Science.gov

Sample records for resection tissue reveals

  1. Tissue Remodelling following Resection of Porcine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nygård, Ingvild Engdal; Mortensen, Kim Erlend; Hedegaard, Jakob; Conley, Lene Nagstrup; Bendixen, Christian; Sveinbjørnsson, Baldur; Revhaug, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study genes regulating the extracellular matrix (ECM) and investigate the tissue remodelling following liver resection in porcine. Methods. Four pigs with 60% partial hepatectomy- (PHx-) induced liver regeneration were studied over six weeks. Four pigs underwent sham surgery and another four pigs were used as controls of the normal liver growth. Liver biopsies were taken upon laparotomy, after three and six weeks. Gene expression profiles were obtained using porcine-specific oligonucleotide microarrays. Immunohistochemical staining was performed and a proliferative index was assessed. Results. More differentially expressed genes were associated with the regulation of ECM in the resection group compared to the sham and control groups. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) and collagen 1, alpha 2 (COL1A2) were both upregulated in the early phase of liver regeneration, validated by immunopositive cells during the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. A broadened connective tissue was demonstrated by Masson's Trichrome staining, and an immunohistochemical staining against pan-Cytokeratin (pan-CK) demonstrated a distinct pattern of migrating cells, followed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive nuclei. Conclusions. The present study demonstrates both a distinct pattern of PCNA positive nuclei and a deposition of ECM proteins in the remodelling phase of liver regeneration. PMID:26240819

  2. Optical assessment of pathology in surgically resected tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laughney, Ashley; Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan; Wells, Wendy A.; Conde, Olga M.; Paulsen, Keith D.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-03-01

    Multi-spectral spatially modulated light is used to guide localized spectroscopy of surgically resected tissues for cancer involvement. Modulated imaging rapidly quantifies near-infrared optical parameters with sub-millimeter resolution over the entire field for identification of residual disease in resected tissues. Suspicious lesions are further evaluated using a spectroscopy platform designed to image thick tissue samples at a spatial resolution sensitive to the diagnostic gold standard, pathology. MI employs a spatial frequency domain sampling and model-based analysis of the spatial modulation transfer function to interpret a tissue's absorption and scattering parameters at depth. The spectroscopy platform employs a scanning-beam, telecentric dark-field illumination and confocal detection to image fields up to 1cm2 with a broadband source (480:750nm). The sampling spot size (100μm lateral resolution) confines the volume of tissue probed to within a few transport pathlengths so that multiple-scattering effects are minimized and simple empirical models may be used to analyze spectra. Localized spectroscopy of Intralipid and hemoglobin phantoms demonstrate insensitivity of recovered scattering parameters to changes in absorption, but a non-linear dependence of scattering power on Intralipid concentration is observed due to the phase sensitivity of the measurement system. Both systems were validated independently in phantom and murine studies. Ongoing work focuses on assessing the combined utility of these systems to identify cancer involvement in vitro, particularly in the margins of resected breast tumors.

  3. Extremity Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Tailoring Resection to Histologic Subtype.

    PubMed

    Cable, Matthew G; Randall, R Lor

    2016-10-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas comprise tumors originating from mesenchymal or connective tissue. Histologic grade is integral to prognosis. Because sarcoma management is multimodal, histologic subtype should inform optimum treatment. Appropriate biopsy and communication between surgeon and pathologist can help ensure a correct diagnosis. Treatment often involves surgical excision with wide margins and adjuvant radiotherapy. There is no consensus on what constitutes an adequate margin for histologic subtypes. An appreciation of how histology corresponds with tumor biology and surgical anatomic constraints is needed for management of this disease. Even with the surgical goal of wide resection being obtained, many patients do not outlive their disease. PMID:27591492

  4. Clinical study of ex vivo photoacoustic imaging in endoscopic mucosal resection tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Liang; Streutker, Catherine J.; Marcon, Norman; Cirocco, Maria; Lakovlev, Vladimir V.; DaCosta, Ralph; Foster, F. S.; Wilson, Brian C.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate endoscopic detection and dysplasia in patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) remains a major unmet clinical need. Current diagnosis use multiple biopsies under endoscopic image guidance, where up to 99% of the tissue remains unsampled, leading to significant risk of missing dysplasia. We conducted an ex vivo clinical trial using photoacoustic imaging (PAI) in patients undergoing endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) with known high-grade dysplasia for the purpose of characterizing the esophageal microvascular pattern, with the long-term goal of performing in vivo endoscopic PAI for dysplasia detection and therapeutic guidance. EMR tissues were mounted immediately on an agar layer and covered with ultrasound gel. Digital photography guided the placement of the PAI transducer (40 MHz center frequency). The luminal side of the specimen was scanned over a field of view of 14 mm (width) by 15 mm (depth) at 680, 750, 824, 850 and 970 nm. Acoustic images were simultaneously acquired. Tissues were then sliced and fixed in formalin for histopathology with H and E staining. Analysis consisted of co-registration and correlation between the intrinsic PAI features and the histological images. The initial PAI + ultrasound images from 8 BE patients have demonstrated the technical feasibility of this approach and point to the potential of PAI to reveal the microvascular pattern within EMR specimens. There are several technical factors to be considered in rigorous interpretation of the PAI characteristics, including the loss of blood from the ex vivo specimens and the limited depth penetration of the photoacoustic signal.

  5. Depth of Bacterial Invasion in Resected Intestinal Tissue Predicts Mortality in Surgical Necrotizing Enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Remon, Juan I.; Amin, Sachin C.; Mehendale, Sangeeta R.; Rao, Rakesh; Luciano, Angel A.; Garzon, Steven A.; Maheshwari, Akhil

    2015-01-01

    Objective Up to a third of all infants who develop necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) require surgical resection of necrotic bowel. We hypothesized that the histopathological findings in surgically-resected bowel can predict the clinical outcome of these infants. Study design We reviewed the medical records and archived pathology specimens from all patients who underwent bowel resection/autopsy for NEC at a regional referral center over a 10-year period. Pathology specimens were graded for the depth and severity of necrosis, inflammation, bacteria invasion, and pneumatosis, and histopathological findings were correlated with clinical outcomes. Results We performed clinico-pathological analysis on 33 infants with confirmed NEC, of which 18 (54.5%) died. Depth of bacterial invasion in resected intestinal tissue predicted death from NEC (odds ratio 5.39 per unit change in the depth of bacterial invasion, 95% confidence interval 1.33-21.73). The presence of transmural necrosis and bacteria in the surgical margins of resected bowel was also associated with increased mortality. Conclusions Depth of bacterial invasion in resected intestinal tissue predicts mortality in surgical NEC. PMID:25950918

  6. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Hauf, Martinus; Pollo, Claudio; Müller, Markus; Weisstanner, Christian; Wiest, Roland; Schindler, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure. Methods Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels. Results In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings). The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied. Conclusions We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent

  7. [Transurethral prostate resection prior to kidney transplantation leading to urethral cicatricial tissue].

    PubMed

    Schou-Jensen, Katrine; Mohammad, Wael

    2015-01-26

    In Denmark, kidney transplantations in patients above 50 years have increased during the last decade. Consequently, the number of patients with lower urinary tract symptoms due to prostate hypertrophy increases accordingly. We describe two patients, who both had a resection of the prostate while having anuria and waiting for a kidney transplantation from a deceased donor. In both cases it was impossible to place a urethral catheter during the following transplantation due to total urethral occlusion, so a suprapubic catheter was inserted until the scar tissue was dilated or resected by a later transurethral intervention. PMID:25612989

  8. Tissue expander placement and adjuvant radiotherapy after surgical resection of retroperitoneal liposarcoma offers improved local control

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyojun; Lee, Sanghoon; Kim, BoKyong; Lim, Do Hoon; Choi, Yoon-La; Choi, Gyu Seong; Kim, Jong Man; Park, Jae Berm; Kwon, Choon Hyuck David; Joh, Jae-Won; Kim, Sung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Given that retroperitoneal liposarcoma (LPS) is extremely difficult to completely resect, and has a relatively high rate of recurrence, radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice after surgical resection. However, it is difficult to obtain a sufficient radiation field because of the close proximity of surrounding organs. We introduce the use of tissue expanders (TEs) after LPS resection in an attempt to secure a sufficient radiation field and to improve recurrence-free survival. This study is a retrospective review of 53 patients who underwent surgical resection of LPS at Samsung Medical Center between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2012, and had no residual tumor detected 2 months postoperatively. The median follow-up period was 38.9 months. Patients were divided into 3 groups. Those in group 1 (n = 17) had TE inserted and received postoperative RT. The patients in group 2 (n = 9) did not have TE inserted and received postoperative RT. Finally, those in group 3 (n = 27) did not receive postoperative RT. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify the risk factors associated with recurrence-free survival within 3 years. Younger age, history of LPS treatment, and RT after TE insertion (group 1 vs group 2 or 3) were significantly favorable factors influencing 3-year recurrence-free survival. TE insertion after LPS resection is associated with increased 3-year recurrence-free survival, most likely because it allows effective delivery of postoperative RT. PMID:27512857

  9. Real-time tissue differentiation based on optical emission spectroscopy for guided electrosurgical tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Spether, Dominik; Scharpf, Marcus; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Neugebauer, Alexander; Nüßle, Daniela; Fischer, Klaus; Zappe, Hans; Stenzl, Arnulf; Fend, Falko; Seifert, Andreas; Enderle, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Complete surgical removal of cancer tissue with effective preservation of healthy tissue is one of the most important challenges in modern oncology. We present a method for real-time, in situ differentiation of tissue based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES) performed during electrosurgery not requiring any biomarkers, additional light sources or other excitation processes. The analysis of the optical emission spectra, enables the differentiation of healthy and tumorous tissue. By using multi-class support vector machine (SVM) algorithms, distinguishing between tumor types also seems to be possible. Due to its fast reaction time (0.05s) the method can be used for real-time navigation helping the surgeon achieve complete resection. The system’s easy realization has been proven by successful integration in a commercial electro surgical unit (ESU). In a first step the method was verified by using ex vivo tissue samples. The histological analysis confirmed, 95% of correctly classified tissue types. PMID:25909025

  10. [The vacuum sealing technique. A new procedure to cover soft tissue defects after resection of leiomyosarcoma].

    PubMed

    Bartels, C G; Voigt, C; Blume-Peytavi, U; Treudler, R; Dippel, E; Tebbe, B

    2001-07-01

    The vacuum sealing technique is a new, simple to use procedure for traumatic and chronic soft tissue defects, burns and soft tissue infections. We used this technique for the first time for temporary closure after the resection of deep infiltrating leiomyosarcoma. Radical excision of the tumor with partial resection of the forearm flexor muscles and safety margin of 3 cm led to a large skin defect (12 x 16 cm). For temporary closure of this defect we used the vacuum sealing technique for 7 days. Because of histologically proven incomplete resection of the tumor, we did a second excision and used the vacuum sealing technique a second time for 7 days. After this time period the granulation of the wound ground was excellent, and we closed the defect by split skin transplantation from the thigh. Bacterial infection or other complications were not seen during use of vacuum sealing technique. The vacuum sealing technique induced optimal local conditions for skin grafting: it facilitated granulation tissue production and maintained a clean wound bed without the necessity of changing wound dressing before skin grafting. This technique is painless and does not impair mobility. PMID:11475650

  11. Can Bone Tissue Engineering Contribute to Therapy Concepts after Resection of Musculoskeletal Sarcoma?

    PubMed Central

    Holzapfel, Boris Michael; Chhaya, Mohit Prashant; Melchels, Ferry Petrus Wilhelmus; Holzapfel, Nina Pauline; Prodinger, Peter Michael; von Eisenhart-Rothe, Ruediger; van Griensven, Martijn; Schantz, Jan-Thorsten; Rudert, Maximilian; Hutmacher, Dietmar Werner

    2013-01-01

    Resection of musculoskeletal sarcoma can result in large bone defects where regeneration is needed in a quantity far beyond the normal potential of self-healing. In many cases, these defects exhibit a limited intrinsic regenerative potential due to an adjuvant therapeutic regimen, seroma, or infection. Therefore, reconstruction of these defects is still one of the most demanding procedures in orthopaedic surgery. The constraints of common treatment strategies have triggered a need for new therapeutic concepts to design and engineer unparalleled structural and functioning bone grafts. To satisfy the need for long-term repair and good clinical outcome, a paradigm shift is needed from methods to replace tissues with inert medical devices to more biological approaches that focus on the repair and reconstruction of tissue structure and function. It is within this context that the field of bone tissue engineering can offer solutions to be implemented into surgical therapy concepts after resection of bone and soft tissue sarcoma. In this paper we will discuss the implementation of tissue engineering concepts into the clinical field of orthopaedic oncology. PMID:23509421

  12. Quantification of tissue shrinkage in canine small intestinal specimens after resection and fixation

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Ben S.; Banks, Tania A.; Findji, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the longitudinal shrinkage of canine small intestinal specimens after resection and fixation in 10% formalin. Samples were obtained from 12 clinically normal dogs of medium to large breed via ventral midline coeliotomy and enterectomy. The length of each sample was measured before excision, immediately after excision, and after 24 h in 10% formalin. The results were interpreted with the use of single-sample t-tests of the average changes; P-values of less than 0.01 were considered significant. The samples indicated a significant decrease in length after resection and fixation. The mean shrinkage from the pre-excision state was 28.3% immediately after excision (P < 0.0001) and 26.3% after 24 h of fixation (P < 0.0001). There was a small but not significant increase in the length of the specimens between the 2nd and 3rd measurement points. Quantification of the longitudinal shrinkage of resected intestinal specimens may improve interpretation of the distance of surgical margins from abnormal tissue in histopathology reports and allow investigation of the margins required for the clearance of specific tumors. PMID:24396180

  13. Virtual Cortical Resection Reveals Push-Pull Network Control Preceding Seizure Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khambhati, Ankit N; Davis, Kathryn A; Lucas, Timothy H; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S

    2016-09-01

    In ∼20 million people with drug-resistant epilepsy, focal seizures originating in dysfunctional brain networks will often evolve and spread to surrounding tissue, disrupting function in otherwise normal brain regions. To identify network control mechanisms that regulate seizure spread, we developed a novel tool for pinpointing brain regions that facilitate synchronization in the epileptic network. Our method measures the impact of virtually resecting putative control regions on synchronization in a validated model of the human epileptic network. By applying our technique to time-varying functional networks, we identified brain regions whose topological role is to synchronize or desynchronize the epileptic network. Our results suggest that greater antagonistic push-pull interaction between synchronizing and desynchronizing brain regions better constrains seizure spread. These methods, while applied here to epilepsy, are generalizable to other brain networks and have wide applicability in isolating and mapping functional drivers of brain dynamics in health and disease. PMID:27568515

  14. Quantitative proteomics in resected renal cancer tissue for biomarker discovery and profiling

    PubMed Central

    Atrih, A; Mudaliar, M A V; Zakikhani, P; Lamont, D J; Huang, J T-J; Bray, S E; Barton, G; Fleming, S; Nabi, G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Proteomics-based approaches for biomarker discovery are promising strategies used in cancer research. We present state-of-art label-free quantitative proteomics method to assess proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) compared with noncancer renal tissues. Methods: Fresh frozen tissue samples from eight primary RCC lesions and autologous adjacent normal renal tissues were obtained from surgically resected tumour-bearing kidneys. Proteins were extracted by complete solubilisation of tissues using filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) method. Trypsin digested proteins were analysed using quantitative label-free proteomics approach followed by data interpretation and pathways analysis. Results: A total of 1761 proteins were identified and quantified with high confidence (MASCOT ion score threshold of 35 and P-value <0.05). Of these, 596 proteins were identified as differentially expressed between cancer and noncancer tissues. Two upregulated proteins in tumour samples (adipose differentiation-related protein and Coronin 1A) were further validated by immunohistochemistry. Pathway analysis using IPA, KOBAS 2.0, DAVID functional annotation and FLink tools showed enrichment of many cancer-related biological processes and pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and amino acid synthetic pathways. Conclusions: Our study identified a number of differentially expressed proteins and pathways using label-free proteomics approach in RCC compared with normal tissue samples. Two proteins validated in this study are the focus of on-going research in a large cohort of patients. PMID:24548857

  15. Surgically resected human tumors reveal the biological significance of the gastric cancer stem cell markers CD44 and CD26

    PubMed Central

    NISHIKAWA, SHIMPEI; KONNO, MASAMITSU; HAMABE, ATSUSHI; HASEGAWA, SHINICHIRO; KANO, YOSHIHIRO; FUKUSUMI, TAKAHITO; SATOH, TAROH; TAKIGUCHI, SHUJI; MORI, MASAKI; DOKI, YUICHIRO; ISHII, HIDESHI

    2015-01-01

    Cancer tissue is maintained by relatively small populations of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which are involved in chemotherapy resistance, recurrence and metastasis. As tumor tissues are comprised of various cells, studies of human clinical samples are important for the characterization of CSCs. In the present study, an expression profiling study was performed in which an anti-cell surface marker antibody-based array platform, a flow cytometry-based cell separation technique and a tumorigenicity analysis in immunodeficient animals were utilized. These approaches revealed that the markers cluster of differentiation (CD)44 and CD26 facilitated the fractionation of surgically resected human gastric cancer (GC) cells into the following subset populations with distinct tumorigenic potentials: Highly tumorigenic CD26+CD44+ cells (6/6 mice formed tumors), moderately tumorigenic CD26+CD44− cells (5/6 mice formed tumors), and weakly or non-tumorigenic CD26−CD44− cells (2/6 mice formed tumors). Furthermore, exposure to 5-fluorouracil significantly increased the proportion of CD26+ cells in vitro. The present study demonstrated that the combined expression of CD26 and CD44 presents a potential marker of human GC stem cells. PMID:26137071

  16. Clinical outcomes of tissue expanders on adjuvant radiotherapy of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jeong Il; Lim, Do Hoon; Park, Hee Chul; Nam, Heerim; Kim, Bo Kyoung; Kim, Sung-Joo; Park, Jae Berm

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the efficacy and safety of a tissue expander (TE) for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) of resected retroperitoneal sarcoma (RPS). This study was conducted with 37 patients with RPS who received resection with or without TE insertion followed by RT from August 2006 to June 2012 at Samsung Medical Center. Among the 37 patients, TE was inserted in 19. The quality of TE insertion was evaluated according to the correlation of clinical target volume and retroperitoneal surface volume covered by TE and was defined as follows: excellent, ≥85%; good, 70% to 85%; fair, 50% to 70%; and poor, <50%. The median follow-up period after surgery was 47.9 months (range, 5.5–85.5 months). The quality of TE insertion was excellent in 7 (36.8%), good in 5 (26.3%), fair in 4 (21.0%), and poor in 3 (16.7%) patients. A significantly higher biologically equivalent dose (BED, α/β = 10) was used in patients who had TE insertion (median, 64.8 vs. 60.0 Gy, P = 0.01). Local control was 39.7%, and overall survival was 76.4% at 5 years. Local control was significantly higher in patients who received ≥65 Gy of BED, 100.0% in contrast to 22.8% (P = 0.01). One patient with a history of multiple tumor resections showed abdominal infection with duodenal perforation of uncertain cause but had the potential of being related to TE and/or RT. Otherwise there were no ≥grade III acute or late toxicities. TE for adjuvant RT in RPS is feasible for delivering a higher RT dose with acceptable toxicity. PMID:27428199

  17. Multiple soft tissue aneurysmal cysts: An occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of fibula

    PubMed Central

    Karkuzhali, P; Bhattacharyya, Mahuya; Sumitha, P

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of multiple extraosseous aneurysmal cysts occurring in the muscle and subcutaneous plane of postero-lateral aspects of the upper right leg. They appeared about 15 months after resection of aneurysmal bone cyst of the upper end of the fibula. They varied in size from 2 cm to 5 cm. Radiologically they were well-defined lesions with central septate areas surrounded by a rim of calcification. Histologically they showed central cystic spaces separated by septa consisting of fibroblasts, osteoclast type of giant cells and reactive woven bone. Thus they showed histological similarity with aneurysmal bone cysts, but did not show any connection with the bone. Only very few examples of aneurysmal cysts of soft tissue had been described in the past one decade and they were reported in various locations including rare sites such as arterial wall and larynx. Recent cytogenetic analyses have shown abnormalities involving 17p11-13 and/or 16q22 in both osseous and extraosseous aneurysmal cysts indicating its probable neoplastic nature. Our case had unique features like multiplicity and occurrence after resection of primary aneurysmal bone cyst of the underlying bone. PMID:21139755

  18. [Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with vertical rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal resection for cancer].

    PubMed

    Bognár, Gábor; Novák, András; István, Gábor; Lóderer, Zoltán; Ledniczky, György; Ondrejka, Pál

    2012-10-01

    Perineal wound healing problems following extended abdomino-perineal resection of ano-rectal cancer represent a great challenge to the surgeon. Perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with a myocutan flap was thought to reduce surgical wound healing complications. A review of the relevant literature was carried out on perineal soft-tissue reconstruction with rectus abdominis myocutan (VRAM) flap following extended abdomino-perineal rectal resection for cancer. The more commonly used neoadjuvant chemo- and radiotherapy as well as extended surgical radicality resulted in increased perioperative risks, therefore combined procedures between the colorectal and plastic surgical teams are inevitable. This case report illustrates the above trend. PMID:23086826

  19. Volumetric x-ray coherent scatter imaging of cancer in resected breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study using virtual anthropomorphic phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer patients undergoing surgery often choose to have a breast conserving surgery (BCS) instead of mastectomy for removal of only the breast tumor. If post-surgical analysis such as histological assessment of the resected tumor reveals insufficient healthy tissue margins around the cancerous tumor, the patient must undergo another surgery to remove the missed tumor tissue. Such re-excisions are reported to occur in 20%-70% of BCS patients. A real-time surgical margin assessment technique that is fast and consistently accurate could greatly reduce the number of re-excisions performed in BCS. We describe here a tumor margin assessment method based on x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) imaging and demonstrate its utility in surgical margin assessment using Monte Carlo simulations. A CSCT system was simulated in Geant4 and used to simulate two virtual anthropomorphic CSCT scans of phantoms resembling surgically resected tissue. The resulting images were volume-rendered and found to distinguish cancerous tumors embedded in complex distributions of adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue (as is expected in the breast). The images exhibited sufficient spatial and spectral (i.e. momentum transfer) resolution to classify the tissue in any given voxel as healthy or cancerous. ROC analysis of the classification accuracy revealed an area under the curve of up to 0.97. These results indicate that coherent scatter imaging is promising as a possible fast and accurate surgical margin assessment technique.

  20. Volumetric x-ray coherent scatter imaging of cancer in resected breast tissue: a Monte Carlo study using virtual anthropomorphic phantoms.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Harrawood, Brian P; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2015-08-21

    Breast cancer patients undergoing surgery often choose to have a breast conserving surgery (BCS) instead of mastectomy for removal of only the breast tumor. If post-surgical analysis such as histological assessment of the resected tumor reveals insufficient healthy tissue margins around the cancerous tumor, the patient must undergo another surgery to remove the missed tumor tissue. Such re-excisions are reported to occur in 20%-70% of BCS patients. A real-time surgical margin assessment technique that is fast and consistently accurate could greatly reduce the number of re-excisions performed in BCS. We describe here a tumor margin assessment method based on x-ray coherent scatter computed tomography (CSCT) imaging and demonstrate its utility in surgical margin assessment using Monte Carlo simulations. A CSCT system was simulated in GEANT4 and used to simulate two virtual anthropomorphic CSCT scans of phantoms resembling surgically resected tissue. The resulting images were volume-rendered and found to distinguish cancerous tumors embedded in complex distributions of adipose and fibroglandular breast tissue (as is expected in the breast). The images exhibited sufficient spatial and spectral (i.e. momentum transfer) resolution to classify the tissue in any given voxel as healthy or cancerous. ROC analysis of the classification accuracy revealed an area under the curve of up to 0.97. These results indicate that coherent scatter imaging is promising as a possible fast and accurate surgical margin assessment technique. PMID:26237265

  1. Oct4B, CD90, and CD73 are upregulated in bladder tissue following electro-resection of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Takumi; Tonooka, Akiko; Okuno, Yumiko; Hattori-Kato, Mami; Mikami, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We tested the hypothesis that stimulation by electro-resection of bladder tissue induces stem cells in the tissue repair process. Materials & Methods: After primary transurethral resection of a bladder tumor and surrounding tissue (TUR-Bt), second TUR-Bt was performed. Tissues excised by second TUR-Bt were immunohistochemically stained for Oct4, a marker of pluripotency, and for CD90 and CD73, markers of mesenchymal stromal cells, when no bladder tumor cells remained. Results and Conclusions: Oct4B protein was sporadically stained in the cytoplasm of interstitial cells in four out of eight cases. CD90 and CD73 are upregulated in interstitial and vascular endothelial cells without CD45 expression. Mesenchymal stromal cells, but not pluripotent stem cells, may be mainly involved in bladder tissue repair. PMID:27397997

  2. Phase II Study of Neoadjuvant Bevacizumab and Radiotherapy for Resectable Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sam S.; Duda, Dan G.; Karl, Daniel L.; Kim, Tae-Min; Kambadakone, Avinash R.; Chen, Yen-Lin; Rothrock, Courtney; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Kirsch, David G.; Choy, Edwin; Harmon, David C.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Dreyfuss, Jonathan; Ancukiewicz, Marek; and others

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Numerous preclinical studies have demonstrated that angiogenesis inhibitors can increase the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT). We sought to examine the safety and efficacy of bevacizumab (BV) and RT in soft tissue sarcomas and explore biomarkers to help determine the treatment response. Methods and Materials: Patients with {>=}5 cm, intermediate- or high-grade soft tissue sarcomas at significant risk of local recurrence received neoadjuvant BV alone followed by BV plus RT before surgical resection. Correlative science studies included analysis of the serial blood and tumor samples and serial perfusion computed tomography scans. Results: The 20 patients had a median tumor size of 8.25 cm, with 13 extremity, 1 trunk, and 6 retroperitoneal/pelvis tumors. The neoadjuvant treatment was well tolerated, with only 4 patients having Grade 3 toxicities (hypertension, liver function test elevation). BV plus RT resulted in {>=}80% pathologic necrosis in 9 (45%) of 20 tumors, more than double the historical rate seen with RT alone. Three patients had a complete pathologic response. The median microvessel density decreased 53% after BV alone (p <.05). After combination therapy, the median tumor cell proliferation decreased by 73%, apoptosis increased 10.4-fold, and the blood flow, blood volume, and permeability surface area decreased by 62-72% (p <.05). Analysis of gene expression microarrays of untreated tumors identified a 24-gene signature for treatment response. The microvessel density and circulating progenitor cells at baseline and the reduction in microvessel density and plasma soluble c-KIT with BV therapy also correlated with a good pathologic response (p <.05). After a median follow-up of 20 months, only 1 patient had developed local recurrence. Conclusions: The results from the present exploratory study indicated that BV increases the efficacy of RT against soft tissue sarcomas and might reduce the incidence of local recurrence. Thus, this regimen warrants

  3. Surgical resection with adjuvant brachytherapy in soft tissue sarcoma of the extremity – a case report

    PubMed Central

    Łyczek, Jarosław; Kowalik, Łukasz

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Surgery is the major therapeutic method in soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity (E-STS). Treatment of large high-grade tumours, which resection cannot be performed with a wide safe margin, should include complementary radiation and/or chemo-therapy. Hopefully, the use of adjuvant brachytherapy will improve the prognosis of E-STS. Case description After a long process of diagnosing a tumour in the medial compartment of the thigh, a 65-year-old woman with diagnosed synovial sarcoma underwent a surgery. Compartment resection was performed and the tumour was removed with a 10 mm safety margin of healthy tissue. Adjuvant brachytherapy was delivered with 192Ir (MicroSelectron, Nucletron Electa Group, Stockholm, Sweden®) with 10 Ci of nominal activity to a dose of 55 Gy in 16 days because of large tumour size (99 × 78 × 73 mm) and its proximity to the neurovascular bundle. No complications were reported. The patient was discharged from the hospital on the 28th day after the surgery. The wound healed without any complications and the outpatient follow-up is being continued. Discussion Adjuvant brachytherapy is rarely used after surgical treatment due to its limited accessibility in hospitals with surgical and orthopaedic departments. There are numerous publications proving positive influence of brachytherapy on local control and decreased number of recurrences. The recurrence-free survival time also increased significantly, however no direct impact on the number of distant metastases was found. Treatment is well tolerated and short. The complication rate varies between centres from 5 to 30%. The most common adverse effects include: peripheral neuropathy, skin necrosis and osteonecrosis of the long bones. Conclusions Treatment of large soft tissue sarcomas of the extremity (E-STS) should include combination of surgical intervention and external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. Adjuvant brachytherapy improves local control rate up to 78%, is well tolerated and

  4. Normalization of gene expression measurement of tissue samples obtained by transurethral resection of bladder tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Laura A; Pileczki, Valentina; Cojocneanu-Petric, Roxana M; Petrut, Bogdan; Braicu, Cornelia; Jurj, Ancuta M; Buiga, Rares; Achimas-Cadariu, Patriciu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana

    2016-01-01

    Background Sample processing is a crucial step for all types of genomic studies. A major challenge for researchers is to understand and predict how RNA quality affects the identification of transcriptional differences (by introducing either false-positive or false-negative errors). Nanotechnologies help improve the quality and quantity control for gene expression studies. Patients and methods The study was performed on 14 tumor and matched normal pairs of tissue from patients with bladder urothelial carcinomas. We assessed the RNA quantity by using the NanoDrop spectrophotometer and the quality by nano-microfluidic capillary electrophoresis technology provided by Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer. We evaluated the amplification status of three housekeeping genes and one small nuclear RNA gene using the ViiA 7 platform, with specific primers. Results Every step of the sample handling protocol, which begins with sample harvest and ends with the data analysis, is of utmost importance due to the fact that it is time consuming, labor intensive, and highly expensive. High temperature of the surgical procedure does not affect the small nucleic acid sequences in comparison with the mRNA. Conclusion Gene expression is clearly affected by the RNA quality, but less affected in the case of small nuclear RNAs. We proved that the high-temperature, highly invasive transurethral resection of bladder tumor procedure damages the tissue and affects the integrity of the RNA from biological specimens. PMID:27330317

  5. Narrowing Resection of Parametrial Tissues Is Feasible in Low-Risk Cases of Stage IA2-IB1 Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Lian; Liu, Xiao-Xia; Cao, Guan-Shu; Ju, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Hua

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is the standard surgical treatment for patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer, but the wide excision increases the complications. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the feasibility of narrowing resection of parametrial tissues in stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospectively analyzed the pathological and clinical data of patients with stage IA2-IB1 cervical cancer who received radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy in OB/GYN Hospital, Fudan University, China from Jan 2008 to Dec 2011. The affected factors of parametrial metastases and outcomes were discussed. The single factor analysis was made with χ2 test, and the relationship of the resection width of parametrial tissues and the patients' outcomes was analyzed with χ2 test and log-rank. P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: There were 31 cases recurred, 26 cases died of cervical cancer in 513 patients during the follow-up period (from 2 months to 66 months, averaged 39 months). The low-risk factors included diameter of tumor ≤2cm, depth of cervical myometrial invasion<1/2 and without lymph vascular involvement. There were no parametrial metastases in cases with all three low-risk factors. Whether the resection width of parametrial tissues ≥3cm or not had no statistically significant effect on progression free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) of low-risk patients. D2-40 and CD31 were related with parametrial metastases, but not with recurrence or outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The resection width of parametrial tissues has no effect on PFS and OS of low-risk patients, and narrowing resection of parametrial tissues (<3cm) is feasible. PMID:27471564

  6. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, A.; Aoki, K.; Kito, M.; Okamoto, M.; Suzuki, S.; Momose, T.; Kato, H.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to predict the knee extension strength and post-operative function in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Methods A total of 18 patients (14 men, four women) underwent total or partial quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh between 2002 and 2014. The number of resected quadriceps was surveyed, knee extension strength was measured with the Biodex isokinetic dynamometer system (affected side/unaffected side) and relationships between these were examined. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score, Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS), European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) score and the Short Form 8 were used to evaluate post-operative function and examine correlations with extension strength. The cutoff value for extension strength to expect good post-operative function was also calculated using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and Fisher’s exact test. Results Extension strength decreased when the number of resected quadriceps increased (p < 0.001), and was associated with lower MSTS score, TESS and EQ-5D (p = 0.004, p = 0.005, p = 0.006, respectively). Based on the functional evaluation scales, the cutoff value of extension strength was 56.2%, the equivalent to muscle strength with resection of up to two muscles. Conclusion Good post-operative results can be expected if at least two quadriceps muscles are preserved. Cite this article: A. Tanaka, Y. Yoshimura, K. Aoki, M. Kito, M. Okamoto, S. Suzuki, T. Momose, H. Kato. Knee extension strength and post-operative functional prediction in quadriceps resection for soft-tissue sarcoma of the thigh. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:232–238. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.56.2000631. PMID:27317788

  7. Drug Resistance in Cortical and Hippocampal Slices from Resected Tissue of Epilepsy Patients: No Significant Impact of P-Glycoprotein and Multidrug Resistance-Associated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sandow, Nora; Kim, Simon; Raue, Claudia; Päsler, Dennis; Klaft, Zin-Juan; Antonio, Leandro Leite; Hollnagel, Jan Oliver; Kovacs, Richard; Kann, Oliver; Horn, Peter; Vajkoczy, Peter; Holtkamp, Martin; Meencke, Heinz-Joachim; Cavalheiro, Esper A.; Pragst, Fritz; Gabriel, Siegrun; Lehmann, Thomas-Nicolas; Heinemann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistant patients undergoing epilepsy surgery have a good chance to become sensitive to anticonvulsant medication, suggesting that the resected brain tissue is responsible for drug resistance. Here, we address the question whether P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) expressed in the resected tissue contribute to drug resistance in vitro. Effects of anti-epileptic drugs [carbamazepine (CBZ), sodium valproate, phenytoin] and two unspecific inhibitors of Pgp and MRPs [verapamil (VPM) and probenecid (PBN)] on seizure-like events (SLEs) induced in slices from 35 hippocampal and 35 temporal cortex specimens of altogether 51 patients (161 slices) were studied. Although in slice preparations the blood brain barrier is not functional, we found that SLEs predominantly persisted in the presence of anticonvulsant drugs (90%) and also in the presence of VPM and PBN (86%). Following subsequent co-administration of anti-epileptic drugs and drug transport inhibitors, SLEs continued in 63% of 143 slices. Drug sensitivity in slices was recognized either as transition to recurrent epileptiform transients (30%) or as suppression (7%), particularly by perfusion with CBZ in PBN containing solutions (43, 9%). Summarizing responses to co-administration from more than one slice per patient revealed that suppression of seizure-like activity in all slices was only observed in 7% of patients. Patients whose tissue was completely or partially sensitive (65%) presented with higher seizure frequencies than those with resistant tissue (35%). However, corresponding subgroups of patients do not differ with respect to expression rates of drug transporters. Our results imply that parenchymal MRPs and Pgp are not responsible for drug resistance in resected tissue. PMID:25741317

  8. Adjuvant Chemotherapy Following Complete Resection of Soft Tissue Sarcoma in Adults: A Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Bramwell, Vivien H. C.; Bell, Robert; Davis, Aileen M.; Charette, Manya L.; The members of the cancer care Ontario practice guidelines initiative sarcoma disease site group

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. To review the literature and make recommendations for the use of anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy in adult patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Patients. The recommendations apply to patients >15 years old with completely resected STS. Methods. A systematic overview of the published literature was combined with a consensus process around the interpretation of the evidence in the context of conventional practice to develop an evidence-based practice guideline. Results. Four meta-analyses and 17 randomized clinical trials comparing anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy versus observation were reviewed. The Sarcoma Meta-Analysis Collaboration (SMAC) was the best analysis because it assessed individual patient data and had the longest follow-up. The results of the SMAC meta-analysis together with data from more recently published randomized trials, as well as our analysis of the toxicity and compliance data, are incorporated in this systematic review. Discussion. It is reasonable to consider anthracycline-based adjuvant chemotherapy in patients who have had removal of a sarcoma with features predicting a high likelihood of relapse (deep location, size >5 cm, high histological grade). Although the benefits of adjuvant chemotherapy are most apparent in patients with extremity sarcomas, patients with high-risk tumours at other sites should also be considered for such therapy. PMID:18521341

  9. Toward a real time multi-tissue Adaptive Physics-Based Non-Rigid Registration framework for brain tumor resection.

    PubMed

    Drakopoulos, Fotis; Foteinos, Panagiotis; Liu, Yixun; Chrisochoides, Nikos P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive non-rigid registration method for aligning pre-operative MRI with intra-operative MRI (iMRI) to compensate for brain deformation during brain tumor resection. This method extends a successful existing Physics-Based Non-Rigid Registration (PBNRR) technique implemented in ITKv4.5. The new method relies on a parallel adaptive heterogeneous biomechanical Finite Element (FE) model for tissue/tumor removal depicted in the iMRI. In contrast the existing PBNRR in ITK relies on homogeneous static FE model designed for brain shift only (i.e., it is not designed to handle brain tumor resection). As a result, the new method (1) accurately captures the intra-operative deformations associated with the tissue removal due to tumor resection and (2) reduces the end-to-end execution time to within the time constraints imposed by the neurosurgical procedure. The evaluation of the new method is based on 14 clinical cases with: (i) brain shift only (seven cases), (ii) partial tumor resection (two cases), and (iii) complete tumor resection (five cases). The new adaptive method can reduce the alignment error up to seven and five times compared to a rigid and ITK's PBNRR registration methods, respectively. On average, the alignment error of the new method is reduced by 9.23 and 5.63 mm compared to the alignment error from the rigid and PBNRR method implemented in ITK. Moreover, the total execution time for all the case studies is about 1 min or less in a Linux Dell workstation with 12 Intel Xeon 3.47 GHz CPU cores and 96 GB of RAM. PMID:24596553

  10. Toward a real time multi-tissue Adaptive Physics-Based Non-Rigid Registration framework for brain tumor resection

    PubMed Central

    Drakopoulos, Fotis; Foteinos, Panagiotis; Liu, Yixun; Chrisochoides, Nikos P.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive non-rigid registration method for aligning pre-operative MRI with intra-operative MRI (iMRI) to compensate for brain deformation during brain tumor resection. This method extends a successful existing Physics-Based Non-Rigid Registration (PBNRR) technique implemented in ITKv4.5. The new method relies on a parallel adaptive heterogeneous biomechanical Finite Element (FE) model for tissue/tumor removal depicted in the iMRI. In contrast the existing PBNRR in ITK relies on homogeneous static FE model designed for brain shift only (i.e., it is not designed to handle brain tumor resection). As a result, the new method (1) accurately captures the intra-operative deformations associated with the tissue removal due to tumor resection and (2) reduces the end-to-end execution time to within the time constraints imposed by the neurosurgical procedure. The evaluation of the new method is based on 14 clinical cases with: (i) brain shift only (seven cases), (ii) partial tumor resection (two cases), and (iii) complete tumor resection (five cases). The new adaptive method can reduce the alignment error up to seven and five times compared to a rigid and ITK's PBNRR registration methods, respectively. On average, the alignment error of the new method is reduced by 9.23 and 5.63 mm compared to the alignment error from the rigid and PBNRR method implemented in ITK. Moreover, the total execution time for all the case studies is about 1 min or less in a Linux Dell workstation with 12 Intel Xeon 3.47 GHz CPU cores and 96 GB of RAM. PMID:24596553

  11. Initial experience of surgical microwave tissue precoagulation in liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic liver.

