Science.gov

Sample records for reservoir pressure reduction

  1. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The equalizing-reservoir pressure or brake-pipe pressure reduction during an automatic brake application shall be at a rate not...

  2. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  3. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  4. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  5. 49 CFR 236.554 - Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. 236.554 Section 236.554 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation...; Locomotives § 236.554 Rate of pressure reduction; equalizing reservoir or brake pipe. The...

  6. Interpreting isotopic analyses of microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubbard, C. G.; Engelbrektson, A. L.; Druhan, J. L.; Cheng, Y.; Li, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Coates, J. D.; Conrad, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs is often associated with secondary production of oil where seawater (28 mM sulfate) is commonly injected to maintain reservoir pressure and displace oil. The hydrogen sulfide produced can cause a suite of operating problems including corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks and additional processing costs. We propose that monitoring of the sulfur and oxygen isotopes of sulfate can be used as early indicators that microbial sulfate reduction is occurring, as this process is well known to cause substantial isotopic fractionation. This approach relies on the idea that reactions with reservoir (iron) minerals can remove dissolved sulfide, thereby delaying the transport of the sulfide through the reservoir relative to the sulfate in the injected water. Changes in the sulfate isotopes due to microbial sulfate reduction may therefore be measurable in the produced water before sulfide is detected. However, turning this approach into a predictive tool requires (i) an understanding of appropriate fractionation factors for oil reservoirs, (ii) incorporation of isotopic data into reservoir flow and reactive transport models. We present here the results of preliminary batch experiments aimed at determining fractionation factors using relevant electron donors (e.g. crude oil and volatile fatty acids), reservoir microbial communities and reservoir environmental conditions (pressure, temperature). We further explore modeling options for integrating isotope data and discuss whether single fractionation factors are appropriate to model complex environments with dynamic hydrology, geochemistry, temperature and microbiology gradients.

  7. Pressure effect on dissimilatory sulfate reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A. J.; Carlson, H. K.; Coates, J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Biosouring is the production of H2S by sulfate reducing microorganisms (SRM) in-situ or in the produced fluids of oil reservoirs. Sulfide is explosive, toxic and corrosive which can trigger equipment and transportation failure, leading to environmental catastrophe. As oil exploration and reservoir development continue, subsequent enhanced recovery is occurring in progressively deeper formations and typical oil reservoir pressures range from 10-50 MPa. Therefore, an understanding of souring control effects will require an accurate understanding of the influence of pressure on SRM metabolism and the efficacy of souring control treatments at high pressure. Considerable work to date has focussed on souring control at ambient pressure; however, the influence of pressure on biogeochemical processes and souring treatments in oil reservoirs is poorly understood. To explore the impact of pressure on SRM, wild type Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 (isolated from a producing oil well in Ventura County, California) was grown under a range of pressures (0.1-14 MPa) at 30 °C. Complete sulfate reduction occurred in all pressures tested within 3 days, but microbial growth was inhibited with increasing pressure. Bar-seq identified several genes associated with flagella biosynthesis (including FlhB) and assembly as important for survival at elevated pressure and fitness was confirmed using individual transposon mutants. Flagellar genes have previously been implicated with biofilm formation and confocal microscopy on glass slides incubated with wild type D. alaskensis G20 showed more biomass associated with surfaces under pressure, highlighting the link between pressure, flagellar and biofilm formation. To determine the effect of pressure on the efficacy of SRM inhibitors, IC50 experiments were conducted and D. alaskensis G20 showed a greater resistance to nitrate and the antibiotic chloramphenicol, but a lower resistance to perchlorate. These results will be discussed in the context of

  8. Perchlorate reduction by microbes inhabiting oil reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebensteiner, Martin; Stams, Alfons; Lomans, Bart

    2014-05-01

    Microbial perchlorate and chlorate reduction is a unique type of anaerobic respiration as during reduction of (per)chlorate chlorite is formed, which is then split into chloride and molecular oxygen. In recent years it was demonstrated that (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria may employ oxygenase-dependent pathways for the degradation of aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. These findings suggested that (per)chlorate may be used as oxygen-releasing compound in anoxic environments that contain hydrocarbons, such as polluted soil sites and oil reservoirs. We started to study perchlorate reduction by microbes possibly inhabiting oil reservoirs. One of the organisms studied was Archaeoglobus fulgidus. This extremely thermophilic archaeon is known as a major contributor to souring in hot oil reservoirs. A. fulgidus turned out to be able to use perchlorate as terminal electron acceptor for growth with lactate (Liebensteiner et al 2013). Genome based physiological experiments indicated that A. fulgidus possesses a novel perchlorate reduction pathway. Perchlorate is first reduced to chlorite, but chlorite is not split into chloride and molecular oxygen as occurs in bacteria. Rather, chlorite reacts chemically with sulfide, forming oxidized sulfur compounds, which are reduced to sulfide in the electron transport chain by the archaeon. The dependence of perchlorate reduction on sulfur compounds could be shown. The implications of our findings as novel strategy for microbiological enhanced oil recovery and for souring mitigation are discussed. Liebensteiner MG, Pinkse MWH, Schaap PJ, Stams AJM and Lomans BP (2013) Archaeal (per)chlorate reduction at high temperature, a matter of abiotic-biotic reactions. Science 340: 85-87

  9. Pressure behavior of laterally composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J.; Habashy, T.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a new general method for solving the pressure diffusion equation in laterally composite reservoirs, where rock and fluid properties may change laterally as a function of y in the x-y plane. Composite systems can be encountered as a result of many different types of depositional and tectonic processes. For example, meandering point bar reservoirs or reservoirs with edgewater encroachment are examples of such systems. The new solution method presented is based on the reflection-transmission concept of electromagnetics to solve fluid-flow problems in 3D nonhomogeneous reservoirs, where heterogeneity is in only one (y) direction. A general Green`s function for a point source in 3D laterally composite systems is developed by using the reflection-transmission method. The solutions in the Laplace transform domain are then developed from the Green`s function for the pressure behavior of specific composite reservoirs. The solution method can also be applied to many different types of wells, such as vertical, fractured, and horizontal in composite reservoirs. The pressure behavior of a few well-known laterally composite systems are investigated. It is shown that a network of partially communicating faults and fractures in porous medium can be modeled as composite systems. It is also shown that the existing solutions for a partially communicating fault are not valid when the fault permeability is substantially larger than the formation permeability. The derivative plots are presented for selected faulted, fractured, channel, and composite reservoirs as diagnostic tools for well-test interpretation. It is also shown that if the composite system`s permeability varies moderately in the x or y direction, it exhibits a homogeneous system behavior. However, it does not yield the system`s average permeability. Furthermore, the composite systems with distributed low-permeability zones behave as if the system has many two no-flow boundaries.

  10. Phosphorus load reduction goals for Feitsui Reservoir Watershed, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Shang; Lee, Tsu-Chuan; Lin, Jen-Yang; Yu, Shaw L

    2007-08-01

    The present paper describes an effort for developing the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for phosphorus and a load reduction strategy for the Feitsui Reservoir in Northern Taiwan. BASINS model was employed to estimate watershed pollutant loads from nonpoint sources (NPS) in the Feitsui Reservoir watershed. The BASINS model was calibrated using field data collected during a 2-year sampling period and then used to compute watershed pollutant loadings into the Feitsui Reservoir. The simulated results indicate that the average annual total phosphorus (TP) loading into the reservoir is 18,910 kg/year, which consists of non-point source loading of 16,003 kg/year, and point source loading of 2,907 kg/year. The Vollenweider mass balance model was used next to determine the degree of eutrophication under current pollutant loading and the load reduction needed to keep the reservoir from being eutrophic. It was estimated that Feitsui Reservoir can becoming of the oligotrophic state if the average annual TP loading is reduced by 37% or more. The results provide the basis on which an integrated control action plan for both point and nonpoint sources of pollution in the watershed can be developed. PMID:17171261

  11. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Burnett, J. E.; Felder, S. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    An intraocular pressure reduction and regulation system is described and data are presented covering performance in: (1) reducing intraocular pressure to a preselected value, (2) maintaining a set minimum intraocular pressure, and (3) reducing the dynamic increases in intraocular pressure resulting from external loads applied to the eye.

  12. Intraocular pressure reduction and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.; Mcgannon, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    System designed to reduce intraocular pressure hydraulically to any level desired by physician over set time and in controlled manner has number of uses in ophthalmology. Device may be most immediately useful in treatment of glaucoma.

  13. Anisotropic permeabilities evolution of reservoir rocks under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeremie, D.; Nicolas, G.; Alexandre, D.; Olga, V.

    2006-12-01

    The aim of our study is to measure, to model and to forecast the evolutions of porosity and permeability under anisotropic stresses representative of hydrocarbon reservoir conditions. Reservoir field exploitation induces a decrease of the pore pressure, hence modifying the effective stress-state at the reservoir scale. To optimize production and recovery rates of the reservoir it is of fundamental interest to understand all the physical and mechanical evolutions of the host-rock and their influence on transport properties. In the case of weakly consolidated reservoirs the variations of stresses are modest, yet they can induce significant porosity and permeability changes due to their high compressibility. In the case of deeply buried and consolidated reservoirs the stress variations might be pronounced enough to influence flow properties as well. Because of reservoir boundaries conditions, the fluid pressure drop influences essentially the vertical stress. The recovery rate is a function of horizontal permeability. In order to understand how the anisotropic stress-states induced during production may influence the transport properties experiments must be designed to measure simultaneously both horizontal and vertical permeabilities under deviatoric stresses. For this purpose we developed a specific triaxial cell operating in conditions representative of the field conditions. Preliminary results obtained with low permeability sandstones allowed a coupled observation of deformation and directional permeability evolution. Because of complex geometrical conditions the results required numerical interpretations. A finite-element inversion of our data allowed the determination of the complete permeability tensor. In addition the study aims on the identification of the microphysical mechanics that induce the pore scale microstructural evolution, which is ultimately responsible of the permeability decrease. For this purpose we used synthetic hot-pressed calcite

  14. Reservoir transport and poroelastic properties from oscillating pore pressure experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, Azar K.

    Hydraulic transport properties of reservoir rocks, permeability and storage capacity are traditionally defined as rock properties, responsible for the passage of fluids through the porous rock sample, as well as their storage. The evaluation of both is an important part of any reservoir characterization workflow. Moreover, permeability and storage capacity are main inputs into any reservoir simulation study, routinely performed by reservoir engineers on almost any major oil and gas field in the world. An accurate reservoir simulation is essential for production forecast and economic analysis, hence the transport properties directly control the profitability of the petroleum reservoir and their estimation is vital for oil and gas industry. This thesis is devoted to an integrated study of reservoir rocks' hydraulic, streaming potential and poroelastic properties as measured with the oscillating pore pressure experiment. The oscillating pore pressure method is traditionally used to measure hydraulic transport properties. We modified the method and built an experimental setup, capable of measuring all aforementioned rock properties simultaneously. The measurements were carried out for four conventional reservoir-rock quality samples at a range of oscillation frequencies and effective stresses. An apparent frequency dependence of permeability and streaming potential coupling coefficient was observed. Measured frequency dispersion of drained poroelastic properties indicates an intrinsically inelastic nature of the porous mineral rock frame. Standard Linear Model demonstrated the best fit to the experimental dispersion data. Pore collapse and grain crushing effects took place during hydrostatic loading of the dolomitic sample and were observed in permeability, coupling coefficient and poroelastic measurements simultaneously. I established that hydraulically-measured storage capacities are overestimated by almost one order of magnitude when compared to elastically

  15. Pressure behavior of horizontal wells in multilayer reservoirs with crossflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchuk, F.J.; Habashy, T.

    1996-03-01

    New analytic solutions for horizontal wells with wellbore storage and skin in layered reservoirs with cross flow are presented. These layered systems can be bounded by two horizontal impermeable boundary planes at the top and the bottom, or either one of the boundary planes can have a constant pressure (the system either has a gas cap or an active aquifer), while the other is maintained as a no-flow boundary. The new solutions are derived by utilizing the reflection and transmission concept of electromagnetics to solve fluid flow problems in three dimensional layered reservoirs, where nonhomogeneity is in only one direction. The solution technique is sufficiently general that it may be applied to a wide variety of fluid flow and well testing problems involving single-phase flow. The solutions are applied to a number of layered-reservoir examples. It is shown that a gas cap or aquifer should automatically not be treated as a constant-pressure boundary. It is also shown that estimation of layer parameters from conventional well tests is difficult. A field example is presented for the use of the new solutions for the interpretation of a buildup test from a horizontal well in a multilayer reservoir, where the layers are separated sporadically by low permeability zones. The Horner method is also used to interpret the field test; however, Horner does not work well for layered systems with horizontal wells.

  16. Influence of shape and skin of matrix-rock blocks on pressure transients in fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    de Swaan, A.

    1986-01-01

    A formulation of pressure transients in terms of the intrinsic, or core, properties of the two media that compose the fractured reservoir, establishes the influence of these properties, and reciprocally, their corroboration from - the pressure-time relationship observed in well tests and interference tests. The following reservoir characteristics are analyzed: the area of fractures transverse to flow; the dimensions, shape and properties of rectangular parallelepiped matrix-rock blocks; and a permeability reduction in the blocks surface. A restatement of the so-called pseudo-steady state inter-media flow gives to parameters alfa and lambda in the theory of a previous study the physical meaning they lacked, and allows a direct determination of the blocks minimum dimension.

  17. An evaluation of pore pressure diffusion into a shale overburden and sideburden induced by production-related changes in reservoir fluid pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricard, Ludovic P.; MacBeth, Colin; HajNasser, Yesser; Schutjens, Peter

    2012-06-01

    It is commonplace in the simulation of reservoir fluid flow induced by hydrocarbon production to regard shales as barriers to flow. Whilst this appears correct for fluid exchange, this is not the case for the fluid pressure component of this process. Indeed, the authors observe that pore pressure reduction due to reservoir depletion can propagate significant distances into the shale overburden or sideburden over the production time scale. Shales may deplete their pore pressures by more than 10% of that experienced in the reservoir sand for distances of tens of metres to kilometres into the shale, depending on the production history, duration and the specific shale properties. An important factor controlling these results is heterogeneity of the shale sediments, and the pressure diffusion process can be considerably enhanced by the presence of silt laminations and streaks. These results suggest a possible risk to drillers when advancing towards the top of a depleting reservoir or when drilling a well alongside an already depleted reservoir. Our analyses conclude that pore pressure diffusion should be considered as a factor in geomechanical and fluid flow reservoir modelling, and in mud weight determination during infill drilling.

  18. Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, Jan; Griffin, Mr. Bob; Wright, Anthony L

    2006-01-01

    Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

  19. Understanding creep in sandstone reservoirs - theoretical deformation mechanism maps for pressure solution in granular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Christopher

    2014-05-01

    Subsurface exploitation of the Earth's natural resources removes the natural system from its chemical and physical equilibrium. As such, groundwater extraction and hydrocarbon production from subsurface reservoirs frequently causes surface subsidence and induces (micro)seismicity. These effects are not only a problem in onshore (e.g. Groningen, the Netherlands) and offshore hydrocarbon fields (e.g. Ekofisk, Norway), but also in urban areas with extensive groundwater pumping (e.g. Venice, Italy). It is known that fluid extraction inevitably leads to (poro)elastic compaction of reservoirs, hence subsidence and occasional fault reactivation, and causes significant technical, economic and ecological impact. However, such effects often exceed what is expected from purely elastic reservoir behaviour and may continue long after exploitation has ceased. This is most likely due to time-dependent compaction, or 'creep deformation', of such reservoirs, driven by the reduction in pore fluid pressure compared with the rock overburden. Given the societal and ecological impact of surface subsidence, as well as the current interest in developing geothermal energy and unconventional gas resources in densely populated areas, there is much need for obtaining better quantitative understanding of creep in sediments to improve the predictability of the impact of geo-energy and groundwater production. The key problem in developing a reliable, quantitative description of the creep behaviour of sediments, such as sands and sandstones, is that the operative deformation mechanisms are poorly known and poorly quantified. While grain-scale brittle fracturing plus intergranular sliding play an important role in the early stages of compaction, these time-independent, brittle-frictional processes give way to compaction creep on longer time-scales. Thermally-activated mass transfer processes, like pressure solution, can cause creep via dissolution of material at stressed grain contacts, grain

  20. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum

  1. Partial pressure of CO2 and CO2 emission in a monsoon-driven hydroelectric reservoir (Danjiangkou Reservoir), China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S. Y.; Zhang, Q. F.

    2013-06-01

    Hydroelectric reservoirs have been under sampled to establish them as sources or sinks of the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Such poor coverage is well known for subtropic, particularly monsoon driven reservoirs in China. Our study presented the spatiotemporal changes of the carbonate system and CO2 flux in a hydroelectric reservoir (Dangjiankou Reservoir) locating in a subtropical monsoon climate region. Our 21 filed surveys conducted during 2004-2011 revealed significantly spatial and monthly variations of surface water partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the Reservoir. pCO2, showing higher concentrations in the wet and warm seasons, averaged 595 ± 545 µatm (ranging from 53-3751 µatm) in the reservoir surface, while substantially higher pCO2 (1132 ± 1220 µatm) was observed in the river downstream the dam. A clear pCO2 drawdown in the reservoir as water flows demonstrated a significantly descending order of Dan Reservoir > site close to dam > Han Reservoir. This spatial contrast can also be seen in the distributions of dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. Pronounced seasonality in pCO2 was controlled by seasonal monsoon rainfall, while photosynthetic CO2 uptake dominated spatial patterns and dry-month variability of pCO2. We further related pCO2 to water chemical properties and indicated that pCO2 had strong positive correlations with Si, TP and DOC, negative correlations with DO saturation, TN and Chl a, while weak correlations with other variables including biogenic elements. CO2 flux from the Reservoir surface showed a bottom average of 9 mmol m-2 d-2 in comparison with other hydroelectric reservoir in China. River downstream the dam had quite high flux of CO2 (119 mmol m-2 d-2), which was intermediate between temperate rivers and compared to global rivers' average. This means that water releasing from reservoir would be an important channel for atmospheric CO2 sources. The annual CO2 emission from the Danjiangkou Reservoir was estimated to be

  2. Analysis and reduction of well failures in diatomite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, L.; Jacobsen, J.; Horsman, J.

    1995-12-31

    Well damage induced by compactable formation deformation has occurred in oil fields in the Gulf of Mexico, the mid-continent region, the North Sea, on-shore Europe, Asia, and South America. The diatomite reservoirs of California are particularly susceptible to compaction due to the very high porosity of the diatomite. In these reservoirs well replacement, lost production and abandonment costs have exceeded $200 million to date. In 1994 alone about 40 wells were damaged. A study is currently underway involving data analysis and 3-D visualization, laboratory testing, and numerical modelling to improve understanding of casing damage due to reservoir compaction and to develop tools and operating strategies to reduce casing damage. The study is focused on the South Belridge field. Results to date show a consistent correlation between failure and structural markers and apparent influence of local production and injection supporting the need for 3-D simulation.

  3. Effects of steam-liquid counterflow on pressure transient data from two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Cox, B.L.; Ripperda, M.

    1987-06-01

    Numerical studies are performed to investigate the effects localized feedzones on the pressure transients in two-phase reservoirs. It is shown that gravity effects can significantly affect the pressure transients, because of the large difference in the density of liquid water and vapor. Production from such systems enhances steam/liquid water counterflow and expands the vapor-dominated zone at the top of the reservoir. Subcooled liquid regions develop in the center of the reservoir due to gravity drainage of cooler liquid water. The vapor zone will act as a constant pressure boundary and help stabilize the decline in the system. It is shown that the pressure transients at observation wells depend greatly on the location (depth) of the major feedzone; if this is not accounted for, large errors in deduced reservoir properties will result. At shallow observation points pressures may actually increase as a result of enhanced steam upflow due to production at a deep feedzone. 12 refs., 17 figs.

  4. Case history of pressure maintenance by gas injection in the 26R gravity drainage reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, M.H.; Yu, J.P.; Moore, D.M.; Ezekwe, N.; Querin, M.E.; Williams, L.L.

    1992-02-01

    This paper is a field case history on the performance of the 26R Reservoir. This is a gravity drainage reservoir under pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection. The 26R Reservoir is a highly layered Stevens turbidite sandstone. The reservoir is located in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR{number_sign}1) in Elk Hills, Kern County, California. The 26R Reservoir is contained within the steeply dipping southwestern limb of the 31S Anticline. The reservoir had an initial oil column of 1800 feet. Original oil-in-place (OOIP) was estimated at 424 million barrels. Pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection was initiated immediately after production began in October 1976. The total volume of gas injected is about 586 BCF. This exceeds one reservoir pore volume. Reservoir pressure has declined from 3030 psi to 2461 psi. This pressure decline believe to be due to migration of injected gas into the overlaying shale reservoirs. Under the gas injection pressure maintenance strategy, reserves are estimated to be approximately 212 million barrels. Reservoir studies have concluded that the aquifer at the base of the reservoir has been relatively inactive. Well recompletions, deepenings, and horizontal wells are used to improve oil recovery. An aggressive program of controlling gas production began in the mid 1980`s by the installation of multiple packers and sleeves. As the gas-oil contact (GOC) has dropped, sand intervals have subsequently been isolated behind packers. A cased hole logging program was recently undertaken to identify possible remaining reserves in the gas cap. 15 refs., 24 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

  6. Improving multi-objective reservoir operation optimization with sensitivity-informed dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G.; Li, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a sensitivity-informed method for multi-objective operation of reservoir systems, which uses global sensitivity analysis as a screening tool to reduce computational demands. Sobol's method is used to screen insensitive decision variables and guide the formulation of the optimization problems with a significantly reduced number of decision variables. This sensitivity-informed method dramatically reduces the computational demands required for attaining high-quality approximations of optimal trade-off relationships between conflicting design objectives. The search results obtained from the reduced complexity multi-objective reservoir operation problems are then used to pre-condition the full search of the original optimization problem. In two case studies, the Dahuofang reservoir and the inter-basin multi-reservoir system in Liaoning province, China, sensitivity analysis results show that reservoir performance is strongly controlled by a small proportion of decision variables. Sensitivity-informed dimension reduction and pre-conditioning are evaluated in their ability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary optimization. Overall, this study illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the sensitivity-informed method and the use of global sensitivity analysis to inform dimension reduction of optimization problems when solving complex multi-objective reservoir operation problems.

  7. Transient pressure behavior for a horizontal well with multiple finite-conductivity fractures in tight reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jingjing; Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Liehui

    2015-08-01

    Horizontal drilling and multi-stage hydraulic fracturing have been common and efficient practices in exploitation of tight reservoirs. Establishing corresponding mathematical models and analyzing transient pressure behaviors of this type of well-reservoir configuration can provide a better understanding of fluid flow patterns in formation as well as estimations of important parameters. Most current models proposed for fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs do not incorporate either reservoir permeability loss during the production, which is believed to be non-ignorable or finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures. A coupling model for a multi-fractured horizontal well (MFHW) in tight reservoirs is presented in this article, in which finite conductivity of hydraulic fractures and stress-dependant reservoir permeability are taken into account simultaneously. A semi-analytical solution is obtained in the Laplace domain by using source function theory, Laplace transformation, perturbation technique, discretization of fractures, and superposition principle. Analysis of transient pressure responses indicates that several characteristic flow periods of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs can be identified, including linear flow in fracture, bi-linear flow, linear flow in reservoir, pseudo-radial flow around fractures, and pseudo-radial flow around the horizontal wellbore and fractures. Parametric analysis shows that fracture conductivity, fracture spacing, fracture length, permeability modulus, and skin effect can significantly influence the transient pressure responses of fractured horizontal wells in tight reservoirs. The model presented in this article can be applied to obtain important parameters pertinent to reservoir or fractures by type curve matching, and it can also provide useful information for optimizing fracture parameters. Finally, the model presented in this article can also be easily extended to dual-porosity cases.

  8. Identifying diagnostics for reservoir structure and CO2 plume migration from multilevel pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandli, Christin W.; Benson, Sally M.

    2013-06-01

    Important to large-scale implementation of Carbon Capture and Sequestration is the ability to monitor the carbon dioxide (CO2) that has been injected underground. The focus of this study is to understand how flow processes during CO2 injection impact the pressure observed at a nearby monitoring well. In particular, we are interested in how the reservoir structure (layering and anisotropy) and CO2 plume migration influence the pressure transients at different depths. For a multilayered geologic model, four basic combinations of homogeneity/heterogeneity and isotropy/anisotropy conditions are examined. Numerical simulations using TOUGH2 show different CO2 plume migration and large pressure buildups in the storage reservoir and the seal for each scenario. Pressure buildups normalized to the pressure buildup at the depth of injection are diagnostic of the approximate height of the CO2 plume and provide information on the reservoir structure. Vertical pressure gradients normalized to the initial hydrostatic pressure gradient are diagnostic of reservoir structure soon after the start of injection. Over time, they provide information on the height of the CO2 plume. The diagnostic features in the pressure response are evident long before the CO2 arrives at the monitoring well and can be attributed to buoyancy induced and gravity segregated aqueous flows caused by the advancing CO2 plume. The identified diagnostics will aid in the ultimate goal, which is to develop a monitoring technique based on multilevel pressure measurements.

  9. Transient pressure analysis of fractured well in bi-zonal gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Liu, Yong-hui; Hu, Shu-Yong; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2015-05-01

    For hydraulic fractured well, how to evaluate the properties of fracture and formation are always tough jobs and it is very complex to use the conventional method to do that, especially for partially penetrating fractured well. Although the source function is a very powerful tool to analyze the transient pressure for complex structure well, the corresponding reports on gas reservoir are rare. In this paper, the continuous point source functions in anisotropic reservoirs are derived on the basis of source function theory, Laplace transform method and Duhamel principle. Application of construction method, the continuous point source functions in bi-zonal gas reservoir with closed upper and lower boundaries are obtained. Sequentially, the physical models and transient pressure solutions are developed for fully and partially penetrating fractured vertical wells in this reservoir. Type curves of dimensionless pseudo-pressure and its derivative as function of dimensionless time are plotted as well by numerical inversion algorithm, and the flow periods and sensitive factors are also analyzed. The source functions and solutions of fractured well have both theoretical and practical application in well test interpretation for such gas reservoirs, especial for the well with stimulated reservoir volume around the well in unconventional gas reservoir by massive hydraulic fracturing which always can be described with the composite model.

  10. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be usedmore » directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.« less

  11. Pre-injection brine production for managing pressure in compartmentalized CO₂ storage reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, Thomas A.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Mingjie; Sun, Yunwei; Hao, Yue; Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.

    2014-12-31

    We present a reservoir management approach for geologic CO₂ storage that combines CO₂ injection with brine extraction. In our approach,dual-mode wells are initially used to extract formation brine and subsequently used to inject CO₂. These wells can also be used to monitor the subsurface during pre-injection brine extraction so that key data is acquired and analyzed prior to CO₂ injection. The relationship between pressure drawdown during pre-injection brine extraction and pressure buildup during CO₂ injection directly informs reservoir managers about CO₂ storage capacity. These data facilitate proactive reservoir management, and thus reduce costs and risks. The brine may be used directly as make-up brine for nearby reservoir operations; it can also be desalinated and/or treated for a variety of beneficial uses.

  12. HEAT AND MASS TRANSFER IN A FAULT-CONTROLLED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR CHARGED AT CONSTANT PRESSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Goyal, K. P.; Narasimhan, T. N.

    1981-12-01

    A two-dimensional mathematical model of a fault controlled geothermal reservoir has been developed. Heated lighter water, rising in the fault, is assumed to charge a reservoir which, in turn, is overlain by a thin impermeable, thermally conducting cap rock. The mass flow rate or the pressure associated with the charging process at the fault inlet is unknown and can only be estimated. Thus, in this paper, the pressure in the fault at the bottom of the reservoir is assumed to be prescribed. Quasi-analytic solutions for the velocity, pressure, and temperature are obtained in the fault-reservoir system for a high Rayleigh number flow. In this approximation, the upwelling fluid does not cool off appreciably until it reaches the cold upper boundary of the reservoir and encounters conductive heat loss. This thermal boundary layer, which is thin at the top of the fault, grows outward laterally and occupies the full thickness of the aquifer far away from the fault. The mathematical model is based on the flow of liquid water in a saturated porous medium. The solution techniques involve the combination of perturbation methods, boundary layer theory and numerical methods. The analysis of this generic model can be applied to liquid dominated geothermal systems where the thickness of the impermeable caprock is very small compared to the depth of the reservoir.

  13. Pressurization Risk Assessment of CO2 Reservoirs Utilizing Design of Experiments and Response Surface Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guyant, E.; Han, W. S.; Kim, K. Y.; Park, E.; Han, K.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring of pressure buildup can provide explicit information on reservoir integrity and is an appealing tool, however pressure variation is dependent on a variety of factors causing high uncertainty in pressure predictions. This work evaluated pressurization of a reservoir system in the presence of leakage pathways as well as exploring the effects of compartmentalization of the reservoir utilizing design of experiments (Definitive Screening, Box Behnken, Central Composite, and Latin Hypercube designs) and response surface methods. Two models were developed, 1) an idealized injection scenario in order to evaluate the performance of multiple designs, and 2) a complex injection scenario implementing the best performing design to investigate pressurization of the reservoir system. A holistic evaluation of scenario 1, determined that the Central Composite design would be used for the complex injection scenario. The complex scenario evaluated 5 risk factors: reservoir, seal, leakage pathway and fault permeabilities, and horizontal position of the pathway. A total of 60 response surface models (RSM) were developed for the complex scenario with an average R2 of 0.95 and a NRMSE of 0.067. Sensitivity to the input factors was dynamic through space and time; at the earliest time (0.05 years) the reservoir permeability was dominant, and for later times (>0.5 years) the fault permeability became dominant for all locations. The RSM's were then used to conduct a Monte Carlo Analysis to further analyze pressurization risks, identifying the P10, P50, P90 values. This identified the in zone (lower) P90 values as 2.16, 1.77, and 1.53 MPa and above zone values of 1.35, 1.23, 1.09 MPa for monitoring locations 1, 2, and 3, respectively. In summary, the design of experiments and response surface methods allowed for an efficient sensitivity and uncertainty analysis to be conducted permitting a complete evaluation of the pressurization across the entire parameter space.

  14. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

    2004-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request

  15. Age-related changes in reservoir and excess components of central aortic pressure in asymptomatic adults.

    PubMed

    Bia, Daniel; Cymberknop, Leandro; Zócalo, Yanina; Farro, Ignacio; Torrado, Juan; Farro, Federico; Pessana, Franco; Armentano, Ricardo L

    2011-01-01

    Study of humans aging has presented difficulties in separating the aging process from concomitant disease and/or in defining normality and abnormality during its development. In accordance with this, aging associates structural and functional changes evidenced in variations in vascular parameters witch suffer alterations during atherosclerosis and have been proposed as early markers of the disease. The absence of adequate tools to differentiate the expected (normal) vascular changes due to aging from those related with a vascular disease is not a minor issue. For an individual, an early diagnosis of a vascular disease should be as important as the diagnosis of a healthy vascular aging. Recent studies have proposed that the capacitive or reservoir function of the aorta and large elastic arteries plays a major role in determining the pulse wave morphology. The arterial pressure waveform can be explained in terms of a reservoir pressure, related to the arterial system compliance, and an "excess" or wave-related pressure, associated with the traveling waves. The aim of this study was to evaluate, by means of a mathematical approach, age-related changes in measured, reservoir and excess central aortic pressure in order to determine if age-related changes are concentrated in particular decades of life. Central aortic pressure waveform was non-invasively obtained in healthy subjects (age range: 20-69 years old). Age-related profiles in measured, reservoir and excess pressure were calculated. PMID:22255816

  16. Reservoir hydraulic properties from oscillating pore pressure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanov, A.; Batzle, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    We use the oscillatory pore pressure method for simultaneous measurements of rock transport properties, such as intrinsic permeability and specific storage capacity. The pore pressure pulsing method has been described by several researchers; however we examine the relationship between a rock's transport properties and dynamic pressure parameters, such as amplitude and frequency. We confirm that the oscillating pore pressure method accurately measures permeability; however storage capacity values suffer from measurement uncertainties. We further developed a novel method to infer the permeabilities from frequency-dependent data. Permeabilities are calculated by non-linear least-squares fitting of the pressure attenuation and phase data, measured on three rock samples at various confining pressures and oscillating pore pressure frequencies. Permeabilities estimated for three tested specimen were in close agreement with steady-state values. Storage capacities, however, exhibit significant absolute errors. Frequency dependence of derived values were furtherexplored, and an apparent increase in permeability has been noticed. These observations do not necessarily indicate a dispersion effect of the absolute permeability of the rock sample. We explain this effect by the deviation in phase shifts, caused by non-Darcy or radial flow. Permeabilities still can be inverted with high accuracy from the frequency-dependent amplitude ratio data, as well as lower frequency limit of phase data by nonlinear least-squares fitting of the theoretical permeability curve. Our future work includes measuring lower permeability rocks, such as tight gas sandstones and shales. We also plan to expand the working frequency range by utilizing pore pressure intensifier as a source of pressure oscillations.

