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Sample records for reservoir discrete feature

  1. Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Curran, Brendan; Einstein, Herbert; LaPointe, Paul; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate

    2002-07-26

    The report presents summaries of technology development for discrete feature modeling in support of the improved oil recovery (IOR) for heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, the report describes the demonstration of these technologies at project study sites.

  2. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

    1998-12-01

    This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

  3. Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, William S.; Cladouhos, Trenton

    2001-09-06

    This progress report describes activities during the period January 1, 1999 to June 30, 1999. Work was carried out on 21 tasks. The major activity during the reporting period was the development and preliminary application of discrete fracture network (DFN) models for Stoney Point, South Oregon Basin, and North Oregon Basins project study sites. In addition, research was carried out on analysis algorithms for discrete future orientation.

  4. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

    1998-01-01

    This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

  5. Core-Generating Discretization for Rough Set Feature Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, David; Zeng, Xiao-Jun; Keane, John

    Rough set feature selection (RSFS) can be used to improve classifier performance. RSFS removes redundant attributes whilst keeping important ones that preserve the classification power of the original dataset. The feature subsets selected by RSFS are called reducts. The intersection of all reducts is called core. However, RSFS handles discrete attributes only. To process datasets consisting of real attributes, they are discretized before applying RSFS. Discretization controls core of the discrete dataset. Moreover, core may critically affect the classification performance of reducts. This paper defines core-generating discretization, a type of discretization method; analyzes the properties of core-generating discretization; models core-generating discretization using constraint satisfaction; defines core-generating approximate minimum entropy (C-GAME) discretization; models C-GAME using constraint satisfaction and evaluates the performance of C-GAME as a pre-processor of RSFS using ten datasets from the UCI Machine Learning Repository.

  6. The formation of discrete high velocity molecular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartquist, T. W.; Dyson, J. E.

    1987-10-01

    Clumps embedded in a flowing diffuse medium will be dissipated before ram pressure accelerates them substantially. Molecular hydrogen can be accelerated to high speeds by passing through a slow shock leading a shell at the edge of a wind-driven bubble if the density in the ambient medium drops rapidly enough to allow the shell to accelerate subsequently. The shell will be subject to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability which will drive transonic turbulence but will not initiate the formation of fragments having large density contrasts until the shell reaches sufficient speeds to become thermally unstable. The existence of high velocity discrete features in and the magnitude of the linewidth of the H2 emission from CRL 618 are explained with this acceleration mechanism. High velocity water masers may be formed in a similar fashion, but not Herbig-Haro objects.

  7. Discrete wavelet transform coupled with ANN for daily discharge forecasting into Três Marias reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C. A. G.; Freire, P. K. M. M.; Silva, G. B. L.; Silva, R. M.

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes the use of discrete wavelet transform (DWT) to remove the high-frequency components (details) of an original signal, because the noises generally present in time series (e.g. streamflow records) may influence the prediction quality. Cleaner signals could then be used as inputs to an artificial neural network (ANN) in order to improve the model performance of daily discharge forecasting. Wavelet analysis provides useful decompositions of original time series in high and low frequency components. The present application uses the Coiflet wavelets to decompose hydrological data, as there have been few reports in the literature. Finally, the proposed technique is tested using the inflow records to the Três Marias reservoir in São Francisco River basin, Brazil. This transformed signal is used as input for an ANN model to forecast inflows seven days ahead, and the error RMSE decreased by more than 50% (i.e. from 454.2828 to 200.0483).

  8. Discrete structural features among interface residue-level classes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI) is essential for molecular functions in biological cells. Investigation on protein interfaces of known complexes is an important step towards deciphering the driving forces of PPIs. Each PPI complex is specific, sensitive and selective to binding. Therefore, we have estimated the relative difference in percentage of polar residues between surface and the interface for each complex in a non-redundant heterodimer dataset of 278 complexes to understand the predominant forces driving binding. Results Our analysis showed ~60% of protein complexes with surface polarity greater than interface polarity (designated as class A). However, a considerable number of complexes (~40%) have interface polarity greater than surface polarity, (designated as class B), with a significantly different p-value of 1.66E-45 from class A. Comprehensive analyses of protein complexes show that interface features such as interface area, interface polarity abundance, solvation free energy gain upon interface formation, binding energy and the percentage of interface charged residue abundance distinguish among class A and class B complexes, while electrostatic visualization maps also help differentiate interface classes among complexes. Conclusions Class A complexes are classical with abundant non-polar interactions at the interface; however class B complexes have abundant polar interactions at the interface, similar to protein surface characteristics. Five physicochemical interface features analyzed from the protein heterodimer dataset are discriminatory among the interface residue-level classes. These novel observations find application in developing residue-level models for protein-protein binding prediction, protein-protein docking studies and interface inhibitor design as drugs. PMID:26679043

  9. Automated Breast Image Classification Using Features from Its Discrete Cosine Transform

    PubMed Central

    Kendall, Edward J.; Flynn, Matthew T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This work aimed to improve breast screening program accuracy using automated classification. The goal was to determine if whole image features represented in the discrete cosine transform would provide a basis for classification. Priority was placed on avoiding false negative findings. Methods Online datasets were used for this work. No informed consent was required. Programs were developed in Mathematica and, where necessary to improve computational performance ported to C++. The use of a discrete cosine transform to separate normal from cancerous breast tissue was tested. Features (moments of the mean) were calculated in square sections of the transform centered on the origin. K-nearest neighbor and naive Bayesian classifiers were tested. Results Forty-one features were generated and tested singly, and in combination of two or three. Using a k-nearest neighbor classifier, sensitivities as high as 98% with a specificity of 66% were achieved. With a naive Bayesian classifier, sensitivities as high as 100% were achieved with a specificity of 64%. Conclusion Whole image classification based on discrete cosine transform (DCT) features was effectively implemented with a high level of sensitivity and specificity achieved. The high sensitivity attained using the DCT generated feature set implied that these classifiers could be used in series with other methods to increase specificity. Using a classifier with near 100% sensitivity, such as the one developed in this project, before applying a second classifier could only boost the accuracy of that classifier. PMID:24632807

  10. Feature Extraction on Brain Computer Interfaces using Discrete Dyadic Wavelet Transform: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gareis, I.; Gentiletti, G.; Acevedo, R.; Rufiner, L.

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate different feature extraction alternatives to detect the event related evoked potential signal on brain computer interfaces, trying to minimize the time employed and the classification error, in terms of sensibility and specificity of the method, looking for alternatives to coherent averaging. In this context the results obtained performing the feature extraction using discrete dyadic wavelet transform using different mother wavelets are presented. For the classification a single layer perceptron was used. The results obtained with and without the wavelet decomposition were compared; showing an improvement on the classification rate, the specificity and the sensibility for the feature vectors obtained using some mother wavelets.

  11. The discrete dipole approximation code DDscat.C++: features, limitations and plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choliy, V. Ya.

    2013-08-01

    We present a new freely available open-source C++ software for numerical solution of the electromagnetic waves absorption and scattering problems within the Discrete Dipole Approximation paradigm. The code is based upon the famous and free Fortan-90 code DDSCAT by B. Draine and P. Flatau. Started as a teaching project, the presented code DDscat.C++ differs from the parent code DDSCAT with a number of features, essential for C++ but quite seldom in Fortran. This article introduces the new code, explains its features, presents timing information and some plans for further development.

  12. Lamb wave feature extraction using discrete wavelet transformation and Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghodsi, Mojtaba; Ziaiefar, Hamidreza; Amiryan, Milad; Honarvar, Farhang; Hojjat, Yousef; Mahmoudi, Mehdi; Al-Yahmadi, Amur; Bahadur, Issam

    2016-04-01

    In this research, a new method is presented for eliciting the proper features for recognizing and classifying the kinds of the defects by guided ultrasonic waves. After applying suitable preprocessing, the suggested method extracts the base frequency band from the received signals by discrete wavelet transform and discrete Fourier transform. This frequency band can be used as a distinctive feature of ultrasonic signals in different defects. Principal Component Analysis with improving this feature and decreasing extra data managed to improve classification. In this study, ultrasonic test with A0 mode lamb wave is used and is appropriated to reduce the difficulties around the problem. The defects under analysis included corrosion, crack and local thickness reduction. The last defect is caused by electro discharge machining (EDM). The results of the classification by optimized Neural Network depicts that the presented method can differentiate different defects with 95% precision and thus, it is a strong and efficient method. Moreover, comparing the elicited features for corrosion and local thickness reduction and also the results of the two's classification clarifies that modeling the corrosion procedure by local thickness reduction which was previously common, is not an appropriate method and the signals received from the two defects are different from each other.

  13. Henipaviruses: an updated review focusing on the pteropid reservoir and features of transmission.

    PubMed

    Clayton, B A; Wang, L F; Marsh, G A

    2013-02-01

    The henipaviruses, Hendra virus and Nipah virus, are pathogens that have emerged from flying foxes in Australia and South-east Asia to infect both livestock and humans, often fatally. Since the emergence of Hendra virus in Australia in 1994 and the identification of Australian flying foxes as hosts to this virus, our appreciation of bats as reservoir hosts of henipaviruses has expanded globally to include much of Asia and areas of Africa. Despite this, little is currently known of the mechanisms by which bats harbour viruses capable of causing such severe disease in other terrestrial mammals. Pteropid bat ecology, henipavirus virology, therapeutic developments and features of henipavirus infection, pathology and disease in humans and other mammals are reviewed elsewhere in detail. This review focuses on bats as reservoir hosts to henipaviruses and features of transmission of Hendra virus and Nipah virus following spillover from these reservoir hosts. PMID:22709528

  14. Discrete Sources Method for light scattering analysis of non-axisymmetric features of a substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eremin, Yuri; Wriedt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Discrete Sources Method (DSM) has been extended to analyze polarized light scattering by non-axial symmetric nano-sized features on a plane substrate. A detailed description of the corresponding numerical scheme is provided. Using a "fictitious" particle approach the new DSM model enables to consider scattering from such substrate defects as a line bump and a line pit. The developed computer model has been employed for demonstrating the ability to perform a comparative analysis of light scattering from such line features. Simulation results corresponding to the Differential Scattering Cross-Section (DSC) and the integral response for P/S polarized light are presented. It was found that the integral response can change by an order of magnitude depending on the orientation of the linear defect with respect to the direction of the incident laser light. In addition, it was shown that some defects can turn out to be "invisible" if an oblique angle of incidence is chosen.

  15. Hydrogeomorphic features mediate the effects of land use/cover on reservoir productivity and food webs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bremigan, M.T.; Soranno, P.A.; Gonzalez, M.J.; Bunnell, D.B.; Arend, K.K.; Renwick, W.H.; Stein, R.A.; Vanni, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Although effects of land use/cover on nutrient concentrations in aquatic systems are well known, half or more of the variation in nutrient concentration remains unexplained by land use/cover alone. Hydrogeomorphic (HGM) landscape features can explain much remaining variation and influence food web interactions. To explore complex linkages among land use/cover, HGM features, reservoir productivity, and food webs, we sampled 11 Ohio reservoirs, ranging broadly in agricultural catchment land use/cover, for 3 years. We hypothesized that HGM features mediate the bottom-up effects of land use/cover on reservoir productivity, chlorophyll a, zooplankton, and recruitment of gizzard shad, an omnivorous fish species common throughout southeastern U.S. reservoirs and capable of exerting strong effects on food web and nutrient dynamics. We tested specific hypotheses using a model selection approach. Percent variation explained was highest for total nitrogen (R2 = 0.92), moderately high for total phosphorus, chlorophyll a, and rotifer biomass (R2 = 0.57 to 0.67), relatively low for crustacean zooplankton biomass and larval gizzard shad hatch abundance (R2 = 0.43 and 0.42), and high for larval gizzard shad survivor abundance (R2 = 0.79). The trophic status models included agricultural land use/cover and an HGM predictor, whereas the zooplankton models had few HGM predictors. The larval gizzard shad models had the highest complexity, including more than one HGM feature and food web components. We demonstrate the importance of integrating land use/cover, HGM features, and food web interactions to investigate critical interactions and feedbacks among physical, chemical, and biological components of linked land-water ecosystems.

  16. Stochastic dynamic programming for reservoir optimal control: Dense discretization and inflow correlation assumption made possible by parallel computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Carlo; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo

    1991-05-01

    The solution via dynamic programming (DP) of a reservoir optimal control problem is often computationally prohibitive when the proper description of the inflow process leads to a system model having several state variables and/or when a sufficiently dense state discretization is required to achieve numerical accuracy. Thus, to simplify, the inflow correlation is usually neglected and/or a coarse state discretization is adopted. However, these simplifications may significantly affect the reliability of the solution of the optimization problem. Nowadays, the availability of very powerful computers based on innovative architectures (vector and parallel machines), even in the domain of personal computers (transputer architectures), stimulates the reformulation of the standard dynamic programming algorithm in a form able to exploit these new machine architectures. The reformulated DP algorithm and new machines enable faster and less costly solution of optimization problems involving a system model having two state variables (storage and previous period inflow, then taking into account the inflow correlation) and a number of states (of the order of 104) such as to guarantee a high numerical accuracy.

  17. Geological feature selection in reservoir modelling and history matching with Multiple Kernel Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demyanov, V.; Backhouse, L.; Christie, M.

    2015-12-01

    There is a continuous challenge in identifying and propagating geologically realistic features into reservoir models. Many of the contemporary geostatistical algorithms are limited by various modelling assumptions, like stationarity or Gaussianity. Another related challenge is to ensure the realistic geological features introduced into a geomodel are preserved during the model update in history matching studies, when the model properties are tuned to fit the flow response to production data. The above challenges motivate exploration and application of other statistical approaches to build and calibrate reservoir models, in particular, methods based on statistical learning. The paper proposes a novel data driven approach - Multiple Kernel Learning (MKL) - for modelling porous property distributions in sub-surface reservoirs. Multiple Kernel Learning aims to extract relevant spatial features from spatial patterns and to combine them in a non-linear way. This ability allows to handle multiple geological scenarios, which represent different spatial scales and a range of modelling concepts/assumptions. Multiple Kernel Learning is not restricted by deterministic or statistical modelling assumptions and, therefore, is more flexible for modelling heterogeneity at different scales and integrating data and knowledge. We demonstrate an MKL application to a problem of history matching based on a diverse prior information embedded into a range of possible geological scenarios. MKL was able to select the most influential prior geological scenarios and fuse the selected spatial features into a multi-scale property model. The MKL was applied to Brugge history matching benchmark example by calibrating the parameters of the MKL reservoir model parameters to production data. The history matching results were compared to the ones obtained from other contemporary approaches - EnKF and kernel PCA with stochastic optimisation.

  18. Learning slow features with reservoir computing for biologically-inspired robot localization.

    PubMed

    Antonelo, Eric; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    This work proposes a hierarchical biologically-inspired architecture for learning sensor-based spatial representations of a robot environment in an unsupervised way. The first layer is comprised of a fixed randomly generated recurrent neural network, the reservoir, which projects the input into a high-dimensional, dynamic space. The second layer learns instantaneous slowly-varying signals from the reservoir states using Slow Feature Analysis (SFA), whereas the third layer learns a sparse coding on the SFA layer using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). While the SFA layer generates non-localized activations in space, the ICA layer presents high place selectivity, forming a localized spatial activation, characteristic of place cells found in the hippocampus area of the rodent's brain. We show that, using a limited number of noisy short-range distance sensors as input, the proposed system learns a spatial representation of the environment which can be used to predict the actual location of simulated and real robots, without the use of odometry. The results confirm that the reservoir layer is essential for learning spatial representations from low-dimensional input such as distance sensors. The main reason is that the reservoir state reflects the recent history of the input stream. Thus, this fading memory is essential for detecting locations, mainly when locations are ambiguous and characterized by similar sensor readings. PMID:21945043

  19. Mineral-petrographic features of hydrocarbon reservoirs of the Tevlinsko-Russkinskoe oil deposit (Western Siberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitdikova, Elina; Izotov, Victor

    2010-05-01

    The Tevlinsko-Russkinskoe oil field is located in the central part of the West Siberian lowland. It concerns a group of multistory deposits and is one of the perspective deposits in the West Siberian oil and gas province. The young Sortym formation and the Jurassic sediments offer the best prospects. Layers are consisted of sand-clay deposits of Mesozoic-Cainozoic sedimentary cover and rocks of the pre-Jurassic basement. Core material of base drill holes of the Tevlinsko-Russkinskoe oil field was studied in order to obtain detailed lithological and mineralogical characteristics of rocks features. These drill holes found out main productive horizons. Sandstones of productive horizons of Jurassic petroliferous complex are of a homogeneous and monotonous structure. In the studied samples of core material massive structures prevail. Mineral composite of clastic component of sandstones is polymictic and it is represented by quartz, orthoclase, microcline, plagioclases, biotite, strongly changed dark-coloured minerals, fragments of effusive rocks and quartzite of different degrees of recrystallization. Cluster formation - grains accretion into separated quartzite-like parts - is typical for these rocks. Process of cluster formation is accompanied by change of sandstone structure. This results in reservoir quality alteration and extension of porosity and permeability properties. In the studied rocks-reservoirs of Jurassic oil complex processes of cluster formation were lasting during period of diagenesis and were followed by repartition of cement mass. We carried out electron microscopic research of reservoirs structure to analyze void space structure. Electron microscopic studies were spent on the scanning electron microscope of XL-30 system (Phillips company). The conducted research testifies that reservoirs can be considered a mesoporous-nanoporous medium. Its' studying is of a great importance for realization of questions of Tevlinsko-Russkinskoe oil field working out.

  20. Information Requirements for Integrating Spatially Discrete, Feature-Based Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Aufdenkampe, A. K.; Lehnert, K. A.; Mayorga, E.; Hsu, L.; Song, L.; Zaslavsky, I.; Valentine, D. L.

    2014-12-01

    Several cyberinfrastructures have emerged for sharing observational data collected at densely sampled and/or highly instrumented field sites. These include the CUAHSI Hydrologic Information System (HIS), the Critical Zone Observatory Integrated Data Management System (CZOData), the Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) and EarthChem system, and the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). These systems rely on standard data encodings and, in some cases, standard semantics for classes of geoscience data. Their focus is on sharing data on the Internet via web services in domain specific encodings or markup languages. While they have made progress in making data available, it still takes investigators significant effort to discover and access datasets from multiple repositories because of inconsistencies in the way domain systems describe, encode, and share data. Yet, there are many scenarios that require efficient integration of these data types across different domains. For example, understanding a soil profile's geochemical response to extreme weather events requires integration of hydrologic and atmospheric time series with geochemical data from soil samples collected over various depth intervals from soil cores or pits at different positions on a landscape. Integrated access to and analysis of data for such studies are hindered because common characteristics of data, including time, location, provenance, methods, and units are described differently within different systems. Integration requires syntactic and semantic translations that can be manual, error-prone, and lossy. We report information requirements identified as part of our work to define an information model for a broad class of earth science data - i.e., spatially-discrete, feature-based earth observations resulting from in-situ sensors and environmental samples. We sought to answer the question: "What information must accompany observational data for them to be archivable and discoverable within

  1. Complementary hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element and microseismic modelling to predict hydraulic fracture propagation in tight shale reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Profit, Matthew; Dutko, Martin; Yu, Jianguo; Cole, Sarah; Angus, Doug; Baird, Alan

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to predict the propagation of hydraulic fractures in tight shale reservoirs. Many hydraulic fracture modelling schemes assume that the fracture direction is pre-seeded in the problem domain discretisation. This is a severe limitation as the reservoir often contains large numbers of pre-existing fractures that strongly influence the direction of the propagating fracture. To circumvent these shortcomings, a new fracture modelling treatment is proposed where the introduction of discrete fracture surfaces is based on new and dynamically updated geometrical entities rather than the topology of the underlying spatial discretisation. Hydraulic fracturing is an inherently coupled engineering problem with interactions between fluid flow and fracturing when the stress state of the reservoir rock attains a failure criterion. This work follows a staggered hydro-mechanical coupled finite/discrete element approach to capture the key interplay between fluid pressure and fracture growth. In field practice, the fracture growth is hidden from the design engineer and microseismicity is often used to infer hydraulic fracture lengths and directions. Microseismic output can also be computed from changes of the effective stress in the geomechanical model and compared against field microseismicity. A number of hydraulic fracture numerical examples are presented to illustrate the new technology.

  2. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in Cheney Reservoir near Cheney, Kansas, 2001--2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Gatotho, Jackline W.

    2013-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir, located in south-central Kansas, is one of the primary water supplies for the city of Wichita, Kansas. The U.S. Geological Survey has operated a continuous real-time water-quality monitoring station in Cheney Reservoir since 2001; continuously measured physicochemical properties include specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, turbidity, fluorescence (wavelength range 650 to 700 nanometers; estimate of total chlorophyll), and reservoir elevation. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during 2001 through 2009 and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, taste-and-odor compounds, cyanotoxins, phytoplankton community composition, actinomycetes bacteria, and other water-quality measures. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physicochemical properties to compute concentrations of constituents that are not easily measured in real time. The water-quality information in this report is important to the city of Wichita because it allows quantification and characterization of potential constituents of concern in Cheney Reservoir. This report updates linear regression models published in 2006 that were based on data collected during 2001 through 2003. The update uses discrete and continuous data collected during May 2001 through December 2009. Updated models to compute dissolved solids, sodium, chloride, and suspended solids were similar to previously published models. However, several other updated models changed substantially from previously published models. In addition to updating relations that were previously developed, models also were developed for four new constituents, including magnesium, dissolved phosphorus, actinomycetes bacteria, and the cyanotoxin microcystin. In addition, a conversion factor of 0.74 was established to convert the Yellow Springs Instruments (YSI) model 6026 turbidity sensor measurements to the newer YSI

  3. Finite element method for simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in discretely fractured porous media and application to enhanced geothermal reservoir analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Wong, L.; Bloecher, G.; Cacace, M.; Kolditz, O.

    2012-12-01

    We present our recent development of the finite element method (FEM) for simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes in discretely fractured porous media and an application to geothermal reservoir modeling for the research test site Gross Schoenebeck in Germany operated by the GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences. Numerical analysis of multi-physics problems in fractured rocks is important for various geotechnical applications. In particular for enhanced geothermal reservoirs where induced fractures and possibly natural fault systems dominate the system behavior, explicit modeling of those characteristic fractures (i.e. discrete fracture models) is essential to get more detailed understanding of in-situ processes and reliable estimations of heat extraction from those deep reservoirs. However, as fractures are mechanical discontinuities, it is difficult to solve the problems using continuity based numerical methods such as the FEM. Currently, equivalent porous medium or multiple continuum model approaches are often only the way to model fractured rocks with the FEM. The authors have recently developed lower-dimensional interface elements (LIEs) for modeling mechanics-involved coupled processes with pre-existing fractures (Watanabe et al. 2012 IJNME). The method does not require any double nodes unlike conventional interface elements. Moreover, for coupled problems, the approach allows for the use of a single mesh for both mechanical and other related processes such as flow and transport. All the code developments have been carried out within the scientific open source project OpenGeoSys (www.opengeosys.net) (Kolditz et al. 2012 EES). Using both traditional and new simulation techniques, a geothermal reservoir model for the research test site Gross Schoenebeck has been developed. Unstructured meshing of the complex faulted reservoir including both rock matrix and fracture elements has been conducted using recently developed automatic

  4. Youth with Psychopathy Features Are Not a Discrete Class: A Taxometric Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murrie, Daniel C.; Marcus, David K.; Douglas, Kevin S.; Lee, Zina; Salekin, Randall T.; Vincent, Gina

    2007-01-01

    Background: Recently, researchers have sought to measure psychopathy-like features among youth in hopes of identifying children who may be progressing toward a particularly destructive form of adult pathology. However, it remains unclear whether psychopathy-like personality features among youth are best conceptualized as dimensional (distributed…

  5. Nuclear Structure and Quasi-Discrete Features populated in the 152,154Sm(p,t) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humby, P.; Beausang, C. W.; Simon, A.; Cooper, N.; Wilson, E.; Gell, K.; Tarlow, T.; Vyas, G.; Ross, T. J.; Hughes, R. O.; Burke, J. T.; Casperson, R. J.; Koglin, J.; Ota, S.; Allmond, J. M.; McCleskey, M.; McCleskey, E.; Saastamoinen, A.; Chyzh, R.; Dag, M.

    2016-03-01

    The 152,154Sm(p,t) reactions were used to investigate large, narrow, quasi-discrete structures observed in the triton energy spectra at excitation energies of 2-3 MeV. The experiment utilized a 25 MeV proton beam from the K-150 cyclotron at the Cyclotron Institute of Texas A&M University and the outgoing charged particles and γ rays were detected using the STARLiTeR array. This consists of a highly segmented ΔE-E silicon telescope and six BGO shielded HPGe clover detectors. The angular distributions of the outgoing tritons populating the narrow structures are compared to those from both the population of low energy discrete states and the high energy continuum region. The fraction of strength in the structures accounted for by the observed discrete states and the total strength of the feature in neighboring isotopes are discussed. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy No. DE-FG02-05ER41379, DE-FG52-09NA29467 and DE-NA0001801, the National Science Foundation under PHY-130581, and by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Separable and non-separable discrete wavelet transform based texture features and image classification of breast thermograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etehadtavakol, Mahnaz; Ng, E. Y. K.; Chandran, Vinod; Rabbani, Hossien

    2013-11-01

    Highly sensitive infrared cameras can produce high-resolution diagnostic images of the temperature and vascular changes of breasts. Wavelet transform based features are suitable in extracting the texture difference information of these images due to their scale-space decomposition. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential of extracted features in differentiating between breast lesions by comparing the two corresponding pectoral regions of two breast thermograms. The pectoral regions of breastsare important because near 50% of all breast cancer is located in this region. In this study, the pectoral region of the left breast is selected. Then the corresponding pectoral region of the right breast is identified. Texture features based on the first and the second sets of statistics are extracted from wavelet decomposed images of the pectoral regions of two breast thermograms. Principal component analysis is used to reduce dimension and an Adaboost classifier to evaluate classification performance. A number of different wavelet features are compared and it is shown that complex non-separable 2D discrete wavelet transform features perform better than their real separable counterparts.

  7. A modelling investigation of solute transport in permeable porous media containing a discrete preferential flow feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebben, Megan L.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2016-08-01

    Preferential flow features (PFFs, e.g. fractures and faults) are common features in rocks that otherwise have significant matrix permeability. Despite this, few studies have explored the influence of a PFF on the distribution of solute plumes in permeable rock formations, and the current understanding of PFF effects on solute plumes is based almost entirely on low-permeability rock matrices. This research uses numerical modelling to examine solute plumes that pass through a PFF in permeable rock, to explore the PFF's influence on plume migration. The study adopts intentionally simplified arrangements involving steady-state solute plumes in idealised, moderate-to-high-permeability rock aquifers containing a single PFF. A range of matrix-PFF permeability ratios (4.9 × 10-6-2.5 × 10-2), typical of fractured sedimentary aquifers, is considered. The results indicate that for conditions representative of high-to-moderate-permeability sedimentary rock matrices containing a medium-sized fracture, the effect of the PFF on solute plume displacement and spreading can be considerable. For example, plumes are between 1.3 and 19 times wider than in associated porous media only scenarios, and medium-sized PFFs in moderately permeable matrices can reduce the maximum solute concentration by up to 104 times. Plume displacement and spreading is lower in aquifers of higher matrix-PFF permeability ratios, and where solute plumes are more dispersed at the point of intersection with the PFF. Asymmetry in the plume caused by the passage through the PFF is more pronounced for more dispersive plumes. The current study demonstrates that PFFs most likely govern solute plume characteristics in typical permeable matrices, given that a single PFF of aperture representing a medium-sized fracture (i.e. 5.0 × 10-4m) produces the equivalent spreading effects of 0.22-7.88 m of plume movement through the permeable matrix.

  8. Research on Copy-Move Image Forgery Detection Using Features of Discrete Polar Complex Exponential Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Yanfen; Zhong, Junliu

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of sophisticated photo-editing software, such as Photoshop, copy-move image forgery operation has been widely applied and has become a major concern in the field of information security in the modern society. A lot of work on detecting this kind of forgery has gained great achievements, but the detection results of geometrical transformations of copy-move regions are not so satisfactory. In this paper, a new method based on the Polar Complex Exponential Transform is proposed. This method addresses issues in image geometric moment, focusing on constructing rotation invariant moment and extracting features of the rotation invariant moment. In order to reduce rounding errors of the transform from the Polar coordinate system to the Cartesian coordinate system, a new transformation method is presented and discussed in detail at the same time. The new method constructs a 9 × 9 shrunk template to transform the Cartesian coordinate system back to the Polar coordinate system. It can reduce transform errors to a much greater degree. Forgery detection, such as copy-move image forgery detection, is a difficult procedure, but experiments prove our method is a great improvement in detecting and identifying forgery images affected by the rotated transform.

  9. SU-E-J-243: Reproducibility of Radiomics Features Through Different Voxel Discretization Levels in F18-FDG PET Images of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Altazi, B; Fernandez, D; Zhang, G; Biagioli, M; Moros, E; Moffitt, H. Lee

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Site-specific investigations of the role of Radiomics in cancer diagnosis and therapy are needed. We report of the reproducibility of quantitative image features over different discrete voxel levels in PET/CT images of cervical cancer. Methods: Our dataset consisted of the pretreatment PET/CT scans from a cohort of 76 patients diagnosed with cervical cancer, FIGO stage IB-IVA, age range 31–76 years, treated with external beam radiation therapy to a dose range between 45–50.4 Gy (median dose: 45 Gy), concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy and MRI-based Brachytherapy to a dose of 20–30 Gy (median total dose: 28 Gy). Two board certified radiation oncologists delineated Metabolic Tumor volume (MTV) for each patient. Radiomics features were extracted based on 32, 64, 128 and 256 discretization levels (DL). The 64 level was chosen to be the reference DL. Features were calculated based on Co-occurrence (COM), Gray Level Size Zone (GLSZM) and Run-Length (RLM) matrices. Mean Percentage Differences (Δ) of features for discrete levels were determined. Normality distribution of Δ was tested using Kolomogorov - Smirnov test. Bland-Altman test was used to investigate differences between feature values measured on different DL. The mean, standard deviation and upper/lower value limits for each pair of DL were calculated. Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) analysis was performed to examine the reliability of repeated measures within the context of the test re-test format. Results: 3 global and 5 regional features out of 48 features showed distribution not significantly different from a normal one. The reproducible features passed the normality test. Only 5 reproducible results were reliable, ICC range 0.7 – 0.99. Conclusion: Most of the radiomics features tested showed sensitivity to voxel level discretization between (32 – 256). Only 4 GLSZM, 3 COM and 1 RLM showed insensitivity towards mentioned discrete levels.

  10. An initial trial of a prototype telepathology system featuring static imaging with discrete control of the remote microscope.

    PubMed

    Winokur, T S; McClellan, S; Siegal, G P; Reddy, V; Listinsky, C M; Conner, D; Goldman, J; Grimes, G; Vaughn, G; McDonald, J M

    1998-07-01

    Routine diagnosis of pathology images transmitted over telecommunications lines remains an elusive goal. Part of the resistance stems from the difficulty of enabling image selection by the remote pathologist. To address this problem, a telepathology microscope system (TelePath, TeleMedicine Solutions, Birmingham, Ala) that has features associated with static and dynamic imaging systems was constructed. Features of the system include near real time image transmission, provision of a tiled overview image, free choice of any fields at any desired optical magnification, and automated tracking of the pathologist's image selection. All commands and images are discrete, avoiding many inherent problems of full motion video and continuous remote control. A set of 64 slides was reviewed by 3 pathologists in a simulated frozen section environment. Each pathologist provided diagnoses for all 64 slides, as well as qualitative information about the system. Thirty-one of 192 diagnoses disagreed with the reference diagnosis that had been reached before the trial began. Qf the 31, 13 were deferrals and 12 were diagnoses of cases that had a deferral as the reference diagnosis. In 6 cases, the diagnosis disagreed with the reference diagnosis yielding an overall accuracy of 96.9%. Confidence levels in the diagnoses were high. This trial suggests that this system provides high-quality anatomic pathology services, including intraoperative diagnoses, over telecommunications lines. PMID:9661922

  11. [Preliminary research on the feature of dissolved inorganic carbon in Wulixia Reservoir in summer, Guangxi, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Pu, Jun-Bing; Yu, Shi; Zhang, Cheng; Au, Yik-Yu; Yuan, Dao-Xian; Yang, Hui; Tang, Wei

    2014-08-01

    To gain more knowledge on the transformation process of dissolved inorganic carbon in a karst reservoir, in situ monitoring, sampling and lab experiments of water columns were carried out at various sampling sites along the flow line in Wulixia Reservoir, Guangxi, China during early July, 2013. Results showed that: (1) The hydrochemical characteristics of study areas were controlled by the carbonate equilibrium system and the hydrochemical type of all water samples was HCO3-Ca + Mg. (2) The DIC concentration decreased gradually (DIC(Average) : from 1.03 to 0.78 mmol x L(-1)) and the delta13C(DIC) increased gradually (delta13C(DIC(Average) : from -10.21per thousand to -6.62 per thousand) from the reservoir end area to dam area. Meanwhile, with the depth increase in water column, the DIC concentration increased gradually (DIC(Average) : from 0.86 to 1.05 mmol x L(-1)) and the delta13C(DIC) decreased gradually (delta13C(DIC(Average) : from -7.88 per thousand to -13.39 per thousand) from the surface to the bottom of the reservoir. Possible reasons for these research results were found as follows: (1) Dissolution-precipitation process of carbonate substance could be inhibited by other processes such as biogeochemical processes, which played little role in delta13C(DIC) variations. (2) Thermal stratification existed in the study areas which could influence the distribution of DIC and delta13C(DIC) by affecting the distribution of plankton and its orientation and strength of metabolism process, and the extent of organic matter decomposition, and so on. PMID:25338366

  12. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  13. A 181 GOPS AKAZE Accelerator Employing Discrete-Time Cellular Neural Networks for Real-Time Feature Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Guangli; Liu, Leibo; Zhu, Wenping; Yin, Shouyi; Wei, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a real-time feature extraction VLSI architecture for high-resolution images based on the accelerated KAZE algorithm. Firstly, a new system architecture is proposed. It increases the system throughput, provides flexibility in image resolution, and offers trade-offs between speed and scaling robustness. The architecture consists of a two-dimensional pipeline array that fully utilizes computational similarities in octaves. Secondly, a substructure (block-serial discrete-time cellular neural network) that can realize a nonlinear filter is proposed. This structure decreases the memory demand through the removal of data dependency. Thirdly, a hardware-friendly descriptor is introduced in order to overcome the hardware design bottleneck through the polar sample pattern; a simplified method to realize rotation invariance is also presented. Finally, the proposed architecture is designed in TSMC 65 nm CMOS technology. The experimental results show a performance of 127 fps in full HD resolution at 200 MHz frequency. The peak performance reaches 181 GOPS and the throughput is double the speed of other state-of-the-art architectures. PMID:26404305

  14. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    2015-12-01

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  15. Discrete resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivaldi, Franco

    The concept of resonance has been instrumental to the study of Hamiltonian systems with divided phase space. One can also define such systems over discrete spaces, which have a finite or countable number of points, but in this new setting the notion of resonance must be re-considered from scratch. I review some recent developments in the area of arithmetic dynamics which outline some salient features of linear and nonlinear stable (elliptic) orbits over a discrete space, and also underline the difficulties that emerge in their analysis.

  16. Model documentation for relations between continuous real-time and discrete water-quality constituents in the North Fork Ninnescah River upstream from Cheney Reservoir, south-central Kansas, 1999--2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Mandy L.; Graham, Jennifer L.; Gatotho, Jackline W.

    2013-01-01

    Cheney Reservoir in south-central Kansas is one of the primary sources of water for the city of Wichita. The North Fork Ninnescah River is the largest contributing tributary to Cheney Reservoir. The U.S. Geological Survey has operated a continuous real-time water-quality monitoring station since 1998 on the North Fork Ninnescah River. Continuously measured water-quality physical properties include streamflow, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Discrete water-quality samples were collected during 1999 through 2009 and analyzed for sediment, nutrients, bacteria, and other water-quality constituents. Regression models were developed to establish relations between discretely sampled constituent concentrations and continuously measured physical properties to estimate concentrations of those constituents of interest that are not easily measured in real time because of limitations in sensor technology and fiscal constraints. Regression models were published in 2006 that were based on a different dataset collected during 1997 through 2003. This report updates those models using discrete and continuous data collected during January 1999 through December 2009. Models also were developed for five new constituents, including additional nutrient species and indicator bacteria. The water-quality information in this report is important to the city of Wichita because it allows the concentrations of many potential pollutants of interest, including nutrients and sediment, to be estimated in real time and characterized over conditions and time scales that would not be possible otherwise.

  17. A discrete fractional random transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhengjun; Zhao, Haifa; Liu, Shutian

    2005-11-01

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  18. Profiling of Discrete Gynecological Cancers Reveals Novel Transcriptional Modules and Common Features Shared by Other Cancer Types and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Amariglio, Ninette; Vlachos, George D.; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on individual types of gynecological cancers (GCs), utilizing novel expression technologies, have revealed specific pathogenetic patterns and gene markers for cervical (CC), endometrial (EC) and vulvar cancer (VC). Although the clinical phenotypes of the three types of gynecological cancers are discrete, the fact they originate from a common embryological origin, has led to the hypothesis that they might share common features reflecting regression to early embryogenesis. To address this question, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of their profiles. Our data identified both common features (pathways and networks) and novel distinct modules controlling the same deregulated biological processes in all three types. Specifically, four novel transcriptional modules were discovered regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Integration and comparison of our data with other databases, led to the identification of common features among cancer types, embryonic stem (ES) cells and the newly discovered cell population of squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix, considered to host the early cancer events. Conclusively, these data lead us to propose the presence of common features among gynecological cancers, other types of cancers, ES cells and the pre-malignant SC junction cells, where the novel E2F/NFY and MAX/CEBP modules play an important role for the pathogenesis of gynecological carcinomas. PMID:26559525

  19. Bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) movement in relation to water temperature, season, and habitat features in Arrowrock Reservoir, Idaho, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maret, Terry R.; Schultz, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic telemetry was used to determine spring to summer (April–August) movement and habitat use of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in Arrowrock Reservoir (hereafter “Arrowrock”), a highly regulated reservoir in the Boise River Basin of southwestern Idaho. Water management practices annually use about 86 percent of the reservoir water volume to satisfy downstream water demands. These practices might be limiting bull trout habitat and movement patterns. Bull trout are among the more thermally sensitive coldwater species in North America, and the species is listed as threatened throughout the contiguous United States under the Endangered Species Act. Biweekly water-temperature and dissolved-oxygen profiles were collected by the Bureau of Reclamation at three locations in Arrowrock to characterize habitat conditions for bull trout. Continuous streamflow and water temperature also were measured immediately upstream of the reservoir on the Middle and South Fork Boise Rivers, which influence habitat conditions in the riverine zones of the reservoir. In spring 2012, 18 bull trout ranging in total length from 306 to 630 millimeters were fitted with acoustic transmitters equipped with temperature and depth sensors. Mobile boat tracking and fixed receivers were used to detect released fish. Fish were tagged from March 28 to April 20 and were tracked through most of August. Most bull trout movements were detected in the Middle Fork Boise River arm of the reservoir. Fifteen individual fish were detected at least once after release. Water surface temperature at each fish detection location ranged from 6.0 to 16.2 degrees Celsius (°C) (mean=10.1°C), whereas bull trout body temperatures were colder, ranging from 4.4 to 11.6°C (mean=7.3°C). Bull trout were detected over deep-water habitat, ranging from 8.0 to 42.6 meters (m) (mean=18.1 m). Actual fish depths were shallower than total water depth, ranging from 0.0 to 24.5 m (mean=6.7 m). The last bull trout was

  20. Simulation study to determine the impact of different design features on design efficiency in discrete choice experiments

    PubMed Central

    Vanniyasingam, Thuva; Cunningham, Charles E; Foster, Gary; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Discrete choice experiments (DCEs) are routinely used to elicit patient preferences to improve health outcomes and healthcare services. While many fractional factorial designs can be created, some are more statistically optimal than others. The objective of this simulation study was to investigate how varying the number of (1) attributes, (2) levels within attributes, (3) alternatives and (4) choice tasks per survey will improve or compromise the statistical efficiency of an experimental design. Design and methods A total of 3204 DCE designs were created to assess how relative design efficiency (d-efficiency) is influenced by varying the number of choice tasks (2–20), alternatives (2–5), attributes (2–20) and attribute levels (2–5) of a design. Choice tasks were created by randomly allocating attribute and attribute level combinations into alternatives. Outcome Relative d-efficiency was used to measure the optimality of each DCE design. Results DCE design complexity influenced statistical efficiency. Across all designs, relative d-efficiency decreased as the number of attributes and attribute levels increased. It increased for designs with more alternatives. Lastly, relative d-efficiency converges as the number of choice tasks increases, where convergence may not be at 100% statistical optimality. Conclusions Achieving 100% d-efficiency is heavily dependent on the number of attributes, attribute levels, choice tasks and alternatives. Further exploration of overlaps and block sizes are needed. This study's results are widely applicable for researchers interested in creating optimal DCE designs to elicit individual preferences on health services, programmes, policies and products. PMID:27436671

  1. Depositional features and source and reservoir rocks of Tertiary age in northern part of South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S.

    1986-07-01

    The northern part of the South China Sea covers an area of about 400,000 km/sup 2/. Tertiary deposits more than 10,000 m in thickness are widely distributed there. The area has sedimentary rocks more than 1000 m thick covers more than 300,000 km/sup 2/. Five sedimentary basins have been established in this area: Beibu Bay, Yinggehai, Southeastern Qiong, Pearl River Mouth, and Southwestern Taiwann basins. The primary source and reservoir rocks for oil and gas prospects are of Tertiary age. Tertiary rocks underwent three stages of development, each forming a specific sedimentation system: (1) a system of fluviolacustrine deposits in rift depressions from the Paleocene to early Oligocene; (2) a system of semiclosed-sea deposits from the late Oligocene to early Miocene; and (3) a system of deltaic open-sea deposits from the middle Miocene to Pliocene. These three sedimentation systems resulted in three suites of source rocks, three suites of reservoir rocks, and three groups of independent oil pools, complete with source, reservoir, and cap rocks. The three suites of source rocks are as follows: (1) the Eocene Liushagang Formation in the Beibu Bay basin, which is believed to be the best source rock discovered in the area; (2) the Oligocene Zhuhai Formation in the Pearl River Mouth basin; and (3) the lower Miocene series in the Pearl River Mouth basin. The Eocene formation is probably the principal source rock of regional scale in the northern part of the South China Sea. The three suites of reservoir rocks are as follows: (1) the fluviolacustrine sandstone bodies in the Liushagang Formation; (2) the fluviolacustrine sand bodies and shallow-sea sandstone bodies in the Zhuhai Formation and Lingshu Formation; (3) the deltaic, littoral, and shallow-sea sand bodies and bioherms of Neogene age, with the middle Miocene sandstone reservoirs having the best physical properties.

  2. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which

  3. The Features of Condensate Water and Its Guide on Gas Proudction in upper Triassic Gas Reservoir of Western Sichuan Depression, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C.; Lou, Z.

    2012-12-01

    In upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation of western Sichuan depression, China, there developed ultrathight sandstones reservoirs, of which the mean porosity is 4.02% and the permeability mode is less than 0.1×10-3μm2. Because of the ultrathight sandstones, thick gaseous- liquid phase transition develops in the upper Trassic Xujiahe Formation. The absolute quantity of gaseous water is lager. Due to the change of temperature and pressure at the wellhead, the gaseous water in gas reservoir becomes condensate water. Therefore, the condensate water of low salinity can be widely found at the original productive process in the Xujiahe Formation reservoir, such as wells named Lian 150, Xin 851, Xin 853, Xin 856, Dayi 101, Dayi 103. The main cations are K++Na+, while the anions are HCO3- and Cl-. The main water type is CaCl2, followed by NaHCO3, Na2SO4 and MgCl2. The PH of condensate water is 5.28-8.20 with mean value 6.40. The salinity of condensate water is lower than that of formation water. The milligram equivalent (mEq) percent of ion is used to study the features of condensate water. The anions (mEq) distribution of condensate water are scattered in ternary diagram, while that of formation water concentrate upon the SO42- and Cl- endpoints. The percent of HCO3-(mEq) in condensate water is higher than that of formation water. There is no obvious difference of cations mEq percent between condensate water and formation water, which indicates that condensate water strongly affected by formation water. Through this study, condensate water may originate from formation water and then be affected by complicated physical and chemical interactions. The condensate water is affected by gas and formation water. The relationship between condensate water and gas yield is very close. The variations of water yield, salinity and ions composition can reflect the change of gas yield. Taking well Xin 856 for example, which is located in Xinchang gas felid, there exist a relationship between

  4. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  5. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  6. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of Sex-Biased Expressed Genes Reveals Discrete Biological and Physiological Features of Male and Female Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Gobert, Geoffrey N.; McManus, Donald P.; Chen, Qijun

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic and debilitating disease caused by blood flukes (digenetic trematodes) of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are sexually dimorphic and exhibit dramatic morphological changes during a complex lifecycle which requires subtle gene regulatory mechanisms to fulfil these complex biological processes. In the current study, a 41,982 features custom DNA microarray, which represents the most comprehensive probe coverage for any schistosome transcriptome study, was designed based on public domain and local databases to explore differential gene expression in S. japonicum. We found that approximately 1/10 of the total annotated genes in the S. japonicum genome are differentially expressed between adult males and females. In general, genes associated with the cytoskeleton, and motor and neuronal activities were readily expressed in male adult worms, whereas genes involved in amino acid metabolism, nucleotide biosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, glycosylation, cell cycle processes, DNA synthesis and genome fidelity and stability were enriched in females. Further, miRNAs target sites within these gene sets were predicted, which provides a scenario whereby the miRNAs potentially regulate these sex-biased expressed genes. The study significantly expands the expressional and regulatory characteristics of gender-biased expressed genes in schistosomes with high accuracy. The data provide a better appreciation of the biological and physiological features of male and female schistosome parasites, which may lead to novel vaccine targets and the development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27128440

  7. Comprehensive Transcriptome Analysis of Sex-Biased Expressed Genes Reveals Discrete Biological and Physiological Features of Male and Female Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pengfei; Liu, Shuai; Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P; Chen, Qijun

    2016-04-01

    Schistosomiasis is a chronic and debilitating disease caused by blood flukes (digenetic trematodes) of the genus Schistosoma. Schistosomes are sexually dimorphic and exhibit dramatic morphological changes during a complex lifecycle which requires subtle gene regulatory mechanisms to fulfil these complex biological processes. In the current study, a 41,982 features custom DNA microarray, which represents the most comprehensive probe coverage for any schistosome transcriptome study, was designed based on public domain and local databases to explore differential gene expression in S. japonicum. We found that approximately 1/10 of the total annotated genes in the S. japonicum genome are differentially expressed between adult males and females. In general, genes associated with the cytoskeleton, and motor and neuronal activities were readily expressed in male adult worms, whereas genes involved in amino acid metabolism, nucleotide biosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, glycosylation, cell cycle processes, DNA synthesis and genome fidelity and stability were enriched in females. Further, miRNAs target sites within these gene sets were predicted, which provides a scenario whereby the miRNAs potentially regulate these sex-biased expressed genes. The study significantly expands the expressional and regulatory characteristics of gender-biased expressed genes in schistosomes with high accuracy. The data provide a better appreciation of the biological and physiological features of male and female schistosome parasites, which may lead to novel vaccine targets and the development of new therapeutic interventions. PMID:27128440

  8. Exact discretization by Fourier transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2016-08-01

    A discretization of differential and integral operators of integer and non-integer orders is suggested. New type of differences, which are represented by infinite series, is proposed. A characteristic feature of the suggested differences is an implementation of the same algebraic properties that have the operator of differentiation (property of algebraic correspondence). Therefore the suggested differences are considered as an exact discretization of derivatives. These differences have a property of universality, which means that these operators do not depend on the form of differential equations and the parameters of these equations. The suggested differences operators allows us to have difference equations whose solutions are equal to the solutions of corresponding differential equations. The exact discretization of the derivatives of integer orders is given by the suggested differences of the same integer orders. Similarly, the exact discretization of the Riesz derivatives and integrals of integer and non-integer order is given by the proposed fractional differences of the same order.

  9. Petrographic and reservoir features of Hauterivian (Lower Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon in the Malay gas field, Amu-Darya basin, east Turkmenia

    SciTech Connect

    Naz, H.; Ersan, A.

    1996-08-01

    Malay gas field in Amu-Darya basin, eastern Turkmenia, is located on the structural high that is on the Malay-Bagadzha arch north of the Repetek-Kelif structure zone. With 500 km{sup 2} areal coverage, 16 producing wells and 200 billion m{sup 3} estimated reserves, the field was discovered in 1978 and production began in 1987 from 2400-m-deep Hauterivian-age (Early Cretaceous) Shatlyk horizon. The Shatlyk elastic sequence shows various thickness up to 100 m in the Malay structural closure and is studied through E-log, core, petrographic data and reservoir characteristics. The Shatlyk consists of poorly indurated, reddish-brown and gray sandstones, and sandy gray shales. The overall sand-shale ratio increases up and the shales interleave between the sand packages. The reservoir sandstones are very fine to medium grained, moderately sorted, compositionally immature, subarkosic arenites. The framework grains include quartz, feldspar and volcanic lithic fragments. Quartz grains are monocrystalline in type and most are volcanic in origin. Feldspars consist of K- Feldspar and plagioclase. The orthoclases are affected by preferential alteration. The sandstones show high primary intergranular porosity and variations in permeability. Patch-like evaporate cement and the iron-rich grain coatings are reducing effects in permeability. The coats are pervasive in reddish-brown sandstones but are not observed in the gray sandstones. The evaporate cement is present in all the sandstone samples examined and, in places, follows the oxidation coats. The petrographic evidences and the regional facies studies suggest the deposition in intersection area from continental to marine nearshore deltaic environment.

  10. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  11. Discrete Trials Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghezzi, Patrick M.

    2007-01-01

    The advantages of emphasizing discrete trials "teaching" over discrete trials "training" are presented first, followed by a discussion of discrete trials as a method of teaching that emerged historically--and as a matter of necessity for difficult learners such as those with autism--from discrete trials as a method for laboratory research. The…

  12. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-08-01

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  13. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W.; Wadleigh, E.

    1997-12-31

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  14. Discrete-Time Goldfishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calogero, Francesco

    2011-08-01

    The original continuous-time ''goldfish'' dynamical system is characterized by two neat formulas, the first of which provides the N Newtonian equations of motion of this dynamical system, while the second provides the solution of the corresponding initial-value problem. Several other, more general, solvable dynamical systems ''of goldfish type'' have been identified over time, featuring, in the right-hand (''forces'') side of their Newtonian equations of motion, in addition to other contributions, a velocity-dependent term such as that appearing in the right-hand side of the first formula mentioned above. The solvable character of these models allows detailed analyses of their behavior, which in some cases is quite remarkable (for instance isochronous or asymptotically isochronous). In this paper we introduce and discuss various discrete-time dynamical systems, which are as well solvable, which also display interesting behaviors (including isochrony and asymptotic isochrony) and which reduce to dynamical systems of goldfish type in the limit when the discrete-time independent variable l=0,1,2,... becomes the standard continuous-time independent variable t, 0≤t<∞.