    PubMed

    Abdelraouf, A; Hamdy, H; El Erian, A M; Elsebae, M; Taha, S; Elshafey, H E; Ismail, S; Hassany, M

    2014-08-01

    Surgical hepatic resection has been considered as the first-line treatment which is most effective and radical treatment for HCC, however, HCC is usually associated with poor liver function owing to chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Techniques that can eradicate the tumor and also preserve liver function are needed. Moreover, hepatic resection, in the presence of cirrhosis, raises special problem of high risk as hemorrhage and liver failure, thus, good clinical results can only be achieved by minimizing operative blood loss, time of the intervention as well as the hepatic reserve. The tremendous progress in microwave technology has recently attracted considerable attention. This study evaluated the feasibility of this new liver transection technique demonstrating the high performance of this procedure, the accuracy in terms of squeeze effect on veins and portal branch and in terms of reducing the intra operative blood loss, and minimizing the operative time for safe hepatectomy. Twenty-six consecutive patients a first-time diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on top of liver cirrhosis were recruited for the study, from August 2011 to January 2013. All patients were subjected to full clinical examination, laboratory investigations, abdomen ultrasound (U/S), triphasic computed tomographic liver scan (CT) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in some doubtful cases. Inclusion requirements were presence of resectable disease without vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread at imaging, Child-Pugh class A & B (Score 7) liver cirrhosis, (INR) < 1.6 or platelet count) 60 000/mm3 with no previous treatment. Patients were treated by applying pre-coagulation of the liver transection lines using microwave probe positioned in parallel to the line of resection by open approach after intra-operative U/S assessment for localization of the tumor and line of resection. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia. Mobilization of the liver was not

  12. Distal ulna giant cell tumor resection with reconstruction using distal ulna prosthesis and brachioradialis wrap soft tissue stabilization.

    PubMed

    Burke, Charity S; Gupta, Amit; Buecker, Peter

    2009-12-01

    This is a surgical technique report concerning the treatment of a 32-year-old male who had a giant cell tumor of distal ulna with suspected metastatic disease to the lungs. Three curettage procedures and a Darrach procedure were performed at an outlying facility. Upon the fourth reoccurrence, the patient was referred to our facility. It was established that the patient needed a distal ulna en bloc resection. To accommodate his activity requirements, reconstruction of the sigmoid notch and distal ulna was undertaken using a prosthesis. Soft tissue stabilization of the prosthesis was a challenge due to his previous procedures. This was accomplished using a brachioradialis tendon wrap. PMID:19370378

  13. Compensation by the residual intestine after intestinal resection in the rat. I. Influence of amount of tissue removed.

    PubMed

    Hanson, W R; Osborne, J W; Sharp, J G

    1977-04-01

    Thirty days after resection of 10 to 80% of the midportion of the small intestine, excluding the duodenum, several cell kinetic parameters were investigated in the residual intestine. The degree of intestinal response increased in a stepwise fashion as the amount of tissue removed was increased. The response involved marked increases in: DNA synthesis per crypt expressed as disintegrations per minute of tritium (3H) reflecting (3H)thymidine incorporation, cells per crypt column, 3H-labelled cells per crypt column, cells per villus column, and thickness of all intestinal wall components. These changes occureed throughout the small intestine even at lesser resections. "Crypt profiles'' reflected changes in cell counts, but when the labeling frequency of proliferative cells was expressed as a percentage of the total crypt height, there was no change. The total number of crypts in the duodenum remained unchanged and the total number of cyrpts in the residual jejunum plus ileum decreased proportionally to the amount of tissue removed. Intestinal compensation occurred by increasing the size of the structures present in the residual intestine, not by increasing the number of structural units. PMID:838224

  14. Quantification of the Effect of Vertical Bone Resection of the Medial Proximal Tibia for Achieving Soft Tissue Balancing in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung Hyun; Kang, Ho Won

    2016-01-01

    Background Degenerative osteoarthritis of the knee usually shows arthritic change in the medial tibiofemoral joint with severe varus deformity. In total knee arthroplasty (TKA), the medial release technique is often used for achieving mediolateral balancing. But, in a more severe varus knee, there are more difficult technical problems. Bony resection of the medial proximal tibia (MPT) as an alternative technique for achieving soft tissue balancing was assessed in terms of its effectiveness and possibility of quantification. Methods TKAs were performed in 78 knees (60 patients) with vertical bone resection of the MPT for soft tissue balancing from September 2011 to March 2013. During operation, the medial and lateral gaps were measured before and after the bony resection technique. First, the correlation between the measured thickness of the resected bone and the change in medial and lateral gaps was analyzed. Second, the possibility of quantification of each parameter was evaluated by linear regression and the coefficient ratio was obtained. Results A significant correlation was identified between alteration in the medial gap change in extension and the measured thickness of the vertically resected MPT (r = 0.695, p = 0.000). In the medial gap change in flexion, there was no statistical significance (r = 0.214, p = 0.059). When the MPT was resected at an average thickness of 8.25 ± 1.92 mm, the medial gap in extension was increased by 2.94 ± 0.87 mm. In simple linear regression, it was predictable that MPT resection at a thickness of 2.80 mm was required to increase the medial gap by 1.00 mm in knee extension. Conclusions The method of bone resection of the MPT can be considered effective with a predictable result for achieving soft tissue balancing in terms of quantification during TKA. PMID:26929799

  15. Investigation of water spray to reduce collateral thermal damage during laser resection of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen-Kunde, D.; Wolken, H.; Ellebrecht, D.; Danicke, V.; Wurster, L.; Kleemann, M.; Birngruber, R.

    2013-06-01

    To reduce unwanted collateral thermal damage to surrounding tissue and organs during laparoscopic laser dissection (cw, wavelength: 1.9μm) of porcine liver water spray was used. Size and amount of the produced water droplets of the water spray were photographed by short time imaging and analyzed by imaging software. At in vivo measurements on fresh porcine liver the depth of thermal damage was reduced by 85 % with water spray and the lateral size of thermal damage at the tissue surface could be reduced by 67%. This results show that especially for laparoscopic laser surgery water spray application might be a useful tool to avoid unwanted collateral thermal damage.

  16. Protons Offer Reduced Normal-Tissue Exposure for Patients Receiving Postoperative Radiotherapy for Resected Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, Romaine C.; Huh, Soon N.; Prado, Karl L.; Yi, Byong Y.; Sharma, Navesh K.; Ho, Meng W.; Hoppe, Bradford S.; Mendenhall, Nancy P.; Li, Zuofeng; Regine, William F.

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the potential role for adjuvant proton-based radiotherapy (PT) for resected pancreatic head cancer. Methods and Materials: Between June 2008 and November 2008, 8 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic head cancers underwent optimized intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment planning. IMRT plans used between 10 and 18 fields and delivered 45 Gy to the initial planning target volume (PTV) and a 5.4 Gy boost to a reduced PTV. PTVs were defined according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 radiotherapy guidelines. Ninety-five percent of PTVs received 100% of the target dose and 100% of the PTVs received 95% of the target dose. Normal tissue constraints were as follows: right kidney V18 Gy to <70%; left kidney V18 Gy to <30%; small bowel/stomach V20 Gy to <50%, V45 Gy to <15%, V50 Gy to <10%, and V54 Gy to <5%; liver V30 Gy to <60%; and spinal cord maximum to 46 Gy. Optimized two- to three-field three-dimensional conformal proton plans were retrospectively generated on the same patients. The team generating the proton plans was blinded to the dose distributions achieved by the IMRT plans. The IMRT and proton plans were then compared. A Wilcoxon paired t-test was performed to compare various dosimetric points between the two plans for each patient. Results: All proton plans met all normal tissue constraints and were isoeffective with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of PTV coverage. The proton plans offered significantly reduced normal-tissue exposure over the IMRT plans with respect to the following: median small bowel V20 Gy, 15.4% with protons versus 47.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0156); median gastric V20 Gy, 2.3% with protons versus 20.0% with IMRT (p = 0.0313); and median right kidney V18 Gy, 27.3% with protons versus 50.5% with IMRT (p = 0.0156). Conclusions: By reducing small bowel and stomach exposure, protons have the potential to reduce the acute and late toxicities of postoperative chemoradiation in this setting.

  17. Resection and reconstruction of pelvic and extremity soft tissue sarcomas with major vascular involvement: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    McGoldrick, Niall P; Butler, Joseph S; Lavelle, Maire; Sheehan, Stephen; Dudeney, Sean; O'Toole, Gary C

    2016-05-18

    Soft tissue sarcoma accounts for approximately 1% of all cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. When these rare malignant mesodermal tumours arise in the pelvis and extremities, they may potentially encase or invade large calibre vascular structures. This presents a major challenge in terms of safe excision while also leaving acceptable surgical margins. In recent times, the trend has been towards limb salvage with vascular reconstruction in preference to amputation. Newer orthopaedic and vascular reconstructive techniques including both synthetic and autogenous graft reconstruction have made complex limb-salvage surgery feasible. Despite this, limb-salvage surgery with concomitant vascular reconstruction remains associated with higher rates of post-operative complications including infection and amputation. In this review we describe the initial presentation and investigation of patients presenting with soft tissue sarcomas in the pelvis and extremities, which involve vascular structures. We further discuss the key surgical reconstructive principles and techniques available for the management of these complex tumours, drawn from our institution's experience as a national tertiary referral sarcoma service. PMID:27190757

  18. Resection and reconstruction of pelvic and extremity soft tissue sarcomas with major vascular involvement: Current concepts

    PubMed Central

    McGoldrick, Niall P; Butler, Joseph S; Lavelle, Maire; Sheehan, Stephen; Dudeney, Sean; O'Toole, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcoma accounts for approximately 1% of all cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. When these rare malignant mesodermal tumours arise in the pelvis and extremities, they may potentially encase or invade large calibre vascular structures. This presents a major challenge in terms of safe excision while also leaving acceptable surgical margins. In recent times, the trend has been towards limb salvage with vascular reconstruction in preference to amputation. Newer orthopaedic and vascular reconstructive techniques including both synthetic and autogenous graft reconstruction have made complex limb-salvage surgery feasible. Despite this, limb-salvage surgery with concomitant vascular reconstruction remains associated with higher rates of post-operative complications including infection and amputation. In this review we describe the initial presentation and investigation of patients presenting with soft tissue sarcomas in the pelvis and extremities, which involve vascular structures. We further discuss the key surgical reconstructive principles and techniques available for the management of these complex tumours, drawn from our institution’s experience as a national tertiary referral sarcoma service. PMID:27190757

  19. Surgical Management of Retroperitoneal Soft Tissue Sarcomas: Role of Curative Resection.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Fausto; Fiorillo, Claudio; Tortorelli, Antonio Pio; Sánchez, Alejandro Martin; Costamagna, Guido; Doglietto, Giovanni Battista; Alfieri, Sergio

    2016-02-01

    Retroperitoneal sarcomas are a rare group of malignant soft tissue tumors with a generally poor prognosis. However, factors affecting the recurrence and long-term survival are not well understood. The aim of this study was to assess clinical, pathological, and treatment-related factors affecting prognosis in patients with retroperitoneal sarcomas. The hospital records of 107 patients who underwent surgical exploration at our unit for primary or recurrent retroperitoneal sarcomas between 1984 and 2013 were reviewed. Of these patients, 92 had a primary tumor and 15 had a recurrent neoplasm. Study end points included factors affecting overall and recurrence-free survival for the 92 patients with primary disease. Mean follow-up was 79.7 ± 56.3 months. Only the patients undergoing surgery for primary sarcoma were included in this study. Overall 5-year survival was 71 per cent. Disease-free 5-year survival was 65 per cent. Only tumor grade affects overall and disease-free survival. This study confirmed the importance of an aggressive surgical management for retroperitoneal sarcomas to offer these patients the best chance of cure. In our series, only the tumor grade seems to be associated with worse outcome and higher rate of recurrence, regardless of the size of the tumor. PMID:26874134

  20. Radiation Therapy for Control of Soft-Tissue Sarcomas Resected With Positive Margins

    SciTech Connect

    DeLaney, Thomas F. . E-mail: tdelaney@partners.org; Kepka, Lucyna; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Gebhardt, Mark C.; Yoon, Sam S.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Harmon, David C.; Kirsch, David G.; Mankin, Henry J.; Rosenberg, Andrew E.; Nielsen, G. Petur; Suit, Herman D.

    2007-04-01

    Purpose: Positive margins (PM) remain after surgery in some soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) patients. We investigated the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) in STS patients with PM. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was performed on 154 patients with STS at various anatomic sites with PM, defined as tumor on ink, who underwent RT with curative intent between 1970 and 2001. Local control (LC), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS) rates were evaluated by univariate (log-rank) and multivariate analysis of prognostic and treatment factors. Results: At 5 years, actuarial LC, DFS, and OS rates were: 76%, 46.7%, and 65.2%, respectively. LC was highest with extremity lesions (p < 0.01), radiation dose >64 Gy (p < 0.05), microscopically (vs. grossly visible) positive margin (p = 0.03), and superficial lesions (p = 0.05). Patients receiving >64 Gy had higher 5-year LC, DFS, and OS rates of 85%, 52.1%, and 67.8% vs. 66.1%, 41.8%, and 62.9% if {<=}64 Gy, p < 0.04. OS was worse in patients with G2/G3 tumors with local failure (LF), p < 0.001. Other known prognostic factors, including grade, stage, size, and age (>50), also significantly influenced OS. By multivariate analysis, the best predictors of LC were site (extremity vs. other), p < 0.01 and dose (>64 vs. {<=}64 Gy), p < 0.05; the best predictors for OS were size, p < 0.001, gross vs. microscopic PM, p < 0.05, and LF, p < 0.01. Conclusion: Local control is achieved in most PM STS patients undergoing RT. Doses >64 Gy, superficial location, and extremity site are associated with improved LC. OS is worse in patients with tumors with lesions >5 cm, grossly positive margins, and after local failure.

  1. Complications Following Carinal Resections and Sleeve Resections.

    PubMed

    Tapias, Luis F; Ott, Harald C; Mathisen, Douglas J

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary resections with concomitant circumferential airway resection and resection and reconstruction of carina and main stem bronchi remain challenging operations in thoracic surgery. Anastomotic complications range from mucosal sloughing and formation of granulation tissue, anastomotic ischemia promoting scar formation and stricture, to anastomotic breakdown leading to bronchopleural or bronchovascular fistulae or complete dehiscence. Careful attention to patient selection and technical detail results in acceptable morbidity and mortality as well as good long-term survival. In this article, we focus on the technical details of the procedures, how to avoid complications and most importantly how to manage complications when they occur. PMID:26515944

  2. Characterization and Clinical Implication of Th1/Th2/Th17 Cytokines Produced from Three-Dimensionally Cultured Tumor Tissues Resected from Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiyomi, Anna; Makita, Masujiro; Ozeki, Tomoko; Li, Na; Satomura, Aiko; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Iwase, Takuji; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Several cytokines secreted from breast cancer tissues are suggested to be related to disease prognosis. We examined Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines produced from three-dimensionally cultured breast cancer tissues and related them with patient clinical profiles. METHODS: 21 tumor tissues and 9 normal tissues surgically resected from breast cancer patients were cultured in thermoreversible gelatin polymer–containing medium. Tissue growth and Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine concentrations in the culture medium were analyzed and were related with hormone receptor expressions and patient clinical profiles. RESULTS: IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed highly in culture medium of both cancer and normal tissues. However, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and IL-17A were not detected in the supernatant of the three-dimensionally cultured normal mammary gland and are seemed to be specific to breast cancer tissues. The growth abilities of hormone receptor–negative cancer tissues were significantly higher than those of receptor-positive tissues (P = 0.0383). Cancer tissues of stage ≥ IIB patients expressed significantly higher TNF-α levels as compared with those of patients with stage < IIB (P = 0.0096). CONCLUSIONS: The tumor tissues resected from breast cancer patients can grow in the three-dimensional thermoreversible gelatin polymer culture system and produce Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines. Hormone receptor–positive cancer tissues showed less growth ability. TNF-α is suggested to be a biomarker for the cancer stage. PMID:26310378

  3. The Potential of High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy in the Pathologic Analysis of Resected Breast and Lymph Tissue.

    PubMed

    Dashevsky, Brittany Z; D'Alfonso, Timothy; Sutton, Elizabeth J; Giambrone, Ashley; Aronowitz, Eric; Morris, Elizabeth A; Juluru, Krishna; Ballon, Douglas J

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic evaluation of breast specimens requires a fixation and staining procedure of at least 12 hours duration, delaying diagnosis and post-operative planning. Here we introduce an MRI technique with a custom-designed radiofrequency resonator for imaging breast and lymph tissue with sufficient spatial resolution and speed to guide pathologic interpretation and offer value in clinical decision making. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to image breast and lymphatic tissue using 7.0 Tesla MRI, achieving a spatial resolution of 59 × 59 × 94 μm(3) with a signal-to-noise ratio of 15-20, in an imaging time of 56 to 70 minutes. These are the first MR images to reveal characteristic pathologic features of both benign and malignant breast and lymph tissue, some of which were discernible by blinded pathologists who had no prior training in high resolution MRI interpretation. PMID:26639673

  4. The Potential of High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Microscopy in the Pathologic Analysis of Resected Breast and Lymph Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dashevsky, Brittany Z.; D'Alfonso, Timothy; Sutton, Elizabeth J.; Giambrone, Ashley; Aronowitz, Eric; Morris, Elizabeth A.; Juluru, Krishna; Ballon, Douglas J.

    2015-01-01

    Pathologic evaluation of breast specimens requires a fixation and staining procedure of at least 12 hours duration, delaying diagnosis and post-operative planning. Here we introduce an MRI technique with a custom-designed radiofrequency resonator for imaging breast and lymph tissue with sufficient spatial resolution and speed to guide pathologic interpretation and offer value in clinical decision making. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to image breast and lymphatic tissue using 7.0 Tesla MRI, achieving a spatial resolution of 59 × 59 × 94 μm3 with a signal-to-noise ratio of 15–20, in an imaging time of 56 to 70 minutes. These are the first MR images to reveal characteristic pathologic features of both benign and malignant breast and lymph tissue, some of which were discernible by blinded pathologists who had no prior training in high resolution MRI interpretation. PMID:26639673

  5. Endoscopic resection of subepithelial tumors

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Bauder, Markus; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Management of subepithelial tumors (SETs) remains challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has improved differential diagnosis of these tumors but a definitive diagnosis on EUS findings alone can be achieved in the minority of cases. Complete endoscopic resection may provide a reasonable approach for tissue acquisition and may also be therapeutic in case of malignant lesions. Small SET restricted to the submucosa can be removed with established basic resection techniques. However, resection of SET arising from deeper layers of the gastrointestinal wall requires advanced endoscopic methods and harbours the risk of perforation. Innovative techniques such as submucosal tunneling and full thickness resection have expanded the frontiers of endoscopic therapy in the past years. This review will give an overview about endoscopic resection techniques of SET with a focus on novel methods. PMID:25512768

  6. Hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, K; Kawamura, T; Sanada, T; Kumashiro, Y; Okamoto, H; Nakamura, N; Arii, S

    2002-09-01

    Thanks to recent advances, performance of liver resection is now possible using laparoscopic procedures. However, still there are some difficulties to overcome. The hand-assisted method lends safety and reliability to the laparoscopic procedure. A 54-year-old man diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was referred for hepatectomy. Angiography with computed tomography (CT) scans revealed a 2-cm hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) at segment V, close to the gallbladder. A hand-assisted laparoscopic hepatic resection was performed. Four 10-mm trocars, one for wall lifting and three for working, were placed in the upper abdomen. A small incision was added at the right side of umbilicus, and the operator's left hand was inserted through it. A microwave tissue coagulator and laparoscopic ultrasonic dissector were used for liver resection. Total operation time was 162 min; blood loss was 20 g. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the postoperative hospital stay was 7 days. We thus demonstrated that laparoscopic liver resection is safer and easier when the hand of the operator can be inserted into the abdomen. The small incision does not greatly diminish the benefits that accrue from minimally invasive laparoscopic surgery. The hand-assisted procedure allows better access to the tumor. In addition, hand assistance restores the sense of touch to the operator and is an effective means of controlling sudden and unexpected bleeding. PMID:12235510

  7. Sildenafil promotes smooth muscle preservation and ameliorates fibrosis through modulation of extracellular matrix and tissue growth factor gene expression after bilateral cavernosal nerve resection in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Sirad, Fara; Hlaing, Su; Kovanecz, Istvan; Artaza, Jorge N.; Garcia, Leah A.; Rajfer, Jacob; Ferrini, Monica G.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been shown that PDE 5 inhibitors preserve smooth muscle (SM) content and ameliorate the fibrotic degeneration normally seen in the corpora cavernosa after bilateral cavernosal nerve resection (BCNR). However, the downstream mechanisms by which these drugs protect the corpora cavernosa remain poorly understood. Aim To provide insight into the mechanism, we aimed to determine the gene expression profile of angiogenesis related pathways within the penile tissue after BCNR with or without continuous sildenafil treatment. Methods 5-month old Fisher rats were subjected to BCNR or sham operation and treated with or without sildenafil (20 mg/Kg. B.W drinking water) for 3 days or 45 days (n=8 rats per group). Total RNAs isolated from the denuded penile shaft and prostate were subjected to reverse transcription and to angiogenesis real time-PCR arrays (84 genes). Changes in protein expression of selected genes such as epiregulin and CTGF were corroborated by western blot and immunohistochemistry. Main outcomes measures Genes modulated by BCNR and sildenafil treatment. Results A decreased expression of genes related to SM growth factors such as epiregulin (EREG), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), extracellular matrix regulators such as metalloproteinases 3 and 9, endothelial growth factors, together with an up-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes such as connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and TGFβ2 were found at both time points after BCNR. Sildenafil treatment reversed this process by up-regulating endothelial and SM growth factors and down-regulating pro-fibrotic factors. Sildenafil did not affect the expression of EREG, VEGF, PDGF in the ventral prostate of BCNR animals Conclusions Sildenafil treatment after BCNR activates genes related to SM preservation and down regulates genes related to fibrosis in the corpora cavernosa. These results provide a mechanistic justification for the use of sildenafil and other PDE5 inhibitors as protective therapy

  8. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F.; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  9. A Balanced Tissue Composition Reveals New Metabolic and Gene Expression Markers in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tessem, May-Britt; Bertilsson, Helena; Angelsen, Anders; Bathen, Tone F; Drabløs, Finn; Rye, Morten Beck

    2016-01-01

    Molecular analysis of patient tissue samples is essential to characterize the in vivo variability in human cancers which are not accessible in cell-lines or animal models. This applies particularly to studies of tumor metabolism. The challenge is, however, the complex mixture of various tissue types within each sample, such as benign epithelium, stroma and cancer tissue, which can introduce systematic biases when cancers are compared to normal samples. In this study we apply a simple strategy to remove such biases using sample selections where the average content of stroma tissue is balanced between the sample groups. The strategy is applied to a prostate cancer patient cohort where data from MR spectroscopy and gene expression have been collected from and integrated on the exact same tissue samples. We reveal in vivo changes in cancer-relevant metabolic pathways which are otherwise hidden in the data due to tissue confounding. In particular, lowered levels of putrescine are connected to increased expression of SRM, reduced levels of citrate are attributed to upregulation of genes promoting fatty acid synthesis, and increased succinate levels coincide with reduced expression of SUCLA2 and SDHD. In addition, the strategy also highlights important metabolic differences between the stroma, epithelium and prostate cancer. These results show that important in vivo metabolic features of cancer can be revealed from patient data only if the heterogeneous tissue composition is properly accounted for in the analysis. PMID:27100877

  10. A phase II study evaluating neo-/adjuvant EIA chemotherapy, surgical resection and radiotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The role of chemotherapy in high-risk soft tissue sarcoma is controversial. Though many patients undergo initial curative resection, distant metastasis is a frequent event, resulting in 5-year overall survival rates of only 50-60%. Neo-adjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy (CTX) has been applied to achieve pre-operative cytoreduction, assess chemosensitivity, and to eliminate occult metastasis. Here we report on the results of our non-randomized phase II study on neo-adjuvant treatment for high-risk STS. Method Patients with potentially curative high-risk STS (size ≥ 5 cm, deep/extracompartimental localization, tumor grades II-III [FNCLCC]) were included. The protocol comprised 4 cycles of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (EIA, etoposide 125 mg/m2 iv days 1 and 4, ifosfamide 1500 mg/m2 iv days 1 - 4, doxorubicin 50 mg/m2 day 1, pegfilgrastim 6 mg sc day 5), definitive surgery with intra-operative radiotherapy, adjuvant radiotherapy and 4 adjuvant cycles of EIA. Result Between 06/2005 and 03/2010 a total of 50 subjects (male = 33, female = 17, median age 50.1 years) were enrolled. Median follow-up was 30.5 months. The majority of primary tumors were located in the extremities or trunk (92%), 6% originated in the abdomen/retroperitoneum. Response by RECIST criteria to neo-adjuvant CTX was 6% CR (n = 3), 24% PR (n = 12), 62% SD (n = 31) and 8% PD (n = 4). Local recurrence occurred in 3 subjects (6%). Distant metastasis was observed in 12 patients (24%). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 years was 83% and 68%, respectively. Multivariate analysis failed to prove influence of resection status or grade of histological necrosis on OS or DFS. Severe toxicities included neutropenic fever (4/50), cardiac toxicity (2/50), and CNS toxicity (4/50) leading to CTX dose reductions in 4 subjects. No cases of secondary leukemias were observed so far. Conclusion The current protocol is feasible for achieving local control rates, as well as OS and

  11. Multimodal Optical Microscopy Methods Reveal Polyp Tissue Morphology and Structure in Caribbean Reef Building Corals

    PubMed Central

    Sivaguru, Mayandi; Fried, Glenn A.; Miller, Carly A. H.; Fouke, Bruce W.

    2014-01-01

    An integrated suite of imaging techniques has been applied to determine the three-dimensional (3D) morphology and cellular structure of polyp tissues comprising the Caribbean reef building corals Montastraeaannularis and M. faveolata. These approaches include fluorescence microscopy (FM), serial block face imaging (SBFI), and two-photon confocal laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM). SBFI provides deep tissue imaging after physical sectioning; it details the tissue surface texture and 3D visualization to tissue depths of more than 2 mm. Complementary FM and TPLSM yield ultra-high resolution images of tissue cellular structure. Results have: (1) identified previously unreported lobate tissue morphologies on the outer wall of individual coral polyps and (2) created the first surface maps of the 3D distribution and tissue density of chromatophores and algae-like dinoflagellate zooxanthellae endosymbionts. Spectral absorption peaks of 500 nm and 675 nm, respectively, suggest that M. annularis and M. faveolata contain similar types of chlorophyll and chromatophores. However, M. annularis and M. faveolata exhibit significant differences in the tissue density and 3D distribution of these key cellular components. This study focusing on imaging methods indicates that SBFI is extremely useful for analysis of large mm-scale samples of decalcified coral tissues. Complimentary FM and TPLSM reveal subtle submillimeter scale changes in cellular distribution and density in nondecalcified coral tissue samples. The TPLSM technique affords: (1) minimally invasive sample preparation, (2) superior optical sectioning ability, and (3) minimal light absorption and scattering, while still permitting deep tissue imaging. PMID:25226350

  12. Kinematic resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlin, Fergal P.

    1995-01-01

    A new geometric formulation is given for the problem of determining position and orientation of a satellite scanner from error-prone ground control point observations in linear pushbroom imagery. The pushbroom satellite resection problem is significantly more complicated than that of the conventional frame camera because of irregular platform motion throughout the image capture period. Enough ephemeris data are typically available to reconstruct satellite trajectory and hence the interior orientation of the pushbroom imagery. The new approach to resection relies on the use of reconstructed scanner interior orientation to determine the relative orientations of a bundle of image rays. The absolute position and orientation which allows this bundle to minimize its distance from a corresponding set of ground control points may then be found. The interior orientation is represented as a kinematic chain of screw motions, implemented as dual-number quaternions. The motor algebra is used in the analysis since it provides a means of line, point, and motion manipulation. Its moment operator provides a metric of distance between the image ray and the ground control point.

  13. Metabolomics reveals the heterogeneous secretome of two entomopathogenic fungi to ex vivo cultured insect tissues.

    PubMed

    de Bekker, Charissa; Smith, Philip B; Patterson, Andrew D; Hughes, David P

    2013-01-01

    Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied. PMID:23940603

  14. Metabolomics Reveals the Heterogeneous Secretome of Two Entomopathogenic Fungi to Ex Vivo Cultured Insect Tissues

    PubMed Central

    de Bekker, Charissa; Smith, Philip B.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Hughes, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal entomopathogens rely on cellular heterogeneity during the different stages of insect host infection. Their pathogenicity is exhibited through the secretion of secondary metabolites, which implies that the infection life history of this group of environmentally important fungi can be revealed using metabolomics. Here metabolomic analysis in combination with ex vivo insect tissue culturing shows that two generalist isolates of the genus Metarhizium and Beauveria, commonly used as biological pesticides, employ significantly different arrays of secondary metabolites during infectious and saprophytic growth. It also reveals that both fungi exhibit tissue specific strategies by a distinguishable metabolite secretion on the insect tissues tested in this study. In addition to showing the important heterogeneous nature of these two entomopathogens, this study also resulted in the discovery of several novel destruxins and beauverolides that have not been described before, most likely because previous surveys did not use insect tissues as a culturing system. While Beauveria secreted these cyclic depsipeptides when encountering live insect tissues, Metarhizium employed them primarily on dead tissue. This implies that, while these fungi employ comparable strategies when it comes to entomopathogenesis, there are most certainly significant differences at the molecular level that deserve to be studied. PMID:23940603

  15. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  16. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Substantial Tissue Specificity in Human Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Ying; Gu, Weidong; Ni, Buqing; Sun, Haoliang; Yu, Tong; Gu, Wanjun; Chen, Liang; Shao, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revolutionary roles in transcriptome identification and quantification of different types of tissues and cells in many organisms. Although numerous RNA-seq data derived from many types of human tissues and cell lines, little is known on the transcriptome repertoire of human aortic valve. In this study, we sequenced the total RNA prepared from two calcified human aortic valves and reported the whole transcriptome of human aortic valve. Integrating RNA-seq data of 13 human tissues from Human Body Map 2 Project, we constructed a transcriptome repertoire of human tissues, including 19,505 protein-coding genes and 4,948 long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Among them, 263 lincRNAs were identified as novel noncoding transcripts in our data. By comparing transcriptome data among different human tissues, we observed substantial tissue specificity of RNA transcripts, both protein-coding genes and lincRNAs, in human aortic valve. Further analysis revealed that aortic valve-specific lincRNAs were more likely to be recently derived from repetitive elements in the primate lineage, but were less likely to be conserved at the nucleotide level. Expression profiling analysis showed significant lower expression levels of aortic valve-specific protein-coding genes and lincRNA genes, when compared with genes that were universally expressed in various tissues. Isoform-level expression analysis also showed that a majority of mRNA genes had a major isoform expressed in the human aortic valve. To our knowledge, this is the first comparative transcriptome analysis between human aortic valve and other human tissues. Our results are helpful to understand the transcriptome diversity of human tissues and the underlying mechanisms that drive tissue specificity of protein-coding genes and lincRNAs in human aortic valve. PMID:27493474

  17. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Richard J; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-08-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs. PMID:26099271

  18. Tissue-Based Proteogenomics Reveals that Human Testis Endows Plentiful Missing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yao; Li, Qidan; Wu, Feilin; Zhou, Ruo; Qi, Yingzi; Su, Na; Chen, Lingsheng; Xu, Shaohang; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Chengpu; Cheng, Gang; Chen, Xinguo; Kong, Degang; Wang, Yujia; Zhang, Tao; Zi, Jin; Wei, Wei; Gao, Yuan; Zhen, Bei; Xiong, Zhi; Wu, Songfeng; Yang, Pengyuan; Wang, Quanhui; Wen, Bo; He, Fuchu; Xu, Ping; Liu, Siqi

    2015-09-01

    Investigations of missing proteins (MPs) are being endorsed by many bioanalytical strategies. We proposed that proteogenomics of testis tissue was a feasible approach to identify more MPs because testis tissues have higher gene expression levels. Here we combined proteomics and transcriptomics to survey gene expression in human testis tissues from three post-mortem individuals. Proteins were extracted and separated with glycine- and tricine-SDS-PAGE. A total of 9597 protein groups were identified; of these, 166 protein groups were listed as MPs, including 138 groups (83.1%) with transcriptional evidence. A total of 2948 proteins are designated as MPs, and 5.6% of these were identified in this study. The high incidence of MPs in testis tissue indicates that this is a rich resource for MPs. Functional category analysis revealed that the biological processes that testis MPs are mainly involved in are sexual reproduction and spermatogenesis. Some of the MPs are potentially involved in tumorgenesis in other tissues. Therefore, this proteogenomics analysis of individual testis tissues provides convincing evidence of the discovery of MPs. All mass spectrometry data from this study have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange (data set identifier PXD002179). PMID:26282447

  19. Perspectives of holmium laser resection of the prostate: cutting effects with the holmium:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenauer, Rolf H.; Droege, Gerit; Brinkmann, Ralf; Neuss, Malte; Gafumbegete, Evariste; Jocham, Dieter

    1998-07-01

    Laser prostatectomy shows an improvement in peak urinary flow rates, in post-void residual urine volumes and also a symptomatic improvement when compared to the transurethral resection of the prostate (TUR-P). Time to achieve symptomatic improvement is delayed with many established laser procedures compared to standard resection. However, this disadvantage can be solved with a new resection technique using a pulsed holmium laser. Nevertheless, this advanced technique shows a few problems in a first clinical trial. Besides this clinical study, in vitro experiments were carried out in order to determine the optimal irradiation parameters with respect to resection rate, incision/ablation quality and handling. Prostate tissue of radical prostatectomies and chicken breast as model were irradiated with a pulsed holmium-laser in vitro with different laser parameters using a bare fiber in contact to tissue. The incision quality (depths and coagulation/vaporization effects) was analyzed with regard to pulse energy (speed of incision, angle of incision) and fiber diameter. Fast flash photography was performed to analyze thermo-mechanical side-effects. Fast flash photography reveals cavitation bubble up to 7 mm length in water and dissections in tissue. The ablation rate increases proportional to the laser pulse energy. The Holmium Laser Resection of the Prostate (HOLRP) in humans with available instrumentation right now shows equieffective results compared to the transurethral resection, no need for transfusion, no transurethral resection syndrome, short time for catheterization. Further technical approvement may significantly improve holmium laser prostate resection. We present a new application system for the laser resection.