  17. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel

    2006-02-01

    The field operator, Goldrus Producing Company, has been unable to secure funding needed to continue the field demonstration phase of the project. Accordingly, we have temporarily halted all project activities until necessary funding is obtained. Goldrus felt confident that funds could be acquired by third quarter 2005 at which time it would have been necessary to request a project extension to complete the originally designed study. A project extension was granted but it appears Goldrus will have difficulty securing funds. We Bureau of Economic Geology are investigating a new approach on how to fulfill our initial objectives of promoting high-pressure air injection of Ellenburger reservoirs.

  18. Alternative method to Mariotte reservoir system for maintaining constant hydraulic pressure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thamir, Falah

    1991-01-01

    Several problems with the Mariotte reservoir system were discovered when it was used to apply a constant water pressure as a boundary condition for a prolonged period. The constant-pressure boundary condition is required for some laboratory experiments to study water flow through porous media. The observed problems were caused by temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations while the flow rates were very small and caused erroneous water flow-rate measurements. An alternative method was developed and used where the water pressure is controlled by regulating its level by using water-level sensing electrodes. The new method eliminated the effects of temperature and barometric-pressure fluctuations and maintained an acceptable accuracy of the estimated water flow rate without compromising the advantages of the Mariotte reservoir.

  19. Analysis of horizontal well pressure behaviour in fractured low permeability reservoirs with consideration of the threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long; Zhang, Lie-Hui; Wu, Feng; Zhang, Bo-Ning; Liu, Qi-Guo

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for the analysis of the transient pressure behaviour of a horizontal well in naturally fractured low permeability reservoirs, which takes the threshold pressure gradient (TPG) into consideration. Then, the solution of this model is obtained by using the method of Laplace transform and Fourier cosine transform, and the type curves are plotted by the Stehfest numerical inversion method. Pressure behaviour is analysed by examining the pressure drawdown curves, the derivative plots and the effect of the characteristic parameters. The typical pressure response of this reservoir is presented by the following five flow regimes: (1) wellbore storage and transition flow; (2) early radial flow in the vertical plane; (3) line flow in the horizontal plane; (4) matrix-fracture system transition flow; and (5) later pseudo-radial flow affected by the TPG. At the end, a field application manifests the correctness of the solutions derived in this paper, and the results have both theoretical and practical significance in predicting the production behaviour of carbonate reservoirs and evaluating fluid flow and transport in such a formation.

  20. An alternative to reduction of surface pressure to sea level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deardorff, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The pitfalls of the present method of reducing surface pressure to sea level are reviewed, and an alternative, adjusted pressure, P, is proposed. P is obtained from solution of a Poisson equation over a continental region, using the simplest boundary condition along the perimeter or coastline where P equals the sea level pressure. The use of P would avoid the empiricisms and disadvantages of pressure reduction to sea level, and would produce surface pressure charts which depict the true geostrophic wind at the surface.

  1. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson

    2005-01-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and his thesis was reported on in the last semi-annual report. We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, we requested and received an extension of the project to September 30, 2005. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project by the end of the extension data. We strongly believe that the results of

  2. Transient-pressure analysis in geothermal steam reservoirs with an immobile vaporizing liquid phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moench, A.F.; Atkinson, P.G.

    1978-01-01

    A finite-difference model for the radial horizontal flow of steam through a porous medium is used to evaluate transient-pressure behavior in the presence of an immobile vaporizing or condensing liquid phase. Graphs of pressure drawdown and buildup in terms of dimensionless pressure and time are obtained for a well discharging steam at a constant mass flow rate for a specified time. The assumptions are made that the steam is in local thermal equilibrium with the reservoir rocks, that temperature changes are due only to phase change, and that effects of vapor-pressure lowering are negligible. Computations show that when a vaporizing liquid phase is present the pressure drawdown exhibits behavior similar to that observed in noncondensable gas reservoirs, but delayed in time. A theoretical analysis allows for the computation of this delay and demonstrates that it is independent of flow geometry. The response that occurs upon pressure buildup is markedly different from that in a noncondensable gas system. This result may provide a diagnostic tool for establishing the existence of phase-change phenomena within a reservoir. ?? 1979.

  3. HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-12-10

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

  4. Semi-analytical solutions for nonisothermal fluid injection including heat loss from the reservoir: Part 2. Pressure and stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForce, T.; Mijić, A.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2014-11-01

    In this work semi-analytical solutions for saturation, temperature, pressure and in situ reservoir stress are found for immiscible nonisothermal injection into a radial porous medium. A model for advection-dominated, nonisothermal, two-phase flow from a previous work is used to estimate the reservoir pressure and stress that result from injection of cold CO2. Flow is assumed to be one-dimensional and purely advective, while temperature has radial advection in the reservoir and transverse diffusion into the surrounding media. A simplified thermal solution is developed to allow for easier analysis of the reservoir stress. Two pressure models are presented, one which requires numerical integration of the pressure in the two-phase region, and one which is fully analytical, but simplifies the pressure profile. Two models are used to calculate reservoir stress, one which uses the full pressure and temperature profiles and must be numerically integrated, and one which uses the simplified models and has a closed-form analytical solution. The resulting radial and tangential (hoop) stress profiles in the reservoir are compared and it is shown that the simplified model is adequate for estimating the reservoir stresses. The impact of outer boundary conditions on reservoir pressure and stresses is also explored.

  5. Equation of state density models for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at extreme temperature and pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue; Bamgbade, Babatunde A.; Burgess, Ward A.; Tapriyal, Deepak; Baled, Hseen O.; Enick, Robert M.; McHugh, Mark A.

    2013-10-01

    The necessity of exploring ultradeep reservoirs requires the accurate prediction of hydrocarbon density data at extreme temperatures and pressures. In this study, three equations of state (EoS) models, Peng-Robinson (PR), high-temperature high-pressure volume-translated PR (HTHP VT-PR), and perturbed-chain statistical associating fluid theory (PC-SAFT) EoS are used to predict the density data for hydrocarbons in ultradeep reservoirs at temperatures to 523 K and pressures to 275 MPa. The calculated values are compared with experimental data. The results show that the HTHP VT-PR EoS and PC-SAFT EoS always perform better than the regular PR EoS for all the investigated hydrocarbons.

  6. An investigation into reservoir NOM reduction by UV photolysis and advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Goslan, Emma H; Gurses, Filiz; Banks, Jenny; Parsons, Simon A

    2006-11-01

    A comparison of four treatment technologies for reduction of natural organic matter (NOM) in a reservoir water was made. The work presented here is a laboratory based evaluation of NOM treatment by UV-C photolysis, UV/H(2)O(2), Fenton's reagent (FR) and photo-Fenton's reagent (PFR). The work investigated ways of reducing the organic load on water treatment works (WTWs) with a view to treating 'in-reservoir' or 'in-pipe' before the water reaches the WTW. The efficiency of each process in terms of NOM removal was determined by measuring UV absorbance at 254 nm (UV(254)) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In terms of DOC reduction PFR was the most effective (88% removal after 1 min) however there were interferences when measuring UV(254) which was reduced to a lesser extent (31% after 1 min). In the literature, pH 3 is reported to be the optimal pH for oxidation with FR but here the reduction of UV(254) and DOC was found to be insensitive to pH in the range 3-7. The treatment that was identified as the most effective in terms of NOM reduction and cost effectiveness was PFR. PMID:16765416

  7. Gas filtration from an underground reservoir at a large initial pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, T. P.; Lutsenko, N. A.; Levin, V. A.

    2015-09-01

    Gas filtration from an underground reservoir through a layer of a porous medium due to an instantaneous increase in the gas pressure in the reservoir is studied. The problem is considered in a one-dimensional formulation in the general case where the temperatures of the gas and the porous medium are different and unstable, and in the case of a high specific heat of the solid phase and a high interfacial heat-transfer rate. The dynamics of the gas flow at the inlet and outlet of the underground reservoir is analyzed, the time of unloading of the system is estimated as a function of the permeability of the porous medium. It is shown that, depending on the properties of the porous layer, two characteristic gas flow regimes are possible: a fast discharge regime and a slow regime which is determined mainly by barodiffusion.

  8. An assessment of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir, Philippines, at high-pressure operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Z.F.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Rodis, N.O.; Saw, V.S.

    1993-10-01

    An evaluation of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir was conducted to improve the power recovery through reservoir and process optimization. The performance of the existing production wells was reviewed and the response of the field based on the anticipated production levels was simulated at various operating conditions. The results indicate that the Tongonan geothermal reservoir can be exploited at a high pressure operating condition with substantial improvement in the field capacity. The authors calculate that the Upper Mahiao and the Malitbog sectors of the Tongonan field are capable of generating 395 MWe at 1.0 MPa abs., on top of the existing 112.5 MWe plant, compared with 275 MWe if the field is operated at 0.6 MPa abs. The total capacity for the proposed Leyte A 640 MWe expansion can be generated from these sectors with the additional power to be tapped from Mahanagdong and Alto Peak sectors.

  9. Influences of porous reservoir Laplace pressure on emissions from passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Courtney, Daniel G. Shea, Herbert

    2015-09-07

    Passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources are capable of efficiently emitting a variety of ion beams with promising applications to spacecraft propulsion and as focused ion beams. Practical devices will require integrated or coupled ionic liquid reservoirs; the effects of which have not been explored in detail. Porous reservoirs are a simple, scalable solution. However, we have shown that their pore size can dramatically alter the beam composition. Emitting the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethylsulfonyl)amide, the same device was shown to yield either an ion or droplet dominated beam when using reservoirs of small or large pore size, respectively; with the latter having a mass flow in excess of 15 times larger than the former at negative polarity. Another source, emitting nearly purely ionic beams of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, was similarly shown to emit a significant droplet population when coupled to reservoirs of large (>100 μm) pores; constituting a reduction in propulsive efficiency from greater than 70% to less than 30%. Furthermore, we show that reservoir selection can alter the voltage required to obtain and sustain emission, increasing with smaller pore size.

  10. Influences of porous reservoir Laplace pressure on emissions from passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtney, Daniel G.; Shea, Herbert

    2015-09-01

    Passively fed ionic liquid electrospray sources are capable of efficiently emitting a variety of ion beams with promising applications to spacecraft propulsion and as focused ion beams. Practical devices will require integrated or coupled ionic liquid reservoirs; the effects of which have not been explored in detail. Porous reservoirs are a simple, scalable solution. However, we have shown that their pore size can dramatically alter the beam composition. Emitting the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(triflouromethylsulfonyl)amide, the same device was shown to yield either an ion or droplet dominated beam when using reservoirs of small or large pore size, respectively; with the latter having a mass flow in excess of 15 times larger than the former at negative polarity. Another source, emitting nearly purely ionic beams of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, was similarly shown to emit a significant droplet population when coupled to reservoirs of large (>100 μm) pores; constituting a reduction in propulsive efficiency from greater than 70% to less than 30%. Furthermore, we show that reservoir selection can alter the voltage required to obtain and sustain emission, increasing with smaller pore size.

  11. Lava lake level as a gauge of magma reservoir pressure and eruptive hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patrick, Matthew R.; Anderson, Kyle R.; Poland, Michael P.; Orr, Tim R.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2015-01-01

    Forecasting volcanic activity relies fundamentally on tracking magma pressure through the use of proxies, such as ground surface deformation and earthquake rates. Lava lakes at open-vent basaltic volcanoes provide a window into the uppermost magma system for gauging reservoir pressure changes more directly. At Kīlauea Volcano (Hawaiʻi, USA) the surface height of the summit lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu Crater fluctuates with surface deformation over short (hours to days) and long (weeks to months) time scales. This correlation implies that the lake behaves as a simple piezometer of the subsurface magma reservoir. Changes in lava level and summit deformation scale with (and shortly precede) changes in eruption rate from Kīlauea's East Rift Zone, indicating that summit lava level can be used for short-term forecasting of rift zone activity and associated hazards at Kīlauea.

  12. Compaction bands in high temperature/pressure diagenetically altered unconventional shale gas reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Veveakis, M.; Poulet, T.

    2014-12-01

    Unconventional energy and mineral resources are typically trapped in a low porosity/permeability environment and are difficult to produce. An extreme end-member is the shale gas reservoir in the Cooper Basin (Australia) that is located at 3500-4000 m depth and ambient temperature conditions around 200oC. Shales of lacustrine origin (with high clay content) are diagenetically altered. Diagenesis involves fluid release mineral reactions of the general type Asolid ↔ Bsolid +Cfluid and switches on suddenly in the diagenetic window between 100-200oC. Diagenetic reactions can involve concentrations of smectite, aqueous silica compound, illite, potassium ions, aqueous silica, quartz, feldspar, kerogen, water and gas . In classical petroleum engineering such interlayer water/gas release reactions are considered to cause cementation and significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Yet in contradiction to the expected permeability reduction gas is successfully being produced. We propose that the success is based on the ductile equivalent of classical compaction bands in solid mechanics. The difference being that that the rate of the volumetric compaction is controlled by the diagenetic reactions. Ductile compaction bands are forming high porosity fluid channels rather than low porosity crushed grains in the solid mechanical equivalent. We show that this new type of volumetric instability appears in rate-dependent heterogenous materials as Cnoidal waves. These are nonlinear and exact periodic stationary waves, well known in the shallow water theory of fluid mechanics. Their distance is a direct function of the hydromechanical diffusivities. These instabilities only emerge in low permeability environment where the fluid diffusivity is about an order of magnitude lower than the mechanical loading. The instabilities are expected to be of the type as shown in the image below. The image shows a CT-scan of a laboratory experiment kindly provided by Papamichos (pers

  13. Pressure and fluid saturation prediction in a multicomponent reservoir, using combined seismic and electromagnetic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gritto, Roland; Washbourne, John; Daley, Tom

    2002-06-10

    This paper presents a method for combining seismic and electromagnetic measurements to predict changes in water saturation, pressure, and CO{sub 2} gas/oil ratio in a reservoir undergoing CO{sub 2} flood. Crosswell seismic and electromagnetic data sets taken before and during CO{sub 2} flooding of an oil reservoir are inverted to produce crosswell images of the change in compressional velocity, shear velocity, and electrical conductivity during a CO{sub 2} injection pilot study. A rock properties model is developed using measured log porosity, fluid saturations, pressure, temperature, bulk density, sonic velocity, and electrical conductivity. The parameters of the rock properties model are found by an L1-norm simplex minimization of predicted and observed differences in compressional velocity and density. A separate minimization, using Archie's law, provides parameters for modeling the relations between water saturation, porosity, and the electrical conductivity. The rock-properties model is used to generate relationships between changes in geophysical parameters and changes in reservoir parameters. Electrical conductivity changes are directly mapped to changes in water saturation; estimated changes in water saturation are used along with the observed changes in shear wave velocity to predict changes in reservoir pressure. The estimation of the spatial extent and amount of CO{sub 2} relies on first removing the effects of the water saturation and pressure changes from the observed compressional velocity changes, producing a residual compressional velocity change. This velocity change is then interpreted in terms of increases in the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio. Resulting images of the CO{sub 2}/oil ratio show CO{sub 2}-rich zones that are well correlated to the location of injection perforations, with the size of these zones also correlating to the amount of injected CO{sub 2}. The images produced by this process are better correlated to the location and amount of injected

  14. Prospecting and developing carbonate reservoirs under excessive pressures in fields of preCaspian depression taken as an example

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, R.; Perepelichenko, V.; Shilin, A.

    1996-08-01

    All large sub-salt hydrocarbon fields of the PreCaspian depression are connected with carbonate reservoirs and are characterized by abnormally high reservoir pressures of different origin. Exploratory drilling in fields under excessive pressures is very much complicated. To reduce the probability of disastrous absorptions and blowouts there has been developed special drilling-in technology with constant bottom-hole pressure control. To avoid fractures healing, to provide hydrocarbon phase state control, and to achieve maximum oil recovery there has been worked out a new technology of oil field development. According to this technology oil should be recovered first from the lower peripheral parts of the pool. This technology (taking into account the abnormally high reservoir pressures) provides gradual decreasing of reservoir pressure in the process of field development.

  15. Nonlinear Fluid Migration Patterns in Fractured Reservoirs due to Stress-Pressure Coupling induced Changes in Reservoir Permeabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annewandter, R.; Geiger, S.; Main, I. G.

    2011-12-01

    Sustainable storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) requires a thorough understanding of injection induced pressure build-up and its effects on the storage formation's integrity, since it determines the cap rock's sealing properties as well as the total storable amount of carbon dioxide. Fractures are abundant in the subsurface and difficult to detect due to their subseismic characteristic. If present in the cap during injection, they can be primary pathways for CO2 leakage. The North Sea is considered as Europe's most important carbon dioxide storage area. However, almost all of the potential storage formations have been exposed to post-glacial lithospheric flexure, possibly causing the generation of new fracture networks in the overburden whilst rebounding. Drawing upon, fast carbon dioxide uprise can be facilitated due to opening of fractures caused by changes in the stress field over time. The overall effective permeability, and hence possible leakage rates, of a fractured storage formation is highly sensitive to the fracture aperture which itself depends on the far field and in situ stress field. For this reason, our in-house general purpose reservoir simulator Complex System Modeling Platform (CSMP++) has been expanded, which is particularly designed to simulate multiphase flow on fractured porous media. It combines finite element (FE) and finite volume (FV) methods on mixed-dimensional hybrid-element meshes. The unstructured FE-FV based scheme allows us to model complex geological structures, such as fractures, at great detail. The simulator uses a compositional model for NaCl-H2O-CO2-systems for compressible fluids for computing thermophysical properties as a function of formation pressure and temperature. A fixed stress-split sequential procedure is being used to calculate coupled fluid flow and geomechanics. Numerical proof of concept studies will be presented showing the impact of fracture opening and closure on fluid migration patterns due to coupled stress-pressure

  16. Evolution of pore fluid pressures in a stimulated geothermal reservoir inferred from earthquake focal mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terakawa, T.; Deichmann, N.

    2014-12-01

    We developed an inversion method to estimate the evolution of pore fluid pressure fields from earthquake focal mechanism solutions based on the Bayesian statistical inference and Akaike's Bayesian information criterion (ABIC). This method's application to induced seismicity in the Basel enhanced geothermal system in Switzerland shows the evolution of pore fluid pressures in response to fluid injection experiments. For a few days following the initiation of the fluid injection, overpressurized fluids are concentrated around the borehole and then anisotropically propagate within the reservoir until the bleed-off time. Then, the pore fluid pressure in the vicinity of the borehole drastically decreases, and overpressurized fluids become isolated in a few major fluid pockets. The pore fluid pressure in these pockets gradually decreases with time. The pore fluid pressure in the reservoir is less than the minimum principal stress at each depth, indicating that the hydraulic fracturing did not occur during stimulation. This suggests that seismic events may play an important role to promote the development of permeable channels, particularly southeast of the borehole where the largest seismic event (ML 3.4) occurred. This is not directly related to a drastic decrease in fault strength at the hypocenter, but rather the positive feedback between permeability enhancement and poro-elastic and stress transfer loading from slipping interfaces. These processes likely contribute to this event's nucleation.

  17. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  18. Using pressure transient analysis to improve well performance and optimize field development in compartmentalized shelf margin deltaic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, K.L.; Crawford, G.E.; Mills, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    BP Exploration`s Gulf of Mexico group developed procedures to conduct effective well tests on conventional production wells and employed them during the development drilling phase of the Mississippi Canyon 109 (MC109) field. Bottomhole pressure data were recorded during the initial few weeks of production. Typically, a 48 hour pressure buildup survey (surface shut-in) was obtained near the end of data acquisition. Data from these tests were analyzed for completion efficiency, reservoir flow capacity, reservoir heterogeneities, and drainage area. Initially wells were gravel packed for sand control, until buildup interpretations indicated skins greater than 20. Frac packing technology was then employed, and an immediate improvement was observed with skins dropping into the teens. Over a period of time frac packs were optimized using the test derived skins as a metric. Analysis of pressure data also played an important role in identifying reservoir compartmentalization. The two major reservoir horizons at MC 109 are interpreted as shelf margin deltas. However, each of these has distinctly different compartmentalization issues. The continuous character of the G Sand made it easier to define the depositional system and investigate reservoir compartmentalization issues using a combination of well log, 3D seismic, static pressure trends, and fluid information. In the more distal deltaic reservoirs of the J Sand however, complications with seismic amplitudes and a less reliable tie between wireline and seismic data required the use of pressure transient analysis to efficiently exploit the reservoir.

  19. Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure

    DOEpatents

    Reitz, Rolf D.; Thiel, Matthew P.

    2003-01-01

    Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

  20. CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR ORIGIN OF ABNORMALLY PRESSURED GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN LOW-PERMEABILITY RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Law, B.E.; Dickinson, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The paper suggests that overpressured and underpressured gas accumulations of this type have a common origin. In basins containing overpressured gas accumulations, rates of thermogenic gas accumulation exceed gas loss, causing fluid (gas) pressure to rise above the regional hydrostatic pressure. Free water in the larger pores is forced out of the gas generation zone into overlying and updip, normally pressured, water-bearing rocks. While other diagenetic processes continue, a pore network with very low permeability develops. As a result, gas accumulates in these low-permeability reservoirs at rates higher than it is lost. In basins containing underpressured gas accumulations, rates of gas generation and accumulation are less than gas loss. The basin-center gas accumulation persists, but because of changes in the basin dynamics, the overpressured accumulation evolves into an underpressured system.

  1. Reservoir Modeling for Production Management

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Donald W.

    1989-03-21

    For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

  2. Reduction of CO2 using a Rhenium Bipyridine Complex Containing Ancillary BODIPY Redox Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teesdale, Justin; Pistner, Allen; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Ma, Yingzhong; Lutterman, Daniel A; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The reduction of carbon dioxide to chemical fuels such as carbon monoxide is an important challenge in the field of renewable energy conversion. Given the thermodynamic stability of carbon dioxide, it is difficult to efficiently activate this substrate in a selective fashion and the development of new electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction is of prime importance. To this end, we have prepared and studied a new fac-ReI(CO)3 complex supported by a bipyridine ligand containing ancillary BODIPY moieties ([Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl]). Voltammetry experiments revealed that this system displays a rich redox chemistry under N2, as [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] can be reduced by up to four electrons at modest potentials. These redox events have been characterized as the ReI/0 couple, and three ligand based reductions two of which are localized on the BODIPY units. The ability of the BB2 ligand to serve as a noninnocent redox reservoir is manifest in an enhanced electrocatalysis with CO2 as compared to an unsubstituted Re-bipyridine complex lacking BODIPY units ([Re(bpy)(CO)3Cl]). The second order rate constant for reduction of CO2 by [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was measured to be k = 3400 M 1s 1 at an applied potential of 2.0 V versus SCE, which is roughly three times greater than the corresponding unsubstituted Re-bipyridine homologue. Photophysical and photochemical studies were also carried out to determine if [Re(BB2)(CO)3Cl] was a competent platform for CO2 reduction using visible light. These experiments showed that this complex supports unusual excited state dynamics that are not typically observed for fac- ReI(CO)3 complexes.

  3. Hornblende phenocrysts record a pressure gradient in and contamination of the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.; Wittke, J. ); Duffield, W. ); Davis, A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Taylor Creek Rhyolite of southwestern New Mexico comprises 20 coeval porphyritic lava domes erupted from a large vertically zoned reservoir of silicic magma. The rhyolite is high-silica, subalkaline, and is nearly constant in major-element composition. Trace elements and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr[sub i] (0.705 to 0.713) define vertical zoning that records a downward-decreasing imprint of minor (<1 wt%) partial assimilation of Proterozoic roof rocks. Consistent with the major-element homogeneity, electron-microprobe analyses of hornblende phenocrysts show little or no measurable variation in principal constituents. The hornblende is edenite whose mean composition and standard deviation of 110 analyses are SiO[sub 2], 44.66 [+-] 0.64; TiO[sub g], 1.27 [+-] 0.13; Al[sub 2]O[sub 3], 6.80 [+-] 0.31; FeO, 21.00 [+-] 1.60; MnO, 1.19 [+-] 0.16; MgO, 9.94 [+-] 1.09; CaO, 10.51 [+-] 0.22; Na[sub 2]O, 2.22 [+-] 0.13; K[sup 2]O, 0.98 [+-] 0.08; F, 2.04 [+-] 0.35; Cl, 0.20 [+-] 0.03. Except for FeO, MnO, and MgO, compositional variations are non systematic and mostly within analytical uncertainty. FeO and Mno exhibit strong negative correlation with MgO. Individual hornblende crystals are zoned to relatively MgO-rich and FeO-MnO-poor rims, opposite what might be expected if the Taylor Creek Rhyolite magma reservoir evolved chemically isolated from its surroundings. Hornblende with rims richest in MgO occurs in domes fed from the uppermost part of the reservoir. Calculated pressures based on Al in hornblende range from 1.6 to 2.0 kb, [+-] 0.5 kb. Though the range of calculated P is encompassed within the uncertainty, the lowest hornblende pressure is for a dome fed from, or near, the top of the reservoir, whereas the chemically defined vertical zoning.

  4. Gas-cap effects in pressure-transient response of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Bemani, A.S.; Ershaghi, I.

    1997-03-01

    During the primary production life of an oil reservoir, segregation of oil and gas within the fissures before reaching the producing wells could create a secondary gas cap if no original gas cap were present, or will join the expanding original gas-cap gas. This paper presents a theoretical framework of gas-cap effects in naturally fractured reservoirs. General pressure solutions are derived for both pseudosteady-state and unsteady-state matrix-fracture interporosity flow. Deviation from the fracture or fracture-matrix response occurs as the gas-cap effect is felt. Anomalous slope changes during the transition period depend entirely on the contrast between the fracture anisotropy parameter, {lambda}{sub l}, and matrix-fracture interporosity parameter, {lambda}, and between the total gas-cap storage capacitance (1 {minus} {omega}{sub 1}) and oil-zone matrix storage (1 {minus} {omega}). A composite double-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {le} {omega}{sub 1c} and 1.0 {le} {lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} {le} 1,000. A triple-porosity response is observed for {omega}{sub 1} {ge} {omega}{sub k} and 140 < {omega}{lambda}{sub 1}/{lambda} < 1.0E05.

  5. Simulating the gas hydrate production test at Mallik using the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeschen, Katja; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Priegnitz, Mike; Giese, Ronny; Luzi-Helbing, Manja

    2014-05-01

    LARS, the LArge Reservoir Simulator, allows for one of the few pilot scale simulations of gas hydrate formation and dissociation under controlled conditions with a high resolution sensor network to enable the detection of spatial variations. It was designed and built within the German project SUGAR (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) for sediment samples with a diameter of 0.45 m and a length of 1.3 m. During the project, LARS already served for a number of experiments simulating the production of gas from hydrate-bearing sediments using thermal stimulation and/or depressurization. The latest test simulated the methane production test from gas hydrate-bearing sediments at the Mallik test site, Canada, in 2008 (Uddin et al., 2011). Thus, the starting conditions of 11.5 MPa and 11°C and environmental parameters were set to fit the Mallik test site. The experimental gas hydrate saturation of 90% of the total pore volume (70 l) was slightly higher than volumes found in gas hydrate-bearing formations in the field (70 - 80%). However, the resulting permeability of a few millidarcy was comparable. The depressurization driven gas production at Mallik was conducted in three steps at 7.0 MPa - 5.0 MPa - 4.2 MPa all of which were used in the laboratory experiments. In the lab the pressure was controlled using a back pressure regulator while the confining pressure was stable. All but one of the 12 temperature sensors showed a rapid decrease in temperature throughout the sediment sample, which accompanied the pressure changes as a result of gas hydrate dissociation. During step 1 and 2 they continued up to the point where gas hydrate stability was regained. The pressure decreases and gas hydrate dissociation led to highly variable two phase fluid flow throughout the duration of the simulated production test. The flow rates were measured continuously (gas) and discontinuously (liquid), respectively. Next to being discussed here, both rates were used to verify a model of gas

  6. Method for growth of crystals by pressure reduction of supercritical or subcritical solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, P. J. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Crystals of high morphological quality are grown by dissolution of a substance to be grown into the crystal in a suitable solvent under high pressure, and by subsequent slow, time-controlled reduction of the pressure of the resulting solution. During the reduction of the pressure interchange of heat between the solution and the environment is minimized by performing the pressure reduction either under isothermal or adiabatic conditions.

  7. Thermodynamic Constraints on Sulfate Reduction and Methanogenesis in a Coalbed Methane Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, M. F.; Marquart, K. A.; Wilson, B. H.; Flynn, T. M.; Vinson, D. S.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we consider how commercial natural gas production could affect sulfate reduction and methanogenesis in coal-bearing sediments of the Cherokee Basin, Kansas, USA. Controls on the activity of these two groups of microbes are important to understand because their activity and interactions may influence methane formation and retention in unconventional reservoirs. During November 2013, we collected water and gas samples from 16 commercial gas wells for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Results indicate that methane in the coalbeds formed biologically and that both methanogens and sulfate reducers are present. Gas samples consisted almost entirely of methane (C1/(C2+C3) = 2638 on avg.) and the δD and δ13C of methane averaged -222‰ VSMOW and -61‰ VPDB, respectively. Archaeal sequences in our samples were nearly all classified within groups of methanogens (avg. 91%) and cultivable methanogens were present in all water samples. On average, 6% of the bacterial sequences from our samples were classified in groups of sulfate reducers and sulfate available to support their activity ranged up to 110 μM in concentration. Any interaction that occurs between these groups may be influenced by the energetics of their metabolic reactions. Thermodynamic calculations show that methanogens hold an energy advantage over sulfate reducers if dissolved methane concentrations are low. Under current conditions, methanogens see between 12 and 16 kJ mol-1 more usable free energy than sulfate reducers, if we assume a minimal methane concentration (1 μM). However, usable energy for methanogens would equal that available to sulfate reducers at methane concentrations ranging between 144 and 831 μM, well below saturation levels. Production activities that hold methane concentration below these levels, therefore, would help maintain an energy advantage for methanogens. In contrast, if production activities cause sulfate concentrations to increase, sulfate reducers would

  8. Active CO2 Reservoir Management: A Strategy for Controlling Pressure, CO2 and Brine Migration in Saline-Formation CCS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buscheck, T. A.; Sun, Y.; Hao, Y.; Court, B.; Celia, M. A.; Wolery, T.; Tompson, A. F.; Aines, R. D.; Friedmann, J.

    2010-12-01

    CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations is regarded as a promising means of lowering the amount of CO2 emitted to the atmosphere and thereby mitigate global warming. The most promising systems for CCS are depleted oil reservoirs, particularly those suited to CO2-based Enhanced Oil Recovery (CCS-EOR), and deep saline formations, both of which are well separated from the atmosphere. For conventional, industrial-scale, saline-formation CCS, pressure buildup can have a limiting effect on CO2 storage capacity. To address this concern, we analyze Active CO2 Reservoir Management (ACRM), which combines brine extraction and residual-brine reinjection with CO2 injection, comparing it with conventional saline-formation CCS. We investigate the influence of brine extraction on pressure response and CO2 and brine migration using the NUFT code. By extracting brine from the lower portion of the storage formation, from locations progressively further from the center of injection, we can counteract buoyancy that drives CO2 to the top of the formation, which is useful in dipping formations. Using “push-pull” manipulation of the CO2 plume, we expose less of the caprock seal to CO2 and more of the storage formation to CO2, with more of the formation utilized for trapping mechanisms. Plume manipulation can also counteract the influence of heterogeneity. We consider the impact of extraction ratio, defined as net extracted brine volume (extraction minus reinjection) divided by injected CO2 volume. Pressure buildup is reduced with increasing extraction ratio, which reduces CO2 and brine migration, increases CO2 storage capacity, and reduces other risks, such as leakage up abandoned wells, caprock fracturing, fault activation, and induced seismicity. For a 100-yr injection period, a 10-yr delay in brine extraction does not diminish the magnitude of pressure reduction. Moreover, it is possible to achieve pressure management with just a few brine-extraction wells

  9. Effect of Salinity on Effective CO2 Permeability in Reservoir Rock Determined by Pressure Transient Methods: an Experimental Study on Hawkesbury Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathnaweera, T. D.; Ranjith, P. G.; Perera, M. S. A.