  15. Using outcrop observations, 3D discrete feature network (DFN) fluid-flow simulations, and subsurface data to constrain the impact of normal faults and opening mode fractures on fluid flow in an active asphalt mine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, C. E.; Aydin, A.; Durlofsky, L.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Brownlow, D. T.

    2008-12-01

    An active quarry near Uvalde, TX which mines asphaltic limestone from the Anacacho Formation offers an ideal setting to study fluid-flow in fractured and faulted carbonate rocks. Semi-3D exposures of normal faults and fractures in addition to visual evidence of asphalt concentrations in the quarry help constrain relationships between geologic structures and the flow and transport of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, a subsurface dataset which includes thin sections and measured asphalt concentration from the surrounding region provides a basis to estimate asphalt concentrations and constrain the depositional architecture of both the previously mined portions of the quarry and the un-mined surrounding rock volume. We characterized a series of normal faults and opening mode fractures at the quarry and documented a correlation between the intensity and distribution of these structures with increased concentrations of asphalt. The three-dimensional depositional architecture of the Anacacho Formation was characterized using the subsurface thin sections. Then outcrop exposures of faults, fractured beds, and stratigraphic contacts were mapped and their three-dimensional positions were recorded with differential gps devices. These two datasets were assimilated and a quarry-scale, geologically realistic, three-dimensional Discrete Feature Network (DFN) which represents the geometries and material properties of the matrix, normal faults, and fractures within the quarry was constructed. We then performed two-point flux, control-volume finite- difference fluid-flow simulations with the DFN to investigate the 3D flow and transport of fluids. The results were compared and contrasted with available asphalt concentration estimates from the mine and the aforementioned data from the surrounding drill cores.

  16. Modeling the distribution of diagenetic elements within deltaic reservoirs of NE Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Moraes, M.A.S. )

    1991-03-01

    Lacustrine deltaic sandstones are important reservoirs in Potiguar and Reconcavo rift basins of northeastern Brazil. They commonly occur as delta front deposits accumulated in lows associated with growth faults. Diagenetic elements, including calcite, secondary porosity, dolomite, and chlorite, present specific distribution patterns at different reservoir levels. Such distributions have been modeled based on thin section, core, and petrophysical data. At the microscopic level, the most significant heterogeneity is the association between reduced primary (RP) porosity and carbonate dissolution (CD) porosity. Reduced primary porosity commonly occurs as islands of small pores surrounded by zones presenting larger CD pores. This type of pore structure causes high irreducible water saturation to appear in many reservoirs. At a larger scale level, dolomite cement is observed associated with micas and mud clasts concentrated in discrete stratification planes, a feature that increases permeability anisotropy, lowering the effective permeability of cross-bedded zones. Chlorite rims cause permeability reduction in fine-grained sandstones but have little influence in coarser sandstones. This grain size dependent effect produces significant alterations in the permeability structure of the reservoirs. Relating the distribution of diagenetic elements to the facies architecture of deltaic sandstones permits generating reservoir models that integrate depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities at different levels, an approach that leads to more accurate determination of effective properties used for performance prediction and numerical simulation.

  17. A discrete formulation of the Wigner transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Youm

    2007-12-01

    A discrete formulation of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) and the Wigner transport equation (WTE) is proposed, where the "discreteness" of the WDF and WTE is not just a practical, mathematical feature of discretization for the possible computations, but reveals a fundamental physics regarding the maximum correlation length of potentials (an essential quantum-mechanical feature of the WTE): it is set by the positional uncertainty due to the discrete values of momentum in evaluating the discrete WDF. Our formulation also shows that the weighting function to the potential-correlation term can be derived naturally from a mathematical necessity related to the antiperiodicity of the discrete density operator. In addition, we propose a mutually independent discretization scheme for the diagonal and cross-diagonal coordinates of the density operator, which results in a numerically effective discrete WTE in that it requires much less computational resources without significant loss in accuracy.

  18. Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.L.

    1992-03-24

    The reservoir technology program supports the utilization of geothermal resources through development and verification of new earth science technologies for: exploration, fluid production and injection; and prediction of reservoir lifetimes. A two-fold strategy of conducting DOE-sponsored research to meet higher-risk, longer-term needs and cost-shared research with industry in areas of greatest current need is utilized to maximize the benefit of the program to the geothermal industry. The program uses a coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach to investigating and solving reservoir problems facing the industry. Research at The Geysers geothermal field has received major emphasis in the past three years. Recent progress in that work will be reviewed in detail by The Geysers operators, federal, state and local regulators and other interested parties during a meeting in Santa Rosa on May 5 and 6, 1992. Hence the papers by Lipman, Bodvarsson et al., Wannamaker, et al., Horne, and Shook in this proceedings volume emphasize non-Geysers research in the program.

  19. What is the Effect of Interannual Hydroclimatic Variability on Water Supply Reservoir Operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galelli, S.; Turner, S. W. D.

    2015-12-01

    Rather than deriving from a single distribution and uniform persistence structure, hydroclimatic data exhibit significant trends and shifts in their mean, variance, and lagged correlation through time. Consequentially, observed and reconstructed streamflow records are often characterized by features of interannual variability, including long-term persistence and prolonged droughts. This study examines the effect of these features on the operating performance of water supply reservoirs. We develop a Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) model that can incorporate a regime-shifting climate variable. We then compare the performance of operating policies—designed with and without climate variable—to quantify the contribution of interannual variability to standard policy sub-optimality. The approach uses a discrete-time Markov chain to partition the reservoir inflow time series into small number of 'hidden' climate states. Each state defines a distinct set of inflow transition probability matrices, which are used by the SDP model to condition the release decisions on the reservoir storage, current-period inflow and hidden climate state. The experimental analysis is carried out on 99 hypothetical water supply reservoirs fed from pristine catchments in Australia—all impacted by the Millennium drought. Results show that interannual hydroclimatic variability is a major cause of sub-optimal hedging decisions. The practical import is that conventional optimization methods may misguide operators, particularly in regions susceptible to multi-year droughts.

  20. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  1. Principles of Discrete Time Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-04-01

    1. Introduction; 2. The physics of discreteness; 3. The road to calculus; 4. Temporal discretization; 5. Discrete time dynamics architecture; 6. Some models; 7. Classical cellular automata; 8. The action sum; 9. Worked examples; 10. Lee's approach to discrete time mechanics; 11. Elliptic billiards; 12. The construction of system functions; 13. The classical discrete time oscillator; 14. Type 2 temporal discretization; 15. Intermission; 16. Discrete time quantum mechanics; 17. The quantized discrete time oscillator; 18. Path integrals; 19. Quantum encoding; 20. Discrete time classical field equations; 21. The discrete time Schrodinger equation; 22. The discrete time Klein-Gordon equation; 23. The discrete time Dirac equation; 24. Discrete time Maxwell's equations; 25. The discrete time Skyrme model; 26. Discrete time quantum field theory; 27. Interacting discrete time scalar fields; 28. Space, time and gravitation; 29. Causality and observation; 30. Concluding remarks; Appendix A. Coherent states; Appendix B. The time-dependent oscillator; Appendix C. Quaternions; Appendix D. Quantum registers; References; Index.

  2. Discrete exterior calculus discretization of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations over surface simplicial meshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Mamdouh S.; Hirani, Anil N.; Samtaney, Ravi

    2016-05-01

    A conservative discretization of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations is developed based on discrete exterior calculus (DEC). A distinguishing feature of our method is the use of an algebraic discretization of the interior product operator and a combinatorial discretization of the wedge product. The governing equations are first rewritten using the exterior calculus notation, replacing vector calculus differential operators by the exterior derivative, Hodge star and wedge product operators. The discretization is then carried out by substituting with the corresponding discrete operators based on the DEC framework. Numerical experiments for flows over surfaces reveal a second order accuracy for the developed scheme when using structured-triangular meshes, and first order accuracy for otherwise unstructured meshes. By construction, the method is conservative in that both mass and vorticity are conserved up to machine precision. The relative error in kinetic energy for inviscid flow test cases converges in a second order fashion with both the mesh size and the time step.

  3. On-line Optimization-Based Simulators for Fractured and Non-fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Milind D. Deo

    2005-08-31

    Oil field development is a multi-million dollar business. Reservoir simulation is often used to guide the field management and development process. Reservoir characterization and geologic modeling tools have become increasingly sophisticated. As a result the geologic models produced are complex. Most reservoirs are fractured to a certain extent. The new geologic characterization methods are making it possible to map features such as faults and fractures, field-wide. Significant progress has been made in being able to predict properties of the faults and of the fractured zones. Traditionally, finite difference methods have been employed in discretizing the domains created by geologic means. For complex geometries, finite-element methods of discretization may be more suitable. Since reservoir simulation is a mature science, some of the advances in numerical methods (linear, nonlinear solvers and parallel computing) have not been fully realized in the implementation of most of the simulators. The purpose of this project was to address some of these issues. {sm_bullet} One of the goals of this project was to develop a series of finite-element simulators to handle problems of complex geometry, including systems containing faults and fractures. {sm_bullet} The idea was to incorporate the most modern computing tools; use of modular object-oriented computer languages, the most sophisticated linear and nonlinear solvers, parallel computing methods and good visualization tools. {sm_bullet} One of the tasks of the project was also to demonstrate the construction of fractures and faults in a reservoir using the available data and to assign properties to these features. {sm_bullet} Once the reservoir model is in place, it is desirable to find the operating conditions, which would provide the best reservoir performance. This can be accomplished by utilization optimization tools and coupling them with reservoir simulation. Optimization-based reservoir simulation was one of the

  4. Interactive reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Regtien, J.M.M. Por, G.J.A.; Stiphout, M.T. van; Vlugt, F.F. van der

    1995-12-31

    Shell`s new Modular Reservoir Simulator (MoReS) has been equipped with a comprehensive and versatile user interface called FrontEnd. Apart from providing a user-friendly environment for interactive reservoir simulation, FrontEnd serves a software platform for other dynamic simulation and reservoir-engineering applications. It offers to all supported applications a common user interface, enables the re-use of code and reduces overall maintenance and support costs associated with the embedded applications. Because of its features, FrontEnd facilitates the transfer of research results in the form of operational software to end users. When coupled with MoReS, FrontEnd can be used for pre- and post-processing and interactive simulation. The pre-processing options allow data to be inputted by means of various OSF/Motif widgets containing a spreadsheet, text editors, dialogues and graphical input. The display of the input data as well as the post-processing of all simulation results is made possible by a variety of user-defined plot of tabular (e.g. timestep summary) and array (simulation grid) data. During a simulation user-defined plots can be displayed and edited, allowing a close inspection of the results as they are being calculated. FrontEnd has been equipped with a powerful input command language, which gives the batch user as much flexibility and control over the input as the interactive user.

  5. Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    . production as well as 1, 3, 5, and 10 year cum. oil, gas and water production and Gas Oil Ratio and Water Cut) are calculated. These analyses and statistics generate a large volume of data and information that are snapshots of reservoir behavior in discrete slices of time and space. This large volume of data is processed using state-of-the-art in artificial intelligence and data mining (neural modeling, genetic optimization and fuzzy pattern recognition), first using a set of discrete modeling techniques to generate production related predictive models of well behavior. The set of discrete, intelligent models are then integrated using a continuous fuzzy pattern recognition algorithm in order to arrive at a cohesive picture and model of the reservoir as a whole. The Top-Down, Intelligent Reservoir Model is calibrated using the most recent set of wells that have been drilled. The calibrated model is used for field development strategies to improve and enhance hydrocarbon recovery.

  6. Tree Ensembles on the Induced Discrete Space.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Olcay Taner

    2016-05-01

    Decision trees are widely used predictive models in machine learning. Recently, K -tree is proposed, where the original discrete feature space is expanded by generating all orderings of values of k discrete attributes and these orderings are used as the new attributes in decision tree induction. Although K -tree performs significantly better than the proper one, their exponential time complexity can prohibit their use. In this brief, we propose K -forest, an extension of random forest, where a subset of features is selected randomly from the induced discrete space. Simulation results on 17 data sets show that the novel ensemble classifier has significantly lower error rate compared with the random forest based on the original feature space. PMID:26011897

  7. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  8. Discrete Gabor Filters For Binocular Disparity Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiman, Carl F. R.

    1995-01-01

    Discrete Gabor filters proposed for use in determining binocular disparity - difference between positions of same feature or object depicted in stereoscopic images produced by two side-by-side cameras aimed in parallel. Magnitude of binocular disparity used to estimate distance from cameras to feature or object. In one potential application, cameras charge-coupled-device video cameras in robotic vision system, and binocular disparities and distance estimates used as control inputs - for example, to control approaches to objects manipulated or to maintain safe distances from obstacles. Binocular disparities determined from phases of discretized Gabor transforms.

  9. Synchronous Discrete Harmonic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Antippa, Adel F.; Dubois, Daniel M.

    2008-10-17

    We introduce the synchronous discrete harmonic oscillator, and present an analytical, numerical and graphical study of its characteristics. The oscillator is synchronous when the time T for one revolution covering an angle of 2{pi} in phase space, is an integral multiple N of the discrete time step {delta}t. It is fully synchronous when N is even. It is pseudo-synchronous when T/{delta}t is rational. In the energy conserving hyperincursive representation, the phase space trajectories are perfectly stable at all time scales, and in both synchronous and pseudo-synchronous modes they cycle through a finite number of phase space points. Consequently, both the synchronous and the pseudo-synchronous hyperincursive modes of time-discretization provide a physically realistic and mathematically coherent, procedure for dynamic, background independent, discretization of spacetime. The procedure is applicable to any stable periodic dynamical system, and provokes an intrinsic correlation between space and time, whereby space-discretization is a direct consequence of background-independent time-discretization. Hence, synchronous discretization moves the formalism of classical mechanics towards that of special relativity. The frequency of the hyperincursive discrete harmonic oscillator is ''blue shifted'' relative to its continuum counterpart. The frequency shift has the precise value needed to make the speed of the system point in phase space independent of the discretizing time interval {delta}t. That is the speed of the system point is the same on the polygonal (in the discrete case) and the circular (in the continuum case) phase space trajectories.

  10. Dispersed fluid flow in fractured reservoirs: An analysis of tracer-determined residence time distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    1984-11-01

    A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir using tracer-determined residence time distribution curves is outlined. Emphasis is placed on comparison of the statistical quantities obtained from the tracer curves of different reservoirs or of the same reservoir under different conditions. In this way, model-independent information may be used unambiguously to construct empirical reservoir performance correlations. Downhole measurements of the tracer response exiting from discrete fracture zones permit further characterization of reservoir fluid flow behavior. Tracer experiments conducted in prototype hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs in fractured rock are examined using these statistically based data analysis methods.

  11. Symmetric Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanwei; Orchard, Jeff

    2008-09-01

    The Stockwell Transform (ST) is a time-frequency signal decomposition that is gaining in popularity, likely because of its direct relation with the Fourier Transform (FT). A discrete and non-redundant version of the ST, denoted the Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform (DOST), has made the use of the ST more feasible. However, the matrix multiplication required by the DOST can still be a formidable computation, especially for high-dimensional data. Moreover, the symmetric property of the ST and FT is not present in the DOST. In this paper, we investigate a new Symmetric Discrete Orthonormal Stockwell Transform (SDOST) that still keeps the non-redundant multiresolution features of the DOST, while maintaining a symmetry property similar to that of the FT. First, we give a brief introduction for the ST and the DOST. Then we analyze the DOST coefficients and modify the transform to get a symmetric version. A small experiment shows that the SDOST has kept the abilities of the DOST and demonstrates the advantage of symmetry when applying the SDOST.

  12. Interference in discrete Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cormick, Cecilia; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2006-12-15

    We analyze some features of the class of discrete Wigner functions that was recently introduced by Gibbons et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] to represent quantum states of systems with power-of-prime dimensional Hilbert spaces. We consider ''cat'' states obtained as coherent superpositions of states with positive Wigner function; for such states we show that the oscillations of the discrete Wigner function typically spread over the entire discrete phase space (including the regions where the two interfering states are localized). This is a generic property, which is in sharp contrast with the usual attributes of Wigner functions that make them useful candidates to display the existence of quantum coherence through oscillations. However, it is possible to find subsets of cat states with a natural phase-space representation, in which the oscillatory regions remain localized. We show that this can be done for interesting families of stabilizer states used in quantum error-correcting codes, and illustrate this by analyzing the phase-space representation of the five-qubit error-correcting code.

  13. Discrete monotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsten, B.E.; Haynes, W.B.

    1996-08-01

    The authors theoretically and numerically investigate the operation and behavior of the discrete monotron oscillator, a novel high-power microwave source. The discrete monotron differs from conventional monotrons and transit time oscillators by shielding the electron beam from the monotron cavity`s RF fields except at two distinct locations. This makes the discrete monotron act more like a klystron than a distributed traveling wave device. As a result, the oscillator has higher efficiency and can operate with higher beam powers than other single cavity oscillators and has more stable operation without requiring a seed input signal than mildly relativistic, intense-beam klystron oscillators.

  14. Discrete-contact nanowire photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Michelle J.; Wen, Wen; Maldonado, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    A series of finite-element simulations have been performed to assess the operational characteristics of a new semiconductor nanowire solar cell design operating under high-level injection conditions. Specifically, the steady-state current-voltage behavior of a cylindrical silicon (Si) nanowire with a series of discrete, ohmic-selective contacts under intense sunlight illumination was investigated. The scope of the analysis was limited to only the factors that impact the net internal quantum yield for solar to electricity conversion. No evaluations were performed with regards to optical light trapping in the modeled structures. Several aspects in a discrete-contact nanowire device that could impact operation were explored, including the size and density of ohmic-selective contacts, the size of the nanowire, the electronic quality and conductivity of the nanowire, the surface defect density of the nanowire, and the type of ohmic selectivity employed at each contact. The analysis showed that there were ranges of values for each parameter that supported good to excellent photoresponses, with certain combinations of experimentally attainable material properties yielding internal energy conversion efficiencies at the thermodynamic limit for a single junction cell. The merits of the discrete-contact nanowire cell were contrasted with "conventional" nanowire photovoltaic cells featuring a uniform conformal contact and also with planar point-contact solar cells. The unique capacity of the discrete-contact nanowire solar cell design to operate at useful energy conversion efficiencies with low quality semiconductor nanowires (i.e., possessing short charge-carrier lifetimes) with only light doping is discussed. This work thus defines the impetus for future experimental work aimed at developing this photovoltaic architecture.

  15. The Discrete Hanging Cable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, James V.

    2004-01-01

    Using the methods of finite difference equations the discrete analogue of the parabolic and catenary cable are analysed. The fibonacci numbers and the golden ratio arise in the treatment of the catenary.

  16. Discretizations of axisymmetric systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frauendiener, Jörg

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we discuss stability properties of various discretizations for axisymmetric systems including the so-called cartoon method which was proposed by Alcubierre et al. for the simulation of such systems on Cartesian grids. We show that within the context of the method of lines such discretizations tend to be unstable unless one takes care in the way individual singular terms are treated. Examples are given for the linear axisymmetric wave equation in flat space.

  17. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Hybrid Discrete-Continuous Markov Decision Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Zhengzhu; Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicholas; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a Markov decision process (MDP) model that features both discrete and continuous state variables. We extend previous work by Boyan and Littman on the mono-dimensional time-dependent MDP to multiple dimensions. We present the principle of lazy discretization, and piecewise constant and linear approximations of the model. Having to deal with several continuous dimensions raises several new problems that require new solutions. In the (piecewise) linear case, we use techniques from partially- observable MDPs (POMDPS) to represent value functions as sets of linear functions attached to different partitions of the state space.

  19. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  20. Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

    1974-01-22

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

  1. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Reservoir management applications to oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.D.; Ouenes, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Chawathe, A.

    1996-02-01

    Winnipegosis and Red River oil production in the Bainville North Field in Roosevelt County, Montana began in 1979. The Red River is at 12,500 ft and one well is completed in the Nisku formation at 10,200 ft. This well produced 125,000 bbl from the Nisku during its first 41 months. Since operating conditions inhibit dual completions and Nisku wells cost $900,000, the need for a Nisku development plan is apparent. The size of the reservoir and optimum well density are the key unknowns. Recognizing the need for additional Nisku data, a 5000 acre 3-D seismic survey was processed and the results used to map the top of the Nisku. The reservoir thickness, porosity, and water saturation were known from the openhole logs at eight well locations on an average of 320 acres spacing. The thickness of the thin pay limited the seismic information to areal extent of reservoir depth. Static reservoir pressure from drillstem test was available at two wells. Additional reservoir pressure data in the form of transient tests were available at two wells. Under Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Ordering Agreement 9-XU3-0402J-1, the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC) characterized the Nisku to develop a reservoir management plan. Nance Petroleum provided all available field and laboratory data for characterizing the Nisku formation. Due to sparse well coverage, and the lack of producing wells, the PRRC had to develop a new reservoir description approach to reach an acceptable characterization of the entire reservoir. This new approach relies on the simultaneous use of 3-D seismic and reservoir simulation to estimate key reservoir properties.

  3. Deformed discrete symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arzano, Michele; Kowalski-Glikman, Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    We construct discrete symmetry transformations for deformed relativistic kinematics based on group valued momenta. We focus on the specific example of κ-deformations of the Poincaré algebra with associated momenta living on (a sub-manifold of) de Sitter space. Our approach relies on the description of quantum states constructed from deformed kinematics and the observable charges associated with them. The results we present provide the first step towards the analysis of experimental bounds on the deformation parameter κ to be derived via precision measurements of discrete symmetries and CPT.

  4. Discrete breathers in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.; Korznikova, E. A.; Baimova, Yu A.; Velarde, M. G.

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems, in addition to traveling waves, support vibrational defect-localized modes. It turned out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Since the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, it is only through the special choice of initial conditions that a group of nodes can be found on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), will be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of the small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically conserve its vibrational energy forever provided no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery in them of DBs was only a matter of time. It is well known that periodic discrete defect-containing systems support both traveling waves and vibrational defect-localized modes. It turns out that if a periodic discrete system is nonlinear, it can support spatially localized vibrational modes as exact solutions even in the absence of defects. Because the nodes of the system are all on equal footing, only a special choice of the initial conditions allows selecting a group of nodes on which such a mode, called a discrete breather (DB), can be excited. The DB frequency must be outside the frequency range of small-amplitude traveling waves. Not resonating with and expending no energy on the excitation of traveling waves, a DB can theoretically preserve its vibrational energy forever if no thermal vibrations or other perturbations are present. Crystals are nonlinear discrete systems, and the discovery of DBs in them was only a matter of time. Experimental studies of DBs encounter major technical difficulties, leaving atomistic computer simulations as the primary investigation tool. Despite

  5. Natural discretization in noncommutative field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acatrinei, Ciprian Sorin

    2015-12-01

    A discretization scheme for field theory is developed, in which the space time coordinates are assumed to be operators forming a noncommutative algebra. Generic waves without rotational symmetry are studied in (2+1) - dimensional scalar field theory with Heisenberg-type noncommutativity. In the representation chosen, the radial coordinate is naturally rendered discrete. Nonlocality along this coordinate, induced by noncommutativity, accounts for the angular dependence of the fields. A complete solution and the interpretation of its nonlocal features are given. The exact form of standing and propagating waves on such a discrete space is found in terms of finite series. A precise correspondence is established between the degree of nonlocality and the angular momentum of a field configuration. At small distance no classical singularities appear, even at the location of the sources. At large radius one recovers the usual commutative/continuum behaviour.

  6. Natural discretization in noncommutative field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Acatrinei, Ciprian Sorin

    2015-12-07

    A discretization scheme for field theory is developed, in which the space time coordinates are assumed to be operators forming a noncommutative algebra. Generic waves without rotational symmetry are studied in (2+1) - dimensional scalar field theory with Heisenberg-type noncommutativity. In the representation chosen, the radial coordinate is naturally rendered discrete. Nonlocality along this coordinate, induced by noncommutativity, accounts for the angular dependence of the fields. A complete solution and the interpretation of its nonlocal features are given. The exact form of standing and propagating waves on such a discrete space is found in terms of finite series. A precise correspondence is established between the degree of nonlocality and the angular momentum of a field configuration. At small distance no classical singularities appear, even at the location of the sources. At large radius one recovers the usual commutative/continuum behaviour.