  20. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways.

    PubMed

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Human Brown Adipose Tissue Reveals Utilization of Coupled and Uncoupled Energy Expenditure Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Sebastian; Balaz, Miroslav; Stefanicka, Patrik; Varga, Lukas; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ukropec, Jozef; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wolfrum, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) has become an attractive target to combat the current epidemical spread of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Currently, information on its functional role is primarily derived from rodent studies. Here, we present the first comparative proteotype analysis of primary human brown adipose tissue versus adjacent white adipose tissue, which reveals significant quantitative differences in protein abundances and in turn differential functional capabilities. The majority of the 318 proteins with increased abundance in BAT are associated with mitochondrial metabolism and confirm the increased oxidative capacity. In addition to uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), the main functional effector for uncoupled respiration, we also detected the mitochondrial creatine kinases (CKMT1A/B, CKMT2), as effective modulators of ATP synthase coupled respiration, to be exclusively expressed in BAT. The abundant expression and utilization of both energy expenditure pathways in parallel highlights the complex functional involvement of BAT in human physiology. PMID:27418403

  2. Multi-Tissue Omics Analyses Reveal Molecular Regulatory Networks for Puberty in Composite Beef Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cánovas, Angela; Reverter, Antonio; DeAtley, Kasey L.; Ashley, Ryan L.; Colgrave, Michelle L.; Fortes, Marina R. S.; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Lehnert, Sigrid; Porto-Neto, Laercio; Rincón, Gonzalo; Silver, Gail A.; Snelling, Warren M.; Medrano, Juan F.; Thomas, Milton G.

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e. hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary, uterus, and endometrium) as well as tissues known to be relevant to growth and metabolism needed to achieve puberty (i.e., longissimus dorsi muscle, adipose, and liver). These tissues were collected from pre- and post-pubertal Brangus heifers (3/8 Brahman; Bos indicus x 5/8 Angus; Bos taurus) derived from a population of cattle used to identify quantitative trait loci associated with fertility traits (i.e., age of first observed corpus luteum (ACL), first service conception (FSC), and heifer pregnancy (HPG)). In order to exploit the power of complementary omics analyses, pre- and post-puberty co-expression gene networks were constructed by combining the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), RNA-Seq, and bovine transcription factors. Eight tissues among pre-pubertal and post-pubertal Brangus heifers revealed 1,515 differentially expressed and 943 tissue-specific genes within the 17,832 genes confirmed by RNA-Seq analysis. The hypothalamus experienced the most notable up-regulation of genes via puberty (i.e., 204 out of 275 genes). Combining the results of GWAS and RNA-Seq, we identified 25 loci containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with ACL, FSC, and (or) HPG. Seventeen of these SNP were within a gene and 13 of the genes were expressed in uterus or endometrium. Multi-tissue omics analyses revealed 2,450 co-expressed genes relative to puberty. The pre-pubertal network had 372,861 connections whereas the post-pubertal network had 328,357 connections. A sub-network from this process revealed key transcriptional regulators (i.e., PITX2, FOXA1, DACH2, PROP1, SIX6, etc.). Results from these multi-tissue omics

  3. Multi-tissue omics analyses reveal molecular regulatory networks for puberty in composite beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Cánovas, Angela; Reverter, Antonio; DeAtley, Kasey L; Ashley, Ryan L; Colgrave, Michelle L; Fortes, Marina R S; Islas-Trejo, Alma; Lehnert, Sigrid; Porto-Neto, Laercio; Rincón, Gonzalo; Silver, Gail A; Snelling, Warren M; Medrano, Juan F; Thomas, Milton G

    2014-01-01

    Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e. hypothalamus, pituitary gland, ovary, uterus, and endometrium) as well as tissues known to be relevant to growth and metabolism needed to achieve puberty (i.e., longissimus dorsi muscle, adipose, and liver). These tissues were collected from pre- and post-pubertal Brangus heifers (3/8 Brahman; Bos indicus x 5/8 Angus; Bos taurus) derived from a population of cattle used to identify quantitative trait loci associated with fertility traits (i.e., age of first observed corpus luteum (ACL), first service conception (FSC), and heifer pregnancy (HPG)). In order to exploit the power of complementary omics analyses, pre- and post-puberty co-expression gene networks were constructed by combining the results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), RNA-Seq, and bovine transcription factors. Eight tissues among pre-pubertal and post-pubertal Brangus heifers revealed 1,515 differentially expressed and 943 tissue-specific genes within the 17,832 genes confirmed by RNA-Seq analysis. The hypothalamus experienced the most notable up-regulation of genes via puberty (i.e., 204 out of 275 genes). Combining the results of GWAS and RNA-Seq, we identified 25 loci containing a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associated with ACL, FSC, and (or) HPG. Seventeen of these SNP were within a gene and 13 of the genes were expressed in uterus or endometrium. Multi-tissue omics analyses revealed 2,450 co-expressed genes relative to puberty. The pre-pubertal network had 372,861 connections whereas the post-pubertal network had 328,357 connections. A sub-network from this process revealed key transcriptional regulators (i.e., PITX2, FOXA1, DACH2, PROP1, SIX6, etc.). Results from these multi-tissue omics

  4. Prognostic Value of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Patients Treated With Surgical Resection and Intraoperative Electron Beam Radiation Therapy for Locally Recurrent Soft Tissue Sarcoma: A Multicentric Long-Term Outcome Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Calvo, Felipe A.; Sole, Claudio V.; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Montero, Angel; Polo, Alfredo; Gonzalez, Carmen; Cuervo, Miguel; San Julian, Mikel; and others

    2014-01-01

    Background: A joint analysis of data from centers involved in the Spanish Cooperative Initiative for Intraoperative Electron Radiotherapy was performed to investigate long-term outcomes of locally recurrent soft tissue sarcoma (LR-STS) patients treated with a multidisciplinary approach. Methods and Materials: Patients with a histologic diagnosis of LR-STS (extremity, 43%; trunk wall, 24%; retroperitoneum, 33%) and no distant metastases who underwent radical surgery and intraoperative electron radiation therapy (IOERT; median dose, 12.5 Gy) were considered eligible for participation in this study. In addition, 62% received external beam radiation therapy (EBRT; median dose, 50 Gy). Results: From 1986 to 2012, a total of 103 patients from 3 Spanish expert IOERT institutions were analyzed. With a median follow-up of 57 months (range, 2-311 months), 5-year local control (LC) was 60%. The 5-year IORT in-field control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival were 73%, 43%, and 52%, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, no EBRT to treat the LR-STS (P=.02) and microscopically involved margin resection status (P=.04) retained significance in relation to LC. With regard to IORT in-field control, only not delivering EBRT to the LR-STS retained significance in the multivariate analysis (P=.03). Conclusion: This joint analysis revealed that surgical margin and EBRT affect LC but that, given the high risk of distant metastases, DFS remains modest. Intensified local treatment needs to be further tested in the context of more efficient concurrent, neoadjuvant, and adjuvant systemic therapy.

  5. Transgenic Zebrafish Reveal Tissue-Specific Differences in Estrogen Signaling in Response to Environmental Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki S.; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EEDs) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ERs) in the larval heart compared with the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit tissue-specific effects similar to those of BPA and genistein, or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of ER genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: We observed selective patterns of ER activation in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue specificity in ER activation was due to differences in the expression of ER subtypes. ERα was expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 had the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activated the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero was associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves. Citation: Gorelick DA, Iwanowicz LR, Hung AL, Blazer VS, Halpern ME. 2014. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to

  6. Super-resolution microscopy reveals altered desmosomal protein organization in pemphigus vulgaris patient tissue

    PubMed Central

    Stahley, Sara N.; Warren, Maxine F.; Feldman, Ron J.; Swerlick, Robert A.; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3). In order to better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, PV patient biopsies were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy (SIM), a form of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and localized to PV IgG-containing endocytic linear arrays. Patient IgG also colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of Dsg3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that Dsg3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in PV patient tissue. Further, this study reveals that super-resolution optical imaging is powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin. PMID:26763424

  7. Super-Resolution Microscopy Reveals Altered Desmosomal Protein Organization in Tissue from Patients with Pemphigus Vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Stahley, Sara N; Warren, Maxine F; Feldman, Ron J; Swerlick, Robert A; Mattheyses, Alexa L; Kowalczyk, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is an autoimmune epidermal blistering disease in which autoantibodies (IgG) are directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3. To better understand how PV IgG alters desmosome morphology and function in vivo, biopsies from patients with PV were analyzed by structured illumination microscopy, a form of superresolution fluorescence microscopy. In patient tissue, desmosomal proteins were aberrantly clustered and patient IgG colocalized with markers for lipid rafts and endosomes. Additionally, steady-state levels of desmoglein 3 were decreased and desmosomes were reduced in size in patient tissue. Desmosomes at blister sites were occasionally split, with PV IgG decorating the extracellular faces of split desmosomes. Desmosome splitting was recapitulated in vitro by exposing cultured keratinocytes both to PV IgG and to mechanical stress, demonstrating that splitting at the blister interface in patient tissue is due to compromised desmosomal adhesive function. These findings indicate that desmoglein 3 clustering and endocytosis are associated with reduced desmosome size and adhesion defects in tissue of patients with PV. Further, this study reveals that superresolution optical imaging is a powerful approach for studying epidermal adhesion structures in normal and diseased skin. PMID:26763424

  8. Multiplatform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues of origin.

    PubMed

    Hoadley, Katherine A; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M; Cherniack, Andrew D; Tamborero, David; Ng, Sam; Leiserson, Max D M; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael D; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Zhang, Jiashan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Akbani, Rehan; Shen, Hui; Omberg, Larsson; Chu, Andy; Margolin, Adam A; Van't Veer, Laura J; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Laird, Peter W; Raphael, Benjamin J; Ding, Li; Robertson, A Gordon; Byers, Lauren A; Mills, Gordon B; Weinstein, John N; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Collisson, Eric A; Benz, Christopher C; Perou, Charles M; Stuart, Joshua M

    2014-08-14

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically defined tumor types identify "within-a-tissue" disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head and neck, and a subset of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multiplatform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides independent information for predicting clinical outcomes. All data sets are available for data-mining from a unified resource to support further biological discoveries and insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25109877

  9. High Resolution Magnetic Images of Planar Wave Fronts Reveal Bidomain Properties of Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Fong, Luis E.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Wikswo, John P.; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2004-01-01

    We magnetically imaged the magnetic action field and optically imaged the transmembrane potentials generated by planar wavefronts on the surface of the left ventricular wall of Langendorff-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. The magnetic action field images were used to produce a time series of two-dimensional action current maps. Overlaying epifluorescent images allowed us to identify a net current along the wavefront and perpendicular to gradients in the transmembrane potential. This is in contrast to a traditional uniform double-layer model where the net current flows along the gradient in the transmembrane potential. Our findings are supported by numerical simulations that treat cardiac tissue as a bidomain with unequal anisotropies in the intra- and extracellular spaces. Our measurements reveal the anisotropic bidomain nature of cardiac tissue during plane wave propagation. These bidomain effects play an important role in the generation of the whole-heart magnetocardiogram and cannot be ignored. PMID:15377521

  10. Comparative genomics reveals tissue-specific regulation of prolactin receptor gene expression.

    PubMed

    Schennink, Anke; Trott, Josephine F; Manjarin, Rodrigo; Lemay, Danielle G; Freking, Bradley A; Hovey, Russell C

    2015-02-01

    Prolactin (PRL), acting via the PRL receptor (PRLR), controls hundreds of biological processes across a range of species. Endocrine PRL elicits well-documented effects on target tissues such as the mammary glands and reproductive organs in addition to coordinating whole-body homeostasis during states such as lactation or adaptive responses to the environment. While changes in PRLR expression likely facilitates these tissue-specific responses to circulating PRL, the mechanisms regulating this regulation in non-rodent species has received limited attention. We performed a wide-scale analysis of PRLR 5' transcriptional regulation in pig tissues. Apart from the abundantly expressed and widely conserved exon 1, we identified alternative splicing of transcripts from an additional nine first exons of the porcine PRLR (pPRLR) gene. Notably, exon 1.5 transcripts were expressed most abundantly in the heart, while expression of exon 1.3-containing transcripts was greatest in the kidneys and small intestine. Expression of exon 1.3 mRNAs within the kidneys was most abundant in the renal cortex, and increased during gestation. A comparative analysis revealed a human homologue to exon 1.3, hE1N2, which was also principally transcribed in the kidneys and small intestines, and an exon hE1N3 was only expressed in the kidneys of humans. Promoter alignment revealed conserved motifs within the proximal promoter upstream of exon 1.3, including putative binding sites for hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 and Sp1. Together, these results highlight the diverse, conserved and tissue-specific regulation of PRLR expression in the targets for PRL, which may function to coordinate complex physiological states such as lactation and osmoregulation. PMID:25358647

  11. Network-based gene expression analysis of intracranial aneurysm tissue reveals role of antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Krischek, B; Kasuya, H; Tajima, A; Akagawa, H; Sasaki, T; Yoneyama, T; Ujiie, H; Kubo, O; Bonin, M; Takakura, K; Hori, T; Inoue, I

    2008-07-17

    Little is known about the pathology and pathogenesis of the rupture of intracranial aneurysms. For a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in intracranial aneurysm (IA) formation we performed a gene expression analysis comparing ruptured and unruptured aneurysm tissue to a control artery. Tissue samples of six ruptured and four unruptured aneurysms, and four cerebral arteries serving as controls, were profiled using oligonucleotide microarrays. Gene ontology classification of the differentially expressed genes was analyzed and regulatory functional networks and canonical pathways were identified with a network-based computational pathway analysis tool. Real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemical staining were performed as confirmation. Analysis of aneurysmal and control tissue revealed 521 differentially expressed genes. The most significantly associated gene ontology term was antigen processing (P=1.64E-16). Further network-based analysis showed the top scoring regulatory functional network to be built around overexpressed major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and II complex related genes and confirmed the canonical pathway "Antigen Presentation" to have the highest upregulation in IA tissue (P=7.3E-10). Real time RT-PCR showed significant overexpression of MHC class II genes. Immunohistochemical staining showed strong positivity for MHC II molecule specific antibody (HLA II), for CD68 (macrophages, monocytes), for CD45RO (T-cells) and HLA I antibody. Our results offer strong evidence for MHC class II gene overexpression in human IA tissue and that antigen presenting cells (macrophages, monocytes) play a key role in IA formation. PMID:18538937

  12. RNA-seq analysis of hippocampal tissues reveals novel candidate genes for drug refractory epilepsy in patients with MTLE-HS.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Aparna Banerjee; Banerjee, Jyotirmoy; Srivastava, Arpna; Tripathi, Manjari; Sarkar, Chitra; Kakkar, Aanchal; Jain, Mukesh; Chandra, P Sarat

    2016-05-01

    Array-based profiling studies have shown implication of aberrant gene expression patterns in epileptogenesis. We have performed transcriptome analysis of hippocampal tissues resected from patients with MTLE-HS using RNAseq approach. Healthy tissues from tumour margins obtained during tumour surgeries were used as non-epileptic controls. RNA sequencing was performed using standard protocols on Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Differential gene expression analysis of the RNAseq data revealed 56 significantly regulated genes in MTLE patients. Gene cluster analysis identified 3 important hubs of genes mostly linked to, neuroinflammation and innate immunity, synaptic transmission and neuronal network modulation which are supportive of intrinsic severity hypothesis of pharmacoresistance. This study identified various genes like FN1 which is central in our analysis, NEUROD6, RELN, TGFβR2, NLRP1, SCRT1, CSNK2B, SCN1B, CABP1, KIF5A and antisense RNAs like AQP4-AS1 and KIRREL3-AS2 providing important insight into the understanding of the pathophysiology or genomic basis of drug refractory epilepsy due to MTS. PMID:27094248

  13. Defining the human adipose tissue proteome to reveal metabolic alterations in obesity.

    PubMed

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Kampf, Caroline; Asplund, Anna; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Edlund, Karolina; Blüher, Matthias; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-11-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) has a major role in the progression of obesity. Here, we combined data from RNA-Seq and antibody-based immunohistochemistry to describe the normal physiology of human WAT obtained from three female subjects and explored WAT-specific genes by comparing WAT to 26 other major human tissues. Using the protein evidence in WAT, we validated the content of a genome-scale metabolic model for adipocytes. We employed this high-quality model for the analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) gene expression data obtained from subjects included in the Swedish Obese Subjects Sib Pair study to reveal molecular differences between lean and obese individuals. We integrated SAT gene expression and plasma metabolomics data, investigated the contribution of the metabolic differences in the mitochondria of SAT to the occurrence of obesity, and eventually identified cytosolic branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transaminase 1 as a potential target that can be used for drug development. We observed decreased glutaminolysis and alterations in the BCAAs metabolism in SAT of obese subjects compared to lean subjects. We also provided mechanistic explanations for the changes in the plasma level of BCAAs, glutamate, pyruvate, and α-ketoglutarate in obese subjects. Finally, we validated a subset of our model-based predictions in 20 SAT samples obtained from 10 lean and 10 obese male and female subjects. PMID:25219818

  14. Massive chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant disease

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N; Kleontas, Athanassios D; Tagarakis, George; Nana, Chryssoula; Alexiou, Ioannis; Grosomanidis, Vasilis; Tossios, Paschalis; Papadaki, Elena; Kioumis, Ioannis; Baka, Sofia; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Malignant chest wall tumors are rare neoplasms. Resection with wide-free margins is an important prognostic factor, and massive chest wall resection and reconstruction are often necessary. A recent case series of 20 consecutive patients is reported in order to find any possible correlation between tumor histology, extent of resection, type of reconstruction, and adjuvant treatment with short- and long-term outcomes. Methods Twenty patients were submitted to chest wall resection and reconstruction for malignant chest wall neoplasms between 2006 and 2014. The mean age (ten males) was 59±4 years. The size and histology of the tumor, the technique of reconstruction, and the short- and long-term follow-up records were noted. Results The median maximum diameter of tumors was 10 cm (5.4–32 cm). Subtotal sternal resection was performed in nine cases, and the resection of multiple ribs was performed in eleven cases. The median area of chest wall defect was 108 cm2 (60–340 cm2). Histology revealed soft tissue, bone, and cartilage sarcomas in 16 cases (80%), most of them chondrosarcomas. The rest of the tumors was metastatic tumors in two cases and localized malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma in one case. The chest wall defect was reconstructed by using the “sandwich technique” (propylene mesh/methyl methacrylate/propylene mesh) in nine cases of large anterior defects or by using a 2 mm polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE) mesh in nine cases of lateral or posterior defects. Support from a plastic surgeon was necessary to cover the full-thickness chest wall defects in seven cases. Adjuvant oncologic treatment was administered in 13 patients. Local recurrences were observed in five cases where surgical reintervention was finally necessary in two cases. Recurrences were associated with larger tumors, histology of malignant fibrous histiocytoma, and initial incomplete resection or misdiagnosis made by nonthoracic surgeons. Three patients died

  15. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yongbin; Wang, Qilei; Zhang, Long; Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  16. Transgenic zebrafish reveal tissue-specific differences in estrogen signaling in response to environmental water samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gorelick, Daniel A.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Hung, Alice L.; Blazer, Vicki; Halpern, Marnie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Environmental endocrine disruptors (EED) are exogenous chemicals that mimic endogenous hormones, such as estrogens. Previous studies using a zebrafish transgenic reporter demonstrated that the EEDs bisphenol A and genistein preferentially activate estrogen receptors (ER) in the larval heart compared to the liver. However, it was not known whether the transgenic zebrafish reporter was sensitive enough to detect estrogens from environmental samples, whether environmental estrogens would exhibit similar tissue-specific effects as BPA and genistein or why some compounds preferentially target receptors in the heart. Methods: We tested surface water samples using a transgenic zebrafish reporter with tandem estrogen response elements driving green fluorescent protein expression (5xERE:GFP). Reporter activation was colocalized with tissue-specific expression of estrogen receptor genes by RNA in situ hybridization. Results: Selective patterns of ER activation were observed in transgenic fish exposed to river water samples from the Mid-Atlantic United States, with several samples preferentially activating receptors in embryonic and larval heart valves. We discovered that tissue-specificity in ER activation is due to differences in the expression of estrogen receptor subtypes. ERα is expressed in developing heart valves but not in the liver, whereas ERβ2 has the opposite profile. Accordingly, subtype-specific ER agonists activate the reporter in either the heart valves or the liver. Conclusion: The use of 5xERE:GFP transgenic zebrafish has revealed an unexpected tissue-specific difference in the response to environmentally relevant estrogenic compounds. Exposure to estrogenic EEDs in utero is associated with adverse health effects, with the potentially unanticipated consequence of targeting developing heart valves.

  17. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chunguang; Xiong, Wenwei; Chen, Xinjian; Deng, Fei; Ma, Zhiyan; Qiao, Dahe; Hu, Chunhui; Ren, Yangliu; Li, Yuling

    2015-01-01

    The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize. PMID:26587848

  18. Analyses of resected human brain metastases of breast cancer reveal the association between up-regulation of hexokinase 2 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L; Weil, Robert J; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M; Merino, Maria J; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M; Meltzer, Paul S; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S

    2009-09-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer seem to be increasingin incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser-captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared with unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases, which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMgamma3, SIAH, STHMN3, and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P) in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using short hairpin RNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose-limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival after craniotomy (P = 0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  19. Analyses of Resected Human Brain Metastases of Breast Cancer Reveal the Association between Up-regulation of Hexokinase 2 and Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Diane; Fitzgerald, Daniel; Shreeve, S. Martin; Hua, Emily; Bronder, Julie L.; Weil, Robert J.; Davis, Sean; Stark, Andreas M.; Merino, Maria J.; Kurek, Raffael; Mehdorn, H. Maximilian; Davis, Gary; Steinberg, Seth M.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Aldape, Kenneth; Steeg, Patricia S.

    2009-01-01

    Brain metastases of breast cancer appear to be increasing in incidence as systemic therapy improves. Metastatic disease in the brain is associated with high morbidity and mortality. We present the first gene expression analysis of laser captured epithelial cells from resected human brain metastases of breast cancer compared to unlinked primary breast tumors. The tumors were matched for histology, TNM stage and hormone receptor status. Most differentially expressed genes were down-regulated in the brain metastases which included, surprisingly, many genes associated with metastasis. Q-PCR analysis confirmed statistically significant differences or strong trends in the expression of six genes: BMP1, PEDF, LAMγ3, SIAH, STHMN3 and TSPD2. Hexokinase 2 (HK2) was also of interest because of its increased expression in brain metastases. HK2 is important in glucose metabolism and apoptosis. In agreement with our microarray results, HK2 levels (both mRNA and protein) were elevated in a brain metastatic derivative (231-BR) of the human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 relative to the parental cell line (231-P), in vitro. Knockdown of HK2 expression in 231-BR cells using shRNA reduced cell proliferation when cultures were maintained in glucose limiting conditions. Finally, HK2 expression was analyzed in a cohort of 123 resected brain metastases of breast cancer. High HK2 expression was significantly associated with poor patient survival post-craniotomy (P=0.028). The data suggest that HK2 overexpression is associated with metastasis to the brain in breast cancer and it may be a therapeutic target. PMID:19723875

  20. Small bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    Small intestine surgery; Bowel resection - small intestine; Resection of part of the small intestine; Enterectomy ... her hand inside your belly to feel the intestine or remove the diseased segment. Your belly is ...

  1. Comparative tissue transcriptomics reveal prompt inter-organ communication in response to local bacterial kidney infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mucosal infections elicit inflammatory responses via regulated signaling pathways. Infection outcome depends strongly on early events occurring immediately when bacteria start interacting with cells in the mucosal membrane. Hitherto reported transcription profiles on host-pathogen interactions are strongly biased towards in vitro studies. To detail the local in vivo genetic response to infection, we here profiled host gene expression in a recent experimental model that assures high spatial and temporal control of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) infection within the kidney of a live rat. Results Transcriptional profiling of tissue biopsies from UPEC-infected kidney tissue revealed 59 differentially expressed genes 8 h post-infection. Their relevance for the infection process was supported by a Gene Ontology (GO) analysis. Early differential expression at 3 h and 5 h post-infection was of low statistical significance, which correlated to the low degree of infection. Comparative transcriptomics analysis of the 8 h data set and online available studies of early local infection and inflammation defined a core of 80 genes constituting a "General tissue response to early local bacterial infections". Among these, 25% were annotated as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) regulated. Subsequent experimental analyses confirmed a systemic increase of IFN-γ in rats with an ongoing local kidney infection, correlating to splenic, rather than renal Ifng induction and suggested this inter-organ communication to be mediated by interleukin (IL)-23. The use of comparative transcriptomics allowed expansion of the statistical data handling, whereby relevant data could also be extracted from the 5 h data set. Out of the 31 differentially expressed core genes, some represented specific 5 h responses, illustrating the value of comparative transcriptomics when studying the dynamic nature of gene regulation in response to infections. Conclusion Our hypothesis-free approach identified

  2. Metagenomic analysis reveals presence of Treponema denticola in a tissue biopsy of the Iceman.

    PubMed

    Maixner, Frank; Thomma, Anton; Cipollini, Giovanna; Widder, Stefanie; Rattei, Thomas; Zink, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Ancient hominoid genome studies can be regarded by definition as metagenomic analyses since they represent a mixture of both hominoid and microbial sequences in an environment. Here, we report the molecular detection of the oral spirochete Treponema denticola in ancient human tissue biopsies of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old Copper Age natural ice mummy. Initially, the metagenomic data of the Iceman's genomic survey was screened for bacterial ribosomal RNA (rRNA) specific reads. Through ranking the reads by abundance a relatively high number of rRNA reads most similar to T. denticola was detected. Mapping of the metagenome sequences against the T. denticola genome revealed additional reads most similar to this opportunistic pathogen. The DNA damage pattern of specifically mapped reads suggests an ancient origin of these sequences. The haematogenous spread of bacteria of the oral microbiome often reported in the recent literature could already explain the presence of metagenomic reads specific for T. denticola in the Iceman's bone biopsy. We extended, however, our survey to an Iceman gingival tissue sample and a mouth swab sample and could thereby detect T. denticola and Porphyrimonas gingivalis, another important member of the human commensal oral microflora. Taken together, this study clearly underlines the opportunity to detect disease-associated microorganisms when applying metagenomics-enabled approaches on datasets of ancient human remains. PMID:24941044

  3. Requirement for interleukin-1 to drive brain inflammation reveals tissue-specific mechanisms of innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Giles, James A; Greenhalgh, Andrew D; Davies, Claire L; Denes, Adam; Shaw, Tovah; Coutts, Graham; Rothwell, Nancy J; McColl, Barry W; Allan, Stuart M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system is implicated in a wide range of disorders affecting the brain and is, therefore, an attractive target for therapy. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) is a potent regulator of the innate immune system important for host defense but is also associated with injury and disease in the brain. Here, we show that IL-1 is a key mediator driving an innate immune response to inflammatory challenge in the mouse brain but is dispensable in extracerebral tissues including the lung and peritoneum. We also demonstrate that IL-1α is an important ligand contributing to the CNS dependence on IL-1 and that IL-1 derived from the CNS compartment (most likely microglia) is the major source driving this effect. These data reveal previously unknown tissue-specific requirements for IL-1 in driving innate immunity and suggest that IL-1-mediated inflammation in the brain could be selectively targeted without compromising systemic innate immune responses that are important for resistance to infection. This property could be exploited to mitigate injury- and disease-associated inflammation in the brain without increasing susceptibility to systemic infection, an important complication in several neurological disorders. PMID:25367678

  4. Orbit-associated tumors: navigation and control of resection using intraoperative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Terpolilli, Nicole A; Rachinger, Walter; Kunz, Mathias; Thon, Niklas; Flatz, Wilhelm H; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Schichor, Christian

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT Treatment of skull base lesions is complex and usually requires a multidisciplinary approach. In meningioma, which is the most common tumor entity in this region, resection is considered to be the most important therapeutic step to avoid tumor recurrence. However, resection of skull base lesions with orbital or optic nerve involvement poses a challenge due to their anatomical structure and their proximity to eloquent areas. Therefore the main goal of surgery should be to achieve the maximum extent of resection while preserving neurological function. In the postoperative course, medical and radiotherapeutic strategies may then be successfully used to treat possible tumor residues. Methods to safely improve the extent of resection in skull base lesions therefore are desirable. The current study reports the authors' experience with the use of intraoperative CT (iCT) combined with neuronavigation with regard to feasibility and possible benefits of the method. METHODS Those patients with tumorous lesions in relationship to the orbit, sphenoid wing, or cavernous sinus who were surgically treated between October 2008 and December 2013 using iCT-based neuronavigation and in whom an intraoperative scan was obtained for control of resection were included. In all cases a second iCT scan was performed under sterile conditions after completion of navigation-guided microsurgical tumor resection. The surgical strategy was adapted accordingly; if necessary, resection was continued. RESULTS Twenty-three patients (19 with WHO Grade I meningioma and 4 with other lesions) were included. The most common clinical symptoms were loss of visual acuity and exophthalmus. Intraoperative control of resection by iCT was successfully obtained in all cases. Intraoperative imaging changed the surgical approach in more than half (52.2%) of these patients, either because iCT demonstrated unexpected residual tumor masses or because the second scan revealed additional tumor tissue that was not

  5. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-08-21

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  6. Endoscopic full-thickness resection: Current status

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Arthur; Meier, Benjamin; Caca, Karel

    2015-01-01

    Conventional endoscopic resection techniques such as endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection are powerful tools for treatment of gastrointestinal neoplasms. However, those techniques are restricted to superficial layers of the gastrointestinal wall. Endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) is an evolving technique, which is just about to enter clinical routine. It is not only a powerful tool for diagnostic tissue acquisition but also has the potential to spare surgical therapy in selected patients. This review will give an overview about current EFTR techniques and devices. PMID:26309354

  7. The inferior mesenteric vessels as recipients when performing free tissue transfer for pelvic defects following abdomino-perineal resection. A novel technique and review of intra-peritoneal recipient vessel options for microvascular transfer.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Nicola C; Chan, James K K; Chave, Helen; McGuiness, Caroline N

    2010-12-01

    Successful microvascular transfer of tissue is dependent upon suitable vessels not only of the donor tissue but also at the recipient site. Congenital deformities, previous surgery, infection or irradiation at the recipient site may render vessels less suitable for this purpose. Under such circumstances it becomes desirable to identify suitable recipient vessels remote to the compromised area. In cases where external beam radiotherapy has been delivered, the superficial surface area damaged can be rather extensive precluding the use of even the longest of flap pedicles--a problem potentially addressed by searching for recipient vessels deep to the tissue planes affected. We report one such case where the inferior mesenteric vessels were used as recipient vessels for the microvascular transfer of a free Latissimus Dorsi musculocutaneous flap to reconstruct an extensive perineal defect following abdomino-perineal resection where the vessels would otherwise serve no purpose. Whilst a limited number of intra-peritoneal vessels have previously been reported as recipient vessels for free flap surgery there has not been, to our knowledge, any report of utilising the inferior mesenteric artery (Inf Mes A). Whilst based on a single case report, this article examines the literature describing microvascular transfer of tissue to compromised recipient sites and it reviews previously reported recipient vessel options available when reconstructing the perineum, abdominal wall or trunk with particular emphasis on intra-peritoneal options. PMID:20378437

  8. A non-comparative phase II study of dose intensive chemotherapy with doxorubicin and ifosfamide followed by high dose ICE consolidation with PBSCT in non-resectable, high grade, adult type soft tissue sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jörg Thomas; Horger, M; Kluba, T; Königsrainer, A; de Zwart, P; von Weyhern, C Hann; Eckert, F; Budach, W; Bokemeyer, C

    2013-12-01

    The objective was to determine the role of dose intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with soft tissue sarcomas (STS) that were considered unresectable. Treatment consisted of 2-3 cycles of doxorubicin (Dox) and ifosfamide (Ifo) followed by high dose chemotherapy with ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide (HD-ICE) plus peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). 30 out of 631 consecutive patients, median age 46 years (21-62), with high grade STS were included. 29 patients completed at least 2 cycles of Dox/Ifo. HD-ICE was withheld because of progressive disease (PD) in 5 patients, neurotoxicity in 6 cases, insufficient peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) mobilization, complete remission (CR) and refusal in 1 patient each. HD-ICE was associated with non-haematological grade III toxicity including emesis, mucositis, fever, neurotoxicity, and transaminase level elevation. Two additional patients attained a partial response after HD-ICE. Overall, 24 of 30 (80%) patients underwent surgery, with complete tumor resections in 19 patients (63% of all patients, 79% of the operated subgroup); however, 2 of these required amputation. After a median follow up period of 50 months in surviving patients (range, 26-120), 5-year PFS and OS rates were 39% and 48%, respectively. Induction chemotherapy plus consolidation HD-ICE is generally feasible, but is associated with significant neurotoxicity. The advantage of HD-ICE over conventional dose chemotherapy plus external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in non-resectable disease remains unproven. PMID:24091981

  9. African Lungfish Reveal the Evolutionary Origins of Organized Mucosal Lymphoid Tissue in Vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin T; Muñoz, Pilar; Amemiya, Chris T; Salinas, Irene

    2015-09-21

    One of the most remarkable innovations of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the progressive organization of the lymphoid tissues that leads to increased efficiency of immune surveillance and cell interactions. The mucosal immune system of endotherms has evolved organized secondary mucosal lymphoid tissues (O-MALT) such as Peyer's patches, tonsils, and adenoids. Primitive semi-organized lymphoid nodules or aggregates (LAs) were found in the mucosa of anuran amphibians, suggesting that O-MALT evolved from amphibian LAs ∼250 million years ago. This study shows for the first time the presence of O-MALT in the mucosa of the African lungfish, an extant representative of the closest ancestral lineage to all tetrapods. Lungfish LAs are lymphocyte-rich structures associated with a modified covering epithelium and express all IGH genes except for IGHW2L. In response to infection, nasal LAs doubled their size and increased the expression of CD3 and IGH transcripts. Additionally, de novo organogenesis of inducible LAs resembling mammalian tertiary lymphoid structures was observed. Using deep-sequencing transcriptomes, we identified several members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, and subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed its extraordinary diversification within sarcopterygian fish. Attempts to find AICDA in lungfish transcriptomes or by RT-PCR failed, indicating the possible absence of somatic hypermutation in lungfish LAs. These findings collectively suggest that the origin of O-MALT predates the emergence of tetrapods and that TNF family members play a conserved role in the organization of vertebrate mucosal lymphoid organs. PMID:26344090

  10. African Lungfish Reveal the Evolutionary Origins of Organized Mucosal Lymphoid Tissue in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Tacchi, Luca; Larragoite, Erin T.; Muñoz, Pilar; Amemiya, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY One of the most remarkable innovations of the vertebrate adaptive immune system is the progressive organization of the lymphoid tissues that leads to increased efficiency of immune surveillance and cell interactions. The mucosal immune system of endotherms has evolved organized secondary mucosal lymphoid tissues (O-MALT) such as Peyer’s patches, tonsils, and adenoids. Primitive semi-organized lymphoid nodules or aggregates (LAs) were found in the mucosa of anuran amphibians [1], suggesting that O-MALT evolved from amphibian LAs_250 million years ago [1–4]. This study shows for the first time the presence of O-MALT in the mucosa of the African lungfish, an extant representative of the closest ancestral lineage to all tetrapods. Lungfish LAs are lymphocyte-rich structures associated with a modified covering epithelium and express all IGH genes except for IGHW2L. In response to infection, nasal LAs doubled their size and increased the expression of CD3 and IGH transcripts. Additionally, de novo organogenesis of inducible LAs resembling mammalian tertiary lymphoid structures was observed. Using deep-sequencing transcriptomes, we identified several members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily, and subsequent phylogenetic analyses revealed its extraordinary diversification within sarcopterygian fish. Attempts to find AICDA in lungfish transcriptomes or by RT-PCR failed, indicating the possible absence of somatic hypermutation in lungfish LAs. These findings collectively suggest that the origin of O-MALT predates the emergence of tetrapods and that TNF family members play a conserved role in the organization of vertebrate mucosal lymphoid organs. PMID:26344090