    2015-09-01

    The determination of effective carbon dioxide (CO2) permeability in reservoir rock and its variation is of great interest in the process of CO2 sequestration in deep saline aquifers, as CO2 sequestration-induced permeability alternations appear to create major problems during the CO2 injection process. The main objective of this study is to investigate the effect of salinity on the effective CO2 permeability of reservoir rock under different injection pressures. A series of high-pressure tri-axial experiments was, therefore, performed to investigate the effect of salinity on effective CO2 permeability in Hawkesbury sandstone under various brine concentrations. The selected brine concentrations were 0, 10, 20, and 30 % sodium chloride (NaCl) by weight and the experiments were conducted for a range of CO2 injection pressures (2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 MPa) at a constant confinement of 20 MPa and a temperature of 35 °C, respectively. According to the results, the degree of salinity of the aquifer's pore fluid plays a vital role in the effective CO2 permeability variation which occurs with CO2 injection, and the effective permeability decreases with increasing salinity in the range of 0-30 % of NaCl. Interestingly, in dry reservoir rock samples, the phase transition of the injection of CO2 from gas to super-critical condition caused a sudden reduction of CO2 permeability, related to the slip flow effect which occurs in gas CO2. Transfer into vapor or super-critical CO2 causes this slip flow to be largely reduced, reducing the reservoir permeability for CO2 movement in dry reservoir rock samples. However, this behavior was not observed for water- and brine-saturated samples, and an increasing trend of effective CO2 permeability was observed with increasing injection pressure. A detailed chemical analysis was then conducted to understand the physical phenomenon causing the salinity effect on effective CO2 permeability using scanning electron microscopy analyses. Such

  10. By how much does dietary salt reduction lower blood pressure? III--Analysis of data from trials of salt reduction.

    PubMed Central

    Law, M R; Frost, C D; Wald, N J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine whether the reduction in blood pressure achieved in trials of dietary salt reduction is quantitatively consistent with estimates derived from blood pressure and sodium intake in different populations, and, if so, to estimate the impact of reducing dietary salt on mortality from stroke and ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN--Analysis of the results of 68 crossover trials and 10 randomised controlled trials of dietary salt reduction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Comparison of observed reductions in systolic blood pressure for each trial with predicted values calculated from between population analysis. RESULTS--In the 45 trials in which salt reduction lasted four weeks or less the observed reductions in blood pressure were less than those predicted, with the difference between observed and predicted reductions being greatest in the trials of shortest duration. In the 33 trials lasting five weeks or longer the predicted reductions in individual trials closely matched a wide range of observed reductions. This applied for all age groups and for people with both high and normal levels of blood pressure. In people aged 50-59 years a reduction in daily sodium intake of 50 mmol (about 3 g of salt), attainable by moderate dietary salt reduction would, after a few weeks, lower systolic blood pressure by an average of 5 mm Hg, and by 7 mm Hg in those with high blood pressure (170 mm Hg); diastolic blood pressure would be lowered by about half as much. It is estimated that such a reduction in salt intake by a whole Western population would reduce the incidence of stroke by 22% and of ischaemic heart disease by 16% [corrected]. CONCLUSIONS--The results from the trials support the estimates from the observational data in the accompanying two papers. The effect of universal moderate dietary salt reduction on mortality from stroke and ischaemic heart disease would be substantial--larger, indeed, than could be achieved by fully implementing recommended policy for

  11. Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design

    SciTech Connect

    Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

    1983-03-01

    This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

  12. Cocoa Flavanol Cardiovascular Effects Beyond Blood Pressure Reduction.

    PubMed

    Jumar, Agnes; Schmieder, Roland E

    2016-04-01

    The protective cardiovascular (CV) effect of cocoa flavanol has been a target of many recent clinical prospective and retrospective investigations. Epidemiological data in different patient cohorts revealed an association between higher intake of flavanol-rich foods and decreased incidence of CV events, especially stroke and myocardial infarction. Cocoa flavanol has been shown to reduce systolic (2.8 mm Hg) and diastolic (2.2 mm Hg) office blood pressure (BP). Greater BP reduction has been found in hypertensive patients and people younger than 50 years. Cocoa flavanol intake exerts beneficial effects on pathophysiologic mechanisms of hypertension-related organ damage, such as improved endothelial function, anti-inflammatory potency, inhibition of platelet activation, and increased vasodilatory capacity. Recent clinical trials have focused on establishing a potential link between epidemiology and pathophysiology of flavanol and identified possible mechanisms for prevention of end-organ damage in patients at CV risk. This review summarizes the available data on the antihypertensive effects of cocoa flavanol beyond BP-BP lowering lowering effects, accentuates subgroup-specific protective actions of cocoa according to patients' different CV risk profile, and outlines potential cocoa flavanol-associated clinical implications. PMID:26514936

  13. Reduction of particulate carryover from a pressurized fluidized bed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patch, R. W.

    1979-01-01

    A bench scale fluidized bed combustor was constructed with a conical shape so that the enlarged upper part of the combustor would also serve as a granular bed filter. The combustor was fed coal and limestone. Ninety-nine tests of about four hours each were conducted over a range of conditions. Coal-to-air ratio varied from 0.033 to 0.098 (all lean). Limestone-to-coal ratio varied from 0.06 to 0.36. Bed depth varied from 3.66 to 8.07 feet. Temperature varied from 1447 to 1905 F. Pressure varied from 40 to 82 psia. Heat transfer area had the range zero to 2.72 ft squared. Two cone angles were used. The average particulate carry over of 2.5 grains/SCF was appreciably less than cylindrical fluidized bed combustors. The carry over was correlated by multiple regression analysis to yield the dependence on bed depth and hence the collection efficiency, which was 20%. A comparison with a model indicated that the exhaust port may be below the transport disengaging height for most of the tests, indicating that further reduction in carry over and increase in collection efficiency could be affected by increasing the freeboard and height of the exhaust port above the bed.

  14. Permeability of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Teufel, L.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Hydraulic fracture stress data collected from carbonate and clastic reservoirs show that the minimum horizontal in situ stress decreases with reservoir depletion and pore pressure drawdown. The reduction in minimum horizontal stress is, in part, a poro-elastic effect that is linear with pore pressure drawdown and can be approximated by an unlaxial compaction model. The observed change in horizontal stress is equal to 40% to 80% of the net change in pore pressure. This type of stress behavior has important implications for reservoir management of naturally fractured reservoirs, because conductivity of fractures is highly stress sensitive. Laboratory studies clearly demonstrate that with increasing effective normal stress fracture apertures close and conductivity decreases. Accordingly, in sharp contrast to the standard procedure, predictions of changes in fracture permeability during reservoir depletion should not be made simply as a function of pore pressure drawdown, but more importantly should be based on how the effective in situ stresses change during drawdown and the orientation of natural fractures relative to the in situ stress field. The increase in the effective overburden stress will be the largest and equal to the magnitude of the pore pressure decline because the overburden stress is constant and does not change with drawdown. However, the increase in the effective minimum horizontal stress will be much smaller. Accordingly, for a reservoir with several sets of fractures with similar morphology, the reduction in fracture conductivity during drawdown will be greatest for horizontal fractures and least for vertical fractures aligned with the maximum horizontal stress direction.

  15. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Martin G.; Hughes, Alun D.; Davies, Justin E.; Sharman, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV -aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = −0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = −0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  16. Associations and clinical relevance of aortic-brachial artery stiffness mismatch, aortic reservoir function, and central pressure augmentation.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Martin G; Hughes, Alun D; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-10-01

    Central augmentation pressure (AP) and index (AIx) predict cardiovascular events and mortality, but underlying physiological mechanisms remain disputed. While traditionally believed to relate to wave reflections arising from proximal arterial impedance (and stiffness) mismatching, recent evidence suggests aortic reservoir function may be a more dominant contributor to AP and AIx. Our aim was therefore to determine relationships among aortic-brachial stiffness mismatching, AP, AIx, aortic reservoir function, and end-organ disease. Aortic (aPWV) and brachial (bPWV) pulse wave velocity were measured in 359 individuals (aged 61 ± 9, 49% male). Central AP, AIx, and aortic reservoir indexes were derived from radial tonometry. Participants were stratified by positive (bPWV > aPWV), negligible (bPWV ≈ aPWV), or negative stiffness mismatch (bPWV < aPWV). Left-ventricular mass index (LVMI) was measured by two-dimensional-echocardiography. Central AP and AIx were higher with negative stiffness mismatch vs. negligible or positive stiffness mismatch (11 ± 6 vs. 10 ± 6 vs. 8 ± 6 mmHg, P < 0.001 and 24 ± 10 vs. 24 ± 11 vs. 21 ± 13%, P = 0.042). Stiffness mismatch (bPWV-aPWV) was negatively associated with AP (r = -0.18, P = 0.001) but not AIx (r = -0.06, P = 0.27). Aortic reservoir pressure strongly correlated to AP (r = 0.81, P < 0.001) and AIx (r = 0.62, P < 0.001) independent of age, sex, heart rate, mean arterial pressure, and height (standardized β = 0.61 and 0.12, P ≤ 0.001). Aortic reservoir pressure independently predicted abnormal LVMI (β = 0.13, P = 0.024). Positive aortic-brachial stiffness mismatch does not result in higher AP or AIx. Aortic reservoir function, rather than discrete wave reflection from proximal arterial stiffness mismatching, provides a better model description of AP and AIx and also has clinical relevance as evidenced by an independent association of aortic reservoir pressure with LVMI. PMID:26276816

  17. Effects of pressure drawdown and recovery on the Cerro Prieto beta reservoir in the CP-III area

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.

    1998-02-01

    The production characteristics of wells in the northwestern Cerro Prieto III area changed greatly when the Cp-III power plant went on line in 1986. Fluid extraction in the field more than doubled and reservoir-wide boiling started immediately, greatly increasing the enthalpy of produced fluids. Some well fluids showed a decrease in chloride due to adiabatic steam condensation in the well and separator, and others were enriched in chloride due to boiling. As reservoir drawdown increased, entrance of cooler and more dilute groundwaters into the reservoir became evident (i.e., condensation stopped, and there was a decrease in enthalpy and chloride in produced fluids). Although some groundwater inflow was from the leaky western margin of the reservoir, the majority is in the northeast, inferred to be local and downward, possibly through more permeable zones associated with the normal fault H. This natural recharge and some reinjection have slowed and possibly reversed pressure drawdown throughout CP-III. Enthalpy has decreased and liquid saturation has increased as the steam-rich zone in the upper part of the reservoir has either disappeared or become thinner.

  18. Spatial distribution and reduction of PCDD/PCDF toxic equivalents along three shallow lowland reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Urbaniak, M; Kiedrzyńska, E; Zieliński, M; Tołoczko, W; Zalewski, M

    2014-03-01

    Reservoirs situated along a river continuum are ecosystems where rates of transfer of suspended matter and associated micropollutants are reduced due to sedimentation, accumulation, and biological and physical transformation processes. Among the micropollutants, PCDDs and PCDFs are substances that are highly toxic and carcinogenic for humans and animals. They are emitted and dispersed in the environment throughout the whole catchment area and may accumulate in aquatic and terrestrial food chains, creating a risk for human health. A wealth of data exists indicating the increase in the concentrations of pollutants along a river continuum. A comparative analysis of total, individual, and TEQ PCDD/PCDF concentrations in large lowland, shallow reservoirs located in different catchments ("I"-industrial/urban/agricultural, "U"-urban/agricultural, and "A"-agricultural/rural) showed decreases of the TEQ concentrations in bottom sediments along a gradient from the middle sections to the dam walls. Moreover, penta-, hexa-, and heptachlorinated CDD/CDF congeners were reduced from 28.8 up to 93.6 % in all three types of reservoirs. A further analysis of water samples from the inlets and outlets of the "A" reservoir confirmed this tendency. PMID:24337994

  19. Analysis of formation pressure test results in the Mount Elbert methane hydrate reservoir through numerical simulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kurihara, M.; Sato, A.; Funatsu, K.; Ouchi, H.; Masuda, Y.; Narita, H.; Collett, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Targeting the methane hydrate (MH) bearing units C and D at the Mount Elbert prospect on the Alaska North Slope, four MDT (Modular Dynamic Formation Tester) tests were conducted in February 2007. The C2 MDT test was selected for history matching simulation in the MH Simulator Code Comparison Study. Through history matching simulation, the physical and chemical properties of the unit C were adjusted, which suggested the most likely reservoir properties of this unit. Based on these properties thus tuned, the numerical models replicating "Mount Elbert C2 zone like reservoir" "PBU L-Pad like reservoir" and "PBU L-Pad down dip like reservoir" were constructed. The long term production performances of wells in these reservoirs were then forecasted assuming the MH dissociation and production by the methods of depressurization, combination of depressurization and wellbore heating, and hot water huff and puff. The predicted cumulative gas production ranges from 2.16??106m3/well to 8.22??108m3/well depending mainly on the initial temperature of the reservoir and on the production method.This paper describes the details of modeling and history matching simulation. This paper also presents the results of the examinations on the effects of reservoir properties on MH dissociation and production performances under the application of the depressurization and thermal methods. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Nutrient concentrations and fluxes in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir, China, and potential nutrient reduction strategies.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jian; Du, Pengfei; Lang, Cong

    2015-03-01

    The Miyun Reservoir is Beijing's main drinking water source. Increased nutrient levels in the reservoir have resulted in an increased risk of harmful algal blooms. One hundred ten water samples were collected at a range of spatial scales in the upper catchment of the Miyun Reservoir and were analyzed for total nitrogen (TN), nitrate (NO3 (-)-N), ammonium (NH4 (+)-N), total phosphorus (TP), and the potassium permanganate index (CODMn). Empirical equations were developed from relationships between nutrient concentrations and the main controls on nutrient, and were used to identify parts of the catchment that should be targeted with nutrient load reduction measures. Cropland was the main source of sediment for the streams, and much of the phosphorus was associated with sediment. The annual mean TP concentrations were closely correlated with both the annual mean suspended sediment concentrations and the ratio of the cropland area to the total basin area. There was a linear relationship between the annual mean TN concentration and the population density in the basins. Soil conservation may play an important role in reducing TP concentrations in the upper reaches of the Chao and Bai Rivers. It may be useful to (1) construct natural riparian buffers and vegetated buffers along croplands close to the watercourses, (2) implement management strategies to reduce nitrogen (N) fertilizer applications, and (3) construct additional wetlands to reduce nutrient loads in the study area. PMID:25673273

  1. The Influence of Seal Properties on Pressure Buildup and Leakage of Carbon Dioxide from Sequestration Reservoirs (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, S. M.; Chabora, E.

    2009-12-01

    The transport properties of seals, namely permeability, relative permeability, and capillary pressure control both migration of carbon dioxide and brine through the seal. Only recently has the the importance of brine migration emerged as key issue in the environmental performance of carbon dioxide sequestration projects. In this study we use numerical simulation to show that brine migration through the seal can be either advantageous or deleterious to the environmental performance of a carbon dioxide sequestration project. Brine migration through the seal can lower the pressure buildup in the storage reservoir, thereby reducing the risk of leakage or geomechanical stresses on the seal. On the other hand, if the seal is penetrated by a permeable fault it can lead to focused flow up a fault, which could lead to brine migration into drinking water aquifers. We also show that as the carbon dioxide plume grows, brine flow undergoes a complex evolution from upward flow to downward flows driven by countercurrent migration of carbon dioxide and brine in the seal and capillary pressure gradients at the base of the seal. Finally, we discuss desirable attributes seals, taking into account both carbon dioxide and brine migration through the seal. In particular, identifying seals that provide an effective capillary barrier to block the flow of carbon dioxide while allowing some brine migration through the seal can help to control pressure buildup and allow more efficient utilization of a sequestration reservoir. This could be particularly important in those settings that may be limited by the maximum allowable pressure buildup.

  2. Physical Mechanisms of Failure, Ultralow Partial Pressure Lubrication, and the Reservoir Effect in MEMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, David Adam

    measurements relating to microsystem contact conditions experiments must be conducted on actual microdevices. In the work presented here I have used microelectromechanical system (MEMS) tribometers to measure the friction and adhesive forces of SAM coated surfaces over the coarse of many sliding cycles as well as normal contacting cycles. It is shown that robustly adhered monolayer coatings degrade extremely rapidly and there is a direct correlation between the respective energies dissipated both in sliding and normal contacting cycles and the time it takes for the layers to degrade. Also it is shown that devices fail in two main modes: one where wear of the devices in the form of dislocation of polysilicon grains leads to a low/adhesion high wear regime and another where high adhesive forces are developed and the devices fail with little to no wear. In the studies of ultra low partial pressure lubrication of devices a clear correlation between lubricant mobility to device lubrication is observed even in the presence of a vapor, which should in principle be able to replenish removed lubricant in between sliding cycles. We show that ultralow partial pressures nominally corresponding to submonolayer coverages of ethanol and pentanol show a distinct decrease in coefficient of friction and lubricate MEMS microcontacts however this is only loosely correlated to their effectiveness as lubricants. Pentanol was only shown to lubricate at the point at which it becomes mobile on the surface where as ethanol is mobile at all times and lubricates effectively at very low partial pressures. Trifluoroethanol is not mobile at any portion of its isotherm and does not effectively lubricate the contacts. We also show the ability of the surrounding SAM to act as a lubricant reservoir when vapors of ethanol are removed. The correlation of lubricant mobility to lubrication can be used to predict the effectiveness to new lubricants as well as allow for the tailoring of lubricants to specific

  3. [Secondary prevention of stroke through arterial blood pressure reduction].

    PubMed

    Mancia, G; Grassi, G

    1997-07-01

    Large scale observational studies have conclusively demonstrated that systolic and diastolic blood pressure values are linearly related to the incidence of cerebrovascular diseases and that high blood pressure is an important risk factor for both primary and secondary development of stroke. Interventional studies have shown that blood pressure lowering by antihypertensive treatment reduces the incidence of stroke in hypertensive patients without a history of previous stroke. Whether this is the case also for the secondary prevention of cerebral ischemic attacks has not been unequivocally shown, however. The PROGRESS ("Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study") study has been designed and is under way to collect information on this important issue of the antihypertensive treatment, its purpose being to evaluate the blood pressure lowering effects with an ACE-inhibitor on recurrent stroke in an overall population of 6000 patients with a positive history of previous cerebral ischemic attacks or stroke. PMID:9340173

  4. Compaction and Permeability Reduction of Castlegate Sandstone under Pore Pressure Cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate time-dependent compaction and permeability changes by cycling pore pressure with application to compressed air energy storage (CAES) in a reservoir. Preliminary experiments capture the impacts of hydrostatic stress, pore water pressure, pore pressure cycling, chemical, and time-dependent considerations near a borehole in a CAES reservoir analog. CAES involves creating an air bubble in a reservoir. The high pressure bubble serves as a mechanical battery to store potential energy. When there is excess grid energy, bubble pressure is increased by air compression, and when there is energy needed on the grid, stored air pressure is released through turbines to generate electricity. The analog conditions considered are depth ~1 km, overburden stress ~20 MPa and a pore pressure ~10MPa. Pore pressure is cycled daily or more frequently between ~10 MPa and 6 MPa, consistent with operations of a CAES facility at this depth and may continue for operational lifetime (25 years). The rock can vary from initially fully-to-partially saturated. Pore pressure cycling changes the effective stress.Jacketed, room temperature tap water-saturated samples of Castlegate Sandstone are hydrostatically confined (20 MPa) and subjected to a pore pressure resulting in an effective pressure of ~10 MPa. Pore pressure is cycled between 6 to 10 MPa. Sample displacement measurements yielded determinations of volumetric strain and from water flow measurements permeability was determined. Experiments ran for two to four weeks, with 2 to 3 pore pressure cycles per day. The Castlegate is a fluvial high porosity (>20%) primarily quartz sandstone, loosely calcite cemented, containing a small amount of clay.Pore pressure cycling induces compaction (~.1%) and permeability decreases (~20%). The results imply that time-dependent compactive processes are operative. The load path, of increasing and decreasing pore pressure, may facilitate local loosening and grain readjustments that results in the

  5. Pore Pressure prediction in shale gas reservoirs using neural network and fuzzy logic with an application to Barnett Shale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliouane, Leila; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali; Boudella, Amar

    2015-04-01

    The main goal of the proposed idea is to use the artificial intelligence such as the neural network and fuzzy logic to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Pore pressure is a very important parameter that will be used or estimation of effective stress. This last is used to resolve well-bore stability problems, failure plan identification from Mohr-Coulomb circle and sweet spots identification. Many models have been proposed to estimate the pore pressure from well-logs data; we can cite for example the equivalent depth model, the horizontal model for undercompaction called the Eaton's model…etc. All these models require a continuous measurement of the slowness of the primary wave, some thing that is not easy during well-logs data acquisition in shale gas formtions. Here, we suggest the use the fuzzy logic and the multilayer perceptron neural network to predict the pore pressure in two horizontal wells drilled in the lower Barnett shale formation. The first horizontal well is used for the training of the fuzzy set and the multilayer perecptron, the input is the natural gamma ray, the neutron porosity, the slowness of the compression and shear wave, however the desired output is the estimated pore pressure using Eaton's model. Data of another horizontal well are used for generalization. Obtained results clearly show the power of the fuzzy logic system than the multilayer perceptron neural network machine to predict the pore pressure in shale gas reservoirs. Keywords: artificial intelligence, fuzzy logic, pore pressure, multilayer perecptron, Barnett shale.

  6. PRESSURE DROP REDUCTION BY ELECTRICAL ENHANCEMENT OF FABRIC FILTRATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses economic studies of electrostatic augmentation of fabric filtration (ESFF) that indicate that the reduced rate of pressure drop rise can lead to lower capital and operating costs. (ESFF has been evaluated in the laboratory and at various pilot scales over the ...

  7. Field-wide Pressure Response of Three Mid-Cenozoic Sandstone Reservoirs to Fluid Production: a Reverse Analog to Carbon Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, J.; Jordan, P. D.; Chehal, S.; Gonzales, G.; goodell, J. A.; Wilson, J.

    2013-12-01

    Potential carbon storage reservoirs exist in mature oilfields of the southern San Joaquin Valley, California. Data regarding fluid extraction and injection and reservoir pressure exist for the three main oil reservoirs with carbon storage potential: the Monterey (Stevens sandstone member), Vedder and Temblor formations. The pressure response of these reservoirs to fluid volume changes over time provides information regarding how carbon storage may affect the pressure gradients in the adjacent saline aquifers outside the fields where less data exist. This project may provide a template for analysis of other potential carbon storage reservoirs that are contiguous with oilfields. A field-scale version of the productivity index (PI, defined as the average net fluid production rate divided by the average pressure drop over the time period) was calculated for fields with substantial production from depths suitable for carbon storage. The PI determines the reservoir's pressure response to fluid production and is related to the effective CO2 storage capacity. The variance of the 2005 pressure values within each reservoir provides a measure of reservoir continuity. The highest PI values (113,000 and 88,410 m3/yr/MPa) are in the Vedder Formation. The lowest PI values occur in the Temblor Formation and range from 3734 to 16,460 m3/yr/MPa. This indicates the Vedder reservoirs have more pressure support from the aquifer beyond the field than do the Temblor reservoirs. The pressure variance of 3.2 MPa within the Vedder Formation in the Greeley Field is the lowest. The greatest variance (8.5 MPa) occurs within the Temblor Formation in the Carneros unit of the Railroad Gap field. This indicates greater uniformity in the Vedder and more compartmentalization of the Temblor. Pressure response in the Stevens is more varied within the two fields examined in this study: North and South Coles Levee. In North Coles Levee, water injection was employed throughout the field resulting in a

  8. An internal electron reservoir enhances catalytic CO2 reduction by a semisynthetic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Camille R; Shafaat, Hannah S

    2016-08-01

    The development of an artificial metalloenzyme for CO2 reduction is described. The small-molecule catalyst [Ni(II)(cyclam)](2+) has been incorporated within azurin. Selectivity for CO generation over H(+) reduction is enhanced within the protein environment, while the azurin active site metal impacts the electrochemical overpotential and photocatalytic activity. The enhanced catalysis observed for copper azurin suggests an important role for intramolecular electron transfer, analogous to native CO2 reducing enzymes. PMID:27406946

  9. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N H

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 10(4) s(-1) at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  10. An iron-iron hydrogenase mimic with appended electron reservoir for efficient proton reduction in aqueous media

    PubMed Central

    Becker, René; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Li, Ping; Woutersen, Sander; Reek, Joost N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The transition from a fossil-based economy to a hydrogen-based economy requires cheap and abundant, yet stable and efficient, hydrogen production catalysts. Nature shows the potential of iron-based catalysts such as the iron-iron hydrogenase (H2ase) enzyme, which catalyzes hydrogen evolution at rates similar to platinum with low overpotential. However, existing synthetic H2ase mimics generally suffer from low efficiency and oxygen sensitivity and generally operate in organic solvents. We report on a synthetic H2ase mimic that contains a redox-active phosphole ligand as an electron reservoir, a feature that is also crucial for the working of the natural enzyme. Using a combination of (spectro)electrochemistry and time-resolved infrared spectroscopy, we elucidate the unique redox behavior of the catalyst. We find that the electron reservoir actively partakes in the reduction of protons and that its electron-rich redox states are stabilized through ligand protonation. In dilute sulfuric acid, the catalyst has a turnover frequency of 7.0 × 104 s−1 at an overpotential of 0.66 V. This catalyst is tolerant to the presence of oxygen, thereby paving the way for a new generation of synthetic H2ase mimics that combine the benefits of the enzyme with synthetic versatility and improved stability. PMID:26844297

  11. Expanding the range for predicting critical flow rates of gas wells producing from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Upchurch, E.R. )

    1989-08-01

    The critical flow rate of a gas well is the minimum flow rate required to prevent accumulation of liquids in the tubing. Theoretical models currently available for estimating critical flow rates are restricted to wells with water/gas ratios less than 150bbl/MMcf (0.84 X 10/sup -3/ m/sup 3//m/sup 3/). For wells producing at higher water/gas ratios from normally pressured waterdrive reservoirs, a method of estimating critical flow rates is derived through use of an empirical multiphase-flow correlation.

  12. [Partial pressure of CO2 and CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou and Xiaolangdi Station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-ling; Yang, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    According to periodic sampling analysis per month in Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station from November 2011 to October 2012, combined with continuous sampling analysis of Xiaolangdi Reservoir during runoff and sediment control period in 2012, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in surface water were calculated based on Henry's Law, pCO2 features and air-water CO2 degassing fluxes of Huayuankou station and Xiaolangdi station affected by Xiaolangdi Reservoir were studied. The results were listed as follows, when Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, pCO2 in surface water of Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station varied from 82 to 195 Pa and from 99 to 228 Pa, moreover, pCO2 in surface water from July to September were distinctly higher than those in other months; meanwhile, pCO, in surface water from Huayuankou station were higher than that from Xiaolangdi station. During runoff and sediment control period of Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations commonly indicated that pCO2 in surface water during water draining were obviously lower than those during sediment releasing. Whether in the period of normal operation or runoff and sediment control, pCO2 in surface water had positive relations to DIC content in two hydrological stations. Since the EpCO,/AOU value was higher than the theoretical value of 0. 62, the biological aerobic respiration effect had distinct contribution to pCO2. Throughout the whole year, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes from Xiaolangdi station and Huayuankou station were 0.486 p.mol (m2 s) -l and 0.588 pmol (m2 x s)(-1) respectively; When Xiaolangdi Reservoir operated normally, air-water CO, degassing fluxes in Huayuankou station were higher than that in Xiaolangdi station; during runoff and sediment control from Xiaolangdi Reservoir, two hydrological stations had one observation result in common, namely, air-water CO2 degassing fluxes in the period of water draining were obviously lower than that in the period of sediment releasing

  13. Multifunctional Low Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and NOx Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David; Acosta, Waldo

    2013-01-01

    Determining the feasibility of the induced synthetic jet is key, and is still TBD. center dot Available LPT vane volume is sufficient for tens of resonators per span-wise hole spacing, so physically feasible. center dot Determination of acoustic attenuation requires accurate model of vane, resonator locations, flow field and incident waves. (TBD) center dot Determination of NOx reduction is also TBD.

  14. Evolution of Permeability and Induced Seismicity during Reservoir Stimulation; Role of Fluid Pressure and Thermal Transients on Reactivated Fractured Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, G.; Elsworth, D.

    2012-12-01

    We utilize a continuum model of reservoir behavior subject to coupled THMC (thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical) processes to explore the evolution of stimulation-induced seismicity and of permeability in EGS reservoirs. Our continuum model is capable of accommodating changes in effective stresses that result due to the evolving spatial variations in fluid pressure as well as thermal stress and chemical effects. Discrete penny-shaped fractures (~10-1200m) are seeded within the reservoir volume at prescribed (faults) and random (fractures) orientations and with a Gaussian distribution of lengths and location. Failure is calculated from a continuum model using a Coulomb criterion for friction. Energy release magnitude is utilized to obtain the magnitude-moment relation for induced seismicity by location and with time. This model is applied to a single injector (stimulation) to the proposed Newberry EGS field (USA). We stimulate the reservoir in four zones of differing fracture network properties B, C, D and E (shallow to deep) and at four different depths of 2000, 2500, 2750 and 3000 m. The same network of large fractures (density of 0.003 m-1 and spacing 300 m) is applied in all zones and supplemented by more closely spaced fractures with densities of 0.5 m-1 in the shallow zone B, 0.9 m-1 in the intermediate zones C and D and 0.26 m-1 in the deepest zone E. We show that permeability enhancement is modulated by hydraulic, thermal, and chemical (THMC) processes and that permeability increases by an order of magnitude during stimulation at each depth. For the widely spaced fracture networks, the increase in permeability reaches a smaller radius from the injection point and permeability evolution is slower with time compared to the behavior of the closely spaced fracture network. For seismic events that develop with the stimulation, event magnitude (MS) varies in the range -2 to +1.9 and the largest event size (~1.9) corresponds to the largest fractures (~1200m

  15. Influence of pressure on the kinetics of synthetic llmenite reduction in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, M. L.; Grey, I. E.

    2006-04-01

    In-situ thermogravimetric measurements were used in the hydrogen reduction of poly-granular synthetic ilmenite discs at temperatures in the range 823 to 1173 K and at pressures in the range 1.2 to 13 atm. A symmetrical beam microbalance was used, coupled with twin reactors and twin furnaces, to minimize buoyancy and drag effects. Stable operation was achieved at high gas flow rates where gas film transport effects were negligible. Polishing the ilmenite discs prior to reduction eliminated the formation of dense surface metallic iron films that can impede gas diffusion into the discs. Macroscopically, the reduction reaction proceeded topochemically and a shrinking core reaction model was found to be appropriate to predict conversion-time relationships. It was necessary to allow for water vapor adsorption onto the reacting interface in order to model the effect of pressure on the reduction kinetics. The observed reduction rate increased sharply with pressure up to approximately 3 atm and then approached a plateau with further pressure increase. The porosity in the reduced ilmenite samples was very fine, with pore diameters of typically 0.05 to 0.3 µm. Intragrain gas pressure buildup in the fine pores due to the influence of Knudsen diffusion was incorporated into the modeling of the kinetic data.

  16. Phospholipids fatty acids of drinking water reservoir sedimentary microbial community: Structure and function responses to hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    Chai, Bei-Bei; Huang, Ting-Lin; Zhao, Xiao-Guang; Li, Ya-Jiao

    2015-07-01

    Microbial communities in three drinking water reservoirs, with different depth in Xi'an city, were quantified by phospholipids fatty acids analysis and multivariate statistical analysis was employed to interpret their response to different hydrostatic pressure and other physico-chemical properties of sediment and overlying water. Principle component analyses of sediment characteristics parameters showed that hydrostatic pressure was the most important effect factor to differentiate the overlying water quality from three drinking water reservoirs from each other. NH4+ content in overlying water was positive by related to hydrostatic pressure, while DO in water-sediment interface and sediment OC in sediment were negative by related with it. Three drinking water reservoir sediments were characterized by microbial communities dominated by common and facultative anaerobic Gram-positive bacteria, as well as, by sulfur oxidizing bacteria. Hydrostatic pressure and physico-chemical properties of sediments (such as sediment OC, sediment TN and sediment TP) were important effect factors to microbial community structure, especially hydrostatic pressure. It is also suggested that high hydrostatic pressure and low dissolved oxygen concentration stimulated Gram-positive and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) bacterial population in drinking water reservoir sediment. This research supplied a successful application of phospholipids fatty acids and multivariate analysis to investigate microbial community composition response to different environmental factors. Thus, few physico-chemical factors can be used to estimate composition microbial of community as reflected by phospholipids fatty acids, which is difficult to detect. PMID:26387360

  17. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten capillary pressure curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershenzon, Naum; Soltanian, Mohamadreza; Ritzi, Robert, Jr.; Dominic, David

    2015-04-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Recent studies have led to new conceptual and quantitative models for sedimentary architecture in fluvial deposits over a range of scales that are relevant to the performance of some deep saline reservoirs [1, 2]. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume, during and after injection, is influenced by the hierarchical and multi-scale stratal architecture in such reservoirs [3]. The results strongly suggest that representing these small scales (few cm in vertical direction and few meters in horizontal direction) features and representing how they are organized within a hierarchy of larger-scale features, is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. The results also demonstrated the importance of using separate capillary pressure and relative permeability relationships for different textural facies types. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping in deep saline aquifers using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, to capillary pressure. We showed that capillary trapping as well as dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches if reservoir consists from various species with different capillary pressure and relative permeability curves. We also found a dramatic difference in simulation time; using the van Genuchten approach improves convergence and thus reduces calculation time by one-two orders of magnitude. [1] Bridge, J.S. (2006), Fluvial facies models: Recent developments, in Facies Models Revisited, SEPM Spec. Publ., 84, edited by H. W. Posamentier and R. G. Walker, pp. 85-170, Soc. for Sediment. Geol. (SEPM), Tulsa, Okla [2] Ramanathan, R., A. Guin, R.W. Ritzi, D.F. Dominic, V.L. Freedman, T.D. Scheibe, and I.A. Lunt (2010), Simulating the heterogeneity in channel belt deposits: Part 1. A geometric-based methodology and code, Water Resources

  18. Comparison of reduction in foodborne viral surrogates by high pressure homogenization.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Doris H; Su, Xiaowei; Harte, Federico

    2011-11-01

    With the increasing global spread of human noroviral infections and the emergence of highly virulent noroviral strains, novel inactivation methods are needed to control foodborne outbreaks. High pressure homogenization (HPH) is a novel method that can be applied for foodborne virus reduction in fluids being continuously processed. Our objective in the present study was to compare the titer reduction by HPH between feline calicivirus strain F9 (FCV-F9) and murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) as surrogates for human noroviruses, and MS2 (single-stranded F-RNA coliphage) and somatic coliphage φX174 (single-stranded DNA) as indicators of fecal contamination. Duplicate experiments with each virus in phosphate-buffered saline were carried out with homogenization pressures of 0, 100, 200, 250, and 300 MPa, with exposure temperatures of 24, 46, 63, 70, and 75°C, respectively, for <2 s. FCV-F9 was found highly susceptible to HPH treatment pressures of 300 MPa, with a reduction of >4.95 log PFU/ml. Lower pressures of 250, 200, and 100 MPa resulted in reductions of 1.61, 0.60, and 0.18 log PFU/ml of FCV-F9, respectively, while MNV-1 was not reduced at these lower pressures. Coliphage φX174 showed no significant reduction at 300 MPa or lower homogenization pressures in comparison with MS2, which did show 3.3-log PFU/ml reduction at 300 MPa. Future studies using juices for industrial application of HPH to determine microbial inactivation with simultaneous retention of sensory and nutritional value of foods are needed. PMID:22054183

  19. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harish, Sivasankaran; Tabara, Mitsuru; Ikoma, Yoshifumi; Horita, Zenji; Takata, Yasuyuki; Cahill, David G.; Kohno, Masamichi

    2014-06-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm-1 K-1 to approximately 7.6 Wm-1 K-1). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects.