  7. What Is Discrete Mathematics?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharp, Karen Tobey

    This paper cites information received from a number of sources, e.g., mathematics teachers in two-year colleges, publishers, and convention speakers, about the nature of discrete mathematics and about what topics a course in this subject should contain. Note is taken of the book edited by Ralston and Young which discusses the future of college…

  8. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Integration of reservoir simulation and geomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan

    Fluid production from tight and shale gas formations has increased significantly, and this unconventional portfolio of low-permeability reservoirs accounts for more than half of the gas produced in the United States. Stimulation and hydraulic fracturing are critical in making these systems productive, and hence it is important to understand the mechanics of the reservoir. When modeling fractured reservoirs using discrete-fracture network representation, the geomechanical effects are expected to have a significant impact on important reservoir characteristics. It has become more accepted that fracture growth, particularly in naturally fractured reservoirs with extremely low permeability, cannot be reliably represented by conventional planar representations. Characterizing the evolution of multiple, nonplanar, interconnected and possibly nonvertical hydraulic fractures requires hydraulic and mechanical characterization of the matrix, as well as existing latent or healed fracture networks. To solve these challenging problems, a reservoir simulator (Advanced Reactive Transport Simulator (ARTS)) capable of performing unconventional reservoir simulation is developed in this research work. A geomechanical model has been incorporated into the simulation framework with various coupling schemes and this model is used to understand the geomechanical effects in unconventional oil and gas recovery. This development allows ARTS to accept geomechanical information from external geomechanical simulators (soft coupling) or the solution of the geomechanical coupled problem (hard coupling). An iterative solution method of the flow and geomechanical equations has been used in implementing the hard coupling scheme. The hard coupling schemes were verified using one-dimensional and two-dimensional analytical solutions. The new reservoir simulator is applied to learn the influence of geomechanical impact on unconventional oil and gas production in a number of practical recovery scenarios

  11. Dolomite reservoirs: Porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1995-02-01

    Systematic analyses of the published record of dolomite reservoirs worldwide reveal that the majority of hydrocarbon-producing dolomite reservoirs occurs in (1) peritidal-dominated carbonate, (2) subtidal carbonate associated with evaporitic tidal flat/lagoon, (3) subtidal carbonate associated with basinal evaporite, and (4) nonevaporitic carbonate sequence associated with topographic high/unconformity, platform-margin buildup or fault/fracture. Reservoir characteristics vary greatly from one dolomite type to another depending upon the original sediment fabric, the mechanism by which dolomite was formed, and the extent to which early formed dolomite was modified by post-dolomitization diagenetic processes (e.g., karstification, fracturing, and burial corrosion). This paper discusses the origin of dolomite porosity and demonstrates the porosity evolution and reservoir characteristics of different dolomite types.

  12. Magma reservoir systems inferred from tilt patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimozuru, D.

    1981-09-01

    Inflation patterns based on water-tube tiltmeter and levelling observation show different features for Krafla Volcano in Iceland and Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii. Monotonous sawtooth shape inflation is observed at Krafla, while inflation curves at Kileauea are more or less complicated. The difference was attributed to differences in the system of magma reservoir for the two volcanoes. By using the electrical equivalent of a magma reservoir and volcanic conduit as a capacitor and a resistor, an electrical oseillator was considered to be a possible model for a magma reservoir system. In the case of Krafla, the magma reservoir system is replaced with one electric oscillator called «Single system» or «Icelandic type» system. The complicated inflation pattern of Kilauea was interpreted as the assembly of a main magma reservoir and the group of surrounding small reservoirs. The equivalent electric analogue is the composite parallel and serial connection of a single oscillator which generates irregular output voltage during a charging process. The proposed magma reservoir system of Kilauea is called «Multi-coupled system» or «Hawaiian type system» which also help in interpreting the wondering of the uplift center and tidal phenomena of the Halemaumau lava lake.

  13. Discreteness induced extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira; da Silva, Linaena Méricy

    2015-11-01

    Two simple models based on ecological problems are discussed from the point of view of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. It is shown how discrepant may be the results of the models that include spatial distribution with discrete interactions when compared with the continuous analogous models. In the continuous case we have, under certain circumstances, the population explosion. When we take into account the finiteness of the population, we get the opposite result, extinction. We will analyze how these results depend on the dimension d of the space and describe the phenomenon of the "Discreteness Inducing Extinction" (DIE). The results are interpreted in the context of the "paradox of sex", an old problem of evolutionary biology.

  14. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal analysis techniques, to interpret cyclicity, determine its controlling factors, and detect zone boundaries. We tested the cyclostratigraphic assessments using well log and core data from a well in a fluvio-eolian sequence in the Ormskirk Sandstone, Irish Sea. The boundary detection technique was tested using log data from 10 wells in the Apiay field, Colombia. We processed the wavelet coefficients for each zone of the Ormskirk Formation and determined the wavelengths of the strongest cyclicities. Comparing these periodicities with Milankovitch cycles, we found a strong correspondence of the two. This suggests that climate exercised an important control on depositional cyclicity, as had been concluded in previous studies of the Ormskirk Sandstone. The wavelet coefficients from the log data in the Apiay field were combined to form features. These vectors were used in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques to perform detection in 7 boundaries. For the upper two units, the boundary was detected within 10 feet of their actual depth, in 90% of the wells. The mean detection performance in the Apiay field is 50%. We compared our method with other traditional techniques which do not focus on selecting optimal features for boundary identification. Those methods resulted in detection performances of 40% for the uppermost boundary, which lag behind the 90% performance of our method. Automated determination of geologic boundaries will expedite studies, and knowledge of the controlling deposition factors will enhance stratigraphic and reservoir characterization models. We expect that automated boundary detection and cyclicity analysis will prove to be valuable and time-saving methods for establishing correlations and their

  15. Relationship of small bowel motility to ileoanal reservoir function.

    PubMed Central

    Groom, J S; Kamm, M A; Nicholls, R J

    1994-01-01

    Some patients with an ileoanal reservoir have a high defecation frequency, despite a good anatomical result and the absence of pouchitis. This study aimed to determine whether variation in function is related to a difference in small bowel motility proximal to the reservoir and if small bowel motility is propagated into the reservoir. Ambulatory small bowel and reservoir motility was studied for 24 hours in five patients with good function (median bowel frequency 4 per day, range 3-6) and seven subjects with poor function (median bowel frequency 12 per day, range 10-20). Five solid state pressure sensors were positioned in the small bowel and one in the reservoir. During the fasting nocturnal period (2300-0800 h), patients with poor function had a median of 10 (range 5-13) migrating motor complexes (MMC), significantly greater (p = 0.03) than the corresponding median number of 3 (range 2-7) in patients with good function. A total of 120 MMCs were observed in the whole series of 12 patients. Of these only two were propagated from the small bowel into the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were not propagated into the reservoir, although prolonged propagated contractions did pass into the reservoir in one patient. Patients with poor function had similar 24 hour stool output and radiological reservoir size to those with good function, but the median maximum tolerated volume on reservoir distension was 290 ml (range 160-450) for patients with poor function compared with 475 ml (range 460-550) for patients with good function (p = 0.005). Small bowel motility proximal to the reservoir bears an important relationship to pouch function and defecation frequency. Propagation of coordinated proximal small intestinal motility into the reservoir is rare. PMID:8174992

  16. A paradigm for discrete physics

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P.; McGoveran, D.; Etter, T.; Manthey, M.J.; Gefwert, C.

    1987-01-01

    An example is outlined for constructing a discrete physics using as a starting point the insight from quantum physics that events are discrete, indivisible and non-local. Initial postulates are finiteness, discreteness, finite computability, absolute nonuniqueness (i.e., homogeneity in the absence of specific cause) and additivity.

  17. Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators

    SciTech Connect

    Pritchett, J.W.

    1980-11-01

    The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

  18. Discrete Dynamics Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuensche, Andrew

    DDLab is interactive graphics software for creating, visualizing, and analyzing many aspects of Cellular Automata, Random Boolean Networks, and Discrete Dynamical Networks in general and studying their behavior, both from the time-series perspective — space-time patterns, and from the state-space perspective — attractor basins. DDLab is relevant to research, applications, and education in the fields of complexity, self-organization, emergent phenomena, chaos, collision-based computing, neural networks, content addressable memory, genetic regulatory networks, dynamical encryption, generative art and music, and the study of the abstract mathematical/physical/dynamical phenomena in their own right.

  19. Discrete chaotic cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulski, Zbigniew; Szczepaski, Janusz

    In the paper we propose a new method of constructing cryptosystems utilising a nonpredictability property of discrete chaotic systems. We formulate the requirements for such systems to assure their safety. We also give examples of practical realisation of chaotic cryptosystems, using a generalisation of the method presented in [7]. The proposed algorithm of encryption and decryption is based on multiple iteration of a certain dynamical chaotic system. We assume that some part of the initial condition is a plain message. As the secret key we assume the system parameter(s) and additionally another part of the initial condition.

  20. 95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    95. BOUQUET RESERVOIR LOOKING UP VALLEY TO RESERVOIR LOOKING EAST - Los Angeles Aqueduct, From Lee Vining Intake (Mammoth Lakes) to Van Norman Reservoir Complex (San Fernando Valley), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  1. Dimensionality Problem in Discrete Discriminant Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Ana Sousa

    2011-09-01

    A high dimensional problem is very often in Discrete Discriminant Analysis (DDA) due to the fact that the number of parameters estimated in DDA models is very frequently too large. Then, the main problem is sparseness, in which some of the multinomial cells may have no data in the training sets (for one or several classes). Furthermore, there aren't truly reliable methods for selecting the most discrete discriminative features and often we deal with small sample sizes with classes not well separated. This dimensional DDA problem is often known as the "curse of dimensionality". In this context, a combining models approach seems to be promising since it is known that different DDA models perform differently on different subjects. This approach currently appears in an increasing number of papers aiming to obtain more robust and stable models. Thus, in discrete problems we propose new forms of modeling the conditional probability functions based on linear combinations of reference models (e.g. the Full Multinomial Model (FMM) and the First-order Independence Model (FOIM)). Recently, since class separability is another fundamental problem in discrete supervised problems we have focused in exploring measures for analyzing class separability. We investigate the performance of the present approaches on real and simulated data.

  2. Boone Reservoir bacteriological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, H.A.

    1990-03-01

    Since 1984, the bacteriological water quality of Boone Reservoir has improved. The actual reservoir pool consistently meets State bacteriological criteria for fecal coliform. Areas of the reservoir that remain impacted by high fecal coliform densities are the riverine portions upstream from SFHRM 35 on the South Fork Holston arm and WRM 13 on the Watauga River am of the reservoir. Improvements have resulted from a combined effort of water resource agencies, local municipalities, and private citizens. Both TVA and the TDHE have conducted monitoring programs over the last six years to assess the condition of the reservoir. Wastewater treatment facility improvements have been made by the cities of Bristol, Tennessee and Virginia, Bluff City, Elizabethton, and Johnson City to increase treatment efficiency and thereby improve Boone Reservoir water quality. Storm runoff events were correlated with elevated fecal coliform measurements in the Boone River watershed, with the greatest impact observed on the Watauga River arm and in the upper portion of the South Fork Holston River arm of the reservoir. Storm events increased the occurrence of wastewater bypasses from the Elizabethton STP and are primarily responsible for the high fecal coliform counts on the Watauga arm. However, nonpoint sources of pollution including animal waste and effluent from malfunctioning septic tank systems may also have a significant impact on Boone Reservoir water quality.

  3. Geysers reservoir studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

    1993-04-01

    LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

  4. Geothermal reservoir engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, H. J., Jr.; Kruger, P.; Brigham, W. E.; London, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Stanford University research program on the study of stimulation and reservoir engineering of geothermal resources commenced as an interdisciplinary program in September, 1972. The broad objectives of this program have been: (1) the development of experimental and computational data to evaluate the optimum performance of fracture-stimulated geothermal reservoirs; (2) the development of a geothermal reservoir model to evaluate important thermophysical, hydrodynamic, and chemical parameters based on fluid-energy-volume balances as part of standard reservoir engineering practice; and (3) the construction of a laboratory model of an explosion-produced chimney to obtain experimental data on the processes of in-place boiling, moving flash fronts, and two-phase flow in porous and fractured hydrothermal reservoirs.

  5. Implications of magma transfer between multiple reservoirs on eruption cycling.

    PubMed

    Elsworth, Derek; Mattioli, Glen; Taron, Joshua; Voight, Barry; Herd, Richard

    2008-10-10

    Volcanic eruptions are episodic despite being supplied by melt at a nearly constant rate. We used histories of magma efflux and surface deformation to geodetically image magma transfer within the deep crustal plumbing of the Soufrière Hills volcano on Montserrat, West Indies. For three cycles of effusion followed by discrete pauses, supply of the system from the deep crust and mantle was continuous. During periods of reinitiated high surface efflux, magma rose quickly and synchronously from a deflating mid-crustal reservoir (at about 12 kilometers) augmented from depth. During repose, the lower reservoir refilled from the deep supply, with only minor discharge transiting the upper chamber to surface. These observations are consistent with a model involving the continuous supply of magma from the deep crust and mantle into a voluminous and compliant mid-crustal reservoir, episodically valved below a shallow reservoir (at about 6 kilometers). PMID:18845752

  6. A Stochastic Model for Discrete Waves in the Limulus Photoreceptor

    PubMed Central

    Srebro, Richard; Behbehani, Mahmood

    1971-01-01

    A stochastic model that links the absorption of a photon to the production of a discrete wave in the photoreceptor of the lateral eye of Limulus is proposed. By separating a discrete wave into an initial component due directly to the absorption of a photon, and a second quasi all-or-nothing component, a mathematical description of the latencies of discrete waves is deduced and some important features of their time courses are suggested. The predictions of the model are compared to observations from 60 different ommatidia. PMID:5095679

  7. A Discrete Lagrangian Algorithm for Optimal Routing Problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kosmas, O. T.; Vlachos, D. S.; Simos, T. E.

    2008-11-06

    The ideas of discrete Lagrangian methods for conservative systems are exploited for the construction of algorithms applicable in optimal ship routing problems. The algorithm presented here is based on the discretisation of Hamilton's principle of stationary action Lagrangian and specifically on the direct discretization of the Lagrange-Hamilton principle for a conservative system. Since, in contrast to the differential equations, the discrete Euler-Lagrange equations serve as constrains for the optimization of a given cost functional, in the present work we utilize this feature in order to minimize the cost function for optimal ship routing.

  8. Magma Reservoirs Feeding Giant Radiating Dike Swarms: Insights from Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosfils, E. B.; Ernst, R. E.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence of lateral dike propagation from shallow magma reservoirs is quite common on the terrestrial planets, and examination of the giant radiating dike swarm population on Venus continues to provide new insight into the way these complex magmatic systems form and evolve. For example, it is becoming clear that many swarms are an amalgamation of multiple discrete phases of dike intrusion. This is not surprising in and of itself, as on Earth there is clear evidence that formation of both magma reservoirs and individual giant radiating dikes often involves periodic magma injection. Similarly, giant radiating swarms on Earth can contain temporally discrete subswarms defined on the basis of geometry, crosscutting relationships, and geochemical or paleomagnetic signatures. The Venus data are important, however, because erosion, sedimentation, plate tectonic disruption, etc. on Earth have destroyed most giant radiating dike swarm's source regions, and thus we remain uncertain about the geometry and temporal evolution of the magma sources from which the dikes are fed. Are the reservoirs which feed the dikes large or small, and what are the implications for how the dikes themselves form? Does each subswarm originate from a single, periodically reactivated reservoir, or do subswarms emerge from multiple discrete geographic foci? If the latter, are these discrete foci located at the margins of a single large magma body, or do multiple smaller reservoirs define the character of the magmatic center as a whole? Similarly, does the locus of magmatic activity change with time, or are all the foci active simultaneously? Careful study of giant radiating dike swarms on Venus is yielding the data necessary to address these questions and constrain future modeling efforts. Here, using giant radiating dike swarms from the Nemesis Tessera (V14) and Carson (V43) quadrangles as examples, we illustrate some of the dike swarm focal region diversity observed on Venus and briefly explore some

  9. Discrete anti-gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Noyes, H.P. ); Starson, S. )

    1991-03-01

    Discrete physics, because it replaces time evolution generated by the energy operator with a global bit-string generator (program universe) and replaces fields'' with the relativistic Wheeler-Feynman action at a distance,'' allows the consistent formulation of the concept of signed gravitational charge for massive particles. The resulting prediction made by this version of the theory is that free anti-particles near the surface of the earth will fall'' up with the same acceleration that the corresponding particles fall down. So far as we can see, no current experimental information is in conflict with this prediction of our theory. The experiment crusis will be one of the anti-proton or anti-hydrogen experiments at CERN. Our prediction should be much easier to test than the small effects which those experiments are currently designed to detect or bound. 23 refs.

  10. Discrete Sibson interpolation.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung W; Linsen, Lars; Kreylos, Oliver; Owens, John D; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-01-01

    Natural-neighbor interpolation methods, such as Sibson's method, are well-known schemes for multivariate data fitting and reconstruction. Despite its many desirable properties, Sibson's method is computationally expensive and difficult to implement, especially when applied to higher-dimensional data. The main reason for both problems is the method's implementation based on a Voronoi diagram of all data points. We describe a discrete approach to evaluating Sibson's interpolant on a regular grid, based solely on finding nearest neighbors and rendering and blending d-dimensional spheres. Our approach does not require us to construct an explicit Voronoi diagram, is easily implemented using commodity three-dimensional graphics hardware, leads to a significant speed increase compared to traditional approaches, and generalizes easily to higher dimensions. For large scattered data sets, we achieve two-dimensional (2D) interpolation at interactive rates and 3D interpolation (3D) with computation times of a few seconds. PMID:16509383

  11. Immigration and Prosecutorial Discretion

    PubMed Central

    Apollonio, Dorie; Lochner, Todd; Heddens, Myriah

    2015-01-01

    Immigration has become an increasingly salient national issue in the US, and the Department of Justice recently increased federal efforts to prosecute immigration offenses. This shift, however, relies on the cooperation of US attorneys and their assistants. Traditionally federal prosecutors have enjoyed enormous discretion and have been responsive to local concerns. To consider how the centralized goal of immigration enforcement may have influenced federal prosecutors in regional offices, we review their prosecution of immigration offenses in California using over a decade's worth of data. Our findings suggest that although centralizing forces influence immigration prosecutions, individual US attorneys' offices retain distinct characteristics. Local factors influence federal prosecutors' behavior in different ways depending on the office. Contrary to expectations, unemployment rates did not affect prosecutors' willingness to pursue immigration offenses, nor did local popular opinion about illegal immigration. PMID:26146530

  12. Discrete Pearson distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.; Kastenbaum, M.A.

    1991-11-01

    These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

  13. Discrete stability in stochastic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Lepp, R.

    1994-12-31

    In this lecture we study stability properties of stochastic programs with recourse where the probability measure is approximated by a sequence of weakly convergent discrete measures. Such discrete approximation approach gives us a possibility to analyze explicitly the behavior of the second stage correction function. The approach is based on modern functional analytical methods of an approximation of extremum problems in function spaces, especially on the notion of the discrete convergence of vectors to an essentially bounded measurable function.

  14. Mechanism of reservoir testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, Gunnar

    1987-01-01

    In evaluating geothermal resources we are primarily interested in data on the distribution of temperature and fluid conductivity within the reservoir, the total volume of the productive formations, recharge characteristics and chemical quality of the thermal fluids. While geophysical exploration by surface methods may furnish some data on the temperature field and give indications as to the reservoir volume, they furnish practically no information on the fluid conductivity and production characteristics. Such information will generally have to be obtained by tests performed within the reservoir, primarily by production tests on sufficiently deep wells. Reservoir testing is therefore one of the most important tasks in a general exploration program. In principal, reservoir testing has much in common with conventional geophysical exploration. Although the physical fields applied are to some extent different, they face the same type of selection between controlled and natural drives, forward and inverse problem setting, etc. The basic philosophy (Bodvarsson, 1966) is quite similar. In the present paper, they discuss some fundamentals of the theory of reservoir testing where the fluid conductivity field is the primary target. The emphasis is on local and global aspects of the forward approach to the case of liquid saturated (dominated) Darcy type formations. Both controlled and natural driving pressure or strain fields are to be considered and particular emphasis is placed on the situation resulting from the effects of a free liquid surface at the top of the reservoir.

  15. Discrete instability in the DNA double helix.

    PubMed

    Tabi, Conrad Bertrand; Mohamadou, Alidou; Kofané, Timoléon Crépin

    2009-12-01

    Modulational instability (MI) is explored in the framework of the base-rotor model of DNA dynamics. We show, in fact, that the helicoidal coupling introduced in the spin model of DNA reduces the system to a modified discrete sine-Gordon (sG) equation. The MI criterion is thus modified and displays interesting features because of the helicoidal coupling. In the simulations, we have found that a train of pulses is generated when the lattice is subjected to MI, in agreement with analytical results obtained in a modified discrete sG equation. Also, the competitive effects of the harmonic longitudinal and helicoidal constants on the dynamics of the system are notably pointed out. In the same way, it is shown that MI can lead to energy localization which becomes high for some values of the helicoidal coupling constant. PMID:20059197

  16. Optimal Discretization Resolution in Algebraic Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, Behzad; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we focus on data-limited tomographic imaging problems where the underlying linear inverse problem is ill-posed. A typical regularized reconstruction algorithm uses algebraic formulation with a predetermined discretization resolution. If the selected resolution is too low, we may loose useful details of the underlying image and if it is too high, the reconstruction will be unstable and the representation will fit irrelevant features. In this work, two approaches are introduced to address this issue. The first approach is using Mallow's CL method or generalized cross-validation. For each of the two methods, a joint estimator of regularization parameter and discretization resolution is proposed and their asymptotic optimality is investigated. The second approach is a Bayesian estimator of the model order using a complexity-penalizing prior. Numerical experiments focus on a space imaging application from a set of limited-angle tomographic observations.

  17. A new model for discrete character evolution.

    PubMed

    Grafen, A; Ridley, M

    1997-01-01

    The paper provides an explicit justification for the principle that a uniform taxon should contribute only one datapoint in comparative analyses with discrete variables. The justification is that phylogenetic patterns in variables unincluded in the proposed test vitiate the assumption of independence, both at the level of species and at the level of branch segments. The consequence is that a uniform taxon cannot safely be counted as more than one datapoint. The arguments use a branching discrete Markov process in continuous time, with the new feature that the tested variables are only a subset of the evolving characters. This model is proposed as a useful criterion for measuring the merit of proposed tests, and illustrates the necessity for models in evaluating comparative methods. PMID:9039396

  18. Flow and transport effects of compaction bands in sandstone at scales relevant to aquifer and reservoir management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternlof, K. R.; Karimi-Fard, M.; Pollard, D. D.; Durlofsky, L. J.

    2006-07-01

    Thin, tabular, low-porosity, low-permeability compaction bands form pervasive, subparallel, anastomosing arrays that extend over square kilometers of exposure in the Aztec Sandstone of southeastern Nevada, an exhumed analog for active aquifers and reservoirs. In order to examine the potential flow and transport effects of these band arrays at scales relevant to production and management, we performed a suite of simulations using an innovative discrete-feature modeling technique to capture the exact pattern of compaction bands mapped over some 150,000 m2 of contiguous outcrop. Significant impacts related to the presence of the bands and their dominant trend are apparent: the average pressure drop required to drive flow between wells exceeds that for band-free sandstone by a factor of three and is 10% to 50% higher across the bands versus along them; reservoir production efficiency varies up to 56% for a typical five-spot well array, depending on its orientation relative to the dominant band trend; and contaminant transport away from a point source within an aquifer tends to channel along the bands, regardless of the regional gradient direction. We conclude that accounting for the flow effects of similar compaction-band arrays would prove essential for optimal management of those sandstone aquifers and reservoirs in which they occur.

  19. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  20. Potential Mammalian Filovirus Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Darin S.; Mills, James N.; Johnson, Karl M.

    2004-01-01

    Ebola and Marburg viruses are maintained in unknown reservoir species; spillover into human populations results in occasional human cases or epidemics. We attempted to narrow the list of possibilities regarding the identity of those reservoir species. We made a series of explicit assumptions about the reservoir: it is a mammal; it supports persistent, largely asymptomatic filovirus infections; its range subsumes that of its associated filovirus; it has coevolved with the virus; it is of small body size; and it is not a species that is commensal with humans. Under these assumptions, we developed priority lists of mammal clades that coincide distributionally with filovirus outbreak distributions and compared these lists with those mammal taxa that have been tested for filovirus infection in previous epidemiologic studies. Studying the remainder of these taxa may be a fruitful avenue for pursuing the identity of natural reservoirs of filoviruses. PMID:15663841

  1. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  2. Session: Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

  3. Geothermal reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercer, J. W., Jr.; Faust, C.; Pinder, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    The prediction of long-term geothermal reservoir performance and the environmental impact of exploiting this resource are two important problems associated with the utilization of geothermal energy for power production. Our research effort addresses these problems through numerical simulation. Computer codes based on the solution of partial-differential equations using finite-element techniques are being prepared to simulate multiphase energy transport, energy transport in fractured porous reservoirs, well bore phenomena, and subsidence.

  4. Discrete Mathematics and Curriculum Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Margaret J.

    1996-01-01

    Defines discrete mathematics as the mathematics necessary to effect reasoned decision making in finite situations and explains how its use supports the current view of mathematics education. Discrete mathematics can be used by curriculum developers to improve the curriculum for students of all ages and abilities. (SLD)

  5. Discrete Mathematics and Its Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oxley, Alan

    2010-01-01

    The article gives ideas that lecturers of undergraduate Discrete Mathematics courses can use in order to make the subject more interesting for students and encourage them to undertake further studies in the subject. It is possible to teach Discrete Mathematics with little or no reference to computing. However, students are more likely to be…

  6. Reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery research

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, L.W.; Pope, G.A.; Schechter, R.S.

    1992-03-01

    The research in this annual report falls into three tasks each dealing with a different aspect of enhanced oil recovery. The first task strives to develop procedures for accurately modeling reservoirs for use as input to numerical simulation flow models. This action describes how we have used a detail characterization of an outcrop to provide insights into what features are important to fluid flow modeling. The second task deals with scaling-up and modeling chemical and solvent EOR processes. In a sense this task is the natural extension of task 1 and, in fact, one of the subtasks uses many of the same statistical procedures for insight into the effects of viscous fingering and heterogeneity. The final task involves surfactants and their interactions with carbon dioxide and reservoir minerals. This research deals primarily with phenomena observed when aqueous surfactant solutions are injected into oil reservoirs.

  7. Anomalous discrete symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z. )

    1992-12-01

    We examine an interesting scenario to solve the domain-wall problem recently suggested by Preskill, Trivedi, Wilczek, and Wise. The effective potential is calculated in the presence of the QCD axial anomaly. It is shown that some discrete symmetries such as {ital CP} and {ital Z}{sub 2} can be anomalous due to a so-called {ital K} term induced by instantons. We point out that the {ital Z}{sub 2} domain-wall problem in the two-doublet standard model can be resolved by two types of solutions: the {ital CP}-conserving one and the {ital CP}-breaking one. In the first case, there exist two {ital Z}{sub 2}-related local minima whose energy splitting is provided by the instanton effect. In the second case, there is only one unique vacuum so that the domain walls do not form at all. The consequences of this new source of {ital CP} violation are discussed and shown to be well within the experimental limits in weak interactions.

  8. Discreteness inducing coexistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Renato Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Consider two species that diffuse through space. Consider further that they differ only in initial densities and, possibly, in diffusion constants. Otherwise they are identical. What happens if they compete with each other in the same environment? What is the influence of the discrete nature of the interactions on the final destination? And what are the influence of diffusion and additive fluctuations corresponding to random migration and immigration of individuals? This paper aims to answer these questions for a particular competition model that incorporates intra and interspecific competition between the species. Based on mean field theory, the model has a stationary state dependent on the initial density conditions. We investigate how this initial density dependence is affected by the presence of demographic multiplicative noise and additive noise in space and time. There are three main conclusions: (1) Additive noise favors denser populations at the expense of the less dense, ratifying the competitive exclusion principle. (2) Demographic noise, on the other hand, favors less dense populations at the expense of the denser ones, inducing equal densities at the quasi-stationary state, violating the aforementioned principle. (3) The slower species always suffers the more deleterious effects of statistical fluctuations in a homogeneous medium.

  9. Discrete subaortic stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M M; Varma, M P; Cleland, J; O'Kane, H O; Webb, S W; Mulholland, H C; Adgey, A A

    1981-01-01

    Data concerning 17 consecutive patients with discrete subaortic stenosis are recorded. Twelve patients underwent operative resection of the obstructing lesion. Of these all except one were symptomatic and all had electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular hypertrophy with strain. They had a peak resting systolic left ventricular outflow tract gradient of greater than 50 mmHg as predicted from the combined cuff measurement of systolic blood pressure and the echocardiographically estimated left ventricular systolic pressure and/or as determined by cardiac catheterisation. The outflow tract gradient as predicted from M-mode echocardiography and peak systolic pressure showed close correlation with that measured at cardiac catheterisation or operation. During the postoperative follow-up from one month to 11 years, of 11 patients, one patient required a further operation for recurrence of the obstruction four years after the initial operation. All patients are now asymptomatic. Five patients have not had an operation. The left ventricular outflow tract gradient as assessed at the time of cardiac catheterisation was greater than 50 mmHg. One patient has been lost to follow-up. The remaining four have been followed from four to eight years and have remained asymptomatic and the electrocardiograms have remained unchanged. Careful follow-up of all patients is essential with continuing clinical assessment, electrocardiograms, M-mode and two-dimensional echocardiograms, and if necessary cardiac catheterisation. Prophylaxis against bacterial endocarditis is also essential. Images PMID:6457617

  10. Paonia Reservoir Sediment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrel, S.; Collins, K.; Williams, C.

    2014-12-01

    Paonia Dam and Reservoir are located on Muddy Creek, a tributary of the North Fork Gunnison River in western Colorado. Since dam closure in 1962, the 2002 survey estimates an annual sedimentation rate of 153,000 m3/y, resulting in a 25% loss of total reservoir capacity. Long before sediment levels completely fill the reservoir, the outlet works have recently plugged with sediment and debris, adversely impacting operations, and emphasizing the urgency of formulating an effective sediment management plan. Starting in 2010-2011, operations were changed to lower the reservoir and flush sediment through the outlet works in early spring before filling the pool for irrigation. Even though the flushing strategy through the long, narrow reservoir (~5 km long and 0.3 km wide) has prevented outlet works plugging, a long term plan is needed to manage inflowing and deposited sediment more efficiently. Reclamation's Sedimentation and River Hydraulics Group is leading an effort to study the past and current sediment issues at Paonia Dam and Reservoir, evaluate feasible sediment management alternatives, and formulate a plan for future operations and monitoring. The study is building on previously collected data and the existing knowledge base to develop a comprehensive, sustainable sediment management plan. The study is being executed in three phases: Phase 1 consisted of an initial site visit to map and sample existing reservoir bottom sediments, a preliminary site evaluation upstream and downstream of the dam, and establishment of time-lapse photo sites and taking initial ground-based photos. Phase 2 includes a bathymetric survey of entire reservoir and 11 km of the river downstream of the dam, continuous suspended sediment monitoring upstream and downstream of the reservoir, and collection of additional core samples of reservoir bottom sediments. Phase 3 involves the evaluation of current and past operations and sediment management practices, evaluate feasible sediment

  11. Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Model Development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Birdsell, Stephen A.

    1989-03-21

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general.

  12. Hot Dry Rock geothermal reservoir model development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.A.; Birdsell, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Discrete fracture and continuum models are being developed to simulate Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. The discrete fracture model is a two-dimensional steady state simulator of fluid flow and tracer transport in a fracture network which is generated from assumed statistical properties of the fractures. The model's strength lies in its ability to compute the steady state pressure drop and tracer response in a realistic network of interconnected fractures. The continuum approach models fracture behavior by treating permeability and porosity as functions of temperature and effective stress. With this model it is practical to model transient behavior as well as the coupled processes of fluid flow, heat transfer, and stress effects in a three-dimensional system. The model capabilities being developed will also have applications in conventional geothermal systems undergoing reinjection and in fractured geothermal reservoirs in general. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Performance of fractured horizontal well with stimulated reservoir volume in unconventional gas reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Luo, Jian-Xin; Zhang, Bo-Ning

    2014-05-01

    This paper extended the conventional multiple hydraulic fractured horizontal (MFH) well into a composite model to describe the stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) caused by hydraulic fracturing. Employing the Laplace transform, Source function, and Dirac delta function methods, the continuous linear source function for general composite dual-porosity is derived, and the solution of the MFH well in a composite gas reservoir is obtained with the numerical discrete method. Through the Stehfest numerical algorithm and Gauss elimination method, the transient pressure responses for well producing at a constant production rate and the production rate vs. time for constant bottomhole pressure are analyzed. The effects of related parameters such as natural permeability and radial of the SRV region, formation permeability and interporosity coefficient on transient pressure and production performance are analyzed as well. The presented model and obtained results in this paper not only enrich the well testing models of such unconventional reservoir, but also can use to interpret on-site data which have significance on efficient reservoir development.

  14. Seismic Determination of Reservoir Heterogeneity: Application to the Characterization of Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Imhof, Matthias G.; Castle, James W.

    2003-03-12

    The objective of the project was to examine how seismic and geologic data could be used to improve characterization of small-scale heterogeneity and their parameterization in reservoir models. Performed a theoretical and numerical study to examine which subsurface features the surface seismic method actually resolves.

  15. The discrete variational derivative method based on discrete differential forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaguchi, Takaharu; Matsuo, Takayasu; Sugihara, Masaaki

    2012-05-01

    As is well known, for PDEs that enjoy a conservation or dissipation property, numerical schemes that inherit this property are often advantageous in that the schemes are fairly stable and give qualitatively better numerical solutions in practice. Lately, Furihata and Matsuo have developed the so-called “discrete variational derivative method” that automatically constructs energy preserving or dissipative finite difference schemes. Although this method was originally developed on uniform meshes, the use of non-uniform meshes is of importance for multi-dimensional problems. On the other hand, the theories of discrete differential forms have received much attention recently. These theories provide a discrete analogue of the vector calculus on general meshes. In this paper, we show that the discrete variational derivative method and the discrete differential forms by Bochev and Hyman can be combined. Applications to the Cahn-Hilliard equation and the Klein-Gordon equation on triangular meshes are provided as demonstrations. We also show that the schemes for these equations are H1-stable under some assumptions. In particular, one for the nonlinear Klein-Gordon equation is obtained by combination of the energy conservation property and the discrete Poincaré inequality, which are the temporal and spacial structures that are preserved by the above methods.

  16. Computational capabilities of random automata networks for reservoir computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, David; Goudarzi, Alireza; Teuscher, Christof

    2013-04-01

    This paper underscores the conjecture that intrinsic computation is maximal in systems at the “edge of chaos”. We study the relationship between dynamics and computational capability in random Boolean networks (RBN) for reservoir computing (RC). RC is a computational paradigm in which a trained readout layer interprets the dynamics of an excitable component (called the reservoir) that is perturbed by external input. The reservoir is often implemented as a homogeneous recurrent neural network, but there has been little investigation into the properties of reservoirs that are discrete and heterogeneous. Random Boolean networks are generic and heterogeneous dynamical systems and here we use them as the reservoir. A RBN is typically a closed system; to use it as a reservoir we extend it with an input layer. As a consequence of perturbation, the RBN does not necessarily fall into an attractor. Computational capability in RC arises from a tradeoff between separability and fading memory of inputs. We find the balance of these properties predictive of classification power and optimal at critical connectivity. These results are relevant to the construction of devices which exploit the intrinsic dynamics of complex heterogeneous systems, such as biomolecular substrates.

  17. Using a hot dry rock geothermal reservoir for load following

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.W.; Duteau, R.J.

    1995-01-01

    Field measurements and modeling have shown the potential for using a Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir for electric load following: either with Power-Peaking from a base-load operating condition, or for Pumped Storage of off-peak electric energy with a very significant thermal augmentation of the stored mechanical energy during periods of power production. For the base-load with power- peaking mode of operation, and HDR reservoir appears capable of producing over twice its nominal power output for short -- 2 to 4 hour -- periods of time. In this mode of operation, the reservoir normally would be produced under a high-backpressure condition with the HDR reservoir region near the production well highly inflated. Upon demand, the production backpressure would be sharply reduced, surging the production flow. The analytical tool used in these investigations has been the transient finite element model of the an HDR reservoir called GEOCRACK, which is being developed by Professor Dan Swenson and his students at Kansas State University. This discrete-element representation of a jointed rock mass has recently been validated for transient operations using the set of cyclic reservoir operating data obtained at the end of the LTFT.

  18. Accurate multiscale finite element method for numerical simulation of two-phase flow in fractured media using discrete-fracture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Na; Yao, Jun; Huang, Zhaoqin; Wang, Yueying

    2013-06-01

    Numerical simulation in naturally fractured media is challenging because of the coexistence of porous media and fractures on multiple scales that need to be coupled. We present a new approach to reservoir simulation that gives accurate resolution of both large-scale and fine-scale flow patterns. Multiscale methods are suitable for this type of modeling, because it enables capturing the large scale behavior of the solution without solving all the small features. Dual-porosity models in view of their strength and simplicity can be mainly used for sugar-cube representation of fractured media. In such a representation, the transfer function between the fracture and the matrix block can be readily calculated for water-wet media. For a mixed-wet system, the evaluation of the transfer function becomes complicated due to the effect of gravity. In this work, we use a multiscale finite element method (MsFEM) for two-phase flow in fractured media using the discrete-fracture model. By combining MsFEM with the discrete-fracture model, we aim towards a numerical scheme that facilitates fractured reservoir simulation without upscaling. MsFEM uses a standard Darcy model to approximate the pressure and saturation on a coarse grid, whereas fine scale effects are captured through basis functions constructed by solving local flow problems using the discrete-fracture model. The accuracy and the robustness of MsFEM are shown through several examples. In the first example, we consider several small fractures in a matrix and then compare the results solved by the finite element method. Then, we use the MsFEM in more complex models. The results indicate that the MsFEM is a promising path toward direct simulation of highly resolution geomodels.

  19. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  20. Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing

    PubMed Central

    Paquot, Y.; Duport, F.; Smerieri, A.; Dambre, J.; Schrauwen, B.; Haelterman, M.; Massar, S.

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an optoelectronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations. PMID:22371825

  1. Lakes and reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Taub, F.B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume in the Ecosystems of the World series studies lakes and reservoirs. The book opens with a discussion of the ecosystem processes that are common to all lakes and reservoirs and then proceeds to a description of mathematical models of these processes. The chapters concentrate on lakes and reservoirs in different parts of the world, ranging from polar to tropical lakes, and in many of the chapters the effects of human activities such as dam construction, increased nutrient inputs, toxic contaminants and fish introduction, are also considered. The book concludes with a summary of the efforts at lake restoration that are being undertaken in many communities in an attempt to undo the damage that has resulted from some of these activities.

  2. Microscopic derivation of discrete hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Español, Pep; Anero, Jesús G; Zúñiga, Ignacio

    2009-12-28

    By using the standard theory of coarse graining based on Zwanzig's projection operator, we derive the dynamic equations for discrete hydrodynamic variables. These hydrodynamic variables are defined in terms of the Delaunay triangulation. The resulting microscopically derived equations can be understood, a posteriori, as a discretization on an arbitrary irregular grid of the Navier-Stokes equations. The microscopic derivation provides a set of discrete equations that exactly conserves mass, momentum, and energy and the dissipative part of the dynamics produces strict entropy increase. In addition, the microscopic derivation provides a practical implementation of thermal fluctuations in a way that the fluctuation-dissipation theorem is satisfied exactly. This paper points toward a close connection between coarse-graining procedures from microscopic dynamics and discretization schemes for partial differential equations. PMID:20059064

  3. Novel approach to data discretization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borowik, Grzegorz; Kowalski, Karol; Jankowski, Cezary

    2015-09-01

    Discretization is an important preprocessing step in data mining. The data discretization method involves determining the ranges of values for numeric attributes, which ultimately represent discrete intervals for new attributes. The ranges for the proposed set of cuts are analyzed, in order to obtain a minimal set of ranges while retaining the possibility of classification. For this purpose, a special discernibility function can be constructed as a conjunction of alternative cuts set for each pair of different objects of different decisions- cuts discern these objects. However, the data mining methods based on discernibility matrix are insufficient for large databases. The purpose of this paper is the idea of implementation of a new data discretization algorithm that is based on statistics of attribute values and that avoids building the discernibility matrix explicitly. Evaluation of time complexity has shown that the proposed method is much more efficient than currently available solutions for large data sets.

  4. Chaos in Periodic Discrete Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuming; Zhang, Lijuan; Yu, Panpan; Huang, Qiuling

    This paper focuses on chaos in periodic discrete systems, whose state space may vary with time. Some close relationships between some chaotic dynamical behaviors of a periodic discrete system and its autonomous induced system are given. Based on these relationships, several criteria of chaos are established and some sufficient conditions for no chaos are given for periodic discrete systems. Further, it is shown that a finite-dimensional linear periodic discrete system is not chaotic in the sense of Li-Yorke or Wiggins. In particular, an interesting problem of whether nonchaotic rules may generate a chaotic system is studied, with some examples provided, one of which surprisingly shows that a composition of globally asymptotically stable maps can be chaotic. In addition, some properties of sign pattern matrices of non-negative square matrices are given for convenience of the study.

  5. Manicouagin Reservoir of Canada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Recorded by the Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-110 mission, this is a photograph of the ice- covered Manicouagin Reservoir located in the Canadian Shield of Quebec Province in Eastern Canada, partially obscured by low clouds. This reservoir marks the site of an impact crater, 60 miles (100 kilometers) wide, which according to geologists was formed 212 million years ago when a meteorite crashed into this area. Over millions of years, the crater has been worn down by glaciers and other erosional processes. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  6. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, D.

    1995-05-01

    Exploration strategies are needed to identify subtle basement features critical to locating fractured regions in advance of drilling in tight gas reservoirs. The Piceance Basin served as a demonstration site for an analysis utilizing aeromagnetic surveys, remote sensing, Landsat Thematic Mapper, and Side Looking Airborne Radar imagery for the basin and surrounding areas. Spatially detailed aeromagnetic maps were used to to interpret zones of basement structure.

  7. Analysis of discretization errors in LES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosal, Sandip

    1995-01-01

    All numerical simulations of turbulence (DNS or LES) involve some discretization errors. The integrity of such simulations therefore depend on our ability to quantify and control such errors. In the classical literature on analysis of errors in partial differential equations, one typically studies simple linear equations (such as the wave equation or Laplace's equation). The qualitative insight gained from studying such simple situations is then used to design numerical methods for more complex problems such as the Navier-Stokes equations. Though such an approach may seem reasonable as a first approximation, it should be recognized that strongly nonlinear problems, such as turbulence, have a feature that is absent in linear problems. This feature is the simultaneous presence of a continuum of space and time scales. Thus, in an analysis of errors in the one dimensional wave equation, one may, without loss of generality, rescale the equations so that the dependent variable is always of order unity. This is not possible in the turbulence problem since the amplitudes of the Fourier modes of the velocity field have a continuous distribution. The objective of the present research is to provide some quantitative measures of numerical errors in such situations. Though the focus of this work is LES, the methods introduced here can be just as easily applied to DNS. Errors due to discretization of the time-variable are neglected for the purpose of this analysis.

  8. Assessing contribution of DOC from sediments to a drinking-water reservoir using optical profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Downing, Bryan D.; Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Evans, David G.; Boss, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the sources of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in drinking-water reservoirs is an important management issue because DOC may form disinfection by-products, interfere with disinfection, or increase treatment costs. DOC may be derived from a host of sources-algal production of DOC in the reservoir, marginal production of DOC from mucks and vascular plants at the margins, and sediments in the reservoir. The purpose of this study was to assess if release of DOC from reservoir sediments containing ferric chloride coagulant was a significant source of DOC to the reservoir. We examined the source-specific contributions of DOC using a profiling system to measure the in situ distribution of optical properties of absorption and fluorescence at various locations in the reservoir. Vertical optical profiles were coupled with discrete water samples measured in the laboratory for DOC concentration and optical properties: absorption spectra and excitation emission matrix spectra (EEMs). Modeling the in situ optical data permitted estimation of the bulk DOC profile in the reservoir as well as separation into source-specific contributions. Analysis of the source-specific profiles and their associated optical characteristics indicated that the sedimentary source of DOC to the reservoir is significant and that this DOC is labile in the reservoir. We conclude that optical profiling is a useful technique for understanding complex biogeochemical processes in a reservoir.

  9. 3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, and River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    La Pointe, Paul R.; Hermanson, Jan

    2002-09-09

    The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models.

  10. Computer-Aided Diagnosis System for Alzheimer's Disease Using Different Discrete Transform Techniques.

    PubMed

    Dessouky, Mohamed M; Elrashidy, Mohamed A; Taha, Taha E; Abdelkader, Hatem M

    2016-05-01

    The different discrete transform techniques such as discrete cosine transform (DCT), discrete sine transform (DST), discrete wavelet transform (DWT), and mel-scale frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs) are powerful feature extraction techniques. This article presents a proposed computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for extracting the most effective and significant features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) using these different discrete transform techniques and MFCC techniques. Linear support vector machine has been used as a classifier in this article. Experimental results conclude that the proposed CAD system using MFCC technique for AD recognition has a great improvement for the system performance with small number of significant extracted features, as compared with the CAD system based on DCT, DST, DWT, and the hybrid combination methods of the different transform techniques. PMID:26371347

  11. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  12. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  13. Reservoirs 3 carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers the topics of Carbonates; Carbonate depositional environments and Carbonate diagenesis. Included are the following papers: pore geometry of carbonate rocks as revealed by pore casts and capillary pressure; a review of carbonate reservoirs; the chemistry of dolomitization and dolomite precipitation.

  14. Reservoirs III carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    This text is part of a three volume set on petroleum and natural gas reservoir rocks. This volume deals with carbonate rocks and their properties as they relate to oil and gas production. Papers deal specifically with depositional environments, diagenesis, and chemical and physical properties of the rock.

  15. Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficken, W. H.; Schulien, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device supplies controlled amounts of lubricating oil to ball bearings during operation of the bearings. The dynamic reservoir lubricating device includes a rotating reservoir nut, a hollow cylinder filled with lubricating oil, flow restrictors and a ball bearing retainer.

  16. Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management.

    PubMed

    Mei, Ying; Chang, Chein-Chi; Dong, Zhanfeng; Wei, Li

    2016-10-01

    This review on stream, lake, and reservoir management covers selected 2015 publications on the focus of the following sections: • Biota • Climate effect • Models • Remediation and restoration • Reservoir operations • Stream, Lake, and Reservoir Management • Water quality. PMID:27620102

  17. Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Corbett, P.; Ementon, N.

    1994-12-31

    Geochemistry provides a natural but poorly exploited link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the PVT properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a sub-meter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

  18. Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N.

    1997-02-01

    Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

  19. Distributed Relaxation for Conservative Discretizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diskin, Boris; Thomas, James L.

    2001-01-01

    A multigrid method is defined as having textbook multigrid efficiency (TME) if the solutions to the governing system of equations are attained in a computational work that is a small (less than 10) multiple of the operation count in one target-grid residual evaluation. The way to achieve this efficiency is the distributed relaxation approach. TME solvers employing distributed relaxation have already been demonstrated for nonconservative formulations of high-Reynolds-number viscous incompressible and subsonic compressible flow regimes. The purpose of this paper is to provide foundations for applications of distributed relaxation to conservative discretizations. A direct correspondence between the primitive variable interpolations for calculating fluxes in conservative finite-volume discretizations and stencils of the discretized derivatives in the nonconservative formulation has been established. Based on this correspondence, one can arrive at a conservative discretization which is very efficiently solved with a nonconservative relaxation scheme and this is demonstrated for conservative discretization of the quasi one-dimensional Euler equations. Formulations for both staggered and collocated grid arrangements are considered and extensions of the general procedure to multiple dimensions are discussed.

  20. Geothermal Reservoirs: Products of Cooling Plutons

    SciTech Connect

    Denis L. Norton

    2002-09-24

    The goals of this project were to develop an in depth understanding of how geothermal reservoirs form and elucidate those features that could potentially be useful in exploration and development of additional energy reserves. Collaboration with Jeff Hulen, EGI helped closely coordinate theoretical concepts and computational experiments with geologic reality in fulfillment of the tasks for this project. Initial reconnaissance computations with Tom Brikowski, University of Texas were critical in realizing the final products of this project. The products of this work contribute basic understanding of the dynamical conditions attendant to the formation of reservoirs in general and the Geysers reservoir in particular. The most exciting of the discoveries were a combination of mineralogical, computational, and geothermometric data sets that revealed a chaotic-like behavior of the processes is critical in the formation of reservoirs near cooling plutions. This discovery provides a fundamental basis for improving resource assessment and exploration methods for geothermal energy associated with very young magmas. Some of the main results are documented in scientific publications, and DOE progress reports. An additional publication is in preparation on the overall significance of fracture propagation and microseismic activity around young magmas.

  1. Surrogate Reservoir Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    2010-05-01

    Surrogate Reservoir Model (SRM) is new solution for fast track, comprehensive reservoir analysis (solving both direct and inverse problems) using existing reservoir simulation models. SRM is defined as a replica of the full field reservoir simulation model that runs and provides accurate results in real-time (one simulation run takes only a fraction of a second). SRM mimics the capabilities of a full field model with high accuracy. Reservoir simulation is the industry standard for reservoir management. It is used in all phases of field development in the oil and gas industry. The routine of simulation studies calls for integration of static and dynamic measurements into the reservoir model. Full field reservoir simulation models have become the major source of information for analysis, prediction and decision making. Large prolific fields usually go through several versions (updates) of their model. Each new version usually is a major improvement over the previous version. The updated model includes the latest available information incorporated along with adjustments that usually are the result of single-well or multi-well history matching. As the number of reservoir layers (thickness of the formations) increases, the number of cells representing the model approaches several millions. As the reservoir models grow in size, so does the time that is required for each run. Schemes such as grid computing and parallel processing helps to a certain degree but do not provide the required speed for tasks such as: field development strategies using comprehensive reservoir analysis, solving the inverse problem for injection/production optimization, quantifying uncertainties associated with the geological model and real-time optimization and decision making. These types of analyses require hundreds or thousands of runs. Furthermore, with the new push for smart fields in the oil/gas industry that is a natural growth of smart completion and smart wells, the need for real time

  2. Stochastic nonlinear time series forecasting using time-delay reservoir computers: performance and universality.

    PubMed

    Grigoryeva, Lyudmila; Henriques, Julie; Larger, Laurent; Ortega, Juan-Pablo

    2014-07-01

    Reservoir computing is a recently introduced machine learning paradigm that has already shown excellent performances in the processing of empirical data. We study a particular kind of reservoir computers called time-delay reservoirs that are constructed out of the sampling of the solution of a time-delay differential equation and show their good performance in the forecasting of the conditional covariances associated to multivariate discrete-time nonlinear stochastic processes of VEC-GARCH type as well as in the prediction of factual daily market realized volatilities computed with intraday quotes, using as training input daily log-return series of moderate size. We tackle some problems associated to the lack of task-universality for individually operating reservoirs and propose a solution based on the use of parallel arrays of time-delay reservoirs. PMID:24732236

  3. Discretion or discretions? Delineating professional discretion: the case of English medical practice.

    PubMed

    Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Calnan, Michael

    2013-11-01

    There has much debate about the extent to which professional discretion has been challenged by recent organisational changes such as through the new forms of governance associated with the introduction of the principles of the New Public Management (NPM) into health systems and other public sector services. What appears to be missing from these debates is a detailed analysis of the concept of professional discretion itself. This paper attempts to fill this gap by delineating the key concepts of professional discretion evident in the literature and exploring their significance in an empirical study of the influence of the 2004 new general medical services contract (nGMS) and the introduction of the Quality and Outcomes Framework (QOF), a prescriptive pay-for-performance system designed to standardise the quality of care provision in general medical practice in the United Kingdom. The study adopted a longitudinal design using semi-structured interviews with general practitioners (GPs, N = 62) working in the English National Health Service (NHS) between 2007 and 2009. A multi-dimensional conception of discretion was used to explore how GP discretion might have been influenced by contractual changes and in particular, QOF. The findings suggest that through a complex interplay of factors, a post-QOF reduction in GP discretion was identifiable, highlighting different potential sources of constraint such as in the social, organisational and economic dimensions of discretion. The evidence also suggested the emergence of a new form of organisational medical professionalism within general practice characterised by standardisation, bureaucracy and performance management. PMID:24034951

  4. Optimal reservoir operation policies using novel nested algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Historically, the two most widely practiced methods for optimal reservoir operation have been dynamic programming (DP) and stochastic dynamic programming (SDP). These two methods suffer from the so called "dual curse" which prevents them to be used in reasonably complex water systems. The first one is the "curse of dimensionality" that denotes an exponential growth of the computational complexity with the state - decision space dimension. The second one is the "curse of modelling" that requires an explicit model of each component of the water system to anticipate the effect of each system's transition. We address the problem of optimal reservoir operation concerning multiple objectives that are related to 1) reservoir releases to satisfy several downstream users competing for water with dynamically varying demands, 2) deviations from the target minimum and maximum reservoir water levels and 3) hydropower production that is a combination of the reservoir water level and the reservoir releases. Addressing such a problem with classical methods (DP and SDP) requires a reasonably high level of discretization of the reservoir storage volume, which in combination with the required releases discretization for meeting the demands of downstream users leads to computationally expensive formulations and causes the curse of dimensionality. We present a novel approach, named "nested" that is implemented in DP, SDP and reinforcement learning (RL) and correspondingly three new algorithms are developed named nested DP (nDP), nested SDP (nSDP) and nested RL (nRL). The nested algorithms are composed from two algorithms: 1) DP, SDP or RL and 2) nested optimization algorithm. Depending on the way we formulate the objective function related to deficits in the allocation problem in the nested optimization, two methods are implemented: 1) Simplex for linear allocation problems, and 2) quadratic Knapsack method in the case of nonlinear problems. The novel idea is to include the nested

  5. Uncertainties in Parameterizing Faults for Discrete Fracture Network Models (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doe, T.