  11. Unexpected endoscopic full-thickness resection of a duodenal neuroendocrine tumor.

    PubMed

    Hatogai, Ken; Oono, Yasuhiro; Fu, Kuang-I; Odagaki, Tomoyuki; Ikematsu, Hiroaki; Kojima, Takashi; Yano, Tomonori; Kaneko, Kazuhiro

    2013-07-14

    A 57-year-old man underwent endoscopy for investigation of a duodenal polyp. Endoscopy revealed a hemispheric submucosal tumor, about 5 mm in diameter, in the anterior wall of the duodenal bulb. Endoscopic biopsy disclosed a neuroendocrine tumor histologically, therefore endoscopic mucosal resection was conducted. The tumor was effectively and evenly elevated after injection of a mixture of 0.2% hyaluronic acid and glycerol at a ratio of 1:1 into the submucosal layer. A small amount of indigo-carmine dye was also added for coloration of injection fluid. The lesion was completely resected en bloc with a snare after submucosal fluid injection. Immediately, muscle-fiber-like tissues were identified in the marginal area of the resected defect above the blue-colored layer, which suggested perforation. The defect was completely closed with a total of 9 endoclips, and no symptoms associated with peritonitis appeared thereafter. Histologically, the horizontal and vertical margins of the resected specimen were free of tumor and muscularis propria was also seen in the resected specimen. Generally, endoscopic mucosal resection is considered to be theoretically successful if the mucosal defect is colored blue. The blue layer in this case, however, had been created by unplanned injection into the subserosal rather than the submucosal layer. PMID:23864794

  12. A High-Dimensional Atlas of Human T Cell Diversity Reveals Tissue-Specific Trafficking and Cytokine Signatures.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael Thomas; Ong, David Eng Hui; Lim, Frances Sheau Huei; Teng, Karen Wei Weng; McGovern, Naomi; Narayanan, Sriram; Ho, Wen Qi; Cerny, Daniela; Tan, Henry Kun Kiaang; Anicete, Rosslyn; Tan, Bien Keem; Lim, Tony Kiat Hon; Chan, Chung Yip; Cheow, Peng Chung; Lee, Ser Yee; Takano, Angela; Tan, Eng-Huat; Tam, John Kit Chung; Tan, Ern Yu; Chan, Jerry Kok Yen; Fink, Katja; Bertoletti, Antonio; Ginhoux, Florent; Curotto de Lafaille, Maria Alicia; Newell, Evan William

    2016-08-16

    Depending on the tissue microenvironment, T cells can differentiate into highly diverse subsets expressing unique trafficking receptors and cytokines. Studies of human lymphocytes have primarily focused on a limited number of parameters in blood, representing an incomplete view of the human immune system. Here, we have utilized mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze T cell trafficking and functional markers across eight different human tissues, including blood, lymphoid, and non-lymphoid tissues. These data have revealed that combinatorial expression of trafficking receptors and cytokines better defines tissue specificity. Notably, we identified numerous T helper cell subsets with overlapping cytokine expression, but only specific cytokine combinations are secreted regardless of tissue type. This indicates that T cell lineages defined in mouse models cannot be clearly distinguished in humans. Overall, our data uncover a plethora of tissue immune signatures and provide a systemic map of how T cell phenotypes are altered throughout the human body. PMID:27521270

  13. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-04-25

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  14. Diagnosis of a submucosal mass at the staple line after sigmoid colon cancer resection by endoscopic cutting-mucosa biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Mitsuaki; Koinuma, Koji; Lefor, Alan K; Horie, Hisanaga; Ito, Homare; Sata, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yoshikazu; Sunada, Keijiro; Yamamoto, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoid colon resection for cancer and surveillance colonoscopy was performed annually thereafter. Five years after the resection, a submucosal mass was found at the anastomotic staple line, 15 cm from the anal verge. Computed tomography scan and endoscopic ultrasound were not consistent with tumor recurrence. Endoscopic mucosa biopsy was performed to obtain a definitive diagnosis. Mucosal incision over the lesion with the cutting needle knife technique revealed a creamy white material, which was completely removed. Histologic examination showed fibrotic tissue without caseous necrosis or tumor cells. No bacteria, including mycobacterium, were found on culture. The patient remains free of recurrence at five years since the resection. Endoscopic biopsy with a cutting mucosal incision is an important technique for evaluation of submucosal lesions after rectal resection. PMID:27114752

  15. Enhanced transcriptome maps from multiple mouse tissues reveal evolutionary constraint in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pervouchine, Dmitri D; Djebali, Sarah; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A; Barja, Pablo Prieto; Dobin, Alex; Tanzer, Andrea; Lagarde, Julien; Zaleski, Chris; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Wang, Huaien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Pei, Baikang; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Monlong, Jean; Harmanci, Arif; Gerstein, Mark; Beer, Michael A; Notredame, Cedric; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been a long-standing model for human biology and disease. Here we characterize, by RNA sequencing, the transcriptional profiles of a large and heterogeneous collection of mouse tissues, augmenting the mouse transcriptome with thousands of novel transcript candidates. Comparison with transcriptome profiles in human cell lines reveals substantial conservation of transcriptional programmes, and uncovers a distinct class of genes with levels of expression that have been constrained early in vertebrate evolution. This core set of genes captures a substantial fraction of the transcriptional output of mammalian cells, and participates in basic functional and structural housekeeping processes common to all cell types. Perturbation of these constrained genes is associated with significant phenotypes including embryonic lethality and cancer. Evolutionary constraint in gene expression levels is not reflected in the conservation of the genomic sequences, but is associated with conserved epigenetic marking, as well as with characteristic post-transcriptional regulatory programme, in which sub-cellular localization and alternative splicing play comparatively large roles. PMID:25582907

  16. Transcriptome profiling of immune tissues reveals habitat-specific gene expression between lake and river sticklebacks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yun; Chain, Frédéric J J; Panchal, Mahesh; Eizaguirre, Christophe; Kalbe, Martin; Lenz, Tobias L; Samonte, Irene E; Stoll, Monika; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Reusch, Thorsten B H; Milinski, Manfred; Feulner, Philine G D

    2016-02-01

    The observation of habitat-specific phenotypes suggests the action of natural selection. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) has repeatedly colonized and adapted to diverse freshwater habitats across the northern hemisphere since the last glaciation, while giving rise to recurring phenotypes associated with specific habitats. Parapatric lake and river populations of sticklebacks harbour distinct parasite communities, a factor proposed to contribute to adaptive differentiation between these ecotypes. However, little is known about the transcriptional response to the distinct parasite pressure of those fish in a natural setting. Here, we sampled wild-caught sticklebacks across four geographical locations from lake and river habitats differing in their parasite load. We compared gene expression profiles between lake and river populations using 77 whole-transcriptome libraries from two immune-relevant tissues, the head kidney and the spleen. Differential expression analyses revealed 139 genes with habitat-specific expression patterns across the sampled population pairs. Among the 139 differentially expressed genes, eight are annotated with an immune function and 42 have been identified as differentially expressed in previous experimental studies in which fish have been immune challenged. Together, these findings reinforce the hypothesis that parasites contribute to adaptation of sticklebacks in lake and river habitats. PMID:26749022

  17. Enhanced transcriptome maps from multiple mouse tissues reveal evolutionary constraint in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Pervouchine, Dmitri D.; Djebali, Sarah; Breschi, Alessandra; Davis, Carrie A.; Barja, Pablo Prieto; Dobin, Alex; Tanzer, Andrea; Lagarde, Julien; Zaleski, Chris; See, Lei-Hoon; Fastuca, Meagan; Drenkow, Jorg; Wang, Huaien; Bussotti, Giovanni; Pei, Baikang; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Monlong, Jean; Harmanci, Arif; Gerstein, Mark; Beer, Michael A.; Notredame, Cedric; Guigó, Roderic; Gingeras, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Mice have been a long-standing model for human biology and disease. Here we characterize, by RNA sequencing, the transcriptional profiles of a large and heterogeneous collection of mouse tissues, augmenting the mouse transcriptome with thousands of novel transcript candidates. Comparison with transcriptome profiles in human cell lines reveals substantial conservation of transcriptional programmes, and uncovers a distinct class of genes with levels of expression that have been constrained early in vertebrate evolution. This core set of genes captures a substantial fraction of the transcriptional output of mammalian cells, and participates in basic functional and structural housekeeping processes common to all cell types. Perturbation of these constrained genes is associated with significant phenotypes including embryonic lethality and cancer. Evolutionary constraint in gene expression levels is not reflected in the conservation of the genomic sequences, but is associated with conserved epigenetic marking, as well as with characteristic post-transcriptional regulatory programme, in which sub-cellular localization and alternative splicing play comparatively large roles. PMID:25582907

  18. Lower Limb Core Scale: A New Application to Evaluate and Compare the Outcomes of Bone and Soft-Tissue Tumours Resection and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Monticelli, Andrea; Ciclamini, Davide; Boffano, Michele; Boux, Elena; Titolo, Paolo; Panero, Bernardino; Battiston, Bruno; Piana, Raimondo; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Several methods are used to evaluate the functional outcome of tumour resections and reconstructions in the lower limb. However, one of their most common limitations is that they are specifically developed to evaluate only oncological patients. We introduced the Lower Limb Core Scale (LLCS) to overcome this limitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and subjective results in the lower limb and to evaluate the use of the LLCS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using various tools to investigate the outcomes. The results of the LLCS were correlated with the results of other functional tests. A total of 44 patients were included in the study. None of the demographic variables correlated with the functional or health-related quality of life (QoL) scores except for gender, whereby male patients had an increased functional score. The correlation between LLCS and other scores was positive (r2 = 0.77). The satisfactory QoL scores, and functional outcomes scores indicated the LLCS to be a reliable option for general and specific evaluation of lower limb reconstructions. We suggest using the LLCS for comparisons of oncological reconstructions with lower limb reconstructions in different disciplines. PMID:25162021

  19. Lower Limb Core Scale: a new application to evaluate and compare the outcomes of bone and soft-tissue tumours resection and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Monticelli, Andrea; Ciclamini, Davide; Boffano, Michele; Boux, Elena; Titolo, Paolo; Panero, Bernardino; Battiston, Bruno; Piana, Raimondo; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Several methods are used to evaluate the functional outcome of tumour resections and reconstructions in the lower limb. However, one of their most common limitations is that they are specifically developed to evaluate only oncological patients. We introduced the Lower Limb Core Scale (LLCS) to overcome this limitation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the functional and subjective results in the lower limb and to evaluate the use of the LLCS. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using various tools to investigate the outcomes. The results of the LLCS were correlated with the results of other functional tests. A total of 44 patients were included in the study. None of the demographic variables correlated with the functional or health-related quality of life (QoL) scores except for gender, whereby male patients had an increased functional score. The correlation between LLCS and other scores was positive (r (2) = 0.77). The satisfactory QoL scores, and functional outcomes scores indicated the LLCS to be a reliable option for general and specific evaluation of lower limb reconstructions. We suggest using the LLCS for comparisons of oncological reconstructions with lower limb reconstructions in different disciplines. PMID:25162021

  20. Hepatic Resection Using a Water Jet Dissector

    PubMed Central

    Stain, S. C.; Guastella, T.; Maddern, G. J.; Blumgart, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity in major hepatic resection is often related to hemorrhage. A high pressure, high velocity water jet has been developed and has been utilized to assist in hepatic parenchymal transection. Sixty-seven major hepatic resections were performed for solid hepatic tumors. The tissue fracture technique was used in 51 patients (76%), and the water jet dissector was used predominantly in 16 patients (24%). The extent of hepatic resection using each technique was similar. The results showed no difference in operative duration (p = .499). The mean estimated blood loss using the water jet was 1386 ml, and tissue fracture technique 2450 ml (p = .217). Transfusion requirements were less in the water jet group (mean 2.0 units) compared to the tissue fracture group (mean 5.2 units); (p = .023). Results obtained with the new water dissector are encouraging. The preliminary results suggest that blood loss may be diminished. PMID:8387808

  1. Erbium:YAG and holmium:YAG laser root resection of extracted human teeth.

    PubMed

    Komori, T; Yokoyama, K; Matsumoto, Y; Matsumoto, K

    1997-02-01

    Root resection of extracted human teeth was performed using the erbium:YAG (Er:YAG) and holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser to investigate the clinical application of lasers on hard tissue. The CO2 laser and the mechanical drill were also used for comparison. After resection using these technologies, the morphological changes of the cut surface were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscope. Er:YAG laser irradiation produced smooth, clean resected surfaces without signs of thermal damages. Complete obturation of the root canal was maintained after Er:YAG laser irradiation. Ho:YAG laser irradiation, however, produced some signs of thermal damage. Relatively large voids between the gutta-percha and the canal walls were revealed after Ho:YAG laser irradiation. The sealing of the dentinal tubules was not completely attained as stipulated by original conditions of this study. PMID:9467336

  2. Epigenomic footprints across 111 reference epigenomes reveal tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Viren; Harris, R. Alan; Onuchic, Vitor; Jackson, Andrew R.; Charnecki, Tim; Paithankar, Sameer; Lakshmi Subramanian, Sai; Riehle, Kevin; Coarfa, Cristian; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-specific expression of lincRNAs suggests developmental and cell-type-specific functions, yet tissue specificity was established for only a small fraction of lincRNAs. Here, by analysing 111 reference epigenomes from the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics project, we determine tissue-specific epigenetic regulation for 3,753 (69% examined) lincRNAs, with 54% active in one of the 14 cell/tissue clusters and an additional 15% in two or three clusters. A larger fraction of lincRNA TSSs is marked in a tissue-specific manner by H3K4me1 than by H3K4me3. The tissue-specific lincRNAs are strongly linked to tissue-specific pathways and undergo distinct chromatin state transitions during cellular differentiation. Polycomb-regulated lincRNAs reside in the bivalent state in embryonic stem cells and many of them undergo H3K27me3-mediated silencing at early stages of differentiation. The exquisitely tissue-specific epigenetic regulation of lincRNAs and the assignment of a majority of them to specific tissue types will inform future studies of this newly discovered class of genes. PMID:25691256

  3. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hackert, Thilo; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W

    2016-06-01

    Surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy remains the only treatment option for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) with the chance of long-term survival. If a radical tumor resection is possible, 5-year survival rates of 20-25% can be achieved. Pancreatic surgery has significantly changed during the past years and resection approaches have been extended beyond standard procedures, including vascular and multivisceral resections. Consequently, borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BR-PDAC), which has recently been defined by the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS), has become a controversial issue with regard to its management in terms of upfront resection vs. neoadjuvant treatment and sequential resection. Preoperative diagnostic accuracy to define resectability of PDAC is a keypoint in this context as well as the surgical and interdisciplinary expertise to perform advanced pancreatic surgery and manage complications. The present mini-review summarizes the current state of definition, management and outcome of BR-PDAC. Furthermore, the topic of ongoing and future studies on neoadjuvant treatment which is closely related to borderline resectability in PDAC is discussed. PMID:26970276

  4. Recurrence after thymoma resection according to the extent of the resection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Complete resection of the thymus is considered appropriate for a thymoma resection because any remaining thymic tissue can lead to local recurrence. However, there are few studies concerning the extent of thymus resection. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to investigate whether recurrence following thymoma resection correlated to the extent of resection. Methods Between 1986 and 2011, a total of 491 patients underwent resection of thymic epithelial tumors with curative intent. Of those, we excluded patients with an undetermined World Health Organization (WHO) histologic type, patients with type C thymoma, and patients who underwent incomplete resection (n = 21). The remaining 342 patients were reviewed retrospectively and compared recurrence according to the extent of resection. Results Extended thymectomy was performed in 239 patients (69.9%) and limited thymectomy was performed 103 patients (30.1%). In the extended thymectomy group, 29 recurrences occurred, and in the limited thymectomy group, 10 recurrences occurred. Comparing rates of freedom from recurrence between two groups, there was no significant statistical difference in total recurrence (p =0.472) or local recurrence (p =0.798). After matching patients by stage and tumor size, there was no significant difference in freedom from recurrence between the two groups (p = 0.162). Additionally, after adjusting for histologic type and MG, there was also no significant difference (p = 0.125) between groups. Conclusions No difference in the rate of recurrence was observed in patients following limited thymectomy compared with extended thymectomy. PMID:24646138

  5. Anticipated Intraoperative Electron Beam Boost, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Limb-Sparing Surgical Resection for Patients with Pediatric Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremity: A Multicentric Pooled Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes

    SciTech Connect

    Sole, Claudio V.; Calvo, Felipe A.; Polo, Alfredo; Cambeiro, Mauricio; Alvarez, Ana; Gonzalez, Carmen; Gonzalez, Jose; San Julian, Mikel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To perform a joint analysis of data from 3 contributing centers within the intraoperative electron-beam radiation therapy (IOERT)-Spanish program, to determine the potential of IOERT as an anticipated boost before external beam radiation therapy in the multidisciplinary treatment of pediatric extremity soft-tissue sarcomas. Methods and Materials: From June 1993 to May 2013, 62 patients (aged <21 years) with a histologic diagnosis of primary extremity soft-tissue sarcoma with absence of distant metastases, undergoing limb-sparing grossly resected surgery, external beam radiation therapy (median dose 40 Gy) and IOERT (median dose 10 Gy) were considered eligible for this analysis. Results: After a median follow-up of 66 months (range, 4-235 months), 10-year local control, disease-free survival, and overall survival was 85%, 76%, and 81%, respectively. In multivariate analysis after adjustment for other covariates, tumor size >5 cm (P=.04) and R1 margin status (P=.04) remained significantly associated with local relapse. In regard to overall survival only margin status (P=.04) retained association on multivariate analysis. Ten patients (16%) reported severe chronic toxicity events (all grade 3). Conclusions: An anticipated IOERT boost allowed for external beam radiation therapy dose reduction, with high local control and acceptably low toxicity rates. The combined radiosurgical approach needs to be tested in a prospective trial to confirm these results.

  6. Dynamic full field optical coherence tomography: subcellular metabolic contrast revealed in tissues by interferometric signals temporal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Apelian, Clement; Harms, Fabrice; Thouvenin, Olivier; Boccara, A. Claude

    2016-01-01

    We developed a new endogenous approach to reveal subcellular metabolic contrast in fresh ex vivo tissues taking advantage of the time dependence of the full field optical coherence tomography interferometric signals. This method reveals signals linked with local activity of the endogenous scattering elements which can reveal cells where other OCT-based techniques fail or need exogenous contrast agents. We benefit from the micrometric transverse resolution of full field OCT to image intracellular features. We used this time dependence to identify different dynamics at the millisecond scale on a wide range of organs in normal or pathological conditions. PMID:27446672

  7. Lack of tissue renewal in human adult Achilles tendon is revealed by nuclear bomb (14)C.

    PubMed

    Heinemeier, Katja Maria; Schjerling, Peter; Heinemeier, Jan; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Kjaer, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Tendons are often injured and heal poorly. Whether this is caused by a slow tissue turnover is unknown, since existing data provide diverging estimates of tendon protein half-life that range from 2 mo to 200 yr. With the purpose of determining life-long turnover of human tendon tissue, we used the (14)C bomb-pulse method. This method takes advantage of the dramatic increase in atmospheric levels of (14)C, produced by nuclear bomb tests in 1955-1963, which is reflected in all living organisms. Levels of (14)C were measured in 28 forensic samples of Achilles tendon core and 4 skeletal muscle samples (donor birth years 1945-1983) with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) and compared to known atmospheric levels to estimate tissue turnover. We found that Achilles tendon tissue retained levels of (14)C corresponding to atmospheric levels several decades before tissue sampling, demonstrating a very limited tissue turnover. The tendon concentrations of (14)C approximately reflected the atmospheric levels present during the first 17 yr of life, indicating that the tendon core is formed during height growth and is essentially not renewed thereafter. In contrast, (14)C levels in muscle indicated continuous turnover. Our observation provides a fundamental premise for understanding tendon function and pathology, and likely explains the poor regenerative capacity of tendon tissue. PMID:23401563

  8. Chromatin immunoprecipitation from fixed clinical tissues reveals tumor-specific enhancer profiles.

    PubMed

    Cejas, Paloma; Li, Lewyn; O'Neill, Nicholas K; Duarte, Melissa; Rao, Prakash; Bowden, Michaela; Zhou, Chensheng W; Mendiola, Marta; Burgos, Emilio; Feliu, Jaime; Moreno-Rubio, Juan; Guadalajara, Héctor; Moreno, Víctor; García-Olmo, Damián; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Mullane, Stephanie; Hirsch, Michelle; Sweeney, Christopher J; Richardson, Andrea; Liu, X Shirley; Brown, Myles; Shivdasani, Ramesh A; Long, Henry W

    2016-06-01

    Extensive cross-linking introduced during routine tissue fixation of clinical pathology specimens severely hampers chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) analysis from archived tissue samples. This limits the ability to study the epigenomes of valuable, clinically annotated tissue resources. Here we describe fixed-tissue chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (FiT-seq), a method that enables reliable extraction of soluble chromatin from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for accurate detection of histone marks. We demonstrate that FiT-seq data from FFPE specimens are concordant with ChIP-seq data from fresh-frozen samples of the same tumors. By using multiple histone marks, we generate chromatin-state maps and identify cis-regulatory elements in clinical samples from various tumor types that can readily allow us to distinguish between cancers by the tissue of origin. Tumor-specific enhancers and superenhancers that are elucidated by FiT-seq analysis correlate with known oncogenic drivers in different tissues and can assist in the understanding of how chromatin states affect gene regulation. PMID:27111282

  9. Tissue-specific regulatory circuits reveal variable modular perturbations across complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Marbach, Daniel; Lamparter, David; Quon, Gerald; Kellis, Manolis; Kutalik, Zoltán; Bergmann, Sven

    2016-04-01

    Mapping perturbed molecular circuits that underlie complex diseases remains a great challenge. We developed a comprehensive resource of 394 cell type- and tissue-specific gene regulatory networks for human, each specifying the genome-wide connectivity among transcription factors, enhancers, promoters and genes. Integration with 37 genome-wide association studies (GWASs) showed that disease-associated genetic variants-including variants that do not reach genome-wide significance-often perturb regulatory modules that are highly specific to disease-relevant cell types or tissues. Our resource opens the door to systematic analysis of regulatory programs across hundreds of human cell types and tissues (http://regulatorycircuits.org). PMID:26950747

  10. Comprehensive Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Regulatory Programs during Early Tomato Fruit Development1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pattison, Richard J.; Csukasi, Fabiana; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; van der Knaap, Esther; Catalá, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Fruit formation and early development involve a range of physiological and morphological transformations of the various constituent tissues of the ovary. These developmental changes vary considerably according to tissue type, but molecular analyses at an organ-wide level inevitably obscure many tissue-specific phenomena. We used laser-capture microdissection coupled to high-throughput RNA sequencing to analyze the transcriptome of ovaries and fruit tissues of the wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium. This laser-capture microdissection-high-throughput RNA sequencing approach allowed quantitative global profiling of gene expression at previously unobtainable levels of spatial resolution, revealing numerous contrasting transcriptome profiles and uncovering rare and cell type-specific transcripts. Coexpressed gene clusters linked specific tissues and stages to major transcriptional changes underlying the ovary-to-fruit transition and provided evidence of regulatory modules related to cell division, photosynthesis, and auxin transport in internal fruit tissues, together with parallel specialization of the pericarp transcriptome in stress responses and secondary metabolism. Analysis of transcription factor expression and regulatory motifs indicated putative gene regulatory modules that may regulate the development of different tissues and hormonal processes. Major alterations in the expression of hormone metabolic and signaling components illustrate the complex hormonal control underpinning fruit formation, with intricate spatiotemporal variations suggesting separate regulatory programs. PMID:26099271

  11. Retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma resected by a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Hanaoka, Marie; Hashimoto, Masaji; Sasaki, Kazunari; Matsuda, Masamichi; Fujii, Takeshi; Ohashi, Kenichi; Watanabe, Goro

    2013-01-01

    A retroperitoneal hemangioma is a rare disease. We report on the diagnosis and treatment of a retroperitoneal hemangioma which had uncommonly invaded into both the pancreas and duodenum, thus requiring a pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PpPD). A 36-year-old man presented to our hospital with abdominal pain. An enhanced computed tomography scan without contrast enhancement revealed a 12 cm × 9 cm mass between the pancreas head and right kidney. Given the high rate of malignancy associated with retroperitoneal tumors, surgical resection was performed. Intraoperatively, the tumor was inseparable from both the duodenum and pancreas and PpPD was performed due to the invasive behavior. Although malignancy was suspected, pathological diagnosis identified the tumor as a retroperitoneal cavernous hemangioma for which surgical resection was the proper diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. Reteoperitoneal cavernous hemangioma is unique in that it is typically separated from the surrounding organs. However, clinicians need to be aware of the possibility of a case, such as this, which has invaded into the surrounding organs despite its benign etiology. From this case, we recommend that combined resection of inseparable organs should be performed if the mass has invaded into other tissues due to the hazardous nature of local recurrence. In summary, this report is the first to describe a case of retroperitoneal hemangioma that had uniquely invaded into surrounding organs and was treated with PpPD. PMID:23901241

  12. High-throughput proteomics reveal alarmins as amplifiers of tissue pathology and inflammation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Didangelos, Athanasios; Puglia, Michele; Iberl, Michaela; Sanchez-Bellot, Candela; Roschitzki, Bernd; Bradbury, Elizabeth J

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is characterized by acute cellular and axonal damage followed by aggressive inflammation and pathological tissue remodelling. The biological mediators underlying these processes are still largely unknown. Here we apply an innovative proteomics approach targeting the enriched extracellular proteome after spinal cord injury for the first time. Proteomics revealed multiple matrix proteins not previously associated with injured spinal tissue, including small proteoglycans involved in cell-matrix adhesion and collagen fibrillogenesis. Network analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics datasets uncovered persistent overexpression of extracellular alarmins that can trigger inflammation via pattern recognition receptors. In mechanistic experiments, inhibition of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) revealed the involvement of alarmins in inflammatory gene expression, which was found to be dominated by IL1 and NFκΒ signalling. Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) was identified as the likely endogenous regulator of IL1 expression after injury. These data reveal a novel tissue remodelling signature and identify endogenous alarmins as amplifiers of the inflammatory response that promotes tissue pathology and impedes neuronal repair after spinal cord injury. PMID:26899371

  13. High-throughput proteomics reveal alarmins as amplifiers of tissue pathology and inflammation after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Didangelos, Athanasios; Puglia, Michele; Iberl, Michaela; Sanchez-Bellot, Candela; Roschitzki, Bernd; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is characterized by acute cellular and axonal damage followed by aggressive inflammation and pathological tissue remodelling. The biological mediators underlying these processes are still largely unknown. Here we apply an innovative proteomics approach targeting the enriched extracellular proteome after spinal cord injury for the first time. Proteomics revealed multiple matrix proteins not previously associated with injured spinal tissue, including small proteoglycans involved in cell-matrix adhesion and collagen fibrillogenesis. Network analysis of transcriptomics and proteomics datasets uncovered persistent overexpression of extracellular alarmins that can trigger inflammation via pattern recognition receptors. In mechanistic experiments, inhibition of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) revealed the involvement of alarmins in inflammatory gene expression, which was found to be dominated by IL1 and NFκΒ signalling. Extracellular high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) was identified as the likely endogenous regulator of IL1 expression after injury. These data reveal a novel tissue remodelling signature and identify endogenous alarmins as amplifiers of the inflammatory response that promotes tissue pathology and impedes neuronal repair after spinal cord injury. PMID:26899371

  14. Unrestricted modification search reveals lysine methylation as major modification induced by tissue formalin fixation and paraffin embedding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Muller, Markus; Xu, Bo; Yoshida, Yutaka; Horlacher, Oliver; Nikitin, Frederic; Garessus, Samuel; Magdeldin, Sameh; Kinoshita, Naohiko; Fujinaka, Hidehiko; Yaoita, Eishin; Hasegawa, Miki; Lisacek, Frederique; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-08-01

    Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is considered as an appropriate alternative to frozen/fresh tissue for proteomic analysis. Here we study formalin-induced alternations on a proteome-wide level. We compared LC-MS/MS data of FFPE and frozen human kidney tissues by two methods. First, clustering analysis revealed that the biological variation is higher than the variation introduced by the two sample processing techniques and clusters formed in accordance with the biological tissue origin and not with the sample preservation method. Second, we combined open modification search and spectral counting to find modifications that are more abundant in FFPE samples compared to frozen samples. This analysis revealed lysine methylation (+14 Da) as the most frequent modification induced by FFPE preservation. We also detected a slight increase in methylene (+12 Da) and methylol (+30 Da) adducts as well as a putative modification of +58 Da, but they contribute less to the overall modification count. Subsequent SEQUEST analysis and X!Tandem searches of different datasets confirmed these trends. However, the modifications due to FFPE sample processing are a minor disturbance affecting 2-6% of all peptide-spectrum matches and the peptides lists identified in FFPE and frozen tissues are still highly similar. PMID:25825003

  15. Reconstruction after resection of malignant parapharyngeal space tumor

    PubMed Central

    Umezawa, Hiroki; Nakamizo, Munenaga; Yokoshima, Kazuhiko; Nara, Shimpei; Ogawa, Rei; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Primary malignant tumor of the parapharyngeal space (PPS) is rare. After surgical resection, primary closure could be considered if the oropharynx mucosa remains. This report describes two patients who underwent reconstruction by free tissue transfer after the resection of PPS tumors. This report was presented at the 56th annual meeting of the Japanese Society of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, 4 April, 2013.

  16. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Endocervical Tissues Reveals Distinct Gene Expression in the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle.

    PubMed

    Yildiz-Arslan, Sevim; Coon, John S; Hope, Thomas J; Kim, J Julie

    2016-06-01

    The endocervix plays an important role in providing appropriate protective mechanisms of the upper female reproductive tract (FRT) while at the same time providing the appropriate milieu for sperm transport. Hormone fluctuations throughout the menstrual cycle contribute to changes in the mucosal environment that render the FRT vulnerable to infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to identify genes in human endocervix tissues that were differentially expressed in the follicular versus the luteal phases of the menstrual cycle using gene expression profiling. A microarray using the IIlumina platform was performed with eight endocervix tissues from follicular and four tissues from luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Data analysis revealed significant differential expression of 110 genes between the two phases, with a P value <0.05 and a fold change cutoff of 1.5. Categorization of these genes, using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, MetaCore from Thomson Reuters, and DAVID, revealed genes associated with extracellular matrix remodeling and cell-matrix interactions, amino acid metabolism, and lipid metabolism, as well as immune regulation in the follicular phase tissues. In luteal phase tissues, genes associated with chromatin remodeling, inflammation, angiogenesis, oxidative stress, and immune cell regulation were predominately expressed. Using samples from additional patients' tissues, select genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR; immunohistochemical staining was also done to examine protein levels. This is the first microarray analysis comparing gene expression in endocervix tissues in cycling women. This study identified key genes and molecular pathways that were differentially regulated during the menstrual cycle. PMID:27170437

  17. Single cell sequencing reveals low levels of aneuploidy across mammalian tissues

    PubMed Central

    Knouse, Kristin A.; Wu, Jie; Whittaker, Charles A.; Amon, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Whole-chromosome copy number alterations, also known as aneuploidy, are associated with adverse consequences in most cells and organisms. However, high frequencies of aneuploidy have been reported to occur naturally in the mammalian liver and brain, fueling speculation that aneuploidy provides a selective advantage in these organs. To explore this paradox, we used single cell sequencing to obtain a genome-wide, high-resolution assessment of chromosome copy number alterations in mouse and human tissues. We find that aneuploidy occurs much less frequently in the liver and brain than previously reported and is no more prevalent in these tissues than in skin. Our results highlight the rarity of chromosome copy number alterations across mammalian tissues and argue against a positive role for aneuploidy in organ function. Cancer is therefore the only known example, in mammals, of altering karyotype for functional adaptation. PMID:25197050

  18. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Connective Tissue Mast Cell Accumulation in Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Go, Diana; Krenitsky, Daria L.; Huyck, Heidi L.; Solleti, Siva Kumar; Lunger, Valerie A.; Metlay, Leon; Srisuma, Sorachai; Wert, Susan E.; Pryhuber, Gloria S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a major complication of premature birth. Risk factors for BPD are complex and include prenatal infection and O2 toxicity. BPD pathology is equally complex and characterized by inflammation and dysmorphic airspaces and vasculature. Due to the limited availability of clinical samples, an understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of this disease and its causal mechanisms and associated biomarkers is limited. Objectives: Apply genome-wide expression profiling to define pathways affected in BPD lungs. Methods: Lung tissue was obtained at autopsy from 11 BPD cases and 17 age-matched control subjects without BPD. RNA isolated from these tissue samples was interrogated using microarrays. Standard gene selection and pathway analysis methods were applied to the data set. Abnormal expression patterns were validated by quantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Measurements and Main Results: We identified 159 genes differentially expressed in BPD tissues. Pathway analysis indicated previously appreciated (e.g., DNA damage regulation of cell cycle) as well as novel (e.g., B-cell development) biological functions were affected. Three of the five most highly induced genes were mast cell (MC)-specific markers. We confirmed an increased accumulation of connective tissue MCTC (chymase expressing) mast cells in BPD tissues. Increased expression of MCTC markers was also demonstrated in an animal model of BPD-like pathology. Conclusions: We present a unique genome-wide expression data set from human BPD lung tissue. Our data provide information on gene expression patterns associated with BPD and facilitated the discovery that MCTC accumulation is a prominent feature of this disease. These observations have significant clinical and mechanistic implications. PMID:22723293

  19. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: Erection problems (impotence) No symptom improvement Passing semen back into your bladder instead of out through ... Whelan JP, Goeree L. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transurethral resection of the prostate versus minimally ...

  20. Laparoscopic Colon Resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches to complete the procedure. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Colon Resection? Results may vary depending ... type of procedure and patient’s overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain May shorten hospital stay ...

  1. Large bowel resection - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100089.htm Large bowel resection - Series To use the sharing features ... 6 out of 6 Normal anatomy Overview The large bowel [large intestine or the colon] is part ...

  2. Multi-tissue omics analyses reveal molecular regulatory networks for puberty in composite beef cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puberty is a complex physiological event by which animals mature into an adult capable of sexual reproduction. In order to enhance our understanding of the genes and regulatory pathways and networks involved in puberty, we characterized the transcriptome of five reproductive tissues (i.e., hypothal...

  3. Quantitative proteomic analysis of mice corneal tissues reveals angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Shen, Minqian; Tao, Yimin; Feng, Yifan; Liu, Xing; Yuan, Fei; Zhou, Hu

    2016-07-01

    Corneal neovascularization (CNV) was induced in Balb/c mice by alkali burns in the central area of the cornea with a diameter of 2.5mm. After fourteen days, the cornea from one eye was collected for histological staining for CNV examination, while the cornea from the other eye of the same mouse was harvested for proteomic analysis. The label-free quantitative proteomic approach was applied to analyze five normal corneal tissues (normal group mice n=5) and five corresponding neovascularized corneal tissues (model group mice n=5). A total of 2124 proteins were identified, and 1682 proteins were quantified from these corneal tissues. Among these quantified proteins, 290 proteins were significantly changed between normal and alkali burned corneal tissues. Of these significantly changed proteins, 35 were reported or predicted as angiogenesis-related proteins. Then, these 35 proteins were analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software, resulting in 26 proteins enriched and connected to each other in the protein-protein interaction network, such as Lcn-2, αB-crystallin and Serpinf1 (PEDF). These three significantly changed proteins were selected for further Western blotting validation. Consistent with the quantitative proteomic results, Western blotting showed that Lcn-2 and αB-crystallin were significantly up-regulated in CNV model, while PEDF was down-regulated. This study provided increased understanding of angiogenesis-related proteins involved in corneal vascular development, which will be useful in the ophthalmic clinic of specifically target angiogenesis. PMID:27049463

  4. Comparative genomics reveals tissue-specific regulation of prolactin receptor gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prolactin (PRL), acting via the prolactin receptor, fulfills a diversity of biological functions including the maintenance of solute balance and mineral homeostasis via tissues such as the heart, kidneys and intestine. Expression and activity of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) is regulated by various ...

  5. Information Theoretical Analysis of a Bovine Gene Atlas Reveals Chromosomal Regions with Tissue Specific Gene Expression.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An essential step to understanding the genomic biology of any organism is to comprehensively survey its transcriptome. We present the Bovine Gene Atlas (BGA) a compendium of over 7.2 million unique 20 base Illumina DGE tags representing 100 tissue transcriptomes collected primarily from L1 Dominette...