  20. Implications of Sub-Hydrostatic Pressures in the Bravo Dome Natural CO2 Reservoir for the Long-Term Security of Geological Carbon Dioxide Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhbari, D.; Hesse, M. A.; Larson, T.

    2014-12-01

    The Bravo Dome field in northeast New Mexico is one of the largest gas accumulations worldwide and the largest natural CO2 accumulation in North America. The field is only 580-900 m deep and located in the Permian Tubb sandstone that unconformably overlies the granitic basement. Sathaye et al. (2014) estimated that 1.3 Gt of CO2 is stored at the reservoir. A major increase in the pore pressure relative to the hydrostatic pressure is expected due to the large amount of CO2 injected into the reservoir. However, the pre-production gas pressures indicate that most parts of the reservoir are approximately 5 MPa below hydrostatic pressure. Three processes could explain the under pressure in the Bravo Dome reservoir; 1) erosional unloading, 2) CO2 dissolution into the ambient brine, 3) cooling of CO2after injection. Analytical solutions suggest that an erosion rate of 180 m/Ma is required to reduce the pore pressures to the values observed at Bravo Dome. Given that the current erosion rate is only 5 m/Ma (Nereson et al. 2013); the sub-hydrostatic pressures at Bravo Dome are likely due to CO2dissolution and cooling. To investigate the impact of CO2 dissolution on the pore pressure we have developed new analytical solutions and conducted laboratory experiments. We assume that gaseous CO2 was confined to sandstones during emplacement due to the high entry pressure of the siltstones. After emplacement the CO2 dissolves in to the brine contained in the siltstones and the pressure in the sandstones declines. Assuming the sandstone-siltstone system is closed, the pressure decline due to CO2 dissolution is controlled by a single dimensionless number, η = KHRTVw /Vg. Herein, KH is Henry's constant, R is ideal gas constant, T is temperature, Vw is water volume, and Vg is CO2 volume. The pressure drop is controlled by the ratio of water volume to CO2 volume and η varies between 0.1 to 8 at Bravo Dome. This corresponds to pressure drops between 0.8-7.5 MPa and can therefore account

  1. Multifunctional Low-Pressure Turbine for Core Noise Reduction, Improved Efficiency, and Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Christopher J.; Shyam, Vikram; Rigby, David L.

    2013-01-01

    This work studied the feasibility of using Helmholtz resonator cavities embedded in low-pressure-turbine (LPT) airfoils to (1) reduce core noise by damping acoustic modes; (2) use the synthetic jets produced by the liner hole acoustic oscillations to improve engine efficiency by maintaining turbulent attached flow in the LPT at low-Reynolds-number cruise conditions; and (3) reduce engine nitrogen oxide emissions by lining the internal cavities with materials capable of catalytic conversion. Flat plates with embedded Helmholtz resonators, designed to resonate at either 3000 or at 400 Hz, were simulated using computational fluid dynamics. The simulations were conducted for two inlet Mach numbers, 0.25 and 0.5, corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 90 000 and 164 000 based on the effective chordwise distance to the resonator orifice. The results of this study are (1) the region of acoustic treatment may be large enough to have a benefit; (2) the jets may not possess sufficient strength to reduce flow separation (based on prior work by researchers in the flow control area); and (3) the additional catalytic surface area is not exposed to a high velocity, so it probably does not have any benefit.

  2. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Pastouret, Alan; Gooijer, Frans; Overton, Bob; Jonker, Jan; Curley, Jim; Constantine, Walter; Waterman, Kendall Miller

    2015-11-13

    High Temperature insulated wire and optical fiber cable is a key enabling technology for the Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP). Without insulated electrical wires and optical fiber, downhole temperature and pressure sensors, flow meters and gauges cannot communicate with the surface. Unfortunately, there are currently no insulated electrical wire or fiber cable constructions capable of surviving for extended periods of deployment in a geothermal well (240-325°C) or supercritical (374°C) reservoir. This has severely hindered engineered reservoir creation, management and utilization, as hot zones and cool water intrusions cannot be understood over time. The lack of a insulated electrical wire and fiber cable solution is a fundamental limitation to the viability of this energy source. The High Temperature Downhole Tools target specification is development of tools and sensors for logging and monitoring wellbore conditions at depths of up to 10,000 meters and temperatures up to 374oC. It well recognized in the industry that no current electronic or fiber cable can be successfully deployed in a well and function successfully for more a few days at temperatures over 240oC. The goal of this project was to raise this performance level significantly. Prysmian Group’s objective in this project was to develop a complete, multi-purpose cable solution for long-term deployment in geothermal wells/reservoirs that can be used with the widest variety of sensors. In particular, the overall project objective was to produce a manufacturable cable design that can perform without serious degradation: • At temperatures up to 374°C; • At pressures up to 220 bar; • In a hydrogen-rich environment; and • For the life of the well (> 5 years). This cable incorporates: • Specialty optical fibers, with specific glass chemistry and high temperature and pressure protective coatings for data communication and distributed temperature and pressure sensing, and • High

  3. Temperature-pressure conditions in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin: Implications for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pashin, J.C.; McIntyre, M.R.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of gas onto coal is sensitive to pressure and temperature, and carbon dioxide can be a potentially volatile supercritical fluid in coalbed methane reservoirs. More than 5000 wells have been drilled in the coalbed methane fields of the Black Warrior basin in west-central Alabama, and the hydrologic and geothermic information from geophysical well logs provides a robust database that can be used to assess the potential for carbon sequestration in coal-bearing strata.Reservoir temperature within the coalbed methane target zone generally ranges from 80 to 125 ??F (27-52 ??C), and geothermal gradient ranges from 6.0 to 19.9 ??F/1000 ft (10.9-36.2 ??C/km). Geothermal gradient data have a strong central tendency about a mean of 9.0 ??F/1000 ft (16.4 ??C/km). Hydrostatic pressure gradients in the coalbed methane fields range from normal (0.43 psi/ft) to extremely underpressured (<0.05 psi/ft). Pressure-depth plots establish a bimodal regime in which 70% of the wells have pressure gradients greater than 0.30 psi/ft, and 20% have pressure gradients lower than 0.10 psi/ft. Pockets of underpressure are developed around deep longwall coal mines and in areas distal to the main hydrologic recharge zone, which is developed in structurally upturned strata along the southeastern margin of the basin.Geothermal gradients within the coalbed methane fields are high enough that reservoirs never cross the gas-liquid condensation line for carbon dioxide. However, reservoirs have potential for supercritical fluid conditions beyond a depth of 2480 ft (756 m) under normally pressured conditions. All target coal beds are subcritically pressured in the northeastern half of the coalbed methane exploration fairway, whereas those same beds were in the supercritical phase window prior to gas production in the southwestern half of the fairway. Although mature reservoirs are dewatered and thus are in the carbon dioxide gas window, supercritical conditions may develop as reservoirs

  4. A direct method for determining complete positive and negative capillary pressure curves for reservoir rock using the centrifuge

    SciTech Connect

    Spinler, E.A.; Baldwin, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A method is being developed for direct experimental determination of capillary pressure curves from saturation distributions produced during centrifuging fluids in a rock plug. A free water level is positioned along the length of the plugs to enable simultaneous determination of both positive and negative capillary pressures. Octadecane as the oil phase is solidified by temperature reduction while centrifuging to prevent fluid redistribution upon removal from the centrifuge. The water saturation is then measured via magnetic resonance imaging. The saturation profile within the plug and the calculation of pressures for each point of the saturation profile allows for a complete capillary pressure curve to be determined from one experiment. Centrifuging under oil with a free water level into a 100 percent water saturated plug results in the development of a primary drainage capillary pressure curve. Centrifuging similarly at an initial water saturation in the plug results in the development of an imbibition capillary pressure curve. Examples of these measurements are presented for Berea sandstone and chalk rocks.

  5. Core flooding tests to investigate the effects of IFT reduction and wettability alteration on oil recovery during MEOR process in an Iranian oil reservoir.

    PubMed

    Rabiei, Arash; Sharifinik, Milad; Niazi, Ali; Hashemi, Abdolnabi; Ayatollahi, Shahab

    2013-07-01

    Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) refers to the process of using bacterial activities for more oil recovery from oil reservoirs mainly by interfacial tension reduction and wettability alteration mechanisms. Investigating the impact of these two mechanisms on enhanced oil recovery during MEOR process is the main objective of this work. Different analytical methods such as oil spreading and surface activity measurements were utilized to screen the biosurfactant-producing bacteria isolated from the brine of a specific oil reservoir located in the southwest of Iran. The isolates identified by 16S rDNA and biochemical analysis as Enterobacter cloacae (Persian Type Culture Collection (PTCC) 1798) and Enterobacter hormaechei (PTCC 1799) produce 1.53 g/l of biosurfactant. The produced biosurfactant caused substantial surface tension reduction of the growth medium and interfacial tension reduction between oil and brine to 31 and 3.2 mN/m from the original value of 72 and 29 mN/m, respectively. A novel set of core flooding tests, including in situ and ex situ scenarios, was designed to explore the potential of the isolated consortium as an agent for MEOR process. Besides, the individual effects of wettability alteration and IFT reduction on oil recovery efficiency by this process were investigated. The results show that the wettability alteration of the reservoir rock toward neutrally wet condition in the course of the adsorption of bacteria cells and biofilm formation are the dominant mechanisms on the improvement of oil recovery efficiency. PMID:23553033

  6. Underwater plasma-MIG arc welding: Shielding technique and pressure reduction by a centrifugal pump

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.; Mewes, D.; Bartzsch, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1995-12-31

    In comparison to hyperbaric underwater welding in diving chambers, wet welding techniques promise higher flexibility and lower costs. One technique for creating a local dry and pressure reduced welding zone is the use of a centrifugal pump. Results of experimental investigations in combination with a plasma-MIG arc welding system are presented in this paper. Special importance is attached to the local pressure reduction in view of the fact that low pressure, i.e. a high pressure difference between surrounding water and dry welding area, is a good condition for welding but is difficult to be obtained with other shielding systems than pressure chambers. Plasma-MIG welding has been done under water with a good result on the weld quality. Values of the hardness of the joint and the appearance of the weld structure are nearly comparable to atmospheric welds.

  7. Iron reduction and mineralization of deep-sea iron reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 at elevated hydrostatic pressures.

    PubMed

    Wu, W F; Wang, F P; Li, J H; Yang, X W; Xiao, X; Pan, Y X

    2013-11-01

    In this study, iron reduction and concomitant biomineralization of a deep-sea iron reducing bacterium (IRB), Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, were systematically examined at different hydrostatic pressures (0.1, 5, 20, and 50 MPa). Our results indicate that bacterial iron reduction and induced biomineralization are influenced by hydrostatic pressure. Specifically, the iron reduction rate and extent consistently decreases with the increase in hydrostatic pressure. By extrapolation, the iron reduction rate should drop to zero by ~68 MPa, which suggests a possible shut-off of enzymatic iron reduction of WP3 at this pressure. Nano-sized superparamagnetic magnetite minerals are formed under all the experimental pressures; nevertheless, even as magnetite production decreases, the crystallinity and grain size of magnetite minerals increase at higher pressure. These results imply that IRB may play an important role in iron reduction, biomineralization, and biogeochemical cycling in deep-sea environments. PMID:24102974

  8. Effects of Hydrostatic Pressure on the Drag Reduction of Submerged Aerogel-Particle Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed; Vahedi Tafreshi, Hooman; Samaha, Mohamed A.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrophobic aerogel particles with different average diameters are randomly deposited onto metallic substrates with a thin adhesive coating to achieve a combination of hydrophobicity and surface roughness. The resulting surfaces show different degrees of superhydrophobicity and are used to study the effects of elevated pressure on the drag reduction and the degree of hydrophobicity (sustainability) of such surfaces when used for underwater applications. We also developed an image-thresholding technique to estimate the gas area fraction of the coating. The results indicate that there exists a new parameter, the terminal pressure, beyond which the surface undergoes a global transition from the Cassie state to the Wenzel state, and therefore can no longer generate drag reduction. This terminal pressure differs from the previously identified critical pressure. The latter is the pressure above which the surface starts the transition process at some location, but not necessarily at other spots due to the heterogeneity of the surface. For the particle coatings used herein, the terminal pressures are measured to range from 100 to 600 kPa, indicating that such coatings could potentially be used for deep underwater applications.

  9. Numerical modelling of pore pressure variations due to time varying loads using a hybrid technique: the case of the Itoiz reservoir (Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzón, Francisco; García-Jerez, Antonio; Santoyo, Miguel A.; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, we present a hybrid technique to estimate the pore pressure variations at the neighbourhood of dams due to time varying water loads in their reservoirs. When considering flow boundary conditions, the solution of the equations of the problem can be obtained as the superposition of (1) the part computed from a homogeneous diffusion equation with the Dirichlet boundary condition (this is due to the pore pressure diffusion) and (2) the solution of an initial value problem in an inhomogeneous diffusion equation in which the inhomogeneous term is related with the stress variations due to the water loads (the solution due to the compression in the medium). Here, two different techniques are joined to calculate each one of these partial solutions: the pore pressure diffusion term is obtained by using the Green's function of the problem, whereas the second contribution due to stress time changes is computed with a finite difference method. This hybrid technique has been used to compute the pore pressure variations produced by the initial impounding of the Itoiz reservoir, northern Spain. The possible relation between the reservoir and a close seismic series occurred on 2004 September, 8 months after the beginning of its impounding, is investigated. We pay special attention to the pore pressure changes at the hypocentre location of the main shock (with magnitude Mw = 4.5), and also evaluate the change of the Coulomb Failure Stress (ΔCFS) produced by the water loads in the reservoir over the fault responsible of this main shock, obtaining a maximum change of 0.5 kPa in the best of the cases. Accordingly, it seems that the role of the impounding of the reservoir to the main shock was marginal, and that the main load on the origin of the triggered seismicity could well be related to the regional state of stresses of the Pyrenees range and adjacent zones.

  10. The influence of high hydrostatic pressure on bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Hazemann, Jean-Louis; Daniel, Isabelle

    2012-07-01

    The impact of deep-subsurface pressure conditions on microbial activity is still poorly constrained. In particular it is unknown how pressure of deep environments affects microbial transformations of iron. We investigated the effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the rate and the extent of bacterial dissimilatory iron reduction (DIR). We employed a novel experimental setup that enables in situ monitoring of Fe oxidation state and speciation in bacterial cultures in an optimized HHP incubation system using X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was incubated at 30 °C with Fe(III) citrate and tryptone at pressures between 0.1 and 100 MPa. For pressures up to 70 MPa strain MR-1 (108 cells ml-1) was able to reduce all 5 mM Fe(III) provided. Above 70 MPa, the final amount of Fe(III) that MR-1 could reduce decreased linearly and DIR was estimated to stop at 109 ± 7 MPa. The decrease in the reduction yield was correlated with the dramatic decrease in survival (as determined by CFU counts) above 70 MPa. The initial rate of DIR increased with pressure up to 40 MPa, then decreased to reach zero at about 110 MPa. Increased rates of DIR activity and relatively high growth rates for pressures below 40 MPa would potentially ensure the maintenance of MR-1 in most of deep subsurface environments where moderate pressures occur, i.e. deep-sea environments. This study not only provides the first in situ quantitative results for microbial iron metabolism under HHP conditions but also sets the stage for future investigations of deep-sea pressure-adapted iron reducers. Moreover it demonstrates for the first time that XANES at the Fe K-edge is a powerful probe for in vivo monitoring of iron transformations in living microbial cultures.

  11. Pressure-vessel-damage fluence reduction by low-leakage fuel management. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Cokinos, D.; Aronson, A.L.; Carew, J.F.; Kohut, P.; Todosow, M.; Lois, L.

    1983-01-01

    As a result of neutron-induced radiation damage to the pressure vessel and of an increased concern that in a PWR transient the pressure vessel may be subjected to pressurized thermal shock (PTS), detailed analyses have been undertaken to determine the levels of neutron fluence accumulation at the pressure vessels of selected PWR's. In addition, various methods intended to limit vessel damage by reducing the vessel fluence have been investigated. This paper presents results of the fluence analysis and the evaluation of the low-leakage fuel management fluence reduction method. The calculations were performed with DOT-3.5 in an octant of the core/shield/vessel configuration using a 120 x 43 (r, theta) mesh structure.

  12. Operation of a Pressurized System for Continuous Reduction of CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Simon Stone; Michael E. McIlwain

    2012-09-01

    A Ag-based pressurized electrochemical system equipped for continuous reduction of CO2 is presented. At elevated pressures the quantity of CO which can be generated is 5 times that observed at ambient pressure with faradaic efficiencies as high as 92% observed at 350 mA cm-2. For operation at 225 mA cm-2 and 60 degrees C the cell voltage at 18.5 atm was 0.4 V below that observed at ambient pressure. Increasing the temperature further to 90 degrees C led to a cell voltage below 3 V (18.5 atm and 90 degrees C), which equates to an electrical efficiency of 50%.

  13. Sensitivity of CO2 migration estimation on reservoir temperature and pressure uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Preston; Doughty, Christine

    2008-11-01

    The density and viscosity of supercritical CO{sub 2} are sensitive to pressure and temperature (PT) while the viscosity of brine is sensitive primarily to temperature. Oil field PT data in the vicinity of WESTCARB's Phase III injection pilot test site in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California, show a range of PT values, indicating either PT uncertainty or variability. Numerical simulation results across the range of likely PT indicate brine viscosity variation causes virtually no difference in plume evolution and final size, but CO{sub 2} density variation causes a large difference. Relative ultimate plume size is almost directly proportional to the relative difference in brine and CO{sub 2} density (buoyancy flow). The majority of the difference in plume size occurs during and shortly after the cessation of injection.

  14. Microbubble skin friction reduction on an axisymmetric body under the influence of applied axial pressure gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, H.; Deutsch, S.

    1991-12-01

    The influence of both a favorable and an adverse applied axial pressure gradient on microbubble-induced skin friction reduction was examined. An 87 mm diameter, 632 mm long model equipped with a 273 mm long cylindrical force balance was employed. Experiments were carried out in a 305 mm diameter water tunnel, at free-stream speeds of 4.6, 7.6, 10.7, 13.7, and 16.8 m/sec. Air was injected at rates as high as 12×10-3 m3/sec. Measurement of the static pressure along the body with gas injection demonstrated that gas injection did not alter the pressure gradient and that the flow remained axisymmetric. Reductions in skin friction for the zero pressure gradient case agreed well with the earlier results of Deutsch and Castano [Phys. Fluids 29, 3590 (1986)]. The adverse-gradient-induced separation of the boundary layer for speeds at and above 7.6 m/sec, for air injection rates in excess of 5.0×10-3 m3/sec. The favorable gradient strongly inhibited the drag reduction mechanism [47].

  15. Effect of the Reservoir Volume on the Discharge Pressures in the Injection System of the N.A.C.A. Spray Photography Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Lee, D W

    1932-01-01

    Tests were made to determine the effect of the reservoir volume on the discharge pressures in the injection system of the N.A.C.A. spray photography equipment. The data obtained are applicable to the design of a common rail fuel-injection system. The data show that an injection system of the type described can be designed so that not more than full load fuel quantity can be injected into the engine cylinders, and so that the fuel spray characteristics remain constant over a large range of engine speeds. Formulas are presented for computing the volume of the reservoir and the diameter of the discharge orifice.

  16. Prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs using a semi-analytical solution of the non-linear gas flow equation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattar, L.; Adegbesan, L.O.

    1980-01-01

    The differential equation for flow of gases in a porous medium is nonlinear and cannot be solved by strictly analytical methods. Previous studies in the literature have obtained analytical solutions to this equation by linearlization (i.e., treating viscosity and compressibilty as constant). In this study, the solution for nonlinear gas flow equation is obtained using the semianalytical technique developed by Kale and Mattar which solves the nonlinear equation by the method of perturbation. Results obtained, for prediction of pressure drawdown in gas reservoirs, indicate that the solution of the linearlized form of the equation is valid for both low and high permeability reservoirs.

  17. Sustained intraocular pressure reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%

    PubMed Central

    Dubiner, Harvey B; Noecker, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to characterize intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction throughout the day with travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening. Methods The results of seven published, randomized clinical trials including at least one arm in which travoprost 0.004% was dosed once daily in the evening were integrated. Means (and standard deviations) of mean baseline and on-treatment IOP, as well as mean IOP reduction and mean percent IOP reduction at 0800, 1000, and 1600 hours at weeks 2 and 12 were calculated. Results From a mean baseline IOP ranging from 25.0 to 27.2 mmHg, mean IOP on treatment ranged from 17.4 to 18.8 mmHg across all visits and time points. Mean IOP reductions from baseline ranged from 7.6 to 8.4 mmHg across visits and time points, representing a mean IOP reduction of 30%. Results of the safety analysis were consistent with the results from the individual studies for travoprost ophthalmic solution 0.004%, with ocular hyperemia being the most common side effect. Conclusion Travoprost 0.004% dosed once daily in the evening provides sustained IOP reduction throughout the 24-hour dosing interval in subjects with ocular hypertension or open-angle glaucoma. No reduction of IOP-lowering efficacy was observed at the 1600-hour time point which approached the end of the dosing interval. PMID:22536047

  18. Potential Biomarker Peptides Associated with Acute Alcohol-Induced Reduction of Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ichiro; Marumo, Mikio; Nonaka, Daisuke; Shimomura, Tomoko; Eguchi, Ryoji; Lee, Lyang-Ja; Tanaka, Kenji; Hatake, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the peptides that are related to acute reduction of blood pressure after alcohol drinking. Venous blood was collected from male healthy volunteers before and after drinking white wine (3 ml/kg weight) containing 13% of ethanol. Peptidome analysis for serum samples was performed using a new target plate, BLOTCHIP®. Alcohol caused significant decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min. The peptidome analysis showed that the levels of three peptides of m/z 1467, 2380 and 2662 changed significantly after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2662 peptides were identified to be fragments of fibrinogen alpha chain, and the m/z 2380 peptide was identified to be a fragment of complement C4. The intensities of the m/z 2380 and m/z 1467 peptides before drinking were associated with % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels at 45 min after drinking compared with the levels before drinking, while there were no significant correlations between the intensity of the m/z 2662 peptide and % decreases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels after drinking. The m/z 1467 and 2380 peptides are suggested to be markers for acute reduction of blood pressure after drinking alcohol. PMID:26815288

  19. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  20. Quantifying the Reduction Intensity of Handaxes with 3D Technology: A Pilot Study on Handaxes in the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region, Central China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Kuman, Kathleen; Li, Chaorong

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to analyzing the reduction intensity of handaxes with the aid of 3D scanning technology. Two quantitative reduction indices, the Scar Density Index (SDI) and the Flaked Area Index (FAI), are applied to handaxes from the third terrace of the Danjiangkou Reservoir Region (DRR), central China, dated to the Middle Pleistocene. The results show that most of the DRR handaxes in this sample show moderate reduction, which also reflects a least-effort reduction strategy and a generally short use-life for these tools. Detailed examination of the DRR handaxes by sector reveals that the tips generally show the most reduction, while the bases show the least shaping, with cortex often preserved on the base to facilitate handling. While western Acheulean assemblages in this regard are variable, there are many examples of handaxes of varying age with trimming of the bases. We also found no significant differences in the levels of reduction between the two main raw materials, quartz phyllite and trachyte. However, the type of blank used (large flakes versus cobbles) and the type of shaping (bifacial, partly bifacial and unifacial) do play a significant role in the reduction intensity of the DRR handaxes. Finally, a small number of handaxes from the younger (the early Late Pleistocene) second terrace of the DRR was compared with those from the third terrace. The results indicate that there is no technological change in the reduction intensity through time in these two DRR terraces. PMID:26331954

  1. Treating hypertensive emergencies. Controlled reduction of blood pressure and protection of target organs.

    PubMed

    Prisant, L M; Carr, A A; Hawkins, D W

    1993-02-01

    Diastolic blood pressure of 120 mm Hg or more is often cited as identifying a hypertensive crisis. However, the absolute level of blood pressure may not be as important as the rate of increase. One important feature that distinguishes hypertensive emergency from hypertensive "urgency" is the ongoing vascular damage that occurs with hypertensive emergency. When this is present, therapy should be initiated as soon as possible. The initial goal is to reduce mean arterial pressure about 15% to 25% within the first 48 hours. Overzealous or uncontrolled reduction in blood pressure may result in coma, stroke, myocardial infarction, acute renal failure, or death. Thus, a drug with titratable dosing (eg, intravenous nitroprusside sodium [Nipride, Nitropress]) is preferred in most situations. Patients with hypertensive urgency do not have evidence of vascular damage. Usually, they are asymptomatic, have no retinal lesions, and have a marked elevation in diastolic blood pressure. Hypertensive urgency does not require immediate normalization of blood pressure, but initiation of therapy and careful follow-up are critical. PMID:8433961

  2. Thermal conductivity reduction of crystalline silicon by high-pressure torsion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We report a dramatic and irreversible reduction in the lattice thermal conductivity of bulk crystalline silicon when subjected to intense plastic strain under a pressure of 24 GPa using high-pressure torsion (HPT). Thermal conductivity of the HPT-processed samples were measured using picosecond time domain thermoreflectance. Thermal conductivity measurements show that the HPT-processed samples have a lattice thermal conductivity reduction by a factor of approximately 20 (from intrinsic single crystalline value of 142 Wm−1 K−1 to approximately 7.6 Wm−1 K−1). Thermal conductivity reduction in HPT-processed silicon is attributed to the formation of nanograin boundaries and metastable Si-III/XII phases which act as phonon scattering sites, and because of a large density of lattice defects introduced by HPT processing. Annealing the samples at 873 K increases the thermal conductivity due to the reduction in the density of secondary phases and lattice defects. PMID:25024687

  3. Aortic pressure reduction redistributes transmural blood flow in dog left ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Smolich, J.J.; Weissberg, P.L.; Broughton, A.; Korner, P.I. )

    1988-02-01

    The authors studied the effect of graded aortic blood pressure reduction on left ventricular (LV) blood flow in anesthetized, autonomically blocked, open-chest dogs at constant heart rate and mean left atrial pressure. Aortic diastolic pressure (ADP) was lowered from rest to 90, 75, and 60 mmHg with an arteriovenous fistula. Global and regional LV blood flow was measured with radioactive microspheres. Mean LV blood flow fell stepwise from 145 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at rest to 116 ml {center dot} min{sup {minus}1} {center dot} 100 g{sup {minus}1} at ADP of 60 mmHg, whereas the endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio decreased from 1.20 to 084. The transmural redistribution of LV blood flow was not accompanied by increases in LV oxygen extraction, depression of LV contractility, LV dilatation or LV electrical dysfunction and also occurred in the presence of considerable coronary vasodilator flow reserve. Electrical evidence of subendocardial ischemia appeared at ADP of 32 mmHg and an endocardial-to-epicardial flow ratio of 0.41 in a subgroup of animals. They conclude that the redistribution of LV flow during moderate aortic pressure reduction was an appropriate physiological adjustment to uneven transmural alterations in regional LV wall stress and that it preceded a more pronounced redistribution evident with myocardial ischemia.

  4. Drag-Reduction Effectiveness of Riblet Films in Adverse Pressure Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boomsma, Aaron; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2013-11-01

    Riblet films are micro-grooved structures that are widely known to passively reduce skin friction. Past studies have almost solely focused on riblet performance in channel-flows. However, possible applications of riblets include wind turbine blades, gas turbine blades, and other complex bodies that are exposed to non-zero pressure gradient flows--specifically adverse pressure gradients. We use high-resolution large eddy simulations of turbulent flow over three-dimensional riblets under an adverse pressure gradient. We analyze the computed results to quantify drag reduction effectiveness for different riblet shapes and to examine pertinent turbulent structures to gain a fundamental understanding of riblet performance. Supported by the DOE Wind Energy Consortium

  5. Force reduction induced by unidirectional transversal muscle loading is independent of local pressure.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Tobias; Rode, Christian; Till, Olaf; Stutzig, Norman; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2016-05-01

    Transversal unidirectional compression applied to muscles via external loading affects muscle contraction dynamics in the longitudinal direction. A recent study reported decreasing longitudinal muscle forces with increasing transversal load applied with a constant contact area (i.e., leading to a simultaneous increase in local pressure). To shed light on these results, we examine whether the decrease in longitudinal force depends on the load, the local pressure, or both. To this end, we perform isometric experiments on rat M. gastrocnemius medialis without and with transversal loading (i) changing the local pressure from 1.1-3.2Ncm(-2) (n=9) at a constant transversal load (1.62N) and (ii) increasing the transversal load (1.15-3.45N) at a constant local pressure of 2.3Ncm(-2) (n=7). While we did not note changes in the decrease in longitudinal muscle force in the first experiment, the second experiment resulted in an almost-linear reduction of longitudinal force between 7.5±0.6% and 14.1±1.7%. We conclude that the observed longitudinal force reduction is not induced by local effects such as malfunction of single muscle compartments, but that similar internal stress conditions and myofilament configurations occur when the local pressure changes given a constant load. The decreased longitudinal force may be explained by increased internal pressure and a deformed myofilament lattice that is likely associated with the decomposition of cross-bridge forces on the one hand and the inhibition of cross-bridges on the other hand. PMID:26976226

  6. Comparison of foot orthoses made by podiatrists, pedorthists and orthotists regarding plantar pressure reduction in The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Guldemond, Nick A; Leffers, Pieter; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Sanders, Antal P; Nieman, Fred HM; Walenkamp, Geert HIM

    2005-01-01

    Background There is a need for evidence of clinical effectiveness of foot orthosis therapy. This study evaluated the effect of foot orthoses made by ten podiatrists, ten pedorthists and eleven orthotists on plantar pressure and walking convenience for three patients with metatarsalgia. Aims were to assess differences and variability between and within the disciplines. The relationship between the importance of pressure reduction and the effect on peak pressure was also evaluated. Methods Each therapist examined all three patients and was asked to rate the 'importance of pressure reduction' through a visual analogue scale. The orthoses were evaluated twice in two sessions while the patient walked on a treadmill. Plantar pressures were recorded with an in-sole measuring system. Patients scored walking convenience per orthosis. The effects of the orthoses on peak pressure reduction were calculated for the whole plantar surface of the forefoot and six regions: big toe and metatarsal one to five. Results Within each discipline there was an extensive variation in construction of the orthoses and achieved peak pressure reductions. Pedorthists and orthotists achieved greater maximal peak pressure reductions calculated over the whole forefoot than podiatrists: 960, 1020 and 750 kPa, respectively (p < .001). This was also true for the effect in the regions with the highest baseline peak pressures and walking convenience rated by patients A and B. There was a weak relationship between the 'importance of pressure reduction' and the achieved pressure reduction for orthotists, but no relationship for podiatrists and pedorthotists. Conclusion The large variation for various aspects of foot orthoses therapy raises questions about a consistent use of concepts for pressures management within the professional groups. PMID:16368005

  7. Reduction in Cerebral Oxygenation After Prolonged Exercise in Hypoxia is Related to Changes in Blood Pressure.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Masahiro; Dobashi, Shohei; Kiuchi, Masataka; Endo, Junko; Koyama, Katsuhiro; Subudhi, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the relation between blood pressure and cerebral oxygenation (COX) immediately after exercise in ten healthy males. Subjects completed an exercise and recovery protocol while breathing either 21% (normoxia) or 14.1% (hypoxia) O2 in a randomized order. Each exercise session included four sets of cycling (30 min/set, 15 min rest) at 50% of altitude-adjusted peak oxygen uptake, followed by 60 min of recovery. After exercise, mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87±1 vs. 84±1 mmHg, average values across the recovery period) and COX (68±1% vs. 58±1%) were lower in hypoxia compared to normoxia (P<0.001). Changes in MAP and COX were correlated during the recovery period in hypoxia (r=0.568, P<0.001) but not during normoxia (r=0.028, not significant). These results demonstrate that reductions in blood pressure following exercise in hypoxia are (1) more pronounced than in normoxia, and (2) associated with reductions in COX. Together, these results suggest an impairment in cerebral autoregulation as COX followed changes in MAP more passively in hypoxia than in normoxia. These findings could help explain the increased risk for postexercise syncope at high altitude. PMID:26782200

  8. Improvement in diastolic intraventricular pressure gradients in patients with HOCM after ethanol septal reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rovner, Aleksandr; Smith, Rebecca; Greenberg, Neil L.; Tuzcu, E. Murat; Smedira, Nicholas; Lever, Harry M.; Thomas, James D.; Garcia, Mario J.

