Science.gov

Sample records for reservoir systems operation

  1. Multi-objective evolutionary algorithm for operating parallel reservoir system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John

    2009-10-01

    SummaryThis paper applies a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-II), to examine the operations of a multi-reservoir system in Taiwan. The Feitsui and Shihmen reservoirs are the most important water supply reservoirs in Northern Taiwan supplying the domestic and industrial water supply needs for over 7 million residents. A daily operational simulation model is developed to guide the releases of the reservoir system and then to calculate the shortage indices (SI) of both reservoirs over a long-term simulation period. The NSGA-II is used to minimize the SI values through identification of optimal joint operating strategies. Based on a 49 year data set, we demonstrate that better operational strategies would reduce shortage indices for both reservoirs. The results indicate that the NSGA-II provides a promising approach. The pareto-front optimal solutions identified operational compromises for the two reservoirs that would be expected to improve joint operations.

  2. Joint operation and dynamic control of flood limiting water levels for mixed cascade reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yanlai; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Xu, Chongyu

    2014-11-01

    Reservoirs are one of the most efficient infrastructures for integrated water resources development and management; and play a more and more important role in flood control and conservation. Dynamic control of the reservoir flood limiting water level (FLWL) is a valuable and effective approach to compromise the flood control, hydropower generation and comprehensive utilization of water resources of river basins during the flood season. The dynamic control models of FLWL for a single reservoir and cascade reservoirs have been extended for a mixed reservoir system in this paper. The proposed model consists of a dynamic control operation module for a single reservoir, a dynamic control operation module for cascade reservoirs, and a joint operation module for mixed cascade reservoir systems. The Three Gorges and Qingjiang cascade reservoirs in the Yangtze River basin of China are selected for a case study. Three-hour inflow data series for representative hydrological years are used to test the model. The results indicate that the proposed model can make an effective tradeoff between flood control and hydropower generation. Joint operation and dynamic control of FLWL can generate 26.4 × 108 kW h (3.47%) more hydropower for the mixed cascade reservoir systems and increase the water resource utilization rate by 3.72% for the Three Gorges reservoir and 2.42% for the Qingjiang cascade reservoirs without reducing originally designed flood prevention standards.

  3. ASUD2- decision support system on Dnieper reservoirs operations taking into account environmental priorities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritz, L.; Zheleznyak, M.; Dvorzhak, A.; Nesterov, A.; Zaslavsky, A.

    2003-04-01

    On the European continent the Dnieper is the third largest river basin (509000 sq.km). The Ukrainian part of the drainage basin is 291 400 sq.km. The cascade of 6 reservoirs, that have capacity from 2.5 to 18 cub.km comprises the entire reach of Dnieper River in Ukraine, redistributes the water regime in time. As a result, 17-18 cub. km water can be used, 50% for hydropower production, 30% for agriculture and up to 18% for municipal water supply. The water stress, the pollution load, the insufficient technical conditions require a lot of effort in the water management development. In order to achieve optimal use of water recourses in the Dnieper River basin, it is essential to develop strategies both for the long-term perspective (planning) as well as for the short-term perspective (operation). The Dnieper River basin must be seen as complex of the natural water resources, as well as the human system (water use, social and economic intercourse). In the frame of the project, supported by the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) the software tool ASUD2 is developed to support reservoir operations provided by the State Committee of Ukraine on Water Management and by the Joint River Commission. ASUD2 includes multicriteria optimization engine that drives the reservoir water balamce models and box models of water quality. A system of supplementary (off-line) tools support more detailed analyses of the water quality parameters of largest reservoirs (Kachovka and Kremechug). The models AQUATOX and WASP ( in the developed 3-D version) are used for these purposes. The Integrated Database IDB-ASUD2 supplies the information such as state of the all reservoirs, hydrological observations and predictions, water demands, measured water quality parameters. ASUD2 is able to give the following information on an operational basis. : - recommended dynamics of the water elevation during the water allocation planning period in all reservoirs calculated on the

  4. Improving reservoir operations modeling for integration in a regional Earth system model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voisin, N.; Li, H.; Ward, D. L.; Huang, M.; Leung, L.; Wigmosta, M. S.

    2012-12-01

    In integrated Earth system models (EaSMs), accurate hydrologic information in all of its components including socio-economy, atmosphere, land, and energy infrastructure is needed to represent the interactions between human and Earth system processes. The hydrology processes regulate the water, energy and carbon fluxes in this integrated framework. Human influence on the hydrologic cycle includes regulation and storage, consumptive use and overall redistribution of water resources in space and time. Representing these processes is essential for applications of EaSMs in hydrologic and climate predictions, as well as impact studies such as integrated assessment activities at regional to global scales. Dynamic programming approaches to optimize operations of reservoir systems have been widely used for water resources management planning at local and regional scales and recently have emerged in global-scale applications; albeit they are performed offline from the EaSMs , and require accurate knowledge of future flow for the upcoming water year. Other emerging large-scale research reservoir models use generic operating rules that are more flexible for coupling with EaSMs. Those generic operating rules have been successful in reproducing overall regulated flow at large basin scales. Improved generic operating rules are presented and evaluated across multiple spatial scales and objectives (flow but also storage and supply) over the complex multi-objective Columbia River Regulation System, which is representative of large river systems with increasing competitive reservoir purposes in the future. Challenges due to the difference in time and spatial scales between the physical processes versus reservoir operations and targets (irrigation, flood control, hydropower, environmental flow, navigation) are then discussed in the context of improving hydrology and evapotranspiration fluxes within an integrated EaSM.

  5. Optimization of Multiple and Multipurpose Reservoir System Operations by Using Matrix Structure (Case Study: Karun and Dez Reservoir Dams).

    PubMed

    Heydari, Mohammad; Othman, Faridah; Taghieh, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Optimal operation of water resources in multiple and multipurpose reservoirs is very complicated. This is because of the number of dams, each dam's location (Series and parallel), conflict in objectives and the stochastic nature of the inflow of water in the system. In this paper, performance optimization of the system of Karun and Dez reservoir dams have been studied and investigated with the purposes of hydroelectric energy generation and providing water demand in 6 dams. On the Karun River, 5 dams have been built in the series arrangements, and the Dez dam has been built parallel to those 5 dams. One of the main achievements in this research is the implementation of the structure of production of hydroelectric energy as a function of matrix in MATLAB software. The results show that the role of objective function structure for generating hydroelectric energy in weighting method algorithm is more important than water supply. Nonetheless by implementing ε- constraint method algorithm, we can both increase hydroelectric power generation and supply around 85% of agricultural and industrial demands. PMID:27248152

  6. Optimization of Multiple and Multipurpose Reservoir System Operations by Using Matrix Structure (Case Study: Karun and Dez Reservoir Dams)

    PubMed Central

    Othman, Faridah; Taghieh, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Optimal operation of water resources in multiple and multipurpose reservoirs is very complicated. This is because of the number of dams, each dam’s location (Series and parallel), conflict in objectives and the stochastic nature of the inflow of water in the system. In this paper, performance optimization of the system of Karun and Dez reservoir dams have been studied and investigated with the purposes of hydroelectric energy generation and providing water demand in 6 dams. On the Karun River, 5 dams have been built in the series arrangements, and the Dez dam has been built parallel to those 5 dams. One of the main achievements in this research is the implementation of the structure of production of hydroelectric energy as a function of matrix in MATLAB software. The results show that the role of objective function structure for generating hydroelectric energy in weighting method algorithm is more important than water supply. Nonetheless by implementing ε- constraint method algorithm, we can both increase hydroelectric power generation and supply around 85% of agricultural and industrial demands. PMID:27248152

  7. Decision support system for optimal reservoir operation modeling within sediment deposition control.

    PubMed

    Hadihardaja, Iwan K

    2009-01-01

    Suspended sediment deals with surface runoff moving toward watershed affects reservoir sustainability due to the reduction of storage capacity. The purpose of this study is to introduce a reservoir operation model aimed at minimizing sediment deposition and maximizing energy production expected to obtain optimal decision policy for both objectives. The reservoir sediment-control operation model is formulated by using Non-Linear Programming with an iterative procedure based on a multi-objective measurement in order to achieve optimal decision policy that is established in association with the development of a relationship between stream inflow and sediment rate by utilizing the Artificial Neural Network. Trade off evaluation is introduced to generate a strategy for controlling sediment deposition at same level of target ratio while producing hydroelectric energy. The case study is carried out at the Sanmenxia Reservoir in China where redesign and reconstruction have been accomplished. However, this model deals only with the original design and focuses on a wet year operation. This study will also observe a five-year operation period to show the accumulation of sediment due to the impact of reservoir storage capacity. PMID:19214002

  8. An R package for the design, analysis and operation of reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sean; Ng, Jia Yi; Galelli, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    We present a new R package - named "reservoir" - which has been designed for rapid and easy routing of runoff through storage. The package comprises well-established tools for capacity design (e.g., the sequent peak algorithm), performance analysis (storage-yield-reliability and reliability-resilience-vulnerability analysis) and release policy optimization (Stochastic Dynamic Programming). Operating rules can be optimized for water supply, flood control and amenity objectives, as well as for maximum hydropower production. Storage-depth-area relationships are in-built, allowing users to incorporate evaporation from the reservoir surface. We demonstrate the capabilities of the software for global studies using thousands of reservoirs from the Global Reservoir and Dam (GRanD) database fed by historical monthly inflow time series from a 0.5 degree gridded global runoff dataset. The package is freely available through the Comprehensive R Archive Network (CRAN).