  6. [Revealing the structure of the nervous tissue I.: from Marcello Malpighi (1628-1694) to Christian Berres (1796-1844)].

    PubMed

    Chvátal, A

    2014-01-01

    Efforts were already made in antiquity to understand the structure and function of the brain and nervous tissue, but an important impulse for the development of neuroanatomy as a field was the invention of the microscope at the beginning of the 17th century. A brief overview of the history of research of the brain and nerve structure from Marcello Malpighi to Christian Berres shows by what small steps and with what difficulties the investigation of the composition of the nervous tissue advanced. The study of historical sources reveals that despite constantly improving microscopic techniques, many prominent researchers obtained inaccurate data and, on the basis of such data, often reached erroneous conclusions. However, these observations and their interpretation and, in addition, the clashing opinions of scholars of that period greatly influenced the work of later researchers in the field of the microscopic structure and function of the nervous tissue. PMID:24968535

  7. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    PubMed

    Svahn, Sara L; Väremo, Leif; Gabrielsson, Britt G; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens; Johansson, Maria E

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  8. Six Tissue Transcriptomics Reveals Specific Immune Suppression in Spleen by Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Britt G.; Peris, Eduard; Nookaew, Intawat; Grahnemo, Louise; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie; Wernstedt Asterholm, Ingrid; Jansson, John-Olov; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are suggested to modulate immune function, but the effects of dietary fatty acids composition on gene expression patterns in immune organs have not been fully characterized. In the current study we investigated how dietary fatty acids composition affects the total transcriptome profile, and especially, immune related genes in two immune organs, spleen (SPL) and bone marrow cells (BMC). Four tissues with metabolic function, skeletal muscle (SKM), white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT), and liver (LIV), were investigated as a comparison. Following 8 weeks on low fat diet (LFD), high fat diet (HFD) rich in saturated fatty acids (HFD-S), or HFD rich in PUFA (HFD-P), tissue transcriptomics were analyzed by microarray and metabolic health assessed by fasting blood glucose level, HOMA-IR index, oral glucose tolerance test as well as quantification of crown-like structures in WAT. HFD-P corrected the metabolic phenotype induced by HFD-S. Interestingly, SKM and BMC were relatively inert to the diets, whereas the two adipose tissues (WAT and BAT) were mainly affected by HFD per se (both HFD-S and HFD-P). In particular, WAT gene expression was driven closer to that of the immune organs SPL and BMC by HFDs. The LIV exhibited different responses to both of the HFDs. Surprisingly, the spleen showed a major response to HFD-P (82 genes differed from LFD, mostly immune genes), while it was not affected at all by HFD-S (0 genes differed from LFD). In conclusion, the quantity and composition of dietary fatty acids affected the transcriptome in distinct manners in different organs. Remarkably, dietary PUFA, but not saturated fat, prompted a specific regulation of immune related genes in the spleen, opening the possibility that PUFA can regulate immune function by influencing gene expression in this organ. PMID:27166587

  9. Transcriptome analysis of distinct Lindera glauca tissues revealed the differences in the unigenes related to terpenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Niu, Jun; Hou, Xinyu; Fang, Chengliang; An, Jiyong; Ha, Denglong; Qiu, Lin; Ju, Yuxi; Zhao, Haiyan; Du, WenZhi; Qi, Ji; Zhang, Zhixiang; Liu, Genan; Lin, Shanzhi

    2015-03-15

    The Lindera glauca, an economically and ecologically important tree species, has emerged as a novel potential plant for the intensive studies of essential oil owing to its characteristic aroma and medicinal property in distinct tissues. However, the transcriptome information and molecular research on this species is still unknown to date. To reveal the formation and accumulation mechanism of essential oil in distinct L. glauca tissues, it is crucial to analyze transcriptome and to identify the full repertoire of potential unigenes involved in terpenoid biosynthesis. In this paper, the transcriptomes of the roots, sarcocarps, stems, leaves and kernels of L. glauca were analyzed for the first time by using short-read sequencing technology (Illumina). A total of 27.2GB valid reads (the average length=92.7bp) was obtained from distinct L. glauca tissues, and then assembled de novo into 264,831 unigenes by Trinity strategy (mean size=560.2bp). The resulting 98,141 unigenes (38%) of all the assembled unigenes were annotated in multiple public databases, of which 114 potential unigenes were identified to be involved in the terpenoid biosynthetic accumulation in L. glauca. Additionally, the differential expression profiles revealed 675, 697, 432, 1702 and 844 high tissue-specificity expressions of unigenes in the roots, sarcocarps, stems, leaves and kernels of L. glauca, respectively. Overall, these obtained comprehensive unigene resources will contribute to advance the research regarding the specific plant and more specifically discovery of genes participating in the terpenoid pathway and its regulation in specific tissues of the L. glauca, but also could help the understanding of the differential accumulation of secondary metabolites in distinct plant tissues. PMID:25576222

  10. Anatomy of Hepatic Resectional Surgery.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Michael C; D'Angelica, Michael I

    2016-04-01

    Liver anatomy can be variable, and understanding of anatomic variations is crucial to performing hepatic resections, particularly parenchymal-sparing resections. Anatomic knowledge is a critical prerequisite for effective hepatic resection with minimal blood loss, parenchymal preservation, and optimal oncologic outcome. Each anatomic resection has pitfalls, about which the operating surgeon should be aware and comfortable managing intraoperatively. PMID:27017858

  11. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  12. Treatment Strategy after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection of Early Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Gyun

    2016-07-01

    Endoscopic resection of early gastric cancer is defined as incomplete when tumor cells are found at the resection margin upon histopathological examination. However, a tumor-positive resection margin does not always indicate residual tumor; it can also be caused by tissue contraction during fixation, by the cautery effect during endoscopic resection, or by incorrect histopathological mapping. Cases of highly suspicious residual tumor require additional endoscopic or surgical resection. For inoperable patients, argon plasma coagulation can be used as an alternative endoscopic treatment. Immediately after the incomplete resection or residual tumor has been confirmed by the pathologist, clinicians should also decide upon any additional treatment to be carried out during the follow-up period. PMID:27435699

  13. Nano-analytical electron microscopy reveals fundamental insights into human cardiovascular tissue calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertazzo, Sergio; Gentleman, Eileen; Cloyd, Kristy L.; Chester, Adrian H.; Yacoub, Magdi H.; Stevens, Molly M.

    2013-06-01

    The accumulation of calcified material in cardiovascular tissue is thought to involve cytochemical, extracellular matrix and systemic signals; however, its precise composition and nanoscale architecture remain largely unexplored. Using nano-analytical electron microscopy techniques, we examined valves, aortae and coronary arteries from patients with and without calcific cardiovascular disease and detected spherical calcium phosphate particles, regardless of the presence of calcific lesions. We also examined lesions after sectioning with a focused ion beam and found that the spherical particles are composed of highly crystalline hydroxyapatite that crystallographically and structurally differs from bone mineral. Taken together, these data suggest that mineralized spherical particles may play a fundamental role in calcific lesion formation. Their ubiquitous presence in varied cardiovascular tissues and from patients with a spectrum of diseases further suggests that lesion formation may follow a common process. Indeed, applying materials science techniques to ectopic and orthotopic calcification has great potential to lend critical insights into pathophysiological processes underlying calcific cardiovascular disease.

  14. Transcriptional programs of lymphoid tissue capillary and high endothelium reveal control mechanisms for lymphocyte homing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mike; Kiefel, Helena; LaJevic, Melissa D.; Macauley, Matthew S.; Kawashima, Hiroto; O'Hara, Edward; Pan, Junliang; Paulson, James C.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are recruited from blood by high-endothelial venules (HEVs). We performed transcriptomic analyses and identified molecular signatures that distinguish HEVs from capillary endothelium and that define tissue-specific HEV specialization. Capillaries displayed gene programs for vascular development. HEVs were enriched in genes for immune defense and lymphocyte migration. We identify capillary and HEV markers and candidate mechanisms for regulated lymphocyte recruitment including a lymph node HEV-selective transmembrane mucin; transcriptional control of functionally specialized carbohydrate ligands for lymphocyte L-selectin; HEV expression of molecules for transendothelial migration; and metabolic programs for lipid mediators of lymphocyte motility and chemotaxis. We also elucidate a carbohydrate recognition pathway that targets B cells to intestinal lymphoid tissues, defining CD22 as a lectin-homing receptor for mucosal HEVs. PMID:25173345

  15. Insights into Brown Adipose Tissue Physiology as Revealed by Imaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Salem, Victoria; Atkar, Rajveer S; Dhillo, Waljit S

    2014-01-01

    There has been resurgence in interest in brown adipose tissue (BAT) following radiological and histological identification of metabolically active BAT in adult humans. Imaging enables BAT to be studied non-invasively and therefore imaging studies have contributed a significant amount to what is known about BAT function in humans. In this review the current knowledge (derived from imaging studies) about the prevalence, function, activity and regulation of BAT in humans (as well as relevant rodent studies), will be summarized. PMID:26167397

  16. PET/CT Imaging Reveals Unrivaled Placental Avidity for Glucose Compared to Other Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzke, Alexander B.; Norris, Andrew W.; Spyropoulos, Fotios; Walsh, Susan A.; Acevedo, Michael R.; Hu, Shanming; Yao, Jianrong; Wang, Chunlin; Sunderland, John J.; Boles Ponto, Laura L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The goal of this study was to define the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood to placenta to fetus using real time imaging. Methods Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the glucose tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) was used to temporally and spatially define, in vivo, the kinetics of glucose transport from maternal blood into placentae and fetuses, in the late gestational gravid rat. Computed tomography (CT), with intravenous contrast, co-registered to the PET images allowed anatomic differentiation of placentae from fetal and maternal tissues. Results FDG was rapidly taken up by placentae and subsequently appeared in fetuses with minimal temporal lag. FDG standardized uptake values in placentae and fetuses approached that of maternal brain. In both anesthetized and awake dams, one quarter of the administered FDG ultimately was accrued in the collective fetuses and placentae. Accordingly, kinetic modeling demonstrated that the placentae had very high avidity for FDG, 2-fold greater than that of the fetus and maternal brain, when accounting for the fact that fetal FDG necessarily must first be taken up by placentae. Consistent with this, placental expression of glucose transporter 1 exceeded that of all other tissues. Discussion Fetal and placental tissues place a substantial glucose metabolic burden on the mother, owing to very high avidity of placentae for glucose coupled with the large relative mass of fetal and placental tissues. Conclusions The placenta has a tremendous capacity to uptake and transport glucose. PET/CT imaging is an ideal means to study metabolite transport kinetics in the fetoplacental unit. PMID:25555498

  17. CILAIR-Based Secretome Analysis of Obese Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues Reveals Distinctive ECM Remodeling and Inflammation Mediators.

    PubMed

    Roca-Rivada, Arturo; Bravo, Susana Belen; Pérez-Sotelo, Diego; Alonso, Jana; Castro, Ana Isabel; Baamonde, Iván; Baltar, Javier; Casanueva, Felipe F; Pardo, María

    2015-01-01

    In the context of obesity, strong evidences support a distinctive pathological contribution of adipose tissue depending on its anatomical site of accumulation. Therefore, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) has been lately considered metabolically benign compared to visceral fat (VAT), whose location is associated to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and other associated comorbidities. Under the above situation, the chronic local inflammation that characterizes obese adipose tissue, has acquired a major role on the pathogenesis of obesity. In this work, we have analyzed for the first time human obese VAT and SAT secretomes using an improved quantitative proteomic approach for the study of tissue secretomes, Comparison of Isotope-Labeled Amino acid Incorporation Rates (CILAIR). The use of double isotope-labeling-CILAIR approach to analyze VAT and SAT secretomes allowed the identification of location-specific secreted proteins and its differential secretion. Additionally to the very high percentage of identified proteins previously implicated in obesity or in its comorbidities, this approach was revealed as a useful tool for the study of the obese adipose tissue microenvironment including extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammatory status. The results herein presented reinforce the fact that VAT and SAT depots have distinct features and contribute differentially to metabolic disease. PMID:26198096

  18. Gene expression profiling of white adipose tissue reveals paternal transmission of proneness to obesity

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Sumiyo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hayashi, Keiko; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more prone to develop obesity than PWK mice. In addition, we analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice and found that (PWK × B6) F1 mice, which have B6 fathers, are more likely to develop dietary obesity than (B6 × PWK) F1 mice, which have B6 mothers. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity is paternally transmitted. In this study, we performed transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues of B6, PWK, (PWK × B6) F1, and (B6 × PWK) F1 mice using next-generation sequencing. We found that paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity was correlated with genes involved in adipose tissue inflammation, metal ion transport, and cilia. Furthermore, we analyzed the imprinted genes expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT) and obesity. Expression of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) was negatively correlated with body weight, whereas expression of maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs) was positively correlated. In the obesity-prone B6 mice, expression of PEGs was down-regulated by a high-fat diet, suggesting that abnormally low expression of PEGs contributes to high-fat diet-induced obesity in B6 mice. In addition, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms that differ between B6 and PWK, we identified candidate imprinted genes in WAT. PMID:26868178

  19. Flux analysis of cholesterol biosynthesis in vivo reveals multiple tissue and cell-type specific pathways

    PubMed Central

    Mitsche, Matthew A; McDonald, Jeffrey G; Hobbs, Helen H; Cohen, Jonathan C

    2015-01-01

    Two parallel pathways produce cholesterol: the Bloch and Kandutsch-Russell pathways. Here we used stable isotope labeling and isotopomer analysis to trace sterol flux through the two pathways in mice. Surprisingly, no tissue used the canonical K–R pathway. Rather, a hybrid pathway was identified that we call the modified K–R (MK–R) pathway. Proportional flux through the Bloch pathway varied from 8% in preputial gland to 97% in testes, and the tissue-specificity observed in vivo was retained in cultured cells. The distribution of sterol isotopomers in plasma mirrored that of liver. Sterol depletion in cultured cells increased flux through the Bloch pathway, whereas overexpression of 24-dehydrocholesterol reductase (DHCR24) enhanced usage of the MK–R pathway. Thus, relative use of the Bloch and MK–R pathways is highly variable, tissue-specific, flux dependent, and epigenetically fixed. Maintenance of two interdigitated pathways permits production of diverse bioactive sterols that can be regulated independently of cholesterol. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07999.001 PMID:26114596

  20. Gene expression profiling of white adipose tissue reveals paternal transmission of proneness to obesity.

    PubMed

    Morita, Sumiyo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hayashi, Keiko; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we found that C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more prone to develop obesity than PWK mice. In addition, we analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice and found that (PWK × B6) F1 mice, which have B6 fathers, are more likely to develop dietary obesity than (B6 × PWK) F1 mice, which have B6 mothers. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity is paternally transmitted. In this study, we performed transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues of B6, PWK, (PWK × B6) F1, and (B6 × PWK) F1 mice using next-generation sequencing. We found that paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity was correlated with genes involved in adipose tissue inflammation, metal ion transport, and cilia. Furthermore, we analyzed the imprinted genes expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT) and obesity. Expression of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) was negatively correlated with body weight, whereas expression of maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs) was positively correlated. In the obesity-prone B6 mice, expression of PEGs was down-regulated by a high-fat diet, suggesting that abnormally low expression of PEGs contributes to high-fat diet-induced obesity in B6 mice. In addition, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms that differ between B6 and PWK, we identified candidate imprinted genes in WAT. PMID:26868178

  1. Transcriptome analysis of mammary tissues reveals complex patterns of transporter gene expression during pregnancy and lactation.

    PubMed

    Anantamongkol, Utchariya; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Wongdee, Kannikar; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Suthiphongchai, Tuangporn; Prapong, Siriwan; Krishnamra, Nateetip

    2010-01-01

    As a complex Ca2+-rich fluid mixture of water, casein, lactose and several ions, milk secretion requires a number of unknown transporters, which can be identified by a genome-wide microarray study in mammary tissues of lactating animals. Ca2+ was reported to be secreted across mammary epithelial cells through the transcellular pathway, presumably involving TRPC (canonical transient receptor potential) channels. In the present study, we have used quantitative real-time PCR to demonstrate that the human mammary cell line MCF-7, as well as rat mammary tissues from pregnant and lactating rats, expressed TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC6. Expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 were markedly up-regulated, whereas that of TRPC3 and TRPC4 was down-regulated in the early lactating period. To further identify other transporter genes affected by lactation, a highly sensitive Illumina microarray featuring Bead Array technology was performed on RNA samples from mammary tissues of lactating rats. We found that, of the 384 transcripts changed during lactation, 31 transcripts were involved in the transport of water and electrolytes, such as Ca2+, Na+, K+, Cl-, I-, Fe2+, sulfate and phosphate. The present study, therefore, provides information for further investigation of the mechanism of lactation-induced transport adaptation in mammary epithelial cells. PMID:19947944

  2. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing maps from multiple human tissues reveal novel CpG islands associated with tissue-specific regulation.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Yi, Soojin V

    2016-01-01

    CpG islands (CGIs) are one of the most widely studied regulatory features of the human genome, with critical roles in development and disease. Despite such significance and the original epigenetic definition, currently used CGI sets are typically predicted from DNA sequence characteristics. Although CGIs are deeply implicated in practical analyses of DNA methylation, recent studies have shown that such computational annotations suffer from inaccuracies. Here we used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing from 10 diverse human tissues to identify a comprehensive, experimentally obtained, single-base resolution CGI catalog. In addition to the unparalleled annotation precision, our method is free from potential bias due to arbitrary sequence features or probe affinity differences. In addition to clarifying substantial false positives in the widely used University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) annotations, our study identifies numerous novel epigenetic loci. In particular, we reveal significant impact of transposable elements on the epigenetic regulatory landscape of the human genome and demonstrate ubiquitous presence of transcription initiation at CGIs, including alternative promoters in gene bodies and non-coding RNAs in intergenic regions. Moreover, coordinated DNA methylation and chromatin modifications mark tissue-specific enhancers at novel CGIs. Enrichment of specific transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq supports mechanistic roles of CGIs on the regulation of tissue-specific transcription. The new CGI catalog provides a comprehensive and integrated list of genomic hotspots of epigenetic regulation. PMID:26512062

  3. Whole-genome bisulfite sequencing maps from multiple human tissues reveal novel CpG islands associated with tissue-specific regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mendizabal, Isabel; Yi, Soojin V.

    2016-01-01

    CpG islands (CGIs) are one of the most widely studied regulatory features of the human genome, with critical roles in development and disease. Despite such significance and the original epigenetic definition, currently used CGI sets are typically predicted from DNA sequence characteristics. Although CGIs are deeply implicated in practical analyses of DNA methylation, recent studies have shown that such computational annotations suffer from inaccuracies. Here we used whole-genome bisulfite sequencing from 10 diverse human tissues to identify a comprehensive, experimentally obtained, single-base resolution CGI catalog. In addition to the unparalleled annotation precision, our method is free from potential bias due to arbitrary sequence features or probe affinity differences. In addition to clarifying substantial false positives in the widely used University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) annotations, our study identifies numerous novel epigenetic loci. In particular, we reveal significant impact of transposable elements on the epigenetic regulatory landscape of the human genome and demonstrate ubiquitous presence of transcription initiation at CGIs, including alternative promoters in gene bodies and non-coding RNAs in intergenic regions. Moreover, coordinated DNA methylation and chromatin modifications mark tissue-specific enhancers at novel CGIs. Enrichment of specific transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq supports mechanistic roles of CGIs on the regulation of tissue-specific transcription. The new CGI catalog provides a comprehensive and integrated list of genomic hotspots of epigenetic regulation. PMID:26512062

  4. Real-Time In Vivo Imaging of Butterfly Wing Development: Revealing the Cellular Dynamics of the Pupal Wing Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Masaki; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Otaki, Joji M.

    2014-01-01

    Butterfly wings are covered with regularly arranged single-colored scales that are formed at the pupal stage. Understanding pupal wing development is therefore crucial to understand wing color pattern formation. Here, we successfully employed real-time in vivo imaging techniques to observe pupal hindwing development over time in the blue pansy butterfly, Junonia orithya. A transparent sheet of epithelial cells that were not yet regularly arranged was observed immediately after pupation. Bright-field imaging and autofluorescent imaging revealed free-moving hemocytes and tracheal branches of a crinoid-like structure underneath the epithelium. The wing tissue gradually became gray-white, epithelial cells were arranged regularly, and hemocytes disappeared, except in the bordering lacuna, after which scales grew. The dynamics of the epithelial cells and scale growth were also confirmed by fluorescent imaging. Fluorescent in vivo staining further revealed that these cells harbored many mitochondria at the surface of the epithelium. Organizing centers for the border symmetry system were apparent immediately after pupation, exhibiting a relatively dark optical character following treatment with fluorescent dyes, as well as in autofluorescent images. The wing tissue exhibited slow and low-frequency contraction pulses with a cycle of approximately 10 to 20 minutes, mainly occurring at 2 to 3 days postpupation. The pulses gradually became slower and weaker and eventually stopped. The wing tissue area became larger after contraction, which also coincided with an increase in the autofluorescence intensity that might have been caused by scale growth. Examination of the pattern of color development revealed that the black pigment was first deposited in patches in the central areas of an eyespot black ring and a parafocal element. These results of live in vivo imaging that covered wide wing area for a long time can serve as a foundation for studying the cellular dynamics of living

  5. Acetohydroxyacid synthase activity and transcripts profiling reveal tissue-specific regulation of ahas genes in sunflower.

    PubMed

    Ochogavía, Ana C; Breccia, Gabriela; Vega, Tatiana; Felitti, Silvina A; Picardi, Liliana A; Nestares, Graciela

    2014-07-01

    Acetohydroxyacid synthase (AHAS) is the target site of several herbicides and catalyses the first step in the biosynthesis of branched chain amino acid. Three genes coding for AHAS catalytic subunit (ahas1, ahas2 and ahas3) have been reported for sunflower. The aim of this work was to study the expression pattern of ahas genes family and AHAS activity in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.). Different organs (leaves, hypocotyls, roots, flowers and embryos) were evaluated at several developmental stages. The transcriptional profile was studied through RT-qPCR. The highest expression for ahas1 was shown in leaves, where all the induced and natural gene mutations conferring herbicide resistance were found. The maximal expression of ahas2 and ahas3 occurred in immature flowers and embryos. The highest AHAS activity was found in leaves and immature embryos. Correlation analysis among ahas gene expression and AHAS activity was discussed. Our results show that differences in ahas genes expression are tissue-specific and temporally regulated. Moreover, the conservation of multiple AHAS isoforms in sunflower seems to result from different expression requirements controlled by tissue-specific regulatory mechanisms at different developmental stages. PMID:24908515

  6. Imaging of action currents reveals the origin of biomagnetic fields in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzer, Jenny R.; Sidorov, Veniamin; Fong, Luis; Baudenbacher, Franz

    2003-03-01

    The origin of the magnetocardiogram (MCG) and the relative information content between the MCG and the electrocardiogram (ECG) remain central questions in biomagnetism. To provide key insights to this question, we mapped excitation wave fronts in a thin layer of cardiac tissue of an isolated rabbit heart using high-resolution LTS-SQUID microscopy and epi-fluorescent imaging with sub-millimeter resolution. The combination of the two methods allows us to map the transmembrane potential (Vm) and the magnetic field over the same area. The leading edge of a propagating action potential can be defined as the wave front and can be identified by the difference in relative intensities of resting and depolarized tissue in the epi-fluorescence data. The corresponding magnetic field pattern was used to calculate the net action current, which shows a strong current component parallel to and overlying the Vm wave front. These electrically silent currents are a direct consequence of the cardiac bidomain with unequal anisotropies in the intra- and extracellular space and depend strongly on the angle of the wave front relative to the fiber orientation. We provide evidence that the MCG contains information not present in the ECG, and that it is necessary to reexamine the modeling and interpretation of the MCG.

  7. Novel Loci for Metabolic Networks and Multi-Tissue Expression Studies Reveal Genes for Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Inouye, Michael; Ripatti, Samuli; Kettunen, Johannes; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Oksala, Niku; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Soininen, Pasi; Savolainen, Markku J.; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Raitakari, Olli; Lehtimäki, Terho; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Palotie, Aarno; de Bakker, Paul I. W.

    2012-01-01

    Association testing of multiple correlated phenotypes offers better power than univariate analysis of single traits. We analyzed 6,600 individuals from two population-based cohorts with both genome-wide SNP data and serum metabolomic profiles. From the observed correlation structure of 130 metabolites measured by nuclear magnetic resonance, we identified 11 metabolic networks and performed a multivariate genome-wide association analysis. We identified 34 genomic loci at genome-wide significance, of which 7 are novel. In comparison to univariate tests, multivariate association analysis identified nearly twice as many significant associations in total. Multi-tissue gene expression studies identified variants in our top loci, SERPINA1 and AQP9, as eQTLs and showed that SERPINA1 and AQP9 expression in human blood was associated with metabolites from their corresponding metabolic networks. Finally, liver expression of AQP9 was associated with atherosclerotic lesion area in mice, and in human arterial tissue both SERPINA1 and AQP9 were shown to be upregulated (6.3-fold and 4.6-fold, respectively) in atherosclerotic plaques. Our study illustrates the power of multi-phenotype GWAS and highlights candidate genes for atherosclerosis. PMID:22916037

  8. [Assessment of resectability of colorectal liver metastases and extended resection].

    PubMed

    Settmacher, U; Scheuerlein, H; Rauchfuss, F

    2014-01-01

    Most patients with colorectal liver metastases are treated within a multimodal therapy regime whereby liver resection is a key point in the curative treatment concept. The achievement of an R0 situation is of vital importance for long-term survival. Besides general operability and the assessment of comorbidities, resection depends on the quality of liver parenchyma (functional resectability) and the anatomical position of the tumor (oncological resectability). The improvement of operation techniques and perioperative medicine nowadays allow complex surgical procedures for metastasis surgery. This article presents the methods for the assessment of resectability and modern strategies of preoperative conditioning as well as approaches for extended liver resection. PMID:24317339

  9. Resection of cervical ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Giuseppe; Morales-Valero, Saul F; Krauss, William E; Campero, Mario; Marsh, W Richard

    2014-09-01

    Intramedullary ependymomas are surgically curable tumors. However, their surgical resection poses several challenges. In this intraoperative video we illustrate the main steps for the surgical resection of a cervical intramedullary ependymoma. These critical steps include: adequate exposure of the entire length of the tumor; use of the intraoperative ultrasound; identification of the posterior median sulcus and separation of the posterior columns; Identification of the plane between the spinal cord and the tumor; mobilization and debulking of the tumor and disconnection of the vascular supply (usually from small anterior spinal artery branches). Following these basic steps a complete resection can be safely achieved in many cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/QMYXC_F4O4U. PMID:25175575

  10. Analysis of gene networks in white adipose tissue development reveals a role for ETS2 in adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Birsoy, Kivanç; Berry, Ryan; Wang, Tim; Ceyhan, Ozge; Tavazoie, Saeed; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Rodeheffer, Matthew S

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is characterized by an expansion of white adipose tissue mass that results from an increase in the size and the number of adipocytes. However, the mechanisms responsible for the formation of adipocytes during development and the molecular mechanisms regulating their increase and maintenance in adulthood are poorly understood. Here, we report the use of leptin-luciferase BAC transgenic mice to track white adipose tissue (WAT) development and guide the isolation and molecular characterization of adipocytes during development using DNA microarrays. These data reveal distinct transcriptional programs that are regulated during murine WAT development in vivo. By using a de novo cis-regulatory motif discovery tool (FIRE), we identify two early gene clusters whose promoters show significant enrichment for NRF2/ETS transcription factor binding sites. We further demonstrate that Ets transcription factors, but not Nrf2, are regulated during early adipogenesis and that Ets2 is essential for the normal progression of the adipocyte differentiation program in vitro. These data identify ETS2 as a functionally important transcription factor in adipogenesis and its possible role in regulating adipose tissue mass in adults can now be tested. Our approach also provides the basis for elucidating the function of other gene networks during WAT development in vivo. Finally these data confirm that although gene expression during adipogenesis in vitro recapitulates many of the patterns of gene expression in vivo, there are additional developmental transitions in pre and post-natal adipose tissue that are not evident in cell culture systems. PMID:21989915

  11. Molecular Imaging Using Fluorescence and Bioluminescence to Reveal Tissue Response to Laser-Mediated Thermal Injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackanos, Mark A.; Jansen, E. Duco; Contag, Christopher H.

    For decades biological investigation has focused on a reductionist approach, which has greatly advanced our understanding of the biological process, but has also served to move the analysis further and further away from the living body. This was necessary as we sought to identify the cells, genes, mutations and/or etiological agents that were associated with a given process. The information generated through these approaches can now be used to advance more integrative strategies in which specific cellular and molecular events can be studied in context of the functional circulation and intact organ systems of living animals, and humans. Essential tools for integrative analyses of biology include imaging modalities that enable visualization of structure and function in the living body. The relatively recent development of molecular probes as exogenous contrast agents and reporter genes that encode proteins with unique properties that can be distinguished from tissues and cells has ushered in a new set of approaches that are being called molecular imaging.

  12. System-wide Clinical Proteomics of Breast Cancer Reveals Global Remodeling of Tissue Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Pozniak, Yair; Balint-Lahat, Nora; Rudolph, Jan Daniel; Lindskog, Cecilia; Katzir, Rotem; Avivi, Camilla; Pontén, Fredrik; Ruppin, Eytan; Barshack, Iris; Geiger, Tamar

    2016-03-23

    The genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of breast cancer have been extensively studied, but the proteomes of breast tumors are far less characterized. Here, we use high-resolution, high-accuracy mass spectrometry to perform a deep analysis of luminal-type breast cancer progression using clinical breast samples from primary tumors, matched lymph node metastases, and healthy breast epithelia. We used a super-SILAC mix to quantify over 10,000 proteins with high accuracy, enabling us to identify key proteins and pathways associated with tumorigenesis and metastatic spread. We found high expression levels of proteins associated with protein synthesis and degradation in cancer tissues, accompanied by metabolic alterations that may facilitate energy production in cancer cells within their natural environment. In addition, we found proteomic differences between breast cancer stages and minor differences between primary tumors and their matched lymph node metastases. These results highlight the potential of proteomic technology in the elucidation of clinically relevant cancer signatures. PMID:27135363

  13. Transcriptome analysis of cortical tissue reveals shared sets of downregulated genes in autism and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Ellis, S E; Panitch, R; West, A B; Arking, D E

    2016-01-01

    Autism (AUT), schizophrenia (SCZ) and bipolar disorder (BPD) are three highly heritable neuropsychiatric conditions. Clinical similarities and genetic overlap between the three disorders have been reported; however, the causes and the downstream effects of this overlap remain elusive. By analyzing transcriptomic RNA-sequencing data generated from post-mortem cortical brain tissues from AUT, SCZ, BPD and control subjects, we have begun to characterize the extent of gene expression overlap between these disorders. We report that the AUT and SCZ transcriptomes are significantly correlated (P<0.001), whereas the other two cross-disorder comparisons (AUT-BPD and SCZ-BPD) are not. Among AUT and SCZ, we find that the genes differentially expressed across disorders are involved in neurotransmission and synapse regulation. Despite the lack of global transcriptomic overlap across all three disorders, we highlight two genes, IQSEC3 and COPS7A, which are significantly downregulated compared with controls across all three disorders, suggesting either shared etiology or compensatory changes across these neuropsychiatric conditions. Finally, we tested for enrichment of genes differentially expressed across disorders in genetic association signals in AUT, SCZ or BPD, reporting lack of signal in any of the previously published genome-wide association study (GWAS). Together, these studies highlight the importance of examining gene expression from the primary tissue involved in neuropsychiatric conditions-the cortical brain. We identify a shared role for altered neurotransmission and synapse regulation in AUT and SCZ, in addition to two genes that may more generally contribute to neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric conditions. PMID:27219343

  14. A diurnal rhythm in glucose uptake in brown adipose tissue revealed by in vivo PET-FDG imaging

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Daan R; Shao, Jinping; Chapman, Sarah; Leevy, W Matthew; Duffield, Giles E

    2012-01-01

    Using a micro-PET/CT scanner, we have measured 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) in C57Bl/6 mice at intervals across a 24-hour light-dark cycle. Our data reveals a strong 24-hour profile of glucose uptake of iBAT, peaking at approximately 9 hours into the light phase of the 12 hour light, 12 hour dark day. BAT is increasingly gaining attention as being involved in metabolic phenotypes and obesity, where BAT, as observed by PET analysis, negatively correlates with obesity and age. Conversely, animals that show perturbations in circadian clocks, behavior and physiology show metabolic phenotypes. The observation of a 24-hour rhythm in glucose uptake in iBAT makes this tissue a candidate site of interaction between metabolic and circadian systems. PMID:22447290

  15. Radical Carinal Resection for a Glomic Tumor.

    PubMed

    Bellier, Jocelyn; Sage, Edouard; Gonin, François; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Chapelier, Alain

    2016-08-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old woman who presented with increasing dyspnea secondary to a tumor arising from the carina. After desobstruction by bronchoscopy, the pathologic analysis revealed a glomic tumor. Carinal resection and reconstruction were performed with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and the long-term result was excellent. PMID:27449451

  16. Metabolomic Screening of Tumor Tissue and Serum in Glioma Patients Reveals Diagnostic and Prognostic Information

    PubMed Central

    Mörén, Lina; Bergenheim, A. Tommy; Ghasimi, Soma; Brännström, Thomas; Johansson, Mikael; Antti, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Glioma grading and classification, today based on histological features, is not always easy to interpret and diagnosis partly relies on the personal experience of the neuropathologists. The most important feature of the classification is the aimed correlation between tumor grade and prognosis. However, in the clinical reality, large variations exist in the survival of patients concerning both glioblastomas and low-grade gliomas. Thus, there is a need for biomarkers for a more reliable classification of glioma tumors as well as for prognosis. We analyzed relative metabolite concentrations in serum samples from 96 fasting glioma patients and 81 corresponding tumor samples with different diagnosis (glioblastoma, oligodendroglioma) and grade (World Health Organization (WHO) grade II, III and IV) using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS). The acquired data was analyzed and evaluated by pattern recognition based on chemometric bioinformatics tools. We detected feature patterns in the metabolomics data in both tumor and serum that distinguished glioblastomas from oligodendrogliomas (ptumor = 2.46 × 10−8, pserum = 1.3 × 10−5) and oligodendroglioma grade II from oligodendroglioma grade III (ptumor = 0.01, pserum = 0.0008). Interestingly, we also found patterns in both tumor and serum with individual metabolite features that were both elevated and decreased in patients that lived long after being diagnosed with glioblastoma compared to those who died shortly after diagnosis (ptumor = 0.006, pserum = 0.004; AUROCCtumor = 0.846 (0.647–1.000), AUROCCserum = 0.958 (0.870–1.000)). Metabolic patterns could also distinguish long and short survival in patients diagnosed with oligodendroglioma (ptumor = 0.01, pserum = 0.001; AUROCCtumor = 1 (1.000–1.000), AUROCCserum = 1 (1.000–1.000)). In summary, we found different metabolic feature patterns in tumor tissue and serum for glioma diagnosis, grade and survival, which indicates that, following

  17. Integrating Proteomics and Enzyme Kinetics Reveals Tissue-Specific Types of the Glycolytic and Gluconeogenic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Wiśniewski, Jacek R; Gizak, Agnieszka; Rakus, Dariusz

    2015-08-01

    Glycolysis is the core metabolic pathway supplying energy to cells. Whereas the vast majority of studies focus on specific aspects of the process, global analyses characterizing simultaneously all enzymes involved in the process are scarce. Here, we demonstrate that quantitative label- and standard-free proteomics allows accurate determination of titers of metabolic enzymes and enables simultaneous measurements of titers and maximal enzymatic activities (Amax) of all glycolytic enzymes and the gluconeogenic fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase in mouse brain, liver and muscle. Despite occurrence of tissue-specific isoenzymes bearing different kinetic properties, the enzyme titers often correlated well with the Amax values. To provide a more general picture of energy metabolism, we analyzed titers of the enzymes in additional 7 mouse organs and in human cells. Across the analyzed samples, we identified two basic profiles: a "fast glucose uptake" one in brain and heart, and a "gluconeogenic rich" one occurring in liver. In skeletal muscles and other organs, we found intermediate profiles. Obtained data highlighted the glucose-flux-limiting role of hexokinase which activity was always 10- to 100-fold lower than the average activity of all other glycolytic enzymes. A parallel determination of enzyme titers and maximal enzymatic activities allowed determination of kcat values without enzyme purification. Results of our in-depth proteomic analysis of the mouse organs did not support the concepts of regulation of glycolysis by lysine acetylation. PMID:26080680

  18. Metabolic Profiling of Somatic Tissues from Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Reveals Effects of Irradiation on Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Liangjian; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhang, Yongan

    2014-01-01

    A high-level of sexual sterility is of importance for the sterile insect technique (SIT). However, the use of high-dose-intensity gamma radiation to induce sterility has negative impacts not only on reproductive cells but also on somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the metabolite differences in somatic tissues between non-irradiated, 20-Gy-irradiated, and 40-Gy-irradiated male Monochamus alternatus, an important vector of the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which kills Asian pines. The results showed that metabolite levels changed moderately in the 20-Gy samples but were markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples compared with the non-irradiated samples. Twenty-six and 53 metabolites were disturbed by 20-Gy and 40-Gy radiation, respectively. Thirty-six metabolites were found to be markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples but were not changed significantly in the 20-Gy samples. The comprehensive metabolomic disorders induced by 40-Gy radiation dysregulated six metabolic pathways involved in the life process. The findings presented in this manuscript will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with gamma-radiation-induced damage to somatic cells and will allow for better exploration of the SIT for the control of this target pest. PMID:24937685

  19. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5′ distal regions were often enriched in 3′ distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/. PMID:25505144

  20. Extensive weight loss reveals distinct gene expression changes in human subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Heiker, John T.; Gärtner, Daniel; Björnson, Elias; Schön, Michael R.; Flehmig, Gesine; Klöting, Nora; Krohn, Knut; Fasshauer, Mathias; Stumvoll, Michael; Nielsen, Jens; Blüher, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss has been shown to significantly improve Adipose tissue (AT) function, however changes in AT gene expression profiles particularly in visceral AT (VAT) have not been systematically studied. Here, we tested the hypothesis that extensive weight loss in response to bariatric surgery (BS) causes AT gene expression changes, which may affect energy and lipid metabolism, inflammation and secretory function of AT. We assessed gene expression changes by whole genome expression chips in AT samples obtained from six morbidly obese individuals, who underwent a two step BS strategy with sleeve gastrectomy as initial and a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass as second step surgery after 12 ± 2 months. Global gene expression differences in VAT and subcutaneous (S)AT were analyzed through the use of genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) for adipocytes. Significantly altered gene expressions were PCR-validated in 16 individuals, which also underwent a two-step surgery intervention. We found increased expression of cell death-inducing DFFA-like effector a (CIDEA), involved in formation of lipid droplets in both fat depots in response to significant weight loss. We observed that expression of the genes associated with metabolic reactions involved in NAD+, glutathione and branched chain amino acid metabolism are significantly increased in AT depots after surgery-induced weight loss. PMID:26434764

  1. Metabolic profiling of somatic tissues from Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) reveals effects of irradiation on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangjian; Wang, Lijuan; Wang, Qinghua; Wang, Yuzhu; Zhang, Yongan

    2014-01-01

    A high-level of sexual sterility is of importance for the sterile insect technique (SIT). However, the use of high-dose-intensity gamma radiation to induce sterility has negative impacts not only on reproductive cells but also on somatic cells. In this study, we investigated the metabolite differences in somatic tissues between non-irradiated, 20-Gy-irradiated, and 40-Gy-irradiated male Monochamus alternatus, an important vector of the pathogenic nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, which kills Asian pines. The results showed that metabolite levels changed moderately in the 20-Gy samples but were markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples compared with the non-irradiated samples. Twenty-six and 53 metabolites were disturbed by 20-Gy and 40-Gy radiation, respectively. Thirty-six metabolites were found to be markedly altered in the 40-Gy samples but were not changed significantly in the 20-Gy samples. The comprehensive metabolomic disorders induced by 40-Gy radiation dysregulated six metabolic pathways involved in the life process. The findings presented in this manuscript will contribute to our knowledge of the characteristic metabolic changes associated with gamma-radiation-induced damage to somatic cells and will allow for better exploration of the SIT for the control of this target pest. PMID:24937685

  2. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Sedger, Lisa M.; Tull, Dedreia L.; McConville, Malcolm J.; De Souza, David P.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W. T.; Williams, Spencer J.; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C.; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  3. Lipidomic Profiling of Adipose Tissue Reveals an Inflammatory Signature in Cancer-Related and Primary Lymphedema.

    PubMed

    Sedger, Lisa M; Tull, Dedreia L; McConville, Malcolm J; De Souza, David P; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W T; Williams, Spencer J; Dayalan, Saravanan; Lanzer, Daniel; Mackie, Helen; Lam, Thomas C; Boyages, John

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related and primary lymphedema (LE) are associated with the production of adipose tissue (AT). Nothing is known, however, about the lipid-based molecules that comprise LE AT. We therefore analyzed lipid molecules in lipoaspirates and serum obtained from LE patients, and compared them to lipoaspirates from cosmetic surgery patients and healthy control cohort serum. LE patient serum analysis demonstrated that triglycerides, HDL- and LDL-cholesterol and lipid transport molecules remained within the normal range, with no alterations in individual fatty acids. The lipidomic analysis also identified 275 lipid-based molecules, including triacylglycerides, diacylglycerides, fatty acids and phospholipids in AT oil and fat. Although the majority of lipid molecules were present in a similar abundance in LE and non-LE samples, there were several small changes: increased C20:5-containing triacylglycerides, reduced C10:0 caprinic and C24:1 nervonic acids. LE AT oil also contained a signature of increased cyclopropane-type fatty acids and inflammatory mediators arachidonic acid and ceramides. Interestingly C20:5 and C22:6 omega-3-type lipids are increased in LE AT, correlating with LE years. Hence, LE AT has a normal lipid profile containing a signature of inflammation and omega-3-lipids. It remains unclear, however, whether these differences reflect a small-scale global metabolic disturbance or effects within localised inflammatory foci. PMID:27182733

  4. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cashman, Timothy J; Josowitz, Rebecca; Johnson, Bryce V; Gelb, Bruce D; Costa, Kevin D

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  5. Human Engineered Cardiac Tissues Created Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Reveal Functional Characteristics of BRAF-Mediated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bryce V.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Costa, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death that often goes undetected in the general population. HCM is also prevalent in patients with cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFCS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by aberrant signaling in the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. Understanding the mechanisms of HCM development in such RASopathies may lead to novel therapeutic strategies, but relevant experimental models of the human condition are lacking. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop the first 3D human engineered cardiac tissue (hECT) model of HCM. The hECTs were created using human cardiomyocytes obtained by directed differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells derived from a patient with CFCS due to an activating BRAF mutation. The mutant myocytes were directly conjugated at a 3:1 ratio with a stromal cell population to create a tissue of defined composition. Compared to healthy patient control hECTs, BRAF-hECTs displayed a hypertrophic phenotype by culture day 6, with significantly increased tissue size, twitch force, and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene expression. Twitch characteristics reflected increased contraction and relaxation rates and shorter twitch duration in BRAF-hECTs, which also had a significantly higher maximum capture rate and lower excitation threshold during electrical pacing, consistent with a more arrhythmogenic substrate. By culture day 11, twitch force was no longer different between BRAF and wild-type hECTs, revealing a temporal aspect of disease modeling with tissue engineering. Principal component analysis identified diastolic force as a key factor that changed from day 6 to day 11, supported by a higher passive stiffness in day 11 BRAF-hECTs. In summary, human engineered cardiac tissues created from BRAF mutant cells recapitulated, for the first time, key aspects of the HCM phenotype, offering a new in vitro model for studying intrinsic mechanisms and screening new

  6. Low immunoglobulin A levels detected via the tissue transglutaminase assay can reveal previously undetected monoclonal proteins.

    PubMed

    Wallage, M; Dutton, D; Lock, R J

    2016-05-01

    Increased awareness of coeliac disease and the 2009 NICE guidance has led to an increase in patients being screened for Immunoglobulin A deficiency. We have shown previously that this provides an opportunity for the early identification of other underlying primary immunodeficiency, e.g. common variable immunodeficiency. In this context, the underlying gastrointestinal problem appears to be related to bacterial overgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that in addition this also provides an opportunity to reveal underlying secondary immunodeficiency due to other causes in patients with gastrointestinal presentation, notably lymphoproliferative disorders. In one 3-month period, of 60 cases reviewed for low Immunoglobulin A, we found four new paraproteins through this testing route; one symptomatic multiple myeloma, one asymptomatic multiple myeloma, one monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance and one in a known chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patient. PMID:26684021

  7. De novo assembly and analysis of tissue-specific transcriptomes revealed the tissue-specific genes and profile of immunity from Strongylocentrotus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yadong; Chang, Yaqing; Wang, Xiuli; Qiu, Xuemei; Liu, Yang

    2015-10-01

    Strongylocentrotus intermedius is an important marine species in north China and Japan. Recent years, diseases are threating the sea urchin aquaculture industry seriously. To provide a genetic resource for S. intermedius as well as overview the immune-related genes of S. intermedius, we performed transcriptome sequencing of three cDNA libraries representing three tissues, coelomocytes, gut and peristomial membrane respectively. In total 138,421 contigs were assembled from all sequencing data. 96,764 contigs were annotated according to bioinformatics databases, including NT, nr, Swiss-Prot, KEGG, COG. 49,336 Contigs were annotated as CDS. In this study, we obtained 24,778 gene families from S. intermedius transcriptome. The gene expression analysis revealed that more genes were expressed in gut, more high expression level genes in coelomocytes when compared with other tissues. Specific expressed contigs in coelomocytes, gut, and peristomial membrane were 546, 1136, and 1012 respectively. Pathway analysis suggested 25, 17 and 36 potential specifically pathways may specific progressed in peristomial membrane, gut and coelomocytes respectively. Similarities and differences between S. intermedius and other echinoderms were analyzed. S. intermedius was more homology to Strongylocentrotus purpuratus than others sea urchin. Of 24,778 genes, 1074 genes are immune-related, immune genes were expressed with a higher level in coelomocytes than other tissues. Complement system may be the most important immune system in sea urchin. We also identified 2438 SSRs and 16,236 SNPs for S. intermedius. These results provide a transcriptome resource and foundation to study molecular mechanisms of sea urchin immune system. PMID:26253994

  8. Multi-platform analysis of 12 cancer types reveals molecular classification within and across tissues-of-origin

    PubMed Central

    Hoadley, Katherine A.; Yau, Christina; Wolf, Denise M.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Tamborero, David; Ng, Sam; Leiserson, Max D.M.; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael D.; Uzunangelov, Vladislav; Zhang, Jiashan; Kandoth, Cyriac; Akbani, Rehan; Shen, Hui; Omberg, Larsson; Chu, Andy; Margolin, Adam A.; van’t Veer, Laura J.; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Laird, Peter W.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Ding, Li; Robertson, A. Gordon; Byers, Lauren A.; Mills, Gordon B.; Weinstein, John N.; Van Waes, Carter; Chen, Zhong; Collisson, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic analyses of pathologically-defined tumor types identify “within-a-tissue” disease subtypes. However, the extent to which genomic signatures are shared across tissues is still unclear. We performed an integrative analysis using five genome-wide platforms and one proteomic platform on 3,527 specimens from 12 cancer types, revealing a unified classification into 11 major subtypes. Five subtypes were nearly identical to their tissue-of-origin counterparts, but several distinct cancer types were found to converge into common subtypes. Lung squamous, head & neck, and a subset of bladder cancers coalesced into one subtype typified by TP53 alterations, TP63 amplifications, and high expression of immune and proliferation pathway genes. Of note, bladder cancers split into three pan-cancer subtypes. The multi-platform classification, while correlated with tissue-of-origin, provides independent information for predicting clinical outcomes. All datasets are available for data-mining from a unified resource to support further biological discoveries and insights into novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:25109877

  9. The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1: Unique tissue-specific functions revealed by selective gene knockout studies

    PubMed Central

    Lillis, Anna P.; Van Duyn, Lauren B.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.; Strickland, Dudley K.

    2008-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein (originally called LRP, but now referred to as LRP1) is a large endocytic receptor that is widely expressed in several tissues. LRP1 is a member of the LDL receptor family that plays diverse roles in various biological processes including lipoprotein metabolism, degradation of proteases, activation of lysosomal enzymes and cellular entry of bacterial toxins and viruses. Deletion of the LRP1 gene leads to lethality in mice, revealing a critical, but as of yet, undefined role in development. Tissue-specific gene deletion studies reveal an important contribution of LRP1 in the vasculature, central nervous system, in macrophages and in adipocytes. Three important properties of LRP1 dictate its diverse role in physiology: first, its ability to recognize more than thirty distinct ligands; second, its ability to bind a large number of cytoplasmic adaptor proteins via determinants located on its cytoplasmic domain in a phosphorylation-specific manner; and third, its ability to associate with and modulate the activity of other transmembrane receptors such as integrins and receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:18626063

  10. Intraperitoneal adipose tissue is strongly related to survival rate in a mouse cecal ligation and puncture model

    PubMed Central

    Niiyama, Shuhei; Takasu, Osamu; Sakamoto, Teruo; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) models exhibiting polymicrobial sepsis are considered as the gold standard in sepsis research. However, despite meticulous research being conducted in this field, only few treatment drugs are available, indicating that CLP sepsis models do not completely mimic human sepsis models. The greatest flaw in CLP models is abscess formation because the localization of inflammation caused by abscess formation increases the survival rate. Therefore, by resecting intraperitoneal adipose tissue, we developed a mouse CLP model wherein abscess formation was unlikely. Survival rates at 7 days postoperatively were compared using the Kaplan–Meier method for an intraperitoneal adipose tissue resection group (resection group, n=34), an intraperitoneal adipose tissue non-resection group (non-resection group, n=35) and a sham group (n=10). Results indicated that the survival rate was significantly higher in the non-resection group compared with the resection group. Intraperitoneal macroscopic findings in the non-resection group revealed the localization of inflammation caused by abscesses formation covered in adipose tissue. The survival rate for the sham group was 100%. Measurement of interleukin 6 (IL-6) indicated that during the 12 h after the creation of the CLP model, the median level of IL-6 was 1300 (552–3000) pg ml−1 in the non-resection group (n=19) and 3000 (1224–8595) pg ml−1 in the resection group (n=19). Meanwhile, for the sham group, IL-6 values were below measurement sensitivity in most cases (9/10 mice). Thus our results suggest that, in CLP models, intraperitoneal adipose tissue has an important role in abscess formation and is strongly related to the survival rate. PMID:26962454

  11. Vaginoscopic resection of vaginal septum.

    PubMed

    Nassif, Joseph; Al Chami, Ali; Abu Musa, Antoine; Nassar, Anwar H; Kurdi, Ahmad; Ghulmiyyah, Labib

    2012-12-01

    We report the resection of a vaginal septum while preserving the virginity of a 12-year-old girl with Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich Syndrome (HWWS) having a didelphys uterus, obstructed hemivagina, and an ipsilateral renal agenesis with follow-up at 18 months. Successful resection of the vaginal septum with conservation of the hymenal ring and complete drainage of both the hematocolpos and the hematometra were achieved. Cyclic dysmenorrhea and pelvic pain were completely resolved on follow-up visits at 4, 6, and 18 months. Office hysteroscopy performed during the last follow-up visit revealed a patent vaginal vault without evidence of adenosis or recurrence of the vaginal septum. Vaginoscopy is a safe, convenient, and efficient diagnostic and therapeutic modality that can be used in the management of patients with an obstructed hemivagina. It maintains the patient's virginity and it is useful in patients with a restrictive vaginal opening or narrow vaginal canal. Furthermore, the hysteroscopic excision of the vaginal septum offers minimal risk of recurrence of the septal defect. PMID:23315718

  12. Systems biology of tissue-specific response to Anaplasma phagocytophilum reveals differentiated apoptosis in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis.

    PubMed

    Ayllón, Nieves; Villar, Margarita; Galindo, Ruth C; Kocan, Katherine M; Šíma, Radek; López, Juan A; Vázquez, Jesús; Alberdi, Pilar; Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Kopáček, Petr; de la Fuente, José

    2015-03-01

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an emerging pathogen that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis. Infection with this zoonotic pathogen affects cell function in both vertebrate host and the tick vector, Ixodes scapularis. Global tissue-specific response and apoptosis signaling pathways were characterized in I. scapularis nymphs and adult female midguts and salivary glands infected with A. phagocytophilum using a systems biology approach combining transcriptomics and proteomics. Apoptosis was selected for pathway-focused analysis due to its role in bacterial infection of tick cells. The results showed tissue-specific differences in tick response to infection and revealed differentiated regulation of apoptosis pathways. The impact of bacterial infection was more pronounced in tick nymphs and midguts than in salivary glands, probably reflecting bacterial developmental cycle. All apoptosis pathways described in other organisms were identified in I. scapularis, except for the absence of the Perforin ortholog. Functional characterization using RNA interference showed that Porin knockdown significantly increases tick colonization by A. phagocytophilum. Infection with A. phagocytophilum produced complex tissue-specific alterations in transcript and protein levels. In tick nymphs, the results suggested a possible effect of bacterial infection on the inhibition of tick immune response. In tick midguts, the results suggested that A. phagocytophilum infection inhibited cell apoptosis to facilitate and establish infection through up-regulation of the JAK/STAT pathway. Bacterial infection inhibited the intrinsic apoptosis pathway in tick salivary glands by down-regulating Porin expression that resulted in the inhibition of Cytochrome c release as the anti-apoptotic mechanism to facilitate bacterial infection. However, tick salivary glands may promote apoptosis to limit bacterial infection through induction of the extrinsic apoptosis pathway. These dynamic changes in response to A

  13. Quantitative Imaging Assessment of an Alternative Approach to Surgical Mitral Valve Leaflet Resection: An Acute Porcine Study.

    PubMed

    Boronyak, Steven M; Fredi, Joseph L; Young, Michael N; Dumont, Douglas M; Williams, Phillip E; Byram, Brett C; Merryman, W David

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the initial in vivo use of a combined radiofrequency ablation and cryo-anchoring (RFC) catheter as an alternative to surgical mitral valve (MV) leaflet resection. Radiofrequency ablation thermally shrinks enlarged collagenous tissues, providing an alternative to leaflet resection, and cryo-anchoring provides reversible attachment of a catheter to freely mobile MV leaflets. Excised porcine MVs (n = 9) were tested in a left heart flow simulator to establish treatment efficacy criteria. Resected leaflet area was quantified by tracking markers on the leaflet surface, and leaflet length reductions were directly measured on echocardiography. Leaflet area decreased by 38 ± 2.7%, and leaflet length decreased by 9.2 ± 1.8% following RFC catheter treatment. The RFC catheter was then tested acutely in healthy pigs (n = 5) under epicardial echocardiographic guidance, open-chest without cardiopulmonary bypass, using mid-ventricular free wall access. Leaflet length was quantified using echocardiography. Quantitative assessment of MV leaflet length revealed that leaflet resection was successful in 4 of 5 pigs, with a leaflet length reduction of 13.3 ± 4.6%. Histological, mechanical, and gross pathological findings also confirmed that RFC catheter treatment was efficacious. The RFC catheter significantly reduces MV leaflet size in an acute animal model, providing a possible percutaneous alternative to surgical leaflet resection. PMID:26508331

  14. Laparoscopic pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Harrell, K N; Kooby, D A

    2015-10-01

    Though initially slow to gain acceptance, the minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection grew during the last decade and pancreatic operations such as the distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic enucleation are frequently performed laparoscopically. More complex operations such as the pancreaticoduodenectomy may also confer benefits with a minimally invasive approach but are less widely utilized. Though most research to date comparing open and laparoscopic pancreatectomy is retrospective, the current data suggest that compared with open, a laparoscopic procedure may afford postoperative benefits such as less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, and fewer wound complications. Regarding oncologic considerations, despite initial concerns, laparoscopic resection appears to be non-inferior to an open procedure in terms of lymph node retrieval, negative margin rates, and long-term survival. New technologies, such as robotics, are also gaining acceptance. Data show that while the laparoscopic approach incurs higher cost in the operating room, the resulting shorter hospital stay appears to be associated with an equivalent or lower overall cost. The minimally invasive approach to pancreatic resection can be safe and appropriate with significant patient benefits and oncologic non-inferiority based on existing data. PMID:26199025

  15. Laparoscopic resection of an intra-abdominal esophageal duplication cyst: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Kawano, Fumihiro; Fujita, Shohei; Omori, Satoshi; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki; Sakaguchi, Asumi; Ogura, Kanako; Matsumoto, Toshiharu

    2015-01-01

    Duplication of the alimentary tract is a rare congenital malformation that occurs most often in the abdominal region, whereas esophageal duplication cyst develops typically in the thoracic region but occasionally in the neck and abdominal regions. Esophageal duplication cyst is usually diagnosed in early childhood because of symptoms related to bleeding, infection, and displacement of tissue surrounding the lesion. We recently encountered a rare adult case of esophageal duplication cyst in the abdominal esophagus. A 50-year-old man underwent gastroscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging to investigate epigastric pain and dysphagia that started 3 months earlier. Imaging findings suggested esophageal duplication cyst, and the patient underwent laparoscopic resection followed by intraoperative esophagoscopy to reconstruct the esophagus safely and effectively. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen revealed two layers of smooth muscle in the cystic wall, confirming the diagnosis of esophageal duplication cyst. PMID:25883826

  16. Effects of drought on gene expression in maize reproductive and leaf meristem tissue revealed by RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Kakumanu, Akshay; Ambavaram, Madana M R; Klumas, Curtis; Krishnan, Arjun; Batlang, Utlwang; Myers, Elijah; Grene, Ruth; Pereira, Andy

    2012-10-01

    Drought stress affects cereals especially during the reproductive stage. The maize (Zea mays) drought transcriptome was studied using RNA-Seq analysis to compare drought-treated and well-watered fertilized ovary and basal leaf meristem tissue. More drought-responsive genes responded in the ovary compared with the leaf meristem. Gene Ontology enrichment analysis revealed a massive decrease in transcript abundance of cell division and cell cycle genes in the drought-stressed ovary only. Among Gene Ontology categories related to carbohydrate metabolism, changes in starch and Suc metabolism-related genes occurred in the ovary, consistent with a decrease in starch levels, and in Suc transporter function, with no comparable changes occurring in the leaf meristem. Abscisic acid (ABA)-related processes responded positively, but only in the ovaries. Related responses suggested the operation of low glucose sensing in drought-stressed ovaries. The data are discussed in the context of the susceptibility of maize kernel to drought stress leading to embryo abortion and the relative robustness of dividing vegetative tissue taken at the same time from the same plant subjected to the same conditions. Our working hypothesis involves signaling events associated with increased ABA levels, decreased glucose levels, disruption of ABA/sugar signaling, activation of programmed cell death/senescence through repression of a phospholipase C-mediated signaling pathway, and arrest of the cell cycle in the stressed ovary at 1 d after pollination. Increased invertase levels in the stressed leaf meristem, on the other hand, resulted in that tissue maintaining hexose levels at an "unstressed" level, and at lower ABA levels, which was correlated with successful resistance to drought stress. PMID:22837360

  17. Systems Analysis of the Dynamic Inflammatory Response to Tissue Damage Reveals Spatiotemporal Properties of the Wound Attractant Gradient.

    PubMed

    Weavers, Helen; Liepe, Juliane; Sim, Aaron; Wood, Will; Martin, Paul; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-08-01

    In the acute inflammatory phase following tissue damage, cells of the innate immune system are rapidly recruited to sites of injury by pro-inflammatory mediators released at the wound site. Although advances in live imaging allow us to directly visualize this process in vivo, the precise identity and properties of the primary immune damage attractants remain unclear, as it is currently impossible to directly observe and accurately measure these signals in tissues. Here, we demonstrate that detailed information about the attractant signals can be extracted directly from the in vivo behavior of the responding immune cells. By applying inference-based computational approaches to analyze the in vivo dynamics of the Drosophila inflammatory response, we gain new detailed insight into the spatiotemporal properties of the attractant gradient. In particular, we show that the wound attractant is released by wound margin cells, rather than by the wounded tissue per se, and that it diffuses away from this source at rates far slower than those of previously implicated signals such as H2O2 and ATP, ruling out these fast mediators as the primary chemoattractant. We then predict, and experimentally test, how competing attractant signals might interact in space and time to regulate multi-step cell navigation in the complex environment of a healing wound, revealing a period of receptor desensitization after initial exposure to the damage attractant. Extending our analysis to model much larger wounds, we uncover a dynamic behavioral change in the responding immune cells in vivo that is prognostic of whether a wound will subsequently heal or not. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27426513

  18. Color-Doppler sonographic tissue perfusion measurements reveal significantly diminished renal cortical perfusion in kidneys with vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Scholbach, T. M.; Sachse, C.

    2016-01-01

    Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and its sequelae may lead to reduced renal perfusion and loss of renal function. Methods to describe and monitor tissue perfusion are needed. We investigated dynamic tissue perfusion measurement (DTPM) with the PixelFlux-software to measure microvascular changes in the renal cortex in 35 children with VUR and 28 healthy children. DTPM of defined horizontal slices of the renal cortex was carried out. A kidney was assigned to the “low grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade of the voiding cystourethrogram was 1 to 3 and to the “high grade reflux”-group if the reflux grade was 4 to 5. Kidneys with VUR showed a significantly reduced cortical perfusion. Compared to healthy kidneys, this decline reached in low and high grade refluxes within the proximal 50% of the cortex: 3% and 12 %, in the distal 50% of the cortex: 21% and 44 % and in the most distal 20 % of the cortex 41% and 44%. DTPM reveals a perfusion loss in kidneys depending on the degree of VUR, which is most pronounced in the peripheral cortex. Thus, DTPM offers the tool to evaluate microvascular perfusion, to help planning treatment decisions in children with VUR. PMID:27051133

  19. Transcriptome profiling reveals divergent expression shifts in brown and white adipose tissue from long-lived GHRKO mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Xu; Rohde, Kyle; List, Edward O.; Berryman, Darlene E.; Kopchick, John J.; Gesing, Adam; Fang, Yimin; Masternak, Michal M.

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking the growth hormone receptor (GHRKO) exhibit improved lifespan and healthspan due to loss of growth hormone signaling. Both the distribution and activity of brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT) are altered in GHRKO mice, but the contribution of each tissue to age-related phenotypes has remained unclear. We therefore used whole-genome microarrays to evaluate transcriptional differences in BAT and WAT depots between GHRKO and normal littermates at six months of age. Our findings reveal a unique BAT transcriptome as well as distinctive responses of BAT to Ghr ablation. BAT from GHRKO mice exhibited elevated expression of genes associated with mitochondria and metabolism, along with reduced expression of genes expressed by monocyte-derived cells (dendritic cells [DC] and macrophages). Largely the opposite was observed in WAT, with increased expression of DC-expressed genes and reduced expression of genes associated with metabolism, cellular respiration and the mitochondrial inner envelope. These findings demonstrate divergent response patterns of BAT and WAT to loss of GH signaling in GHRKO mice. These patterns suggest both BAT and WAT contribute in different ways to phenotypes in GHRKO mice, with Ghr ablation blunting inflammation in BAT as well as cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT. PMID:26436954

  20. Biospectroscopy reveals the effect of varying water quality on tadpole tissues of the common frog (Rana temporaria).

    PubMed

    Strong, Rebecca J; Halsall, Crispin J; Ferenčík, Martin; Jones, Kevin C; Shore, Richard F; Martin, Francis L

    2016-06-01

    Amphibians are undergoing large population declines in many regions around the world. As environmental pollution from both agricultural and urban sources has been implicated in such declines, there is a need for a biomonitoring approach to study potential impacts on this vulnerable class of organism. This study assessed the use of infrared (IR) spectroscopy as a tool to detect changes in several tissues (liver, muscle, kidney, heart and skin) of late-stage common frog (Rana temporaria) tadpoles collected from ponds with differing water quality. Small differences in spectral signatures were revealed between a rural agricultural pond and an urban pond receiving wastewater and landfill run-off; these were limited to the liver and heart, although large differences in body size were apparent, surprisingly with tadpoles from the urban site larger than those from the rural site. Large differences in liver spectra were found between tadpoles from the pesticide and nutrient impacted pond compared to the rural agricultural pond, particularly in regions associated with lipids. Liver mass and hepatosomatic indices were found to be significantly increased in tadpoles from the site impacted by pesticides and trace organic chemicals, suggestive of exposure to environmental contamination. Significant alterations were also found in muscle tissue between tadpoles from these two ponds in regions associated with glycogen, potentially indicative of a stress response. This study highlights the use of IR spectroscopy, a low-cost, rapid and reagent-free technique in the biomonitoring of a class of organisms susceptible to environmental degradation. PMID:26925755

  1. Transcriptome profiling reveals divergent expression shifts in brown and white adipose tissue from long-lived GHRKO mice.

    PubMed

    Stout, Michael B; Swindell, William R; Zhi, Xu; Rohde, Kyle; List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Kopchick, John J; Gesing, Adam; Fang, Yimin; Masternak, Michal M

    2015-09-29

    Mice lacking the growth hormone receptor (GHRKO) exhibit improved lifespan and healthspan due to loss of growth hormone signaling. Both the distribution and activity of brown and white adipose tissue (BAT and WAT) are altered in GHRKO mice, but the contribution of each tissue to age-related phenotypes has remained unclear. We therefore used whole-genome microarrays to evaluate transcriptional differences in BAT and WAT depots between GHRKO and normal littermates at six months of age. Our findings reveal a unique BAT transcriptome as well as distinctive responses of BAT to Ghr ablation. BAT from GHRKO mice exhibited elevated expression of genes associated with mitochondria and metabolism, along with reduced expression of genes expressed by monocyte-derived cells (dendritic cells [DC] and macrophages). Largely the opposite was observed in WAT, with increased expression of DC-expressed genes and reduced expression of genes associated with metabolism, cellular respiration and the mitochondrial inner envelope. These findings demonstrate divergent response patterns of BAT and WAT to loss of GH signaling in GHRKO mice. These patterns suggest both BAT and WAT contribute in different ways to phenotypes in GHRKO mice, with Ghr ablation blunting inflammation in BAT as well as cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT. PMID:26436954

  2. Attenuating Mutations in nsP1 Reveal Tissue-Specific Mechanisms for Control of Ross River Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Stoermer Burrack, Kristina A.; Hawman, David W.; Jupille, Henri J.; Oko, Lauren; Minor, Marissa; Shives, Katherine D.; Gunn, Bronwyn M.; Long, Kristin M.

    2014-01-01

    the antiviral type I interferon response, a major component of antiviral defense in mammals. Furthermore, our studies revealed that the effects of these attenuating mutations are tissue specific. These findings suggest that these mutations in nsP1 influence the sensitivity of RRV to type I interferon only in specific host tissues. The new knowledge gained from these studies contributes to our understanding of host responses that control alphavirus infection and viral determinants that counteract these responses. PMID:24429363

  3. ECHO-liveFISH: in vivo RNA labeling reveals dynamic regulation of nuclear RNA foci in living tissues

    PubMed Central

    Oomoto, Ikumi; Suzuki-Hirano, Asuka; Umeshima, Hiroki; Han, Yong-Woon; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Carlton, Peter; Harada, Yoshie; Kengaku, Mineko; Okamoto, Akimitsu; Shimogori, Tomomi; Wang, Dan Ohtan

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the dynamic organization of nuclear RNA foci is important for understanding and manipulating these functional sites of gene expression in both physiological and pathological states. However, such studies have been difficult to establish in vivo as a result of the absence of suitable RNA imaging methods. Here, we describe a high-resolution fluorescence RNA imaging method, ECHO-liveFISH, to label endogenous nuclear RNA in living mice and chicks. Upon in vivo electroporation, exciton-controlled sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes revealed focally concentrated endogenous 28S rRNA and U3 snoRNA at nucleoli and poly(A) RNA at nuclear speckles. Time-lapse imaging reveals steady-state stability of these RNA foci and dynamic dissipation of 28S rRNA concentrations upon polymerase I inhibition in native brain tissue. Confirming the validity of this technique in a physiological context, the in vivo RNA labeling did not interfere with the function of target RNA nor cause noticeable cytotoxicity or perturbation of cellular behavior. PMID:26101260

  4. Multiscale models of skeletal muscle reveal the complex effects of muscular dystrophy on tissue mechanics and damage susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Kelley M.; Martin, Kyle S.; Peirce, Shayn M.; Blemker, Silvia S.

    2015-01-01

    Computational models have been increasingly used to study the tissue-level constitutive properties of muscle microstructure; however, these models were not created to study or incorporate the influence of disease-associated modifications in muscle. The purpose of this paper was to develop a novel multiscale muscle modelling framework to elucidate the relationship between microstructural disease adaptations and modifications in both mechanical properties of muscle and strain in the cell membrane. We used an agent-based model to randomly generate new muscle fibre geometries and mapped them into a finite-element model representing a cross section of a muscle fascicle. The framework enabled us to explore variability in the shape and arrangement of fibres, as well as to incorporate disease-related changes. We applied this method to reveal the trade-offs between mechanical properties and damage susceptibility in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is a fatal genetic disease caused by a lack of the transmembrane protein dystrophin, leading to muscle wasting and death due to cardiac or pulmonary complications. The most prevalent microstructural variations in DMD include: lack of transmembrane proteins, fibrosis, fatty infiltration and variation in fibre cross-sectional area. A parameter analysis of these variations and case study of DMD revealed that the nature of fibrosis and density of transmembrane proteins strongly affected the stiffness of the muscle and susceptibility to membrane damage. PMID:25844152

  5. The influence of lesion volume, perilesion resection volume, and completeness of resection on seizure outcome after resective epilepsy surgery for cortical dysplasia in children.

    PubMed

    Oluigbo, Chima O; Wang, Jichuan; Whitehead, Matthew T; Magge, Suresh; Myseros, John S; Yaun, Amanda; Depositario-Cabacar, Dewi; Gaillard, William D; Keating, Robert

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is one of the most common causes of intractable epilepsy leading to surgery in children. The predictors of seizure freedom after surgical management for FCD are still unclear. The objective of this study was to perform a volumetric analysis of factors shown on the preresection and postresection brain MRI scans of patients who had undergone resective epilepsy surgery for cortical dysplasia and to determine the influence of these factors on seizure outcome. METHODS The authors reviewed the medical records and brain images of 43 consecutive patients with focal MRI-documented abnormalities and a pathological diagnosis of FCD who had undergone surgical treatment for refractory epilepsy. Preoperative lesion volume and postoperative resection volume were calculated by manual segmentation using OsiriX PRO software. RESULTS Forty-three patients underwent first-time surgery for resection of an FCD. The age range of these patients at the time of surgery ranged from 2 months to 21.8 years (mean age 7.3 years). The median duration of follow-up was 20 months. The mean age at onset was 31.6 months (range 1 day to 168 months). Complete resection of the area of an FCD, as adjudged from the postoperative brain MR images, was significantly associated with seizure control (p = 0.0005). The odds of having good seizure control among those who underwent complete resection were about 6 times higher than those among the patients who did not undergo complete resection. Seizure control was not significantly associated with lesion volume (p = 0.46) or perilesion resection volume (p = 0.86). CONCLUSIONS The completeness of FCD resection in children is a significant predictor of seizure freedom. Neither lesion volume nor the further resection of perilesional tissue is predictive of seizure freedom. PMID:26030332

  6. Quantitative analysis of tissue deformation dynamics reveals three characteristic growth modes and globally aligned anisotropic tissue deformation during chick limb development

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Yoshihiro; Kuroiwa, Atsushi; Suzuki, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-level characterization of deformation dynamics is crucial for understanding organ morphogenetic mechanisms, especially the interhierarchical links among molecular activities, cellular behaviors and tissue/organ morphogenetic processes. Limb development is a well-studied topic in vertebrate organogenesis. Nevertheless, there is still little understanding of tissue-level deformation relative to molecular and cellular dynamics. This is mainly because live recording of detailed cell behaviors in whole tissues is technically difficult. To overcome this limitation, by applying a recently developed Bayesian approach, we here constructed tissue deformation maps for chick limb development with high precision, based on snapshot lineage tracing using dye injection. The precision of the constructed maps was validated with a clear statistical criterion. From the geometrical analysis of the map, we identified three characteristic tissue growth modes in the limb and showed that they are consistent with local growth factor activity and cell cycle length. In particular, we report that SHH signaling activity changes dynamically with developmental stage and strongly correlates with the dynamic shift in the tissue growth mode. We also found anisotropic tissue deformation along the proximal-distal axis. Morphogenetic simulation and experimental studies suggested that this directional tissue elongation, and not local growth, has the greatest impact on limb shaping. This result was supported by the novel finding that anisotropic tissue elongation along the proximal-distal axis occurs independently of cell proliferation. Our study marks a pivotal point for multi-scale system understanding in vertebrate development. PMID:25858459

  7. Impact of Delay to Cryopreservation on RNA Integrity and Genome-Wide Expression Profiles in Resected Tumor Samples

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Geoffroy; Robinot, Nivonirina; Wozniak, Magdalena B.; Galateau-Salle, Françoise; Byrnes, Graham; Hainaut, Pierre; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The quality of tissue samples and extracted mRNA is a major source of variability in tumor transcriptome analysis using genome-wide expression microarrays. During and immediately after surgical tumor resection, tissues are exposed to metabolic, biochemical and physical stresses characterized as “warm ischemia”. Current practice advocates cryopreservation of biosamples within 30 minutes of resection, but this recommendation has not been systematically validated by measurements of mRNA decay over time. Using Illumina HumanHT-12 v3 Expression BeadChips, providing a genome-wide coverage of over 24,000 genes, we have analyzed gene expression variation in samples of 3 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) and 3 lung carcinomas (LC) cryopreserved at times up to 2 hours after resection. RNA Integrity Numbers (RIN) revealed no significant deterioration of mRNA up to 2 hours after resection. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis detected non-significant gene expression variations of −3.5%/hr (95% CI: −7.0%/hr to 0.1%/hr; p = 0.054). In LC, no consistent gene expression pattern was detected in relation with warm ischemia. In HCC, a signature of 6 up-regulated genes (CYP2E1, IGLL1, CABYR, CLDN2, NQO1, SCL13A5) and 6 down-regulated genes (MT1G, MT1H, MT1E, MT1F, HABP2, SPINK1) was identified (FDR <0.05). Overall, our observations support current recommendation of time to cryopreservation of up to 30 minutes and emphasize the need for identifying tissue-specific genes deregulated following resection to avoid misinterpreting expression changes induced by warm ischemia as pathologically significant changes. PMID:24278187

  8. Myocardial Sleeve Tissues in Surgical Lung Specimens.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Akihiko; Kamata, Tsugumasa; Iwasa, Takeshi; Watanabe, Shun-ichi; Tsuta, Koji

    2015-10-01

    Left atrial myocardial extensions over the pulmonary veins (PVs), known as myocardial sleeves, are present in the physiological anatomy of most individuals. Although this structure has recently received clinical attention as a major origin of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF), it has not been documented in surgical specimens. Here, we examine incidentally identified myocardial sleeve tissue in routinely processed lung resection specimens to determine its incidence and diagnostic implications. Among 694 lung resection specimens with evaluable PV margins, myocardial sleeve tissue was identified in 26 cases (3.7%). The tissue was located within the adventitia of the PVs, mostly in margin preparations, and existed outside the pericardium in the majority of cases. Carcinoma infiltration of the sleeves was evident in 6 cases. No heart injuries were observed, and no tumors invaded the heart. Preoperative electrocardiography showed sinus rhythm in all cases, whereas postoperative monitoring revealed sinus rhythm in all patients except one who showed AF and flutter. Myocardial sleeve tissue is an underrecognized incidental finding in lung resection specimens, and it is not indicative of heart injury. Cancer infiltration into this tissue indicates neither heart invasion nor, by itself, invasion into the pericardium. Although surgical transection of the myocardial sleeve did not evoke immediate arrhythmia in most cases, the overall influence of this procedure on the postsurgical risk of AF remains to be determined in further studies involving extensive rhythm assessment. PMID:26099012

  9. Differences in mitochondrial function in homogenated samples from healthy and epileptic specific brain tissues revealed by high-resolution respirometry.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Johannes; Zangrandi, Luca; Schwarzer, Christoph; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are strongly implicated in neurodegenerative diseases and epilepsy. Strikingly, neurodegenerative diseases show regional specificity in vulnerability and follow distinct patterns of neuronal loss. A challenge is to understand, why mitochondria fail in particular brain regions under specific pathological conditions. A potential explanation could be provided by regional or cellular specificity of mitochondrial function. We applied high-resolution respirometry to analyze the integrated Complex I- and II (CI and CII)-linked respiration, the activity of Complex IV, and the combined CI&II-linked oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)- and electron-transfer system (ETS)-capacity in microsamples obtained from distinct regions of the mouse brain. We compared different approaches to assess mitochondrial density and suggest flux control ratios as a valid method to normalize respiration to mitochondrial density. This approach revealed significant differences of CI- and CII-linked OXPHOS capacity and coupling control between motor cortex, striatum, hippocampus and pons of naïve mice. CI-linked respiration was highest in motor cortex, while CII-linked respiration predominated in the striatum. To investigate if this method could also determine differences in normal and disease states within the same brain region, we compared hippocampal homogenates in a chronic epilepsy model. Three weeks after stereotaxic injection of kainate, there was a down-regulation of CI- and upregulation of CII-linked respiration in the resulting epileptic ipsilateral hippocampus compared to the contralateral one. In summary, respirometric OXPHOS analysis provides a very sensitive diagnostic approach using small amounts of distinct brain tissues. In a single assay, information is obtained on numerous OXPHOS parameters as indicators of tissue-specific mitochondrial performance. PMID:26516105

  10. Extended resections for thymic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wright, Cameron D

    2010-10-01

    Almost all series reporting on the results of resection in thymic tumors indicate that the performance of a complete resection is probably the most important prognostic factor. This issue is not a factor in Masaoka stage I and II tumors that are almost always easily completely resected and have an excellent prognosis. Masaoka stage III tumors that invade the pericardium, lungs, or great vessels have relatively higher incomplete resection rates, significantly higher recurrence rates, and thus a worse prognosis. There are several small reports on the efficacy of resection of the great veins when involved by a thymic malignancy with low morbidity and meaningful long-term survival. Superior vena cava reconstruction is commonly performed by a polytetrafluroethylene, venous, or pericardial graft. These cases can usually be identified preoperatively and, thus, considered for induction therapy. Because these types of cases are almost always of marginal respectability in terms of obtaining a true en bloc resection, there is an increasing enthusiasm for offering induction therapy in an effort to enhance resectability. Preliminary results suggest increased R0 resection rates and improved survival with induction therapy for locally advanced tumors. The optimal induction treatment is unknown. The ultimate extended surgery for advanced thymic tumors is an extrapleural pneumonectomy performed for extensive pleural disease (Masaoka stage IVA). These rarely performed operations are done for IVA disease found at initial presentation and for recurrent disease as a salvage procedure. Again these advanced patients are probably best managed by induction chemotherapy followed by resection. PMID:20859130

  11. Research Resource: Whole-Genome Estrogen Receptor α Binding in Mouse Uterine Tissue Revealed by ChIP-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Chen, Yu; Liu, Liwen; Li, Yin; Bushel, Pierre R.; Fargo, David; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    To advance understanding of mechanisms leading to biological and transcriptional endpoints related to estrogen action in the mouse uterus, we have mapped ERα and RNA polymerase II (PolII) binding sites using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing of enriched chromatin fragments. In the absence of hormone, 5184 ERα-binding sites were apparent in the vehicle-treated ovariectomized uterine chromatin, whereas 17,240 were seen 1 h after estradiol (E2) treatment, indicating that some sites are occupied by unliganded ERα, and that ERα binding is increased by E2. Approximately 15% of the uterine ERα-binding sites were adjacent to (<10 kb) annotated transcription start sites, and many sites are found within genes or are found more than 100 kb distal from mapped genes; however, the density (sites per base pair) of ERα-binding sites is significantly greater adjacent to promoters. An increase in quantity of sites but no significant positional differences were seen between vehicle and E2-treated samples in the overall locations of ERα-binding sites either distal from, adjacent to, or within genes. Analysis of the PolII data revealed the presence of poised promoter-proximal PolII on some highly up-regulated genes. Additionally, corecruitment of PolII and ERα to some distal enhancer regions was observed. A de novo motif analysis of sequences in the ERα-bound chromatin confirmed that estrogen response elements were significantly enriched. Interestingly, in areas of ERα binding without predicted estrogen response element motifs, homeodomain transcription factor-binding motifs were significantly enriched. The integration of the ERα- and PolII-binding sites from our uterine sequencing of enriched chromatin fragments data with transcriptional responses revealed in our uterine microarrays has the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of mechanisms governing estrogen response in uterine and other estrogen target tissues. PMID:22446102

  12. [R0 Resection by Distal Pancreatectomy with En Bloc Celiac Axis Resection after Down-Staging by FOLFIRINOX Therapy in a Case of Pancreas Cancer--Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Makino, Hironobu; Kametaka, Hisashi; Fukada, Tadaomi; Seike, Kazuhiro; Koyama, Takashi; Hasegawa, Akio

    2015-11-01

    The patient, a 55-year-old man, was diagnosed elsewhere as having cancer of the tail of the pancreas and was referred to our hospital. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a remarkably large tumor, 90 mm in diameter, in the tail of the pancreas, with invasion of the adjacent spleen, stomach, left adrenal gland, diaphragm, and celiac artery; metastasis to the liver; and peritoneal dissemination. The serum levels of the tumor markers CEA and CA19-9 were elevated (21.2 ng/mL and 9,530 U/mL, respectively). Since surgery was not considered to be feasible in this condition, the patient was started on FOLFIRINOX therapy. Adverse events, including Grade 3 decreased neutrophil count, anorexia, diarrhea, and hyperkalemia occurred; however, the patient was able to receive 10 cycles of therapy with downward adjustments of the dosage. In response to the therapy, the tumor marker levels fell rapidly, and on CT, the tumor shrank to 40 mm in diameter; however, resection was still scheduled because positron emission tomography (PET)-CT revealed suspected remnants of the disease in the pancreatic tail. After preoperative transcatheter embolization of the common hepatic artery and the left gastric artery, distal pancreatectomy with en bloc celiac axis resection (DP-CAR) was performed. Intraoperative ultrasonography revealed no metastatic lesions in the liver. Histopathologically, the resected sites were found to be almost totally replaced with fibrous scar tissue, and only trace evidence of moderately differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma components were seen in the pancreatic tail, gastric submucosa, and left adrenal gland. Therefore, R0 resection had been achieved. The patient remains alive, showing no signs of recurrence at 18 months after the initial treatment and 11 months after the tumor resection. The results in this case suggest that FOLFIRINOX therapy can increase the radical curability of pancreatic cancer via down-staging and eventually improve the prognosis. PMID

  13. A novel microarray approach reveals new tissue-specific signatures of known and predicted mammalian microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Beuvink, Iwan; Kolb, Fabrice A.; Budach, Wolfgang; Garnier, Arlette; Lange, Joerg; Natt, Francois; Dengler, Uwe; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Microarrays to examine the global expression levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) in a systematic in-parallel manner have become important tools to help unravel the functions of miRNAs and to understand their roles in RNA-based regulation and their implications in human diseases. We have established a novel miRNA-specific microarray platform that enables the simultaneous expression analysis of both known and predicted miRNAs obtained from human or mouse origin. Chemically modified 2′-O-(2-methoxyethyl)-(MOE) oligoribonucleotide probes were arrayed onto Evanescent Resonance (ER) microchips by robotic spotting. Supplementing the complementary probes against miRNAs with carefully designed mismatch controls allowed for accurate sequence-specific determination of miRNA expression profiles obtained from a panel of mouse tissues. This revealed new expression signatures of known miRNAs as well as of novel miRNAs previously predicted using bioinformatic methods. Systematic confirmation of the array data with northern blotting and, in particular, real-time PCR suggests that the described microarray platform is a powerful tool to analyze miRNA expression patterns with rapid throughput and high fidelity. PMID:17355992

  14. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  15. High-Throughput Sequencing of miRNAs Reveals a Tissue Signature in Gastric Cancer and Suggests Novel Potential Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Darnet, Sylvain; Moreira, Fabiano C; Hamoy, Igor G; Burbano, Rommel; Khayat, André; Cruz, Aline; Magalhães, Leandro; Silva, Artur; Santos, Sidney; Demachki, Samia; Assumpção, Monica; Assumpção, Paulo; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ândrea

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer has a high incidence and mortality rate worldwide; however, the use of biomarkers for its clinical diagnosis remains limited. The microRNAs (miRNAs) are biomarkers with the potential to identify the risk and prognosis as well as therapeutic targets. We performed the ultradeep miRnomes sequencing of gastric adenocarcinoma and gastric antrum without tumor samples. We observed that a small set of those samples were responsible for approximately 80% of the total miRNAs expression, which might represent a miRNA tissue signature. Additionally, we identified seven miRNAs exhibiting significant differences, and, of these, hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c were able to discriminate antrum without tumor from gastric cancer regardless of the histological type. These findings were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results revealed that hsa-miR-135b and hsa-miR-29c are potential gastric adenocarcinoma occurrence biomarkers with the ability to identify individuals at a higher risk of developing this cancer, and could even be used as therapeutic targets to allow individualized clinical management. PMID:26157332

  16. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  17. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125. PMID:26997197

  18. 3D-printed guiding templates for improved osteosarcoma resection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Limin; Zhou, Ye; Zhu, Ye; Lin, Zefeng; Wang, Yingjun; Zhang, Yu; Xia, Hong; Mao, Chuanbin

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma resection is challenging due to the variable location of tumors and their proximity with surrounding tissues. It also carries a high risk of postoperative complications. To overcome the challenge in precise osteosarcoma resection, computer-aided design (CAD) was used to design patient-specific guiding templates for osteosarcoma resection on the basis of the computer tomography (CT) scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the osteosarcoma of human patients. Then 3D printing technique was used to fabricate the guiding templates. The guiding templates were used to guide the osteosarcoma surgery, leading to more precise resection of the tumorous bone and the implantation of the bone implants, less blood loss, shorter operation time and reduced radiation exposure during the operation. Follow-up studies show that the patients recovered well to reach a mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society score of 27.125.

  19. Thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction for adenoid cystic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Wenjie; Zhu, Dezhang; Cheng, Zhaozhong; Zhao, Yandong

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel technique of thoracoscopic circumferential tracheal resection and end-to-end anastomosis. A 60-year-old woman presented with wheezing and progressive dyspnea. Computed tomography scan revealed a mass at the lower trachea, and a nitinol mesh stent was implanted by bronchoscopy. After 2 weeks, a complete thoracoscopic tracheal resection and reconstruction was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. The final pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of primary adenoid cystic carcinoma of the trachea. PMID:25555982

  20. 5-aminolevulinic acid guidance during awake craniotomy to maximise extent of safe resection of glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Corns, Robert; Mukherjee, Soumya; Johansen, Anja; Sivakumar, Gnanamurthy

    2015-01-01

    Overall survival for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been consistently shown to improve when the surgeon achieves a gross total resection of the tumour. It has also been demonstrated that surgical adjuncts such as 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) fluorescence--which delineates malignant tumour tissue--normal brain tissue margin seen using violet-blue excitation under an operating microscope--helps achieve this. We describe the case of a patient with recurrent left frontal GBM encroaching on Broca's area (eloquent brain). Gross total resection of the tumour was achieved by combining two techniques, awake resection to prevent damage to eloquent brain and 5-ALA fluorescence guidance to maximise the extent of tumour resection.This technique led to gross total resection of all T1-enhancing tumour with the avoidance of neurological deficit. The authors recommend this technique in patients when awake surgery can be tolerated and gross total resection is the aim of surgery. PMID:26177997

  1. The Influence of Liver Resection on Intrahepatic Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Hannes H; Nißler, Valérie; Croner, Roland S

    2016-01-01

    The high incidence of tumor recurrence after resection of metastatic liver lesions remains an unsolved problem. Small tumor cell deposits, which are not detectable by routine clinical imaging, may be stimulated by hepatic regeneration factors after liver resection. It is not entirely clear, however, which factors are crucial for tumor recurrence. The presented mouse model may be useful to explore the mechanisms that play a role in the development of recurrent malignant lesions after liver resection. The model combines the easy-to-perform and reproducible techniques of defined amounts of liver tissue removal and tumor induction (by injection) in mice. The animals were treated with either a single laparotomy, a 30% liver resection, or a 70% liver resection. All animals subsequently received a tumor cell injection into the remaining liver tissue. After two weeks of observation, the livers and tumors were evaluated for size and weight and examined by immunohistochemistry. After a 70% liver resection, the tumor volume and weight were significantly increased compared to a laparotomy alone (p <0.05). In addition, immunohistochemistry (Ki67) showed an increased tumor proliferation rate in the resection group (p <0.05). These findings demonstrate the influence of hepatic regeneration mechanisms on intrahepatic tumor growth. Combined with methods like histological workup or RNA analysis, the described mouse model could serve as foundation for a close examination of different factors involved in tumor growth and metastatic disease recurrence within the liver. A considerable number of variables like the length of postoperative observation, the cell line used for injection or the timing of injection and liver resection offer multiple angles when exploring a specific question in the context of post-hepatectomy metastases. The limitations of this procedure are the authorization to perform the procedure on animals, access to an appropriate animal testing facility and acquisition

  2. Early Adaptation of Small Intestine After Massive Small Bowel Resection in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jie; Qin, Zhen; Shan, Hongmei; Xiao, Yongtao; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important that the residual bowel adapts after massive resection. The necessary intestinal adaptation is a progressive recovery from intestinal failure through increase in absorptive surface area and functional capacity and includes both morphological and functional adaptations. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate intestinal morphological and functional adaptations of small bowel syndrome (SBS) model rats (SBS1W) 7 days after bowel resection. Materials and Methods: Male sprague–dawley rats (n = 20/group) underwent either a 75% proximal small bowel resection (SBS1W group) or a control operation (control group). Markers of morphological adaptation were revealed by TEM analysis of H&E-stained tissue samples. The intestinal barrier condition was assessed by BT, and sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus was measured by ELISA. Contractility and the slow wave rhythm of the entire intestinal remnant were measured and recorded. Results: The SBS1W group experienced more weight loss than control group and had a clearly different intestinal morphology as revealed in TEM images. Compared with control rats, the SBS1W group had a lower sIgA concentration in intestinal mucus and higher BT to lymph nodes (70% vs 40%; level I), portal blood (40% vs 10%; level II), and peripheral blood (60% vs 30%; level III). Disorder of spontaneous rhythmic contraction, irregular amplitude, and slow frequency were detected in the SBS1W group by a muscle strips test. Similarly, the slow wave of the entire intestinal remnant in the SBS1W group was irregular and uncoordinated. Conclusions: The finding of intestinal adaptation following massive SBR in SBS1W rats provides more understanding of the mechanisms of progressive recovery from the intestinal failure that underlies SBS. The mechanical, chemical, immunological, and biological barriers were all impaired at 7 days following bowel resection, indicating that the SBS model rats were still in the intestinal

  3. Endoscopic resection of superficial gastrointestinal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Marc, Giovannini; Lopes, Cesar Vivian

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic endoscopy plays a major role in the management of gastrointestinal (GI) neoplasia. Its indications can be generalized into four broad categories; to remove or obliterate neoplastic lesion, to palliate malignant obstruction, or to treat bleeding. Only endoscopic resection allows complete histological staging of the cancer, which is critical as it allows stratification and refinement for further treatment. Although other endoscopic techniques, such as ablation therapy, may also cure early GI cancer, they can not provide a definitive pathological specimen. Early stage lesions reveal low frequency of lymph node metastasis which allows for less invasive treatments and thereby improving the quality of life when compared to surgery. Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) are now accepted worldwide as treatment modalities for early cancers of the GI tract. PMID:18698673

  4. Perioperative chemotherapy and hepatic resection for resectable colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Toru; Sakamoto, Yasuo; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Baba, Hideo

    2015-02-01

    The role of perioperative chemotherapy in the management of initially resectable colorectal liver metastases (CRLM) is still unclear. The EPOC trial [the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 40983] is an important study that declares perioperative chemotherapy as the standard of care for patients with resectable CRLM, and the strategy is widely accepted in western countries. Compared with surgery alone, perioperative FOLFOX therapy significantly increased progression-free survival (PFS) in eligible patients or those with resected CRLM. Overall survival (OS) data from the EPOC trial were recently published in The Lancet Oncology, 2013. Here, we discussed the findings and recommendations from the EORTC 40983 trial. PMID:25713806

  5. Fluorescently Tagged pUL47 of Marek's Disease Virus Reveals Differential Tissue Expression of the Tegument Protein In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Sina; Kaufer, Benedikt B.; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), a lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek's disease (MD) in chickens. MD is characterized by neurological signs, chronic wasting, and T cell lymphomas that predominate in the visceral organs. MDV replicates in a highly cell-associated manner in vitro and in vivo, with infectious virus particles being released only from feather follicle epithelial (FFE) cells in the skin. Virus produced and shed from FFE cells allows transmission of MDV from infected to naïve chickens, but the mechanisms or roles of differential virus gene expression have remained elusive. Here, we generated recombinant MDV in which we fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the C terminus of the tegument protein pUL47 (vUL47-EGFP) or pUL49 (vUL49-EGFP). While vUL49-EGFP was highly attenuated in vitro and in vivo, vUL47-EGFP showed unaltered pathogenic potential and stable production of pUL47-EGFP, which facilitated direct analysis of pUL47 expression in cells and tissues. Our studies revealed that pUL47-EGFP is expressed at low levels and localizes to the nucleus during lytic replication in vitro and in lymphocytes in the spleen in vivo, while it is undetectable in tumors. In contrast, pUL47-EGFP is highly abundant and localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm in FFE cells in the skin, where MDV is shed into the environment. We concluded that differential expression and localization of MDV pUL47-EGFP tegument protein is potentially important for the unique cell-associated nature of MDV in vitro and in lymphocytes in vivo, as well as production of free virus in FFE cells. PMID:22190714

  6. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  7. Identification of the interactome between fish plasma proteins and Edwardsiella tarda reveals tissue-specific strategies against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Huang, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Zaohai; Peng, Xuan-Xian; Peng, Bo

    2016-09-01

    Elucidating the complex pathogen-host interaction is essential for a comprehensive understanding of how these remarkable agents invade their hosts and how the hosts defend against these invaders. During the infection, pathogens interact intensively with host to enable their survival, which can be revealed through their interactome. Edwardsiella tarda is a Gram-negative bacterial pathogen causing huge economic loss in aquaculture and a spectrum of intestinal and extraintestinal diseases in humans. E. tarda is an ideal model for host-pathogen investigation as it infects fish in three distinct steps: entering the host, circulating through the blood and establishing infection. We adopted a previous established proteomic approach that inactivated E. tarda cells and covalent crosslink fish plasma proteins were used to capture plasma proteins and bacterial outer membrane proteins, respectively. By the combinatorial use of proteomic and biochemical approaches, six plasma proteins and seven outer membrane proteins (OMPs) were identified. Interactions among these proteins were validated with protein-array, far-Western blotting and co-immunoprecipitation. At last, seventeen plasma protein-bacteria protein-protein interaction were confirmed to be involved in the interaction network, forming a complex interactome. Compared to our previous results, different host proteins were detected, whereas some of the bacterial proteins were similar, which indicates that hosts adopt tissue-specific strategies to cope with the same pathogen during infection. Thus, our results provide a robust demonstration of both bacterial initiators and host receptors or interacting proteins to further explore infection and anti-infective mechanisms between hosts and microbes. PMID:27458055

  8. Fluorescently tagged pUL47 of Marek's disease virus reveals differential tissue expression of the tegument protein in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jarosinski, Keith W; Arndt, Sina; Kaufer, Benedikt B; Osterrieder, Nikolaus

    2012-03-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV), a lymphotropic alphaherpesvirus, causes Marek's disease (MD) in chickens. MD is characterized by neurological signs, chronic wasting, and T cell lymphomas that predominate in the visceral organs. MDV replicates in a highly cell-associated manner in vitro and in vivo, with infectious virus particles being released only from feather follicle epithelial (FFE) cells in the skin. Virus produced and shed from FFE cells allows transmission of MDV from infected to naïve chickens, but the mechanisms or roles of differential virus gene expression have remained elusive. Here, we generated recombinant MDV in which we fused enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) to the C terminus of the tegument protein pUL47 (vUL47-EGFP) or pUL49 (vUL49-EGFP). While vUL49-EGFP was highly attenuated in vitro and in vivo, vUL47-EGFP showed unaltered pathogenic potential and stable production of pUL47-EGFP, which facilitated direct analysis of pUL47 expression in cells and tissues. Our studies revealed that pUL47-EGFP is expressed at low levels and localizes to the nucleus during lytic replication in vitro and in lymphocytes in the spleen in vivo, while it is undetectable in tumors. In contrast, pUL47-EGFP is highly abundant and localizes predominantly in the cytoplasm in FFE cells in the skin, where MDV is shed into the environment. We concluded that differential expression and localization of MDV pUL47-EGFP tegument protein is potentially important for the unique cell-associated nature of MDV in vitro and in lymphocytes in vivo, as well as production of free virus in FFE cells. PMID:22190714

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Tomato Flower Pedicel Tissues Reveals Abscission Zone-Specific Modulation of Key Meristem Activity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  10. Transcriptome analysis of tomato flower pedicel tissues reveals abscission zone-specific modulation of key meristem activity genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Liu, Danmei; Li, Aili; Sun, Xiuli; Zhang, Rongzhi; Wu, Liang; Liang, Yanchun; Mao, Long

    2013-01-01

    Tomato flower abscises at the anatomically distinct abscission zone that separates the pedicel into basal and apical portions. During abscission, cell separation occurs only at the abscission zone indicating distinctive molecular regulation in its cells. We conducted a transcriptome analysis of tomato pedicel tissues during ethylene promoted abscission. We found that the abscission zone was the most active site with the largest set of differentially expressed genes when compared with basal and apical portions. Gene Ontology analyses revealed enriched transcription regulation and hydrolase activities in the abscission zone. We also demonstrate coordinated responses of hormone and cell wall related genes. Besides, a number of ESTs representing homologs of key Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem activity genes were found to be preferentially expressed in the abscission zone, including WUSCHEL (WUS), KNAT6, LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN PROTEIN 1(LBD1), and BELL-like homeodomain protein 1 (BLH1), as well as tomato axillary meristem genes BLIND (Bl) and LATERAL SUPPRESSOR (Ls). More interestingly, the homologs of WUS and the potential functional partner OVATE FAMILIY PROTEIN (OFP) were subsequently down regulated during abscission while Bl and AGL12 were continuously and specifically induced in the abscission zone. The expression patterns of meristem activity genes corroborate the idea that cells of the abscission zone confer meristem-like nature and coincide with the course of abscission and post-abscission cell differentiation. Our data therefore propose a possible regulatory scheme in tomato involving meristem genes that may be required not only for the abscission zone development, but also for abscission. PMID:23390523

  11. Large bowel resection

    MedlinePlus

    ... bag outside your body. This is called an colostomy . The colostomy may be either short-term or permanent. Colectomy ... to the ureter or bladder Problems with the colostomy Scar tissue that forms in the belly and ...

  12. Variations in genes involved in immune response checkpoints and association with outcomes in patients with resected colorectal liver metastases.

    PubMed

    Stremitzer, S; Sunakawa, Y; Zhang, W; Yang, D; Ning, Y; Stintzing, S; Sebio, A; Yamauchi, S; Matsusaka, S; El-Khoueiry, R; Stift, J; Wrba, F; Gruenberger, T; Lenz, H-J

    2015-12-01

    In patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM), liver resection offers the possibility of cure and long-term survival. The liver is a highly immunogenic organ harboring ~80% of the body's tissue macrophages. Emerging data demonstrate a critical role of the immune response for cancer treatment. We investigated variations within genes involved in immune response checkpoints and their association with outcomes in patients with CLM who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy including bevacizumab and liver resection. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in nine genes (CCL2, CCR2, LAG3, NT5E, PDCD1, CD274, IDO1, CTLA4 and CD24) were analyzed in genomic DNA from 149 patients with resected bevacizumab-pretreated CLM by direct Sanger DNA sequencing, and correlated with response, recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS), probability of cure and recurrence patterns. IDO1 (indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase) rs3739319 G>A and CD24 rs8734 G>A showed a significant difference in 3-year OS rates. In addition, IDO1 rs3739319 G>A was significantly associated with extrahepatic recurrence. Recursive partitioning analyses revealed that IDO1 rs3739319 G>A was the dominant SNP predicting RFS and OS. Our data suggest that variants within genes involved in immune response checkpoints are associated with outcomes in patients with resected CLM and might lead to improved treatment strategies modulating anti-tumor immune response by targeting novel immune checkpoints. PMID:25752522

  13. Raman microscopy in the diagnosis and prognosis of surgically resected nonsmall cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Nicholas David; Beattie, James Renwick; Carland, Chris; Davis, Richard; McManus, Kieran; Bradbury, Ian; Fennell, Dean Andrew; Hamilton, Peter William; Ennis, Madeleine; McGarvey, John Joseph; Elborn, Joseph Stuart

    2010-03-01

    The main curative therapy for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer is surgery. Despite this, the survival rate is only 50%, therefore it is important to more efficiently diagnose and predict prognosis for lung cancer patients. Raman spectroscopy is useful in the diagnosis of malignant and premalignant lesions. The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of Raman microscopy to diagnose lung cancer from surgically resected tissue sections, and predict the prognosis of these patients. Tumor tissue sections from curative resections are mapped by Raman microscopy and the spectra analzsed using multivariate techniques. Spectra from the tumor samples are also compared with their outcome data to define their prognostic significance. Using principal component analysis and random forest classification, Raman microscopy differentiates malignant from normal lung tissue. Principal component analysis of 34 tumor spectra predicts early postoperative cancer recurrence with a sensitivity of 73% and specificity of 74%. Spectral analysis reveals elevated porphyrin levels in the normal samples and more DNA in the tumor samples. Raman microscopy can be a useful technique for the diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer patients receiving surgery, and for elucidating the biochemical properties of lung tumors.

  14. Computer-assisted resection and reconstruction of pelvic tumor sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft. PMID:21127723

  15. Computer-Assisted Resection and Reconstruction of Pelvic Tumor Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Paul, Laurent; Cartiaux, Olivier; Delloye, Christian; Banse, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Pelvic sarcoma is associated with a relatively poor prognosis, due to the difficulty in obtaining an adequate surgical margin given the complex pelvic anatomy. Magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography allow valuable surgical resection planning, but intraoperative localization remains hazardous. Surgical navigation systems could be of great benefit in surgical oncology, especially in difficult tumor location; however, no commercial surgical oncology software is currently available. A customized navigation software was developed and used to perform a synovial sarcoma resection and allograft reconstruction. The software permitted preoperative planning with defined target planes and intraoperative navigation with a free-hand saw blade. The allograft was cut according to the same planes. Histological examination revealed tumor-free resection margins. Allograft fitting to the pelvis of the patient was excellent and allowed stable osteosynthesis. We believe this to be the first case of combined computer-assisted tumor resection and reconstruction with an allograft. PMID:21127723

  16. Endoscopically assisted laparoscopic local resection of gastric tumor

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive procedures have been applied in treatment of gastric submucosal tumors. Currently, combined laparoscopic - endoscopic rendezvous resection (CLERR) emerges as a new technique which further reduces operative invasiveness. Case presentation A-57-year-old female patient presented with epigastric pain. She was submitted to gastroscopy, which revealed a tumor located at the angle of His. Biopsy specimens demonstrated a leiomyoma. The patient underwent endoscopically assisted laparoscopic resection of the tumor. The operative time was 45 minutes. Diagnosis of leiomyoma was confirmed by the final histopathological examination. The patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery and was discharged on the 2nd postoperative day. Conclusion Combined laparoscopic and endoscopic rendezvous resection appears as a promising alternative minimally invasive technique. It offers easy recognition of the tumor, regardless of location, safe dissection, and full thickness resection with adequate margins as well as less operative time. PMID:24119820

  17. Perspectives of transurethral robotic laser resection of the prostate: vaporization and coagulation effects with the Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Teo, Ming Y.; Kwoh, Chee K.; Ng, Wan S.; Cheng, Wai S.

    2000-05-01

    A longer operating time and steeper learning curve in mastering the techniques for transurethral laser resection of the prostate are the main problems faced by surgeons compared to standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). However, these disadvantages can be solved with the introduction of a treatment modality designed and developed based on an integrated system of computer, robotics and laser technology. In vitro experiments were carried out to determine variables affecting the vaporization and coagulation lesions, in order to identify the parameters that could optimize this modality. Human cadaveric prostate and fresh chicken breast tissues were irradiated with different parameters using continuous wave Nd:YAG laser fiber in contact with the tissue. The effects of irrigant flowrate, fiber/tissue angle of inclination, number of passes, direction, speed and power of lase on the volume of tissue vaporized and coagulated, were assessed. A non-contact optical coordinate measuring machine was used to measure the depth and width of the vaporized and coagulated lesion. Results reveal that for each directional vaporization path (forward, clockwise and counter-clockwise), power and speed of lase are the most significant parameters influencing the volume of the vaporized and coagulated lesion. Optimized values of the power and speed of lase at 100 W and 1 - 3 mm/s respectively were obtained from the experiments when the tissues were irradiated in the forward, clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. It was concluded from our study to quantify tissue removal and damage, optimized values of irradiation power and speed could be obtained and implemented in the procedure of transurethral robotic laser resection of the prostate.

  18. Case Report: Cardiac Tumor Resection And Repair With Porcine Xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Abu Saleh, Walid K.; Al Jabbari, Odeaa; Ramlawi, Basel; Bruckner, Brian A.; Loebe, Matthias; Reardon, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Primary cardiac sarcomas are rare and carry a grave prognosis. Improved survival requires a complete margin negative resection of the tumor. These surgical resections are often large and complex, requiring extensive reconstructive procedures. The appropriate material for cardiac reconstruction is not known. We have used glutaraldehyde-fixed bovine pericardium in our early series but have recently employed the MatriStem® Surgical Matrix PSMX membrane (ACell®, Inc.; Columbia, MD), a unique proprietary urinary bladder matrix derived from porcine urinary bladder with the potential for viability and tissue ingrowth. In our study of six patients at this institution, all six underwent successful surgical resection and repair with the MatriStem acellular porcine urinary bladder membrane (ACell). The postoperative course was uncomplicated in all patients, and they are still alive at this time. An aggressive surgical approach to cardiac tumors can possibly lead to complete resection but often requires reconstruction of the cardiac tissue with a membrane. We were able to achieve acceptable results in our cardiac reconstruction by using the ACell extracellular matrix to reconstruct the defect following tumor resection. Longer-term follow-up in these patients, including imaging studies, will be necessary to demonstrate the durability and integrity of the reconstruction. PMID:27486495

  19. A high-resolution tissue-specific proteome and phosphoproteome atlas of maize primary roots reveals functional gradients along the root axes.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Caroline; Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Walley, Justin W; Shen, Zhouxin; Paschold, Anja; Smith, Laurie G; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Briggs, Steven P; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-05-01

    A high-resolution proteome and phosphoproteome atlas of four maize (Zea mays) primary root tissues, the cortex, stele, meristematic zone, and elongation zone, was generated. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry identified 11,552 distinct nonmodified and 2,852 phosphorylated proteins across the four root tissues. Two gradients reflecting the abundance of functional protein classes along the longitudinal root axis were observed. While the classes RNA, DNA, and protein peaked in the meristematic zone, cell wall, lipid metabolism, stress, transport, and secondary metabolism culminated in the differentiation zone. Functional specialization of tissues is underscored by six of 10 cortex-specific proteins involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. Comparison of this data set with high-resolution seed and leaf proteome studies revealed 13% (1,504/11,552) root-specific proteins. While only 23% of the 1,504 root-specific proteins accumulated in all four root tissues, 61% of all 11,552 identified proteins accumulated in all four root tissues. This suggests a much higher degree of tissue-specific functionalization of root-specific proteins. In summary, these data illustrate the remarkable plasticity of the proteomic landscape of maize primary roots and thus provide a starting point for gaining a better understanding of their tissue-specific functions. PMID:25780097

  20. A High-Resolution Tissue-Specific Proteome and Phosphoproteome Atlas of Maize Primary Roots Reveals Functional Gradients along the Root Axes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Waqas Ahmed; Shen, Zhouxin; Paschold, Anja

    2015-01-01

    A high-resolution proteome and phosphoproteome atlas of four maize (Zea mays) primary root tissues, the cortex, stele, meristematic zone, and elongation zone, was generated. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry identified 11,552 distinct nonmodified and 2,852 phosphorylated proteins across the four root tissues. Two gradients reflecting the abundance of functional protein classes along the longitudinal root axis were observed. While the classes RNA, DNA, and protein peaked in the meristematic zone, cell wall, lipid metabolism, stress, transport, and secondary metabolism culminated in the differentiation zone. Functional specialization of tissues is underscored by six of 10 cortex-specific proteins involved in flavonoid biosynthesis. Comparison of this data set with high-resolution seed and leaf proteome studies revealed 13% (1,504/11,552) root-specific proteins. While only 23% of the 1,504 root-specific proteins accumulated in all four root tissues, 61% of all 11,552 identified proteins accumulated in all four root tissues. This suggests a much higher degree of tissue-specific functionalization of root-specific proteins. In summary, these data illustrate the remarkable plasticity of the proteomic landscape of maize primary roots and thus provide a starting point for gaining a better understanding of their tissue-specific functions. PMID:25780097

  1. [Laparoscopic rectal resection technique].

    PubMed

    Anthuber, M; Kriening, B; Schrempf, M; Geißler, B; Märkl, B; Rüth, S

    2016-07-01

    The quality of radical oncological operations for patients with rectal cancer determines the rate of local recurrence and long-term survival. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced tumors, a standardized surgical procedure for rectal tumors less than 12 cm from the anus with total mesorectal excision (TME) and preservation of the autonomous nerve system for sexual and bladder function have significantly improved the oncological results and quality of life of patients. The TME procedure for rectal resection has been performed laparoscopically in Germany for almost 20 years; however, no reliable data are available on the frequency of laparoscopic procedures in rectal cancer patients in Germany. The rate of minimally invasive procedures is estimated to be less than 20 %. A prerequisite for using the laparoscopic approach is implicit adherence to the described standards of open surgery. Available data from prospective randomized trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses indicate that in the early postoperative phase the generally well-known positive effects of the minimally invasive approach to the benefit of patients can be realized without any long-term negative impact on the oncological results; however, the results of many of these studies are difficult to interpret because it could not be confirmed whether the hospitals and surgeons involved had successfully completed the learning curve. In this article we would like to present our technique, which we have developed over the past 17 years in more than 1000 patients. Based on our experiences the laparoscopic approach can be highly recommended as a suitable alternative to the open procedure. PMID:27277556

  2. Large-scale atlas of microarray data reveals the distinct expression landscape of different tissues in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    He, Fei; Yoo, Shinjae; Wang, Daifeng; Kumari, Sunita; Gerstein, Mark; Ware, Doreen; Maslov, Sergei

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptome data sets from thousands of samples of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been collectively generated by multiple individual labs. Although integration and meta-analysis of these samples has become routine in the plant research community, it is often hampered by a lack of metadata or differences in annotation styles of different labs. In this study, we carefully selected and integrated 6057 Arabidopsis microarray expression samples from 304 experiments deposited to the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). Metadata such as tissue type, growth conditions and developmental stage were manually curated for each sample. We then studied the global expression landscape of the integrated data set and found that samples of the same tissue tend to be more similar to each other than to samples of other tissues, even in different growth conditions or developmental stages. Root has the most distinct transcriptome, compared with aerial tissues, but the transcriptome of cultured root is more similar to the transcriptome of aerial tissues, as the cultured root samples lost their cellular identity. Using a simple computational classification method, we showed that the tissue type of a sample can be successfully predicted based on its expression profile, opening the door for automatic metadata extraction and facilitating the re-use of plant transcriptome data. As a proof of principle, we applied our automated annotation pipeline to 708 RNA-seq samples from public repositories and verified the accuracy of our predictions with sample metadata provided by the authors. PMID:27015116

  3. Large-scale atlas of microarray data reveals the distinct expression landscape of different tissues in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGESBeta

    He, Fei; Maslov, Sergei; Yoo, Shinjae; Wang, Daifeng; Kumari, Sunita; Gerstein, Mark; Ware, Doreen

    2016-03-25

    Here, transcriptome datasets from thousands of samples of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana have been collectively generated by multiple individual labs. Although integration and meta-analysis of these samples has become routine in the plant research community, it is often hampered by the lack of metadata or differences in annotation styles by different labs. In this study, we carefully selected and integrated 6,057 Arabidopsis microarray expression samples from 304 experiments deposited to NCBI GEO. Metadata such as tissue type, growth condition, and developmental stage were manually curated for each sample. We then studied global expression landscape of the integrated dataset andmore » found that samples of the same tissue tend to be more similar to each other than to samples of other tissues, even in different growth conditions or developmental stages. Root has the most distinct transcriptome compared to aerial tissues, but the transcriptome of cultured root is more similar to those of aerial tissues as the former samples lost their cellular identity. Using a simple computational classification method, we showed that the tissue type of a sample can be successfully predicted based on its expression profile, opening the door for automatic metadata extraction and facilitating re-use of plant transcriptome data. As a proof of principle we applied our automated annotation pipeline to 708 RNA-seq samples from public repositories and verified accuracy of our predictions with samples’ metadata provided by authors.« less

  4. Poly(A) code analyses reveal key determinants for tissue-specific mRNA alternative polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Lingjie; Li, Yi; Xie, Xiaohui; Shi, Yongsheng

    2016-06-01

    mRNA alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a critical mechanism for post-transcriptional gene regulation and is often regulated in a tissue- and/or developmental stage-specific manner. An ultimate goal for the APA field has been to be able to computationally predict APA profiles under different physiological or pathological conditions. As a first step toward this goal, we have assembled a poly(A) code for predicting tissue-specific poly(A) sites (PASs). Based on a compendium of over 600 features that have known or potential roles in PAS selection, we have generated and refined a machine-learning algorithm using multiple high-throughput sequencing-based data sets of tissue-specific and constitutive PASs. This code can predict tissue-specific PASs with >85% accuracy. Importantly, by analyzing the prediction performance based on different RNA features, we found that PAS context, including the distance between alternative PASs and the relative position of a PAS within the gene, is a key feature for determining the susceptibility of a PAS to tissue-specific regulation. Our poly(A) code provides a useful tool for not only predicting tissue-specific APA regulation, but also for studying its underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:27095026

  5. Heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a laser is mainly due to emission to the environment: an experimental ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, A; Ocker, M; Bartsch, D K; Quint, K

    2014-05-01

    Laser-directed resection of lung metastases is performed more frequently in recent years. The energy-loaded laser rays heat up the lung tissue, considerably. It is still unclear which mechanism is more important for tissue heat dissipation: the lung perfusion or the tissue emission. Therefore, we created a special experimental model to investigate the spontaneous heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a diode-pumped laser with a high output power. Experiments were conducted on paracardiac pig lung lobes (n = 12) freshly dissected at the slaughterhouse. Nonanatomical resection of lung parenchyma was performed without lobe perfusion in group 1 (n = 6), while group 2 (n = 6) was perfused at a physiological pressure of 25 cm H2O at 37 °C with saline via the pulmonary artery. For this, we used a diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) LIMAX® 120 laser (Gebrüder Martin GmbH & Co. KG, Tuttlingen, Germany) with a wavelength of 1,318 nm and a power output of 100 W. Immediately after completing laser resection, the lungs were monitored with an infrared camera (Type IC 120LV; Trotec, Heinsberg, Germany) while allowed to cool down. The resection surface temperature was taken at 10-s intervals and documented in a freeze-frame until a temperature of 37 °C had been reached. The temperature drop per time unit was analyzed in both groups. Immediately after laser resection, the temperature at the lung surface was 84.33 ± 8.08 °C in group 1 and 76.75 ± 5.33 °C in group 2 (p = 0.29). Group 1 attained the final temperature of 37 °C after 182.95 ± 53.76 s, and group 2 after 121.70 ± 16.02 s (p = 0.01). The temperature drop occurred exponentially in both groups. We calculated both groups' decays using nonlinear regression, which revealed nearly identical courses. The mean time of tissue temperature of >42 °C, as a surrogate marker for tissue damage, was 97.14 ± 26.90 s in group 1 and 65.00 ± 13.78 s in group 2 (p = 0.02). Heat

  6. Experimental model in cadavera of arthroscopic resection of calcaneonavicular coalition and its first in-vivo application: preliminary communication.

    PubMed

    Molano-Bernardino, Carlos; Bernardino, Carlos Molano; Golanó, Pau; Garcia, Maria Angeles; López-Vidriero, Emilio

    2009-11-01

    Open surgical resection of calcaneonavicular coalition is indicated after the failure of conservative treatment. Our objectives are to develop the arthroscopic surgical technique and to check the feasibility of the arthroscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular coalition. We designed and performed endoscopic resection of the calcaneonavicular ligament and part of the anterior process of calcaneus as a simulation of the coalition resection on four cadaver specimens. After this procedure, we successfully performed the first resection in a 12-year-old girl, without any soft tissue interposition. American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society Hindfoot Scale was 55 before surgery, 98 after 10 weeks, and 100 after 2 years without recurrence. PMID:19623084

  7. [STUDYING OF MORPHOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF SUBMANDIBULAR SALIVARY GLANDS AFTER GASTRIC RESECTION IN EXPERIMENT].

    PubMed

    Usenko, A Yu; Kosenko, K; Savitskaya, I M

    2016-03-01

    The impact of gastric resection on the submandibular salivary gland (SSG) state, using histological and histochemical methods of investigation in experiment, was studied up. A relative mass of a SSG after gastric resection conduction have had reduced, and the accompanying changes in stroma were revealed with the gland's secretion enhancement. Essential dystrophic changes in the SSG parenchyma and stroma after gastric resection conduction may cause a pronounced disorders of their function. PMID:27514096

  8. Surgical Resection of a Giant Coronary Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Mehall, John R; Verlare, Jordan L

    2015-06-01

    Coronary aneurysms are quite uncommon, and those qualifying as giant aneurysms are even more so. Currently, no standardized treatment protocol exists. We report the case of a 46-year-old man presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of acute myocardial infarction who was found to have a giant coronary aneurysm. The patient was initially evaluated with a computed tomography angiogram, which revealed a 9-cm aneurysm of the left circumflex coronary artery. Surgical resection of the aneurysm, ligation of the proximal circumflex artery, and bypass using the left internal mammary artery to vascularize the proximal circumflex artery was performed. PMID:26046882

  9. Resection interposition arthroplasty for failed distal ulna resections.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Rubright, James H; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2013-02-01

    The major complications of distal ulna resection, the Darrach procedure, are radioulnar impingement and instability. High failure rates have been reported despite published modifications of the Darrach procedure. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat this difficult problem and to mitigate the symptoms associated with painful convergence and impingement. No technique has demonstrated clinical superiority. Recently, implant arthroplasty of the distal ulna has been endorsed as an option for the management of the symptomatic patient with a failed distal ulna resection. However, there are concerns for implant longevity, especially in young, active adults. Resection interposition arthroplasty relies on interposition of an Achilles tendon allograft between the distal radius and the resected distal ulna. Although this technique does not restore normal mechanics of the distal radioulnar joint, it can prevent painful convergence of the radius on the ulna. Achilles allograft interposition arthroplasty is a safe and highly effective alternative for failed distal ulna resections, especially for young, active patients, in whom an implant or alternative procedure may not be appropriate. PMID:24436784

  10. AFM mapping of the elastic properties of brain tissue reveals kPa μm(-1) gradients of rigidity.

    PubMed

    Bouchonville, Nicolas; Meyer, Mikaël; Gaude, Christophe; Gay, Emmanuel; Ratel, David; Nicolas, Alice

    2016-07-20

    It is now well established that the mechanical environment of the cells in tissues deeply impacts cellular fate, including life cycle, differentiation and tumor progression. Designs of biomaterials already include the control of mechanical parameters, and in general, their main focus is to control the rheological properties of the biomaterials at a macroscopic scale. However, recent studies have demonstrated that cells can stress their environment below the micron scale, and therefore could possibly respond to the rheological properties of their environment at this micron scale. In this context, probing the mechanical properties of physiological cellular environments at subcellular scales is becoming critical. To this aim, we performed in vitro indentation measurements using AFM on sliced human pituitary gland tissues. A robust methodology was implemented using elasto-adhesive models, which shows that accounting for the adhesion of the probe on the tissue is critical for the reliability of the measurement. In addition to quantifying for the first time the rigidity of normal pituitary gland tissue, with a geometric mean of 9.5 kPa, our measurements demonstrated that the mechanical properties of this tissue are far from uniform at subcellular scales. Gradients of rigidity as large as 12 kPa μm(-1) were observed. This observation suggests that physiological rigidity can be highly non-uniform at the micron-scale. PMID:27377831

  11. Prevention and Management of Complications Following Tracheal Resection.

    PubMed

    Sihag, Smita; Wright, Cameron D

    2015-11-01

    Careful patient selection and preparation are paramount to optimize outcomes following tracheal resection. Risk factors for postoperative anastomotic complications include age less than 17 years, reoperation, laryngeal involvement, diabetes, increased length of resection, and need for preoperative tracheostomy. Major complications involve the anastomosis and are associated with an increased risk of mortality. Complications range from granulation tissue formation to stricture to separation, and successful management typically requires reoperation, T-tube stenting, or tracheostomy. Other complications to consider include vocal cord edema, recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, esophageal injury, wound infection, swallowing dysfunction, aspiration pneumonia, and fistula to the esophagus or innominate artery. PMID:26515949

  12. Novel Approaches Reveal that Toxoplasma gondii Bradyzoites within Tissue Cysts Are Dynamic and Replicating Entities In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Elizabeth; Zhao, Yihua; Dhara, Animesh; Eller, Becca; Patwardhan, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite their critical role in chronic toxoplasmosis, the biology of Toxoplasma gondii bradyzoites is poorly understood. In an attempt to address this gap, we optimized approaches to purify tissue cysts and analyzed the replicative potential of bradyzoites within these cysts. In order to quantify individual bradyzoites within tissue cysts, we have developed imaging software, BradyCount 1.0, that allows the rapid establishment of bradyzoite burdens within imaged optical sections of purified tissue cysts. While in general larger tissue cysts contain more bradyzoites, their relative “occupancy” was typically lower than that of smaller cysts, resulting in a lower packing density. The packing density permits a direct measure of how bradyzoites develop within cysts, allowing for comparisons across progression of the chronic phase. In order to capture bradyzoite endodyogeny, we exploited the differential intensity of TgIMC3, an inner membrane complex protein that intensely labels newly formed/forming daughters within bradyzoites and decays over time in the absence of further division. To our surprise, we were able to capture not only sporadic and asynchronous division but also synchronous replication of all bradyzoites within mature tissue cysts. Furthermore, the time-dependent decay of TgIMC3 intensity was exploited to gain insights into the temporal patterns of bradyzoite replication in vivo. Despite the fact that bradyzoites are considered replicatively dormant, we find evidence for cyclical, episodic bradyzoite growth within tissue cysts in vivo. These findings directly challenge the prevailing notion of bradyzoites as dormant nonreplicative entities in chronic toxoplasmosis and have implications on our understanding of this enigmatic and clinically important life cycle stage. PMID:26350965

  13. Multi-tissue analyses reveal limited inter-annual and seasonal variation in mercury exposure in an Antarctic penguin community.

    PubMed

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Polito, Michael J; Emslie, Steven D

    2014-10-01

    Inter-annual variation in tissue mercury concentrations in birds can result from annual changes in the bioavailability of mercury or shifts in dietary composition and/or trophic level. We investigated potential annual variability in mercury dynamics in the Antarctic marine food web using Pygoscelis penguins as biomonitors. Eggshell membrane, chick down, and adult feathers were collected from three species of sympatrically breeding Pygoscelis penguins during the austral summers of 2006/2007-2010/2011. To evaluate the hypothesis that mercury concentrations in penguins exhibit significant inter-annual variation and to determine the potential source of such variation (dietary or environmental), we compared tissue mercury concentrations with trophic levels as indicated by δ(15)N values from all species and tissues. Overall, no inter-annual variation in mercury was observed in adult feathers suggesting that mercury exposure, on an annual scale, was consistent for Pygoscelis penguins. However, when examining tissues that reflected more discrete time periods (chick down and eggshell membrane) relative to adult feathers, we found some evidence of inter-annual variation in mercury exposure during penguins' pre-breeding and chick rearing periods. Evidence of inter-annual variation in penguin trophic level was also limited suggesting that foraging ecology and environmental factors related to the bioavailability of mercury may provide more explanatory power for mercury exposure compared to trophic level alone. Even so, the variable strength of relationships observed between trophic level and tissue mercury concentrations across and within Pygoscelis penguin species suggest that caution is required when selecting appropriate species and tissue combinations for environmental biomonitoring studies in Antarctica. PMID:25085270

  14. An atlas of bovine gene expression reveals novel distinctive tissue characteristics and evidence for improving genome annotation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or gene atlas, provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. We present an atlas of RNA abundance for 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues and three cattle cell lines. Results The Bovine Gene Atlas was generated from 7.2 million unique digital gene expression tag sequences (300.2 million total raw tag sequences), from which 1.59 million unique tag sequences were identified that mapped to the draft bovine genome accounting for 85% of the total raw tag abundance. Filtering these tags yielded 87,764 unique tag sequences that unambiguously mapped to 16,517 annotated protein-coding loci in the draft genome accounting for 45% of the total raw tag abundance. Clustering of tissues based on tag abundance profiles generally confirmed ontology classification based on anatomy. There were 5,429 constitutively expressed loci and 3,445 constitutively expressed unique tag sequences mapping outside annotated gene boundaries that represent a resource for enhancing current gene models. Physical measures such as inferred transcript length or antisense tag abundance identified tissues with atypical transcriptional tag profiles. We report for the first time the tissue-specific variation in the proportion of mitochondrial transcriptional tag abundance. Conclusions The Bovine Gene Atlas is the deepest and broadest transcriptome survey of any livestock genome to date. Commonalities and variation in sense and antisense transcript tag profiles identified in different tissues facilitate the examination of the relationship between gene expression, tissue, and gene function. PMID:20961407

  15. Pyrosequencing revealed shifts of prokaryotic communities between healthy and disease-like tissues of the Red Sea sponge Crella cyathophora

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhao-Ming; Wang, Yong; Tian, Ren-Mao; Lee, On On; Wong, Yue Him; Batang, Zenon B.; Al-Suwailem, Abdulaziz; Lafi, Feras F.; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Sponge diseases have been widely reported, yet the causal factors and major pathogenic microbes remain elusive. In this study, two individuals of the sponge Crella cyathophora in total that showed similar disease-like characteristics were collected from two different locations along the Red Sea coast separated by more than 30 kilometers. The disease-like parts of the two individuals were both covered by green surfaces, and the body size was much smaller compared with adjacent healthy regions. Here, using high-throughput pyrosequencing technology, we investigated the prokaryotic communities in healthy and disease-like sponge tissues as well as adjacent seawater. Microbes in healthy tissues belonged mainly to the Proteobacteria, Cyanobacteria and Bacteroidetes, and were much more diverse at the phylum level than reported previously. Interestingly, the disease-like tissues from the two sponge individuals underwent shifts of prokaryotic communities and were both enriched with a novel clade affiliated with the phylum Verrucomicrobia, implying its intimate connection with the disease-like Red Sea sponge C. cyathophora. Enrichment of the phylum Verrucomicrobia was also considered to be correlated with the presence of algae assemblages forming the green surface of the disease-like sponge tissues. This finding represents an interesting case of sponge disease and is valuable for further study. PMID:26082867

  16. An atlas of bovine gene expression reveals novel distinctive tissue characteristics and evidence for improving genome annotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background A comprehensive transcriptome survey, or gene atlas, provides information essential for a complete understanding of the genomic biology of an organism. We present an atlas of RNA abundance for 92 adult, juvenile and fetal cattle tissues and three cattle cell lines. Results The Bovine Gene...

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 reveal differential expression patterns in cancer and low antigen expression in normal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Bujak, Emil; Pretto, Francesca; Ritz, Danilo; Gualandi, Laura; Wulhfard, Sarah; Neri, Dario

    2014-09-10

    There is a considerable interest for the discovery and characterization of tumor-associated antigens, which may facilitate antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies. Thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are homologous secreted proteins, which have previously been reported to be overexpressed during remodeling typical for wound healing and tumor progression and to possibly play a functional role in cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. To our knowledge, a complete immunohistochemical characterization of thrombospondins levels in normal rodent tissues has not been reported so far. Using antibody phage technology, we have generated and characterized monoclonal antibodies specific to murine thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2, two antigens which share 62% aminoacid identity. An immunofluorescence analysis revealed that both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues, except for a weak staining of heart tissue by antibodies specific to thrombospondin-1. The analysis also showed that thrombospondin-1 was strongly expressed in 5/7 human tumors xenografted in nude mice, while it was only barely detectable in 3/8 murine tumors grafted in immunocompetent mice. By contrast, a high-affinity antibody to thrombospondin-2 revealed a much lower level of expression of this antigen in cancer specimens. Our analysis resolves ambiguities related to conflicting reports on thrombosponding expression in health and disease. Based on our findings, thrombospondin-1 (and not thrombospondin-2) may be considered as a target for antibody-based pharmacodelivery strategies, in consideration of its low expression in normal tissues and its upregulation in cancer. - Highlights: • High affinity monoclonal antibodies to murine and human TSP1 and 2 were raised. • Both antigens are virtually undetectable in normal mouse tissues. • Strong positivity of human tumor xenografts for TSP1 was detected. • Study revealed much lower level of TSP2 expression in cancer specimens

  18. Use of dressing with human fibrin and thrombin during resection of a right atrial angiosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Bochenek, Maciej; Kapelak, Bogusław; Bartuś, Krzysztof; Urbańczyk, Małgorzata; Sadowski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Primary malignant cardiac tumors are rare and are usually detected at an advanced stage of disease. Their location and infiltration often hinder surgical resection. Tissue sarcomas, especially angiosarcomas, are composed of irregular and delicate vascular tissue. The resection of such tumors from the heart is associated with a high risk of life-threatening bleeding that cannot be stopped with traditional surgical methods. We present a case report of the application of a dressing containing human fibrin and thrombin in order to prevent bleeding during the partial resection of advanced cardiac angiosarcoma in a 40-year-old patient. PMID:26336498

  19. Recurrence of Hypertrophic Abductor Digiti Minimi Muscle of the Foot After Subtotal Resection.

    PubMed

    Schmauss, Daniel; Harder, Yves; Machens, Hans-Guenther; Lohmeyer, Joern Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue tumors of the foot are rare, and the diagnosis is often difficult. Surgery is indicated if pain, discomfort, or functional impairment is present or to rule out malignancy. We present the case of a 14-year-old female with a painless swelling at the lateral aspect of her right foot. After radiologic imaging, including ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), we performed a subtotal resection of the abductor digiti minimi muscle, preserving its motor nerve. Four months later, recurrence of the soft tissue mass was observed. MRI revealed hypertrophy of the small muscles of the foot, including the abductor digiti minimi, quadratus plantae, and flexor digiti minimi brevis. Functional impairment resulted in complete excision of the remnant abductor digiti minimi muscle and partial excision of the flexor digiti minimi brevis muscle another 7 months later. Twelve months after the secondary surgery, neither clinical nor radiologic signs of a second recurrence were found. At the last follow-up visit, the patient was satisfied with the contour of her foot and not hindered at all during sporting activities. Our findings demonstrate that subtotal resection of a bulky muscle, preserving its motor nerve, can result in reactive hypertrophy of the remnant muscle part. The patient must be informed that partial excision of an innervated muscle could result in reactive hypertrophy and must be contrasted with radical muscle excision that might be more likely to result in functional impairment. PMID:25724471

  20. Avian Soft Tissue Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2016-01-01

    Basic surgical instrumentation for avian soft tissue surgery includes soft tissue retractors, microsurgical instrumentation, surgical loupes, and head-mounted lights. Hemostasis is fundamental during the surgical procedures. The indications, approach, and complications associated with soft tissue surgeries of the integumentary (digit constriction repair, feather cyst excision, cranial wound repair, sternal wound repair, uropygial gland excision), gastrointestinal (ingluviotomy, crop biopsy, crop burn repair, celiotomy, coelomic hernia and pseudohernia repair, proventriculotomy, ventriculotomy, enterotomy, intestinal resection and anastomosis, cloacoplasty, cloacopexy), respiratory (rhinolith removal, sinusotomy, tracheotomy, tracheal resection and anastomosis, tracheostomy, pneumonectomy) and reproductive (ovocentesis, ovariectomy, salpingohysterectomy, cesarean section, orchidectomy, vasectomy, phallectomy) systems are reviewed. PMID:26611927

  1. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  2. Laser-assisted parenchyma-sparing pulmonary resection

    SciTech Connect

    LoCicero, J. III; Frederiksen, J.W.; Hartz, R.S.; Michaelis, L.L. )

    1989-05-01

    The neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser is an excellent tool for removing lesions while sparing surrounding normal tissue. Local excision of 32 pulmonary lesions in 26 patients was performed with the Nd:YAG laser. Fourteen patients had moderate to severe impairment of pulmonary function: average forced vital capacity = 2.2 +/- 0.3 L and forced expiratory volume in 1 second = 1.3 +/- 0.3 L. Limited thoracotomy was used in the last 23 patients. The resected lesions included 16 primary malignant tumors: nine adenocarcinomas, five squamous carcinomas, and two large cell carcinomas. Eight of these lesions were classified as T1 N0, seven were T2 N0; and one was T1 N2. There were 10 metastatic lesions: three lymphomas, two adenocarcinomas, two leiomyosarcomas, and one case each of melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. There were six benign lesions: three granulomas, two hamartomas, and one carcinoid. Twelve lesions were deep seated, could not have been removed by wedge resection or segmentectomy, and would have necessitated lobectomy without this technique. With the laser, the lesion could be precisely excised with minimal loss of lung parenchyma. Mean operating time was 80 +/- 20 minutes; laser resection time was 15 +/- 8 minutes. Resection necessitated 10,000 to 20,000 J. Total blood loss was minimal (less than 100 ml). Chest tubes were always used and remained in place 5 +/- 2 days. The mean hospitalization time was 10 +/- 2 days. Pulmonary function testing, perform 6 weeks to 6 months after discharge, showed no significant difference from preoperative levels. To date, there have been no local recurrences (longest follow-up 2 years). The Nd:YAG laser is an excellent adjunct for pulmonary resection in patients who have marginal pulmonary function or who have deep parenchymal lesions not amenable to wedge resection. The operative technique for laser resection is presented.

  3. Endoscopic resection of colorectal granular cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Take, Iri; Shi, Qiang; Qi, Zhi-Peng; Cai, Shi-Lun; Yao, Li-Qing; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of endoscopic resection for the treatment of colorectal granular cell tumors (GCTs). METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. From January 2008 to April 2015, we examined a total of 11 lesions in 11 patients who were treated by an endoscopic procedure for colorectal GCTs in the Endoscopy Center, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Either endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed by three surgeons with expertise in endoscopic treatment. The pre- and post-operative condition and follow-up of these patients were evaluated by colonoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). RESULTS: Of these 11 lesions, 2 were located in the cecum, 3 were in the ileocecal junction, 5 were in the ascending colon, and 1 was in the rectum. The median maximum diameter of the tumors was 0.81 cm (range 0.4-1.2 cm). The en bloc rate was 100%, and the complete resection rate was 90.9% (10/11). Post-operative pathology in one patient showed a tumor at the cauterization margin. However, during ESD, this lesion was removed en bloc, and no tumor tissue was seen in the wound. No perforations or delayed perforations were observed and emergency surgery was not required for complications. All patients were followed up to May 2015, and none had recurrence, metastasis, or complaints of discomfort. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment performed by endoscopists with sufficient experience appears to be feasible and effective for colorectal GCTs. PMID:26730166

  4. The interaction of asbestos and iron in lung tissue revealed by synchrotron-based scanning X-ray microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Schneider, Giulia; Salomé, Murielle; Schneider, Manuela; Calligaro, Carla; Kiskinova, Maya; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2013-01-01

    Asbestos is a potent carcinogen associated with malignant mesothelioma and lung cancer but its carcinogenic mechanisms are still poorly understood. Asbestos toxicity is ascribed to its particular physico-chemical characteristics, and one of them is the presence of and ability to adsorb iron, which may cause an alteration of iron homeostasis in the tissue. This observational study reports a combination of advanced synchrotron-based X-ray imaging and micro-spectroscopic methods that provide correlative morphological and chemical information for shedding light on iron mobilization features during asbestos permanence in lung tissue. The results show that the processes responsible for the unusual distribution of iron at different stages of interaction with the fibres also involve calcium, phosphorus and magnesium. It has been confirmed that the dominant iron form present in asbestos bodies is ferritin, while the concurrent presence of haematite suggests alteration of iron chemistry during asbestos body permanence. PMID:23350030

  5. Tissue- and cell-specific functions of the androgen receptor revealed through conditional knockout models in mice.

    PubMed

    De Gendt, Karel; Verhoeven, Guido

    2012-04-16

    This review aims to evaluate the contribution of individual cell-selective knockout models to our current understanding of androgen action. Cre/loxP technology has allowed the generation of cell-selective knockout models targeting the androgen receptor (AR) in distinct putative target cells in a wide variety of organs and tissues including: testis, ovary, accessory sex tissues, muscle, bone, fat, liver, skin and myeloid tissue. In some androgen-regulated processes such as spermatogenesis and folliculogenesis this approach has lead to the identification of a key cellular mediator of androgen action (Sertoli and granulosa cells, respectively). In many target tissues, however, the final response to androgens appears to be more complex. Here, cell-selective knockout technology offers a platform upon which we can begin to unravel the more complex interplay and signaling pathways of androgens. A prototypic example is the analysis of mesenchymal-epithelial interactions in many accessory sex glands. Furthermore, for some actions of testosterone, in which part of the effect is mediated by the active metabolite 17β-estradiol, conditional knockout technology offers a novel strategy to study the relative contribution of AR and estrogen receptor-mediated signaling. The latter approach has already resulted in a better understanding of androgen action in brain and bone. Finally, cell-selective knockout technology has generated valuable models to search for AR-controlled molecular mediators of androgen action, a strategy that has successfully been applied to the study of androgen action in the testis and in the epididymis. Although some conditional knockout models have provided clear answers to physiologic questions, it should be noted that others have pointed to unexpected complexities or technical limitations confounding interpretation of the results. PMID:21871526

  6. [Evaluation of safe resection margins in rectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Hovorková, E; Hadži-Nikolov, D; Ferko, A; Örhalmi, J; Chobola, M; Ryška, A

    2014-02-01

    The fact that surgically well performed total mesorectal excision with negative circumferential resection margin represents one of the most important prognostic factors in colorectal carcinoma is already well known. These parameters significantly affect the incidence of local tumour recurrence as well as distant metastasis, and are thus related to the duration of patient survival. The surgeons task is to perform mesorectal excision as completely as possible, i.e., to remove the rectum with an intact cylinder of mesorectal fat. The approach of the pathologist to evaluation of total mesorectal excision specimens differs greatly from that of resection specimens from other parts of the large bowel. Besides evaluation of the usual parameters for colon cancer staging, it is essential to assess certain additional factors specific to rectal carcinomas, namely tumour distance from circumferential (radial) resection margins and the quality of the mesorectal excision. In order to accurately evaluate these parameters, knowledge of a wide range of clinical data is indispensable (results of preoperative imaging, intraoperative findings). For objective evaluation of these parameters it is necessary to introduce standardized procedures for resection specimen processing and macro and microscopic examination. This approach is based mainly on standardized macroscopic photo-documentation of the integrity of the mesorectal surface. Parallel transverse sections of the resection specimens are made with targeted tissue sampling for histological examination. It is essential to have close cooperation between surgeons and pathologists within a multidisciplinary team enabling mutual feedback. PMID:24702293

  7. Biodistribution Analysis of Oncolytic Adenoviruses in Patient Autopsy Samples Reveals Vascular Transduction of Noninjected Tumors and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Koski, Anniina; Bramante, Simona; Kipar, Anja; Oksanen, Minna; Juhila, Juuso; Vassilev, Lotta; Joensuu, Timo; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-10-01

    In clinical trials with oncolytic adenoviruses, there has been no mortality associated with treatment vectors. Likewise, in the Advanced Therapy Access Program (ATAP), where 290 patients were treated with 10 different viruses, no vector-related mortality was observed. However, as the patient population who received adenovirus treatments in ATAP represented heavily pretreated patients, often with very advanced disease, some patients died relatively soon after receiving their virus treatment mandating autopsy to investigate cause of death. Eleven such autopsies were performed and confirmed disease progression as the cause of death in each case. The regulatory requirement for investigating the safety of advanced therapy medical products presented a unique opportunity to study tissue samples collected as a routine part of the autopsies. Oncolytic adenoviral DNA was recovered in a wide range of tissues, including injected and noninjected tumors and various normal tissues, demonstrating the ability of the vector to disseminate through the vascular route. Furthermore, we recovered and cultured viable virus from samples of noninjected brain metastases of an intravenously treated patient, confirming that oncolytic adenovirus can reach tumors through the intravascular route. Data presented here give mechanistic insight into mode of action and biodistribution of oncolytic adenoviruses in cancer patients. PMID:26156245

  8. Glycomic Analysis of Membrane Glycoproteins with Bisecting Glycosylation from Ovarian Cancer Tissues Reveals Novel Structures and Functions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers capable of detecting and targeting epithelial ovarian cancer cells for diagnostics and therapeutics would be extremely valuable. Ovarian cancer is the deadliest reproductive malignancy among women in the U.S., killing over 14 000 women each year. Both the lack of presenting symptoms and high mortality rates illustrate the need for earlier diagnosis and improved treatment of this disease. The glycosyltransferase enzyme GnT-III encoded by the Mgat3 gene is responsible for the addition of GlcNAc (N-acetylglucosamine) to form bisecting N-linked glycan structures. GnT-III mRNA expression is amplified in ovarian cancer tissues compared with normal ovarian tissue. We use a lectin capture strategy coupled to nano-ESI–RPLC–MS/MS to isolate and identify the membrane glycoproteins and unique glycan structures associated with GnT-III amplification in human ovarian cancer tissues. Our data illustrate that the majority of membrane glycoproteins with bisecting glycosylation are common to both serous and endometrioid histological subtypes of ovarian cancer, and several have been reported to participate in signaling pathways such as Notch, Wnt, and TGFβ. PMID:25437919

  9. Holmium laser resection of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, K; Iida, S; Tomiyasu, K; Shimada, A; Suekane, S; Noda, S

    1998-06-01

    A total of 35 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) were treated with the Ho: YAG laser using a new technique termed holmium laser resection of the prostate or HoLRP. The laser energy was applied directly to prostatic tissue exclusively through the use of a standard 550 micron end-firing fiber. A high-powered holmium laser was used and was set at 2.4 J per pulse at 25 pulses per second for an average power of 60 W. The mean preoperative AUA Symptom Score was 24. Postoperatively, the score dropped to 10.9, 8.2, 5.2, and 4.6 at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, respectively. The peak urine flow rate improved from 6.3 mL/sec preoperatively to 15.1, 15.3 and 16 mL/sec at 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months. A foley catheter was removed within 24 hours of completion of the operation in 31 patients (89%), and voiding was improved. The HoLRP technique was bloodless, and the short-term results were satisfactory. Most importantly, the defect produced by HoLRP is identical to that of a conventional transurethral resection. These initial results demonstrate that HoLRP is a useful surgical alternative in the treatment of patients with obstructive BPH. PMID:9658303

  10. Noninvasive quantification of heterogeneous lung growth following extensive lung resection by high-resolution computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cuneyt; Ravikumar, Priya; Dane, D Merrill; Bellotto, Dennis J; Johnson, Robert L; Hsia, Connie C W

    2009-11-01

    To quantify the in vivo magnitude and distribution of regional compensatory lung growth following extensive lung resection, we performed high-resolution computed tomography at 15- and 30-cmH(2)O transpulmonary pressures and measured air and tissue (including microvascular blood) volumes within and among lobes in six adult male foxhounds, before and after balanced 65% lung resection ( approximately 32% removed from each side). Each lobe was identified from lobar fissures. Intralobar gradients in air and tissue volumes were expressed along standardized x,y,z-coordinate axes. Fractional tissue volume (FTV) was calculated as the volume ratio of tissue/(tissue + air). Following resection compared with before, lobar air and tissue volumes increased 1.8- to 3.5-fold, and whole lung air and tissue volumes were 67 and 90% of normal, respectively. Lobar-specific compliance doubled post-resection, and whole lung-specific compliance normalized. These results are consistent with vigorous compensatory growth in all remaining lobes. Compared with pre-resection, post-resection interlobar heterogeneity of FTV, assessed from the coefficient of variation, decreased at submaximal inflation, but was unchanged at maximal inflation. The coefficient of variation of intralobar FTV gradients changed variably due to the patchy development of thickened pleura and alveolar septa, with elevated alveolar septal density and connective tissue content in posterior-caudal and peripheral regions of the remaining lobes; these areas likely experienced disproportional mechanical stress. We conclude that HRCT can noninvasively and quantitatively assess the magnitude and spatial distribution of compensatory lung growth. Following extensive resection, heterogeneous regional mechanical lung strain may exceed the level that could be sustained solely by existing connective tissue elements. PMID:19729592