    2003-01-01

    We sought to validate measurement of intraventricular pressure gradients (IVPG) and analyze their change in patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) after ethanol septal reduction (ESR). Quantitative analysis of color M-mode Doppler (CMM) images may be used to estimate diastolic IVPG noninvasively. Noninvasive IVPG measurement was validated in 10 patients undergoing surgical myectomy. Echocardiograms were then analyzed in 19 patients at baseline and after ESR. Pulsed Doppler data through the mitral valve and pulmonary venous flow were obtained. CMM was used to obtain the flow propagation velocity (Vp) and to calculate IVPG off-line. Left atrial pressure was estimated with the use of previously validated Doppler equations. Data were compared before and after ESR. CMM-derived IVPG correlated well with invasive measurements obtained before and after surgical myectomy [r = 0.8, P < 0.01, Delta(CMM - invasive IVPG) = 0.09 +/- 0.45 mmHg]. ESR resulted in a decrease of resting LVOT systolic gradient from 62 +/- 10 to 29 +/- 5 mmHg (P < 0.001). There was a significant increase in the Vp and IVPG (from 48 +/- 5to 74 +/- 7 cm/s and from 1.5 +/- 0.2 to 2.6 +/- 0.3 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.001 for both). Estimated left atrial pressure decreased from 16.2 +/- 1.1 to 11.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg (P < 0.001). The increase in IVPG correlated with the reduction in the LVOT gradient (r = 0.6, P < 0.01). Reduction of LVOT obstruction after ESR is associated with an improvement in diastolic suction force. Noninvasive measurements of IVPG may be used as an indicator of diastolic function improvement in HOCM.

  9. Blood pressure reduction by CCl/sub 4/ in the spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Loyke, H.F.

    1988-07-01

    It has been established that the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) presents an experimental model whose pathogenesis resembles that of essential hypertension in man. A great advantage of this model is that the entire life history of this disease is compressed within a time frame of two years. Many antihypertensive agents have been found effective in reducing blood pressure in SHR animals. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl/sub 4/) treatment has resulted in blood pressure reduction and subsequent elevation after discontinuing treatment in Grollman renal hypertensive rats and in endocrine hypertensive rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR), could be modified by CCl/sub 4/ treatment and to evaluate its effects on kidney and liver tissue.

  10. Cardiac contractile dysfunction during mild coronary flow reductions is due to an altered calcium-pressure relationship in rat hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo, V M; Brandes, R; Weiner, M W; Massie, B M; Camacho, S A

    1992-01-01

    Coronary artery stenosis or occlusion results in reduced coronary flow and myocardial contractile depression. At severe flow reductions, increased inorganic phosphate (Pi) and intracellular acidosis clearly play a role in contractile depression. However, during milder flow reductions the mechanism(s) underlying contractile depression are less clear. Previous perfused heart studies demonstrated no change of Pi or pH during mild flow reductions, suggesting that changes of intravascular pressure (garden hose effect) may be the mediator of this contractile depression. Others have reported conflicting results regarding another possible mediator of contractility, the cytosolic free calcium (Cai). To examine the respective roles of Cai, Pi, pH, and vascular pressure in regulating contractility during mild flow reductions, Indo-1 calcium fluorescence and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements were performed on Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Cai and diastolic calcium levels did not change during flow reductions to 50% of control. Pi demonstrated a close relationship with developed pressure and significantly increased from 2.5 +/- 0.3 to 4.2 +/- 0.4 mumol/g dry weight during a 25% flow reduction. pH was unchanged until a 50% flow reduction. Increasing vascular pressure to superphysiological levels resulted in further increases of developed pressure, with no change in Cai. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that during mild coronary flow reductions, contractile depression is mediated by an altered relationship between Cai and pressure, rather than by decreased Cai. Furthermore, increased Pi and decreased intravascular pressure may be responsible for this altered calcium-pressure relationship during mild coronary flow reductions. PMID:1430205

  11. Stress Reduction Programs in Patients with Elevated Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rainforth, Maxwell V.; Schneider, Robert H.; Nidich, Sanford I.; Gaylord-King, Carolyn; Salerno, John W.; Anderson, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Substantial evidence indicates that psychosocial stress contributes to hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Previous meta-analyses of stress reduction and high blood pressure (BP) were outdated and/or methodologically limited. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review of the published literature and identified 107 studies on stress reduction and BP. Seventeen trials with 23 treatment comparisons and 960 participants with elevated BP met criteria for well-designed randomized controlled trials and were replicated within intervention categories. Meta-analysis was used to calculate BP changes for biofeedback, −0.8/−2.0 mm Hg (P = NS); relaxation-assisted biofeedback, +4.3/+2.4 mm Hg (P = NS); progressive muscle relaxation, −1.9/−1.4 mm Hg (P = NS); stress management training, −2.3/−1.3 mm (P = NS); and the Transcendental Meditation program, −5.0/−2.8 mm Hg (P = 0.002/0.02). Available evidence indicates that among stress reduction approaches, the Transcendental Meditation program is associated with significant reductions in BP. Related data suggest improvements in other CVD risk factors and clinical outcomes. PMID:18350109

  12. Pore Characterization of Shale Rock and Shale Interaction with Fluids at Reservoir Pressure-Temperature Conditions Using Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, M.; Hjelm, R.; Watkins, E.; Xu, H.; Pawar, R.

    2015-12-01

    Oil/gas produced from unconventional reservoirs has become strategically important for the US domestic energy independence. In unconventional realm, hydrocarbons are generated and stored in nanopores media ranging from a few to hundreds of nanometers. Fundamental knowledge of coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes that control fluid flow and propagation within nano-pore confinement is critical for maximizing unconventional oil/gas production. The size and confinement of the nanometer pores creates many complex rock-fluid interface interactions. It is imperative to promote innovative experimental studies to decipher physical and chemical processes at the nanopore scale that govern hydrocarbon generation and mass transport of hydrocarbon mixtures in tight shale and other low permeability formations at reservoir pressure-temperature conditions. We have carried out laboratory investigations exploring quantitative relationship between pore characteristics of the Wolfcamp shale from Western Texas and the shale interaction with fluids at reservoir P-T conditions using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). We have performed SANS measurements of the shale rock in single fluid (e.g., H2O and D2O) and multifluid (CH4/(30% H2O+70% D2O)) systems at various pressures up to 20000 psi and temperature up to 150 oF. Figure 1 shows our SANS data at different pressures with H2O as the pressure medium. Our data analysis using IRENA software suggests that the principal changes of pore volume in the shale occurred on smaller than 50 nm pores and pressure at 5000 psi (Figure 2). Our results also suggest that with increasing P, more water flows into pores; with decreasing P, water is retained in the pores.

  13. Reduction of the bulk modulus at high pressure in CrN.

    PubMed

    Rivadulla, Francisco; Bañobre-López, Manuel; Quintela, Camilo X; Piñeiro, Alberto; Pardo, Victor; Baldomir, Daniel; López-Quintela, Manuel Arturo; Rivas, José; Ramos, Carlos A; Salva, Horacio; Zhou, Jian-Shi; Goodenough, John B

    2009-12-01

    Nitride coatings are increasingly demanded in the cutting- and machining-tool industry owing to their hardness, thermal stability and resistance to corrosion. These properties derive from strongly covalent bonds; understanding the bonding is a requirement for the design of superhard materials with improved capabilities. Here, we report a pressure-induced cubic-to-orthorhombic transition at approximately 1 GPa in CrN. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and ab initio calculations show an unexpected reduction of the bulk modulus, K0, of about 25% in the high-pressure (lower volume) phase. Our combined theoretical and experimental approach shows that this effect is the result of a large exchange striction due to the approach of the localized Cr:t3 electrons to becoming molecular-orbital electrons in Cr-Cr bonds. The softening of CrN under pressure is a manifestation of a strong competition between different types of chemical bond that are found at a crossover from a localized to a molecular-orbital electronic transition. PMID:19855384

  14. Reduction in Mitral Regurgitation During Therapy Guided by Measured Filling Pressures in the ESCAPE Trial

    PubMed Central

    Palardy, Maryse; Stevenson, Lynne W.; Tasissa, Gudaye; Hamilton, Michele A.; Bourge, Robert C.; DiSalvo, Thomas G.; Elkayam, Uri; Hill, James A.; Reimold, Sharon C.

    2009-01-01

    Background Dynamic mitral regurgitation (MR) contributes to decompensation in chronic dilated heart failure. Reduction of MR was the primary physiologic endpoint in the ESCAPE trial, which compared acute therapy guided by JVP, edema, and weight (CLIN) to therapy guided additionally by pulmonary artery catheters (PAC) toward pulmonary wedge pressure ≤15 and right atrial pressure ≤8 mmHg. Methods and Results Patients were randomized to PAC or CLIN during hospitalization with chronic HF and mean LVEF 20%, and at least 1 symptom and 1 sign of congestion. MR and mitral flow patterns, measured blinded to therapy and timepoint, were available at baseline and discharge in 133 patients, and at 3 months in 104 patients. Changes in MR and related transmitral flow patterns were compared between PAC and CLIN patients. Jugular venous pressure, edema, and weights decreased similarly during therapy in the hospital for both groups. In PAC but not in CLIN patients, MR jet area, MR/LAA ratio, and E velocity were each significantly reduced and deceleration time increased by discharge. By 3 months, patients had clinical evidence of increased JVP, edema, and weight since discharge, reaching significance in the PAC arm, and the change in MR was no longer different between the 2 groups, although the change in E velocity remained greater in PAC patients. Conclusions During hospitalization, therapy guided by PAC to reduce left-sided pressures improved MR and related filling patterns more than therapy guided clinically by evidence of systemic venous congestion. This early reduction did not translate into improved outcomes out of the hospital, where volume status reverted toward baseline. PMID:19808338

  15. Pressurized magma reservoir within the east rift zone of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i: Evidence for relaxed stress changes from the 1975 Kalapana earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Scott; Amelung, Falk

    2015-03-01

    We use 2000-2012 InSAR data from multiple satellites to investigate magma storage in Kīlauea's east rift zone (ERZ). The study period includes a surge in magma supply rate and intrusion-eruptions in 2007 and 2011. The Kupaianaha area inflated by ~5 cm prior to the 2007 intrusion and the Nāpau Crater area by ~10 cm following the 2011 intrusion. For the Nāpau Crater area, elastic modeling suggests an inflation source at 5 ± 2 km depth or more below sea level. The reservoir is located in the deeper section of the rift zone for which secular magma intrusion was inferred for the period following the 1975 Mw7.7 décollement earthquake. Reservoir pressurization suggests that in this section of the ERZ, extensional stress changes due to the earthquake have largely been compensated for and that this section is approaching its pre-1975 state. Reservoir pressurization also puts the molten core model into question for this section of Kīlauea's rift zone.

  16. Evolution of pore-fluid pressure during folding and basin contraction in overpressured reservoirs assessed by combined fracture analysis and calcite twinning paleopiezometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, Nicolas; Lacombe, Olivier; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Amrouch, Khalid; Daniel, Jean-Marc

    2014-05-01

    Reconstructing the evolution of paleofluid (over)pressure in sedimentary basins during deformation is a challenging problem, especially when no hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions are available to provide barometric constraints on the fluid system. This contribution reports the application to a natural case (the Bighorn Basin) of recent methodological advance to access fluid (over)pressure level prevailing in strata during sub-seismic fracture development. The fluid pressure evolution in the Mississippian-Permian Madison-Phosphoria carbonate reservoir is tentatively reconstructed from the early Sevier Layer Parallel Shortening to the Laramide folding in two basement-cored folds: the Sheep Mountain Anticline and the Rattlesnake Mountain Anticline, located on both edges of the Bighorn Basin. This reconstruction is based on a combination of stress inversion of fault slip data, calcite twins paleopiezometry and rock mechanics. Results point out that supra-hydrostatic pressure values prevail in the carbonate reservoir during most of its whole Sevier-Laramide history, and a coeval evolution between fluid overpressure and differential stress build-up is also emphasized. In each fold, a maximum value of 30-35 MPa for overpressure (i.e. above hydrostatic value) is recorded, just before Laramide folding, while minimum values of 0 MPa or 7 MPa are recorded during Sevier foreland flexure/forebulge and Laramide folding, respectively. After normalization to the same depth for both folds of differential stress magnitudes obtained from calcite twins paleopiezometry, the reconstructed values for the two folds can be compared and this comparison provides an image of the evolution fluid pressure levels at the basin scale. Until folding, the evolution of the fluid overpressure during deformation can be interpreted as reflecting large-scale fluid migrations in a laterally connected reservoir. The drop of fluid overpressure recorded in both folds during folding illustrates the

  17. The influence of a rapid drawdown and prolonged dewatering on angling pressure, catch and harvest in a Nebraska reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeBoer, Jason A.; Webber, Christa M.; Dixon, Taylor A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Reservoirs can be dynamic systems, often prone to unpredictable and extreme water-level fluctuations, and can be environments where survival is difficult for zooplankton and larval fish. Although numerous studies have examined the effects of extreme reservoir drawdown on water quality, few have examined extreme drawdown on both abiotic and biotic characteristics. A fissure in the dam at Red Willow Reservoir in southwest Nebraska necessitated an extreme drawdown; the water level was lowered more than 6 m during a two-month period, reducing reservoir volume by 76%. During the subsequent low-water period (i.e., post-drawdown), spring sampling (April–June) showed dissolved oxygen concentration was lower, while turbidity and chlorophyll-a concentration were greater, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Additionally, there was an overall increase in zooplankton density, although there were differences among taxa, and changes in mean size among taxa, relative to pre-drawdown conditions. Zooplankton assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 19.3% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. The ratio of zero to non-zero catches was greater post-drawdown for larval common carp and for all larval fishes combined, whereas we observed no difference for larval gizzard shad. Larval fish assemblage composition had an average dissimilarity of 39.7% from pre-drawdown to post-drawdown. Given the likelihood that other dams will need repair or replacement in the near future, it is imperative for effective reservoir management that we anticipate the likely abiotic and biotic responses of reservoir ecosystems as these management actions will continue to alter environmental conditions in reservoirs.

  18. High-Pressure Micellar Solutions of Polystyrene-block-Polybutadiene and Polystyrene-block-Polyisoprene Solutions in Propane Exhibit Cloud-Pressure Reduction and Distinct Micellization End Points

    SciTech Connect

    Winoto, Winoto; Radosz, Maciej; Tan, Sugata; Hong, Kunlun; Mays, Jimmy

    2009-01-01

    Micellar solutions of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene and polystyrene-block-polyisoprene in propane are found to exhibit significantly lower cloud pressures than the corresponding hypothetical non-micellar solutions. Such a cloud-pressure reduction indicates the extent to which micelle formation enhances the apparent diblock solubility in near-critical and hence compressible propane. Pressure-temperature points beyond which no micelles can be formed, referred to as the micellization end points, are found to depend on the block type, size and ratio, and on the polymer concentration. For a given pressure, the micellization end-point temperature corresponds to the "critical micelle temperature." The cloud-pressure reduction and the micellization end point measured for styrene-diene diblocks in propane should be characteristic of all amphiphilic diblock copolymer solutions that form micelles in compressible solvents.

  19. Reply to ‘Comment on “The analysis of horizontal well pressure behavior in fractured low permeability reservoirs with consideration of the threshold pressure gradient”’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Long

    2014-06-01

    In his recent comment on our previously published paper (Zhao et al 2013 J. Geophys. Eng. 10 035014), which outlined a mathematical model for the analysis of the pressure behavior of a horizontal well in naturally fractured low permeability reservoirs with a TPG (Lu 2014 J. Geophys. Eng. 11 038001) suggested that there were several errors in it. We thank the author for his careful review, and here we address his concerns.

  20. Clinically meaningful blood pressure reductions with low intensity isometric handgrip exercise. A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Hess, N Cl; Carlson, D J; Inder, J D; Jesulola, E; McFarlane, J R; Smart, N A

    2016-07-18

    There exists no examination of what is the minimum anti-hypertensive threshold intensity for isometric exercise training. Twenty two normotensive participants were randomly assigned to training intensities at either 5 % or 10 % of their maximal contraction. Twenty participants completed the study. Clinical meaningful, but not statistically significant, reductions in systolic blood pressure were observed in both 5 % and 10 % groups -4.04 mm Hg (95 % CI -8.67 to +0.59, p=0.08) and -5.62 mm Hg (95 % CI -11.5 to +0.29, p=0.06) respectively after 6 weeks training. No diastolic blood pressure reductions were observed in either 5 % -0.97 mm Hg (95 % CI -2.56 to +0.62, p=0.20) or 10 % MVC +1.8 mm Hg (95 % CI -1.29 to +4.89, p=0.22) groups respectively after training. In those unable to complete isometric exercise at the traditional 30 % intensity, our results suggest there is no difference between 5 and 10 % groups and based on the principle of regression to the mean, this could mean both interventions induce a similar placebo-effect. PMID:27070747

  1. Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) Pressurized Fuselage Modeling, Analysis, and Design for Weight Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interim progress for an in-house study that is directed toward innovative structural analysis and design of next-generation advanced aircraft concepts, such as the Hybrid Wing-Body (HWB) and the Advanced Mobility Concept-X flight vehicles, for structural weight reduction and associated performance enhancement. Unlike the conventional, skin-stringer-frame construction for a cylindrical fuselage, the box-type pressurized fuselage panels in the HWB undergo significant deformation of the outer aerodynamic surfaces, which must be minimized without significant structural weight penalty. Simple beam and orthotropic plate theory is first considered for sizing, analytical verification, and possible equivalent-plate analysis with appropriate simplification. By designing advanced composite stiffened-shell configurations, significant weight reduction may be possible compared with the sandwich and ribbed-shell structural concepts that have been studied previously. The study involves independent analysis of the advanced composite structural concepts that are presently being developed by The Boeing Company for pressurized HWB flight vehicles. High-fidelity parametric finite-element models of test coupons, panels, and multibay fuselage sections, were developed for conducting design studies and identifying critical areas of potential failure. Interim results are discussed to assess the overall weight/strength advantages.

  2. Reservoir Characterization and CO2 Plume Migration Modeling Based on Bottom-hole Pressure Data: An Example from the AEP Mountaineer Geological Storage Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Srikanta; Kelley, Mark; Oruganti, YagnaDeepika; Bhattacharya, Indra; Spitznogle, Gary

    2014-05-01

    We present an integrated approach for formation permeability estimation, front tracking, reservoir model calibration, and plume migration modeling based on injection rate and down-hole pressure data from CO2 geologic sequestration projects. The data are taken from the 20 MW CO2 capture and storage project at American Electric Power's Mountaineer Plant in West Virginia, USA. The Mountaineer CO2 injection system consists of two injection wells - one in the Copper Ridge Dolomite formation and one in the Rose Run sandstone formation, and three deep observation wells that were operational between October 2009 and May 2011. Approximately 27000 MT and 10000 MT were injected into the Copper Ridge dolomite formation and Rose Run sandstone formation, respectively. A wealth of pressure and rate data from injection and observation wells is available covering a series of injection and pressure falloff events. The methodology developed and applied for interpreting and integrating the data during reservoir analysis and modeling from the Rose Run formation is the subject of this paper. For the analysis of transient pressure data at the injection and observation wells, the CO2 storage reservoir is conceptualized as a radial composite system, where the inner (invaded) zone consists of both supercritical CO2 and brine, and the outer (uninvaded) zone consists of undisturbed brine. Using established analytical solutions for analyzing fluid injection problems in the petroleum reservoir engineering literature, we show how the late-time pressure derivative response from both injection and observation wells will be identical - reflecting the permeability-thickness product of the undisturbed brine-filled formation. We also show how the expanding CO2 plume affects the "effective" compressibility that can be estimated by history matching injection-falloff data and how this can be used to develop a relationship between the plume radius and "effective" compressibility. This provides a novel non

  3. Sweat loss during heat stress contributes to subsequent reductions in lower-body negative pressure tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Ganio, Matthew S.; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G.

    2016-01-01

    The contribution of sweating to heat stress-induced reductions in haemorrhagic tolerance is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that fluid loss due to sweating contributes to reductions in simulated haemorrhagic tolerance in conditions of heat stress. Eight subjects (35 ± 8 years old; 77 ± 5 kg) underwent a normothermic time control and two heat stress trials (randomized). The two heat stress trials were as follows: (i) with slow intravenous infusion of lactated Ringer solution sufficient to offset sweat loss (IV trial); or (ii) without intravenous infusion (dehydration; DEH trial). Haemorrhage was simulated via progressive lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) to presyncope after core body (intestinal) temperature was raised by ~1.5°C using a water-perfused suit or a normothermic time control period. The LBNP tolerance was quantified via a cumulative stress index. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity (transcranial Doppler) and mean blood pressure (Finometer®) were measured continuously. Relative changes in plasma volume were calculated from haematocrit and haemoglobin. Increases in core body temperature and sweat loss (~1.6% body mass deficit) were similar (P > 0.05) between heat stress trials. Slow intravenous infusion (1.2 ± 0.3 litres) prevented heat-induced reductions in plasma volume (IV trial, −0.6 ± 6.1%; and DEH trial, −6.6 ± 5.1%; P = 0.01). Intravenous infusion improved LBNP tolerance (632 ± 64 mmHg min) by ~20% when compared with the DEH trial (407 ± 117 mmHg min; P = 0.01), yet tolerance remained 44% lower in the IV trial relative to the time control normothermic trial (1138 ± 183 mmHg min; P < 0.01). These data indicate that although sweat-induced dehydration impairs simulated haemorrhagic tolerance, this impairment is secondary to the negative impact of heat stress itself. PMID:22872657

  4. Veins in Paleo-reservoir as a Natural Indication of Coupled Changes in Pore Pressure and Stress, Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwon, S.; Edwards, P.; Kim, Y. S.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrofracturing associated with elevated fluid pressure coupled with changes in stress has been crucial in enhancing the production and recovery of hydrocarbons. Furthermore, it is also an important issue to access the efficiency and stability of long-term CO2 geologic storage reservoirs. Veins are mineral-filled extension fractures developed along the plane of σ1-σ2 and perpendicular to σ3, and the fluid pressure must exceed σ3applied to the plane when the vein opens. Therefore, vein is a well-known natural analogue for fluid migration in a paleo-reservoir. In the Salt Wash Graben of SE Utah, CO2-charged vein systems hosted in the bleached Entrada Formation are well developed and examined to understand the conditions of fluid pressure and stress during the injections of CO2-charged fluid. Based on color and relative cross-cutting relationship in the field, veins are subdivided into two sets; sub-vertical black mineral-rich veins and orthogonal calcite veins that have previously been described as 'grid-lock fractures'. The vein distribution and fluid leakage along through-going fractures in mechanic units allow us to determine the stress regime and driving stress condition through 3D-Mohr circle reconstruction. The results of this statistical analysis for the veins show that the orthogonal veins indicate a 'stress transition' with maximum principal stress direction changing from vertical to NNW-SSE sub-horizontal which coincides with the current regional stress regime. The possible causes of the stress transition can be considered. The process of repeated sealing, reactivation and localization of veins within the bleached zone is a natural indication of a coupled change in pore pressure and stress in the reservoir. Thus, an understanding of the effect of stress changes due to the volumetric injection of CO2 in the subsurface as well as a knowledge of how pre-existing fractures affect fluid flow with respect to elevated pore pressures in layered rocks are

  5. Compaction of North-sea chalk by pore-failure and pressure solution in a producing reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Daniel; Dysthe, Dag; Jamtveit, Bjorn

    2016-02-01

    The Ekofisk field, Norwegian North sea,is an example of compacting chalk reservoir with considerable subsequent seafloor subsidence due to petroleum production. Previously, a number of models were created to predict the compaction using different phenomenological approaches. Here we present a different approach, we use a new creep model based on microscopic mechanisms with no fitting parameters to predict strain rate at core scale and at reservoir scale. The model is able to reproduce creep experiments and the magnitude of the observed subsidence making it the first microstructural model which can explain the Ekofisk compaction.

  6. Blood Pressure Reduction, Decreased Diffusion on MRI, and Outcomes After Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rajeev K; Liebling, Storm M; Maas, Matthew B; Nemeth, Alexander J; Russell, Eric J; Naidech, Andrew M

    2011-01-01

    Background Decreased diffusion (DD) consistent with acute ischemia may be detected on MRI after acute intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but its risk factors and impact on functional outcomes are not well defined. We tested the hypotheses that DD after ICH is related to acute blood pressure (BP) reduction and lower hemoglobin (HGB) and presages worse functional outcomes. Methods Patients who underwent MRI were prospectively evaluated for DD by certified neuroradiologists blinded to outcomes. HGB and BP data were obtained via electronic queries. Outcomes were obtained at 14 days and 3 months with the modified Rankin Scale (mRS), a functional scale scored from 0 (no symptoms) to 6 (dead). We used logistic regression for dependence or death (mRS 4 to 6). Results DD distinct from the hematoma was found on MRI in 36 of 95 patients (38%). DD was associated with greater BP reductions from baseline, and a higher risk of dependence or death at 3 months (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.7 – 13.9, P=0.004) after correction for ICH Score (1.8 per point, 95%CI 1.2–3.1, P=0.01). Lower HGB was associated with worse ICH score, larger hematoma volume and worse outcomes, but not DD. Conclusions DD is common after ICH, associated with greater acute BP reductions, and associated with disability and death at 3 months in multivariate analysis. The potential benefits of acute BP reduction to reduce hematoma growth may be limited by DD. The prevention and treatment of cerebral ischemia manifested as DD is a potential method to improve outcomes. PMID:21980211

  7. Weight and blood pressure reduction among participants engaged in a cancer awareness and prevention program

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Vivian L.; Dawkins, Norma L.; Howard, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives African–Americans consume a diet high in fat, salt and sugar; such dietary habits increase the risks of cancer and other chronic diseases. The objective of this study was to engage rural communities in a nutrition and physical activity behavior modification program to promote cancer awareness and risk reduction. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted to generate information for the development of a nutrition and physical activity program. African Americans (N = 62) from two rural counties (Bullock and Macon) in Alabama participated in a year-long intervention program in 2012 and 2013. Weight loss and blood pressure were evaluated to measure the impact of the intervention. Results Themes emerged for the focus group discussions were: nutrition, health, family, environment, and resource access. In Macon County participants lost weight irrespective of the exercise regimen, with those involved in floor exercise losing the most weight (− 22.4 lbs, or − 11.18% change), while in Bullock county walking was most effective in weight loss (6.1 lbs or − 3.40% change) p < 0.05. Systolic and diastolic pressure decreased from 5.3 to 10.5 mm Hg; − 2.0 to − 6.4 mm Hg, respectively, for Bullock county, except for the walking group. In Macon County, both systolic and diastolic pressure % change ranged from − 8.94 to 12.66 and − 5.34 to 12.66 mm Hg respectively, irrespective of physical activity respectively. Conclusion In this study, changes in weight lost and blood pressure were observed among individuals engaged in a nutrition education and physical activity program. PMID:26601053

  8. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, G.; Bao, J.; Hou, Z.; Fang, Y.; Ren, H.

    2013-12-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on pressure build-up and ground surface displacement and therefore risks of induced seismicity during CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the migration of injected CO2 and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 12 other parameters describing hydrogeological properties of subsurface formations, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, pore-size index, Young's modulus, and Poisson's ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 13 input parameters. For the investigated two-dimensional cases, reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most signifi cant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection, such as injection pressure and ground surface uplift. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations.

  9. Capillary pressure-saturation relations for supercritical CO2 and brine in limestone/dolomite sands: implications for geologic carbon sequestration in carbonate reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shibo; Tokunaga, Tetsu K

    2015-06-16

    In geologic carbon sequestration, capillary pressure (Pc)-saturation (Sw) relations are needed to predict reservoir processes. Capillarity and its hysteresis have been extensively studied in oil-water and gas-water systems, but few measurements have been reported for supercritical (sc) CO2-water. Here, Pc-Sw relations of scCO2 displacing brine (drainage), and brine rewetting (imbibition) were studied to understand CO2 transport and trapping behavior under reservoir conditions. Hysteretic drainage and imbibition Pc-Sw curves were measured in limestone sands at 45 °C under elevated pressures (8.5 and 12.0 MPa) for scCO2-brine, and in limestone and dolomite sands at 23 °C (0.1 MPa) for air-brine using a new computer programmed porous plate apparatus. scCO2-brine drainage and imbibition curves shifted to lower Pc relative to predictions based on interfacial tension, and therefore deviated from capillary scaling predictions for hydrophilic interactions. Fitting universal scaled drainage and imbibition curves show that wettability alteration resulted from scCO2 exposure over the course of months-long experiments. Residual trapping of the nonwetting phases was determined at Pc = 0 during imbibition. Amounts of trapped scCO2 were significantly larger than for those for air, and increased with pressure (depth), initial scCO2 saturation, and time. These results have important implications for scCO2 distribution, trapping, and leakage potential. PMID:25945400

  10. The Research on Borehole Stability in Depleted Reservoir and Caprock: Using the Geophysics Logging Data

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Jingen; Luo, Yong; Guo, Shisheng; Zhang, Haishan; Tan, Qiang; Zhao, Kai; Hu, Lianbo

    2013-01-01

    Long-term oil and gas exploitation in reservoir will lead to pore pressure depletion. The pore pressure depletion will result in changes of horizontal in-situ stresses both in reservoirs and caprock formations. Using the geophysics logging data, the magnitude and orientation changes of horizontal stresses in caprock and reservoir are studied. Furthermore, the borehole stability can be affected by in-situ stresses changes. To address this issue, the dehydration from caprock to reservoir and roof effect of caprock are performed. Based on that, the influence scope and magnitude of horizontal stresses reduction in caprock above the depleted reservoirs are estimated. The effects of development on borehole stability in both reservoir and caprock are studied step by step with the above geomechanical model. PMID:24228021

  11. Generation of isotopically and compositionally distinct water during thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR) in carbonate reservoirs: Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Sichuan Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Lei; Worden, Richard H.; Cai, Chunfang

    2015-09-01

    Thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR), the reaction of petroleum with anhydrite in reservoirs resulting in the growth of calcite and the accumulation of H2S, has been documented in the Feixianguan Formation dolomite reservoir in the Sichuan Basin, China. Fluid inclusion salinity and homogenization temperature data have shown that TSR results in a decrease in salinity from a pre-TSR value of 25 wt.% down to 5 wt.% as a result of water created as a byproduct of progressive TSR. We have studied the isotopic character of the water that resulted from TSR in the Feixianguan Formation by analyzing the oxygen isotopes of TSR calcite and determining the oxygen isotopes of the water in equilibrium with the TSR calcite at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have compared these TSR-waters to water that would have been in equilibrium with the bulk rock, also at the temperatures determined by aqueous fluid inclusion analysis. We have found that the TSR-waters are relatively depleted in oxygen isotopes (by up to 8‰ compared to what would be expected at equilibrium between the bulk rock and water) since this type of water was specifically derived from anhydrite. The generation of relatively large volumes of low salinity, low δ18O water associated with advanced TSR in the Feixianguan Formation has also been reported in the Permian Khuff Formation in Abu Dhabi and from sour Devonian fields in the Western Canada Basin. This suggests that TSR-derived water may be a common phenomenon, the effects of which on mesogenetic secondary porosity and reservoir quality have previously been underappreciated.

  12. Brinzolamide nanocrystal formulations for ophthalmic delivery: reduction of elevated intraocular pressure in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tuomela, Annika; Liu, Peng; Puranen, Jooseppi; Rönkkö, Seppo; Laaksonen, Timo; Kalesnykas, Giedrius; Oksala, Olli; Ilkka, Jukka; Laru, Johanna; Järvinen, Kristiina; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2014-06-01

    Nanocrystal-based drug delivery systems provide important tools for ocular formulation development, especially when considering poorly soluble drugs. The objective of the study was to formulate ophthalmic, intraocular pressure (IOP) reducing, nanocrystal suspensions from a poorly soluble drug, brinzolamide (BRA), using a rapid wet milling technique, and to investigate their IOP reducing effect in vivo. Different stabilizers for the nanocrystals were screened (hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), poloxamer F127 and F68, polysorbate 80) and HPMC was found to be the only successful stabilizer. In order to investigate both the effect of an added absorption enhancer (polysorbate 80) and the impact of the free drug in the nanocrystal suspension, formulations in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.4 and pH 4.5 were prepared. Particle size, polydispersity (PI), solid state (DSC), morphology (SEM) as well as dissolution behavior and the uniformity of the formulations were characterized. There was rapid dissolution of BRA (in PBS pH 7.4) from all the nanocrystal formulations; after 1 min 100% of the drug was fully dissolved. The effect was significantly pronounced at pH 4.5, where the dissolved fraction of drug was the highest. The cytotoxicity of nanocrystal formulations to human corneal epithelial cell (HCE-T) viability was tested. The effects of the nanocrystal formulations and the commercial product on the cell viability were comparable. The intraocular pressure (IOP) lowering effect was investigated in vivo using a modern rat ocular hypertensive model and elevated IOP reduction was seen in vivo with all the formulations. Notably, the reduction achieved in experimentally elevated IOP was comparable to that obtained with a marketed product. In conclusion, various BRA nanocrystal formulations, which all showed advantageous dissolution and absorption behavior, were successfully formulated. PMID:24680962

  13. Development of Alternative Reductant Application in Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domae, Masafumi; Kawamura, Hirotaka; Ohira, Taku

    In primary coolant of pressurized water reactors, high concentration dissolved hydrogen (DH) has been added, to prevent generation of oxidizing species through radiolysis of the coolant. Recently, number of ageing plants is increasing and utilities are concerned about primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC). Some researchers consider that occurrence of PWSCC and crack propagation rate are affected by the DH concentration. The authors consider that one of possible mitigation methods toward PWSCC is use of alternative reductant in place of hydrogen. Because from the radiation chemical aspect aliphatic alcohols are typical scavengers of the oxidizing radical generated through the radiolysis of water, they are promising candidates of the alternative reductant. In the present work, possible alternatives of hydrogen were screened, and methanol was selected as the best candidate. Corrosion tests of type 304 stainless steels were carried out in high temperature water at 320°C without irradiation under two conditions: (1) DH 1.5 ppm (part per million) and (2) methanol 2.9 ppm. Electrochemical corrosion potential of the stainless steel specimens was measured during the immersion tests. After the immersion tests for 1500 h, surface morphology of the stainless steel specimens was observed by scanning probe microscope. Major component of the oxide film formed on the stainless steel specimens was analyzed by X-ray diffraction. From comparison of the test results, it is concluded that addition of 2.9 ppm methanol has almost the same effect on corrosion environment as DH 1.5 ppm addition.

  14. Reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia at atmospheric pressures over platinum polycrystalline foils as model catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, T.; Guczi, L.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1991-12-01

    The reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied using batch-mode and flow-mode measurements in partial pressure ranges of 70-660 Pa (0.5-5 Torr) on polycrystalline platinum foils over the temperature range of 373-633 K. The reaction products observed were nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water. Unimolecular decompositions of NO or NH{sub 3} were not detectable under these conditions, up to 773 K. The reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia occurred in the temperature range of 548-633 K. The Arrhenius curve of the reaction showed a break in the 563-603 K range, which was slightly dependent on the reactant concentrations. In this temperature range the reaction became oscillatory. The activation energies were 102 kJ/mol in the low-temperature and 212 kJ/mol in the high-temperature ranges, respectively. The product distribution was different in the two temperature regions; in the low-temperature range the n{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O ratio was close to 1, while in the high-temperature regime N{sub 2} formation was dominant, and the previously formed N{sub 2}O was consumed as well.

  15. Reservoir management applications to oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.D.; Ouenes, A.; Weiss, W.W.; Chawathe, A.

    1996-02-01

    Winnipegosis and Red River oil production in the Bainville North Field in Roosevelt County, Montana began in 1979. The Red River is at 12,500 ft and one well is completed in the Nisku formation at 10,200 ft. This well produced 125,000 bbl from the Nisku during its first 41 months. Since operating conditions inhibit dual completions and Nisku wells cost $900,000, the need for a Nisku development plan is apparent. The size of the reservoir and optimum well density are the key unknowns. Recognizing the need for additional Nisku data, a 5000 acre 3-D seismic survey was processed and the results used to map the top of the Nisku. The reservoir thickness, porosity, and water saturation were known from the openhole logs at eight well locations on an average of 320 acres spacing. The thickness of the thin pay limited the seismic information to areal extent of reservoir depth. Static reservoir pressure from drillstem test was available at two wells. Additional reservoir pressure data in the form of transient tests were available at two wells. Under Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Ordering Agreement 9-XU3-0402J-1, the New Mexico Petroleum Recovery Research Center (PRRC) characterized the Nisku to develop a reservoir management plan. Nance Petroleum provided all available field and laboratory data for characterizing the Nisku formation. Due to sparse well coverage, and the lack of producing wells, the PRRC had to develop a new reservoir description approach to reach an acceptable characterization of the entire reservoir. This new approach relies on the simultaneous use of 3-D seismic and reservoir simulation to estimate key reservoir properties.

  16. Petroleum reservoir data for testing simulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, J.M.; Harrison, W.

    1980-09-01

    This report consists of reservoir pressure and production data for 25 petroleum reservoirs. Included are 5 data sets for single-phase (liquid) reservoirs, 1 data set for a single-phase (liquid) reservoir with pressure maintenance, 13 data sets for two-phase (liquid/gas) reservoirs and 6 for two-phase reservoirs with pressure maintenance. Also given are ancillary data for each reservoir that could be of value in the development and validation of simulation models. A bibliography is included that lists the publications from which the data were obtained.

  17. Pressure pyrolysed non-precious oxygen reduction catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallathambi, Vijayadurga

    2011-12-01

    Worldwide energy demand has driven long-term efforts towards developing a clean, hydrogen-based energy economy. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are low emissions and high efficiency devices that utilize the power of hydrogen and are a key enabling technology for the hydrogen economy. Carbon supported platinum-black is the state-of the art catalyst for oxygen reduction in a PEMFC because it can withstand the acidic environment. However, the high cost and low abundance of this precious metal has limited large-scale commercialization of PEMFCs. Current efforts focus on developing alternative inexpensive, non-noble metal-based catalysts for oxygen reduction with performance comparable to conventional platinum based electrocatalysts. In this work, inexpensive metal-nitrogen-carbon (MNC) catalysts have been synthesized by pyrolyzing transition metal and nitrogen precursors together with high surface area carbon materials in a closed, constant-volume quartz tube. High pressure generated due to nitrogen precursor evaporation lead to increased surface nitrogen content in the catalysts post-pyrolysis. Electrochemical oxygen reduction activity of MNC catalysts was analyzed using half-cell Rotating Ring Disc Electrode (RRDE) studies. The effect of nitrogen precursor morphology on the generation of active sites has been explored in detail. By increasing the Nitrogen/Carbon ratio of the nitrogen precursor, the accessible active site density increased by reducing carbon deposition in the pores of the carbon support during pyrolysis. The most active catalysts were obtained using melamine, having a N/C ratio of 2. Single PEMFC measurements employing MNC catalysts as cathodes indicated kinetic current density as high as 15 A cm-3 at 0.8 ViR-free and over 100 h of stable current at 0.5 V were observed. Effects of carbon free ammonia generating solid nitrogen precursors such as urea and ammonium carbamate were also studied. These precursors etched the carbon support

  18. Pressure dependence of the oxygen reduction reaction at the platinum microelectrode/nafion interface - Electrode kinetics and mass transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parthasarathy, Arvind; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Martin, Charles R.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of oxygen reduction kinetics at the platinum/Nafion interface is of great importance in the advancement of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel-cell technology. This study focuses on the dependence of the oxygen reduction kinetics on oxygen pressure. Conventional Tafel analysis of the data shows that the reaction order with respect to oxygen is unity at both high and low current densities. Chronoamperometric measurements of the transport parameters for oxygen in Nafion show that oxygen dissolution follows Henry's isotherm. The diffusion coefficient of oxygen is invariant with pressure; however, the diffusion coefficient for oxygen is lower when air is used as the equilibrating gas as compared to when oxygen is used for equilibration. These results are of value in understanding the influence of O2 partial pressure on the performance of PEM fuel cells and also in elucidating the mechanism of oxygen reduction at the platinum/Nafion interface.

  19. Numerical modeling of the simulated gas hydrate production test at Mallik 2L-38 in the pilot scale pressure reservoir LARS - Applying the "foamy oil" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth, Sven; Thaler, Jan; Klump, Jens; Schicks, Judith; Uddin, Mafiz

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam. These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. We performed an experiment similar to the field-test conditions of the production test in the Mallik gas hydrate field (Mallik 2L-38) in the Beaufort Mackenzie Delta of the Canadian Arctic. The aim of this experiment was to study the transport behavior of fluids in gas hydrate reservoirs during depressurization (see also Heeschen et al. and Priegnitz et al., this volume). The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, to validate the models through history matching, and to feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the one observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. They suggest that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. Our results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models of gas flow in water. References Uddin M., Wright J.F. and Coombe D

  20. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  1. Fimasartan for independent reduction of blood pressure variability in mild-to-moderate hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi-Seung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Changsoo; Cho, Eun Joo; Sung, Ki-Chul; Kang, Seok-Min; Kim, Dong-Soo; Joo, Seung Jae; Lee, Seung Hwan; Hwang, Kyung-Kuk; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin receptor antagonist fimasartan lowered blood pressure (BP) in a previous large population study. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether fimasartan treatment for 3 months affects clinical and home BP variability in addition to reducing BP. Methods The study enrolled 1,396 patients (mean age 56.2±10.0 years; males 53.6%) with mild-to-moderate hypertension who had a complete set of home BP measurements (morning and evening) and metabolic risk evaluation. During the 3 months of study, fimasartan alone was used to control BP at a daily dose of 30–120 mg. Clinical and home BP measurements were performed before and after the 3-month treatment. BP variability included beat-to-beat variability (clinical) and day-to-day variability (home). Results Fimasartan reduced BP after 3 months of treatment. The average reduction of clinical systolic BP (c-SBP) was 15.08±18.36 mmHg (P<0.0001), and the average reduction of morning home SBP (m-SBP) was 11.49±19.33 mmHg (P<0.0001). Beat-to-beat variability as standard deviation (SD) of c-SBP was reduced from 4.56±3.22 to 4.24±3.11 mmHg (P=0.0026). Day-to-day variability as SD of m-SBP was reduced from 7.92±6.74 to 6.95±4.97 mmHg (P<0.0001). Multiple regression analysis revealed an independent association between the change in the SD of c-SBP and the change in c-SBP (P=0.0268) and, similarly, between the change in the SD of m-SBP and the change in m-SBP (P=0.0258), after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, and change in mean BP. Conclusion This study indicated that 3 months of fimasartan treatment reduced day-to-day BP variability independent of BP reduction in patients with hypertension. PMID:27217724

  2. Research on Oil Recovery Mechanisms in Heavy Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Louis M. Castanier; William E. Brigham

    1998-03-31

    The goal of this project is to increase recovery of heavy oils. Towards that goal studies are being conducted in how to assess the influence of temperature and pressure on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; to evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in site combustion process; to develop and understand mechanisms of surfactants on for the reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; and to improve techniques of formation evaluation.

  3. Oleic acid content is responsible for the reduction in blood pressure induced by olive oil

    PubMed Central

    Terés, S.; Barceló-Coblijn, G.; Benet, M.; Álvarez, R.; Bressani, R.; Halver, J. E.; Escribá, P. V.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that high olive oil intake reduces blood pressure (BP). These positive effects of olive oil have frequently been ascribed to its minor components, such as α-tocopherol, polyphenols, and other phenolic compounds that are not present in other oils. However, in this study we demonstrate that the hypotensive effect of olive oil is caused by its high oleic acid (OA) content (≈70–80%). We propose that olive oil intake increases OA levels in membranes, which regulates membrane lipid structure (HII phase propensity) in such a way as to control G protein-mediated signaling, causing a reduction in BP. This effect is in part caused by its regulatory action on G protein-associated cascades that regulate adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. In turn, the OA analogues, elaidic and stearic acids, had no hypotensive activity, indicating that the molecular mechanisms that link membrane lipid structure and BP regulation are very specific. Similarly, soybean oil (with low OA content) did not reduce BP. This study demonstrates that olive oil induces its hypotensive effects through the action of OA. PMID:18772370

  4. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  5. A multistrategic approach in the development of sourdough bread targeted towards blood pressure reduction.

    PubMed

    Peñas, E; Diana, M; Frias, J; Quílez, J; Martínez-Villaluenga, C

    2015-03-01

    Rising prevalence of hypertension is pushing food industry towards the development of innovative food products with antihypertensive effects. The aim was to study the effect of reduced sodium content and 21% addition of wholemeal wheat sourdough (produced by Lactobacillus brevis CECT 8183 and protease) on proximate composition, γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and peptide content of wheat bread. Angiotensin converting enzyme I (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities were also evaluated. Sodium replacement by potassium salt did not affect chemical composition and biological activities of bread. In contrast, GABA and peptides <3 kDa contents in sourdough bread (SDB) were 7 and 3 times higher, respectively, than the observed in control. ACE inhibitory and antioxidant activities of the peptide fraction < 3 kDa from SDB was 1.7 and 2.6-3.0 times higher than control. Therefore, the combination of reduced sodium content with enriched concentrations of bioactive compounds in bread making may provide interesting perspectives for development of innovative breads towards blood pressure reduction. PMID:25638256

  6. The application of high-pressure treatment in the reduction of phosphate levels in breakfast sausages.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, C C; Cruz-Romero, M C; Troy, D J; Mullen, A M; Kerry, J P

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated effects of high pressure (HP) treatment of pork meat at 150 or 300 MPa for 5 min before manufacturing sausages on the reduction of phosphate levels and compared to sausages manufactured with untreated pork meat (control sausages). Improvement in perceived saltiness, juiciness and overall flavour was observed in sausages manufactured using HP-treated meat at 150 MPa and 0% phosphate, compared to control sausages. Sausages manufactured using meat HP-treated at 150 MPa and 0.25% phosphate (P<0.05) improved hardness of sausages. HP-treated meat at 300 MPa and 0% phosphate decreased juiciness and adhesiveness, while at 0.25% phosphate, adversely affected emulsion stability and sensory attributes. HP treatment did not affect significantly the lightness of the sausages; however, elimination of phosphate reduced (P<0.05) the yellowness, while HP treatment at 150 MPa with 0.25 or 0.5% phosphate increased (P<0.05) redness. HP reatment at 150 MPa has potential for reducing phosphate levels in sausages without significant changes in their functionality and improved acceptability. PMID:24056406

  7. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltański Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Anna; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR). Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment. PMID:25906352

  8. Phytoplankton Composition and Abundance in Restored Maltański Reservoir under the Influence of Physico-Chemical Variables and Zooplankton Grazing Pressure.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Anna; Gołdyn, Ryszard; Dondajewska, Renata

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present the effects of environmental factors and zooplankton food pressure on phytoplankton in the restored man-made Maltański Reservoir (MR). Two methods of restoration: biomanipulation and phosphorus inactivation have been applied in the reservoir. Nine taxonomical groups of phytoplankton represented in total by 183 taxa were stated there. The richest groups in respect of taxa number were green algae, cyanobacteria and diatoms. The diatoms, cryptophytes, chrysophytes, cyanobacteria, green algae and euglenophytes dominated in terms of abundance and/or biomass. There were significant changes among environmental parameters resulting from restoration measures which influenced the phytoplankton populations in the reservoir. These measures led to a decrease of phosphorus concentration due to its chemical inactivation and enhanced zooplankton grazing as a result of planktivorous fish stocking. The aim of the study is to analyse the reaction of phytoplankton to the restoration measures and, most importantly, to determine the extent to which the qualitative and quantitative composition of phytoplankton depends on variables changing under the influence of restoration in comparison with other environmental variables. We stated that application of restoration methods did cause significant changes in phytoplankton community structure. The abundance of most phytoplankton taxa was negatively correlated with large zooplankton filter feeders, and positively with zooplankton predators and concentrations of ammonium nitrogen and partly of phosphates. However, restoration was insufficient in the case of decreasing phytoplankton abundance. The effects of restoration treatments were of less importance for the abundance of phytoplankton than parameters that were independent of the restoration. This was due to the continuous inflow of large loads of nutrients from the area of the river catchment. PMID:25906352

  9. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-10-01

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations.

  10. Electrocatalytic H2 Evolution by Supramolecular Ru(II)-Rh(III)-Ru(II) Complexes: Importance of Ligands as Electron Reservoirs and Speciation upon Reduction.

    PubMed

    Manbeck, Gerald F; Canterbury, Theodore; Zhou, Rongwei; King, Skye; Nam, Geewoo; Brewer, Karen J

    2015-08-17

    The supramolecular water reduction photocatalysts [{(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)}2RhX2](PF6)5 (Ph2phen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, dpp =2,3-bis(2-pyridyl)pyrazine X = Cl, Br) are efficient electrocatalysts for the reduction of CF3SO3H, CF3CO2H, and CH3CO2H to H2 in DMF or DMF/H2O mixtures. The onset of catalytic current occurs at -0.82 V versus Ag/AgCl for CF3SO3H, -0.90 V for CF3CO2H, and -1.1 V for CH3CO2H with overpotentials of 0.61, 0.45, and 0.10 V, respectively. In each case, catalysis is triggered by the first dpp ligand reduction implicating the dpp as an electron reservoir in catalysis. A new species with Epc ∼ -0.75 V was observed in the presence of stoichiometric amounts of strong acid, and its identity is proposed as the Rh(H)(III/II) redox couple. H2 was produced in 72-85% Faradaic yields and 95-116 turnovers after 2 h and 435 turnovers after 10 h of bulk electrolysis. The identities of Rh(I) species upon reduction have been studied. In contrast to the expected dissociation of halides in the Rh(I) state, the halide loss depends on solvent and water content. In dry CH3CN, in which Cl(-) is poorly solvated, a [Ru] complex dissociates and [(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)Rh(I)Cl2](+) and [(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)](2+) are formed. In contrast, for X = Br(-), the major product of reduction is the intact trimetallic Rh(I) complex [{(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)}2Rh(I)](5+). Chloride loss in CH3CN is facilitated by addition of 3 M H2O. In DMF, the reduced species is [{(Ph2phen)2Ru(dpp)}2Rh(I)](5+) regardless of X = Cl(-) or Br(-). PMID:26247428

  11. Evolution of the Cerro Prieto reservoirs under exploitation

    SciTech Connect

    Truesdell, A.H.; Lippmann, M.J.; Puente, H.G.

    1997-07-01

    The Cerro Prieto Geothermal field of Baja California (Mexico) has been under commercial production to generate electricity since 1973. Over the years, the large amount of Geothermal fluids extracted (at present about 12,000 tons per hour) to supply steam to the power plants has resulted in a reduction of pressures, changes in reservoir processes, and increased flow of cooler groundwater into the geothermal system. The groundwater recharging the reservoir moves horizontally through permeable layers, as well as vertically through permeable fault zones. In addition, the supply of deep hot waters has continued unabated, and perhaps has increased as reservoir pressure decreased. Since 1989, this natural fluid recharge has been supplemented by injection which presently amounts to about 20% of the fluid produced. Changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of the reservoir fluids due to the drop in pressures and the inflow of cooler groundwaters and injectate have been detected on the basis of wellhead data. These changes point to reservoir processes like local boiling, phase segregation, steam condensation, mixing and dilution. Finally, the study identified areas where fluids are entering the reservoir, as well as indicated their source (i.e. natural Groundwater recharge versus injectate) and established the controlling geologic structures.

  12. Seal assessment and estimated storage capacities of a targeted CO2 reservoir based on new displacement pressures in SW Wyoming, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spaeth, Lynsey; Campbell-Stone, Erin; Lynds, Ranie; Frost, Carol; McLaughlin, J. Fred

    2013-04-01

    single wetting phase at elevated pressures and temperatures, resulting in an interfacial tension of 0 milliNewton/meter. Under these conditions the pore throat radius of sealing units is assumed to be the principle inhibitor to flow through the seal. Experimental data indicate pore throat radii range from 39.2 to 113.5 nanometers in the confining system, and preliminary column height calculations indicate that, depending on the size of the plume, reservoir thickness will most likely be the limiting factor to the amount of CO2 that can be sequestered rather than the column height.

  13. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  14. Uncertainty quantification for evaluating impacts of caprock and reservoir properties on pressure buildup and ground surface displacement during geological CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Jie; Hou, Zhangshuan; Fang, Yilin; Ren, Huiying; Lin, Guang

    2013-08-12

    A series of numerical test cases reflecting broad and realistic ranges of geological formation properties was developed to systematically evaluate and compare the impacts of those properties on geomechanical responses to CO2 injection. A coupled hydro-geomechanical subsurface transport simulator, STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases), was adopted to simulate the CO2 migration process and geomechanical behaviors of the surrounding geological formations. A quasi-Monte Carlo sampling method was applied to efficiently sample a high-dimensional parameter space consisting of injection rate and 14 subsurface formation properties, including porosity, permeability, entry pressure, irreducible gas and aqueous saturation, Young’s modulus, and Poisson’s ratio for both reservoir and caprock. Generalized cross-validation and analysis of variance methods were used to quantitatively measure the significance of the 15 input parameters. Reservoir porosity, permeability, and injection rate were found to be among the most significant factors affecting the geomechanical responses to the CO2 injection. We used a quadrature generalized linear model to build a reduced-order model that can estimate the geomechanical response instantly instead of running computationally expensive numerical simulations. The injection pressure and ground surface displacement are often monitored for injection well safety, and are believed can partially reflect the risk of fault reactivation and seismicity. Based on the reduced order model and response surface, the input parameters can be screened for control the risk of induced seismicity. The uncertainty of the subsurface structure properties cause the numerical simulation based on a single or a few samples does not accurately estimate the geomechanical response in the actual injection site. Probability of risk can be used to evaluate and predict the risk of injection when there are great uncertainty in the subsurface properties and operation

  15. Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?

    SciTech Connect

    Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N.

    1997-02-01

    Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

  16. Reductions in central venous pressure by lower body negative pressure or blood loss elicit similar hemodynamic responses

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Blair D.; van Helmond, Noud; Curry, Timothy B.; van Buskirk, Camille M.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare hemodynamic and blood analyte responses to reduced central venous pressure (CVP) and pulse pressure (PP) elicited during graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) to those observed during graded blood loss (BL) in conscious humans. We hypothesized that the stimulus-response relationships of CVP and PP to hemodynamic responses during LBNP would mimic those observed during BL. We assessed CVP, PP, heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and other hemodynamic markers in 12 men during LBNP and BL. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of catecholamines, hematocrit, hemoglobin, arginine vasopressin, and blood gases. LBNP consisted of 5-min stages at 0, 15, 30, and 45 mmHg of suction. BL consisted of 5 min at baseline and following three stages of 333 ml of hemorrhage (1,000 ml total). Individual r2 values and linear regression slopes were calculated to determine whether the stimulus (CVP and PP)-hemodynamic response trajectories were similar between protocols. The CVP-MAP trajectory was the only CVP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (0.93 ± 0.27 vs. 0.13 ± 0.26; P = 0.037). The PP-heart rate trajectory was the only PP-response slope that was statistically different during LBNP compared with BL (−1.85 ± 0.45 vs. −0.46 ± 0.27; P = 0.024). Norepinephrine, hematocrit, and hemoglobin were all lower at termination in the BL protocol compared with LBNP (P < 0.05). Consistent with our hypothesis, LBNP mimics the hemodynamic stimulus-response trajectories observed during BL across a significant range of CVP in humans. PMID:24876357

  17. Sedimentary reservoir oxidation during geologic CO2 sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammers, Laura N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Bird, Dennis K.; Thomas, Randal B.; Johnson, Natalie C.; Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Maher, Katharine

    2015-04-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide into subsurface geologic reservoirs during geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) introduces an oxidizing supercritical CO2 phase into a subsurface geologic environment that is typically reducing. The resulting redox disequilibrium provides the chemical potential for the reduction of CO2 to lower free energy organic species. However, redox reactions involving carbon typically require the presence of a catalyst. Iron oxide minerals, including magnetite, are known to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of C-bearing species. If the redox conditions in the reservoir are modified by redox transformations involving CO2, such changes could also affect mineral stability, leading to dissolution and precipitation reactions and alteration of the long-term fate of CO2 in GCS reservoirs. We present experimental evidence that reservoirs with reducing redox conditions are favorable environments for the relatively rapid abiotic reduction of CO2 to organic molecules. In these experiments, an aqueous suspension of magnetite nanoparticles was reacted with supercritical CO2 under pressure and temperature conditions relevant to GCS in sedimentary reservoirs (95-210 °C and ∼100 bars of CO2). Hydrogen production was observed in several experiments, likely caused by Fe(II) oxidation either at the surface of magnetite or in the aqueous phase. Heating of the Fe(II)-rich system resulted in elevated PH2 and conditions favorable for the reduction of CO2 to acetic acid. Implications of these results for the long-term fate of CO2 in field-scale systems were explored using reaction path modeling of CO2 injection into reservoirs containing Fe(II)-bearing primary silicate minerals, with kinetic parameters for CO2 reduction obtained experimentally. The results of these calculations suggest that the reaction of CO2 with reservoir constituents will occur in two primary stages (1) equilibration of CO2 with organic acids resulting in mineral-fluid disequilibrium, and

  18. Experimental Investigation on the Influence of High Pressure and High Temperature on the Mechanical Properties of Deep Reservoir Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Mishra, Brijes; Heasley, Keith A.

    2015-11-01

    Deep and ultra-deep resources extraction has resulted in the challenge of drilling into high-pressure, high-temperature (HPHT) environments. Drilling challenges at such extreme conditions prompted NETL to develop a specialized ultra-deep drilling simulator (UDS) for investigating drill behavior in such conditions. Using the UDS apparatus, complex laboratory tests were performed on Carthage marble (Warsaw limestone) and Crab Orchard sandstone, which represent the rocks in the basins of the Tuscaloosa trend in southern Louisiana and the Arbuckle play in Oklahoma and North Texas. Additionally, numerical models of the UDS were developed for performing parametric analyses that would be impossible with the UDS alone. Subsequently, it was found that the input properties for these two rock types at such extreme pressure and temperature conditions were unavailable. Therefore, a suite of unconfined compressive strength, indirect tensile strength, and triaxial compression tests ( σ 1 > σ 2 = σ 3) were performed on Carthage marble and Crab Orchard sandstone for investigating their behavior in HPHT environments. The HPHT experiments were performed at confining pressures ranging from atmospheric to 200 MPa, and with temperatures ranging from 25 to 180 °C. The influences of confining pressure and temperature on the mechanical properties of two rocks were investigated.

  19. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions

    PubMed Central

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0–125 MPa) and temperatures (4–37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface. PMID:25653646

  20. Iron reduction by the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a under subsurface pressure and temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Picard, Aude; Testemale, Denis; Wagenknecht, Laura; Hazael, Rachael; Daniel, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms influence biogeochemical cycles from the surface down to the depths of the continental rocks and oceanic basaltic crust. Due to the poor recovery of microbial isolates from the deep subsurface, the influence of physical environmental parameters, such as pressure and temperature, on the physiology and metabolic potential of subsurface inhabitants is not well constrained. We evaluated Fe(III) reduction rates (FeRRs) and viability, measured as colony-forming ability, of the deep-sea piezophilic bacterium Shewanella profunda LT13a over a range of pressures (0-125 MPa) and temperatures (4-37∘C) that included the in situ habitat of the bacterium isolated from deep-sea sediments at 4500 m depth below sea level. S. profunda LT13a was active at all temperatures investigated and at pressures up to 120 MPa at 30∘C, suggesting that it is well adapted to deep-sea and deep sedimentary environments. Average initial cellular FeRRs only slightly decreased with increasing pressure until activity stopped, suggesting that the respiratory chain was not immediately affected upon the application of pressure. We hypothesize that, as pressure increases, the increased energy demand for cell maintenance is not fulfilled, thus leading to a decrease in viability. This study opens up perspectives about energy requirements of cells in the deep subsurface. PMID:25653646

  1. Reduction of Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus stearothermophilus and Streptococcus faecalis in meat batters by temperature-high hydrostatic pressure pasteurization.

    PubMed

    Moerman, F; Mertens, B; Demey, L; Huyghebaert, A

    2001-10-01

    People have a growing preference for fresh, healthy, palatable and nutritious meals and drinks. However, as food deterioration is a constant threat along the entire food chain, food preservation remains as necessary now as in the past. High pressure processing is one of the emerging technologies being studied as an alternative to the classical pasteurization and sterilization treatments of food. Samples of fried minced pork meat were inoculated with strains of Streptococcus faecalis and with sporulating microorganisms like Bacillus subtilis and stearothermophilus. The samples were subjected to several combined temperature-high pressure treatments predicted by the mathematical model applied in Response Surface Methodology. Using the "Box-Behnken" concept, the number of tests for a whole area of pressure-temperature-time-combinations (pressure variation: 50-400 MPa, temperature variation 20-80°C, time variation 1-60 min) could be limited to 15. In the center point of the model, the experimental combination was performed in triple to estimate the experimental variance. All the tests were executed in a randomized order to exclude the disturbing effect of environmental factors. Microbial analysis revealed for each microorganism an important reduction in total plate count, demonstrating a superior pressure resistance of the sporulating microorganisms in comparison with the most pressure resistant vegetative species Streptococcus faecalis. The effect of the medium composition could be neglected, showing little protective effect of, e.g. the fat fraction as seen in heat preservation techniques. PMID:22062669

  2. Cavitation in hydraulic fluids. I - Inception in shear flow. II - Delay time for stepwise reduction in pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, A.

    1980-09-01

    A novel concentric-cylinder test apparatus was used to study the onset of cavitation in hydraulic fluids with allowance for the effects of shear. The fluids tested were base oils and include four types of paraffinic mineral oils and two types of naphthenic oils. In addition, the delay time of gaseous cavitation in seven types of hydraulic fluids and tap water was measured for a stepwise reduction in pressure from atmospheric pressure to given pressure. The longest delay time for the incipient cavitation is obtained for water-glycol fluids, and the second longest for tap water. Petroleum-based hydraulic fluids and the phosphate ester have almost the same delay times, which are slightly longer than for the base oil.

  3. Isotopic insights into microbial sulfur cycling in oil reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Christopher G.; Cheng, Yiwei; Engelbrekston, Anna; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Li, Li; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan B.; Coates, John D.; Conrad, Mark E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial sulfate reduction in oil reservoirs (biosouring) is often associated with secondary oil production where seawater containing high sulfate concentrations (~28 mM) is injected into a reservoir to maintain pressure and displace oil. The sulfide generated from biosouring can cause corrosion of infrastructure, health exposure risks, and higher production costs. Isotope monitoring is a promising approach for understanding microbial sulfur cycling in reservoirs, enabling early detection of biosouring, and understanding the impact of souring. Microbial sulfate reduction is known to result in large shifts in the sulfur and oxygen isotope compositions of the residual sulfate, which can be distinguished from other processes that may be occurring in oil reservoirs, such as precipitation of sulfate and sulfide minerals. Key to the success of this method is using the appropriate isotopic fractionation factors for the conditions and processes being monitored. For a set of batch incubation experiments using a mixed microbial culture with crude oil as the electron donor, we measured a sulfur fractionation factor for sulfate reduction of −30‰. We have incorporated this result into a simplified 1D reservoir reactive transport model to highlight how isotopes can help discriminate between biotic and abiotic processes affecting sulfate and sulfide concentrations. Modeling results suggest that monitoring sulfate isotopes can provide an early indication of souring for reservoirs with reactive iron minerals that can remove the produced sulfide, especially when sulfate reduction occurs in the mixing zone between formation waters (FW) containing elevated concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and injection water (IW) containing elevated sulfate. In addition, we examine the role of reservoir thermal, geochemical, hydrological, operational and microbiological conditions in determining microbial souring dynamics and hence the anticipated isotopic signatures. PMID:25285094

  4. Blunted reduction of pulse pressure during nighttime is associated with left ventricular hypertrophy in elderly hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takashi; Kohno, Isao; Fujioka, Daisuke; Ichigi, Yoshihide; Kawabata, Ken-ichi; Obata, Jun-ei; Osada, Mitsuru; Takano, Hajime; Umetani, Ken; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2004-08-01

    Increased pulse pressure (PP) is recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, especially in elderly patients. However, blood pressure (BP) is known to have a circadian variation. Therefore, this study asked whether or not PP has a circadian variation and, if so, whether a circadian variation of PP has clinical importance. Ambulatory BP monitoring (every 30 min for 48 h) was performed in 255 patients with untreated essential hypertension (24 to 82 years old; mean: 52+/-12 years). Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) was estimated from M-mode echocardiography. PP was decreased during nighttime (10+/-11% reduction from daytime PP). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that, among four variables-the degree of nighttime PP reduction, daytime PP, 48-h systolic BP, and nondipper hypertension-the degree of nighttime PP reduction had the strongest (inverse) correlation with LVMI in a subgroup of elderly patients (> or =60 years old, n =67) (standardized regression coefficient=-0.32, p =0.02), whereas this association was not significant in the whole patient population unclassified by age. Furthermore, a blunted reduction of nighttime PP in combination with nondipper hypertension was an incremental risk for increase in LVMI in the elderly patients. In conclusion, PP is reduced during nighttime, but the degree of reduction varies among patients. The blunted reduction of nighttime PP is a risk for left ventricular hypertrophy, an established predictor of hypertension-induced cardiovascular events, and it may thus play a role in cardiovascular complications, especially in elderly patients with nondipper hypertension. PMID:15492477

  5. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  6. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  7. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  8. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  9. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  10. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  11. Mechanism of reservoir testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, Gunnar

    1987-01-01

    In evaluating geothermal resources we are primarily interested in data on the distribution of temperature and fluid conductivity within the reservoir, the total volume of the productive formations, recharge characteristics and chemical quality of the thermal fluids. While geophysical exploration by surface methods may furnish some data on the temperature field and give indications as to the reservoir volume, they furnish practically no information on the fluid conductivity and production characteristics. Such information will generally have to be obtained by tests performed within the reservoir, primarily by production tests on sufficiently deep wells. Reservoir testing is therefore one of the most important tasks in a general exploration program. In principal, reservoir testing has much in common with conventional geophysical exploration. Although the physical fields applied are to some extent different, they face the same type of selection between controlled and natural drives, forward and inverse problem setting, etc. The basic philosophy (Bodvarsson, 1966) is quite similar. In the present paper, they discuss some fundamentals of the theory of reservoir testing where the fluid conductivity field is the primary target. The emphasis is on local and global aspects of the forward approach to the case of liquid saturated (dominated) Darcy type formations. Both controlled and natural driving pressure or strain fields are to be considered and particular emphasis is placed on the situation resulting from the effects of a free liquid surface at the top of the reservoir.

  12. Selective Heart Rate Reduction With Ivabradine Increases Central Blood Pressure in Stable Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Rimoldi, Stefano F; Messerli, Franz H; Cerny, David; Gloekler, Steffen; Traupe, Tobias; Laurent, Stéphane; Seiler, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Heart rate (HR) lowering by β-blockade was shown to be beneficial after myocardial infarction. In contrast, HR lowering with ivabradine was found to confer no benefits in 2 prospective randomized trials in patients with coronary artery disease. We hypothesized that this inefficacy could be in part related to ivabradine's effect on central (aortic) pressure. Our study included 46 patients with chronic stable coronary artery disease who were randomly allocated to placebo (n=23) or ivabradine (n=23) in a single-blinded fashion for 6 months. Concomitant baseline medication was continued unchanged throughout the study except for β-blockers, which were stopped during the study period. Central blood pressure and stroke volume were measured directly by left heart catheterization at baseline and after 6 months. For the determination of resting HR at baseline and at follow-up, 24-hour ECG monitoring was performed. Patients on ivabradine showed an increase of 11 mm Hg in central systolic pressure from 129±22 mm Hg to 140±26 mm Hg (P=0.02) and in stroke volume by 86±21.8 to 107.2±30.0 mL (P=0.002). In the placebo group, central systolic pressure and stroke volume remained unchanged. Estimates of myocardial oxygen consumption (HR×systolic pressure and time-tension index) remained unchanged with ivabradine.The decrease in HR from baseline to follow-up correlated with the concomitant increase in central systolic pressure (r=-0.41, P=0.009) and in stroke volume (r=-0.61, P<0.001). In conclusion, the decrease in HR with ivabradine was associated with an increase in central systolic pressure, which may have antagonized possible benefits of HR lowering in coronary artery disease patients. CLINICAL TRIALSURL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier NCT01039389. PMID:27091900

  13. Reduction of pressure in postcapillary venules induced by EPI-fluorescent illumination of FITC-dextrans

    SciTech Connect

    Bekker, A.Y.; Ritter, A.B.; Duran, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    Blue light (488nm) irradiation of intravenously injected fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-Dextrans induces platelet aggregation in microvessels. The build-up of the aggregates in the microvessel lumen results in a change in microcirculatory hemodynamics. We found that lumenal pressure falls to approximately 75% of the control pressure within the first 10 seconds following the onset of irradiation. The damage, however, is not permanent and pressure returns to control level after the illumination of the microcirculatory field is discontinued. This effect can lead to erroneous conclusions in studies of microcirculatory hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity in preparations in which intravital fluorescence microscopy is employed. Short time irradiation (1 min. or less) of the microcirculatory field is recommended as a means of minimizing the deleterious effects of blue light irradiation.

  14. Long-Lasting Reduction of Blood Pressure by Electroacupuncture in Patients with Hypertension: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peng; Cheng, Ling; Liu, Dongmei; Painovich, Jeannette; Vinjamury, Sivarama; Longhurst, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Acupuncture at specific acupoints has experimentally been found to reduce chronically elevated blood pressure. Objective: To examine effectiveness of electroacupuncture (EA) at select acupoints to reduce systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures (DBP) in hypertensive patients. Design: Two-arm parallel study. Patients: Sixty-five hypertensive patients not receiving medication were assigned randomly to one of the two acupuncture intervention (33 versus 32 patients). Intervention: Patients were assessed with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. They were treated with 30-minutes of EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37 or LI 6-7+GB 37-39 once weekly for 8 weeks. Four acupuncturists provided single-blinded treatment. Main outcome measures: Primary outcomes measuring effectiveness of EA were peak and average SBP and DBP. Secondary outcomes examined underlying mechanisms of acupuncture with plasma norepinephrine, renin, and aldosterone before and after 8 weeks of treatment. Outcomes were obtained by double-blinded evaluation. Results: After 8 weeks, 33 patients treated with EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37 had decreased peak and average SBP and DBP, compared with 32 patients treated with EA at LI 6-7+GB 37-39 control acupoints. Changes in blood pressures significantly differed between the two patient groups. In 14 patients, a long-lasting blood pressure–lowering acupuncture effect was observed for an additional 4 weeks of EA at PC 5-6+ST 36-37. After treatment, the plasma concentration of norepinephrine, which was initially elevated, was decreased by 41%; likewise, renin was decreased by 67% and aldosterone by 22%. Conclusions: EA at select acupoints reduces blood pressure. Sympathetic and renin-aldosterone systems were likely related to the long-lasting EA actions. PMID:26392838

  15. Increase of stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1992-01-01

    High stagnation pressures and enthalpies are required for the testing of aerospace vehicles such as aerospace planes, aeroassist vehicles, and reentry vehicles. Among the most useful ground test facilities for performing such tests are shock tunnels. With a given driver gas condition, the enthalpy and pressure in the driven tube nozzle reservoir condition can be varied by changing the driven tube geometry and initial gas fill pressure. Reducing the driven tube diameter yields only very modest increases in reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Reducing the driven tube initial gas fill pressure can increase the reservoir enthalpy significantly, but at the cost of reduced reservoir pressure and useful test time. A new technique, the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is found to produce substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. Using a one-dimensional inviscid full kinetics code, a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section were studied and the best cases found. For these best cases, for driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure can be increased by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively and the enthalpy can be increased by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  16. High and Ultrahigh pressure peridotites: fossil reservoirs of subduction zone processes and deep crust-mantle wedge interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scambelluri, Marco

    2010-05-01

    The large-scale mass transfer allied with subduction recycles surface volatiles and crustal materials into the mantle, to affect its composition and rheology. Most geological processes related to subduction thus originate from an interplay between subducting plates and overlying lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle. Much information on phase relations during subduction has been provided by experiments and by studies of natural high- (HP) and ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) rocks and fluids. In contrast, knowledge on supra-subduction mantle wedges is much less. Here, the interaction between slab fluids and mantle rocks at variable subduction depths is discussed considering two case-studies: the UHP garnet websterites from Bardane (Western Gneiss Region, Norway) and the HP garnet peridotites from the Ulten Zone (Eastern Alps). The Bardane websterites derive from cold Archean subcontinental mantle involved in Scandian subduction to UHP. Subduction metamorphism was promoted by slab fluid infiltration in the overlying mantle up to P of 6.5 - 7 GPa (c.a. 200 km depth), as witnessed by micro-diamond-bearing inclusions and by crystallization of majoritic garnet in veins. The Ulten peridotites are slices of Variscan mantle wedge which experienced infiltration of metasomatic subduction fluids. These favoured transformation of spinel-peridotites into garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites at P < 3GPa. Formation of metasomatized garnet peridotite mylonites suggest channelled influx of subduction fluids. The high XMg and the incompatible element-enriched composition of subduction minerals in Bardane indicate that previously depleted websterites were refertilized by COH subduction fluids. Comparison with the Ulten garnet + amphibole + dolomite peridotites outlines relevant similarity in the metasomatic fingerprints and in the COH fluid phase involved. This calls for concomitant subduction of the continental crust, to provide carbon and incompatible element-enriched fluids. For

  17. Impact of Stress Reduction Interventions on Hostility and Ambulatory Systolic Blood Pressure in African American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Lynda Brown; Gregoski, Mathew J.; Tingen, Martha S.; Barnes, Vernon A.; Treiber, Frank A.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the impact of breathing awareness meditation (BAM), life skills (LS) training, and health education (HE) interventions on self-reported hostility and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) in 121 African American (AA) ninth graders at increased risk for development of essential hypertension. They were randomly assigned to BAM,…

  18. Control and reduction of unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dolling, David S.; Barter, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The focus was on developing means of controlling and reducing unsteady pressure loads in separated shock wave turbulent boundary layer interactions. Section 1 describes how vortex generators can be used to effectively reduce loads in compression ramp interaction, while Section 2 focuses on the effects of 'boundary-layer separators' on the same interaction.

  19. Effect of high pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a five-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a post-packaging intervention. QF was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, was starter-free and was not pressed...

  20. Reservoirs 3 carbonates

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H.

    1988-01-01

    This book covers the topics of Carbonates; Carbonate depositional environments and Carbonate diagenesis. Included are the following papers: pore geometry of carbonate rocks as revealed by pore casts and capillary pressure; a review of carbonate reservoirs; the chemistry of dolomitization and dolomite precipitation.

  1. Study of Pyridine-Mediated Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Methanol at High CO2 Pressure.

    PubMed

    Rybchenko, Sergey I; Touhami, Dalila; Wadhawan, Jay D; Haywood, Stephanie K

    2016-07-01

    The recently proposed highly efficient route of pyridine-catalyzed CO2 reduction to methanol was explored on platinum electrodes at high CO2 pressure. At 55 bar (5.5 MPa) of CO2 , the bulk electrolysis in both potentiostatic and galvanostatic regimes resulted in methanol production with Faradaic yields of up to 10 % for the first 5-10 C cm(-2) of charge passed. For longer electrolysis, the methanol concentration failed to increase proportionally and was limited to sub-ppm levels irrespective of biasing conditions and pyridine concentration. This limitation cannot be removed by electrode reactivation and/or pre-electrolysis and appears to be an inherent feature of the reduction process. In agreement with bulk electrolysis findings, the CV analysis supported by simulation indicated that hydrogen evolution is still the dominant electrode reaction in pyridine-containing electrolyte solution, even with an excess CO2 concentration in the solution. No prominent contribution from either a direct or coupled CO2 reduction was found. The results obtained suggest that the reduction of CO2 to methanol is a transient process that is largely decoupled from the electrode charge transfer. PMID:27253886

  2. Long-Term Reduction of High Blood Pressure by Angiotensin II DNA Vaccine in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Koriyama, Hiroshi; Nakagami, Hironori; Nakagami, Futoshi; Osako, Mariana Kiomy; Kyutoku, Mariko; Shimamura, Munehisa; Kurinami, Hitomi; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Rakugi, Hiromi; Morishita, Ryuichi

    2015-07-01

    Recent research on vaccination has extended its scope from infectious diseases to chronic diseases, including Alzheimer disease, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. The aim of this study was to design DNA vaccines for high blood pressure and eventually develop human vaccine therapy to treat hypertension. Plasmid vector encoding hepatitis B core-angiotensin II (Ang II) fusion protein was injected into spontaneously hypertensive rats using needleless injection system. Anti-Ang II antibody was successfully produced in hepatitis B core-Ang II group, and antibody response against Ang II was sustained for at least 6 months. Systolic blood pressure was consistently lower in hepatitis B core-Ang II group after immunization, whereas blood pressure reduction was continued for at least 6 months. Perivascular fibrosis in heart tissue was also significantly decreased in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. Survival rate was significantly improved in hepatitis B core-Ang II group. This study demonstrated that Ang II DNA vaccine to spontaneously hypertensive rats significantly lowered high blood pressure for at least 6 months. In addition, Ang II DNA vaccines induced an adequate humoral immune response while avoiding the activation of self-reactive T cells, assessed by ELISPOT assay. Future development of DNA vaccine to treat hypertension may provide a new therapeutic option to treat hypertension. PMID:26015450

  3. Research on oil recovery mechanisms in heavy oil reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Brigham, W.E.; Aziz, K.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute is to conduct research directed toward increasing the recovery of heavy oils. Presently, SUPRI is working in five main directions: Assess the influence of different reservoir conditions (temperature and pressure) on the absolute and relative permeability to oil and water and on capillary pressure; evaluate the effect of different reservoir parameters on the in-situ combustion process. This project includes the study of the kinetics of the reactions; investigate the mechanisms of the process using commercially available surfactants for reduction of gravity override and channeling of steam; investigate and improve techniques of formation evaluation such as tracer tests and pressure transient tests; and provide technical support for design and monitoring of DOE sponsored or industry initiated field projects.

  4. Stepping Up the Pressure: Arousal Can Be Associated with a Reduction in Male Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Andrew; Mann, Traci; Westling, Erika H.; Creswell, J. David; Ebert, Jeffrey P.; Wallaert, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The attentional myopia model of behavioral control (Mann & Ward, 2007) was tested in an experiment investigating the relationship between physiological arousal and aggression. Drawing on previous work linking arousal and narrowed attentional focus, the model predicts that arousal will lead to behavior that is relatively disinhibited in situations in which promoting pressures to aggress are highly salient. In situations in which inhibitory pressures are more salient, the model predicts behavior that is relatively restrained. In the experiment, 81 male undergraduates delivered noise-blasts against a provoking confederate while experiencing either high or low levels of physiological arousal and, at the same time, being exposed to cues that served either to promote or inhibit aggression. In addition to supporting the predictions of the model, this experiment provided some of the first evidence for enhanced control of aggression under conditions of heightened physiological arousal. Implications for interventions designed to reduce aggression are discussed. PMID:18561301

  5. Fluid shifts, vasodilatation and ambulatory blood pressure reduction during long duration spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Norsk, Peter; Asmar, Ali; Damgaard, Morten; Christensen, Niels Juel

    2015-01-01

    Acute weightlessness in space induces a fluid shift leading to central volume expansion. Simultaneously, blood pressure is either unchanged or decreased slightly. Whether these effects persist for months in space is unclear. Twenty-four hour ambulatory brachial arterial pressures were automatically recorded at 1–2 h intervals with portable equipment in eight male astronauts: once before launch, once between 85 and 192 days in space on the International Space Station and, finally, once at least 2 months after flight. During the same 24 h, cardiac output (rebreathing method) was measured two to five times (on the ground seated), and venous blood was sampled once (also seated on the ground) for determination of plasma catecholamine concentrations. The 24 h average systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures (mean ± se) in space were reduced by 8 ± 2 mmHg (P = 0.01; ANOVA), 9 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.001) and 10 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.006), respectively. The nightly blood pressure dip of 8 ± 3 mmHg (P = 0.015) was maintained. Cardiac stroke volume and output increased by 35 ± 10% and 41 ± 9% (P < 0.001); heart rate and catecholamine concentrations were unchanged; and systemic vascular resistance was reduced by 39 ± 4% (P < 0.001). The increase in cardiac stroke volume and output is more than previously observed during short duration flights and might be a precipitator for some of the vision problems encountered by the astronauts. The spaceflight vasodilatation mechanism needs to be explored further. PMID:25774397

  6. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  7. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  8. Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval exercise performed in water or dryland condition.

    PubMed

    Sosner, Philippe; Gayda, Mathieu; Dupuy, Olivier; Garzon, Mauricio; Lemasson, Christopher; Gremeaux, Vincent; Lalongé, Julie; Gonzales, Mariel; Hayami, Douglas; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil; Bosquet, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65 ± 7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥ 130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic blood pressures [SBP/DBP]) were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24 minutes at 50% peak power output) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10 minutes with phases of 15 seconds 100% peak power output interspersed by 15 seconds of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-hour average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-hour BP decrease (SBP: -3.6 ± 5.7/DBP: -2.8 ± 3.0 mm Hg, P < .05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8 ± 9.5/DBP: -3.0 ± 4.5 mm Hg, P < .05). The one condition that modified 24-hour pulse-wave velocity was immersed HIIE (-0.21 ± 0.30 m/s, P < .05). PMID:27026570

  9. Exploring the effects of data quality, data worth, and redundancy of CO2 gas pressure and saturation data on reservoir characterization through PEST Inversion

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhufeng; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Engel, David W.; Fang, Yilin; Eslinger, Paul W.

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the impacts of reservoir properties on CO2 migration after subsurface injection and evaluated the possibility of characterizing reservoir properties using CO2 monitoring data such as saturation distribution. The injection reservoir was assumed to be located 1400-1500 m below the ground surface such that CO2 remained in the supercritical state. The reservoir was assumed to contain layers with alternating conductive and resistive properties, which is analogous to actual geological formations such as the Mount Simon Sandstone unit. The CO2 injection simulation used a cylindrical grid setting in which the injection well was situated at the center of the domain, which extended up to 8000 m from the injection well. The CO2 migration was simulated using the PNNL-developed simulator STOMP-CO2e (the water-salt-CO2 module). We adopted a nonlinear parameter estimation and optimization modeling software package, PEST, for automated reservoir parameter estimation. We explored the effects of data quality, data worth, and data redundancy on the detectability of reservoir parameters using CO2 saturation monitoring data, by comparing PEST inversion results using data with different levels of noises, various numbers of monitoring wells and locations, and different data collection spacing and temporal sampling intervals. This study yielded insight into the use of CO2 saturation monitoring data for reservoir characterization and how to design the monitoring system to optimize data worth and reduce data redundancy.

  10. Efficacy of combined cataract extraction and endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation for the reduction of intraocular pressure and medication burden

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Sammie J.; Mulvahill, Matthew; SooHoo, Jeffrey R.; Pantcheva, Mina B.; Kahook, Malik Y.; Seibold, Leonard K.

    2016-01-01

    AIM To report on the efficacy of combined endoscopic cyclophotocoagulation (ECP) and phacoemulsification cataract extraction (PCE) with intraocular lens placement for reduction of intraocular pressure (IOP) and medication burden in glaucoma. METHODS A retrospective case review of 91 eyes (73 patients) with glaucoma and cataract that underwent combined PCE/ECP surgery was performed. Baseline demographic and ocular characteristics were recorded, as well as intraocular pressure, number of glaucoma medications, and visual acuity postoperatively with 12-month follow-up. Treatment failure was defined as less than 20% reduction in IOP from baseline on two consecutive visits (at 1, 3, 6, or 12mo postoperatively), IOP ≥21 mm Hg or ≤5 mm Hg on two consecutive visits, or additional glaucoma surgery performed within 12mo after PCE/ECP. RESULTS Overall, mean medicated IOP was reduced from 16.65 mm Hg at baseline to 13.38 mm Hg at 12mo (P<0.0001). Mean number of glaucoma medications was reduced from 1.88 medications at baseline to 1.48 medications at 12mo (P=0.0003). At 3mo postoperatively, the success rate was 73.6% (95%CI: 63.3, 81.5), 57.1% at 6mo (95% CI: 46.3, 66.6), and 49.7% at 12mo (95%CI: 38.9, 59.6). Patient demographic characteristics were not associated with treatment success. The only ocular characteristic associated with treatment success was a higher baseline IOP. CONCLUSION Combined PCE/ECP surgery is an effective surgical option for the reduction of IOP and medication burden in glaucoma patients. Patients with higher baseline IOP levels are most likely to benefit from this procedure. PMID:27275423

  11. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products. PMID:27014228

  12. Acidic Electrolyzed Water as a Novel Transmitting Medium for High Hydrostatic Pressure Reduction of Bacterial Loads on Shelled Fresh Shrimp

    PubMed Central

    Du, Suping; Zhang, Zhaohuan; Xiao, Lili; Lou, Yang; Pan, Yingjie; Zhao, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acidic electrolyzed water (AEW), a novel non-thermal sterilization technology, is widely used in the food industry. In this study, we firstly investigated the effect of AEW as a new pressure transmitting medium for high hydrostatic pressure (AEW-HHP) processing on microorganisms inactivation on shelled fresh shrimp. The optimal conditions of AEW-HHP for Vibrio parahaemolyticus inactivation on sterile shelled fresh shrimp were obtained using response surface methodology: NaCl concentration to electrolysis 1.5 g/L, treatment pressure 400 MPa, treatment time 10 min. Under the optimal conditions mentioned above, AEW dramatically enhanced the efficiency of HHP for inactivating V. parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes on artificially contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, and the log reductions were up to 6.08 and 5.71 log10 CFU/g respectively, while the common HHP could only inactivate the two pathogens up to 4.74 and 4.31 log10 CFU/g respectively. Meanwhile, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed the same phenomenon. For the naturally contaminated shelled fresh shrimp, AEW-HHP could also significantly reduce the micro flora when examined using plate count and PCR-DGGE. There were also no significant changes, histologically, in the muscle tissues of shrimps undergoing the AEW-HHP treatment. In summary, using AEW as a new transmitting medium for HHP processing is an innovative non thermal technology for improving the food safety of shrimp and other aquatic products. PMID:27014228

  13. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  14. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.; Keen, Noel D.; Johnson, Jeffrey N.

    2015-04-18

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes.

  15. Effect of high-pressure processing on reduction of Listeria monocytogenes in packaged Queso Fresco.

    PubMed

    Tomasula, P M; Renye, J A; Van Hekken, D L; Tunick, M H; Kwoczak, R; Toht, M; Leggett, L N; Luchansky, J B; Porto-Fett, A C S; Phillips, J G

    2014-03-01

    The effect of high-hydrostatic-pressure processing (HPP) on the survival of a 5-strain rifampicin-resistant cocktail of Listeria monocytogenes in Queso Fresco (QF) was evaluated as a postpackaging intervention. Queso Fresco was made using pasteurized, homogenized milk, and was starter-free and not pressed. In phase 1, QF slices (12.7 × 7.6 × 1 cm), weighing from 52 to 66 g, were surface inoculated with L. monocytogenes (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g) and individually double vacuum packaged. The slices were then warmed to either 20 or 40°C and HPP treated at 200, 400, and 600 MPa for hold times of 5, 10, 15, or 20 min. Treatment at 600 MPa was most effective in reducing L. monocytogenes to below the detection level of 0.91 log10 cfu/g at all hold times and temperatures. High-hydrostatic-pressure processing at 40°C, 400 MPa, and hold time ≥ 15 min was effective but resulted in wheying-off and textural changes. In phase 2, L. monocytogenes was inoculated either on the slices (ca. 5.0 log10 cfu/g; ON) or in the curds (ca. 7.0 log10 cfu/g; IN) before the cheese block was formed and sliced. The slices were treated at 20°C and 600 MPa at hold times of 3, 10, and 20 min, and then stored at 4 and 10°C for 60 d. For both treatments, L. monocytogenes became less resistant to pressure as hold time increased, with greater percentages of injured cells at 3 and 10 min than at 20 min, at which the lethality of the process increased. For the IN treatment, with hold times of 3 and 10 min, growth of L. monocytogenes increased the first week of storage, but was delayed for 1 wk, with a hold time of 20 min. Longer lag times in growth of L. monocytogenes during storage at 4°C were observed for the ON treatment at hold times of 10 and 20 min, indicating that the IN treatment may have provided a more protective environment with less injury to the cells than the ON treatment. Similarly, HPP treatment for 10 min followed by storage at 4°C was the best method for suppressing the growth of

  16. Coarsened Exact Matching of Phaco-Trabectome to Trabectome in Phakic Patients: Lack of Additional Pressure Reduction from Phacoemulsification

    PubMed Central

    Parikh, Hardik A.; Bussel, Igor I.; Schuman, Joel S.; Brown, Eric N.; Loewen, Nils A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare intraocular pressure (IOP) after trabectome-mediated ab interno trabeculectomy surgery in phakic patients (T) and trabectome with same session phacoemulsification (PT) using Coarsened Exact Matching. Although phacoemulsification is associated with IOP reduction when performed on its own, it is not known how much it contributes in PT. Methods Subjects were divided into phakic T and PT. Exclusion criteria were follow-up for <12 months and additional glaucoma surgery. Demographics were compared by the Mann-Whitney U test and chi-squared test for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Multiple imputation was utilized to avoid eliminating data with missing values. Groups were then matched using Coarsened Exact Matching based on age, race, type of glaucoma, baseline IOP, and number of preoperative glaucoma medications. Univariate linear regression was used to examine IOP reduction after surgery; those variables that were statistically significant were included in the final multivariate regression model. Results A total of 753 cases were included (T: 255, PT: 498). When all variables except for age were kept constant, there was an additional IOP reduction of 0.05±0.01 mmHg conferred for every yearly increment in age. Every 1 mmHg increase in baseline IOP correlated to an additional IOP reduction of 0.80±0.02 mmHg. Phacoemulsification was not found to be a statistically significant contributor to IOP when comparing T and PT (p≥0.05). T had a 21% IOP reduction to 15.9±3.5 mmHg (p<0.01) while PT had an 18% reduction to 15.5±3.6 mmHg (p<0.01). Number of medications decreased (p<0.01) in both groups from 2.4±1.2 to 1.9±1.3 and from 2.3±1.1 to 1.7±1.3, respectively. Conclusion Phacoemulsification does not make a significant contribution to postoperative IOP or number of medications when combined with trabectome surgery in phakic patients. PMID:26895293

  17. Beyond blood pressure: new paradigms in sodium intake reduction and health outcomes.

    PubMed

    King, Janet C; Reimers, Kristin J

    2014-09-01

    Since 1980, when inaugural national dietary guidance was to “avoid too much sodium,” recommendations have evolved to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ quantified guidance of 2300 and 1500 mg/d [USDA and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary guidelines for Americans, 1st (http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAs1980Guidelines.htm) and 7th (http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2010/dietaryguidelines2010.pdf) eds.]. Too much sodium remains a valid concern, but are current targets too low for optimal health? New research moves beyond sodium’s effect on the surrogate marker of blood pressure to examine the relation between sodium intake and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Results show that sodium intakes both less than and greater than ∼3000–5000 mg/d increase the risk of negative health outcomes. Additionally, newly compiled sodium intake data across populations show a uniformity that suggests that intake is physiologically set. Perhaps not coincidentally, the observed intakes fall within the range related to lowest risk. These findings are highly relevant to current efforts to achieve low sodium intakes across populations, because the data suggest that the efforts will be unsuccessful for healthy people and may cause harm to vulnerable populations. Remaining mindful of risks associated with both excessive and inadequate intakes is imperative with all nutrients, and sodium is no exception. Avoiding too much, and too little, sodium may be the best advice for Americans. PMID:25469390

  18. Carbonate petroleum reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Roehl, P.O.; Choquette, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents papers on the geology of petroleum deposits. Topics considered include diagenesis, porosity, dolomite reservoirs, deposition, reservoir rock, reefs, morphology, fracture-controlled production, Cenozoic reservoirs, Mesozoic reservoirs, and Paleozoic reservoirs.

  19. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Evans, T.E.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Unterberg, E. A.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Frerichs, H.; Groth, M.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Lasnier, C. J.; Lehnen, M.; Leonard, A. W.; Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R.A.; Osborne, T. H.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Schaffer, M. J.; Unterberg, B.; West, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q(95) resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q(95) resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  20. Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Lehnen, M.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Unterberg, B.; Evans, T. E.; Austin, M. E.; Bray, B. D.; Brooks, N. H.; Leonard, A. W.; Osborne, T. H.; Schaffer, M. J.; West, W. P.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Groth, M.; Lasnier, C. J.; Unterberg, E. A.; Jakubowski, M. W.; Mordijck, S.

    2009-10-16

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p{sub e} in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q{sub 95} resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p{sub e} reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q{sub 95} resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

  1. Plasma-Assisted Reduction of Graphene Oxide at Low Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure for Flexible Conductor Applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Whan; Mattevi, Cecilia; Chhowalla, Manish; Sankaran, R Mohan

    2012-03-15

    Reduction of graphene oxide (GO) at low temperature and atmospheric pressure via plasma-assisted chemistry is demonstrated. Hydrogen gas is continuously dissociated in a microplasma to generate atomic hydrogen, which flows from the remote plasma to thin films of GO deposited on a substrate. Direct interaction with ions and other energetic species is avoided to mitigate ion-induced sputter removal or damage. The residual oxygen content and structure of the GO films after plasma treatment is systematically characterized at different temperatures and correlated to the conductivity of the films. For example, at 150 °C, we find that the plasma-reduced GO contains less than 12.5% oxygen and exhibits a sheet resistance of 4.77 × 10(4) Ω/sq, as compared with thermal reduction alone, which results in 22.9% oxygen and a sheet resistance of 2.14 × 10(6) Ω/sq. Overall, the effective removal of oxygen functional groups by atomic hydrogen enables large-scale applications of GO as flexible conductors to be realized. PMID:26286289

  2. The application of high-pressure treatment in the reduction of salt levels in reduced-phosphate breakfast sausages.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Claire C; Cruz-Romero, Malco C; Troy, Declan; Mullen, Anne M; Kerry, Joe P

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of high pressure (HP) treatment of pork meat before manufacturing sausages with reduced salt levels and compared them to sausages manufactured with untreated meat (control sausages). A 2×5 factorial design was set up incorporating two pressure levels (0 or 150 MPa) and five salt levels (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5%). Most quality attributes were affected when salt levels were reduced below 1.5%. Fat loss (FL) was (P<0.05) affected by salt level; samples with <1.5% salt had the highest FL. HP treatment increased emulsion stability and reduced cook loss (CL) compared to control sausages. Increased CL was observed when salt was reduced below 2.0%. Salt reduction below 1.5% adversely affected colour, sensory and texture attributes. Independent of salt, HP treatment affected adversely juiciness and cohesiveness while adhesiveness was improved. Overall, there is potential to manufacture sausages maintaining organoleptic and functional properties traditionally associated with sausages using HP treated meat. PMID:24334049

  3. Feasibility study of sustained-release travoprost punctum plug for intraocular pressure reduction in an Asian population

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Shamira A; Ting, Daniel SW; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Chew, Paul T; Aquino, Maria Cecilia D; Sng, Chelvin CA; Ho, Sue-Wei; Aung, Tin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the efficacy and safety of a punctum plug-based sustained drug release system for a prostaglandin analog, travoprost (OTX-TP), for intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction in an Asian population. Methods This is an initial feasibility, prospective, single-arm study involving 26 eyes and a bioresorbable punctum plug containing OTX-TP. An OTX-TP was placed in the vertical portion of the superior or inferior canaliculus of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension. The main outcome measure was the IOP-lowering efficacy of OTX-TP at 3 (8 am) and 10, 20, and 30 days (8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm), compared to baseline. Results A total of 26 OTX-TP were inserted for 17 subjects. The mean (standard deviation) age was 57.2 (13.8) years. At 10 days, all plugs were still present, and the IOP reduction from baseline was 6.2 (23%), 5.4 (21%), and 7.5 mmHg (28%) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively. At 10 days, the mean IOP (standard error of mean) was 21.2 (1.2), 20.4 (0.8), and 19.7 (1.0) at 8 am, 10 am, and 4 pm, respectively, showing no discernible IOP trend during the course of the day. At 30 days, plug retention had declined to 42%, and the overall IOP reduction had decreased to 16%. Conclusion The sustained-release OTX-TP is able to reduce IOP by 24% (day 10) and 15.6% (day 30), respectively. It is a potentially well-tolerable ocular hypotensive for glaucoma patients with a history of poor compliance. PMID:27175058

  4. Association of biometric factors with anterior chamber angle widening and intraocular pressure reduction after uneventful phacoemulsification for cataract

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guofu; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Lee, Roland; Chen, Yi-Chun; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan C.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate anterior chamber biometric factors associated with the degree of angle widening and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after phacoemulsification. SETTING University of California, San Francisco, California, USA. DESIGN Case series. METHODS Anterior chamber parameters obtained by anterior segment coherence tomography were compared preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. Measurements included the angle opening distance 500 μm anterior to the scleral spur (AOD500), trabecular–iris space area 500 μm from the scleral spur (TISA500), iris curvature (I-Curv), anterior chamber angle (ACA), trabecular–iris space area, anterior chamber volume, anterior chamber width, and lens vault (LV). RESULTS The study enrolled 73 eyes. The mean patient age was 77.45 years ± 7.84 (SD); 65.75% of patients were women. From preoperatively to 3 months postoperatively, the mean AOD500 increased significantly (0.254 ± 0.105 to 0.433 ± 0.108 mm) and the mean IOP decreased significantly (14.97 ± 3.35 to 12.62 ± 3.37 mm Hg) (P < .001). The reduction in IOP was correlated with the increase in AOD500 (r = 0.240, P = .041) and preoperative LV (r = 0.235, P = .045). After adjusting for related factors, AOD500 widening was positively correlated with LV (β = 0.458, P = .044) and I-Curv (β = 0.235, P = .043) and negatively correlated with preoperative TISA500 (β = −0.269, P = .025) and ACA (β = −0.919, P = .027). CONCLUSIONS Surgically induced AOD widening was significantly correlated with anterior chamber biometric factors. Preoperative LV appears to be a significant factor in angle widening and IOP reduction after phacoemulsification. PMID:22055073

  5. AUTOMATED TECHNIQUE FOR FLOW MEASUREMENTS FROM MARIOTTE RESERVOIRS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Constantz, Jim; Murphy, Fred

    1987-01-01

    The mariotte reservoir supplies water at a constant hydraulic pressure by self-regulation of its internal gas pressure. Automated outflow measurements from mariotte reservoirs are generally difficult because of the reservoir's self-regulation mechanism. This paper describes an automated flow meter specifically designed for use with mariotte reservoirs. The flow meter monitors changes in the mariotte reservoir's gas pressure during outflow to determine changes in the reservoir's water level. The flow measurement is performed by attaching a pressure transducer to the top of a mariotte reservoir and monitoring gas pressure changes during outflow with a programmable data logger. The advantages of the new automated flow measurement techniques include: (i) the ability to rapidly record a large range of fluxes without restricting outflow, and (ii) the ability to accurately average the pulsing flow, which commonly occurs during outflow from the mariotte reservoir.

  6. Computation of time-dependent subsurface pore pressure variations and stresses due to time varying water loads at the Itoiz reservoir (Northern Spain), and their relation with near seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzón, F.; García-Jerez, A.; Santoyo, M. A.

    2009-04-01

    In this work we study the seismicity produced near the newly constructed Itoiz reservoir in the western Pyrenees (northern Spain). We computed the evolution of the stress changes in the subsoil due to the time water load distribution and relate it with the main seismicity occurred after the beginning of impoundment in 2004. We also computed the pore pressure variations produced around Itoiz dam using a hybrid technique which take into account the time varying water loads in the reservoir. In this methodology, two different techniques are joined to calculate each one of the partial solutions evolved: the pore pressure diffusion term is obtained by using the Green functions of the problem, whereas the second term due to stress time changes is computed with a Finite Difference Method (FDM). We pay special attention to the pore pressure changes at the hypocenter location of the mainshock (with magnitude mb = 4.6) occurred on September 2004, 8 months after the beginning of its impounding. After this, we compute the coseismic and postseismic stress changes produced by the main events of the seismic series and study its influence on the triggering of the aftershocks by means of the Coulomb Failure Stress criterion (ΔCFS). Results show that at the time of occurrence of the main earthquake the pore pressure change was of about 1000 Pa at the hypocenter. However, the pore pressure variation exceeded 1000 Pa at other earlier times and at many different positions near Itoiz dam without the occurrence of earlier earthquakes. Thus, the origin of the September 18, 2004 earthquake (mb = 4.6) can be explained when considering the pore pressure perturbation at a pre-existent fault in the hypocenter location with more aptitude to fail than other sites, together with the assumption of regional pre-existing stress field. At last we found, a large positive influence over most of the aftershocks of the seismic series due to the stress changes produced by the largest events.

  7. Kinetics of reduction of aqueous hexaammineruthenium(III) ion at Pt and Au microelectrodes: electrolyte, temperature, and pressure effects.

    PubMed

    Vijaikanth, Vijendran; Li, Guangchun; Swaddle, Thomas W

    2013-03-01

    Rate constants kel obtained by impedance spectroscopy for the reduction of Ru(NH3)6(3+) at polycrystalline Pt and Au ultramicroelectrodes depend strongly on the identity and concentration of the anion present in the order CF3SO3(-) < Cl(-) < ClO4(-), but not on the cation of the supporting electrolyte (Na(+), K(+), H(+)). For Cl(-) as the sole anion present, kel is directly proportional to the total [Cl(-)], such that kel would be zero if Cl(-) were hypothetically absent, indicating that Cl(-) is directly involved in mediation of the Ru(NH3)6(3+/2+) electron transfer. For CF3SO3(-) as the sole counterion, the dependence of kel on the total [CF3SO3(-)] is not linear, possibly because blocking of the available electrode surface becomes dominant at high triflate concentrations. Volumes of activation ΔVel(⧧) for reduction of Ru(NH3)6(3+) at an electrode in presence of Cl(-) or CF3SO3(-) are much more negative than predictions based on theory (Swaddle, T. W. Chem. Rev.2005, 105, 2573) that has been successful with other electron transfer reactions but which does not take into account the involvement of the anions in the activation process. The strongly negative ΔVel(⧧) values probably reflect solvation increases peculiar to activation processes of Ru(III/II) am(m)ine complexes, possibly together with promotion of desorption of surface-blocking Cl(-) or CF3SO3(-) from electrodes by applied pressure. Frumkin corrections for Ru(NH3)6(3+) within the diffuse double layer would make ΔVel(⧧) even more negative than is observed, although the corrections would be small. The strongly negative ΔVel(⧧) values are inconsistent with reduction of Ru(NH3)6(3+) in direct contact with the metallic electrode surface, which would entail substantial dehydration of both the electrode and Ru(NH3)6(3+). Reduction of Ru(NH3)6(3+) can be regarded as taking place in hard contact with adsorbed water at the outer Helmholtz plane. PMID:23421865

  8. Water aerobics is followed by short-time and immediate systolic blood pressure reduction in overweight and obese hypertensive women.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Raphael Martins; Arsa, Gisela; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Lopes, Lorena Curado; Santana, Fabio; Noleto, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Rolim, Thais I; Lehnen, Alexandre Machado

    2016-07-01

    One exercise training session such as walking, running, and resistance can lead to a decrease in blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, but few studies have investigated the effects of exercise training in an aquatic environment for overweight and obese hypertensive individuals. We aimed to assess the acute effects of a water aerobics session on blood pressure changes in pharmacologically treated overweight and obese hypertensive women. A randomized crossover study was carried out with 18 hypertensive women, 10 of them were overweight (54.4 ± 7.9 years; body mass index: 27.8 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) and eight obese (56.4 ± 6.6 years; body mass index: 33.0 ± 2.0 kg/m(2)). The water aerobics exercise session consisted of a 45-minute training at the intensity of 70%-75% of maximum heart rate adjusted for the aquatic environment. The control group did not enter the pool and did not perform any exercise. We measured systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) before, immediately after, and every 10 minutes up to 30 minutes after the aerobic exercise or control session. Overall (n = 18), DBP did not change after the water aerobic exercise and control session, and SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes postexercise compared to the control session. Among overweight women, SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes postexercise. In contrast, among obese women, SBP decreased only at 10 minutes postexercise. SBP variation was -2.68 mm Hg in overweight and -1.24 mm Hg in obese women. In conclusion, the water aerobics session leads to a reduction in SBP, but not in DBP, during 10 and 20 minutes postexercise recovery. Thus, it may be safely prescribed to overweight and obese women. PMID:27245928

  9. Reservoir depletion at The Geysers geothermal area, California, shown by four-dimensional seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunasekera, R.C.; Foulger, G.R.; Julian, B.R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensive geothermal exploitation at The Geysers geothermal area, California, induces myriads of small-magnitude earthquakes that are monitored by a dense, permanent, local seismometer network. Using this network, tomographic inversions were performed for the three-dimensional Vp and Vp/Vs structure of the reservoir for April 1991, February 1993, December 1994, October 1996, and August 1998. The extensive low-Vp/Vs anomaly that occupies the reservoir grew in strength from a maximum of 9% to a maximum of 13.4% during the 7-year study period. This is attributed to depletion of pore liquid water in the reservoir and replacement with steam. This decreases Vp by increasing compressibility, and increases Vs because of reduction in pore pressure and the drying of argillaceous minerals, e.g., illite, which increase the shear modulus. These effects serendipitously combine to lower Vp/Vs, resulting in a strong overall effect that provides a convenient tool for monitoring reservoir depletion. Variations in the Vp and Vs fields indicate that water depletion is the dominant process in the central part of the exploited reservoir, and pressure reduction and mineral drying in the northwest and southeast parts of the reservoir. The rate at which the Vp/Vs anomaly grew in strength in the period 1991-1998 suggests most of the original anomaly was caused by exploitation. Continuous monitoring of Vp, Vs, and Vp/Vs is an effective geothermal reservoir depletion monitoring tool and can potentially provide information about depletion in parts of the reservoir that have not been drilled.

  10. An experimental study of relative permeability hysteresis, capillary trapping characteristics, and capillary pressure of CO2/brine systems at reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin Suthanthiraraj, Pearlson Prashanth

    We present the results of an extensive experimental study on the effects of hysteresis on permanent capillary trapping and relative permeability of CO2/brine and supercritical (sc)CO2+SO2/brine systems. We performed numerous unsteady- and steady-state drainage and imbibition full-recirculation flow experiments in three different sandstone rock samples, i.e., low and high-permeability Berea, Nugget sandstones, and Madison limestone carbonate rock sample. A state-of-the-art reservoir conditions core-flooding system was used to perform the tests. The core-flooding apparatus included a medical CT scanner to measure in-situ saturations. The scanner was rotated to the horizontal orientation allowing flow tests through vertically-placed core samples with about 3.8 cm diameter and 15 cm length. Both scCO2 /brine and gaseous CO2 (gCO2)/brine fluid systems were studied. The gaseous and supercritical CO2/brine experiments were carried out at 3.46 and 11 MPa back pressures and 20 and 55°C temperatures, respectively. Under the above-mentioned conditions, the gCO2 and scCO2 have 0.081 and 0.393 gr/cm3 densities, respectively. During unsteady-state tests, the samples were first saturated with brine and then flooded with CO2 (drainage) at different maximum flow rates. The drainage process was then followed by a low flow rate (0.375 cm 3/min) imbibition until residual CO2 saturation was achieved. Wide flow rate ranges of 0.25 to 20 cm3/min for scCO2 and 0.125 to 120 cm3min for gCO2 were used to investigate the variation of initial brine saturation (Swi) with maximum CO2 flow rate and variation of trapped CO2 saturation (SCO2r) with Swi. For a given Swi, the trapped scCO2 saturation was less than that of gCO2 in the same sample. This was attributed to brine being less wetting in the presence of scCO2 than in the presence of gCO 2. During the steady-state experiments, after providing of fully-brine saturated core, scCO2 was injected along with brine to find the drainage curve and as

  11. APFBC repowering could help meet Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction goals[Advanced Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, R.E.; Tonnemacher, G.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Clinton Administration signed the 1997 Kyoto Protocol agreement that would limit US greenhouse gas emissions, of which carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is the most significant. While the Kyoto Protocol has not yet been submitted to the Senate for ratification, in the past, there have been few proposed environmental actions that had continued and wide-spread attention of the press and environmental activists that did not eventually lead to regulation. Since the Kyoto Protocol might lead to future regulation, its implications need investigation by the power industry. Limiting CO{sub 2} emissions affects the ability of the US to generate reliable, low cost electricity, and has tremendous potential impact on electric generating companies with a significant investment in coal-fired generation, and on their customers. This paper explores the implications of reducing coal plant CO{sub 2} by various amounts. The amount of reduction for the US that is proposed in the Kyoto Protocol is huge. The Kyoto Protocol would commit the US to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions to 7% below 1990 levels. Since 1990, there has been significant growth in US population and the US economy driving carbon emissions 34% higher by year 2010. That means CO{sub 2} would have to be reduced by 30.9%, which is extremely difficult to accomplish. The paper tells why. There are, however, coal-based technologies that should be available in time to make significant reductions in coal-plant CO{sub 2} emissions. Th paper focuses on one plant repowering method that can reduce CO{sub 2} per kWh by 25%, advanced circulating pressurized fluidized bed combustion combined cycle (APFBC) technology, based on results from a recent APFBC repowering concept evaluation of the Carolina Power and Light Company's (CP and L) L.V. Sutton steam station. The replacement of the existing 50-year base of power generating units needed to meet proposed Kyoto Protocol CO{sub 2} reduction commitments would be a massive undertaking. It is

  12. Reservoir Simulations of Low-Temperature Geothermal Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedre, Madhur Ganesh

    The eastern United States generally has lower temperature gradients than the western United States. However, West Virginia, in particular, has higher temperature gradients compared to other eastern states. A recent study at Southern Methodist University by Blackwell et al. has shown the presence of a hot spot in the eastern part of West Virginia with temperatures reaching 150°C at a depth of between 4.5 and 5 km. This thesis work examines similar reservoirs at a depth of around 5 km resembling the geology of West Virginia, USA. The temperature gradients used are in accordance with the SMU study. In order to assess the effects of geothermal reservoir conditions on the lifetime of a low-temperature geothermal system, a sensitivity analysis study was performed on following seven natural and human-controlled parameters within a geothermal reservoir: reservoir temperature, injection fluid temperature, injection flow rate, porosity, rock thermal conductivity, water loss (%) and well spacing. This sensitivity analysis is completed by using ‘One factor at a time method (OFAT)’ and ‘Plackett-Burman design’ methods. The data used for this study was obtained by carrying out the reservoir simulations using TOUGH2 simulator. The second part of this work is to create a database of thermal potential and time-dependant reservoir conditions for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs by studying a number of possible scenarios. Variations in the parameters identified in sensitivity analysis study are used to expand the scope of database. Main results include the thermal potential of reservoir, pressure and temperature profile of the reservoir over its operational life (30 years for this study), the plant capacity and required pumping power. The results of this database will help the supply curves calculations for low-temperature geothermal reservoirs in the United States, which is the long term goal of the work being done by the geothermal research group under Dr. Anderson at

  13. Novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen: reduction of microbial-contaminants and OH radicals in the air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojima, Hideo; Park, Rae-Eun; Kwon, Jun-Hyoun; Suh, Inseon; Jeon, Junsang; Ha, Eunju; On, Hyeon-Ki; Kim, Hye-Ryung; Choi, Kyoung Hui; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Seong, Baik-Lin; Jung, Hoon; Kang, Shin Jung; Namba, Shinichi; Takiyama, Ken

    2007-01-01

    A novel atmospheric pressure plasma device releasing atomic hydrogen has been developed. This device has specific properties such as (1) deactivation of airborne microbial-contaminants, (2) neutralization of indoor OH radicals and (3) being harmless to the human body. It consists of a ceramic plate as a positive ion generation electrode and a needle-shaped electrode as an electron emission electrode. Release of atomic hydrogen from the device has been investigated by the spectroscopic method. Optical emission of atomic hydrogen probably due to recombination of positive ions, H+(H2O)n, generated from the ceramic plate electrode and electrons emitted from the needle-shaped electrode have been clearly observed in the He gas (including water vapour) environment. The efficacy of the device to reduce airborne concentrations of influenza virus, bacteria, mould fungi and allergens has been evaluated. 99.6% of airborne influenza virus has been deactivated with the operation of the device compared with the control test in a 1 m3 chamber after 60 min. The neutralization of the OH radical has been investigated by spectroscopic and biological methods. A remarkable reduction of the OH radical in the air by operation of the device has been observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. The cell protection effects of the device against OH radicals in the air have been observed. Furthermore, the side effects have been checked by animal experiments. The harmlessness of the device has been confirmed.

  14. Increase in stagnation pressure and enthalpy in shock tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    1993-01-01

    A new technique based on the insertion of a converging section in the driven tube is described which is capable of producing substantial increases in both reservoir pressure and enthalpy. A 1D inviscid full kinetics code is used to study a number of different locations and shapes for the converging driven tube section. For driven tube diameter reductions of factors of 2 and 3, the reservoir pressure is found to increase by factors of 2.1 and 3.2, respectively, and the enthalpy is found to simultaneously increase by factors of 1.5 and 2.1, respectively.

  15. Substrate-specific pressure-dependence of microbial sulfate reduction in deep-sea cold seep sediments of the Japan Trench

    PubMed Central

    Vossmeyer, Antje; Deusner, Christian; Kato, Chiaki; Inagaki, Fumio; Ferdelman, Timothy G.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure on microbial sulfate reduction (SR) was studied using sediments obtained at cold seep sites from 5500 to 6200 m water depth of the Japan Trench. Sediment samples were stored under anoxic conditions for 17 months in slurries at 4°C and at in situ pressure (50 MPa), at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa), or under methanic conditions with a methane partial pressure of 0.2 MPa. Samples without methane amendment stored at in situ pressure retained higher levels of sulfate reducing activity than samples stored at 0.1 MPa. Piezophilic SR showed distinct substrate specificity after hydrogen and acetate addition. SR activity in samples stored under methanic conditions was one order of magnitude higher than in non-amended samples. Methanic samples stored under low hydrostatic pressure exhibited no increased SR activity at high pressure even with the amendment of methane. These new insights into the effects of pressure on substrate specific sulfate reducing activity in anaerobic environmental samples indicate that hydrostatic pressure must be considered to be a relevant parameter in ecological studies of anaerobic deep-sea microbial processes and long-term storage of environmental samples. PMID:22822404

  16. Reservoir Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Renner, J.L.

    1992-03-24

    The reservoir technology program supports the utilization of geothermal resources through development and verification of new earth science technologies for: exploration, fluid production and injection; and prediction of reservoir lifetimes. A two-fold strategy of conducting DOE-sponsored research to meet higher-risk, longer-term needs and cost-shared research with industry in areas of greatest current need is utilized to maximize the benefit of the program to the geothermal industry. The program uses a coordinated, multi-disciplinary approach to investigating and solving reservoir problems facing the industry. Research at The Geysers geothermal field has received major emphasis in the past three years. Recent progress in that work will be reviewed in detail by The Geysers operators, federal, state and local regulators and other interested parties during a meeting in Santa Rosa on May 5 and 6, 1992. Hence the papers by Lipman, Bodvarsson et al., Wannamaker, et al., Horne, and Shook in this proceedings volume emphasize non-Geysers research in the program.

  17. TRITIUM RESERVOIR STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.S.; Morgan, M.J

    2005-11-10

    The burst test is used to assess the material performance of tritium reservoirs in the surveillance program in which reservoirs have been in service for extended periods of time. A materials system model and finite element procedure were developed under a Savannah River Site Plant-Directed Research and Development (PDRD) program to predict the structural response under a full range of loading and aged material conditions of the reservoir. The results show that the predicted burst pressure and volume ductility are in good agreement with the actual burst test results for the unexposed units. The material tensile properties used in the calculations were obtained from a curved tensile specimen harvested from a companion reservoir by Electric Discharge Machining (EDM). In the absence of exposed and aged material tensile data, literature data were used for demonstrating the methodology in terms of the helium-3 concentration in the metal and the depth of penetration in the reservoir sidewall. It can be shown that the volume ductility decreases significantly with the presence of tritium and its decay product, helium-3, in the metal, as was observed in the laboratory-controlled burst tests. The model and analytical procedure provides a predictive tool for reservoir structural integrity under aging conditions. It is recommended that benchmark tests and analysis for aged materials be performed. The methodology can be augmented to predict performance for reservoir with flaws.

  18. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  19. Comparison study of intraocular pressure reduction efficacy and safety between latanoprost and tafluprost in Japanese with normal-tension glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Tada, Kaori; Ueno, Morio; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Sotozono, Chie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate and compare the intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction efficacy and safety between the ophthalmic solutions 0.005% latanoprost (Lat) and 0.0015% tafluprost (Taf) in Japanese patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG). Methods In this randomized nonmasked study, we prospectively enrolled 30 Japanese NTG patients who had used Lat monotherapy for more than 4 weeks, and randomly divided them into the following two groups: 1) Lat-to-Taf group (LT group) and 2) Taf-to-Lat group (TL group). At the beginning of the study, both groups were switched from initial Lat to Lat or Taf for 12 weeks, and then switched over to the other drug (crossover) for 12 additional weeks. At 0, 4, 12, 16, and 24 weeks, we evaluated each patient’s IOP, conjunctival injection, and corneal epitheliopathy score, and at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, we evaluated their eyelash changes and pigmentation of the eyelids and irises. Results The mean IOP of the LT group (15 eyes) was 10.5, 10.6, and 11.1 mmHg, at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively, whereas that of the TL group (15 eyes) was 11.7, 11.1, and 10.5 mmHg at 0, 12, and 24 weeks, respectively. No significant differences were found between the two groups and in the intragroup comparisons. Moreover, no significant differences were found between Lat and Taf in regard to the conjunctival injection score and corneal epitheliopathy score. Eyelash changes and eyelid and iris pigmentation were similar in both groups. Conclusion The findings of this study show that Lat and Taf have equivalent efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with NTG. PMID:27601879

  20. Dissimilar properties within a carbonate-reservoir's small fault zone, and their impact on the pressurization and leakage associated with CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanne, Pierre; Guglielmi, Yves; Cappa, Frédéric

    2013-02-01

    This paper focuses on a small fault zone (too small to be detected by geophysical imaging) affecting a carbonate reservoir composed of porous and low-porosity layers. In a gallery located at 250 m depth, the hydraulic properties of a 20 m thick section of the reservoir affected by the studied fault are characterized by structural measurements and hydraulic injection into boreholes. We conducted electrical tomographies before and after an 18 hour-long injection, to image the fluid flow through the fault zone. Our main finding is that the damage zone displays contrasting permeability values (up to two orders of magnitude) inherited from the differential alteration of the intact rock layers. To characterize the impact of these hydraulic-property variations on the fluid flow, we carried out numerical simulations of water and supercritical CO2 injections, using the TOUGH2 code. Two damage-zone models were compared, with heterogeneous (Model 1) and homogeneous (Model 2) hydraulic properties. In Model 1, injected fluids cannot escape through the fault zone; they generate a high fluid overpressure, located in the damage-zone layers having the highest permeability and storativity. In Model 2, fluids can easily migrate; the overpressure is lower and located in the host rock along the fault zone.

  1. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  2. Self-Calibrating Pressure Transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A self-calibrating pressure transducer is disclosed. The device uses an embedded zirconia membrane which pumps a determined quantity of oxygen into the device. The associated pressure can be determined, and thus, the transducer pressure readings can be calibrated. The zirconia membrane obtains oxygen .from the surrounding environment when possible. Otherwise, an oxygen reservoir or other source is utilized. In another embodiment, a reversible fuel cell assembly is used to pump oxygen and hydrogen into the system. Since a known amount of gas is pumped across the cell, the pressure produced can be determined, and thus, the device can be calibrated. An isolation valve system is used to allow the device to be calibrated in situ. Calibration is optionally automated so that calibration can be continuously monitored. The device is preferably a fully integrated MEMS device. Since the device can be calibrated without removing it from the process, reductions in costs and down time are realized.

  3. Gas reaction in the Cerro Prieto reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nehring, N.L.; Valette-Silver, J.N.

    1982-08-10

    Gases in an undisturbed geothermal reservoir should be in equilibrium with the surrounding rock and water. Production of fluid at rapid rates may cause physical changes in the reservoir that are reflected as changes in gas composition. At Cerro Prieto production has lowered the reservoir pressure enough in places to induce boiling in the aquifer, leading to high enthalpy, low production and eventual drawndown of cold water into the reservoir. These changes are reflected in gas compositions. Differences, in gas composition between well and surface samples reflect changing equilibrium in temperature-dependent chemical reactions and a mixture of gases dissolved in groundwater.

  4. High pressure pyrolyzed non-precious metal oxygen reduction catalysts for alkaline polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Sanetuntikul, Jakkid; Shanmugam, Sangaraju

    2015-05-01

    Non-precious metal catalysts, such as metal-coordinated to nitrogen doped-carbon, have shown reasonable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) performances in alkaline fuel cells. In this report, we present the development of a highly active, stable and low-cost non-precious metal ORR catalyst by direct synthesis under autogenic-pressure conditions. Transmission electron microscopy studies show highly porous Fe-N-C and Co-N-C structures, which were further confirmed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurements. The surface areas of the Fe-N-C and Co-N-C catalysts were found to be 377.5 and 369.3 m(2) g(-1), respectively. XPS results show the possible existence of N-C and M-Nx structures, which are generally proposed to be the active sites in non-precious metal catalysts. The Fe-N-C electrocatalyst exhibits an ORR half-wave potential 20 mV higher than the reference Pt/C catalyst. The cycling durability test for Fe-N-C over 5000 cycles shows that the half-wave potential lost only 4 mV, whereas the half-wave potential of the Pt/C catalyst lost about 50 mV. The Fe-N-C catalyst exhibited an improved activity and stability compared to the reference Pt/C catalyst and it possesses a direct 4-electron transfer pathway for the ORR process. Further, the Fe-N-C catalyst produces extremely low HO2(-) content, as confirmed by the rotating ring-disk electrode measurements. In the alkaline fuel single cell tests, maximum power densities of 75 and 80 mW cm(-2) were observed for the Fe-N-C and Pt/C cathodes, respectively. Durability studies (100 h) showed that decay of the fuel cell current was more prominent for the Pt/C cathode catalyst compared to the Fe-N-C cathode catalyst. Therefore, the Fe-N-C catalyst appears to be a promising new class of non-precious metal catalysts prepared by an autogenic synthetic method. PMID:25833146

  5. Imaging thin-bed reservoirs with 3-D seismic

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.

    1996-12-01

    This article explains how a 3-D seismic data volume, a vertical seismic profile (VSP), electric well logs and reservoir pressure data can be used to image closely stacked thin-bed reservoirs. This interpretation focuses on the Oligocene Frio reservoir in South Texas which has multiple thin-beds spanning a vertical interval of about 3,000 ft.

  6. Quantitative Discomanometry: Correlation of Intradiscal Pressure Values to Pain Reduction in Patients With Intervertebral Disc Herniation Treated With Percutaneous, Minimally Invasive, Image-Guided Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Filippiadis, Dimitrios K. Mazioti, A. Papakonstantinou, O. Brountzos, E.; Gouliamos, A.; Kelekis, N. Kelekis, A.

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To illustrate quantitative discomanometry's (QD) diagnostic efficacy and predictive value in discogenic-pain evaluation in a prospective study correlating intradiscal pressure values with pain reduction after percutaneous image-guided technique (i.e., percutaneous decompression, PD). Materials and Methods: During the last 3 years, 36 patients [21 male and 15 female (mean age 36 {+-} 5.8 years)] with intervertebral disc hernia underwent QD before PD. Under absolute sterilization and fluoroscopy, a mixture of contrast medium and normal saline (3:1 ratio) was injected. A discmonitor performed a constant rate injection and recorded pressure and volume values, thus producing the relative pressure-volume curve. PD was then performed. Pain reduction and improved mobility were recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months after PD using clinical evaluation and a numeric visual scale (NVS; 0 to 10 units). Results: Mean pain values of 7.5 {+-} 1.9 (range 4 to 8) NVS units were recorded before PD; these decreased to 2.9 {+-} 2.44 at 3 months, 1.0 {+-} 1.9 at 12 months, and 1.0 {+-} 1.9 NVS units at 24 months after PD. Recorded correlations (pressure, volume, significant pain-reduction values) with bilateral statistical significance included a maximum injected volume of 2.4 ml (p = 0.045), P{sub o} < 14 psi [initial pressure required to inject 0.1 ml of the mixture inside the disc (p = 0.05)], P{sub max} {<=} 65 psi [greatest pressure value on the curve (p = 0.018)], and P{sub max} - P{sub o} {<=} 47 psi (p = 0.038). Patients meeting these pressure or volume cut-off points, either independently or as a total, had significant pain reduction (>4 NVS units) after PD. No complications were noted. Conclusions: QD is an efficient technique that may have predictive value for discogenic pain evaluation. It might serve as a useful tool for patient selection for intervertebral disc therapies.

  7. Role of Geomechanics in Assessing the Feasibility of CO2 Sequestration in Depleted Hydrocarbon Sandstone Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Zhi; Khaksar, Abbas

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in depleted sandstone hydrocarbon reservoirs could be complicated by a number of geomechanical problems associated with well drilling, completions, and CO2 injection. The initial production of hydrocarbons (gas or oil) and the resulting pressure depletion as well as associated reduction in horizontal stresses (e.g., fracture gradient) narrow the operational drilling mud weight window, which could exacerbate wellbore instabilities while infill drilling. Well completions (casing, liners, etc.) may experience solids flowback to the injector wells when injection is interrupted due to CO2 supply or during required system maintenance. CO2 injection alters the pressure and temperature in the near wellbore region, which could cause fault reactivation or thermal fracturing. In addition, the injection pressure may exceed the maximum sustainable storage pressure, and cause fracturing and fault reactivation within the reservoirs or bounding formations. A systematic approach has been developed for geomechanical assessments for CO2 storage in depleted reservoirs. The approach requires a robust field geomechanical model with its components derived from drilling and production data as well as from wireline logs of historical wells. This approach is described in detail in this paper together with a recent study on a depleted gas field in the North Sea considered for CO2 sequestration. The particular case study shows that there is a limitation on maximum allowable well inclinations, 45° if aligning with the maximum horizontal stress direction and 65° if aligning with the minimum horizontal stress direction, beyond which wellbore failure would become critical while drilling. Evaluation of sanding risks indicates no sand control installations would be needed for injector wells. Fracturing and faulting assessments confirm that the fracturing pressure of caprock is significantly higher than the planned CO2 injection and storage pressures for an ideal

  8. A kinetic pressure effect on the experimental abiotic reduction of aqueous CO2 to methane from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Codi; Cody, George D.; Davis, Jeffrey M.

    2015-02-01

    Aqueous abiotic methane concentrations in a range of geologic settings are below levels expected for equilibrium with coexisting CO2 and H2, indicating that kinetics can control the speciation of reduced carbon-bearing fluids. Previous studies have suggested that mineral catalysts or gas-phase reactions may increase the rate of methanogenesis. Here, we report on experiments that indicate pressure can also accelerate aqueous reduction of CO2 to CH4. Four series of cold-seal hydrothermal experiments were performed from 1 to 3.5 kbar at 300 °C for two weeks and analyzed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The starting fluids were 10-20-μL solutions of 70-mmolal 13C-labeled formic acid (H13COOH) contained in welded gold capsules. Increasing pressure (P) resulted in a systematic, reproducible log-linear increase in 13CH4 yields. The pressure effect could be quantified the log-linear slope, Δlog[13CH4]/ΔP (log mmolal per kbar). The mean slope was 0.66 ± 0.05 (±1s.e.), indicating that 13CH4 yields increased by an average factor of 40-50 over a P range of 2.5 kbar. Pressure-independent variations in [13CH4] were observed as scatter about the log-linear regressions and as variations in the y-intercepts of the regressions. These variations were attributed to trace amounts of catalytic Fe along the inner capsule wall that remained despite cleaning the Au capsules in nitric acid prior to each experimental series. The mechanism for the pressure-dependent effect was interpreted to result from one or more of the following three processes: reduction of a metastable reaction intermediate such as methanol, formation of Fe-carbonyl complexes in the fluid, and/or heterogeneous catalysis by Fe. The results suggest that pressure may influence aqueous abiotic CH4 yields in certain geological environments, particularly when the relative effects of other kinetic factors such as temperature are diminished, e.g., in cool forearcs or other settings with a steep geothermal

  9. Innovative techniques for the description of reservoir heterogeneity using tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, G.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of this research is to develop an advanced, innovative technique for the description of reservoir heterogeneity. This proposed method consists of using tracers in single-well backflow tests. The general idea is to make use of fluid drift in the reservoir either due to naturally occurring pressure gradients in the reservoir, or by deliberately imposed pressure gradients using adjacent injection and production wells in the same reservoir. The analytical tool that will be used to design and interpret these tests is a compositional reservoir simulator with special features added and tested specifically for this purpose. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  10. 08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John Morse; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.