  9. Operational trade-offs in reservoir control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, Aris P.

    1993-11-01

    Reservoir operation decisions require constant reevaluation in the face of conflicting objectives, varying hydrologic conditions, and frequent operational policy changes. Optimality is a relative concept very much dependent on the circumstances under which a decision is made. More than anything else, reservoir management authorities need the means to assess the impacts of various operational options. It is their responsibility to define what is desirable after a thorough evaluation of the existing circumstances. This article presents a model designed to generate operational trade-offs common among reservoir systems. The model avoids an all-encompassing problem formulation and distinguishes three operational modes (levels) corresponding to normal, drought, and flood operations. Each level addresses only relevant system elements and uses a static and a dynamic control module to optimize turbine performance within each planning period and temporally. The model is used for planning the operation of the Savannah River System.

  10. Short-term Hydropower Reservoir Operations in Chile's Central Interconnected System: Tradeoffs between Hydrologic Alteration and Economic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares, M. A.

    2011-12-01

    Hydropower accounts for about 50% of the installed capacity in Chile's Central Interconnected System (CIS) and new developments are envisioned in the near future. Large projects involving reservoirs are perceived negatively by the general public. In terms of operations, hydropower scheduling takes place at monthly, weekly, daily and hourly intervals, and operations at each level affect different environmental processes. Due to its ability to quickly and inexpensively respond to short-term changes in demand, hydropower reservoirs often are operated to provide power during periods of peak demand. This operational scheme, known as hydropeaking, changes the hydrologic regime by altering the rate and frequency of changes in flow magnitude on short time scales. To mitigate impacts on downstream ecosystems, operational constraints -typically minimum instream flows and maximum ramping rates- are imposed on hydropower plants. These operational restrictions limit reduce operational flexibility and can reduce the economic value of energy generation by imposing additional costs on the operation of interconnected power systems. Methods to predict the degree of hydrologic alteration rely on statistical analyses of instream flow time series. Typically, studies on hydrologic alteration use historical operational records for comparison between pre- and post-dam conditions. Efforts to assess hydrologic alteration based on future operational schemes of reservoirs are scarce. This study couples two existing models: a mid-term operations planning and a short-term economic dispatch to simulate short-term hydropower reservoir operations under different future scenarios. Scenarios of possible future configurations of the Chilean CIS are defined with emphasis on the introduction of non-conventional renewables (particularly wind energy) and large hydropower projects in Patagonia. Both models try to reproduce the actual decision making process in the Chilean Central Interconnected System

  11. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  12. Natural and human drivers of salinity in reservoirs and their implications in water supply operation through a Decision Support System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contreras, Eva; Gómez-Beas, Raquel; Linares-Sáez, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Salt can be a problem when is originally in aquifers or when it dissolves in groundwater and comes to the ground surface or flows into streams. The problem increases in lakes hydraulically connected with aquifers affecting water quality. This issue is even more alarming when water resources are used for urban and irrigation supply and water quantity and quality restrict that water demand. This work shows a data based and physical modeling approach in the Guadalhorce reservoir, located in southern Spain. This water body receives salt contribution from mainly groundwater flow, getting salinity values in the reservoir from 3500 to 5500 μScm-1. Moreover, Guadalhorce reservoir is part of a complex system of reservoirs fed from the Guadalhorce River that supplies all urban, irrigation, tourism, energy and ecology water uses, which makes that implementation and validation of methods and tools for smart water management is required. Meteorological, hydrological and water quality data from several monitoring networks and data sources, with both historical and real time data during a 40-years period, were used to analyze the impact salinity. On the other hand, variables that mainly depend on the dam operation, such as reservoir water level and water outflow, were also analyzed to understand how they affect to salinity in depth and time. Finally surface and groundwater inflows to the reservoir were evaluated through a physically based hydrological model to forecast when the major contributions take place. Reservoir water level and surface and groundwater inflows were found to be the main drivers of salinity in the reservoir. When reservoir water level is high, daily water inflow around 0.4 hm3 causes changes in salinity (both drop and rise) up to 500 μScm-1, but no significant changes are found when water level falls 2-3 m. However the gradual water outflows due to dam operation and consequent decrease in reservoir water levels makes that, after dry periods, salinity

  13. First report of the successful operation of a side stream supersaturation hypolimnetic oxygenation system in a eutrophic, shallow reservoir.

    PubMed

    Gerling, Alexandra B; Browne, Richard G; Gantzer, Paul A; Mobley, Mark H; Little, John C; Carey, Cayelan C

    2014-12-15

    Controlling hypolimnetic hypoxia is a key goal of water quality management. Hypoxic conditions can trigger the release of reduced metals and nutrients from lake sediments, resulting in taste and odor problems as well as nuisance algal blooms. In deep lakes and reservoirs, hypolimnetic oxygenation has emerged as a viable solution for combating hypoxia. In shallow lakes, however, it is difficult to add oxygen into the hypolimnion efficiently, and a poorly designed hypolimnetic oxygenation system could potentially result in higher turbidity, weakened thermal stratification, and warming of the sediments. As a result, little is known about the viability of hypolimnetic oxygenation in shallow bodies of water. Here, we present the results from recent successful tests of side stream supersaturation (SSS), a type of hypolimnetic oxygenation system, in a shallow reservoir and compare it to previous side stream deployments. We investigated the sensitivity of Falling Creek Reservoir, a shallow (Zmax = 9.3 m) drinking water reservoir located in Vinton, Virginia, USA, to SSS operation. We found that the SSS system increased hypolimnetic dissolved oxygen concentrations at a rate of ∼1 mg/L/week without weakening stratification or warming the sediments. Moreover, the SSS system suppressed the release of reduced iron and manganese, and likely phosphorus, from the sediments. In summary, SSS systems hold great promise for controlling hypolimnetic oxygen conditions in shallow lakes and reservoirs. PMID:25265305

  14. Robust Operation of a System of Reservoir and Desalination Plant using a Multi-Objective Optimization Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, T.; Bhushan, R.

    2013-12-01

    In many cities, the water supply system is under stress due to increased competition for reliable fresh water supplies from population growth and climate uncertainties resulting in water insecurity. One method to augment fresh water supplies is seawater desalination, which converts seawater to fresh water for industrial and domestic potable and non-potable uses. We propose to address this issue of water supply scarcity and uncertainty in coastal metropolitan cities by developing a robust operating policy for the joint operation of a desalination plant with a freshwater reservoir system using a multi-objective optimization framework. Due to the unlimited availability of seawater, desalination has a strong potential as a reliable source of water in coastal cities around the world. However, being an energy intensive and expensive process, its application is limited. Reservoir water, while cheaper due to its relatively small cost of transportation to the cities, is often limited and variable in its availability. We observe that combining the operation of a desalination plant with a water supply reservoir leads to more cost efficient and reliable water production than if both were to be operated separately. We model a joint reservoir-desalination system as a multi-objective optimization problem with risk, resilience, and vulnerability as the objective functions, and cost as a constraint. In our simulations, rule curves determine the release from the reservoir as a function of existing storage level, and the remaining demand that is unmet by the release from the reservoir determines the amount of water produced from desalination. The overall cost of the system is the sum of the cost of transporting reservoir water and the cost of energy of desalinating seawater. We employ a genetic algorithm to find the optimal values of the thresholds of the reservoir rule curves and the maximum operating capacity of the desalination plant. We will discuss the tradeoffs between water

  15. Operation of TVA reservoirs. Annual report, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1981. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1981. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storages and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plotting of midnight reservoir elevations during calendar year 1981 are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  16. Operation of TVA reservoirs: annual 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1980. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Plates are included in this report tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1980. Additional plates are included for the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of Reservoir Operations. Tables of monthly and annual storage and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included at the end of their respective annual operations summary. Individual plottings of midnight reservoir elevations are included for the principal tributary storage reservoirs and Normandy Reservoir. Group charts are included showing midnight reservoir elevations for other tributary reservoirs, the Tennessee River reservoirs, and the principal Cumberland Basin reservoirs.

  17. Using Monte-Carlo approach for analysis of quantitative and qualitative operation of reservoirs system with regard to the inflow uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motevalli, Mostafa; Zadbar, Ali; Elyasi, Elham; Jalaal, Maziar

    2015-05-01

    Operation of dams' reservoir systems, as one of the main sources of our country's surface water, has a particular importance. Since the operational hydrological and meteorological parameters of water budget in reservoir systems' operation are indefinite, in order to choose a comprehensive and optimal policy for the operation analysis of these systems, water inflow is considered as the most important hydrological parameter in an uncertain reservoir system. Monte-Carlo approach was applied to study the water inflow impact on the performance of both single and multi-reservoir systems. Doing so, artificial statistics for monthly inflow time series of each production reservoir system and the probable distributions of time, quantitative reliability, vulnerability, and resiliency standards were analyzed in five different simulation and optimization models as the system's efficiency criteria. The reason for choosing Karun 3, Karun 4, and Khersan 1 dams was the need for three dams to be setup as reservoir systems in both serial and parallel forms. The results of the operation criteria analysis indicated that for the operation of the whole system, the best quantitative reliability, vulnerability, and resiliency values were in the optimized single-reservoir model, and the best time reliability value was in the optimized multi-reservoir model. Moreover, the inflow uncertainty had the minimum impact on the quantitative reliability criteria and the maximum impact on the resiliency criteria.

  18. Operation of TVA reservoirs. Annual 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-04-01

    Data for 1979 on the operation of TVA reservoirs for flood control, power generation and navigational purposes are reported. The operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1979 is described. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army, Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir, operated by Carolina Power and Light Company; and Woods Reservoir, operated by the US Air Force. Any reference in this report to all reservoirs in the Tennessee or Cumberland River Basins refer to these specific reservoirs. Tabulated data are included on: reservation elevation and storage volume; turbine and gate discharges; and head water elevation. (LCL)

  19. A game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method to develop optimal operation policies for multi-operator reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madani, Kaveh; Hooshyar, Milad

    2014-11-01

    Reservoir systems with multiple operators can benefit from coordination of operation policies. To maximize the total benefit of these systems the literature has normally used the social planner's approach. Based on this approach operation decisions are optimized using a multi-objective optimization model with a compound system's objective. While the utility of the system can be increased this way, fair allocation of benefits among the operators remains challenging for the social planner who has to assign controversial weights to the system's beneficiaries and their objectives. Cooperative game theory provides an alternative framework for fair and efficient allocation of the incremental benefits of cooperation. To determine the fair and efficient utility shares of the beneficiaries, cooperative game theory solution methods consider the gains of each party in the status quo (non-cooperation) as well as what can be gained through the grand coalition (social planner's solution or full cooperation) and partial coalitions. Nevertheless, estimation of the benefits of different coalitions can be challenging in complex multi-beneficiary systems. Reinforcement learning can be used to address this challenge and determine the gains of the beneficiaries for different levels of cooperation, i.e., non-cooperation, partial cooperation, and full cooperation, providing the essential input for allocation based on cooperative game theory. This paper develops a game theory-reinforcement learning (GT-RL) method for determining the optimal operation policies in multi-operator multi-reservoir systems with respect to fairness and efficiency criteria. As the first step to underline the utility of the GT-RL method in solving complex multi-agent multi-reservoir problems without a need for developing compound objectives and weight assignment, the proposed method is applied to a hypothetical three-agent three-reservoir system.

  20. Reservoir Systems in Changing Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, W.; Tung, C.; Tai, C.

    2007-12-01

    Climate change may cause more climate variability and further results in more frequent extreme hydrological events which may greatly influence reservoir¡¦s abilities to provide service, such as water supply and flood mitigation, and even danger reservoir¡¦s safety. Some local studies have identified that climate change may cause more flood in wet period and less flow in dry period in Taiwan. To mitigate climate change impacts, more reservoir space, i.e. less storage, may be required to store higher flood in wet periods, while more reservoir storage may be required to supply water for dry periods. The goals to strengthen adaptive capacity of water supply and flood mitigation are conflict under climate change. This study will focus on evaluating the impacts of climate change on reservoir systems. The evaluation procedure includes hydrological models, a reservoir water balance model, and a water supply system dynamics model. The hydrological models are used to simulate reservoir inflows under different climate conditions. Future climate scenarios are derived from several GCMs. Then, the reservoir water balance model is developed to calculate reservoir¡¦s storage and outflows according to the simulated inflows and operational rules. The ability of flood mitigation is also evaluated. At last, those outflows are further input to the system dynamics model to assess whether the goal of water supply can still be met. To mitigate climate change impacts, the implementing adaptation strategies will be suggested with the principles of risk management. Besides, uncertainties of this study will also be analyzed. The Feitsui reservoir system in northern Taiwan is chosen as a case study.

  1. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  2. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  3. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  4. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  5. 49 CFR 229.49 - Main reservoir system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Main reservoir system. 229.49 Section 229.49... Main reservoir system. (a)(1) The main reservoir system of each locomotive shall be equipped with at... reservoir of air under pressure to be used for operating those power controls. The reservoir shall...

  6. Operation of TVA reservoirs. Annual 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the operation of TVA, ALCOA, and Cumberland Basin reservoirs that were scheduled daily by Reservoir Operations Branch personnel during calendar year 1982. These include all TVA reservoirs, eight reservoirs in the Cumberland River Basin owned by the US Army Corps of Engineers, and six reservoirs in the Tennessee River Basin owned by ALCOA. In addition, storage and flow computations include Walters Reservoir and Woods Reservoir. Data for the Cumberland Basin projects of the US Army Corps of Engineers have been included beginning with the 1954 report. Plates are included tabulating daily elevations, storage volumes, and/or average discharges for 48 reservoirs for 1982. Additional plates show the daily average flow in Barkley Canal, monthly and annual emptyings and water use at each lock in the Tennessee River Basin, monthly and annual capacity factors at each TVA scheduled hydro plant, combined monthly and annual storages and flows (in inches) for reservoirs above Chickamauga and Kentucky Dams, and a summary of reservoir operations. Tables of monthly and annual storages and flows (in inches) for the principal Tennessee River Basin tributary projects are included. Individual plottings of midnight reservoir elevations during calendar year 1982 are included for all principal reservoirs.

  7. Drought Prediction Technique For Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khayyat Kholghi, M.

    After three years critical drought period, Iran is facing a great problem on water re- sources. In this situation, several reservoir dams in this country can play an efficient role for solving an important part of this problem. One of the essential parameters in reservoir simulation is the inflow discharge. Predicting the likelihood of a drought markedly enhance the efficiency of reservoir operation. This study applies the kriging method to predict inflows to Dez reservoir dam in Southern Iran. Thirty-eight years of the one, ten, fifteen and monthly period reservoir inflow data were used in this study. A subsequent reservoir operation simulation is employed to determine the drought lead-time. An efficient reservoir operational strategy can be established with the aid of this time and the probability of successful drought prediction. According to simu- lation results, the kriging approach in terms of the number droughts being correctly predicted the drought lead-time and the probability of success of drought prediction. Keywords: Drought-prediction-kriging-reservoir operation-simulation-Dez reservoir dam-Iran

  8. Robust stochastic optimization for reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Limeng; Housh, Mashor; Liu, Pan; Cai, Ximing; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Optimal reservoir operation under uncertainty is a challenging engineering problem. Application of classic stochastic optimization methods to large-scale problems is limited due to computational difficulty. Moreover, classic stochastic methods assume that the estimated distribution function or the sample inflow data accurately represents the true probability distribution, which may be invalid and the performance of the algorithms may be undermined. In this study, we introduce a robust optimization (RO) approach, Iterative Linear Decision Rule (ILDR), so as to provide a tractable approximation for a multiperiod hydropower generation problem. The proposed approach extends the existing LDR method by accommodating nonlinear objective functions. It also provides users with the flexibility of choosing the accuracy of ILDR approximations by assigning a desired number of piecewise linear segments to each uncertainty. The performance of the ILDR is compared with benchmark policies including the sampling stochastic dynamic programming (SSDP) policy derived from historical data. The ILDR solves both the single and multireservoir systems efficiently. The single reservoir case study results show that the RO method is as good as SSDP when implemented on the original historical inflows and it outperforms SSDP policy when tested on generated inflows with the same mean and covariance matrix as those in history. For the multireservoir case study, which considers water supply in addition to power generation, numerical results show that the proposed approach performs as well as in the single reservoir case study in terms of optimal value and distributional robustness.

  9. Development of an integrated hydrological modeling system for near-real-time multi-objective reservoir operation in large river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Koike, T.

    2010-12-01

    The climate change-induced variability in hydrological cycles directly affects regional water resources management. For improved multiple multi-objective reservoir operation, an integrated modeling system has been developed by incorporating a global optimization system (SCE-UA) into a distributed biosphere hydrological model (WEB-DHM) coupled with the reservoir routing module. The reservoir storage change is estimated from the difference between the simulated inflows and outflows; while the reservoir water level can be defined from the updated reservoir storage by using the H-V curve. According to the reservoir water level, the new operation rule can be decided. For optimization: (1) WEB-DHM is calibrated for each dam’s inflows separately; (2) then the calibrated WEB-DHM is used to simulate inflows and outflows by assuming outflow proportional to inflow; and (3) the proportion coefficients are optimized with Shuffle Complex Evolution method (SCE-UA), to fulfill an objective function towards minimum flood risk at downstream and maximum reservoir water storage for future use. The GSMaP product offers hourly global precipitation maps in near real-time (about four hours after observation). Aiming at near real-time reservoir operation in large river basins, the integrated modeling system takes the inputs from both an operational global quantitative precipitation forecast (JMA-GPV; to achieve an optimal operation rule in the assumed lead time period) and the GSMaP product (to perform current operation with the obtained optimal rule, after correction by gauge rainfall). The newly-developed system was then applied to the Red River Basin, with an area of 160,000 km2, to test its performance for near real-time dam operation. In Vietnam, three reservoirs are located in the upstream of Hanoi city, with Hoa Binh the largest (69% of total volume). After calibration with the gauge rainfall, the inflows to three reservoirs are well simulated; the discharge and water level at

  10. Intelligent Real-Time Reservoir Operation for Flood Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L.; Hsu, H.

    2008-12-01

    Real-time flood control of a multi-purpose reservoir should consider decreasing the flood peak stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage during typhoon seasons. It is a continuous and instant decision-making process based on relevant operating rules, policy and water laws, in addition the immediate rainfall and the hydrology information; however, it is difficult to learn the intelligent experience from the elder operators. The main purpose of this study is to establish the automatic reservoir flood control model to achieve the goal of a reservoir operation during flood periods. In this study, we propose an intelligent reservoir operating methodology for real-time flood control. First, the genetic algorithm is used to search the optimal solutions, which can be considered as extracting the knowledge of reservoir operation strategies. Then, the adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), which uses a hybrid learning procedure for extracting knowledge in the form of fuzzy if-then rules, is used to learn the input-output patterns and then to estimate the optimal flood operation. The Shihmen reservoir in Northern Taiwan was used as a case study, where its 26 typhoon events are investigated by the proposed method. The results demonstrate that the proposed control model can perform much better than the original reservoir operator in 26 flood events and effectively achieve decreasing peak flood stage downstream and storing floodwaters for future usage.

  11. Modelling of Reservoir Operations using Fuzzy Logic and ANNs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van De Giesen, N.; Coerver, B.; Rutten, M.

    2015-12-01

    Today, almost 40.000 large reservoirs, containing approximately 6.000 km3 of water and inundating an area of almost 400.000 km2, can be found on earth. Since these reservoirs have a storage capacity of almost one-sixth of the global annual river discharge they have a large impact on the timing, volume and peaks of river discharges. Global Hydrological Models (GHM) are thus significantly influenced by these anthropogenic changes in river flows. We developed a parametrically parsimonious method to extract operational rules based on historical reservoir storage and inflow time-series. Managing a reservoir is an imprecise and vague undertaking. Operators always face uncertainties about inflows, evaporation, seepage losses and various water demands to be met. They often base their decisions on experience and on available information, like reservoir storage and the previous periods inflow. We modeled this decision-making process through a combination of fuzzy logic and artificial neural networks in an Adaptive-Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). In a sensitivity analysis, we compared results for reservoirs in Vietnam, Central Asia and the USA. ANFIS can indeed capture reservoirs operations adequately when fed with a historical monthly time-series of inflows and storage. It was shown that using ANFIS, operational rules of existing reservoirs can be derived without much prior knowledge about the reservoirs. Their validity was tested by comparing actual and simulated releases with each other. For the eleven reservoirs modelled, the normalised outflow, <0,1>, was predicted with a MSE of 0.002 to 0.044. The rules can be incorporated into GHMs. After a network for a specific reservoir has been trained, the inflow calculated by the hydrological model can be combined with the release and initial storage to calculate the storage for the next time-step using a mass balance. Subsequently, the release can be predicted one time-step ahead using the inflow and storage.

  12. Inflow forecasting using Artificial Neural Networks for reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiamsathit, Chuthamat; Adeloye, Adebayo J.; Bankaru-Swamy, Soundharajan

    2016-05-01

    In this study, multi-layer perceptron (MLP) artificial neural networks have been applied to forecast one-month-ahead inflow for the Ubonratana reservoir, Thailand. To assess how well the forecast inflows have performed in the operation of the reservoir, simulations were carried out guided by the systems rule curves. As basis of comparison, four inflow situations were considered: (1) inflow known and assumed to be the historic (Type A); (2) inflow known and assumed to be the forecast (Type F); (3) inflow known and assumed to be the historic mean for month (Type M); and (4) inflow is unknown with release decision only conditioned on the starting reservoir storage (Type N). Reservoir performance was summarised in terms of reliability, resilience, vulnerability and sustainability. It was found that Type F inflow situation produced the best performance while Type N was the worst performing. This clearly demonstrates the importance of good inflow information for effective reservoir operation.

  13. Advancing reservoir operation description in physically based hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, Daniela; Giudici, Federico; Castelletti, Andrea; Burlando, Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Last decades have seen significant advances in our capacity of characterizing and reproducing hydrological processes within physically based models. Yet, when the human component is considered (e.g. reservoirs, water distribution systems), the associated decisions are generally modeled with very simplistic rules, which might underperform in reproducing the actual operators' behaviour on a daily or sub-daily basis. For example, reservoir operations are usually described by a target-level rule curve, which represents the level that the reservoir should track during normal operating conditions. The associated release decision is determined by the current state of the reservoir relative to the rule curve. This modeling approach can reasonably reproduce the seasonal water volume shift due to reservoir operation. Still, it cannot capture more complex decision making processes in response, e.g., to the fluctuations of energy prices and demands, the temporal unavailability of power plants or varying amount of snow accumulated in the basin. In this work, we link a physically explicit hydrological model with detailed hydropower behavioural models describing the decision making process by the dam operator. In particular, we consider two categories of behavioural models: explicit or rule-based behavioural models, where reservoir operating rules are empirically inferred from observational data, and implicit or optimization based behavioural models, where, following a normative economic approach, the decision maker is represented as a rational agent maximising a utility function. We compare these two alternate modelling approaches on the real-world water system of Lake Como catchment in the Italian Alps. The water system is characterized by the presence of 18 artificial hydropower reservoirs generating almost 13% of the Italian hydropower production. Results show to which extent the hydrological regime in the catchment is affected by different behavioural models and reservoir

  14. Using Forecast Information in Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, B.

    2011-12-01

    Reservoir operation is a series of decisions made over time. We choose whether to release water for various downstream purposes, or store it for later use. We choose whether to detain high flows to protect downstream areas, or pass that flow to retain space to store imminent higher flows. These decisions are driven by current and future inflows to the reservoir, and yet those inflows are uncertain and extremely variable. Conceptually, more information provides opportunity for better decisions, and so information about future inflows can improve reservoir operations. However, uncertain information must be used carefully, with awareness of the uncertainty and the likely consequence of "wrong" decisions (i.e., those with consequences worse than decisions that might otherwise have been made.) The historical streamflow record offers one source of information on the range and timing of streamflows. Streamflow forecasting provides additional valuable information on coming reservoir inflows, both at short and longer time scales. For example, 5-day flow forecasts based on forecasted precipitation can inform rain-flood operations, while seasonal snowmelt forecasts can aid snowmelt-flood operation, reservoir refill, and seasonal allocation of water supply. Forecast information can aid our decision-making greatly, but too much reliance on an incorrect forecast can make operation worse. Informed use of forecasts requires an understanding of the expected range of the actual streamflow (the error distribution). Forecast products must therefore be provided with a description of skill and error distribution understood by the producers and users of that information. Using forecasts wisely, with an understanding of their uncertainty, is an important aspect of the operation of our nation's Federal reservoirs.

  15. Assessing reservoir operations risk under climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brekke, L.D.; Maurer, E.P.; Anderson, J.D.; Dettinger, M.D.; Townsley, E.S.; Harrison, A.; Pruitt, T.

    2009-01-01

    Risk-based planning offers a robust way to identify strategies that permit adaptive water resources management under climate change. This paper presents a flexible methodology for conducting climate change risk assessments involving reservoir operations. Decision makers can apply this methodology to their systems by selecting future periods and risk metrics relevant to their planning questions and by collectively evaluating system impacts relative to an ensemble of climate projection scenarios (weighted or not). This paper shows multiple applications of this methodology in a case study involving California's Central Valley Project and State Water Project systems. Multiple applications were conducted to show how choices made in conducting the risk assessment, choices known as analytical design decisions, can affect assessed risk. Specifically, risk was reanalyzed for every choice combination of two design decisions: (1) whether to assume climate change will influence flood-control constraints on water supply operations (and how), and (2) whether to weight climate change scenarios (and how). Results show that assessed risk would motivate different planning pathways depending on decision-maker attitudes toward risk (e.g., risk neutral versus risk averse). Results also show that assessed risk at a given risk attitude is sensitive to the analytical design choices listed above, with the choice of whether to adjust flood-control rules under climate change having considerably more influence than the choice on whether to weight climate scenarios. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  16. Experience in operating the Bratsk Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarov, A.V.

    1984-04-01

    The Bratsk reservoir is the largest in the USSR and second largest in the world. Initially, the reservoir was expected to be filled by the end of 1966. However, the actual filling was not completed until September of 1967. During filling and in the first years of operation it was constantly necessary to deal with floating timber in order to ensure normal operation of the hydrostation, navigation safety, conditions for fishery, and fulfillment of the sanitary requirements. During seasonal variations of the reservoir level about 160 sq km of the shore zone was subjected to variable flooding and waterlogging. Maximum erosion occurred on expanded stretches, and within their limits on slopes composed of loam and sand deposits. Within the narrows, where the banks are composed mainly of hard and soft rocks and wave action is weak, erosion is negligible. Wind setup and setdown cause maximum denivellation of the water surface. The maximum increase of the level during setup reaches 232 cm and the maximum decrease during setdown is 24 cm. Seiche oscillations with various amplitudes and periods are observed on the reservoir surface. The main uses of the complex are hydropower, water transport, timber floating, water supply, and fishery. For the successful development of the shores of reservoirs it is necessary to select the construction sites with consideration of possible occurrence of karstic and landslide processes; the construction of heavy structures requires special karst-control measures. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  17. Evaluation of stochastic reservoir operation optimization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celeste, Alcigeimes B.; Billib, Max

    2009-09-01

    This paper investigates the performance of seven stochastic models used to define optimal reservoir operating policies. The models are based on implicit (ISO) and explicit stochastic optimization (ESO) as well as on the parameterization-simulation-optimization (PSO) approach. The ISO models include multiple regression, two-dimensional surface modeling and a neuro-fuzzy strategy. The ESO model is the well-known and widely used stochastic dynamic programming (SDP) technique. The PSO models comprise a variant of the standard operating policy (SOP), reservoir zoning, and a two-dimensional hedging rule. The models are applied to the operation of a single reservoir damming an intermittent river in northeastern Brazil. The standard operating policy is also included in the comparison and operational results provided by deterministic optimization based on perfect forecasts are used as a benchmark. In general, the ISO and PSO models performed better than SDP and the SOP. In addition, the proposed ISO-based surface modeling procedure and the PSO-based two-dimensional hedging rule showed superior overall performance as compared with the neuro-fuzzy approach.

  18. Incorporate Hydrologic Forecast for Real-Time Reservoir Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Cai, X.; Zhao, J.

    2011-12-01

    Advances in weather forecasting, hydrologic modeling, and hydro-climatic teleconnection relationships have significantly improved streamflow forecast precision and lead-time. The advances provide great opportunities to improve the operation rules of water resources systems, for example, updating reservoir operation curves using long-term forecast, or even replacing operation rules by real-time optimization and simulation models utilizing various streamflow forecast products. However, incorporation of forecast for real-time optimization of reservoir operation needs more understanding of the forecast uncertainty (FU) evolution with forecast horizon (FH, the advance time of a forecast) and the complicating effect of FU and FH. Increasing horizon may provide more information for decision making in a long time framework but with increasing error and less reliable information. This presentation addresses the challenges on the use of hydrologic forecast for real-time reservoir operations through the following two particular studies: 1) Evaluating the effectiveness of the various hydrological forecast products for reservoir operation with an explicit simulation of dynamic evolution of uncertainties involved in those products. A hypothetical example shows that optimal reservoir operation varies with the hydrologic forecast products. The utility of the reservoir operation with ensemble or probabilistic streamflow forecast (with a probabilistic uncertainty distribution) is the highest compared to deterministic streamflow forecast (DSF) with the forecast uncertainty represented in the form of deterministic forecast errors and DSF-based probabilistic streamflow forecast with the forecast uncertainty represented by a conditional distribution of forecast uncertainty for a given DSF. 2) Identifying an effective forecast horizon (EFH) under a limited inflow forecast considering the complicating effect of FH and FU, as well as streamflow variability and reservoir characteristics

  19. Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Hendron, R.H.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Sinclair, A.R.

    1983-10-01

    Fracturing and completing deep wells in hot, non-porous crystalline basement rock challenges conventional equipment use, procedures, and techniques common in oil and gas and normal geothermal completions. Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh downhole environment. Two deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures are in excess of 600/sup 0/F (315/sup 0/C). The wells were drilled during 1979-1981, inclined at 35 degrees, one above the other, and directionally drilled in an azimuthal direction orthogonal to the least principal in-situ crustal stress field. The pair of wells form the injection and production wells of an energy extraction system which will be unique in reservoir development. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the two wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in isolation liners and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of three-dimensional fracture growth that requires very large volumes of injected water. Two fractured zones have been formed by hydraulic fracturing and defined by close-in, borehole deployed, microseismic detectors.

  20. A multiobjective short-term optimal operation model for a cascade system of reservoirs considering the impact on long-term energy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bin; Zhong, Ping-An; Stanko, Zachary; Zhao, Yunfa; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2015-05-01

    This paper examines the impact of short-term operation on long-term energy production. We propose a multiobjective optimization model for the short-term, daily operation of a system of cascade reservoirs. The two objectives considered in the daily model are: (1) minimizing the total amount of water released and (2) maximizing the stored energy in the system. Optimizing short-term operation without considering its impact on long-term energy production does not guarantee maximum energy production in the system. Therefore, a major goal of this paper is to identify desirable short-term operation strategies that, at the same time, optimize long-term energy production. First, we solve the daily model for 1 month (30 days) using a nondominated genetic algorithm (NSGAII). We then use the nondominated solutions obtained by NSGAII to assess the impact on long-term energy production using a monthly model. We use historical monthly inflows to characterize the inflow variability. We apply the proposed methodology to the Qingjiang cascade system of reservoirs in China. The results show: (1) in average hydrology scenarios, the solution maximizing stored energy produces the most overall long-term energy production; (2) in moderately wet hydrology scenarios, the solution minimizing water released outperforms the maximizing stored energy solution; and (3) when extremely wet hydrology scenarios are expected, a compromise solution is the best strategy.

  1. Optimal Hedging Rule for Reservoir Refill Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, W.; Zhao, J.; Lund, J. R.; Zhao, T.; Lei, X.; Wang, H.

    2015-12-01

    This paper develops an optimal reservoir Refill Hedging Rule (RHR) for combined water supply and flood operation using mathematical analysis. A two-stage model is developed to formulate the trade-off between operations for conservation benefit and flood damage in the reservoir refill season. Based on the probability distribution of the maximum refill water availability at the end of the second stage, three zones are characterized according to the relationship among storage capacity, expected storage buffer (ESB), and maximum safety excess discharge (MSED). The Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions of the model show that the optimality of the refill operation involves making the expected marginal loss of conservation benefit from unfilling (i.e., ending storage of refill period less than storage capacity) as nearly equal to the expected marginal flood damage from levee overtopping downstream as possible while maintaining all constraints. This principle follows and combines the hedging rules for water supply and flood management. A RHR curve is drawn analogously to water supply hedging and flood hedging rules, showing the trade-off between the two objectives. The release decision result has a linear relationship with the current water availability, implying the linearity of RHR for a wide range of water conservation functions (linear, concave, or convex). A demonstration case shows the impacts of factors. Larger downstream flood conveyance capacity and empty reservoir capacity allow a smaller current release and more water can be conserved. Economic indicators of conservation benefit and flood damage compete with each other on release, the greater economic importance of flood damage is, the more water should be released in the current stage, and vice versa. Below a critical value, improving forecasts yields less water release, but an opposing effect occurs beyond this critical value. Finally, the Danjiangkou Reservoir case study shows that the RHR together with a rolling

  2. Evaluating Forecasts in Reservoir Operations: The Role of Reforecast Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guihan, R.; Polebitski, A.; Palmer, R. N.; Werner, K.; Nielson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Forecasts of future weather can provide valuable information for reservoir operations. A challenge confronting reservoir operators today is whether to incorporate new climate products into their operations or to use historic data, perhaps Ensemble Streamflow Predictions (ESP), to guide them. This research evaluates the quality and value of forecasts generated from the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) using the operations of Bear Lake, a multi-purpose reservoir owned by Pacific Corps, and compares it to the quality and value of using an ESP approach. Streamflow reforecasts are generated and used to evaluate the predictive skill of the CFSv2 in the context of decision making and reservoir operations. For the Bear Lake system, forecasts are most critical during the April through September period, when releases are being made for irrigation purposes. Snowpack data, available from April to June, are a determining factor in streamflow runoff during the later spring and early summer. The CFSv2 reforecast data makes use of this information and the approach used this research also uses snowpack data to select appropriate analog years in the ESP estimations. The streamflow forecasts are used as input for a decision support system. The decision support system for this study includes a simulation model that incorporates system constraints and operating policies. To determine the value of the reforecast products, performance metrics meaningful to managers are to be identified and quantified. Without such metrics and awareness of seasonal operational nuances, it is difficult to identify forecast improvements in meaningful ways. Some of the important operational metrics formulated for the Bear Lake Project are maximizing release irrigation allocations and reliably meeting set allocations. These metrics of system performance are compared for the reforecast, climatology, and observed scenarios to evaluate the potential benefits of using CFSv2 seasonal forecasts in systems

  3. Modeling Reservoir-River Networks in Support of Optimizing Seasonal-Scale Reservoir Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villa, D. L.; Lowry, T. S.; Bier, A.; Barco, J.; Sun, A.

    2011-12-01

    each timestep and minimize computational overhead. Power generation for each reservoir is estimated using a 2-dimensional regression that accounts for both the available head and turbine efficiency. The object-oriented architecture makes run configuration easy to update. The dynamic model inputs include inflow and meteorological forecasts while static inputs include bathymetry data, reservoir and power generation characteristics, and topological descriptors. Ensemble forecasts of hydrological and meteorological conditions are supplied in real-time by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and are used as a proxy for uncertainty, which is carried through the simulation and optimization process to produce output that describes the probability that different operational scenario's will be optimal. The full toolset, which includes HydroSCOPE, is currently being tested on the Feather River system in Northern California and the Upper Colorado Storage Project.

  4. First-passage time criteria for the operation of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Aiden J.; Green, David A.; Metcalfe, Andrew V.; Akande, Kunle

    2014-11-01

    A multi-objective optimisation for reservoir operation based on expected monetary value and expected first passage-time criterion is proposed. The computations are facilitated by the algorithms of matrix analytic methods. The formal structure, classifying states as levels and phases within levels, and associated algorithms of matrix analytic methods are introduced in the context of multi-reservoir systems. The algorithms underpin the feasibility of the computations for large systems and enable the calculation of the full distribution of first passage time. A new algorithm for computing results for a seasonal model, which reduces computing time by an order of magnitude for monthly time steps is presented. The methods are illustrated for a two reservoir system, with an option of pumping additional water from a transfer scheme, in the East of England. The Pareto front of Pareto optimal policies is shown.

  5. Sediment transport capacity as an objective of reservoir operations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milhous, Robert T.

    1998-01-01

    A sediment transport capacity index was developed as a part of a program to develop methods of flushing flow analysis. The index can be used to develop reservoir operation strategies that consider the movement of sediment as one of the reservoir management goals. The sedimentation transport capacity index determines the instream flow for the maintenance of the substrate below a reservoir in a condition needed by a desirable ecosystem. It can also be used in investigating the impacts of reservoir on the river channel downstream of the reservoir. The method allows a reservoir operator the flexibility of meeting the streamflow needs with a mix of streamflows.

  6. Optimal reservoir operation policies using novel nested algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Jonoski, Andreja; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2015-04-01

    Historically, the two most widely practiced methods for optimal reservoir operation have been dynamic programming (DP) and stochastic dynamic programming (SDP). These two methods suffer from the so called "dual curse" which prevents them to be used in reasonably complex water systems. The first one is the "curse of dimensionality" that denotes an exponential growth of the computational complexity with the state - decision space dimension. The second one is the "curse of modelling" that requires an explicit model of each component of the water system to anticipate the effect of each system's transition. We address the problem of optimal reservoir operation concerning multiple objectives that are related to 1) reservoir releases to satisfy several downstream users competing for water with dynamically varying demands, 2) deviations from the target minimum and maximum reservoir water levels and 3) hydropower production that is a combination of the reservoir water level and the reservoir releases. Addressing such a problem with classical methods (DP and SDP) requires a reasonably high level of discretization of the reservoir storage volume, which in combination with the required releases discretization for meeting the demands of downstream users leads to computationally expensive formulations and causes the curse of dimensionality. We present a novel approach, named "nested" that is implemented in DP, SDP and reinforcement learning (RL) and correspondingly three new algorithms are developed named nested DP (nDP), nested SDP (nSDP) and nested RL (nRL). The nested algorithms are composed from two algorithms: 1) DP, SDP or RL and 2) nested optimization algorithm. Depending on the way we formulate the objective function related to deficits in the allocation problem in the nested optimization, two methods are implemented: 1) Simplex for linear allocation problems, and 2) quadratic Knapsack method in the case of nonlinear problems. The novel idea is to include the nested

  7. Optimizing Reservoir Operation to Adapt to the Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madadgar, S.; Jung, I.; Moradkhani, H.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change and upcoming variation in flood timing necessitates the adaptation of current rule curves developed for operation of water reservoirs as to reduce the potential damage from either flood or draught events. This study attempts to optimize the current rule curves of Cougar Dam on McKenzie River in Oregon addressing some possible climate conditions in 21th century. The objective is to minimize the failure of operation to meet either designated demands or flood limit at a downstream checkpoint. A simulation/optimization model including the standard operation policy and a global optimization method, tunes the current rule curve upon 8 GCMs and 2 greenhouse gases emission scenarios. The Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) is used as the hydrology model to project the streamflow for the period of 2000-2100 using downscaled precipitation and temperature forcing from 8 GCMs and two emission scenarios. An ensemble of rule curves, each associated with an individual scenario, is obtained by optimizing the reservoir operation. The simulation of reservoir operation, for all the scenarios and the expected value of the ensemble, is conducted and performance assessment using statistical indices including reliability, resilience, vulnerability and sustainability is made.

  8. The Cumberland River Flood of 2010 and Corps Reservoir Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charley, W.; Hanbali, F.; Rohrbach, B.

    2010-12-01

    On Saturday, May 1, 2010, heavy rain began falling in the Cumberland River Valley and continued through the following day. 13.5 inches was measured at Nashville, an unprecedented amount that doubled the previous 2-day record, and exceeded the May monthly total record of 11 inches. Elsewhere in the valley, amounts of over 19 inches were measured. The frequency of this storm was estimated to exceed the one-thousand year event. This historic rainfall brought large scale flooding to the Cumberland-Ohio-Tennessee River Valleys, and caused over 2 billion dollars in damages, despite the numerous flood control projects in the area, including eight U.S. Army Corps of Engineers projects. The vast majority of rainfall occurred in drainage areas that are uncontrolled by Corps flood control projects, which lead to the wide area flooding. However, preliminary analysis indicates that operations of the Corps projects reduced the Cumberland River flood crest in Nashville by approximately five feet. With funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009, hydrologic, hydraulic and reservoir simulation models have just been completed for the Cumberland-Ohio-Tennessee River Valleys. These models are being implemented in the Corps Water Management System (CWMS), a comprehensive data acquisition and hydrologic modeling system for short-term decision support of water control operations in real time. The CWMS modeling component uses observed rainfall and forecasted rainfall to compute forecasts of river flows into and downstream of reservoirs, using HEC-HMS. Simulation of reservoir operations, utilizing either the HEC-ResSim or CADSWES RiverWare program, uses these flow scenarios to provide operational decision information for the engineer. The river hydraulics program, HEC-RAS, computes river stages and water surface profiles for these scenarios. An inundation boundary and depth map of water in the flood plain can be calculated from the HEC-RAS results using Arc

  9. Constrained genetic algorithms for optimizing multi-use reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John; Wang, Kuo-Wei; Dai, Shin-Yi

    2010-08-01

    To derive an optimal strategy for reservoir operations to assist the decision-making process, we propose a methodology that incorporates the constrained genetic algorithm (CGA) where the ecological base flow requirements are considered as constraints to water release of reservoir operation when optimizing the 10-day reservoir storage. Furthermore, a number of penalty functions designed for different types of constraints are integrated into reservoir operational objectives to form the fitness function. To validate the applicability of this proposed methodology for reservoir operations, the Shih-Men Reservoir and its downstream water demands are used as a case study. By implementing the proposed CGA in optimizing the operational performance of the Shih-Men Reservoir for the last 20 years, we find this method provides much better performance in terms of a small generalized shortage index (GSI) for human water demands and greater ecological base flows for most of the years than historical operations do. We demonstrate the CGA approach can significantly improve the efficiency and effectiveness of water supply capability to both human and ecological base flow requirements and thus optimize reservoir operations for multiple water users. The CGA can be a powerful tool in searching for the optimal strategy for multi-use reservoir operations in water resources management.

  10. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model included: quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report summarized the data collected on Lake Roosevelt for 1991 and includes limnological, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, fishery, and reservoir operation data. Discussions cover reservoir operation affect upon zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish. Reservoir operations brought reservoir elevations to a low of 1,221.7 in April, the result of power operations and a flood control shift from Dworshak Dam, in Idaho, to Grand Coulee Dam. Water retention times were correspondingly low reaching a minimum of 14.7 days on April 27th.

  11. A reservoir operating method for riverine ecosystem protection, reservoir sedimentation control and water supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xin-An; Yang, Zhi-Feng; Petts, Geoffrey E.; Kondolf, G. Mathias

    2014-05-01

    Riverine ecosystem protection requires the maintenance of natural flow and sediment regimes downstream from dams. In reservoir management schedules this requirement should be integrated with sedimentation control and human water supply. However, traditional eco-friendly reservoir operating methods have usually only considered the natural flow regime. This paper seeks to develop a reservoir operating method that accounts for both the natural flow and sediment regimes as well as optimizing the water supply allocations. Herein, reservoir water level (RWL), sediment-occupied ratio of reservoir volume (SOR) and rate of change of SOR (RCSOR) are adopted as three triggers of a drawdown-flushing-based sediment management policy. Two different groups of reservoir operating rule curves (RORCs) are designed for sediment-flushing and non-sediment-flushing years, and the three triggers, RWL, SOR and RCSOR, are used to change the “static” RORCs to “dynamic” ones. The approach is applied to the Wangkuai Reservoir, China to test its effectiveness. This shows that the approach can improve the flexibility of reservoir operators to balance the reservoir management, water supply management and the flow and sediment needs of the downstream riverine ecosystem.

  12. Derivation of operation rules for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Xiang; Hu, Tiesong; Xiong, Lihua; Cao, Zhixian; Xu, Chongyu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to derive the general optimality conditions of the commonly used operating policies for reservoirs in parallel with joint water demand, which are defined in terms of system-wide release rules and individual reservoir storage balancing functions. Following that, a new set of release rules for individual reservoirs are proposed in analytical forms by considering the optimality conditions for the balance of total water delivery utility and carryover storage value of individual reservoirs. Theoretical analysis indicates that the commonly used operating policies are a special case of the newly derived rules. The derived release rules are then applied to simulating the operation of a parallel reservoir system in northeastern China. Compared to the performance of the commonly used policies, some advantages of the proposed operation rules are illustrated. Most notably, less water shortage occurrence and higher water supply reliability are obtained from the proposed operation rules.

  13. Optimized cascade reservoir operation considering ice flood control and power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jianxia; Meng, Xuejiao; Wang, ZongZhi; Wang, Xuebin; Huang, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    Ice flood control is an important objective for reservoir operation in cold regions. Maintaining the reservoir outflow in a certain range is considered an effective way to remediate ice flood damage. However, this strategy may decrease the socio-economic benefit of reservoirs, for example, reduction of hydropower production. These conflicting objectives cause a dilemma for water managers when defining reservoir operation policy. This study considers seven cascade reservoirs in the upstream Yellow River, and ice flood control storage is introduced to balance the hydropower generation and ice flood control. The relation between the ice flood control storage volume of the Liujiaxia reservoir and cascade power output is analyzed. An optimization model to explore the trade-offs between hydropower generation and ice flood control requirements is developed. The model takes into account ice flood control requirements. The optimization model compared to simulation model based on the reservoir operation rule curves. The results show that the optimal operation rules are far more efficient in balancing the benefits within the power generation and ice flood control. The cascade reservoirs operation strategies proposed in this study can be effectively and suitably used in reservoir operation systems with similar conditions.

  14. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations Appendices; 1991 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.; Scholz, Allan T.

    1995-08-01

    This report consists of appendices A-F containing the biological data which were collected from Lake Roosevelt, Washington. The data are to be used in the design of a computer model that would predict biological responses of reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review program. Major components of the model included: Quantification of impacts to phytoplankton, zooplanktons, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and quantification of entrainment levels of zooplankton and fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times.

  15. Reservoir operation under variable climate: Case of Rozva Dam, Zimbabwe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ncube, S. P.; Makurira, H.; Kaseke, E.; Mhizha, A.

    The challenge of maintaining or improving the quality of rural livelihoods against the increasing threat of climate change (CC) and climate variability (CV) calls for the development of robust and tested systems, tools and procedures for the management of water resources. The research aimed at assessing reservoir operation under variable climate for Rozva Dam, a medium-sized reservoir in Zimbabwe. Rozva Dam is located in the Bikita District of Zimbabwe and has a full supply capacity of 2.8 Mm 3 at a maximum water level of 17.3 m. The research analysed 46 years of rainfall and temperature data to assess climate variability and or change. The CROPWAT model was used to estimate crop water requirements for the adjacent 80 hectare irrigation scheme. The WAFLEX model was applied to simulate the performance of the system under three scenarios: (1) existing demands and operational rules, (2) reduced water availability due to climate change, as predicted by the Ministry of Mines, but with increasing annual demands and (3) climate change situation coupled with change in irrigation technology. The results show a general decreasing linear trend for rainfall although the variance was not statistically significant at p = 0.05. A clearer cyclic pattern was observed for the decadal analysis. An increasing trend in both maximum and minimum temperature was observed although, again, these were not statistically significant with a Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient ( R sp) of below 0.5. The research used rainfall and temperature data as the basis for confirmation climate change and variability in the study area. Analyses show that the area is experiencing more of CV than CC. Modelling results show that the reservoir can satisfy current demands but will fail to cope under the forecasted increase in demand. The conclusions from the research are that the available water resources in the studied system are sufficient to satisfy the current demands. The predicted level of climate

  16. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  17. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations : Final Report 1993.

    SciTech Connect

    Voeller, Amy C.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to collect biological data from Lake Roosevelt to be used in the design of a computer model that will predict biological responses to reservoir operations as part of the System Operation Review Program. This study worked in conjunction with Lake Roosevelt Monitoring Project which investigated the effectiveness of two kokanee salmon hatcheries. This report summarized the data collected from Lake Roosevelt from 1993 and includes limnological, reservoir operation, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrate, experimental trawling, and net-pen rainbow trout tagging data. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times.

  18. Intelligent control for modeling of real-time reservoir operation, part II: artificial neural network with operating rule curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Ting; Chang, Li-Chiu; Chang, Fi-John

    2005-04-01

    To bridge the gap between academic research and actual operation, we propose an intelligent control system for reservoir operation. The methodology includes two major processes, the knowledge acquired and implemented, and the inference system. In this study, a genetic algorithm (GA) and a fuzzy rule base (FRB) are used to extract knowledge based on the historical inflow data with a design objective function and on the operating rule curves respectively. The adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is then used to implement the knowledge, to create the fuzzy inference system, and then to estimate the optimal reservoir operation. To investigate its applicability and practicability, the Shihmen reservoir, Taiwan, is used as a case study. For the purpose of comparison, a simulation of the currently used M-5 operating rule curve is also performed. The results demonstrate that (1) the GA is an efficient way to search the optimal input-output patterns, (2) the FRB can extract the knowledge from the operating rule curves, and (3) the ANFIS models built on different types of knowledge can produce much better performance than the traditional M-5 curves in real-time reservoir operation. Moreover, we show that the model can be more intelligent for reservoir operation if more information (or knowledge) is involved.

  19. Multi-objective Optimization of the Mississippi Headwaters Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, B. A.; Harou, J. J.

    2006-12-01

    The Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC) of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is participating in a re- operation study of the Mississippi Headwaters reservoir system. The study, termed ROPE (Reservoir Operation Plan Evaluation), will develop a new operation policy for the reservoir system in a Shared Vision Planning effort. The current operating plan is 40 years old and does not account for the diverse objectives of the system altered by increased development and resource awareness. Functions of the six-reservoir system include flood damage reduction, recreation, fish and wildlife habitat considerations, tribal resources, water quality, water supply, erosion and sedimentation control, and hydropower production. Experience has shown that a modeling approach using both optimization, which makes decisions based on their value to objectives, and simulation, which makes decisions that follow operating instructions or rules, is an effective way to improve or develop new operating policies. HEC's role in this study was to develop a multi- objective optimization model of the system using HEC-PRM (Prescriptive Reservoir Model), a generalized computer program that performs multi-period deterministic network-flow optimization of reservoir systems. The optimization model's purpose is to enable stakeholders and decision makers to select appropriate tradeoffs between objectives, and have these tradeoffs reflected in proposed rules. Initial single-objective optimizations allow stakeholders to verify that the penalty functions developed by experts accurately represent their interests. Once penalty functions are confirmed, trade-off curves between pairs of system objectives are developed, and stakeholders and decision makers choose a desired balance between the two objectives. These chosen balance points are maintained in optimizations that consider all objectives. Finally, optimal system decisions are studied to infer operating patterns that embody the chosen tradeoffs. The

  20. Adapting Dam and Reservoir Design and Operations to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, René; Braun, Marco; Chaumont, Diane

    2013-04-01

    In order to identify the potential initiatives that the dam, reservoir and water resources systems owners and operators may undertake to cope with climate change issues, it is essential to determine the current state of knowledge of their impacts on hydrological variables at regional and local scales. Future climate scenarios derived from climate model simulations can be combined with operational hydrological modeling tools and historical observations to evaluate realistic pathways of future hydrological conditions for specific drainage basins. In the case of hydropower production those changes in hydrological conditions may have significant economic impacts. For over a decade the state owned hydropower producer Hydro Québec has been exploring the physical impacts on their watersheds by relying on climate services in collaboration with Ouranos, a consortium on regional climatology and adaptation to climate change. Previous climate change impact analysis had been including different sources of climate simulation data, explored different post-processing approaches and used hydrological impact models. At a new stage of this collaboration the operational management of Hydro Quebec aspired to carry out a cost-benefit analysis of considering climate change in the refactoring of hydro-power installations. In the process of the project not only a set of scenarios of future runoff regimes had to be defined to support long term planning decisions of a dam and reservoir operator, but also the significance of uncertainties needed to be communicated and made understood. We provide insight into a case study that took some unexpected turns and leaps by bringing together climate scientists, hydrologists and hydro-power operation managers. The study includes the selection of appropriate climate scenarios, the correction of biases, the application of hydrological models and the assessment of uncertainties. However, it turned out that communicating the science properly and

  1. Magma reservoir systems inferred from tilt patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimozuru, D.

    1981-09-01

    Inflation patterns based on water-tube tiltmeter and levelling observation show different features for Krafla Volcano in Iceland and Kilauea Volcano in Hawaii. Monotonous sawtooth shape inflation is observed at Krafla, while inflation curves at Kileauea are more or less complicated. The difference was attributed to differences in the system of magma reservoir for the two volcanoes. By using the electrical equivalent of a magma reservoir and volcanic conduit as a capacitor and a resistor, an electrical oseillator was considered to be a possible model for a magma reservoir system. In the case of Krafla, the magma reservoir system is replaced with one electric oscillator called «Single system» or «Icelandic type» system. The complicated inflation pattern of Kilauea was interpreted as the assembly of a main magma reservoir and the group of surrounding small reservoirs. The equivalent electric analogue is the composite parallel and serial connection of a single oscillator which generates irregular output voltage during a charging process. The proposed magma reservoir system of Kilauea is called «Multi-coupled system» or «Hawaiian type system» which also help in interpreting the wondering of the uplift center and tidal phenomena of the Halemaumau lava lake.

  2. A framework for incorporating ecological releases in single reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Brill, Earl D.; Ranjithan, Ranji S.; Sankarasubramanian, A.

    2015-04-01

    Most reservoir operation practices consider downstream environmental flow as a constraint to meet a minimum release. The resulting flow regime may not necessarily provide downstream aquatic conditions to support healthy ecosystems. These effects can be quantified in terms of changes in values of parameters that represent the flow regimes. Numerous studies have focused on determining the ecological response to hydrological alteration caused by reservoir operation. To mitigate hydrological alteration and restore the natural flow regime as much as possible, a reservoir operation framework is proposed to explicitly incorporate ecological flow requirements. A general optimization-based decision model is presented to consider simultaneously the multiple anthropogenic uses of the reservoir and desirable ecological releases represented by parameters that capture the flow regime. Multiple uses of the reservoir, including water supply, hydropower generation, etc., are modeled as a mixed integer programming problem. Hydropower generation, which is represented by a nonlinear function that usually depends on head and water flow, is linearized using a two-dimensional function. Investigations using a reservoir in Virginia, located in the southeastern United States, demonstrate that compared to standard releases based on current operation practice, releases simulated using this framework perform better in mimicking pre-development flows. The tradeoff between anthropogenic use and ecological releases is investigated. The framework is first demonstrated for instances with perfect stream flow information. To examine the flexibility of this framework in reservoir release management, monthly flow forecasts and disaggregated daily flow conditions are incorporated. Retrospective monthly flow forecasts are obtained through regression models that use gridded precipitation forecasts and gridded soil moisture estimates as predictors. A nonparametric method is chosen to disaggregate monthly

  3. Optimizing Wind And Hydropower Generation Within Realistic Reservoir Operating Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, T. M.; Clement, M. A.; Zagona, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the benefits of utilizing the flexibility of hydropower systems to balance the variability and uncertainty of wind generation. However, previous hydropower and wind coordination studies have simplified non-power constraints on reservoir systems. For example, some studies have only included hydropower constraints on minimum and maximum storage volumes and minimum and maximum plant discharges. The methodology presented here utilizes the pre-emptive linear goal programming optimization solver in RiverWare to model hydropower operations with a set of prioritized policy constraints and objectives based on realistic policies that govern the operation of actual hydropower systems, including licensing constraints, environmental constraints, water management and power objectives. This approach accounts for the fact that not all policy constraints are of equal importance. For example target environmental flow levels may not be satisfied if it would require violating license minimum or maximum storages (pool elevations), but environmental flow constraints will be satisfied before optimizing power generation. Additionally, this work not only models the economic value of energy from the combined hydropower and wind system, it also captures the economic value of ancillary services provided by the hydropower resources. It is recognized that the increased variability and uncertainty inherent with increased wind penetration levels requires an increase in ancillary services. In regions with liberalized markets for ancillary services, a significant portion of hydropower revenue can result from providing ancillary services. Thus, ancillary services should be accounted for when determining the total value of a hydropower system integrated with wind generation. This research shows that the end value of integrated hydropower and wind generation is dependent on a number of factors that can vary by location. Wind factors include wind penetration level

  4. Deriving multiple near-optimal solutions to deterministic reservoir operation problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pan; Cai, Ximing; Guo, Shenglian

    2011-08-01

    Even deterministic reservoir operation problems with a single objective function may have multiple near-optimal solutions (MNOS) whose objective values are equal or sufficiently close to the optimum. MNOS is valuable for practical reservoir operation decisions because having a set of alternatives from which to choose allows reservoir operators to explore multiple options whereas the traditional algorithm that produces a single optimum does not offer them this flexibility. This paper presents three methods: the near-shortest paths (NSP) method, the genetic algorithm (GA) method, and the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, to explore the MNOS. These methods, all of which require a long computation time, find MNOS using different approaches. To reduce the computation time, a narrower subspace, namely a near-optimal space (NOSP, described by the maximum and minimum bounds of MNOS) is derived. By confining the MNOS search within the NOSP, the computation time of the three methods is reduced. The proposed methods are validated with a test function before they are examined with case studies of both a single reservoir (the Three Gorges Reservoir in China) and a multireservoir system (the Qing River Cascade Reservoirs in China). It is found that MNOS exists for the deterministic reservoir operation problems. When comparing the three methods, the NSP method is unsuitable for large-scale problems but provides a benchmark to which solutions of small- and medium-scale problems can be compared. The GA method can produce some MNOS but is not very efficient in terms of the computation time. Finally, the MCMC method performs best in terms of goodness-of-fit to the benchmark and computation time, since it yields a wide variety of MNOS based on all retained intermediate results as potential MNOS. Two case studies demonstrate that the MNOS identified in this study are useful for real-world reservoir operation, such as the identification of important operation time periods and

  5. Feasibility study of sedimentary enhanced geothermal systems using reservoir simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jae Kyoung

    investigated. Especially, water density, viscosity and rock heat capacity play a significant role in reservoir performance. The Permian Lyons formation in the Denver Basin is selected for this preliminary study. Well log data around the area of interest are collected and borehole temperature data are analyzed to estimate the geothermal potential of the target area and it follows that the target formation has a geothermal gradient as high as 72 °C/km. Based on the well log data, hypothetical reservoir simulation models are build and tested to access the hydraulic and thermal performance. It turns out that the target formation is marginally or sub-marginally commercial in terms of its formation conductivity. Therefore, the target formation may require reservoir stimulation for commercially viable power generation. Lastly, reservoir simulation models with average petrophysical properties obtained from the well log analysis of the target formation are built. In order to account for overburden and underburden heat transfer for confined reservoirs, low permeability layers representing shale cap/bed rocks are attached to the top and bottom of the reservoir layers. The dual permeability concept is applied to the reservoir layers to model induced fracture networks by reservoir stimulation. The simulation models are tested by changing fracture conductivity and shape factor. The results show that a balance between hydraulic and thermal performance should be achieved to meet the target flow rate and sustainability of 30 years' uninterrupted operation of geothermal electricity power generation. