical trials in…

  9. Research Update: Synthesis, properties, and applications of ultrathin metallic nanowires and associated heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haiqing; Li, Luyao; Scofield, Megan E.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-08-01

    The properties of one-dimensional (1D) nanostructured materials can change considerably and unexpectedly, when their diameters attain the "ultrathin" level, i.e., below 10 nm. Herein, we have summarized recent developments associated with not only the synthesis but also more importantly, the applications of ultrathin 1D nanowires. Specifically, various classes of ultrathin metallic nanowires have been shown to be excellent, high-performing structural motifs for electrocatalysts, superconducting materials, electrical devices, and nano-sized pressure sensors. Moreover, the fabrication of ultrathin-based 0D-1D, 1D-1D, and 1D-2D composite hybrid structures may represent one of the most promising designs for novel architectures in energy storage and conversion, photovoltaic devices, photoconductivity, and photoelectrocatalysis.

  10. Challenges in linking preclinical anti-microbial research strategies with clinical outcomes for device-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, T F; Grainger, D W; Richards, R G

    2014-01-01

    Infections related to implanted medical devices have become a significant health care issue in recent decades. Increasing numbers of medical devices are in use, often in an aging population, and these devices are implanted against a background of increasing antibiotic-resistant bacterial populations. Progressively more antibiotic resistant infections, requiring ever more refined treatment options, are therefore predicted to emerge with greater frequency in the coming decades. Improvements in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of these device-associated infections will remain priority targets both for clinicians and the translational research community charged with addressing these challenges. Preclinical strategies, predictive of ultimate clinical efficacy, should serve as a control point for effective translation of new technologies to clinical applications. The development of new anti-infective medical devices requires a validated preclinical testing protocol; however, reliable validation of experimental and preclinical antimicrobial methodologies currently suffers from a variety of technical limitations. These include the lack of agreement or standardisation of experimental protocols, a general lack of correlation between in vitro and in vivo preclinical results and lack of validation between in vivo preclinical implant infection models and clinical (human) results. Device-associated infections pose additional challenges to practicing clinicians concerning diagnosis and treatment, both of which are complicated by the biofilms formed on the medical device. The critical challenges facing both preclinical research and clinical laboratories in improving both diagnosis and treatment of medical device-associated infections are the focus of this review. PMID:25214018

  11. Changes in heart rate variability associated with acute alcohol consumption: current knowledge and implications for practice and research.

    PubMed

    Romanowicz, Magdalena; Schmidt, John E; Bostwick, John M; Mrazek, David A; Karpyak, Victor M

    2011-06-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with a broad array of physiologic and behavioral effects including changes in heart rate. However, the physiologic mechanisms of alcohol effects and the reasons for individual differences in the cardiac response remain unknown. Measuring changes in resting heart rate (measured as beats/min) has not been found to be as sensitive to alcohol's effects as changes in heart rate variability (HRV). HRV is defined as fluctuations in interbeat interval length which reflect the heart's response to extracardiac factors that affect heart rate. HRV allows simultaneous assessment of both sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and the interplay between them. Increased HRV has been associated with exercise and aerobic fitness, while decreased HRV has been associated with aging, chronic stress, and a wide variety of medical and psychiatric disorders. Decreased HRV has predictive value for mortality in general population samples and patients with myocardial infarction and used as an indicator of altered autonomic function. A significant inverse correlation was found between HRV and both the severity of depression and the duration of the depressive episode. HRV analysis provides insights into mechanisms of autonomic regulation and is extensively used to clarify relationships between depression and cardiovascular disease. This article will review the methodology of HRV measurements and contemporary knowledge about effects of acute alcohol consumption on HRV. Potential implications of this research include HRV response to alcohol that could serve as a marker for susceptibility to alcoholism. At present however there is almost no research data supporting this hypothesis. PMID:21332532

  12. Ten Years A-Talking! Reflecting on the Role of the EERA Council from the Perspective of National Educational Research Associations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hara, Joe; Holm, Gunilla

    2014-01-01

    Drawing on their personal experiences, the authors reflect on the relationship between the European Educational Research Association (EERA) Council and the National Educational Research Associations (NERAs). The article will argue that while much of the work undertaken by the EERA Council is hugely valuable, at times it can be difficult to see a…

  13. Issues in collecting, processing and storing human tissues and associated information to support biomedical research

    PubMed Central

    Grizzle, William E.; Bell, Walter C.; Sexton, Katherine C.

    2012-01-01

    The availability of human tissues to support biomedical research is critical to advance translational research focused on identifying and characterizing approaches to individualized (personalized) medical care. Providing such tissues relies on three acceptable models – a tissue banking model, a prospective collection model and a combination of these two models. An unacceptable model is the “catch as catch can” model in which tissues are collected, processed and stored without goals or a plan or without standard operating procedures, i.e., portions of tissues are collected as available and processed and stored when time permits. In the tissue banking model, aliquots of tissues are collected according to SOPs. Usually specific sizes and types of tissues are collected and processed (e.g., 0.1 gm of breast cancer frozen in OCT). Using the banking model, tissues may be collected that may not be used and/or do not meet specific needs of investigators; however, at the time of an investigator request, tissues are readily available as is clinical information including clinical outcomes. In the model of prospective collection, tissues are collected based upon investigator requests including specific requirements of investigators. For example, the investigator may request that two 0.15 gm matching aliquots of breast cancer be minced while fresh, put in RPMI media with and without fetal calf serum, cooled to 4°C and shipped to the investigator on wet ice. Thus, the tissues collected prospectively meet investigator needs, all collected specimens are utilized and storage of specimens is minimized; however, investigators must wait until specimens are collected, and if needed, for clinical outcome. The operation of any tissue repository requires well trained and dedicated personnel. A quality assurance program is required which provides quality control information on the diagnosis of a specimen that is matched specifically to the specimen provided to an investigator instead

  14. Field support, data analysis and associated research for the acoustic grenade sounding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, T. G.; Bullard, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Temperature and horizontal winds in the 30 to 90 km altitude range of the upper atmosphere, were determined by acoustic grenade soundings conducted at Wallops Island, Virginia and Kourou, French Guiana. Field support provided at these locations included deployment of the large area microphone system, supervision, maintenance and operation of sound ranging stations; and coordination of activities. Data analysis efforts included the analysis of field data to determine upper atmospheric meteorological parameters. Profiles for upper atmospheric temperature, wind and density are provided in plots and tables for each of the acoustic grenade soundings conducted during the contract period. Research efforts were directed toward a systematic comparison of temperature data from acoustic grenade with other meteorological sensor probes in the upper atmosphere.

  15. [Research progress on genotype and genotype-associated pathogenesis of Toxoplasma gondii].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Shen, Ji-Long

    2013-08-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a disease caused by the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii, which is widely prevalent in animals and human throughout the world. It causes serious harm to human health and the development of animal husbandry. T. gondii isolates were considered a single species without geographical boundaries. However, high diversity has been revealed within and between T. gondii populations collected from around the world defined by the multi-locus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE), polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) or microsatellite analysis. Different strains of T. gondii may exhibit differences in virulence to mice. This paper summarizes the research progress on the genotypes from T. gondii isolates in different geographic regions around the world, and the relationship between genotype and virulence of T. gondii. PMID:24812887

  16. SU-E-J-24: An Evaluation of the Stability of Image Quality Parameters of Varian On-Board Imaging (OBI) and EPID Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, D; Papanikolaou, N; Gutierrez, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Quality assurance of the image quality for image guided localization systems is crucial to ensure accurate visualization and localization of target volumes. In this study, the long term stability of selected image parameters was assessed and evaluated for CBCT mode, planar radiographic kV mode and the radiographic MV EPID mode. Methods: The CATPHAN, QckV-1 and QC-3 phantoms were used to evaluate the image quality parameters. The planar radiographic images were analyzed in PIPSpro™ with spatial resolution (f30, f40, f50) being recorded. For OBI CBCT, High quality head Full-Fan acquisition and Pelvis Half-Fan acquisition modes were evaluated for Uniformity, Noise, Spatial Resolution, HU constancy and geometric distortion. Dose and kVp for the OBI were recorded using the Unfors RaySafe Xi system with the R/F High Detector for planar kV and the CT detector for CBCT. Dose for the MV EPID was recorded using a PTW975 Semiflex Ion Chamber, PTW Unidos electrometer and SolidWater™. Results: For each metric, values were normalized to the mean and the standard deviations were recorded. For the planar radiographic spatial resolution the f30, f40, f50 were 0.015, 0.008, 0.004 and 0.006, 0.009, 0.018 for the kV and MV, respectively. The standard deviation of the dose for kV was 0.010 and 0.005 for the MV. The standard deviations for Full and half fan were averaged together and the following standard deviations for each metric were recorded: 0.075(uniformity), 0.071(noise), 0.006(AP-Geometric Distortion), 0.005(LAT-Geometric Distortion), 0.058(mean slice thickness), 0.098(f30),0.101(f40),0.124(f50), 0.031(Lung/PMP-HU constancy), 0.063(Water/poly-HU constancy), 0.015(Bone/Derlin-HU constancy),0.006(Dose-Center), 0.004(Dose-Periphery). Using these, tolerances can be reported as a warning and action threshold of 1σ and 2σ. Conclusion: A study was performed to assess the stability of the basic image quality parameters recommended by TG-142 for the Varian OBI and EPID

  17. SU-E-T-562: Scanned Percent Depth Dose Curve Discrepancy for Photon Beams with Physical Wedge in Place (Varian IX) Using Different Sensitive Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, H; Sarkar, V; Rassiah-Szegedi, P; Huang, Y; Szegedi, M; Huang, L; Salter, B

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate and report the discrepancy of scanned percent depth dose (PDD) for photon beams with physical wedge in place when using ion chambers with different sensitive volumes. Methods/Materials: PDD curves of open fields and physical wedged fields (15, 30, 45, and 60 degree wedge) were scanned for photon beams (6MV and 10MV, Varian iX) with field size of 5x5 and 10x10 cm using three common scanning chambers with different sensitive volumes - PTW30013 (0.6cm3), PTW23323 (0.1cm3) and Exradin A16 (0.007cm3). The scanning system software used was OmniPro version 6.2, and the scanning water tank was the Scanditronix Wellhoffer RFA 300.The PDD curves from the three chambers were compared. Results: Scanned PDD curves of the same energy beams for open fields were almost identical between three chambers, but the wedged fields showed non-trivial differences. The largest differences were observed between chamber PTW30013 and Exradin A16. The differences increased as physical wedge angle increased. The differences also increased with depth, and were more pronounced for 6MV beam. Similar patterns were shown for both 5x5 and 10x10 cm field sizes. For open fields, all PDD values agreed with each other within 1% at 10cm depth and within 1.62% at 20 cm depth. For wedged fields, the difference of PDD values between PTW30013 and A16 reached 4.09% at 10cm depth, and 5.97% at 20 cm depth for 6MV with 60 degree physical wedge. Conclusion: We observed a significant difference in scanned PDD curves of photon beams with physical wedge in place obtained when using different sensitive volume ion chambers. The PDD curves scanned with the smallest sensitive volume ion chamber showed significant difference from larger chamber results, beyond 10cm depth. We believe this to be caused by varying response to beam hardening by the wedges.

  18. SU-E-J-28: Gantry Speed Significantly Affects Image Quality and Imaging Dose for 4D Cone-Beam Computed Tomography On the Varian Edge Platform

    SciTech Connect

    Santoso, A; Song, K; Gardner, S; Chetty, I; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 4D-CBCT facilitates assessment of tumor motion at treatment position. We investigated the effect of gantry speed on 4D-CBCT image quality and dose using the Varian Edge On-Board Imager (OBI). Methods: A thoracic protocol was designed using a 125 kVp spectrum. Image quality parameters were obtained via 4D acquisition using a Catphan phantom with a gating system. A sinusoidal waveform was executed with a five second period and superior-inferior motion. 4D-CBCT scans were sorted into 4 and 10 phases. Image quality metrics included spatial resolution, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), uniformity index (UI), Hounsfield unit (HU) sensitivity, and RMS error (RMSE) of motion amplitude. Dosimetry was accomplished using Gafchromic XR-QA2 films within a CIRS Thorax phantom. This was placed on the gating phantom using the same motion waveform. Results: High contrast resolution decreased linearly from 5.93 to 4.18 lp/cm, 6.54 to 4.18 lp/cm, and 5.19 to 3.91 lp/cm for averaged, 4 phase, and 10 phase 4DCBCT volumes respectively as gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. CNRs decreased linearly from 4.80 to 1.82 as the gantry speed increased from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec, respectively. No significant variations in UIs, HU sensitivities, or RMSEs were observed with variable gantry speed. Ion chamber measurements compared to film yielded small percent differences in plastic water regions (0.1–9.6%), larger percent differences in lung equivalent regions (7.5–34.8%), and significantly larger percent differences in bone equivalent regions (119.1–137.3%). Ion chamber measurements decreased from 17.29 to 2.89 cGy with increasing gantry speed from 1.0 to 6.0 degs/sec. Conclusion: Maintaining technique factors while changing gantry speed changes the number of projections used for reconstruction. Increasing the number of projections by decreasing gantry speed decreases noise, however, dose is increased. The future of 4DCBCT’s clinical utility relies on further

  19. SU-E-J-155: Utilizing Varian TrueBeam Developer Mode for the Quantification of Mechanical Limits and the Simulation of 4D Respiratory Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Moseley, D; Dave, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Use Varian TrueBeam Developer mode to quantify the mechanical limits of the couch and to simulate 4D respiratory motion. Methods: An in-house MATLAB based GUI was created to make the BEAM XML files. The couch was moved in a triangular wave in the S/I direction with varying amplitudes (1mm, 5mm, 10mm, and 50mm) and periods (3s, 6s, and 9s). The periods were determined by specifying the speed. The theoretical positions were compared to the values recorded by the machine at 50 Hz. HD videos were taken for certain tests as external validation. 4D Respiratory motion was simulated by an A/P MV beam being delivered while the couch moved in an elliptical manner. The ellipse had a major axis of 2 cm (S/I) and a minor axis of 1 cm (A/P). Results: The path planned by the TrueBeam deviated from the theoretical triangular form as the speed increased. Deviations were noticed starting at a speed of 3.33 cm/s (50mm amplitude, 6s period). The greatest deviation occurred in the 50mm- 3s sequence with a correlation value of −0.13 and a 27% time increase; the plan essentially became out of phase. Excluding these two, the plans had correlation values of 0.99. The elliptical sequence effectively simulated a respiratory pattern with a period of 6s. The period could be controlled by changing the speeds or the dose rate. Conclusion: The work first shows the quantification of the mechanical limits of the couch and the speeds at which the proposed plans begin to deviate. These limits must be kept in mind when programming other couch sequences. The methodology can be used to quantify the limits of other axes. Furthermore, the work shows the possibility of creating 4D respiratory simulations without using specialized phantoms or motion-platforms. This can be further developed to program patient-specific breathing patterns.

  20. Recent advances in globin research using genome-wide association studies and gene editing.

    PubMed

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2016-03-01

    A long-sought goal in the hemoglobin field has been an improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the switch from fetal (HbF) to adult (HbA) hemoglobin during development. With such knowledge, the hope is that strategies for directed reactivation of HbF in adults could be devised as an approach to therapy for the β-hemoglobinopathies thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) led to identification of three loci (BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB, and the β-globin cluster itself) in which natural genetic variation is correlated with different HbF levels in populations. Here, the central role of BCL11A in control of HbF is reviewed from the perspective of how findings may be translated to gene therapy in the not-too-distant future. This summary traces the evolution of recent studies from the initial recognition of BCL11A through GWAS to identification of critical sequences in an enhancer required for its erythroid-specific expression, thereby highlighting an Achilles heel for genome editing. PMID:26866328

  1. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2006-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by quality-control failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen expressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:16910351

  2. Benefits and concerns associated with biotechnology-derived foods: can additional research reduce children health risks?

    PubMed

    Cantani, A

    2009-01-01

    The development of techniques devised for the genetic manipulation of foods poses new risks for children with food allergy (FA). The introduction of foreign allergenic proteins from different foods into previously tolerated foods may trigger allergic reactions, often complicating with anaphylactic shock in a subset of allergic babies. Children with FA, even if subjected to preventative diets, always challenge the risk of developing allergic manifestations after unintentional intake of a non tolerated food in restaurant settings, with relatives or schoolmates, etc, where product labelling is necessarily lacking. The introduction of potentially allergenic proteins into foods generally considered safe for allergic children can be done deliberately, by either substantially altering the food ingredients, or by genetic manipulation which change the composition or transfer allergens, or unintentionally by qualitycontrol failures, due to contaminations in the production process, or to genetic mismanipulation. There is a controversy between multinationals often favored by governments and consumer association resistance, thus an equidistant analysis poses some unprecedented impediments. The importance of FA and the potential of transgenic plants to bring food allergens into the food supply should not be disregarded. The expression in soybeans of a Brazil nut protein resulted in a food allergen ex-pressed in widely used infant formulas, so paving the way to an often reported multinational debacle. Genetic engineering poses innovative ethical and social concerns, as well as serious challenges to the environment, human health, animal welfare, and the future of agriculture. In this paper will be emphasized practical concepts more crucial for pediatricians. PMID:19364084

  3. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Their Role in Gynecological Cancers: Accelerating Translational Research by Novel High-Throughput Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Fedier, Andre; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2012-01-01

    Glycans are important partners in many biological processes, including carcinogenesis. The rapidly developing field of functional glycomics becomes one of the frontiers of biology and biomedicine. Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids occurs commonly during malignant transformation and leads to the expression of specific tumor-associated glycans. The appearance of aberrant glycans on carcinoma cells is typically associated with grade, invasion, metastasis and overall poor prognosis. Cancer-associated carbohydrates are mostly located on the surface of cancer cells and are therefore potential diagnostic biomarkers. Currently, there is increasing interest in cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, with growing numbers of characteristic cancer targets being detected every day. Breast and ovarian cancer are the most common and lethal malignancies in women, respectively, and potential glycan biomarkers hold promise for early detection and targeted therapies. However, the acceleration of research and comprehensive multi-target investigation of cancer-specific glycans could only be successfully achieved with the help of a combination of novel high-throughput glycomic approaches. PMID:24957768

  4. Research

    SciTech Connect

    1999-10-01

    Subjects covered in this section are: (1) PCAST panel promotes energy research cooperation; (2) Letter issued by ANS urges funding balance in FFTF restart consideration and (3) FESAC panel releases report on priorities and balance.

  5. Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathematics Teaching, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Implications for teachers from Piagetian-oriented piagetian-oriented research on problem solving reported in an article by Eleanor Duckworth are presented. Edward de Bono's Children Solve Problems,'' a collection of examples, is also discussed. (MS)

  6. Physiological Effects Associated with Quinoa Consumption and Implications for Research Involving Humans: a Review.

    PubMed

    Simnadis, Thomas George; Tapsell, Linda C; Beck, Eleanor J

    2015-09-01

    Quinoa is a pseudo-grain consumed as a dietary staple in South America. In recent years, consumer demand for quinoa in the developed world has grown steadily. Its perceived health benefits have been cited as a driving force behind this trend, but there are very few human studies investigating the impact of quinoa consumption. The aim of this review was to identify physiological effects of quinoa consumption with potential for human health. A critical evaluation of animal model studies was conducted. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a methodological quality assessment tool and summative conclusions were drawn to guide the direction of future human research. The majority of studies were of fair quality. Purported physiological effects of quinoa consumption included decreased weight gain, improved lipid profile and improved capacity to respond to oxidative stress. These physiological effects were attributed to the presence of saponins, protein and 20-hydroxyecdysone in the quinoa seed. The implications of these findings are that human studies should investigate the impact of quinoa consumption on weight gain and lipid levels. The role of quinoa as an antioxidant is still unclear and requires further elucidation in animal models. PMID:26249220

  7. American Association of Orthodontists Foundation Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection: Overview of a powerful tool for orthodontic research and teaching.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, Sheldon; Curry, Sean

    2015-08-01

    This article reports on the current status of the American Association of Orthodontists Foundation (AAOF) Craniofacial Growth Legacy Collection--an AAOF-supported multi-institutional project that uses the Internet and cloud computing to collect and share craniofacial images and data for orthodontic research and education. The project gives investigators and clinicians all over the world online access to longitudinal information on craniofacial development in untreated children with malocclusions of various types. It also is a unique source of control samples for testing the validity of consensually accepted beliefs about the effects of orthodontic treatment or of failure to treat. PMID:26232829

  8. SU-E-T-109: Development of An End-To-End Test for the Varian TrueBeamtm with a Novel Multiple-Dosimetric Modality H and N Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Zakjevskii, V; Knill, C; Rakowski, J; Snyder, M

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive end-to-end test for Varian's TrueBeam linear accelerator for head and neck IMRT using a custom phantom designed to utilize multiple dosimetry devices. Methods: The initial end-to-end test and custom H and N phantom were designed to yield maximum information in anatomical regions significant to H and N plans with respect to: i) geometric accuracy, ii) dosimetric accuracy, and iii) treatment reproducibility. The phantom was designed in collaboration with Integrated Medical Technologies. A CT image was taken with a 1mm slice thickness. The CT was imported into Varian's Eclipse treatment planning system, where OARs and the PTV were contoured. A clinical template was used to create an eight field static gantry angle IMRT plan. After optimization, dose was calculated using the Analytic Anisotropic Algorithm with inhomogeneity correction. Plans were delivered with a TrueBeam equipped with a high definition MLC. Preliminary end-to-end results were measured using film and ion chambers. Ion chamber dose measurements were compared to the TPS. Films were analyzed with FilmQAPro using composite gamma index. Results: Film analysis for the initial end-to-end plan with a geometrically simple PTV showed average gamma pass rates >99% with a passing criterion of 3% / 3mm. Film analysis of a plan with a more realistic, ie. complex, PTV yielded pass rates >99% in clinically important regions containing the PTV, spinal cord and parotid glands. Ion chamber measurements were on average within 1.21% of calculated dose for both plans. Conclusion: trials have demonstrated that our end-to-end testing methods provide baseline values for the dosimetric and geometric accuracy of Varian's TrueBeam system.

  9. Comparison between an in-house 1D profile correction method and a 2D correction provided in Varian's PDPC Package for improving the accuracy of portal dosimetry images.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Maritza A; Davis, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    While commissioning Varian's Portal Dose Image Prediction (PDIP) algorithm for portal dosimetry, an asymmetric radial response in the portal imager due to backscatter from the support arm was observed. This asymmetric response led to differences on the order of 2%-3% for simple square fields (< 20 × 20 cm2) when comparing the measured to predicted portal fluences. A separate problem was that discrepancies of up to 10% were seen in measured to predicted portal fluences at increasing off-axis distance (> 10 cm). We have modified suggested methods from the literature to provide a 1D correction for the off-axis response problem which adjusts the diagonal profile used in the portal imager calibration. This inherently cannot fix the 2D problem since the PDIP algorithm assumes a radially symmetric response and will lead to some uncertainty in portal dosimetry results. Varian has recently released generic "2D correction" files with their Portal Dosimetry Pre-configuration (PDPC) package, but no independent testing has been published. We present the comparison between QA results using the Varian correction method to results using our 1D profile correction method using the gamma passing rates with a 3%, 3 mm criterion. The average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates for nine fixed-field IMRT fields at gantry 0° using our profile correction method were 98.1%, 93.7%, and 99.8%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 98.4%, 93.1%, and 99.8%. For four RapidArc fields, the average, minimum, and maximum gamma pass rates using our correction method were 99.6%, 99.4%, and 99.9%, respectively, while the results using the PDPC correction method were 99.8%, 99.5%, and 99.9%. The average gamma pass rates for both correction methods are quite similar, but both show improvement over the uncorrected results. PMID:26103173

  10. Tohoku Earthquake-associated Marine Sciences: the research project for the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazato, Hiroshi; Kijima, Akihiro; Kogure, Kazuhiro; Hara, Motoyuki; Nagata, Toshi; Fujikura, Kasunori; Sonoda, Akira

    2015-04-01

    At 2:46 pm on March 11, 2011, a huge earthquake (M 9.0) occurred off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Region, Japan. The subsequent Tsunamis hit the coasts and seriously damaged fishing villages and towns in the area. Tohoku Region faces Northwestern Pacific where is one of the most productive oceans on the Earth. Then, what happened to the marine ecosystems in the Tohoku Region? What happened to the fishery bioresources? What is the mechanism to sustain high productivity in the Region? Is the ecosystem restoring after 4 years? What is required for the recovery of fisheries in the area? In order to answer these questions, the 10 years research project, TEAMS (Tohoku Ecosystem-Associated Marine Sciences) was launched in January 2012 funded by MEXT (Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan) to conduct comprehensive research on the area. Tohoku University (TU), Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, the University of Tokyo (AORIUT), Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), and 25 other institutions are conducting research for this project in close association with local government and fishery people. Currently, approximately 400 people (200 scientists, 160 students and others) covering physical, chemical, biological, and geological sciences including modeling take part in the project from all over Japan. MEXT also supports TEAMS by constructing R/V Shinsei Maru in 2013 for the oceanic investigations in the region. In this report, the overview of the ecosystem before and after the disaster, major findings and challenges of TEAMS will be described.

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (24th, Biloxi, Mississippi, November 8-10, 1995).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; And Others

    The Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA), organized in 1972, is a nonprofit organization with the purposes of encouraging quality educational research in the mid-South and promoting the application of the results of quality educational research in the schools. This volume contains abstracts of more than 300 discussion papers,…

  12. Institutional Research and Planning in the Next Decade. Proceedings from the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (10th, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 16-18, 1983). Tenth Anniversary Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1983 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research are presented. The contribution of institutional research to university decision making and the topics of student outcomes assessment, retention/attrition studies, marketing/market research, departmental studies, computer and technological applications, and…

  13. Environment-wide association study (EWAS) for type 2 diabetes in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank.

    PubMed

    Hall, Molly A; Dudek, Scott M; Goodloe, Robert; Crawford, Dana C; Pendergrass, Sarah A; Peissig, Peggy; Brilliant, Murray; McCarty, Catherine A; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2014-01-01

    Environment-wide association studies (EWAS) provide a way to uncover the environmental mechanisms involved in complex traits in a high-throughput manner. Genome-wide association studies have led to the discovery of genetic variants associated with many common diseases but do not take into account the environmental component of complex phenotypes. This EWAS assesses the comprehensive association between environmental variables and the outcome of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the Marshfield Personalized Medicine Research Project Biobank (Marshfield PMRP). We sought replication in two National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). The Marshfield PMRP currently uses four tools for measuring environmental exposures and outcome traits: 1) the PhenX Toolkit includes standardized exposure and phenotypic measures across several domains, 2) the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ) is a food frequency questionnaire, 3) the Measurement of a Person's Habitual Physical Activity scores the level of an individual's physical activity, and 4) electronic health records (EHR) employs validated algorithms to establish T2D case-control status. Using PLATO software, 314 environmental variables were tested for association with T2D using logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, and BMI in over 2,200 European Americans. When available, similar variables were tested with the same methods and adjustment in samples from NHANES III and NHANES 1999-2002. Twelve and 31 associations were identified in the Marshfield samples at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively. Seven and 13 measures replicated in at least one of the NHANES at p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively, with the same direction of effect. The most significant environmental exposures associated with T2D status included decreased alcohol use as well as increased smoking exposure in childhood and adulthood. The results demonstrate the utility of the EWAS method and survey tools for identifying environmental components of complex diseases

  14. SU-E-J-47: Comparison of Online Image Registrations of Varian TrueBeam Cone-Beam CT and BrainLab ExacTrac Imaging Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J; Shi, W; Andrews, D; Werner-Wasik, M; Yu, Y; Liu, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose To compare online image registrations of TrueBeam cone-beam CT (CBCT) and BrainLab ExacTrac imaging systems. Methods Tests were performed on a Varian TrueBeam STx linear accelerator (Version 2.0), which is integrated with a BrainLab ExacTrac imaging system (Version 6.0.5). The study was focused on comparing the online image registrations for translational shifts. A Rando head phantom was placed on treatment couch and immobilized with a BrainLab mask. The phantom was shifted by moving the couch translationally for 8 mm with a step size of 1 mm, in vertical, longitudinal, and lateral directions, respectively. At each location, the phantom was imaged with CBCT and ExacTrac x-ray. CBCT images were registered with TrueBeam and ExacTrac online registration algorithms, respectively. And ExacTrac x-ray image registrations were performed. Shifts calculated from different registrations were compared with nominal couch shifts. Results The averages and ranges of absolute differences between couch shifts and calculated phantom shifts obtained from ExacTrac x-ray registration, ExacTrac CBCT registration with default window, ExaxTrac CBCT registration with adjusted window (bone), Truebeam CBCT registration with bone window, and Truebeam CBCT registration with soft tissue window, were: 0.07 (0.02–0.14), 0.14 (0.01–0.35), 0.12 (0.02–0.28), 0.09 (0–0.20), and 0.06 (0–0.10) mm, in vertical direction; 0.06 (0.01–0.12), 0.27 (0.07–0.57), 0.23 (0.02–0.48), 0.04 (0–0.10), and 0.08 (0– 0.20) mm, in longitudinal direction; 0.05 (0.01–0.21), 0.35 (0.14–0.80), 0.25 (0.01–0.56), 0.19 (0–0.40), and 0.20 (0–0.40) mm, in lateral direction. Conclusion The shifts calculated from ExacTrac x-ray and TrueBeam CBCT registrations were close to each other (the differences between were less than 0.40 mm in any direction), and had better agreements with couch shifts than those from ExacTrac CBCT registrations. There were no significant differences between True

  15. Gateways, Gatekeepres, and Roles in the Information Omniverse. Proceedings of the Symposium of the Association of Research Libraries and Association of American University Presses (3rd, Washington, D.C., November 13-15, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okerson, Ann, Ed.; Mogge, Dru, Ed.

    This volume contains the proceedings of the third joint symposium of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) and the Association of American University Presses (AAUP). The following papers were presented: "Opening Remarks for the ARL-AAUP Symposium" (Lisa Freeman); the keynote address, "We're All in this Together, Aren't We?" (Bruce Sterling);…

  16. The evaluation of research papers in the XXI century. The Open Peer Discussion system of the World Economics Association

    PubMed Central

    Ietto-Gillies, Grazia

    2012-01-01

    The paper starts with a brief discussion of the traditional peer review (TPR) system of research evaluation, its role, and the criticisms levelled at it. An analysis of specific problems in economics leads to a full discussion of the Open Peer Review (OPR) system developed by the World Economics Association (WEA) and the principles behind it. The system is open in the following two respects: (a) disclosure of names of authors and reviewers; and (b) inclusivity of potential reviewers in terms of paradigmatic approaches, country, and community. The paper then discusses the applicability of the same system to other disciplines. In doing so, it stressed the aims of various evaluation systems and the possible pitfalls of rating systems. It also speculates on the future of journal publication. PMID:22891057

  17. A research synthesis of therapeutic interventions for whiplash-associated disorder: Part 1 – overview and summary

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W; McClure, J Andrew; Walton, David; Pretty, Jason; Salter, Katherine; Meyer, Matthew; Sequeira, Keith; Death, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a significant public health problem, resulting in a substantial socioeconomic burden throughout the industrialized world, wherever costs are documented. While many treatments have been advocated for patients with WAD, scientific evidence of their effectiveness is often lacking. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the strength of evidence supporting various WAD therapies. Multiple databases (including Web of Science, EMBASE and PubMed) were searched to identify all studies published from January 1980 through March 2009 that evaluated the effectiveness of any clearly defined treatment for acute (less than two weeks), subacute (two to 12 weeks) or chronic (longer than 12 weeks) WAD. The present article, the first in a five-part series, provides an overview of the review methodology as well as a summary and discussion of the review’s main findings. Eighty-three studies met the inclusion criteria, 40 of which were randomized controlled trials. The majority of studies (n=47) evaluated treatments initiated in the chronic stage of the disorder, while 23 evaluated treatments for acute WAD and 13 assessed therapies for subacute WAD. Exercise and mobilization programs for acute and chronic WAD had the strongest supporting evidence, although many questions remain regarding the relative effectiveness of various protocols. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support any treatment for subacute WAD. For patients with chronic WAD who do not respond to conventional treatments, it appears that radiofrequency neurotomy may be the most effective treatment option. The present review found a relatively weak but growing research base on which one could make recommendations for patients at any stage of the WAD continuum. Further research is needed to determine which treatments are most effective at reducing the disabling symptoms associated with WAD. PMID:21038007

  18. Associations Between Rate of Force Development Metrics and Throwing Velocity in Elite Team Handball Players: a Short Research Report

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Mário C.; Saavedra, Francisco J.; Abrantes, Catarina; Aidar, Felipe J.