    2013-12-01

    Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models represent conducting faults and fractures as two dimensional features with transmissivity that defines the flow capacity, storativity that represents the open volume and compressibility, and aperture that determines the flow velocity. While these properties work well for capturing the pressure and flow behaviors they are not complete for understanding solute transport in groundwater or production in fault-dominated oil and gas reservoirs. For oil and gas production, water breakthrough will be controlled by the small portion of the fault that accounts for most of the fault's transmissivity, while the major portion in the fault's storage will be released more slowly. Similarly, in contaminant hydrology, the multiple porosities of the faults may enhance matrix diffusion effects. This presentation focuses on faults in granitic basement rock with low matrix permeability and porosity. Although these rocks contain joints and simple fractures, the major portion of the flow and storage may appear in faults and shear fractures that span a large range of scales. Unlike simple fractures or joints, faults and shear fractures have complex internal geometries including a range of materials including altered rock, breccia, mylonite, cataclasite, and gouge. These materials may have significant porosities ranging from a few percent to over thirty percent in heavily weathered or altered rocks. The core materials may act as either barriers or conduits. Altered granitic rock may also have porosities in the range of several percent. As faults may have thicknesses from a few centimeters to several tens of meters, the pore volumes in fault rock can be very significant. A key to understanding fault zone behaviors lies in having a range for the relative pore volumes of the conducting portion of the fault versus that of the larger damage zone. This presentation summarizes a literature review focusing on these fault properties. The conducting portion of

  6. Archeological inundation studies: Manual for reservoir managers. Contract report

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    Twentieth century demands for water, electricity, and flood control in the United States have resulted in the damming and impoundment of most of America's large rivers and streams. The impact of such activities on North American archeological and historical resources is difficult to measure. Concern for mitigating the impact of dam construction and reservoir impoundment resulted in the Reservoir Salvage Act of 1960, as amended in 1974, which requires that any US agency undertaking dam construction must provide written notice to the Secretary of the Interior, who shall then cause a survey to be conducted for archeological sites, either by the Department of the Interior or by the Federal agency undertaking the construction project. Development and operation of freshwater reservoirs create a variety of potential impacts on archeological resources. These impacts accrue from several sources, including mechanical, biochemical, and human and other processes associated with the reservoir environment. This report summarizes the findings of the National Reservoir Inundation Study, a multi-agency project designed to assess the range of effects of inundation on archeological resources. Potential effects are discussed within three discrete zones of differential impact: (a) the conservation pool, (b) the fluctuation zone, and (c) the backshore zone.

  7. Cavity State Reservoir Engineering in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Eric T.

    Engineered quantum systems are poised to revolutionize information science in the near future. A persistent challenge in applied quantum technology is creating controllable, quantum interactions while preventing information loss to the environment, decoherence. In this thesis, we realize mesoscopic superconducting circuits whose macroscopic collective degrees of freedom, such as voltages and currents, behave quantum mechanically. We couple these mesoscopic devices to microwave cavities forming a cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) architecture comprised entirely of circuit elements. This application of cavity QED is dubbed Circuit QED and is an interdisciplinary field seated at the intersection of electrical engineering, superconductivity, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Two popular methods for taming active quantum systems in the presence of decoherence are discrete feedback conditioned on an ancillary system or quantum reservoir engineering. Quantum reservoir engineering maintains a desired subset of a Hilbert space through a combination of drives and designed entropy evacuation. Circuit QED provides a favorable platform for investigating quantum reservoir engineering proposals. A major advancement of this thesis is the development of a quantum reservoir engineering protocol which maintains the quantum state of a microwave cavity in the presence of decoherence. This thesis synthesizes strongly coupled, coherent devices whose solutions to its driven, dissipative Hamiltonian are predicted a priori. This work lays the foundation for future advancements in cavity centered quantum reservoir engineering protocols realizing hardware efficient circuit QED designs.

  8. Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Bathymetry and capacity of Blackfoot Reservoir, Caribou County, Idaho, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Molly S.; Skinner, Kenneth D.; Fosness, Ryan L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, surveyed the bathymetry and selected above-water sections of Blackfoot Reservoir, Caribou County, Idaho, in 2011. Reservoir operators manage releases from Government Dam on Blackfoot Reservoir based on a stage-capacity relation developed about the time of dam construction in the early 1900s. Reservoir operation directly affects the amount of water that is available for irrigation of agricultural land on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation and surrounding areas. The USGS surveyed the below-water sections of the reservoir using a multibeam echosounder and real-time kinematic global positioning system (RTK-GPS) equipment at full reservoir pool in June 2011, covering elevations from 6,090 to 6,119 feet (ft) above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88). The USGS used data from a light detection and ranging (LiDAR) survey performed in 2000 to map reservoir bathymetry from 6,116 to 6,124 ft NAVD 88, which were mostly in depths too shallow to measure with the multibeam echosounder, and most of the above-water section of the reservoir (above 6,124 ft NAVD 88). Selected points and bank erosional features were surveyed by the USGS using RTK-GPS and a total station at low reservoir pool in September 2011 to supplement and verify the LiDAR data. The stage-capacity relation was revised and presented in a tabular format. The datasets show a 2.0-percent decrease in capacity from the original survey, due to sedimentation or differences in accuracy between surveys. A 1.3-percent error also was detected in the previously used capacity table and measured water-level elevation because of questionable reference elevation at monitoring stations near Government Dam. Reservoir capacity in 2011 at design maximum pool of 6,124 ft above NAVD 88 was 333,500 acre-ft.

  10. Trends in reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Nolen, J.S.

    1995-06-01

    The future of reservoir simulation is driven by two different and, on the surface, paradoxical trends. On the one hand, the user base is on average becoming less experienced, and on the other, increasingly complex models are being built to honor the advances in reservoir-description technology. The job of the software development community is to create software that satisfies both the ease-of-use needs of the novice and the accuracy needs of the integrated geoscience team. One of the near-term effects of these demands will be to improve the capabilities and quality of the fully integrated geoscience work-station. This will include the need for implementation of industry-wide data standards. Reservoir simulators will need to incorporate increasing amounts of interactivity and built-in expertise. Accuracy of results will be improved by increased use of unstructured grids, including automatic gridding software with dynamic capabilities. Additional research will focus on complex wells, including both in-flow performance and wellbore hydraulics. Finally, grid size will continue to escalate in step with advances in hardware and software. The growth of grid size will be mitigated by substantial efforts in upscaling, but ultimately parallel computing must provide the mechanism for continued growth.

  11. A methodology for incorporating geomechanically-based fault damage zones models into reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Pijush Kanti

    both field and well scale observations, I found that damage intensity gradually decreases away from faults, and if the secondary features associated with the damage zones are optimally oriented for shear failure in the present day stress state, they may affect the permeability of the reservoir in both the horizontal and vertical directions. I verified the modeling results with both field (outcrop) scale and well scale observations from a number of studies and show that dynamic rupture propagation gives a reasonable first order approximation of damage zones and can be incorporated into reservoir simulation models. Using fluid simulation in a fine-scale model that included the discrete secondary features of a damage zone, I demonstrated that the permeability anisotropy due to a damage zone exists due to increased permeability along the strike of the fault and in the vertical direction. However, there is no significant change in the permeability of the damage zone in a direction perpendicular to the strike of the parent faults in the studied field. Faults are generally curved and oriented in multiple directions in a reservoir, so often they are not aligned with the simulation grid. Based on the complexity of fault geometry, a simulation grid may have complex cell geometry adjacent to the faults. I present a methodology to implement the effects of damage zones in the simulation grid, which are generally located in fault adjacent grid blocks. To incorporate the fault-related effects of permeability anisotropy in the simulation grid, I used the strike and dip of faults with reference to the grid axes. The relative effects of the dimension of the damage zone are incorporated using the normalized damage zone width with respect to cell volume and surface area. The absolute value of permeability anisotropy is then defined by several iterations of history matching with the observed production data of the studied field. Inclusion of damage zones into simulation model shows a

  12. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  13. Theoretical Analysis of the Mechanism of Fracture Network Propagation with Stimulated Reservoir Volume (SRV) Fracturing in Tight Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuliang; Ren, Long; Meng, Fankun; Xu, Chen; Wang, Wendong

    2015-01-01

    Stimulated reservoir volume (SRV) fracturing in tight oil reservoirs often induces complex fracture-network growth, which has a fundamentally different formation mechanism from traditional planar bi-winged fracturing. To reveal the mechanism of fracture network propagation, this paper employs a modified displacement discontinuity method (DDM), mechanical mechanism analysis and initiation and propagation criteria for the theoretical model of fracture network propagation and its derivation. A reasonable solution of the theoretical model for a tight oil reservoir is obtained and verified by a numerical discrete method. Through theoretical calculation and computer programming, the variation rules of formation stress fields, hydraulic fracture propagation patterns (FPP) and branch fracture propagation angles and pressures are analyzed. The results show that during the process of fracture propagation, the initial orientation of the principal stress deflects, and the stress fields at the fracture tips change dramatically in the region surrounding the fracture. Whether the ideal fracture network can be produced depends on the geological conditions and on the engineering treatments. This study has both theoretical significance and practical application value by contributing to a better understanding of fracture network propagation mechanisms in unconventional oil/gas reservoirs and to the improvement of the science and design efficiency of reservoir fracturing. PMID:25966285

  14. A Discrete Model for Color Naming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegaz, G.; Le Troter, A.; Sequeira, J.; Boi, J. M.

    2006-12-01

    The ability to associate labels to colors is very natural for human beings. Though, this apparently simple task hides very complex and still unsolved problems, spreading over many different disciplines ranging from neurophysiology to psychology and imaging. In this paper, we propose a discrete model for computational color categorization and naming. Starting from the 424 color specimens of the OSA-UCS set, we propose a fuzzy partitioning of the color space. Each of the 11 basic color categories identified by Berlin and Kay is modeled as a fuzzy set whose membership function is implicitly defined by fitting the model to the results of an ad hoc psychophysical experiment (Experiment 1). Each OSA-UCS sample is represented by a feature vector whose components are the memberships to the different categories. The discrete model consists of a three-dimensional Delaunay triangulation of the CIELAB color space which associates each OSA-UCS sample to a vertex of a 3D tetrahedron. Linear interpolation is used to estimate the membership values of any other point in the color space. Model validation is performed both directly, through the comparison of the predicted membership values to the subjective counterparts, as evaluated via another psychophysical test (Experiment 2), and indirectly, through the investigation of its exploitability for image segmentation. The model has proved to be successful in both cases, providing an estimation of the membership values in good agreement with the subjective measures as well as a semantically meaningful color-based segmentation map.

  15. Harmonic Pinnacles in the Discrete Gaussian Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubetzky, Eyal; Martinelli, Fabio; Sly, Allan

    2016-06-01

    The 2 D Discrete Gaussian model gives each height function {η : Z^2to{Z}} a probability proportional to {exp(-β {H}(η))}, where {β} is the inverse-temperature and {{H}(η) = sum_{x˜ y}(η_x-η_y)^2} sums over nearest-neighbor bonds. We consider the model at large fixed {β}, where it is flat unlike its continuous analog (the Discrete Gaussian Free Field). We first establish that the maximum height in an {L× L} box with 0 boundary conditions concentrates on two integers M, M + 1 with {M˜ √{(1/2πβ)log Llog log L}}. The key is a large deviation estimate for the height at the origin in {{Z}2}, dominated by "harmonic pinnacles", integer approximations of a harmonic variational problem. Second, in this model conditioned on {η≥ 0} (a floor), the average height rises, and in fact the height of almost all sites concentrates on levels H, H + 1 where {H˜ M/√{2}}. This in particular pins down the asymptotics, and corrects the order, in results of Bricmont et al. (J. Stat. Phys. 42(5-6):743-798, 1986), where it was argued that the maximum and the height of the surface above a floor are both of order {√{log L}}. Finally, our methods extend to other classical surface models (e.g., restricted SOS), featuring connections to p-harmonic analysis and alternating sign matrices.

  16. Discrete dynamics and non-Markovianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Kimmo; Piilo, Jyrki

    2016-06-01

    We study discrete quantum dynamics where a single evolution step consists of unitary system transformation followed by decoherence via coupling to an environment. Often, non-Markovian memory effects are attributed to structured environments, whereas, here, we take a more general approach within a discrete setting. In addition of controlling the structure of the environment, we are interested in how local unitaries on the open system allow the appearance and control of memory effects. Our first simple qubit model where local unitary is followed by dephasing illustrates how memory effects arise, despite having no structure in the environment the system is coupled with. We, then, elaborate on this observation by constructing a model for an open quantum walk where the unitary coin and transfer operation is augmented with the dephasing of the coin. The results demonstrate tha,t in the limit of strong dephasing within each evolution step, the combined coin-position open system always displays memory effects, and their quantities are independent of the structure of the environment. Our construction makes possible an experimentally realizable open quantum walk with photons exhibiting non-Markovian features.

  17. Magnetic susceptibility of petroleum reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Oleksandr P.; Potter, David K.

    A knowledge of the magnetic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids may provide new techniques for improved reservoir characterisation, petroleum exploration and production. However, magnetic information is currently scarce for the vast majority of reservoir fluids. For instance, there is little in the literature concerning basic magnetic susceptibility values of crude oils or formation waters. We have therefore measured the mass magnetic susceptibility ( χm) of several crude oils, refined oil fractions, and formation waters from local and world-wide sites. All the fluids measured were diamagnetic, however there were distinct differences in magnitude between the different fluid types. In particular, χm for the crude oils was more negative than for the formation waters of the same locality. The magnetic susceptibility of the oils appears to be related to their main physical and chemical properties. The results correlated with the density, residue content, API (American Petroleum Institute) gravity, viscosity, sulphur content and metal concentration of the fluids. Light fractions of crude oil were the most diamagnetic. The magnetic measurements potentially allow physical and chemical differences between the fluids to be rapidly characterised. The results suggest other possible applications, such as passive in situ magnetic susceptibility sensors for fluid monitoring (for example, the onset of water breakthrough, or the detection of migrating fines) in reservoirs, which would provide an environmentally friendly alternative to radioactive tracers. The mass magnetic susceptibilities of the fluids in relation to typical reservoir minerals may also play a role in fluid-rock interactions, such as studies of wettability. The χm of crude oil from the various world-wide oil provinces that were tested also showed some differences, possibly reflecting broad physical and chemical features of the geological history of each province.

  18. Dissipative discrete breathers: periodic, quasiperiodic, chaotic, and mobile.

    PubMed

    Martínez, P J; Meister, M; Floría, L M; Falo, F

    2003-06-01

    The properties of discrete breathers in dissipative one-dimensional lattices of nonlinear oscillators subject to periodic driving forces are reviewed. We focus on oscillobreathers in the Frenkel-Kontorova chain and rotobreathers in a ladder of Josephson junctions. Both types of exponentially localized solutions are easily obtained numerically using adiabatic continuation from the anticontinuous limit. Linear stability (Floquet) analysis allows the characterization of different types of bifurcations experienced by periodic discrete breathers. Some of these bifurcations produce nonperiodic localized solutions, namely, quasiperiodic and chaotic discrete breathers, which are generally impossible as exact solutions in Hamiltonian systems. Within a certain range of parameters, propagating breathers occur as attractors of the dissipative dynamics. General features of these excitations are discussed and the Peierls-Nabarro barrier is addressed. Numerical scattering experiments with mobile breathers reveal the existence of two-breather bound states and allow a first glimpse at the intricate phenomenology of these special multibreather configurations. PMID:12777126

  19. Reduced discretization error in HZETRN

    SciTech Connect

    Slaba, Tony C.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Tweed, John

    2013-02-01

    The deterministic particle transport code HZETRN is an efficient analysis tool for studying the effects of space radiation on humans, electronics, and shielding materials. In a previous work, numerical methods in the code were reviewed, and new methods were developed that further improved efficiency and reduced overall discretization error. It was also shown that the remaining discretization error could be attributed to low energy light ions (A < 4) with residual ranges smaller than the physical step-size taken by the code. Accurately resolving the spectrum of low energy light particles is important in assessing risk associated with astronaut radiation exposure. In this work, modifications to the light particle transport formalism are presented that accurately resolve the spectrum of low energy light ion target fragments. The modified formalism is shown to significantly reduce overall discretization error and allows a physical approximation to be removed. For typical step-sizes and energy grids used in HZETRN, discretization errors for the revised light particle transport algorithms are shown to be less than 4% for aluminum and water shielding thicknesses as large as 100 g/cm{sup 2} exposed to both solar particle event and galactic cosmic ray environments.

  20. Some discrete multiple orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvesú, J.; Coussement, J.; van Assche, W.

    2003-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the theory of discrete orthogonal polynomials (on a linear lattice) to polynomials satisfying orthogonality conditions with respect to r positive discrete measures. First we recall the known results of the classical orthogonal polynomials of Charlier, Meixner, Kravchuk and Hahn (T.S. Chihara, An Introduction to Orthogonal Polynomials, Gordon and Breach, New York, 1978; R. Koekoek and R.F. Swarttouw, Reports of the Faculty of Technical Mathematics and Informatics No. 98-17, Delft, 1998; A.F. Nikiforov et al., Classical Orthogonal Polynomials of a Discrete Variable, Springer, Berlin, 1991). These polynomials have a lowering and raising operator, which give rise to a Rodrigues formula, a second order difference equation, and an explicit expression from which the coefficients of the three-term recurrence relation can be obtained. Then we consider r positive discrete measures and define two types of multiple orthogonal polynomials. The continuous case (Jacobi, Laguerre, Hermite, etc.) was studied by Van Assche and Coussement (J. Comput. Appl. Math. 127 (2001) 317-347) and Aptekarev et al. (Multiple orthogonal polynomials for classical weights, manuscript). The families of multiple orthogonal polynomials (of type II) that we will study have a raising operator and hence a Rodrigues formula. This will give us an explicit formula for the polynomials. Finally, there also exists a recurrence relation of order r+1 for these multiple orthogonal polynomials of type II. We compute the coefficients of the recurrence relation explicitly when r=2.

  1. Discrete impulses in ephaptically coupled nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Maïna, I; Tabi, C B; Ekobena Fouda, H P; Mohamadou, A; Kofané, T C

    2015-04-01

    We exclusively analyze the condition for modulated waves to emerge in two ephaptically coupled nerve fibers. Through the multiple scale expansion, it is shown that a set of coupled cable-like Hodgkin-Huxley equations can be reduced to a single differential-difference nonlinear equation. The standard approach of linear stability analysis of a plane wave is used to predict regions of parameters where nonlinear structures can be observed. Instability features are shown to be importantly controlled not only by the ephaptic coupling parameter, but also by the discreteness parameter. Numerical simulations, to verify our analytical predictions, are performed, and we explore the longtime dynamics of slightly perturbed plane waves in the coupled nerve fibers. On initially exciting only one fiber, quasi-perfect interneuronal communication is discussed along with the possibility of recruiting damaged or non-myelinated nerve fibers, by myelinated ones, into conduction. PMID:25933666

  2. Discrete implementations of scale transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurdjanovic, Dragan; Williams, William J.; Koh, Christopher K.

    1999-11-01

    Scale as a physical quantity is a recently developed concept. The scale transform can be viewed as a special case of the more general Mellin transform and its mathematical properties are very applicable in the analysis and interpretation of the signals subject to scale changes. A number of single-dimensional applications of scale concept have been made in speech analysis, processing of biological signals, machine vibration analysis and other areas. Recently, the scale transform was also applied in multi-dimensional signal processing and used for image filtering and denoising. Discrete implementation of the scale transform can be carried out using logarithmic sampling and the well-known fast Fourier transform. Nevertheless, in the case of the uniformly sampled signals, this implementation involves resampling. An algorithm not involving resampling of the uniformly sampled signals has been derived too. In this paper, a modification of the later algorithm for discrete implementation of the direct scale transform is presented. In addition, similar concept was used to improve a recently introduced discrete implementation of the inverse scale transform. Estimation of the absolute discretization errors showed that the modified algorithms have a desirable property of yielding a smaller region of possible error magnitudes. Experimental results are obtained using artificial signals as well as signals evoked from the temporomandibular joint. In addition, discrete implementations for the separable two-dimensional direct and inverse scale transforms are derived. Experiments with image restoration and scaling through two-dimensional scale domain using the novel implementation of the separable two-dimensional scale transform pair are presented.

  3. A discrete dislocation transformation model for austenitic single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Turteltaub, S.; Van der Giessen, E.; Remmers, J. J. C.

    2008-07-01

    A discrete model for analyzing the interaction between plastic flow and martensitic phase transformations is developed. The model is intended for simulating the microstructure evolution in a single crystal of austenite that transforms non-homogeneously into martensite. The plastic flow in the untransformed austenite is simulated using a plane-strain discrete dislocation model. The phase transformation is modeled via the nucleation and growth of discrete martensitic regions embedded in the austenitic single crystal. At each instant during loading, the coupled elasto-plasto-transformation problem is solved using the superposition of analytical solutions for the discrete dislocations and discrete transformation regions embedded in an infinite homogeneous medium and the numerical solution of a complementary problem used to enforce the actual boundary conditions and the heterogeneities in the medium. In order to describe the nucleation and growth of martensitic regions, a nucleation criterion and a kinetic law suitable for discrete regions are specified. The constitutive rules used in discrete dislocation simulations are supplemented with additional evolution rules to account for the phase transformation. To illustrate the basic features of the model, simulations of specimens under plane-strain uniaxial extension and contraction are analyzed. The simulations indicate that plastic flow reduces the average stress at which transformation begins, but it also reduces the transformation rate when compared with benchmark simulations without plasticity. Furthermore, due to local stress fluctuations caused by dislocations, martensitic systems can be activated even though transformation would not appear to be favorable based on the average stress. Conversely, the simulations indicate that the plastic hardening behavior is influenced by the reduction in the effective austenitic grain size due to the evolution of transformation. During cyclic simulations, the coupled plasticity

  4. Geomechanically Coupled Simulation of Flow in Fractured Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, C.; Moos, D.; Hartley, L.; Baxter, S.; Foulquier, L.; Holl, H.; Hogarth, R.

    2012-12-01

    Capturing the necessary and sufficient detail of reservoir hydraulics to accurately evaluate reservoir behavior remains a significant challenge to the exploitation and management of fracture-dominated geothermal reservoirs. In these low matrix permeability reservoirs, stimulation response is controlled largely by the properties of natural and induced fracture networks, which are in turn controlled by the in situ stresses, the fracture distribution and connectivity and the hydraulic behavior of the fractures. This complex interaction of fracture flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing an effective and efficient simulation to characterize, model and predict fractured reservoir performance. We discuss here a case study of the integration of geological, geophysical, geomechanical, and reservoir engineering data to characterize the in situ stresses, the natural fracture network and the controls on fracture permeability in geothermal reservoirs. A 3D geomechanical reservoir model includes constraints on stress magnitudes and orientations, and constraints on mechanical rock properties and the fractures themselves. Such a model is essential to understanding reservoir response to stimulation and production in low matrix permeability, fracture-dominated reservoirs. The geomechanical model for this study was developed using petrophysical, drilling, and wellbore image data along with direct well test measurements and was mapped to a 3D structural grid to facilitate coupled simulation of the fractured reservoir. Wellbore image and stimulation test data were used along with microseismic data acquired during the test to determine the reservoir fracture architecture and to provide control points for a realistic inter-connected discrete fracture network. As most fractures are stress-sensitive, their hydraulic conductivities will change with changes in bottomhole flowing and reservoir pressures, causing variations in production profiles

  5. Hantavirus immunology of rodent reservoirs: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Schountz, Tony; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Hantaviruses are hosted by rodents, insectivores and bats. Several rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two diseases that share many features in humans, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Eurasia or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in the Americas. It is thought that the immune response plays a significant contributory role in these diseases. However, in reservoir hosts that have been closely examined, little or no pathology occurs and infection is persistent despite evidence of adaptive immune responses. Because most hantavirus reservoirs are not model organisms, it is difficult to conduct meaningful experiments that might shed light on how the viruses evade sterilizing immune responses and why immunopathology does not occur. Despite these limitations, recent advances in instrumentation and bioinformatics will have a dramatic impact on understanding reservoir host responses to hantaviruses by employing a systems biology approach to identify important pathways that mediate virus/reservoir relationships. PMID:24638205

  6. Hantavirus Immunology of Rodent Reservoirs: Current Status and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Schountz, Tony; Prescott, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Hantaviruses are hosted by rodents, insectivores and bats. Several rodent-borne hantaviruses cause two diseases that share many features in humans, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome in Eurasia or hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome in the Americas. It is thought that the immune response plays a significant contributory role in these diseases. However, in reservoir hosts that have been closely examined, little or no pathology occurs and infection is persistent despite evidence of adaptive immune responses. Because most hantavirus reservoirs are not model organisms, it is difficult to conduct meaningful experiments that might shed light on how the viruses evade sterilizing immune responses and why immunopathology does not occur. Despite these limitations, recent advances in instrumentation and bioinformatics will have a dramatic impact on understanding reservoir host responses to hantaviruses by employing a systems biology approach to identify important pathways that mediate virus/reservoir relationships. PMID:24638205

  7. Discrete-time minimal control synthesis adaptive algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Bernardo, M.; di Gennaro, F.; Olm, J. M.; Santini, S.

    2010-12-01

    This article proposes a discrete-time Minimal Control Synthesis (MCS) algorithm for a class of single-input single-output discrete-time systems written in controllable canonical form. As it happens with the continuous-time MCS strategy, the algorithm arises from the family of hyperstability-based discrete-time model reference adaptive controllers introduced in (Landau, Y. (1979), Adaptive Control: The Model Reference Approach, New York: Marcel Dekker, Inc.) and is able to ensure tracking of the states of a given reference model with minimal knowledge about the plant. The control design shows robustness to parameter uncertainties, slow parameter variation and matched disturbances. Furthermore, it is proved that the proposed discrete-time MCS algorithm can be used to control discretised continuous-time plants with the same performance features. Contrary to previous discrete-time implementations of the continuous-time MCS algorithm, here a formal proof of asymptotic stability is given for generic n-dimensional plants in controllable canonical form. The theoretical approach is validated by means of simulation results.

  8. Discrete-continuous variable structural synthesis using dual methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmit, L. A.; Fleury, C.

    1980-01-01

    Approximation concepts and dual methods are extended to solve structural synthesis problems involving a mix of discrete and continuous sizing type of design variables. Pure discrete and pure continuous variable problems can be handled as special cases. The basic mathematical programming statement of the structural synthesis problem is converted into a sequence of explicit approximate primal problems of separable form. These problems are solved by constructing continuous explicit dual functions, which are maximized subject to simple nonnegativity constraints on the dual variables. A newly devised gradient projection type of algorithm called DUAL 1, which includes special features for handling dual function gradient discontinuities that arise from the discrete primal variables, is used to find the solution of each dual problem. Computational implementation is accomplished by incorporating the DUAL 1 algorithm into the ACCESS 3 program as a new optimizer option. The power of the method set forth is demonstrated by presenting numerical results for several example problems, including a pure discrete variable treatment of a metallic swept wing and a mixed discrete-continuous variable solution for a thin delta wing with fiber composite skins.

  9. Faulted reservoirs characterization by an image processing technique

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Angeles, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper has developed an image processing method for obtaining the discontinuous areal distribution of oil parameters (formation top, porosity, water saturation,...) of faulted heterogeneous oil reservoirs. For its application it requires the previous knowledge of a set of discrete values z(k,l) from well-logs and seismic profiles. Faulted structures were discretized into continuous structures or blocks bounded by faults. The theoretical fundamental assumption of the proposed method establishes that the natural distributions can be considered as the superposition of several elementary brownian distributions, represented by discrete values z(k,l), whose physical model is the diffusion differential equation and its solution associated. This is a technique that allows the representation of a composed brownian distribution as a linear combination of all elementary brownian functions. For illustrating the operational aspect of brownian analysis, two examples are studied. The results are presented as a digital images by means of an image processing software. This method can be applied in mapping, three dimensions interpolation and reserves calculation of faulted reservoirs.

  10. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  11. [Human reservoirs of Pneumocystis].

    PubMed

    Wissmann, Gustavo; Morilla, Ruben; Friaza, Vicente; Calderón, Enrique; Varela, Jose M

    2010-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii, the fungal agent that causes Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP), is known to exclusively infect humans. Molecular studies have enabled detection of this fungus in individuals who have been colonized by P. jirovecii. Such colonization, found in several populations, seems to act as a human reservoir for the fungus. Various studies have reported mutations associated with sulfa resistance in P. jirovecii strains isolated from colonized patients, who can transmit the mutant genotype to PCP-susceptible individuals. The growing interest in P. jirovecii colonization may prompt the design of new prevention and management strategies for PCP. PMID:19403207

  12. Reservoir management cost-cutting

    SciTech Connect

    Gulati, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    This article by Mohinder S. Gulati, Chief Engineer, Unocal Geothermal Operations, discusses cost cutting in geothermal reservoir management. The reservoir engineer or geoscientist can make a big difference in the economical outcome of a project by improving well performance and thus making geothermal energy more competitive in the energy marketplace. Bringing plants online in less time and proving resources to reduce the cycle time are some of the ways to reduce reservoir management costs discussed in this article.

  13. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  14. Tracer testing for reservoir description

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Abbaszadeh-Dehghani, M.

    1987-05-01

    When a reservoir is studied in detail for an EOR project, well-to-well tracers should be used as a tool to help understand the reservoir in a quantitative way. Tracers complement the more traditional reservoir evaluation tools. This paper discusses the concepts underlying tracer testing, the analysis methods used to produce quantitative results, and the meaning of these results in terms of conceptual picture of the reservoir. Some of the limitations of these analysis methods are discussed, along with ongoing research on tracer flow.

  15. Systoles in discrete dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Sara; Grácio, Clara; Ramos, Carlos Correia

    2013-01-01

    The fruitful relationship between Geometry and Graph Theory has been explored by several authors benefiting also the Theory of discrete dynamical systems seen as Markov chains in graphs. In this work we will further explore the relation between these areas, giving a geometrical interpretation of notions from dynamical systems. In particular, we relate the topological entropy with the systole, here defined in the context of discrete dynamical systems. We show that for continuous interval maps the systole is trivial; however, for the class of interval maps with one discontinuity point the systole acquires relevance from the point of view of the dynamical behavior. Moreover, we define the geodesic length spectrum associated to a Markov interval map and we compute the referred spectrum in several examples.

  16. Dark Energy from Discrete Spacetime

    PubMed Central

    Trout, Aaron D.

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  17. Dark energy from discrete spacetime.

    PubMed

    Trout, Aaron D

    2013-01-01

    Dark energy accounts for most of the matter-energy content of our universe, yet current theories of its origin rely on radical physical assumptions such as the holographic principle or controversial anthropic arguments. We give a better motivated explanation for dark energy, claiming that it arises from a small negative scalar-curvature present even in empty spacetime. The vacuum has this curvature because spacetime is fundamentally discrete and there are more ways for a discrete geometry to have negative curvature than positive. We explicitly compute this effect using a variant of the well known dynamical-triangulations (DT) model for quantum gravity. Our model predicts a time-varying non-zero cosmological constant with a current value, [Formula: see text] in natural units, in agreement with observation. This calculation is made possible by a novel characterization of the possible DT action values combined with numerical evidence concerning their degeneracies. PMID:24312502

  18. Class of discrete Gabor expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shidong; Healy, Dennis M., Jr.

    1994-03-01

    We present a new approach to studying a discrete Gabor expansion (DGE). We show that, in general, DGE is not the usual biorthogonal decomposition, but belongs to a larger and looser decomposition scheme which we call pseudo frame decomposition. It includes the DGE scheme proposed as a special case. The standard dual frame decomposition is also a special case. We derive algorithms using techniques for Gabor sequences to compute 'biorthogonal' sequences through proper matrix representation. Our algorithms involve solutions to a linear system to obtain the 'biorthogonal' windows. This approach provides a much broader mathematical view of the DGE, and therefore, establishes a wider mathematical foundation towards the theory of DGE. The general algorithm derived also provides a whole class of discrete Gabor expansions, among which 'good' ones can be generated. Simulation results are also provided.

  19. Reservoir development in the Shualba formation (lower Cretaceous) at Al Barakah and Safah Fields Oman - similarities

    SciTech Connect

    Prezbindowski, D.R. ); Benmore, W.C. )

    1996-01-01

    A detailed sedimentological and diagenetic study of the upper Shuaiba in the Al Barakah and Safah Fields indicates that the critically important development of secondary micro-intercrystalline porosity postdates early meteoric water diagenesis. The Shuaiba at Al Barakah and Safah Fields consists of shoaling upward carbonate depositional cycles. The main reservoir is developed in the upper cycle as discrete carbonate accumulations centered around rudist/algal biogenic build-ups with surrounding, deeper water non-reservoir facies. Reservoir porosity is dominated by secondary micro-intercrystalline (chalky) porosity. A moderate sedimentological control on secondary porosity development is evident. The best reservoir quality is developed in the coarse-grained, skeletal-rich packstones associated with the carbonate build-ups. Although the presence of a regional unconformity at the top of the Shuaiba has commonly been thought to be responsible for reservoir porosity development, a lack of petrographic and geochemical evidence for early meteoric water diagenesis has made an evaluation of this reservoir development model difficult. Cores taken of the Shuaiba and Nahr Umr contact in the Safah and Al Barakah Fields indicate that meteoric diagenesis did occur, occluding early porosity. Reservoir porosity development significantly postdates early meteoric water diagenesis, equant spar calcite cementation and stylolitization. Porosity was formed by the dissolution of the micritic components in the limestones during burial. Reservoir porosity development in these fields is not related to the regional input of meteoric water at the Shuaiba unconformity surface.

  20. Reservoir development in the Shualba formation (lower Cretaceous) at Al Barakah and Safah Fields Oman - similarities

    SciTech Connect

    Prezbindowski, D.R.; Benmore, W.C.

    1996-12-31

    A detailed sedimentological and diagenetic study of the upper Shuaiba in the Al Barakah and Safah Fields indicates that the critically important development of secondary micro-intercrystalline porosity postdates early meteoric water diagenesis. The Shuaiba at Al Barakah and Safah Fields consists of shoaling upward carbonate depositional cycles. The main reservoir is developed in the upper cycle as discrete carbonate accumulations centered around rudist/algal biogenic build-ups with surrounding, deeper water non-reservoir facies. Reservoir porosity is dominated by secondary micro-intercrystalline (chalky) porosity. A moderate sedimentological control on secondary porosity development is evident. The best reservoir quality is developed in the coarse-grained, skeletal-rich packstones associated with the carbonate build-ups. Although the presence of a regional unconformity at the top of the Shuaiba has commonly been thought to be responsible for reservoir porosity development, a lack of petrographic and geochemical evidence for early meteoric water diagenesis has made an evaluation of this reservoir development model difficult. Cores taken of the Shuaiba and Nahr Umr contact in the Safah and Al Barakah Fields indicate that meteoric diagenesis did occur, occluding early porosity. Reservoir porosity development significantly postdates early meteoric water diagenesis, equant spar calcite cementation and stylolitization. Porosity was formed by the dissolution of the micritic components in the limestones during burial. Reservoir porosity development in these fields is not related to the regional input of meteoric water at the Shuaiba unconformity surface.

  1. A FORTRAN Program for Discrete Discriminant Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boone, James O.; Brewer, James K.

    1976-01-01

    A Fortran program is presented for discriminant analysis of discrete variables. The program assumes discrete, nominal data with no distributional, variance-covariance assumptions. The program handles a maximum of fifty predictor variables and twelve outcome groups. (Author/JKS)

  2. Efficient genetic algorithms using discretization scheduling.

    PubMed

    McLay, Laura A; Goldberg, David E

    2005-01-01

    In many applications of genetic algorithms, there is a tradeoff between speed and accuracy in fitness evaluations when evaluations use numerical methods with varying discretization. In these types of applications, the cost and accuracy vary from discretization errors when implicit or explicit quadrature is used to estimate the function evaluations. This paper examines discretization scheduling, or how to vary the discretization within the genetic algorithm in order to use the least amount of computation time for a solution of a desired quality. The effectiveness of discretization scheduling can be determined by comparing its computation time to the computation time of a GA using a constant discretization. There are three ingredients for the discretization scheduling: population sizing, estimated time for each function evaluation and predicted convergence time analysis. Idealized one- and two-dimensional experiments and an inverse groundwater application illustrate the computational savings to be achieved from using discretization scheduling. PMID:16156928

  3. COMPARISON OF THE ACCURACY OF VARIOUS SPATIAL DISCRETIZATION SCHEMES OF THE DISCRETE ORDINATES EQUATIONS IN 2D CARTESIAN GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastian Schunert; Yousry Y. Azmy; Damien Fournier

    2011-05-01

    We present a comprehensive error estimation of four spatial discretization schemes of the two-dimensional Discrete Ordinates (SN) equations on Cartesian grids utilizing a Method of Manufactured Solution (MMS) benchmark suite based on variants of Larsen’s benchmark featuring different orders of smoothness of the underlying exact solution. The considered spatial discretization schemes include the arbitrarily high order transport methods of the nodal (AHOTN) and characteristic (AHOTC) types, the discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element method (DGFEM) and the recently proposed higher order diamond difference method (HODD) of spatial expansion orders 0 through 3. While AHOTN and AHOTC rely on approximate analytical solutions of the transport equation within a mesh cell, DGFEM and HODD utilize a polynomial expansion to mimick the angular flux profile across each mesh cell. Intuitively, due to the higher degree of analyticity, we expect AHOTN and AHOTC to feature superior accuracy compared with DGFEM and HODD, but at the price of potentially longer grind times and numerical instabilities. The latter disadvantages can result from the presence of exponential terms evaluated at the cell optical thickness that arise from the semianalytical solution process. This work quantifies the order of accuracy and the magnitude of the error of all four discretization methods for different optical thicknesses, scattering ratios and degrees of smoothness of the underlying exact solutions in order to verify or contradict the aforementioned intuitive expectation.

  4. Anomalies and Discrete Chiral Symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2009-09-07

    The quantum anomaly that breaks the U(1) axial symmetry of massless multi-flavored QCD leaves behind a discrete flavor-singlet chiral invariance. With massive quarks, this residual symmetry has a close connection with the strong CP-violating parameter theta. One result is that if the lightest quarks are degenerate, then a first order transition will occur when theta passes through pi. The resulting framework helps clarify when the rooting prescription for extrapolating in the number of flavors is valid.

  5. Discrete vortex representation of magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kinney, R.; Tajima, T.; Petviashvili, N.; McWilliams, J.C.

    1993-02-01

    We present an alternative approach to statistical analysis of an intermittent ideal MHD fluid in two dimensions, based on the hydrodynamical discrete vortex model applied to the Elsasser variables. The model contains negative temperature states which predict the formation of magnetic islands, but also includes a natural limit under which the equilibrium states revert to the familiar twin-vortex states predicted by hydrodynamical turbulence theories. Numerical dynamical calculations yield equilibrium spectra in agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  6. Cometary activity, discrete outgassing areas, and dust-jet formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sekanina, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Conceptual models for various types of features observed in cometary comae (jets, spirals, halos, fans, etc.), their computer simulation, and the hydrodynamic models for jet formation are critically reviewed, and evidence for anisotropic, strongly collimated flows of ejecta emanating from discrete active regions (vents) on the rotating cometary nuclei is presented. Techniques employed to generate synthetic comet images that simulate the features observed are described, and their relevance to the primary objects of coma-morphology studies is discussed. Modeling of temporal variations in the water emission from discrete active regions suggests that production curves asymmetric with respect to perihelion should be commonplace. Critical comparisons with the activity profiles of Enke's comet and with light curves of disappearing comets and comets that undergo outbursts are presented. Recent developments in the understanding of the processes that cause the nongravitational perturbations of cometary motions are reviewed, and the observed discontinuities are identified with the birth of new sources and/or deactivation of old vents.

  7. Observability of discretized partial differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohn, Stephen E.; Dee, Dick P.

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that complete observability of the discrete model used to assimilate data from a linear partial differential equation (PDE) system is necessary and sufficient for asymptotic stability of the data assimilation process. The observability theory for discrete systems is reviewed and applied to obtain simple observability tests for discretized constant-coefficient PDEs. Examples are used to show how numerical dispersion can result in discrete dynamics with multiple eigenvalues, thereby detracting from observability.

  8. Reservoir simulation in a North Sea reservoir experiencing significant compaction drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, C.C.; Jewell, S.

    1995-12-31

    The Valhall field in the Norwegian North Sea is a high porosity chalk reservoir undergoing primary pressure depletion. Over the last ten years there have been a number of computer modeling studies of the field which have all assumed an original oil-in-place of approximately 2,000 MMSTB (318.0{times}10{sup 6}m{sup 3}) to the present due to the addition of wells and the optimization of completion techniques. However, the single most important and unique feature influencing Valhall long term production performance is reservoir rock compaction. This paper describes the mathematical model used to simulate reservoir performance in a compacting reservoir with specific discussion regarding the proportion of oil produced by each physical recovery process. An understanding of the recovery mechanisms and their relative importance is critical for the successful management of the field. This paper also presents an alternative method for evaluating the various recovery processes using a simple solution to the material balance equation. This is used to substantiate the magnitude of the various recovery mechanisms identified in the simulation model.

  9. Discrete quadratic solitons with competing second-harmonic components

    SciTech Connect

    Setzpfandt, Frank; Pertsch, Thomas; Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    2011-11-15

    We describe families of discrete solitons in quadratic waveguide arrays supported by competing cascaded nonlinear interactions between one fundamental and two second-harmonic modes. We characterize the existence, stability, and excitation dynamics of these solitons and show that their features may resemble those of solitons in saturable media. Our results also demonstrate that a power threshold may appear for soliton formation, leading to a suppression of beam self-focusing which explains recent experimental observations.

  10. Description and correlation of reservoir heterogenity within the Big Injun sandstone, Granny Creek field, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, A.; McDowell, R.; Matchen, D. )

    1992-01-01

    The Granny Creek field (approximately 6 sq. miles in area), located in Clay and Roane counties, West Virginia, produces oil from the Big Injun sandstone (Lower Mississippian). Analysis of 15 cores, 22 core analyses, and approximately 400 wireline logs (gamma ray and bulk density) show that the Big Injun (approximately 12 to 55 feet thick) can be separated into an upper, coarse-grained sandstone and a lower, fine-grained sandstone. The Big Injun is truncated by an erosional unconformity of Early to Middle Mississippian age which removes the coarse-grain upper unit in the northwest portion of the field. The cores show nodules and zones (1 inch to 6 feet thick) of calcite and siderite cement. Where the cements occur as zones, porosity and permeability are reduced. Thin shales (1 inch to 1 foot thick) are found in the coarse-grained member of the Big Injun, whereas the bottom of the fine-grained, lower member contains intertongues of dark shale which cause pinchouts in porosity at the bottom of the reservoir. Calcite and siderite cement are recognized on wireline logs as high bulk density zones that form horizontal, inclined, and irregular pods of impermeable sandstone. At a 400 foot well spacing, pods may be confined to a single well or encompass as many as 30 wells creating linear and irregular barriers to flow. These pods increase the length of the fluid flow path and may divide the reservoir into discrete compartments. The combination of sedimentologic and diagenetic features contribute to the heterogeneity observed in the field.

  11. Reservoir Simulations of Low-Temperature Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedre, Madhur Ganesh

    The eastern United States generally has lower temperature gradients than the western United States. However, West Virginia, in particular, has higher temperature gradients compared to other eastern states. A recent study at Southern Methodist University by Blackwell et al. has shown the presence of a hot spot in the eastern part of West Virginia with temperatures reaching 150°C at a depth of between 4.5 and 5 km. This thesis work examines similar reservoirs at a depth of around 5 km resembling the geology of West Virginia, USA. The temperature gradients used are in accordance with the SMU study. In order to assess the effects of geothermal reservoir conditions on the lifetime of a low-temperature geothermal system, a sensitivity analysis study was performed on following seven natural and human-controlled parameters within a geothermal reservoir: reservoir temperature, injection fluid temperature, injection flow rate, porosity, rock thermal conductivity, water loss (%) and well spacing. This sensitivity analysis is completed by using ‘One factor at a time method (OFAT)’ and ‘Plackett-Burman design’ methods. The data used for this study was obtained by carrying out the reservoir simulations using TOUGH2 simulator. The second part of this work is to create a database of thermal potential and time-dependant reservoir conditions for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs by studying a number of possible scenarios. Variations in the parameters identified in sensitivity analysis study are used to expand the scope of database. Main results include the thermal potential of reservoir, pressure and temperature profile of the reservoir over its operational life (30 years for this study), the plant capacity and required pumping power. The results of this database will help the supply curves calculations for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the United States, which is the long term goal of the work being done by the geothermal research group under Dr. Anderson at

  12. Characteristics of discrete and basin-centered parts of the Lower Silurian regional oil and gas accumulation, Appalachian basin; preliminary results from a data set of 25 oil and gas fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryder, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    equal to or less than 0.1 mD; c) low reservoir water saturation and an average water yield per well less than about 9 to 13 BW/MMCFG; d) a broadly defined updip water-block trap; e) underpressured reservoirs with a gradient ranging from 0.25 to 0.35 psi/ft; and f) reservoir temperature of at least 125? F (52? C). Other than for historical and location purposes, the term field has little or no meaning as an assessment unit for the regional accumulation. In practice, each designated field represents a production sweet spot having relatively high EURs per well that in turn merges with surrounding gas-productive regions that are generally larger in area but have lower EURs per well. This important feature of the Lower Silurian regional accumulation, whereby most wells drilled into it are gas productive, must be considered when assessing its potential for remaining recoverable gas resources. Most of the remaining gas resources reside in 'Clinton' sands and Medina Group sandstone in the basin-centered part of the accumulation where as much as several tens of TCF of natural gas may be technically recoverable. The Tuscarora Sandstone in the eastern extension of the basin-centered part of the accumulation underlies a very large area and, although commonly characterized by very low porosity and permeability and low-Btu gas, probably contains additional gas resources. Remaining undiscovered recoverable gas and oil resources in the discrete and hybrid parts of the accumulation are primarily located beneath Lake Erie.

  13. Thermal Drawdown-Induced Flow Channeling in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Pengcheng; Hao, Yue; Walsh, Stuart D. C.; Carrigan, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the flow-channeling phenomenon caused by thermal drawdown in fractured geothermal reservoirs. A discrete fracture network-based, fully coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical simulator is used to study the interactions between fluid flow, temperature change, and the associated rock deformation. The responses of a number of randomly generated 2D fracture networks that represent a variety of reservoir characteristics are simulated with various injection-production well distances. We find that flow channeling, namely flow concentration in cooled zones, is the inevitable fate of all the scenarios evaluated. We also identify a secondary geomechanical mechanism caused by the anisotropy in thermal stress that counteracts the primary mechanism of flow channeling. This new mechanism tends, to some extent, to result in a more diffuse flow distribution, although it is generally not strong enough to completely reverse flow channeling. We find that fracture intensity substantially affects the overall hydraulic impedance of the reservoir but increasing fracture intensity generally does not improve heat production performance. Increasing the injection-production well separation appears to be an effective means to prolong the production life of a reservoir.

  14. Reservoir High's TE Site Wins Web Site of the Month

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article features "Mr. Rhine's Technology Education Web Site," a winner of the Web Site of the Month. This Web site was designed by Luke Rhine, a teacher at the Reservoir High School in Fulton, Maryland. Rhine's Web site offers course descriptions and syllabuses, class calendars, lectures and presentations, design briefs and other course…

  15. Material point method modeling in oil and gas reservoirs

    DOEpatents

    Vanderheyden, William Brian; Zhang, Duan

    2016-06-28

    A computer system and method of simulating the behavior of an oil and gas reservoir including changes in the margins of frangible solids. A system of equations including state equations such as momentum, and conservation laws such as mass conservation and volume fraction continuity, are defined and discretized for at least two phases in a modeled volume, one of which corresponds to frangible material. A material point model technique for numerically solving the system of discretized equations, to derive fluid flow at each of a plurality of mesh nodes in the modeled volume, and the velocity of at each of a plurality of particles representing the frangible material in the modeled volume. A time-splitting technique improves the computational efficiency of the simulation while maintaining accuracy on the deformation scale. The method can be applied to derive accurate upscaled model equations for larger volume scale simulations.