    2011-01-01

    Performance assessment has become an invaluable component of monitoring participant’s development in distinct sports, yet limited and contradictory data are available in trained subjects. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between ball throwing velocity during a 3-step running throw in elite team handball players and selected measures of rate of force development like force, power, velocity, and bar displacement during a concentric only bench press exercise in elite male handball players. Fitteen elite senior male team handball players volunteered to participate. Each volunteer had power and bar velocity measured during a concentric only bench press test with 25, 35, and 45 kg as well as having one-repetition maximum strength determined. Ball throwing velocity was evaluated with a standard 3-step running throw using a radar gun. The results of this study indicated significant associations between ball velocity and time at maximum rate of force development (0, 66; p<0.05) and rate of force development at peak force (0,56; p<0.05) only with 25kg load. The current research indicated that ball velocity was only median associated with maximum rate of force development with light loads. A training regimen designed to improve ball-throwing velocity in elite male team handball players should emphasize bench press movement using light loads. PMID:23487363

  19. A Review of Research on Health Outcomes for Workers, Home and Host Communities of Population Mobility Associated with Extractive Industries.

    PubMed

    Carney, Jason G; Gushulak, Brian D

    2016-06-01

    With a growing awareness of the association between extractive industries, the nature of work in remote locations, population mobility and health status, there is a need to advance an evidence-based approach to ensuring the health of migrant and mobile populations, and the home and host communities with whom they interact. Through a narrative synthesis of peer-reviewed and grey literature, this review examines what is known, and the nature of research activity concerning the range of health impacts determined by the social conditions inherent with population mobility alongside mining and extractive industries; and the extent to which health outcomes impact on workers, and home and host communities. While much of the literature reviewed in the study considered health in a traditional disease or illness based approach, it is clear that many risk factors for the health of mobile workers in the sector reflect broader social determinants. To support the mitigation of individual and population vulnerability to infectious disease endemics, consideration of both the etiology and the social conditions that give rise to adverse health outcomes is required, including an improvement to workers' living conditions, the expansion of diagnostic and medical services, and an approach that ensures the right to health for mobile populations. To further improve upon the rich body of research, resources are required to implement robust data collection including epidemiological surveillance, outbreak monitoring and investigation, and the long term tracking of standardized health information at both origin locations and destination communities. PMID:26902231

  20. Guide to the assessment of physical activity: Clinical and research applications: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Strath, Scott J; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Ekelund, Ulf; Freedson, Patty S; Gary, Rebecca A; Richardson, Caroline R; Smith, Derek T; Swartz, Ann M

    2013-11-12

    The deleterious health consequences of physical inactivity are vast, and they are of paramount clinical and research importance. Risk identification, benchmarks, efficacy, and evaluation of physical activity behavior change initiatives for clinicians and researchers all require a clear understanding of how to assess physical activity. In the present report, we have provided a clear rationale for the importance of assessing physical activity levels, and we have documented key concepts in understanding the different dimensions, domains, and terminology associated with physical activity measurement. The assessment methods presented allow for a greater understanding of the vast number of options available to clinicians and researchers when trying to assess physical activity levels in their patients or participants. The primary outcome desired is the main determining factor in the choice of physical activity assessment method. In combination with issues of feasibility/practicality, the availability of resources, and administration considerations, the desired outcome guides the choice of an appropriate assessment tool. The decision matrix, along with the accompanying tables, provides a mechanism for this selection that takes all of these factors into account. Clearly, the assessment method adopted and implemented will vary depending on circumstances, because there is no single best instrument appropriate for every situation. In summary, physical activity assessment should be considered a vital health measure that is tracked regularly over time. All other major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking) are assessed routinely. Physical activity status should also be assessed regularly. Multiple physical activity assessment methods provide reasonably accurate outcome measures, with choices dependent on setting-specific resources and constraints. The present scientific statement provides a guide to

  1. [Current modalities and concepts on access and use of biospecimen samples and associated data for research from human biobanks].

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Roman; Semler, Sebastian Claudius

    2016-03-01

    It is accepted worldwide that biospecimen and data sharing (BDS) play an essential role for the future of medical research to improve diagnostics and prognostics, e.g. by validated biomarkers. BDS is also pivotal to the development of new therapeutic treatments and for the improvement of population health. Human biobanks can generate an added value to this need by providing biospecimens and/or associated data to researchers. An inspection of several examples of epidemiological as well as clinical/disease-oriented biobanks in Germany shows that best practice procedures (BPP) that are internationally agreed on are being installed for biospecimen and/or data access. In general, fair access is aimed at requiring a written application by the requesting scientist, which is then peer-reviewed for scientific and ethical validity by the Biobank. Applied BPP take into account (i) patient education/agreement according to the informed consent model, (ii) privacy protection, (iii) intellectual property rights, the (iv) notification obligation of health-related findings (including incidental findings), the (v) use of material (MTA) and data transfer agreements (DTA) for mutual legal security, the avoidance of conflicts of interests, as well as for cost recovery/fee for service as a basis for sustainability of the biobank. BPP are rooted in the self-regulation efforts of life sciences and are supported by parent ethics committees in Germany. Central biobank registries displaying aggregated information on biospecimens stored and the research foci constitute an important tool to make biobanks that are scattered across the country visible to each other, and, can thus promote access to hitherto unknown biospecimen and data resources. PMID:26809822

  2. Renewing the ARL Agenda. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (125th, Washington, DC, October 19-21, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Jennifer, Ed.; Brennan, Patricia, Ed.

    The 125th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) reviewed the mission statement, goals, and objectives of the Association. Major themes from the review process included the effect of technology on access and preservation; the critical need to develop measures of library effectiveness and performance; and the importance of…

  3. Confronting the Challenges of the Digital Era. Proceedings of the Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (133rd, Washington, DC, October 14-16, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhalla, Nicole, Ed.; Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The 133rd meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on strategies for confronting critical challenges associated with the digital era and for fostering understanding from university leaders and supporters regarding the resources needed to perform successfully in this print plus digital environment. Program Session I,…

  4. The Joy of Teaching Literacy. The Thirty-Fourth Yearbook: A Double Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Morrision, Timothy, Ed.; Garza-Garcia, Lizabeth, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER) Yearbook, Volume 34, includes papers presented at the annual conference, which have gone through a double peer review process. It also includes the Presidential Address and the keynote addresses given at the conference. For ALER's 55th annual meeting, the Association of Literacy…

  5. The A.A.A.A. [American Association of Advertising Agencies] Educational Foundation Grants: Purpose, Results, Application; On the 22 Research Grants Awarded by the Foundation from 1968 through 1973, with Bibliographies of Published Material Which Resulted from the Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinkham, Spencer F.

    The Educational Foundation of the American Association of Advertising Agencies was established by the Association's board to foster the accomplishment of six major goals: to create a bridge between advertising and university research, to attract top young people to the study of advertising, to raise the academic stature of advertising, to enlarge…

  6. ARL Statistics, 2000-01: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Four Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Young, Mark, Comp.

    This document is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 123 members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Of these, 113 are university libraries; the remaining 10 are public, governmental, and private research libraries. ARL member libraries are the…

  7. ARL Statistics, 1999-2000: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Two Members of the Association of Research Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Young, Mark, Comp.

    This is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 122 member libraries of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Of these, 112 are universities libraries; the remaining 10 are public, governmental, and private research libraries. ARL member libraries are…

  8. Striving for Excellence. The International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America (Atlanta, Georgia, March 4-7, 1992). Research Poster Session Abstract. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Steven C., Comp.

    Eleven abstracts of research projects related to individuals with learning disabilities are compiled in this booklet. The research projects were presented in poster sessions at the March 1992 International Conference of the Learning Disabilities Association of America. Titles and authors of poster sessions include: "Perceptual and Verbal Skills of…

  9. ARL Statistics 2002-03: A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-Three Members of the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyrillidou, Martha, Comp.; Young, Mark, Comp.

    2004-01-01

    This document is the latest in a series of annual publications that describe collections, staffing, expenditures, and service activities for the 123 members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). Of these, 113 are university libraries, the remaining 10 are public, governmental, and nonprofit research libraries. Data reported by member…

  10. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Meeting, Abstracts of Presented Papers (59th, San Francisco, California, March 28-31, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.; Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    Abstracts of most of the papers, symposia, and poster sessions presented at the 59th conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST) are provided. Subject areas addressed include: instructional practices in secondary school science; research on computers in science learning; teacher's professional knowledge and…

  11. 1991 AAIR Forum. Refereed Proceedings of the Conference of the Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) (2nd, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia, October 1-3, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinburne Inst. of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria (Australia).

    The Australasian Association for Institutional Research (AAIR) conference provided a comprehensive coverage of issues, concepts, and techniques in the areas of planning, data analysis and research, and related aspects of management support in tertiary education. Refereed papers from the conference include: (1) "Changes in Student Approaches to…

  12. IFLA General Conference, 1985. International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) Round-Table on Access to Information in International Legal Research. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on international access to information pertaining to legal research, which were presented at the 1985 conference of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) include: (1) "Materials of European Intergovernmental Organizations and Their Accessibility through Available Research Tools" (Irene Berkey, Northwestern University…

  13. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. General Research Libraries Division: Parliamentary Libraries and National Libraries Sections (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gude, Gilbert; And Others

    This set of papers presented to the General Research Libraries Division of the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) during its 47th annual conference (1981) includes: "The Effect of the Introduction of Computers on Library and Research Staff," by Gilbert Gude; "Libraries as Information Service Agencies (IVS)," by Franz Georg…

  14. Energies for Transition. Proceedings of the National Conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries (4th, Baltimore, Maryland, April 9-12, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitecki, Danuta A., Ed.

    This proceedings of the 1986 conference of the Association of College and Research Libraries contains 60 papers--44 position papers, 7 research reports, and 9 idea briefs--dealing with the issue of transitions facing librarians and ways to respond to these transitions through both formal and informal means. Papers are organized under eight broad…

  15. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (31st, Orlando, FL, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    For the thirty-first year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. This year's Proceedings has two sections--Section 1 includes research and development papers and…

  16. Arts and Learning SIG Proceedings: American Educational Research Association Annual Meeting (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 23-27, 1984). Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koroscik, Judith S., Ed.; Barrett, Terry, Ed.

    Sixteen conference papers representing diverse topics concerning research in the arts and presented as part of the 1984 Arts and Learning Special Interest Group (SIG) program of the American Educational Research Association are presented in the second of two volumes. Papers presented include: "First Graders' Conversations about Art Making: Social…

  17. National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Conference, Abstracts of Presented Papers (61st, Lake of the Ozarks, MO, April 10-13, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blosser, Patricia E., Ed.; Helgeson, Stanley L., Ed.

    This document contains the abstracts of most of the papers, symposia and poster sessions presented at the 61st Annual Conference of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (NARST). Subject areas addressed include: teacher preparation, science, technology and society; classroom research; elementary science; process skills;…

  18. From Joint Experimentation to Laissez-Faire: Transdisciplinary Innovation Research for the Institutional Strengthening of a Water Users Association in Khorezm, Uzbekistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Djanibekov, Nodir; Hornidge, Anna-Katharina; Ul-Hassan, Mehmood

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This article assesses a participatory action and innovation research experience, in which project researchers, farmers and staff members of a local water users association (WUA) came together to: (a) jointly test and adapt a social mobilization and institutional strengthening approach according to the local context, and by doing so, to…

  19. Doing Institutional Research: A Focus on Professional Development. Papers from the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (9th, Durham, New Hampshire, October 17-19, 1982).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Diana M., Ed.

    Institutional research that focuses on professional development is addressed in 35 papers from the 1982 meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Titles and authors include the following: "Modeling College Student Adjustment and Retention for the Individual Institution" (Norman D. Aitken); "The Development Saga of an…

  20. Arts and Learning Research, 1996-1997. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (New York, New York, April 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.; Klein, Sheri R., Ed.

    1997-01-01

    The papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1996 meeting of the American Educational Research Association, mostly at programs of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group. Papers in the volume focus on research in the arts in the areas of profiles of learning and assessment (section 1), community-based art education (section 2),…

  1. Sailing into the New Millennium: Charting the Course for Institutional Research. North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference Proceedings (26th, Newport, Rhode Island, November 13-16, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings contains papers from the 1999 annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. The papers are: (1) "A Marketing Research Program for Commuter Colleges" (Michelle S. Appel and Craig A. Clagett); (2) "Where Do I Start? Determining Institutional Information Needs beyond Mandated Reporting" (Michelle S.…

  2. Arts and Learning Research, 1992-1993. The Journal of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, California, April 1992; Atlanta, Georgia, April 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Lorrie, Ed.; Morbey, Mary Leigh, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    The research papers gathered in this volume were presented at the 1992 and 1993 meetings of the American Educational Research Association most were part of the Arts and Learning Special Interest Group programs. Papers focus on the following themes: assessing student learning; women's movement in art education; and art education in various…

  3. Research in Science Education, 1994. Selected Refereed Papers from the Annual Conference of the Australasian Science Education Research Association (25th, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, July 10-13, 1994).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Paul L., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This volume contains 41 papers, 10 abstracts/research notes, and an after-dinner speech "The Book of Genesis and the Chronicles of the People of ASERA (Australasian Science Education Research Association). Paper titles include: "Improving students' understanding of carbohydrate metabolism in first-year Biochemistry at tertiary level"; "Students'…

  4. Research in Science Education, Volume 6. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (7th, The University of Newcastle, New South Wales, May 17-19, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddock, M. N., Ed.; Power, Colin N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the seventh Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association held at the University of Newcastle in May, 1976. Paper topics include: undergraduate research experience for future teachers, programmable calculator effects on attitude towards physics, development of science concepts…

  5. The Association between Four Citation Metrics and Peer Rankings of Research Influence of Australian Researchers in Six Fields of Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Derrick, Gemma Elizabeth; Haynes, Abby; Chapman, Simon; Hall, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    Doubt about the relevance, appropriateness and transparency of peer review has promoted the use of citation metrics as a viable adjunct or alternative in the assessment of research impact. It is also commonly acknowledged that research metrics will not replace peer review unless they are shown to correspond with the assessment of peers. This paper evaluates the relationship between researchers' influence as evaluated by their peers and various citation metrics representing different aspects of research output in 6 fields of public health in Australia. For four fields, the results showed a modest positive correlation between different research metrics and peer assessments of research influence. However, for two fields, tobacco and injury, negative or no correlations were found. This suggests a peer understanding of research influence within these fields differed from visibility in the mainstream, peer-reviewed scientific literature. This research therefore recommends the use of both peer review and metrics in a combined approach in assessing research influence. Future research evaluation frameworks intent on incorporating metrics should first analyse each field closely to determine what measures of research influence are valued highly by members of that research community. This will aid the development of comprehensive and relevant frameworks with which to fairly and transparently distribute research funds or approve promotion applications. PMID:21494691

  6. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief.