  16. Reservoir Modeling for Production Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1989-03-21

    For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

  17. Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

  18. Stochastic thermodynamics with information reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Barato, Andre C; Seifert, Udo

    2014-10-01

    We generalize stochastic thermodynamics to include information reservoirs. Such information reservoirs, which can be modeled as a sequence of bits, modify the second law. For example, work extraction from a system in contact with a single heat bath becomes possible if the system also interacts with an information reservoir. We obtain an inequality, and the corresponding fluctuation theorem, generalizing the standard entropy production of stochastic thermodynamics. From this inequality we can derive an information processing entropy production, which gives the second law in the presence of information reservoirs. We also develop a systematic linear response theory for information processing machines. For a unicyclic machine powered by an information reservoir, the efficiency at maximum power can deviate from the standard value of 1/2. For the case where energy is consumed to erase the tape, the efficiency at maximum erasure rate is found to be 1/2. PMID:25375481

  19. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly

  20. Reservoir quality studies, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Mowatt, T.C.; Banet, A. )

    1991-03-01

    Reservoir quality studies are part of the reservoir management and resource assessment programs of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in Alaska. Petrographic analyses have been carried out of samples collected from surface exposures in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Alaska, to evaluate surface materials as to their potential reservoir rock qualities in the subsurface. This entails characterization of relevant petrologic-petrophysical properties, integration with regional geological-geophysical relationships, and synthesis in terms of likely diagenetic, structural, and stratigraphic conditions in the subsurface. There is a paucity of relevant data in this region. Inferences must be predicated largely on general principles and known relationships elsewhere. A spectrum of lithologies were studied, representing a substantial portion of the regional stratigraphic column. In a number of cases, particularly among the pre-Brookian samples, the rocks appear to have low reservoir potential, based on their present high degree of diagenetic maturity. There is always the possibility - deemed somewhat unlikely here - of subsurface equivalents with more favorable characteristics, due to different original compositions, textures, and/or geologic histories. Brookian sandstones and conglomerates feature samples with fair-good reservoir characteristics, with prospects of being equally good or better in the subsurface. The samples studied suggest the likelihood of horizons with viable reservoir qualities in the subsurface within the ANWR region.

  1. Reservoir Systems in Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, W.; Tung, C.; Tai, C.

    2007-12-01

    Climate change may cause more climate variability and further results in more frequent extreme hydrological events which may greatly influence reservoir¡¦s abilities to provide service, such as water supply and flood mitigation, and even danger reservoir¡¦s safety. Some local studies have identified that climate change may cause more flood in wet period and less flow in dry period in Taiwan. To mitigate climate change impacts, more reservoir space, i.e. less storage, may be required to store higher flood in wet periods, while more reservoir storage may be required to supply water for dry periods. The goals to strengthen adaptive capacity of water supply and flood mitigation are conflict under climate change. This study will focus on evaluating the impacts of climate change on reservoir systems. The evaluation procedure includes hydrological models, a reservoir water balance model, and a water supply system dynamics model. The hydrological models are used to simulate reservoir inflows under different climate conditions. Future climate scenarios are derived from several GCMs. Then, the reservoir water balance model is developed to calculate reservoir¡¦s storage and outflows according to the simulated inflows and operational rules. The ability of flood mitigation is also evaluated. At last, those outflows are further input to the system dynamics model to assess whether the goal of water supply can still be met. To mitigate climate change impacts, the implementing adaptation strategies will be suggested with the principles of risk management. Besides, uncertainties of this study will also be analyzed. The Feitsui reservoir system in northern Taiwan is chosen as a case study.

  2. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  3. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOEpatents

    Mark, Graham A.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  4. Driven discrete time quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Craig S.; Barkhofen, Sonja; Sansoni, Linda; Jex, Igor; Silberhorn, Christine

    2016-07-01

    We introduce the driven discrete time quantum walk (QW), where walkers are added during the walk instead of only at the beginning. This leads to interference in walker number and very different dynamics when compared to the original QW. These dynamics have two regimes, which we illustrate using the one-dimensional line. Then, we explore a search application which has certain advantages over current search protocols, namely that it does not require a complicated initial state nor a specific measurement time to observe the marked state. Finally, we describe a potential experimental implementation using existing technology.

  5. Fish habitat degradation in U.S. reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Spickard, M.; Dunn, T.; Webb, K.M.; Aycock, J.N.; Hunt, K.

    2010-01-01

    As the median age of the thousands of large reservoirs (> 200 ha) in the United States tops 50, many are showing various signs of fish habitat degradation. Our goal was to identify major factors degrading fish habitat in reservoirs across the country, and to explore regional degradation patterns. An online survey including 14 metrics was scored on a 0 (no degradation) to 5 (high degradation) point scale by 221 fisheries scientists (92% response rate) to describe degradation in 482 reservoirs randomly distributed throughout the continental United States. The highest scored sources of degradation were lack of aquatic macrophytes (41% of the reservoirs scored as 4–5), lack or loss of woody debris (35% scored 4–5), mistimed water level fluctuations (34% scored 4–5), and sedimentation (31% scored 4–5). Factor analysis identified five primary degradation factors that accounted for most of the variability in the 14 degradation metrics. The factors reflected siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. Three degradation factors were driven principally by in-reservoir processes, whereas the other two were driven by inputs from the watershed. A comparison across U.S. regions indicated significant geographical differences in degradation relative to the factors emphasized by each region. Reservoirs sometimes have been dismissed as unnatural and disruptive, but they are a product of public policy, a critical feature of landscapes, and they cannot be overlooked if managers are to effectively conserve river systems. Protection and restoration of reservoir habitats may be enhanced with a broader perspective that includes watershed management, in addition to in reservoir activities.

  6. Fish habitat degradation in U.S. reservoirs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, L.E.; Spickard, M.; Dunn, T.; Webb, K.M.; Aycock, J.N.; Hunt, K.

    2010-01-01

    As the median age of the thousands of large reservoirs (> 200 ha) in the United States tops 50, many are showing various signs of fish habitat degradation. Our goal was to identify major factors degrading fish habitat in reservoirs across the country, and to explore regional degradation patterns. An online survey including 14 metrics was scored on a 0 (no degradation) to 5 (high degradation) point scale by 221 fisheries scientists (92% response rate) to describe degradation in 482 reservoirs randomly distributed throughout the continental United States. The highest scored sources of degradation were lack of aquatic macrophytes (41% of the reservoirs scored as 4-5), lack or loss of woody debris (35% scored 4-5), mistimed water level fluctuations (34% scored 4-5), and sedimentation (31% scored 4-5). Factor analysis identified five primary degradation factors that accounted for most of the variability in the 14 degradation metrics. The factors reflected siltation, structural habitat, eutrophication, water regime, and aquatic plants. Three degradation factors were driven principally by in-reservoir processes, whereas the other two were driven by inputs from the watershed. A comparison across U.S. regions indicated significant geographical differences in degradation relative to the factors emphasized by each region. Reservoirs sometimes have been dismissed as unnatural and disruptive, but they are a product of public policy, a critical feature of landscapes, and they cannot be overlooked if managers are to effectively conserve river systems. Protection and restoration of reservoir habitats may be enhanced with a broader perspective that includes watershed management, in addition to in reservoir activities.

  7. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging

  8. Decision support system for diabetic retinopathy using discrete wavelet transform.

    PubMed

    Noronha, K; Acharya, U R; Nayak, K P; Kamath, S; Bhandary, S V

    2013-03-01

    Prolonged duration of the diabetes may affect the tiny blood vessels of the retina causing diabetic retinopathy. Routine eye screening of patients with diabetes helps to detect diabetic retinopathy at the early stage. It is very laborious and time-consuming for the doctors to go through many fundus images continuously. Therefore, decision support system for diabetic retinopathy detection can reduce the burden of the ophthalmologists. In this work, we have used discrete wavelet transform and support vector machine classifier for automated detection of normal and diabetic retinopathy classes. The wavelet-based decomposition was performed up to the second level, and eight energy features were extracted. Two energy features from the approximation coefficients of two levels and six energy values from the details in three orientations (horizontal, vertical and diagonal) were evaluated. These features were fed to the support vector machine classifier with various kernel functions (linear, radial basis function, polynomial of orders 2 and 3) to evaluate the highest classification accuracy. We obtained the highest average classification accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of more than 99% with support vector machine classifier (polynomial kernel of order 3) using three discrete wavelet transform features. We have also proposed an integrated index called Diabetic Retinopathy Risk Index using clinically significant wavelet energy features to identify normal and diabetic retinopathy classes using just one number. We believe that this (Diabetic Retinopathy Risk Index) can be used as an adjunct tool by the doctors during the eye screening to cross-check their diagnosis. PMID:23662341

  9. Long-time behavior of a finite volume discretization for a fourth order diffusion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, Jan; Matthes, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a non-standard finite-volume discretization of a strongly non-linear fourth order diffusion equation on the d-dimensional cube, for arbitrary d≥slant 1 . The scheme preserves two important structural properties of the equation: the first is the interpretation as a gradient flow in a mass transportation metric, and the second is an intimate relation to a linear Fokker–Planck equation. Thanks to these structural properties, the scheme possesses two discrete Lyapunov functionals. These functionals approximate the entropy and the Fisher information, respectively, and their dissipation rates converge to the optimal ones in the discrete-to-continuous limit. Using the dissipation, we derive estimates on the long-time asymptotics of the discrete solutions. Finally, we present results from numerical experiments which indicate that our discretization is able to capture significant features of the complex original dynamics, even with a rather coarse spatial resolution.

  10. Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min.

    1993-03-01

    This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

  11. Reservoir evaporation in central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spahr, N.E.; Ruddy, B.C.

    1983-01-01

    Evaporation losses from seven reservoirs operated by the Denver Water Department in central Colorado were determined during various periods from 1974 to 1980. The reservoirs studies were Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, Williams Fork, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross. Energy-budget and mass-transfer methods were used to determine evaporation. Class-A pan data also were collected at each reservoir. The energy-budget method was the most accurate of the methods used to determine evaporation. At Ralston, Cheesman, Antero, and Williams Fork Reservoirs the energy-budget method was used to calibrate the mass-transfer coefficients. Calibrated coefficients already were available for Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross Reservoirs. Using the calibrated coefficients, long-term mass-transfer evaporation rates were determined. Annual evaporation values were not determined because the instrumentation was not operated for the entire open-water season. Class-A pan data were used to determine pan coefficients for each season at each reservoir. The coefficients varied from season to season and between reservoirs, and the seasonal values ranged from 0.29 to 1.05. (USGS)

  12. Identifying compartmentalization in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Junkin, J.; Cooper, K.; Sippel, M.

    1997-01-01

    Compartmentalization as a function of depositional systems is now recognized as a common type of reservoir heterogeneity that limits recovery from oil and gas reservoirs. US Department of Energy (DOE) estimates indicate that substantial quantities of gas resources will not be recovered from presently identified reservoirs under historic development practices. The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), state of Texas and DOE quantified compartmentalization over intervals as large as 2,000 feet in several different fluvial deltaic reservoirs. Early recognition of compartmentalized behavior can be used to pursue a more rapid development plan including efficient well spacing and elimination of redundant wells. Three classes of reservoir compartment sizes were delineated in the SGR project using methods discussed in this article. Forward stochastic modeling of gas recovery from these compartment-size classes established well spacing requirements that would yield maximum gas contact efficiency. The presence of reservoir compartmentalization was also shown to correlate with reserve growth. Also, those reservoirs classified as having smaller compartment sizes exhibited the greatest reserve growth potential. Utilization of tools, such as personal computer-based methods discussed, enables better engineering interpretation of actual field behavior. Some of these tools require minimal production data, which is readily available on CD-ROM or via modem at very low cost.

  13. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  14. Discreteness effects in population dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara Hidalgo, Esteban; Lecomte, Vivien

    2016-05-01

    We analyse numerically the effects of small population size in the initial transient regime of a simple example population dynamics. These effects play an important role for the numerical determination of large deviation functions of additive observables for stochastic processes. A method commonly used in order to determine such functions is the so-called cloning algorithm which in its non-constant population version essentially reduces to the determination of the growth rate of a population, averaged over many realizations of the dynamics. However, the averaging of populations is highly dependent not only on the number of realizations of the population dynamics, and on the initial population size but also on the cut-off time (or population) considered to stop their numerical evolution. This may result in an over-influence of discreteness effects at initial times, caused by small population size. We overcome these effects by introducing a (realization-dependent) time delay in the evolution of populations, additional to the discarding of the initial transient regime of the population growth where these discreteness effects are strong. We show that the improvement in the estimation of the large deviation function comes precisely from these two main contributions.

  15. Two Monthly Continuous Dynamic Model Based on Nash Bargaining Theory for Conflict Resolution in Reservoir System

    PubMed Central

    Homayounfar, Mehran; Zomorodian, Mehdi; Martinez, Christopher J.; Lai, Sai Hin

    2015-01-01

    So far many optimization models based on Nash Bargaining Theory associated with reservoir operation have been developed. Most of them have aimed to provide practical and efficient solutions for water allocation in order to alleviate conflicts among water users. These models can be discussed from two viewpoints: (i) having a discrete nature; and (ii) working on an annual basis. Although discrete dynamic game models provide appropriate reservoir operator policies, their discretization of variables increases the run time and causes dimensionality problems. In this study, two monthly based non-discrete optimization models based on the Nash Bargaining Solution are developed for a reservoir system. In the first model, based on constrained state formulation, the first and second moments (mean and variance) of the state variable (water level in the reservoir) is calculated. Using moment equations as the constraint, the long-term utility of the reservoir manager and water users are optimized. The second model is a dynamic approach structured based on continuous state Markov decision models. The corresponding solution based on the collocation method is structured for a reservoir system. In this model, the reward function is defined based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Indeed, it is used to yield equilibrium in every proper sub-game, thereby satisfying the Markov perfect equilibrium. Both approaches are applicable for water allocation in arid and semi-arid regions. A case study was carried out at the Zayandeh-Rud river basin located in central Iran to identify the effectiveness of the presented methods. The results are compared with the results of an annual form of dynamic game, a classical stochastic dynamic programming model (e.g. Bayesian Stochastic Dynamic Programming model, BSDP), and a discrete stochastic dynamic game model (PSDNG). By comparing the results of alternative methods, it is shown that both models are capable of tackling conflict issues in water allocation

  16. Two Monthly Continuous Dynamic Model Based on Nash Bargaining Theory for Conflict Resolution in Reservoir System.

    PubMed

    Homayounfar, Mehran; Zomorodian, Mehdi; Martinez, Christopher J; Lai, Sai Hin

    2015-01-01

    So far many optimization models based on Nash Bargaining Theory associated with reservoir operation have been developed. Most of them have aimed to provide practical and efficient solutions for water allocation in order to alleviate conflicts among water users. These models can be discussed from two viewpoints: (i) having a discrete nature; and (ii) working on an annual basis. Although discrete dynamic game models provide appropriate reservoir operator policies, their discretization of variables increases the run time and causes dimensionality problems. In this study, two monthly based non-discrete optimization models based on the Nash Bargaining Solution are developed for a reservoir system. In the first model, based on constrained state formulation, the first and second moments (mean and variance) of the state variable (water level in the reservoir) is calculated. Using moment equations as the constraint, the long-term utility of the reservoir manager and water users are optimized. The second model is a dynamic approach structured based on continuous state Markov decision models. The corresponding solution based on the collocation method is structured for a reservoir system. In this model, the reward function is defined based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Indeed, it is used to yield equilibrium in every proper sub-game, thereby satisfying the Markov perfect equilibrium. Both approaches are applicable for water allocation in arid and semi-arid regions. A case study was carried out at the Zayandeh-Rud river basin located in central Iran to identify the effectiveness of the presented methods. The results are compared with the results of an annual form of dynamic game, a classical stochastic dynamic programming model (e.g. Bayesian Stochastic Dynamic Programming model, BSDP), and a discrete stochastic dynamic game model (PSDNG). By comparing the results of alternative methods, it is shown that both models are capable of tackling conflict issues in water allocation

  17. Transient pressure behavior for a horizontal well with multiple finite-conductivity fractures in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingjing; Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Liehui

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have been common and efficient practices in exploitation of tight reservoirs. Establishing corresponding mathematical models and analyzing transient pressure behaviors of this type of well-reservoir configuration can provide a better understanding of fluid flow patterns in formation as well as estimations of important parameters. Most current models proposed for fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs do not incorporate either reservoir permeability loss during the production, which is believed to be non-ignorable or finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures. A coupling model for a multi-fractured horizontal well (MFHW) in tight reservoirs is presented in this article, in which finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures and stress-dependant reservoir permeability are taken into account simultaneously. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in the Laplace domain by using source function theory, Laplace transformation, perturbation technique, discretization of fractures, and superposition principle. Analysis of transient pressure responses indicates that several characteristic flow periods of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs can be identified, including linear flow in fracture, bi-linear flow, linear flow in reservoir, pseudo-radial flow around fractures, and pseudo-radial flow around the horizontal wellbore and fractures. Parametric analysis shows that fracture conductivity, fracture spacing, fracture length, permeability modulus, and skin effect can significantly influence the transient pressure responses of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs. The model presented in this article can be applied to obtain important parameters pertinent to reservoir or fractures by type curve matching, and it can also provide useful information for optimizing fracture parameters. Finally, the model presented in this article can also be easily extended to dual-porosity cases.

  18. Operation of TVA reservoirs. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1981. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1981. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storages and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plotting of midnight reservoir elevations during calendar year 1981 are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  19. Operation of TVA reservoirs: annual 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1980. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1980. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plottings of midnight reservoir elevations are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  20. A discrete momentum-conserving explicit algorithm for rigid body dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, K. C.; Chiou, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    A discrete momentum-conserving explicit time integration is presented. The accurate feature and simplicity of the present algorithm are realized by a mid-point implicit formula for integrating the Euler parameters and a second-order discrete momentum-conserving form of the central difference algorithm, respectively. The accuracy and robustness of the algorithm is demonstrated by example problems which exhibit large overall rigid motions under holonomic constraints.

  1. Observers for discrete-time nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, Walter D.

    Observer synthesis for discrete-time nonlinear systems with special applications to parameter estimation is analyzed. Two new types of observers are developed. The first new observer is an adaptation of the Friedland continuous-time parameter estimator to discrete-time systems. The second observer is an adaptation of the continuous-time Gauthier observer to discrete-time systems. By adapting these observers to discrete-time continuous-time parameter estimation problems which were formerly intractable become tractable. In addition to the two newly developed observers, two observers already described in the literature are analyzed and deficiencies with respect to noise rejection are demonstrated. Improved versions of these observers are proposed and their performance demonstrated. The issues of discrete-time observability, discrete-time system inversion, and optimal probing are also addressed.

  2. Reservoir evaporation in Texas, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Ayala, Rolando A.

    2014-03-01

    The role of reservoir surface evaporation in river/reservoir water budgets and water management is explored using a modeling system that combines historical natural hydrology with current conditions of water resources development and management. The long-term mean evaporation from the 3415 reservoirs in the Texas water rights permit system is estimated to be 7.53 billion m3/year, which is equivalent to 61% of total agricultural or 126% of total municipal water use in the state during the year 2010. Evaporation varies with the hydrologic conditions governing reservoir surface areas and evaporation rates. Annual statewide total evaporation volumes associated with exceedance probabilities of 75%, 50%, and 25% are 7.07, 7.47, and 7.95 billion m3/year, respectively. Impacts of evaporation are greatest during extended severe droughts that govern water supply capabilities.

  3. Trends in reservoir performance prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Mackenzie, A.S.

    1994-12-31

    Stronger links between geoscience and petroleum engineering are being fostered by new tools and organizations. These linkages are improving the effectiveness of business decisions concerning reservoir performance, and are generating new challenges for the next generation of tools.

  4. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer.

    PubMed

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  5. Fully analogue photonic reservoir computer

    PubMed Central

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Akrout, Akram; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Introduced a decade ago, reservoir computing is an efficient approach for signal processing. State of the art capabilities have already been demonstrated with both computer simulations and physical implementations. If photonic reservoir computing appears to be promising a solution for ultrafast nontrivial computing, all the implementations presented up to now require digital pre or post processing, which prevents them from exploiting their full potential, in particular in terms of processing speed. We address here the possibility to get rid simultaneously of both digital pre and post processing. The standalone fully analogue reservoir computer resulting from our endeavour is compared to previous experiments and only exhibits rather limited degradation of performances. Our experiment constitutes a proof of concept for standalone physical reservoir computers. PMID:26935166

  6. Characterization and simulation of an exhumed fractured petroleum reservoir. Final report, March 18, 1996--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Forster, C.B.; Nielson, D.L.; Deo, M.

    1998-12-01

    An exhumed fractured reservoir located near Alligator Ridge in central Nevada provides the basis for developing and testing different approaches for simulating fractured petroleum reservoirs. The fractured analog reservoir comprises a 90 m thickness of silty limestone and shaly interbeds within the Devonian Pilot Shale. A period of regional compression followed by ongoing basin and range extension has created faults and fractures that, in tern, have controlled the migration of both oil and gold ore-forming fluids. Open pit gold mines provide access for observing oil seepage, collecting the detailed fracture data needed to map variations in fracture intensity near faults, build discrete fracture network models and create equivalent permeability structures. Fault trace patterns mapped at the ground surface provide a foundation for creating synthetic fault trace maps using a stochastic procedure conditioned by the outcrop data. Conventional simulations of petroleum production from a 900 by 900 m sub-domain within the reservoir analog illustrate the possible influence of faults and fractures on production. The consequences of incorporating the impact of different stress states (e.g., extension, compression or lithostatic) are also explored. Simulating multiphase fluid flow using a discrete fracture, finite element simulator illustrates how faults acting as conduits might be poorly represented by the upscaling procedures used to assign equivalent permeability values within reservoir models. The parallelized reservoir simulators developed during this project provide a vehicle to evaluate when it might be necessary to incorporate very fine scale grid networks in conventional reservoir simulators or to use finely gridded discrete fracture reservoir simulators.

  7. Multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization

    PubMed Central

    Gahalaut, K.P.S.; Kraus, J.K.; Tomar, S.K.

    2013-01-01

    We present (geometric) multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization of scalar second order elliptic problems. The smoothing property of the relaxation method, and the approximation property of the intergrid transfer operators are analyzed. These properties, when used in the framework of classical multigrid theory, imply uniform convergence of two-grid and multigrid methods. Supporting numerical results are provided for the smoothing property, the approximation property, convergence factor and iterations count for V-, W- and F-cycles, and the linear dependence of V-cycle convergence on the smoothing steps. For two dimensions, numerical results include the problems with variable coefficients, simple multi-patch geometry, a quarter annulus, and the dependence of convergence behavior on refinement levels ℓ, whereas for three dimensions, only the constant coefficient problem in a unit cube is considered. The numerical results are complete up to polynomial order p=4, and for C0 and Cp-1 smoothness. PMID:24511168

  8. Multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization.

    PubMed

    Gahalaut, K P S; Kraus, J K; Tomar, S K

    2013-01-01

    We present (geometric) multigrid methods for isogeometric discretization of scalar second order elliptic problems. The smoothing property of the relaxation method, and the approximation property of the intergrid transfer operators are analyzed. These properties, when used in the framework of classical multigrid theory, imply uniform convergence of two-grid and multigrid methods. Supporting numerical results are provided for the smoothing property, the approximation property, convergence factor and iterations count for V-, W- and F-cycles, and the linear dependence of V-cycle convergence on the smoothing steps. For two dimensions, numerical results include the problems with variable coefficients, simple multi-patch geometry, a quarter annulus, and the dependence of convergence behavior on refinement levels [Formula: see text], whereas for three dimensions, only the constant coefficient problem in a unit cube is considered. The numerical results are complete up to polynomial order [Formula: see text], and for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] smoothness. PMID:24511168

  9. Discrete modelling of drapery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thoeni, Klaus; Giacomini, Anna

    2016-04-01

    Drapery systems are an efficient and cost-effective measure in preventing and controlling rockfall hazards on rock slopes. The simplest form consists of a row of ground anchors along the top of the slope connected to a horizontal support cable from which a wire mesh is suspended down the face of the slope. Such systems are generally referred to as simple or unsecured draperies (Badger and Duffy 2012). Variations such as secured draperies, where a pattern of ground anchors is incorporated within the field of the mesh, and hybrid systems, where the upper part of an unsecured drapery is elevated to intercept rockfalls originating upslope of the installation, are becoming more and more popular. This work presents a discrete element framework for simulation of unsecured drapery systems and its variations. The numerical model is based on the classical discrete element method (DEM) and implemented into the open-source framework YADE (Šmilauer et al., 2010). The model takes all relevant interactions between block, drapery and slope into account (Thoeni et al., 2014) and was calibrated and validated based on full-scale experiments (Giacomini et al., 2012).The block is modelled as a rigid clump made of spherical particles which allows any shape to be approximated. The drapery is represented by a set of spherical particle with remote interactions. The behaviour of the remote interactions is governed by the constitutive behaviour of the wire and generally corresponds to a piecewise linear stress-strain relation (Thoeni et al., 2013). The same concept is used to model wire ropes. The rock slope is represented by rigid triangular elements where material properties (e.g., normal coefficient of restitution, friction angle) are assigned to each triangle. The capabilities of the developed model to simulate drapery systems and estimate the residual hazard involved with such systems is shown. References Badger, T.C., Duffy, J.D. (2012) Drapery systems. In: Turner, A.K., Schuster R

  10. Classicality in discrete Wigner functions

    SciTech Connect

    Cormick, Cecilia; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Gottesman, Daniel; Paz, Juan Pablo; Pittenger, Arthur O.

    2006-01-15

    Gibbons et al., [Phys. Rev. A 70, 062101 (2004)] have recently defined discrete Wigner functions W to represent quantum states in a Hilbert space with finite dimension. We show that such a class of Wigner functions W can be defined so that the only pure states having non-negative W for all such functions are stabilizer states, as conjectured by Galvao, [Phys. Rev. A 71, 042302 (2005)]. We also show that the unitaries preserving non-negativity of W for all definitions of W in the class form a subgroup of the Clifford group. This means pure states with non-negative W and their associated unitary dynamics are classical in the sense of admitting an efficient classical simulation scheme using the stabilizer formalism.