    PubMed

    Manning, Wendy D; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-08-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California's voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families. PMID:25018575

  7. Child Well-Being in Same-Sex Parent Families: Review of Research Prepared for American Sociological Association Amicus Brief

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.; Fettro, Marshal Neal; Lamidi, Esther

    2014-01-01

    Recent legal cases before the Supreme Court of the United States were challenging federal definitions of marriage created by the Defense of Marriage Act and California’s voter approved Proposition 8 which limited marriage to different-sex couples only. Social science literature regarding child well-being was being used within these cases, and the American Sociological Association sought to provide a concise evaluation of the literature through an amicus curiae brief. The authors were tasked in the assistance of this legal brief by reviewing literature regarding the well-being of children raised within same-sex parent families. This article includes our assessment of the literature, focusing on those studies, reviews and books published within the past decade. We conclude that there is a clear consensus in the social science literature indicating that American children living within same-sex parent households fare just, as well as those children residing within different-sex parent households over a wide array of well-being measures: academic performance, cognitive development, social development, psychological health, early sexual activity, and substance abuse. Our assessment of the literature is based on credible and methodologically sound studies that compare well-being outcomes of children residing within same-sex and different-sex parent families. Differences that exist in child well-being are largely due to socioeconomic circumstances and family stability. We discuss challenges and opportunities for new research on the well-being of children in same-sex parent families. PMID:25018575

  8. Poster — Thur Eve — 12: Implementation of a Clinical Lung Tumour High Dose Containment Verification Procedure using Respiratory Cone-Beam CT (4DCBCT) on a Varian TrueBeam Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, J.; Bergman, A.

    2014-08-15

    Lung tumours move due to respiratory motion. This is managed during planning by acquiring a 4DCT and capturing the excursion of the GTV (gross tumour volume) throughout the breathing cycle within an IGTV (Internal Gross Tumour Volume) contour. Patients undergo a verification cone-beam CT (CBCT) scan immediately prior to treatment. 3D reconstructed images do not consider tumour motion, resulting in image artefacts, such as blurring. This may lead to difficulty in identifying the tumour on reconstructed images. It would be valuable to create a 4DCBCT reconstruction of the tumour motion to confirm that does indeed remain within the planned IGTV. CBCT projections of a Quasar Respiratory Motion Phantom are acquired in Treatment mode (half-fan scan) on a Varian TrueBeam accelerator. This phantom contains a mobile, low-density lung insert with an embedded 3cm diameter tumour object. It is programmed to create a 15s periodic, 2cm (sup/inf) displacement. A Varian Real-time Position Management (RPM) tracking-box is placed on the phantom breathing platform. Breathing phase information is automatically integrated into the projection image files. Using in-house Matlab programs and RTK (Reconstruction Tool Kit) open-source toolboxes, the projections are re-binned into 10 phases and a 4DCBCT scan reconstructed. The planning IGTV is registered to the 4DCBCT and the tumour excursion is verified to remain within the planned contour. This technique successfully reconstructs 4DCBCT images using clinical modes for a breathing phantom. UBC-BCCA ethics approval has been obtained to perform 4DCBCT reconstructions on lung patients (REB#H12-00192). Clinical images will be accrued starting April 2014.

  9. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. Education and Research Division: Library Theory and Research Section (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolodziejska, Jadwiga; And Others

    Seven of these ten papers are concerned with library research in specific countries; the remaining three deal with library planning and ethics in research. Titles are "The Library as a Cultural Institution," by Jadwiga Kolodziejska, Poland; "The International Seminar 'Book and Library in Society' of the Polish Book and Readers Institute and the…

  10. Comments on integrating person-centered and variable-centered research on problems associated with the use of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Horn, J L

    2000-06-01

    For any sample of m different variables obtained on a sample of n different persons, there is an identity transformation between classifications of persons (types) that are defined with person-centered methods and classifications of variables (factors) defined with variable-centered methods: types are manifested in factors and factors are expressed in types. Both kinds of methods analyze the variability-the same variability-in a persons-by-variables data matrix. Person-centered types can be transformed into variable-centered factors. Thus, at a basic level there is a basis for integrating person-centered and variable-centered research. But there are many different ways to implement person-centered methods, just as there are many different ways to resolve variables into factors, and generally any model for analysis directed at identifying types will not be the complement of a model selected for analysis leading to factors. Thus, while the results from the two kinds of analysis can be related to one another, the results they produce in applications can be quite different. Also, in practice, one method is used before the other. For example, person-centered methods might be used to form types, which are then studied with multiple-group, variable-centered methods to test hypotheses specifying invariance or differences of relationships across types. There are good reasons to think in terms of types as one contemplates analysis in terms of variables. But the reverse also is true. In typological analysis, it must be assumed that types exist and that samples of subjects and indicator variables are drawn in ways that can reveal this. Different typologies indicated by person-centered research are most concretely compared if the different studies use comparable sets of persons, indicator variables, and other variables that can indicate correlates. Strictly speaking, none of these sets were comparable in the three substantive studies reviewed here. Nevertheless, at an abstract

  11. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs.

    PubMed

    Lahr, Jacob; Paßmann, Sven; List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  12. A research synthesis of therapeutic interventions for whiplash-associated disorder (WAD): Part 4 – noninvasive interventions for chronic WAD

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, Robert W; McClure, J Andrew; Walton, David; Pretty, Jason; Salter, Katherine; Meyer, Matthew; Sequeira, Keith; Death, Barry

    2010-01-01

    Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) represents a significant public health problem, resulting in substantial social and economic costs throughout the industrialized world. While many treatments have been advocated for patients with WAD, scientific evidence supporting their effectiveness is often lacking. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the strength of evidence for various WAD therapies. Multiple databases (including Web of Science, EMBASE and PubMed) were searched to identify all studies published from January 1980 through March 2009 that evaluated the effectiveness of any clearly defined treatment for acute (less than two weeks), subacute (two to 12 weeks) or chronic (longer than 12 weeks) WAD. The present article, the fourth in a five-part series, evaluates the evidence for noninvasive interventions initiated during the chronic phase of WAD. Twenty-two studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified, 12 of which were randomized controlled trials with ‘good’ overall methodological quality (median Physiotherapy Evidence Database score of 6). For the treatment of chronic WAD, there is evidence to suggest that exercise programs are effective in relieving whiplash-related pain, at least over the short term. While the majority of a subset of nine studies supported the effectiveness of interdisciplinary interventions, the two randomized controlled trials provided conflicting results. Finally, there was limited evidence, consisting of one supportive case series each, that both manual joint manipulation and myofeedback training may provide some benefit. Based on the available research, exercise programs were the most effective noninvasive treatment for patients with chronic WAD, although many questions remain regarding the relative effectiveness of various exercise regimens. PMID:21038010

  13. Effects of Different Analysis Strategies on Paired Associative Stimulation. A Pooled Data Analysis from Three Research Labs

    PubMed Central

    List, Jonathan; Vach, Werner; Flöel, Agnes; Klöppel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Paired associative stimulation (PAS) is a widely used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigm to non-invasively induce synaptic plasticity in the human brain in vivo. Altered PAS-induced plasticity has been demonstrated for several diseases. However, researchers are faced with a high inter- and intra-subject variability of the PAS response. Here, we pooled original data from nine PAS studies from three centers and analyzed the combined dataset of 190 healthy subjects with regard to age dependency, the role of stimulation parameters and the effect of different statistical methods. We observed no main effect of the PAS intervention over all studies (F(2;362) = 0.44; p = 0.644). The rate of subjects showing the expected increase of motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes was 53%. The PAS effect differed significantly between studies as shown by a significant interaction effect (F(16;362) = 1.77; p = 0.034) but post-hoc testing did not reveal significant effects after correction for multiple tests. There was a trend toward increased variability of the PAS effect in older subjects. Acquisition parameters differed across studies but without systematically influencing changes in MEP-size. The use of post/baseline quotients systematically indicated stronger PAS effects than post/baseline difference or the logarithm of the post/baseline quotient. The non-significant PAS effects across studies and a wide range of responder rates between studies indicate a high variability of this method. We were thus not able to replicate findings from a previous meta-analysis showing robust effects of PAS. No pattern emerged regarding acquisition parameters that at this point could guide future studies to reduce variability and help increase response rate. For future studies, we propose to report the responder rate and recommend the use of the logarithmized post/baseline quotient for further analyses to better address the possibility that results are driven by few extreme cases

  14. Impact of the American Diabetes Association diagnosis criteria on high-risk Spanish population. IGT Research Group. Impaired glucose tolerance.

    PubMed

    Costa, B; Franch, J; Martín, F; Morató, J; Donado, A; Basora, J; Daniel, J

    1999-10-01

    To research into the impact of the new American Diabetes Association (ADA) diagnostic criteria on high risk Spanish population, two cross-sectional studies involving seven primary health care centers in Catalonia (Spain) were revised. Individuals aged > 40 years with any major risk factor for diabetes were screened according to the World Health Organization (WHO) rules using a 75 g oral glucose tolerance test to measure fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2 h plasma glucose. The changes on diabetes prevalence and on epidemiological characteristics were evaluated applying the ADA criteria on the basis of FPG alone. A total of 970 individuals, 453 males (46.7%), mean age 59 years and mean body mass index (BMI) 30.6 kg/m2 were screened. Among the 459 diabetic subjects according to either the WHO or the ADA criteria, 314 (68.4%) were classified as having diabetes with respect to both sets of criteria (WHO and ADA). The overlap between impaired glucose tolerance (WHO) and impaired fasting glucose (ADA) diagnoses was 20.7%. Using the ADA criteria results in a decrease of the prevalence of diabetes by 1.5% (95% confidence interval (CI) = -2.2 to -0.8%). No changes in the diabetic phenotype (age, sex and BMI) were found. Impaired fasting glucose prevalence was 18.4% (95% CI = 16-21%). Overall concordance in terms of crude and weighted kappa-value was only acceptable (kappa = 0.51 and kappa = 0.61, respectively). To apply the new ADA diagnostic criteria on high risk Spanish population evidenced a decrease on diabetes prevalence. Nevertheless, the change of criteria undervalued the risk of postprandial hyperglycaemia related to impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:10580619

  15. SEX DIFFERENCES IN ASTHMA SYMPTOM 1 PROFILES AND CONTROL IN THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION ASTHMA CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTERS

    PubMed Central

    McCallister, Jennifer W.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Wei, Christine Y.; Parsons, Jonathan P.; Benninger, Cathy G.; Dixon, Anne E.; Gerald, Lynn B.; Mastronarde, John G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Important differences between men and women with asthma have been demonstrated, with women describing more symptoms and worse asthma-related quality of life (QOL) despite having similar or better pulmonary function. While current guidelines focus heavily on assessing asthma control, they lack information about whether sex-specific approaches to asthma assessment should be considered. We sought to determine if sex differences in asthma control or symptom profiles exist in the well-characterized population of participants in the American Lung Association Asthma Clinical Research Centers (ALA-ACRC) trials. Methods We reviewed baseline data from four trials published by the ALA-ACRC to evaluate individual item responses to three standardized asthma questionnaires: the Juniper Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ), the multi-attribute Asthma Symptom Utility Index (ASUI), and Juniper Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mini-AQLQ). Results In the poorly-controlled population, women reported similar overall asthma control (mean ACQ 1.9 vs. 1.8; p=0.54), but were more likely to report specific symptoms such as nocturnal awakenings, activity limitations, and shortness of breath on individual item responses. Women reported worse asthma-related QOL on the mini-AQLQ (mean 4.5 vs. 4.9; p<0.001) and more asthma-related symptoms with a lower mean score on the ASUI (0.73 vs. 0.77; p=<0.0001) and were more likely to report feeling bothered by particular symptoms such as coughing, or environmental triggers. Conclusions In participants with poorly-controlled asthma, women had outwardly similar asthma control, but had unique symptom profiles on detailed item analyses which were evident on evaluation of three standardized asthma questionnaires. PMID:23972381

  16. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

    PubMed Central

    Geary, Janis; Jardine, Cynthia G.; Guebert, Jenilee; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Background Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK). Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. Objective This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Design Review. Results Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Conclusions Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements. PMID:23986896

  17. Navigating the Literacy Waters: Research, Praxis, and Advocacy. The Twenty-Ninth Yearbook: A Peer Reviewed Publication of the College Reading Association. [Papers from the College Reading Association Conference, 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Martha M., Ed.; Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Falk-Ross, Francine, Ed.; Sampson, Mary Beth, Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a selection of the research and papers presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the College Reading Association in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in October, 2006. This Yearbook begins with Karen Bromley's presidential address, which explored the future of writing by discussing four predictions: the notion that pens and pencils will be…

  18. Twelve Years of Acoustical Research. American School Band Directors' Association, Research Committee Reports for the 17th Annual Convention, Hot Springs, Arkansas, 1969.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School Band Directors Association, Newark, OH.

    The guide, one in a series of committee reports relating to school band performance, organization, and equipment needs, discusses acoustical problems inherent to the clarinet. The report is presented in five sections. Section I summarizes findings of an American School Band Directors' Association (ASBDA) clarinet testing committee. A major finding…

  19. COPD exacerbations associated with the modified Medical Research Council scale and COPD assessment test among Humana Medicare members

    PubMed Central

    Pasquale, Margaret K; Xu, Yihua; Baker, Christine L; Zou, Kelly H; Teeter, John G; Renda, Andrew M; Davis, Cralen C; Lee, Theodore C; Bobula, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Background The Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease guidelines recommend assessment of COPD severity, which includes symptomatology using the modified Medical Research Council (mMRC) or COPD assessment test (CAT) score in addition to the degree of airflow obstruction and exacerbation history. While there is great interest in incorporating symptomatology, little is known about how patient reported symptoms are associated with future exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs. Methods The mMRC and CAT were mailed to a randomly selected sample of 4,000 Medicare members aged >40 years, diagnosed with COPD (≥2 encounters with International Classification of Dis eases-9th Edition Clinical Modification: 491.xx, 492.xx, 496.xx, ≥30 days apart). The exacerbations and exacerbation-related costs were collected from claims data during 365-day post-survey after exclusion of members lost to follow-up or with cancer, organ transplant, or pregnancy. A logistic regression model estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbations during follow-up, and a generalized linear model with log link and gamma distribution estimated the predictive value of exacerbation history and symptomatology on exacerbation-related costs. Results Among a total of 1,159 members who returned the survey, a 66% (765) completion rate was observed. Mean (standard deviation) age among survey completers was 72.0 (8.3), 53.7% female and 91.2% white. Odds ratios for having post-index exacerbations were 3.06, 4.55, and 16.28 times for members with 1, 2, and ≥3 pre-index exacerbations, respectively, relative to members with 0 pre-index exacerbations (P<0.001 for all). The odds ratio for high vs low symptoms using CAT was 2.51 (P<0.001). Similarly, exacerbation-related costs were 73% higher with each incremental pre-index exacerbation, and over four fold higher for high-vs low-symptom patients using CAT (each P<0.001). The symptoms using mMRC were not

  20. Exploring the World of Literacy. The Thirty-Sixth Yearbook: A Doubled Peer-Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.; Vasinda, Sheri, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    For their 57th annual conference, the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers (ALER) met in Dallas, Texas at Addison Marriott Quorum by the Galleria. This year's conference theme was Exploring the World of Literacy, which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 36. Included are double-peer reviewed papers,…

  1. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (27th, Chicago, Illinois, 2004). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    For the twenty-seventh year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Chicago, Illinois. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  2. Technology and the Future of Scholarly Exchange. Minutes of the Annual Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (114th, Providence, Rhode Island, May 10-12, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Diane, Ed.

    This membership meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on the impact of the new information technologies on scholarly exchange. The program was organized into two sessions comprising 11 papers in all. In the first session, three influential leaders presented papers exploring different aspects of the conference topic. In the…

  3. Preservation of Digital Information. Proceedings of the Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (131st, Washington, DC, October 15-17, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The 131st meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) focused on preservation of digital information. The ARL Preservation Committee convened three panels of experts to highlight major issues raised by the archiving of digital resources, and to encourage discussion about options for operating models and criteria for digital archives.…

  4. Gateway to the Pacific Rim: Information Resources for the 21st Century. Association of Research Libraries, Minutes of the Meeting (122nd, Honolulu, Hawaii, May 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    High economic growth and growing movements toward democratic political systems are reshaping the Pacific countries, and these movements will have profound implications for libraries. The program of the meeting of the Association of Research Libraries was devoted to the cultures, societies, and libraries of the Pacific Rim. Program Session I,…

  5. Toward Self Sufficiency: Social Issues in the Nineties. Proceedings of the National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics (33rd, Scottsdale, Arizona, August 7-11, 1993).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Welfare Research and Statistics, Olympia, WA.

    The presentations compiled in these proceedings on welfare and self-sufficiency reflect much of the current research in areas of housing, health, employment and training, welfare and reform, nutrition, child support, child care, and youth. The first section provides information on the conference and on the National Association for Welfare Research…

  6. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (30th, Anaheim, California, 2007). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    For the thirtieth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  7. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (35th, Louisville, Kentucky, 2012). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    For the thirty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in…

  8. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (35th, Louisville, Kentucky, 2012). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    For the thirty-fifth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in…

  9. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (33rd, Anaheim, California, 2010). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For the thirty-third year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (32nd, Louisville, KY, 2009). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    For the thirty-second year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the national AECT Convention in Louisville, Kentucky. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  11. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (30th, Anaheim, California, 2007). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    For the thirtieth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  12. Promoting Quality through Leadership. General Session Presentations at the Annual Forum of the Association for Institutional Research (28th, Phoenix, Arizona, May 15-18, 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Information from the 1988 annual forum of the Association for Institutional Research (AIR) is presented. The focus is on interests, roles, and responsibilities of AIR members. Speakers focus on the theme of promoting quality through leadership, looking at the important role of managerial leadership in the development, implementation, and…

  13. Assessment: Fad or Fact of Life? Proceedings of the North East Association for Institutional Research Annual Conference (14th, Rochester, New York, October 25-27, 1987).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    Assessment in higher education is addressed in these proceedings of the 1987 conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research. Papers and authors include: "Assessing the Status of Assessment" (Peter T. Ewell); "Has the Middle Class Been Pressured the Most? Multivariate Analysis of Parental Contributions to Higher Education"…

  14. Building Literacy Communities. The Thirty-Second Yearbook: A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Morrison, Timothy, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Boggs, Merry, Ed.; Raine, I. LaVerne, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    For its 53rd annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers met in Charlotte, North Carolina at the Marriott Charlotte City Center. This year's conference theme was "Building Literacy Communities", which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 32. This organization has long been the home of some of the nation's…

  15. AIR 1981-82. Forum 1981 Proceedings: Toward 2001: The IR Perspective (Minneapolis, Minnesota, May 17-20). The Association for Institutional Research Directory, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Institutional Research.

    Proceedings of the 1981 Association for Institutional Research (AIR) Forum and the 1981-82 AIR Directory are presented in a single volume. General session addresses and authors from the forum are as follows: "Some Possible Revolutions by 2001" (Michael Marien); "Information, the Non-Depletive Resource" (John W. Lacey); "What's Higher about Higher…

  16. The Response of the Institution to External Forces: Proactive or Reactive? Conference Proceedings of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (Virginia Beach, Virginia, October 30-November 1, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orahood, Mary Alyce, Ed.

    The proceedings of the 1985 conference of the Southern Association for Institutional Research (SAIR) is presented. The focus was preparing colleges to anticipate and respond to the demand of accrediting bodies, federal agencies, and state legislatures. Contents include: a conference agenda; a keynote address, summaries of pre-conference workshops,…

  17. Planning for Quality. Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the North East Association for Institutional Research (8th, Princeton, New Jersey, November 5-7, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    The proceedings of the annual conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research, whose theme was "Planning for Quality," are presented. The 26 papers were divided into the following topics: admissions, assessment, enrollment, faculty and staff, outcomes, planning, programs and retention, the environment, and the field of…

  18. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (25th, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, November 6-8, 1996).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R., Ed.; McCree, Herbert L., Ed.

    This volume contains abstracts of the more than 250 discussion papers, symposia, displays, and training sessions presented at the Mid-South Educational Research Association (MSERA) 1996 annual meeting. Papers deal with elementary, secondary, and higher education, and cover a broad spectrum of educational issues. Although many papers focus on the…

  19. Consortial Leadership: Cooperation in a Competitive Environment. Proceedings of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (130th, Albuquerque, NM, May 14-16, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Jaia, Ed.; Wetzel, Karen A., Ed.

    The program of the 130th meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) explored the leadership challenges posed by the juxtapositions of cooperation and competing priorities in a consortial environment. Following an opening and welcome (Gloria Werner, ARL Presiding President), and a Keynote Address, "Defining Successful Leadership" (David…

  20. Literacy Is Transformative. The Thirty-Fifth Yearbook A Doubled Peer Reviewed Publication of the Association of Literacy Educators and Researchers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szabo, Susan, Ed.; Martin, Linda, Ed.; Haas, Leslie, Ed.; Garza-Garcia, Lizabeth, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For their 56th annual meeting, the Association of Educators and Researchers (ALER) met in Grand Rapids, Michigan at the Amway Grand Hotel. This year's conference theme was Literacy Is Transformative, which was also used as the title for this year's Yearbook, Volume 35. Included are double-peer reviewed papers, the presidential address,…

  1. Implications of Recent Research for Speech Communication Education; Proceedings of the Speech Communication Association Summer Conference (6th, Chicago, July 9-11, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillars, Malcolm O., Ed.

    This publication contains the proceedings of the 1970 Summer Conference of the Speech Communication Association which explored the practical implications of recent research in the field for classroom teachers. Included are (1) four papers by Barbara Wood, Frederick Williams, Gerald R. Miller, and Lawrence Rosenfield, who were commissioned to write…

  2. Proceedings of the Anniversary Meeting (25th, Toronto, December 28-29, 1972). Industrial Relations Research Association Series. Index of IRRA Publications 1966-1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somers, Gerald G., Ed.

    Papers presented at the 25th meeting of the Industrial Relations Research Association (IRAA) covered issues that are central to industrial relations in North America. Papers and discussions dealt with these major issues: (1) Prices and Income Policy: Comparative Aspects, (2) Dispute Settlement in the Public Sector, (3) Manpower Policies in Canada…

  3. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  4. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  5. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (29th, Dallas, Texas, 2006). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    For the twenty-ninth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  6. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the National Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (28th, Orlando, Florida, 2005). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.; Crawford, Margaret, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    For the twenty-eighth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the National AECT Convention in Orlando, Florida. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  7. Progress in sunflower Sclerotinia research: Pyramiding head rot resistance into elite lines and association mapping of stalk rot resistance using candidate genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need for sunflower quantitative genetics research to find and capture Sclerotinia resistance is increasing with every year that this disease results in widespread losses in yield and crop quality. Our efforts to perform association mapping with the 260 Plant Introductions (PIs) obtained from the...

  8. NCIP: Means to an End. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (109th, Washington, D.C., October 22-23, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daval, Nicola, Ed.

    Presentations on NCIP (North American Collections Inventory Project) program developments and future program directions are combined with business meeting minutes in this report from the Association of Research Libraries (ARL). The text of remarks presented as part of a panel discussion on the program theme includes: (1) "Development and Use of…

  9. International Federation of Library Associations Annual Conference Papers. General Research Libraries Division: University Libraries Section (47th, Leipzig, East Germany, August 17-22, 1981).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveday, Anthony J.; And Others

    This set of papers presented to the General Research Libraries Division, University Libraries Section, of the International Federation of Library Associations during its 47th annual conference (1981) includes: "SCONUL (Standing Conference of National and University Libraries) and British University Library Standards: Some Observations on the Role…

  10. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (37th, Jacksonville, Florida, 2014). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    For the thirty-seventh year, the Research and Theory Division and the Division of Instructional Design of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) sponsored the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Jacksonville, Florida. This year's Proceedings…

  11. Access and Services: Shaping the Future. Minutes of the Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (106th, Cincinnati, Ohio, May 16-17, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    Minutes from the 1985 Membership Meeting of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) include the full-text of the presented paper, "Proposal for a North American Program for Coordinated Retrospective Conversion," by Jutta Reed-Scott, and the comments of a six-member panel, made up of members of the ARL Committee on Bibliographic Control, on the…

  12. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  13. Annual Proceedings of Selected Research and Development Papers Presented at the Annual Convention of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (36th, Anaheim, California, 2013). Volume 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonson, Michael, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    For the thirty-sixth year, the Research and Theory Division of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (AECT) is sponsoring the publication of these Proceedings. Papers published in this volume were presented at the annual AECT Convention in Anaheim, California. The Proceedings of AECT's Convention are published in two…

  14. Research in Science Education, Volume 5. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (6th, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, May 19-21, 1975).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, A. M., Ed.; Power, Colin, N., Ed.

    This volume contains papers presented at the sixth Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (ASERA) held at Flinders University in May, 1975. Paper topics include: pupil learning and classroom climate, teacher structuring behavior, the Australian Science Education Project (ASEP), cognitive preference and…

  15. Research in Science Education. Volume 13. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the Australian Science Education Research Association (14th, University of Waikato, New Zealand, May 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisher, Richard P., Ed.

    1983-01-01

    This publication contains a review of trends in research over the past decade followed by 24 studies focusing on cognitive structure, instructional strategies, curricular issues, and attitudes. Among the specific areas investigated are: concept maps as reflectors of conceptual understanding; equations, translations, and number skills in learning…

  16. Funding and Strategic Alignment Guidance for Infusing Small Business Innovation Research Technology into NASA Programs Associated with the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2015-01-01

    This report is intended to help NASA program and project managers incorporate Small Business Innovation Research/Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) technologies that have gone through Phase II of the SBIR program into NASA Aeronautics and Mission Directorate (ARMD) programs. Other Government and commercial program managers can also find this information useful.

  17. Institutional Research in a Changing Society. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (18th, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 16-19, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Karen, Ed.

    This document contains formal papers, keynote speeches and selected panel presentations delivered at a conference that addressed the issues, responsibilities and challenges faced by institutional researchers now and in the future. Papers are as follows: "Attrition and C.I.R.P. Correlates of a Measure of Self-Confidence Regarding Transition into…

  18. Accountability and Institutional Research: Measuring Results. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the North East Association for Institutional Research (24th, Hartford, Connecticut, November 1-4, 1997).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North East Association for Institutional Research.

    This proceedings document is comprised of the 12 papers, panel presentations, and work shares presented at a 1997 conference on institutional research. The papers are: (1) "What Does Accountability in Higher Education Mean to You?" (William R. Dyson, Andrew G. De Rocco, John R. Doyle, and Merle W. Harris); (2) "The University of Delaware…

  19. Annual Research Review: Functional Somatic Symptoms and Associated Anxiety and Depression--Developmental Psychopathology in Pediatric Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campo, John V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Medically unexplained physical symptoms, commonly referred to as functional somatic symptoms (FSS), are common in pediatric medical settings and associated with suffering, impairment, and medical help seeking. The association of pediatric FSS with anxiety and depressive symptoms and disorders across the life span is reviewed.Method:…

  20. Ethical Principles Associated with the Publication of Research in ASHA's Scholarly Journals: Importance and Adequacy of Coverage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingham, Janis C.; Minifie, Fred D.; Horner, Jennifer; Robey, Randall R.; Lansing, Charissa; McCartney, James H.; Slater, Sarah C.; Moss, Sharon E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this 2-part study was to determine the importance of specific topics relating to publication ethics and adequacy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association's (ASHA's) policies regarding these topics. Method: A 56-item Web-based survey was sent to (a) ASHA journal editors, associate editors, and members of the…

  1. Australian Association for Research in Education Annual Conference: Youth Schooling & Employment. Part B. (Sydney, November 6-9, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ian D., Comp.

    This second of the two-part proceedings of an Australian conference on youth schooling and unemployment contains 25 research reports and texts from two symposia on alienation from school to work, and youth in transition. Focus of the papers is on educational practices and specific problems in the area of educational research. Topics covered in…

  2. 78 FR 79498 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Open-IX Association

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-30

    ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993--Open-IX... Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993, 15 U.S.C. Sec. 4301 et seq. (``the Act''), Open-IX... performance and common and uniform specifications for incoming and outgoing data, as well as...

  3. Propensity Score Techniques and the Assessment of Measured Covariate Balance to Test Causal Associations in Psychological Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Valerie S.; Stuart, Elizabeth A.; Anthony, James C.

    2010-01-01

    There is considerable interest in using propensity score (PS) statistical techniques to address questions of causal inference in psychological research. Many PS techniques exist, yet few guidelines are available to aid applied researchers in their understanding, use, and evaluation. In this study, the authors give an overview of available…

  4. Size and characteristics of the biomedical research workforce associated with U.S. National Institutes of Health extramural grants.

    PubMed

    Pool, Lindsay R; Wagner, Robin M; Scott, Lindsey L; RoyChowdhury, Deepshikha; Berhane, Rediet; Wu, Charles; Pearson, Katrina; Sutton, Jennifer A; Schaffer, Walter T

    2016-03-01

    The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) annually invests approximately $22 billion in biomedical research through its extramural grant programs. Since fiscal year (FY) 2010, all persons involved in research during the previous project year have been required to be listed on the annual grant progress report. These new data have enabled the production of the first-ever census of the NIH-funded extramural research workforce. Data were extracted from All Personnel Reports submitted for NIH grants funded in FY 2009, including position title, months of effort, academic degrees obtained, and personal identifiers. Data were de-duplicated to determine a unique person count. Person-years of effort (PYE) on NIH grants were computed. In FY 2009, NIH funded 50,885 grant projects, which created 313,049 full- and part-time positions spanning all job functions involved in biomedical research. These positions were staffed by 247,457 people at 2,604 institutions. These persons devoted 121,465 PYE to NIH grant-supported research. Research project grants each supported 6 full- or part-time positions, on average. Over 20% of positions were occupied by postdoctoral researchers and graduate and undergraduate students. These baseline data were used to project workforce estimates for FYs 2010-2014 and will serve as a foundation for future research. PMID:26625903

  5. American Personnel and Guidance Association 1970 Presession Systems Research for Counselors, Counselor Educators, and Supervisors. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A.

    This is a report of a five-day training session on systems research for counselors, counselor educators, and supervisors. The training session was an advanced program dealing with the use of systems research for planning and evaluating counseling, counselor education, supervision and related programs. The primary aims of the program were to: (1)…

  6. Association of Research Self-Efficacy with Medical Student Career Interests, Specialization, and Scholarship: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bierer, S. Beth; Prayson, Richard A.; Dannefer, Elaine F.

    2015-01-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal…

  7. Association of research self-efficacy with medical student career interests, specialization, and scholarship: a case study.

    PubMed

    Bierer, S Beth; Prayson, Richard A; Dannefer, Elaine F

    2015-05-01

    This study used variables proposed in social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to focus the evaluation of a research curriculum at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University (CCLCM). Eight cohorts of CCLCM medical students completed a web-based version of the six-scale Clinical Research Appraisal Inventory-Short Form (CRAI-SF) items at matriculation (n = 128) or graduation (n = 111) during 2009-2013. Parametric statistics were used to compare CRAI-SF scales to domains proposed in SCCT: trainees' characteristics (gender, training level, advanced degree), career interests, career intentions (medical specialty), and performance (peer-reviewed publications and required thesis topic). A number of lessons emerged in using theory to frame the evaluation of a complex educational program. Graduates rated their research self-efficacy significantly higher on all six CRAI-SF scales with large effect sizes (>.90) on five scales (Conceptualizing a Study, Study Design and Analysis, Responsible Research Conduct, Collaborating with Others, and Reporting a Study). Women and men did not have significantly different scores on CRAI-SF scales (p > .05), suggesting that the research program provides adequate supports for women students. Most thesis projects addressed clinical (36.9 %, n = 41) or translational (34.2 %, n = 38) research topics. The CRAI-SF discriminated between medical school matriculates and graduates, suggesting that research self-efficacy increases with mastery experiences. No significant relationships occurred between CRAI-SF scores and graduates' thesis topics or chosen clinical specialty. Correlations demonstrated significant relationships between graduates' perceptions of research self-efficacy and their interest in clinical research careers. PMID:25037264

  8. SU-E-J-13: Six Degree of Freedom Image Fusion Accuracy for Cranial Target Localization On the Varian Edge Stereotactic Radiosurgery System: Comparison Between 2D/3D and KV CBCT Image Registration

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H; Song, K; Chetty, I; Kim, J; Wen, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the 6 degree of freedom systematic deviations between 2D/3D and CBCT image registration with various imaging setups and fusion algorithms on the Varian Edge Linac. Methods: An anthropomorphic head phantom with radio opaque targets embedded was scanned with CT slice thicknesses of 0.8, 1, 2, and 3mm. The 6 DOF systematic errors were assessed by comparing 2D/3D (kV/MV with CT) with 3D/3D (CBCT with CT) image registrations with different offset positions, similarity measures, image filters, and CBCT slice thicknesses (1 and 2 mm). The 2D/3D registration accuracy of 51 fractions for 26 cranial SRS patients was also evaluated by analyzing 2D/3D pre-treatment verification taken after 3D/3D image registrations. Results: The systematic deviations of 2D/3D image registration using kV- kV, MV-kV and MV-MV image pairs were within ±0.3mm and ±0.3° for translations and rotations with 95% confidence interval (CI) for a reference CT with 0.8 mm slice thickness. No significant difference (P>0.05) on target localization was observed between 0.8mm, 1mm, and 2mm CT slice thicknesses with CBCT slice thicknesses of 1mm and 2mm. With 3mm CT slice thickness, both 2D/3D and 3D/3D registrations performed less accurately in longitudinal direction than thinner CT slice thickness (0.60±0.12mm and 0.63±0.07mm off, respectively). Using content filter and using similarity measure of pattern intensity instead of mutual information, improved the 2D/3D registration accuracy significantly (P=0.02 and P=0.01, respectively). For the patient study, means and standard deviations of residual errors were 0.09±0.32mm, −0.22±0.51mm and −0.07±0.32mm in VRT, LNG and LAT directions, respectively, and 0.12°±0.46°, −0.12°±0.39° and 0.06°±0.28° in RTN, PITCH, and ROLL directions, respectively. 95% CI of translational and rotational deviations were comparable to those in phantom study. Conclusion: 2D/3D image registration provided on the Varian Edge radiosurgery, 6 DOF

  9. Research in Alumni Relations: Surveying Alumni To Improve Your Programs. Report on the Association for Institutional Research (AIR)/CASE Alumni Research Conference (District of Columbia, April 2-3, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Donna, Ed.

    This book presents summaries of 16 papers presented at a conference on increasing the amount and usefulness of research on alumni relations. Following an introductory paper, "On the Art and Science of Surveying Alumni" (Donna Shoemaker), the papers are: (1) "Targeted Research Gets Results. Comprehensive Research on Alumni Relationships: Four Years…

  10. An Interview with the President-Elect of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The AACC has a number of key goals as it moves into 2011 including: developing ways to continue working with industry within the new AdvaMed guidelines; developing ways in which the AACC can collaborate more with other professional medical associations; increasing the recognition of translational science at our annual meeting; and continuing our global outreach

  11. [Papers Presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Research Conference (New Orleans, Louisiana, October 5-7, 1970).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Medical Association, Chicago, IL.

    This is a collection of twenty speeches presented at the American Medical Association's Air Pollution Medical Conference, October 5-7, 1970. Speeches included: Air Pollution Control: The Physician's Role; Air Pollution Problems in Nuclear Power Development; Airway Resistance and Collateral Ventilation; Asbestos Air Pollution in Urban Areas;…

  12. Trade and Industrial Education Research Committee. Proceedings of the Carrousel Session, American Vocational Association (Dallas, Texas, December 8, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth, Gene L., Ed.

    These proceedings contain the texts of five research reports that were presented at a conference dealing with trade and industrial education. The following papers are included: "A Survey of Teacher Attitudes and Beliefs Related to the Use of Microcomputers in Vocational Education," by Steve Chi-Yin Yuen; "Retraining for Robotics and Other Forms of…

  13. Associations between personal exposures to VOCs and alterations in cardiovascular physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) - presentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007...

  14. 77 FR 38831 - Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of 1993-Tizen Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... 9, 2007 (72 FR 17583). The last notification was filed with the Department on July 19, 2011. A... (76 FR 59161). Patricia A. Brink, Director of Civil Enforcement, Antitrust Division. BILLING CODE P ... Antitrust Division Notice Pursuant to the National Cooperative Research and Production Act of...

  15. Associations between Personal Exposures to VOCs and Alterations in Cardiovascular Physiology: Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: An adult cohort consisting of 63 participants engaged in the US EPA’s recent Detroit Exposure and Aerosol Research Study (DEARS) and a University of Michigan cardiovascular sub-study conducted during summer and winter periods over 3 years between 2004 and 2007 (5 seas...

  16. Current Models of Digital Scholarly Communication: Results of an Investigation Conducted by Ithaka for the Association of Research Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maron, Nancy L.; Smith, K. Kirby

    2008-01-01

    As electronic resources for scholarship proliferate, more and more scholars turn to their computers rather than to print sources to conduct their research. The decentralized distribution of these new model works can make it difficult to fully appreciate their scope and number, even for university librarians tasked with knowing about valuable…

  17. Technician Monographs: A Collection of Papers and Research Studies Related to Associate Degree Programs in Engineering Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defore, Jesse J.

    The papers and research reports comprising the ten chapters of this monograph were originally prepared as background information for a national study of engineering technology education in the United States. Chapter I briefly describes the historical and contemporary settings of engineering technology education. After Chapter II provides…

  18. The Associations between Language Aptitude and Second Language Grammar Acquisition: A Meta-Analytic Review of Five Decades of Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Shaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a meta-analysis that synthesizes the empirical research on the role of language aptitude in second language grammar acquisition. A total of 33 study reports were identified including 17 predictive studies that investigated the correlations between aptitude and ultimate L2 attainment and 16 interactional studies that examined the…

  19. A National Program for the Association of Research Libraries. Minutes of the Meeting (79th, January 22, 1972, Chicago, Illinois).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC.

    A portion of this meeting was devoted to three concurrent discussion groups. Each focused on one aspect of what generally can be termed a national program for research libraries. The first group discussed the more important elements of the report of the Committee on Specifications for a Study of a Periodicals Resources Center. The question of such…

  20. Risky Assessments: Participant Suicidality and Distress Associated with Research Assessments in a Treatment Study of Suicidal Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Sarah K.; Lindenboim, Noam; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Murray, Angela; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine patterns of self-reported suicidality and distress during research assessments in a sample of 63 women meeting criteria for borderline personality disorder and current and chronic suicidality. The risk management protocol we used during the two-year study period (University of Washington Risk Assessment…

  1. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratiosmore » (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.« less

  2. The utility of web mining for epidemiological research: studying the association between parity and cancer risk [Web Mining for Epidemiological Research. Assessing its Utility in Exploring the Association Between Parity and Cancer Risk

    SciTech Connect

    Tourassi, Georgia; Yoon, Hong-Jun; Xu, Songhua; Han, Xuesong

    2015-11-27

    Background: The World Wide Web has emerged as a powerful data source for epidemiological studies related to infectious disease surveillance. However, its potential for cancer-related epidemiological discoveries is largely unexplored. Methods: Using advanced web crawling and tailored information extraction procedures we automatically collected and analyzed the text content of 79,394 online obituary articles published between 1998 and 2014. The collected data included 51,911 cancer (27,330 breast; 9,470 lung; 6,496 pancreatic; 6,342 ovarian; 2,273 colon) and 27,483 non-cancer cases. With the derived information, we replicated a case-control study design to investigate the association between parity and cancer risk. Age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for each cancer type and compared to those reported in large-scale epidemiological studies. Results: Parity was found to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of breast cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.75 to 0.82), pancreatic cancer (OR=0.78, 95% CI = 0.72 to 0.83), colon cancer (OR=0.67, 95% CI = 0.60 to 0.74), and ovarian cancer (OR=0.58, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.62). Marginal association was found for lung cancer prevalence (OR=0.87, 95% CI = 0.81 to 0.92). The linear trend between multi-parity and reduced cancer risk was dramatically more pronounced for breast and ovarian cancer than the other cancers included in the analysis. Conclusion: This large web-mining study on parity and cancer risk produced findings very similar to those reported with traditional observational studies. It may be used as a promising strategy to generate study hypotheses for guiding and prioritizing future epidemiological studies.

  3. Tectonic evolution of greenstone-Gneiss association in Dharwar Craton, South India: Problems and perspectives for future research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Y. J. B.

    1986-01-01

    The two fold stratigraphic subdivision of the Archean-Proterozoic greenstone-gneiss association of Dharwar craton into an older Sargur group (older than 2.9 Ga.) and a younger Dharwar Supergroup serves as an a priori stratigraphic model. The concordant greenstone (schist)-gneiss (Peninsular gneiss) relationships, ambiguities in stratigraphic correlations of the schist belts assigned to Sargur group and difficulties in deciphering the older gneiss units can be best appreciated if the Sargur group be regarded as a trimodal association of: (1) ultrabasic-mafic metavolcanics (including komatiites), (2) clastic and nonclastic metasediments and paragneisses and (3) mainly tonalite/trondhemite gneisses and migmatites of diverse ages which could be as old as c. 3.4 ga. or even older. The extensive occurrence of this greenstone-gneiss complex is evident from recent mapping in many areas of central and southern Karnataka State.

  4. Recent advances in the research for the homolog of breast cancer associated gene AtROW1 in higher plants.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yue; Zhang, Yuzhou; Zhu, Yu-Xian

    2016-08-01

    BARD1 (BRCA1 associated RING domain protein 1), as an important animal tumor suppressor gene associated with many kinds of cancers, has been intensively studied for decades. Surprisingly, homolog of BARD1 was found in plants and it was renamed AtROW1 (repressor of Wuschel-1) according to its extremely important function with regard to plant stem cell homeostasis. Although great advances have been made in human BARD1, the function of this animal tumor-suppressor like gene in plant is not well studied and need to be further elucidated. Here, we review and summarize past and present work regarding this protein. Apart from its previously proposed role in DNA repair, recently it is found essential for shoot and root stem cell development and differentiation in plants. The study of AtROW1 in plant may provide an ideal model for further elucidating the functional mechanism of BARD1 in mammals. PMID:27502904

  5. Translational Research in Oncology Research & Development and Its Impact on Early Development in China: report of the 5th Annual Meeting of the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) at 2013 AACR Annual Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Lingjie; Dai, Yun; Luo, Roger

    2013-01-01

    In April 2013, the US Chinese Anti-Cancer Association (USCACA) held its 5th annual meeting in conjunction with the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 2013 Annual Meeting in Washington DC. The USCACA executive committee reported activities and programs and highlighted the partnership and collaboration between USCACA and other major organizations. The key initiatives and programs of USCACA included 1) USCACA-TIGM Esophageal Cancer Program that funds translational research of esophageal cancer prevention and treatment at the Xinxiang Medical University in Henan province, China; 2) the USCACA-NFCR-AFCR Scholarship Program, which has supported 10 young outstanding Chinese cancer researchers and will award 4 fellowships at the Guangzhou International Symposium on Oncology in November this year; 3) USCACA-Hengrui Training Program for Early Phase Clinical Research, which has supported the training of a Chinese scholar at two major cancer centers in the US; and 4) USCACA has continued its partnership with the Chinese Journal of Cancer, which has reached significant international impact. PMID:23823625

  6. Is dyslexia necessarily associated with negative feelings of self-worth? A review and implications for future research.

    PubMed

    Burden, Robert

    2008-08-01

    This paper will provide an overview of research in the past 20 years into the relationship between dyslexia and various aspects of self-perception, including self-concept, self-esteem, self-efficacy and locus of control. Problems are identified relating to the measurement of some of the most widely used constructs, as is the need for more precise identification of key variables relating to them. Critical issues concerning the assumptions that can be drawn from largely correlational data are highlighted also. The conclusion is drawn that an alternative approach to research in this area is required to enhance our understanding of how those suffering from learning disabilities of a dyslexic nature develop a positive or negative sense of identity. Suggestions are made as to how this can be achieved by drawing upon attribution theory and other aspects of social psychology. PMID:18646275

  7. Active Learning in Research Methods Classes Is Associated with Higher Knowledge and Confidence, Though not Evaluations or Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter J.; Baughman, Frank D.

    2016-01-01

    Research methods and statistics are regarded as difficult subjects to teach, fueling investigations into techniques that increase student engagement. Students enjoy active learning opportunities like hands-on demonstrations, authentic research participation, and working with real data. However, enhanced enjoyment does not always correspond with enhanced learning and performance. In this study, we developed a workshop activity in which students participated in a computer-based experiment and used class-generated data to run a range of statistical procedures. To enable evaluation, we developed a parallel, didactic/canned workshop, which was identical to the activity-based version, except that students were told about the experiment and used a pre-existing/canned dataset to perform their analyses. Tutorial groups were randomized to one of the two workshop versions, and 39 students completed a post-workshop evaluation questionnaire. A series of generalized linear mixed models suggested that, compared to the students in the didactic/canned condition, students exposed to the activity-based workshop displayed significantly greater knowledge of the methodological and statistical issues addressed in class, and were more confident about their ability to use this knowledge in the future. However, overall evaluations and satisfaction between the two groups were not reliably different. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:26973575

  8. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-03-10

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number-one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include electronic cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or former smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the health of the public; however, definitive data are lacking. The AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the US Food and Drug Administration and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. This policy statement was developed by a joint writing group composed of members from the Tobacco and Cancer Subcommittee of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Science Policy and Government Affairs (SPGA) Committee and American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Tobacco Cessation and Control

  9. Mentorship behaviors and mentorship quality associated with formal mentoring programs: closing the gap between research and practice.

    PubMed

    Allen, Tammy D; Eby, Lillian T; Lentz, Elizabeth

    2006-05-01

    Formal mentoring programs continue to gain popularity within organizations despite limited empirical research regarding how these programs should be designed to achieve maximum effectiveness. The present study examined perceived design features of formal mentoring programs and outcomes from both mentor and protégé perspectives. The outcomes examined were career and psychosocial mentoring, role modeling, and mentorship quality. In general, the results indicated that perceived input into the mentoring process and training perceived as high in quality were consistently related to the outcome variables. Implications for the design of formal mentoring programs and future theory development are discussed. PMID:16737355

  10. Adeno-Associated Virus at 50: A Golden Anniversary of Discovery, Research, and Gene Therapy Success—A Personal Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fifty years after the discovery of adeno-associated virus (AAV) and more than 30 years after the first gene transfer experiment was conducted, dozens of gene therapy clinical trials are in progress, one vector is approved for use in Europe, and breakthroughs in virus modification and disease modeling are paving the way for a revolution in the treatment of rare diseases, cancer, as well as HIV. This review will provide a historical perspective on the progression of AAV for gene therapy from discovery to the clinic, focusing on contributions from the Samulski lab regarding basic science and cloning of AAV, optimized large-scale production of vectors, preclinical large animal studies and safety data, vector modifications for improved efficacy, and successful clinical applications. PMID:25807962

  11. Research Problems Associated with Limiting the Applied Force in Vibration Tests and Conducting Base-Drive Modal Vibration Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry D.

    1995-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to make a case for developing and conducting vibration tests which are both realistic and practical (a question of tailoring versus standards). Tests are essential for finding things overlooked in the analyses. The best test is often the most realistic test which can be conducted within the cost and budget constraints. Some standards are essential, but the author believes more in the individual's ingenuity to solve a specific problem than in the application of standards which reduce problems (and technology) to their lowest common denominator. Force limited vibration tests and base-drive modal tests are two examples of realistic, but practical testing approaches. Since both of these approaches are relatively new, a number of interesting research problems exist, and these are emphasized herein.

  12. Reactions, beliefs and concerns associated with providing hair specimens for medical research among a South African sample: a qualitative approach

    PubMed Central

    Coetzee, Bronwyne; Kagee, Ashraf; Tomlinson, Mark; Warnich, Louise; Ikediobi, Ogechi

    2013-01-01

    In order to optimize treatment outcome among antiretroviral therapy users, there is a strong imperative to engage in continued monitoring and maintenance of therapeutic drug levels in patients. The aim of this study was to document the perspectives, beliefs, and concerns of South African antiretroviral therapy users providing hair specimens to determine antiretroviral drug levels. Twenty-one women living with HIV were recruited from a community health center in the Western Cape. Interviews were recorded and transcribed, and analyzed using Atlas.ti version 6. Although participants identified several cultural beliefs influencing their decision to provide hair specimens for drug level measurement, nearly all agreed that they would be willing to do so if provided with enough information by the researcher. PMID:23646064

  13. Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

    2010-07-01

    Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses <100 mSv in a single exposure appear to be too small to allow epidermiological detection of statistically significant excess cancers in the presence of naturally occurring cancers; that low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

  14. Associations between use of crack cocaine and HIV-1 disease progression: research findings and implications for mother-to-infant transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Judith A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent in vitro and in vivo research has suggested that cocaine has a direct effect on the pathogenesis of AIDS. These findings are confirmed by epidemiological studies linking the use of injected, inhaled, and smoked (crack) cocaine and indicators of HIV disease progression, even among adherent users of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Recent studies of vertical HIV transmission suggest that cocaine use may play a role in mother-to-child infection via alteration of maternal immune responses, enhanced viral replication in maternal immune cells, or alterations in the immune systems of neonates or infants. The purpose of this article is to review research conducted over the past several decades on associations between use of cocaine and HIV disease progression, especially among HIV+ women, and to explore its potential relevance for understanding mother-to-infant transmission of HIV. PMID:21219914

  15. National Medical Association/National Institutes of Health Workshop on Violence and the Conduct of Research. Workgroup Proceedings, June 1-2, 1994.

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, R. A.; Pointer, A.; Vereen, D.; Marks, S. F.

    1995-01-01

    The physical, economic, and mental toll caused by violence in the United States has put tremendous pressure on American medical, political, religious, and social institutions. The impact in urban neighborhoods has been especially harrowing, forcing African-American organizations to address this domestic problem with ideas and suggestions unique to their philosophies and collective talents. This article contains general perspectives and commentary from physicians and social science experts who participated in a workshop sponsored by the National Medical Association, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the National Institute of Mental Health to discuss topics on violence, its health consequences, and the conduct of research in the African-American community. PMID:8907813

  16. Research to Reality: Putting VET Research To Work. Proceedings of the Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) Conference (4th, Adelaide, Australia, March 28-30, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association, Alexandria.

    This document contains 95 papers and summaries of 5 poster sessions from an Australian conference on putting vocational education and training (VET) research to work. The following are among the areas covered in the papers: factors affecting VET graduates' employability over time; technical and further education (TAFE) institutes as models of…

  17. Association between mental demands at work and cognitive functioning in the general population – results of the health study of the Leipzig research center for civilization diseases (LIFE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The level of mental demands in the workplace is rising. The present study investigated whether and how mental demands at work are associated with cognitive functioning in the general population. Methods The analysis is based on data of the Health Study of the Leipzig Research Centre for Civilization Disease (LIFE). 2,725 participants aged 40–80 years underwent cognitive testing (Trail-Making Test, Verbal Fluency Test) and provided information on their occupational situation. Participants over the age of 65 years additionally completed the Mini-Mental State Examination. Mental demands at work were rated by a standardized classification system (O*NET). The association between mental demands and cognitive functioning was analyzed using Generalized Linear Modeling (GENLIN) adjusted for age, gender, self-regulation, working hour status, education, and health-related factors. Results Univariate as well as multivariate analyses demonstrated significant and highly consistent effects of higher mental demands on better performance in cognitive testing. The results also indicated that the effects are independent of education and intelligence. Moreover, analyses of retired individuals implied a significant association between high mental demands at work of the job they once held and a better cognitive functioning in old age. Conclusions In sum, our findings suggest a significant association between high mental demands at work and better cognitive functioning. In this sense, higher levels of mental demands – as brought about by technological changes in the working environment – may also have beneficial effects for the society as they could increase cognitive capacity levels and might even delay cognitive decline in old age. PMID:24914403

  18. What Medical Oncologist Residents Think about the Italian Speciality Schools: A Survey of the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) on Educational, Clinical and Research Activities

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Anna; De Angelis, Carmine; Lambertini, Matteo; Cremolini, Chiara; Imbimbo, Martina; Berardi, Rossana; Di Maio, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; La Verde, Nicla

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives Relevant heterogeneity exists among Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, also within the same country. In order to provide a comprehensive overview of the landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology, the Italian Association of Medical Oncology (AIOM) undertook an online survey, inviting all the residents to describe their daily activities and to express their overall satisfaction about their programs. Methods A team composed of five residents and three consultants in medical oncology prepared a 38 items questionnaire that was published online in a reserved section, accessible through a link sent by e-mail. Residents were invited to anonymously fill in the questionnaire that included the following sub-sections: quality of teaching, clinical and research activity, overall satisfaction. Results Three-hundred and eleven (57%) out of 547 invited residents filled in the questionnaire. Two-hundred and twenty-three (72%) participants declared that attending lessons was frequently difficult and 153 (49%) declared they did not gain substantial improvement in their knowledge from them. Fifty-five percent stated that they did not receive lessons on palliative care. Their overall judgment about didactic activity was low in 63% of the interviewed. The satisfaction for clinical activity was in 86% of cases good: 84% recognized that, during the training period, they acquired a progressive independence on patients' management. About research activity, the majority (79%) of participants in the survey was actively engaged in managing patients included in clinical trials but the satisfaction level for the involvement in research activities was quite low (54%). Overall, 246 residents (79%) gave a positive global judgment of their Medical Oncology Schools. Conclusions The landscape of Italian Postgraduate Schools in Medical Oncology is quite heterogeneous across the country. Some improvements in the organization of teaching and in the

  19. Medication Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: 2015 Position Statement of the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Rhee, Yumie; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Lee, Jeong Keun; Kim, Deog-Yoon

    2015-11-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis, and are also used in malignant bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and Paget's disease, and provide therapeutic efficacy on those diseases. However, it was reported that occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) could be related with bisphosphonate exposures, and there have been many cases regarding this issue. Therefore, a clearer definition and treatment guidelines were needed for this disease. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) and American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) reported statements on bisphosphonate-related ONJ (BRONJ), and a revised version was recently presented. In the revised edition, the diagnosis BRONJ was changed to medication-related ONJ (MRONJ), which reflects a consideration of the fact that ONJ also occurs for denosumab, a bone resorption inhibitor of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) antibody family, and bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis inhibitor. In 2009, a statement on ONJ was also reported locally by a relevant organization, which has served as basis for clinical treatment in Korea. In addition to the new official stance of the AAOMS and ASBMR, with an increasing pool of ONJ clinical experience, a revised version of the 2009 local statement is needed. As such, the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research (KSBMR) and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (KAOMS) have collectively formed a committee for the preparation of an official statement on MRONJ, and have reviewed recent local and international data to propose guidelines customized for the local Korean situation. PMID:26713306

  20. Medication Related Osteonecrosis of the Jaw: 2015 Position Statement of the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Min; Rhee, Yumie; Kwon, Yong-Dae; Kwon, Tae-Geon; Lee, Jeong Keun

    2015-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of osteoporosis, and are also used in malignant bone metastases, multiple myeloma, and Paget's disease, and provide therapeutic efficacy on those diseases. However, it was reported that occurrence of osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ) could be related with bisphosphonate exposures, and there have been many cases regarding this issue. Therefore, a clearer definition and treatment guidelines were needed for this disease. The American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) and American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (AAOMS) reported statements on bisphosphonate-related ONJ (BRONJ), and a revised version was recently presented. In the revised edition, the diagnosis BRONJ was changed to medication-related ONJ (MRONJ), which reflects a consideration of the fact that ONJ also occurs for denosumab, a bone resorption inhibitor of the receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL) antibody family, and bevacizumab, an anti-angiogenesis inhibitor. In 2009, a statement on ONJ was also reported locally by a relevant organization, which has served as basis for clinical treatment in Korea. In addition to the new official stance of the AAOMS and ASBMR, with an increasing pool of ONJ clinical experience, a revised version of the 2009 local statement is needed. As such, the Korean Society for Bone and Mineral Research (KSBMR) and the Korean Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (KAOMS) have collectively formed a committee for the preparation of an official statement on MRONJ, and have reviewed recent local and international data to propose guidelines customized for the local Korean situation. PMID:26713306

  1. Research 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tisher, R. P., Ed.

    The eleven papers presented at the 1970 meeting of the Australian Science Education Research Association are arranged in five sections. The first two sections, "Countenance of Science Education Research" and "Cognitive Style," contain one paper each; the first, a review of research trends and the second, an experimental report. "Sequencing and…

  2. Quantitative genetic research on sleep: a review of normal sleep, sleep disturbances and associated emotional, behavioural, and health-related difficulties.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Nicola L; Gregory, Alice M

    2013-02-01

    Over the past 50 years, well over 100 twin studies have focussed on understanding factors contributing to variability in normal sleep-wake characteristics and sleep disturbances. Whilst we have gained a great deal from these studies, there is still much to be learnt. Twin studies can be used in multiple ways to answer questions beyond simply estimating heritability. This paper provides a comprehensive review of some of the most important findings from twin studies relating to sleep to date, with a focus on studies investigating genetic and environmental influences contributing to i) objective and subjective measures of normal sleep characteristics (e.g., sleep stage organisation, sleep quality); as well as sleep disturbances and disorders such as dyssomnias (e.g., insomnia, narcolepsy) and parasomnias (e.g., sleepwalking, bruxism); ii) the persistence of sleep problems from childhood to adulthood, and the possibility that the aetiological influences on sleep change with age; iii) the associations between sleep disturbances, emotional, behavioural and health-related problems; and iv) processes of gene-environment correlation and interaction. We highlight avenues for further research, emphasising the need to further consider the aetiology of longitudinal associations between sleep disturbances and psychopathology; the genetic and environmental overlap between sleep and numerous phenotypes; and processes of gene-environment interplay and epigenetics. PMID:22560641

  3. Diagnostic Intervals and Its Association with Breast, Prostate, Lung and Colorectal Cancer Survival in England: Historical Cohort Study Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink

    PubMed Central

    Redaniel, Maria Theresa; Martin, Richard M.; Ridd, Matthew J.; Wade, Julia; Jeffreys, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Rapid diagnostic pathways for cancer have been implemented, but evidence whether shorter diagnostic intervals (time from primary care presentation to diagnosis) improves survival is lacking. Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, we identified patients diagnosed with female breast (8,639), colorectal (5,912), lung (5,737) and prostate (1,763) cancers between 1998 and 2009, and aged >15 years. Presenting symptoms were classified as alert or non-alert, according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance. We used relative survival and excess risk modeling to determine associations between diagnostic intervals and five-year survival. The survival of patients with colorectal, lung and prostate cancer was greater in those with alert, compared with non-alert, symptoms, but findings were opposite for breast cancer. Longer diagnostic intervals were associated with lower mortality for colorectal and lung cancer patients with non-alert symptoms, (colorectal cancer: Excess Hazards Ratio, EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.85; 95% CI: 0.72-1.00; Lung cancer: EHR 3-6 months vs <1 month: 0.87; 95% CI: 0.80-0.95; EHR >6 months vs <1 month: 0.81; 95% CI: 0.74-0.89). Prostate cancer mortality was lower in patients with longer diagnostic intervals, regardless of type of presenting symptom. The association between diagnostic intervals and cancer survival is complex, and should take into account cancer site, tumour biology and clinical practice. Nevertheless, unnecessary delay causes patient anxiety and general practitioners should continue to refer patients with alert symptoms via the cancer pathways, and actively follow-up patients with non-alert symptoms in the community. PMID:25933397

  4. Dense Genotyping of Immune-Related Loci Identifies Variants Associated with Clearance of HPV among HIV-Positive Women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS)

    PubMed Central

    Sudenga, Staci L.; Wiener, Howard W.; King, Caroline C.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Klein, Robert S.; Shah, Keerti V.; Sobel, Jack D.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2014-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is a necessary and causal factor of cervical cancer. Most women naturally clear HPV infections; however, the biological mechanisms related to HPV pathogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. Host genetic factors that specifically regulate immune response could play an important role. All HIV-positive women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS) with a HR-HPV infection and at least one follow-up biannual visit were included in the study. Cervicovaginal lavage samples were tested for HPV using type-specific HPV hybridization assays. Type-specific HPV clearance was defined as two consecutive HPV-negative tests after a positive test. DNA from participants was genotyped for 196,524 variants within 186 known immune related loci using the custom ImmunoChip microarray. To assess the influence of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with HR-HPV clearance, the Cox proportional hazards model with the Wei-Lin-Weissfeld approach was used, adjusting for CD4+ count, low risk HPV (LR-HPV) co-infection, and relevant confounders. Three analytical models were performed: race-specific (African Americans (n = 258), European Americans (n = 87), Hispanics (n = 55), race-adjusted combined analysis, and meta-analysis of pooled independent race-specific analyses. Women were followed for a median time of 1,617 days. Overall, three SNPs (rs1112085, rs11102637, and rs12030900) in the MAGI-3 gene and one SNP (rs8031627) in the SMAD3 gene were associated with HR-HPV clearance (p<10−6). A variant (rs1633038) in HLA-G were also significantly associated in African American. Results from this study support associations of immune-related genes, having potential biological mechanism, with differential cervical HR-HPV infection outcomes. PMID:24918582

  5. Electronic nicotine delivery systems: a policy statement from the American Association for Cancer Research and the American Society of Clinical Oncology.

    PubMed

    Brandon, Thomas H; Goniewicz, Maciej L; Hanna, Nasser H; Hatsukami, Dorothy K; Herbst, Roy S; Hobin, Jennifer A; Ostroff, Jamie S; Shields, Peter G; Toll, Benjamin A; Tyne, Courtney A; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Warren, Graham W

    2015-02-01

    Combustible tobacco use remains the number one preventable cause of disease, disability, and death in the United States. Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), which include e-cigarettes, are devices capable of delivering nicotine in an aerosolized form. ENDS use by both adults and youth has increased rapidly, and some have advocated these products could serve as harm-reduction devices and smoking cessation aids. ENDS may be beneficial if they reduce smoking rates or prevent or reduce the known adverse health effects of smoking. However, ENDS may also be harmful, particularly to youth, if they increase the likelihood that nonsmokers or formers smokers will use combustible tobacco products or if they discourage smokers from quitting. The American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) and the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recognize the potential ENDS have to alter patterns of tobacco use and affect the public's health; however, definitive data are lacking. AACR and ASCO recommend additional research on these devices, including assessing the health impacts of ENDS, understanding patterns of ENDS use, and determining what role ENDS have in cessation. Key policy recommendations include supporting federal, state, and local regulation of ENDS; requiring manufacturers to register with the FDA and report all product ingredients, requiring childproof caps on ENDS liquids, and including warning labels on products and their advertisements; prohibiting youth-oriented marketing and sales; prohibiting child-friendly ENDS flavors; and prohibiting ENDS use in places where cigarette smoking is prohibited. PMID:25573384

  6. Erectile dysfunction is frequent in systemic sclerosis and associated with severe disease: a study of the EULAR Scleroderma Trial and Research group

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Erectile dysfunction (ED) is common in men with systemic sclerosis (SSc) but the demographics, risk factors and treatment coverage for ED are not well known. Method This study was carried out prospectively in the multinational EULAR Scleroderma Trial and Research database by amending the electronic data-entry system with the International Index of Erectile Function-5 and items related to ED risk factors and treatment. Centres participating in this EULAR Scleroderma Trial and Research substudy were asked to recruit patients consecutively. Results Of the 130 men studied, only 23 (17.7%) had a normal International Index of Erectile Function-5 score. Thirty-eight per cent of all participants had severe ED (International Index of Erectile Function-5 score ≤ 7). Men with ED were significantly older than subjects without ED (54.8 years vs. 43.3 years, P < 0.001) and more frequently had simultaneous non-SSc-related risk factors such as alcohol consumption. In 82% of SSc patients, the onset of ED was after the manifestation of the first non-Raynaud's symptom (median delay 4.1 years). ED was associated with severe cutaneous, muscular or renal involvement of SSc, elevated pulmonary pressures and restrictive lung disease. ED was treated in only 27.8% of men. The most common treatment was sildenafil, whose efficacy is not established in ED of SSc patients. Conclusions Severe ED is a common and early problem in men with SSc. Physicians should address modifiable risk factors actively. More research into the pathophysiology, longitudinal development, treatment and psychosocial impact of ED is needed. PMID:22348608

  7. Preventing and Lessening Exacerbations of Asthma in School-aged children Associated with a New Term (PLEASANT): Recruiting Primary Care Research Sites–the PLEASANT experience

    PubMed Central

    Horspool, Michelle J; Julious, Steven A; Mooney, Cara; May, Robin; Sully, Ben; Smithson, W Henry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recruitment of general practices and their patients into research studies is frequently reported as a challenge. The Preventing and Lessening Exacerbations of Asthma in School-aged children Associated with a New Term (PLEASANT) trial recruited 142 general practices, across England and Wales and delivered the study intervention to time and target. Aims: To describe the process of recruitment used within the cluster randomised PLEASANT trial and present results on factors that influenced recruitment. Methods: Data were collected on the number of and types of contact used to gain expression of interest and subsequent randomisation into the PLEASANT trial. Practice size and previous research experience were also collected. Results: The mean number of contacts required to gain expression of interest were m=3.01 (s.d. 1.6) and total number of contacts from initial invitation to randomisation m=6.8 (s.d. 3.5). Previous randomised controlled trial involvement (hazard ratio (HR)=1.81 (confidence interval (CI) 95%, 1.55–2.11) P<0.001) and number of studies a practice had previously engaged in (odds ratio (OR) 1.91 (CI 95%, (1.52–2.42)) P<0.001), significantly influenced whether a practice would participate in PLEASANT. Practice size was not a significant deciding factor (OR=1.04 (95% CI 0.99–1.08) P=0.137). Conclusions: Recruitment to time and target can be achieved in general practice. The amount of resource required for site recruitment should not, however, be underestimated and multiple strategies for contacting practices should be considered. General practitioners with more research experience are more likely to participate in studies. PMID:26562491

  8. Association between funding source, methodological quality and research outcomes in randomized controlled trials of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics added to infant formula: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is little or no information available on the impact of funding by the food industry on trial outcomes and methodological quality of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics research in infants. The objective of this study was to compare the methodological quality, outcomes of food industry sponsored trials versus non industry sponsored trials, with regards to supplementation of synbiotics, probiotics and prebiotics in infant formula. Methods A comprehensive search was conducted to identify published and unpublished randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Cochrane methodology was used to assess the risk of bias of included RCTs in the following domains: 1) sequence generation; 2) allocation concealment; 3) blinding; 4) incomplete outcome data; 5) selective outcome reporting; and 6) other bias. Clinical outcomes and authors’ conclusions were reported in frequencies and percentages. The association between source of funding, risk of bias, clinical outcomes and conclusions were assessed using Pearson’s Chi-square test and the Fisher’s exact test. A p-value < 0.05 was statistically significant. Results Sixty seven completed and 3 on-going RCTs were included. Forty (59.7%) were funded by food industry, 11 (16.4%) by non-industry entities and 16 (23.9%) did not specify source of funding. Several risk of bias domains, especially sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, were not adequately reported. There was no significant association between the source of funding and sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding and selective reporting, majority of reported clinical outcomes or authors’ conclusions. On the other hand, source of funding was significantly associated with the domains of incomplete outcome data, free of other bias domains as well as reported antibiotic use and conclusions on weight gain. Conclusion In RCTs on infants fed infant formula containing probiotics, prebiotics or synbiotics, the source of funding did not

  9. Research Visibility: Research and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, George, L., Ed.

    1971-01-01

    The purpose of this research review was to demonstrate the relationship between the research and evaluation activities and the operational programs of the American Vocational Association (AVA) as it was presented to the 1970 annual convention. The 18 research reports are reviewed under these categories: (1) Awareness, Maturity, and Performance,…

  10. Youth in Transition: The Challenges of Generational Change in Asia. Proceedings of the Biennial General Conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils (15th, Canberra, Australia, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Fay, Ed.; Fahey, Stephanie, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This book originates from a conference of the Association of Asian Social Science Research Councils and contains writings and research reports on Youth in Transition in the Asia and Pacific region. The definition of "youth" varies from country to country and ranges between the ages of 10 to 35. The publication summarizes issues in the region,…

  11. Burn therapist contributions to the American Burn Association and the Journal of Burn Care and Research: a 45th anniversary review.

    PubMed

    Richard, Reginald

    2014-01-01

    The year 2013 marked the 45th anniversary of American Burn Association (ABA) annual meetings. At this significant juncture, a review of contributions of its members is appropriate to celebrate this milestone. Since the first ABA annual meeting and the initiation of the Journal of Burn Care and Research (JBCR), burn therapists, including both occupational and physical therapists, have grown to become integral members of the ABA, and their contributions among all members are highlighted. A systematic manual review of both ABA annual meeting proceedings and the JBCR was performed. The contributions of burn therapists to the ABA as a whole were classified, cataloged, and hand counted. Areas included: 1) quantifying ABA abstract and JBCR articles on authorship and subject matter, 2) representation on ABA committees; 3) participation in special activities; and 4) other recognitions. Burn therapists comprise 9.7% of ABA members overall. During the course of the first 44 ABA meetings, 8381 abstracts have been presented. Of this number, 634 (7.6%) have been delivered by burn therapists as lead authors. Through the end of 2011, no less than 3207 publications by all disciplines have appeared in JBCR. The vast majority of articles have been written by physicians, followed by doctorate-trained professionals. One hundred-forty therapists have 249 publications (7.8%) to their credit. For both abstracts and articles, the top three subject matter topics have been: scarring, splints and casts, and outcomes. Numerous burn therapists have served as faculty and moderators at ABA annual meetings and on ABA committees including JBCR. Burn therapists have made significant contributions to the JBCR and in support of the ABA and its annual meetings over the past 45 years from the clinical, scientific, and Association perspectives. PMID:24823340

  12. [Sample Quality Control through the Depository and Distribution of Cancer-Related Human Materials: Experience of Kanagawa Cancer Research & Information Association (KCRIA)].

    PubMed

    Miyagi, Yohei

    2015-01-01

    Kanagawa Prefecture and its department of hospital business established the Kanagawa Cancer Research and Information Association (KCRIA) in 2006, and the Kanagawa Cancer Center (KCC) and related institutes have started to collect and distribute patient-derived cancer-related biomaterials to researchers. The tumor tissue center of KCC is collecting frozen tumor tissues, formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor tissues, serum of patients before treatment, and genomic DNA of peripheral white blood cells. Corresponding normal tissues are also collected if possible. Clinical information on patients is annotated in each sample as accurately as possible under linkable anonymization to follow the prognosis. We are evaluating the quality of tumor samples with two indices: the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) of extracted total RNAs from randomly chosen frozen tissues examined with the 2100 Bioanalyzer (Agilent Technologies, Inc., Santa Clara, CA, USA), and the histopathological examination of parts of all frozen tissues prepared in the Optimal Cutting Temperature (OTC) compound and evaluation of the contents of tumor cells. Management of the sample quality is an important issue for any biomaterial repository. The quality of samples is influenced by the procedures of sample collection and storage, and also by the storage duration. The quality could be periodically examined by monitoring analyte stability and integrity, such as RIN of frozen cancer tissues. However, the best way to collect and store RNA might not always be the same for different analytes. Therefore, sample quality control at biomaterial repositories that are preparing samples for future studies on undefined analytes is a very difficult problem. At least the standard sample operation procedure (SOP) should be available for users. PMID:26524887

  13. Organization of research team for nano-associated safety assessment in effort to study nanotoxicology of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Park, Sung Ha; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Ja Hei; Meang, Eun-Ho; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Lim, Seok Tae; Oh, Jae-Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Meyoung-Kon

    2014-01-01

    Currently, products made with nanomaterials are used widely, especially in biology, bio-technologies, and medical areas. However, limited investigations on potential toxicities of nanomaterials are available. Hence, diverse and systemic toxicological data with new methods for nanomaterials are needed. In order to investigate the nanotoxicology of nanoparticles (NPs), the Research Team for Nano-Associated Safety Assessment (RT-NASA) was organized in three parts and launched. Each part focused on different contents of research directions: investigators in part I were responsible for the efficient management and international cooperation on nano-safety studies; investigators in part II performed the toxicity evaluations on target organs such as assessment of genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, or skin penetration; and investigators in part III evaluated the toxicokinetics of NPs with newly developed techniques for toxicokinetic analyses and methods for estimating nanotoxicity. The RT-NASA study was carried out in six steps: need assessment, physicochemical property, toxicity evaluation, toxicokinetics, peer review, and risk communication. During the need assessment step, consumer responses were analyzed based on sex, age, education level, and household income. Different sizes of zinc oxide and silica NPs were purchased and coated with citrate, L-serine, and L-arginine in order to modify surface charges (eight different NPs), and each of the NPs were characterized by various techniques, for example, zeta potentials, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of the "no observed adverse effect level" and systemic toxicities of all NPs were performed by thorough evaluation steps and the toxicokinetics step, which included in vivo studies with zinc oxide and silica NPs. A peer review committee was organized to evaluate and verify the reliability of toxicity tests, and the risk communication step was also needed to convey the current findings

  14. Organization of research team for nano-associated safety assessment in effort to study nanotoxicology of zinc oxide and silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Park, Sung Ha; Lee, Jong-Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Kim, Ja Hei; Meang, Eun-Ho; Yoon, Tae Hyun; Lim, Seok Tae; Oh, Jae-Min; An, Seong Soo A; Kim, Meyoung-Kon

    2014-01-01

    Currently, products made with nanomaterials are used widely, especially in biology, bio-technologies, and medical areas. However, limited investigations on potential toxicities of nanomaterials are available. Hence, diverse and systemic toxicological data with new methods for nanomaterials are needed. In order to investigate the nanotoxicology of nanoparticles (NPs), the Research Team for Nano-Associated Safety Assessment (RT-NASA) was organized in three parts and launched. Each part focused on different contents of research directions: investigators in part I were responsible for the efficient management and international cooperation on nano-safety studies; investigators in part II performed the toxicity evaluations on target organs such as assessment of genotoxicity, immunotoxicity, or skin penetration; and investigators in part III evaluated the toxicokinetics of NPs with newly developed techniques for toxicokinetic analyses and methods for estimating nanotoxicity. The RT-NASA study was carried out in six steps: need assessment, physicochemical property, toxicity evaluation, toxicokinetics, peer review, and risk communication. During the need assessment step, consumer responses were analyzed based on sex, age, education level, and household income. Different sizes of zinc oxide and silica NPs were purchased and coated with citrate, L-serine, and L-arginine in order to modify surface charges (eight different NPs), and each of the NPs were characterized by various techniques, for example, zeta potentials, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Evaluation of the “no observed adverse effect level” and systemic toxicities of all NPs were performed by thorough evaluation steps and the toxicokinetics step, which included in vivo studies with zinc oxide and silica NPs. A peer review committee was organized to evaluate and verify the reliability of toxicity tests, and the risk communication step was also needed to convey the current

  15. Informatics, evidence-based care, and research; implications for national policy: a report of an American Medical Informatics Association health policy conference

    PubMed Central

    Detmer, Don E

    2010-01-01

    There is an increased level of activity in the biomedical and health informatics world (e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records) that, in the near future, will yield a wealth of available data that we can exploit meaningfully to strengthen knowledge building and evidence creation, and ultimately improve clinical and preventive care. The American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) 2008 Health Policy Conference was convened to focus and propel discussions about informatics-enabled evidence-based care, clinical research, and knowledge management. Conference participants explored the potential of informatics tools and technologies to improve the evidence base on which providers and patients can draw to diagnose and treat health problems. The paper presents a model of an evidence continuum that is dynamic, collaborative, and powered by health informatics technologies. The conference's findings are described, and recommendations on terminology harmonization, facilitation of the evidence continuum in a “wired” world, development and dissemination of clinical practice guidelines and other knowledge support strategies, and the role of diverse stakeholders in the generation and adoption of evidence are presented. PMID:20190052

  16. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting, and research needs: a joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-04-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to "predicate" products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  17. Insulin pump risks and benefits: a clinical appraisal of pump safety standards, adverse event reporting and research needs. A joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes and the American Diabetes Association Diabetes Technology Working Group.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Fleming, G Alexander; Petrie, John R; Holl, Reinhard W; Bergenstal, Richard M; Peters, Anne L

    2015-05-01

    Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycaemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycaemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration's Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilised due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices, EUDAMED) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are small and over-reliant on bench testing in relation to 'predicate' products. Once a pump is available on the market, insufficient data are made publicly available on its long-term use in a real

  18. Research Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serig, Dan

    2011-01-01

    In this review, the author explores an often-used process in research--the mind map. He uses this method in his own research and artwork. He also uses this extensively with students, particularly master students when they are trying to surround issues in their thesis projects. Mind maps are closely associated with brainstorming, as brainstorming…

  19. Dementia incidence and mortality in middle-income countries, and associations with indicators of cognitive reserve: a 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Martin; Acosta, Daisy; Ferri, Cleusa P; Guerra, Mariella; Huang, Yueqin; Rodriguez, Juan J Llibre; Salas, Aquiles; Sosa, Ana Luisa; Williams, Joseph D; Dewey, Michael E; Acosta, Isaac; Jotheeswaran, Amuthavalli T; Liu, Zhaorui

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Results of the few cohort studies from countries with low incomes or middle incomes suggest a lower incidence of dementia than in high-income countries. We assessed incidence of dementia according to criteria from the 10/66 Dementia Research Group and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) IV, the effect of dementia at baseline on mortality, and the independent effects of age, sex, socioeconomic position, and indicators of cognitive reserve. Methods We did a population-based cohort study of all people aged 65 years and older living in urban sites in Cuba, the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela, and rural and urban sites in Peru, Mexico, and China, with ascertainment of incident 10/66 and DSM-IV dementia 3–5 years after cohort inception. We used questionnaires to obtain information about age in years, sex, educational level, literacy, occupational attainment, and number of household assets. We obtained information about mortality from all sites. For participants who had died, we interviewed a friend or relative to ascertain the likelihood that they had dementia before death. Findings 12 887 participants were interviewed at baseline. 11 718 were free of dementia, of whom 8137 (69%) were reinterviewed, contributing 34 718 person-years of follow-up. Incidence for 10/66 dementia varied between 18·2 and 30·4 per 1000 person-years, and were 1·4–2·7 times higher than were those for DSM-IV dementia (9·9–15·7 per 1000 person-years). Mortality hazards were 1·56–5·69 times higher in individuals with dementia at baseline than in those who were dementia-free. Informant reports suggested a high incidence of dementia before death; overall incidence might be 4–19% higher if these data were included. 10/66 dementia incidence was independently associated with increased age (HR 1·67; 95% CI 1·56–1·79), female sex (0·72; 0·61–0·84), and low education (0·89; 0·81–0·97), but not with occupational attainment (1

  20. Researcher / Researched: Repositioning Research Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meerwald, Agnes May Lin

    2013-01-01

    "Researcher / Researched" calls for a complementary research methodology by proposing autoethnography as both a method and text that crosses the boundaries of conventional and alternative methodologies in higher education. Autoethnography rearticulates the researcher / researched positions by blurring the boundary between them. This…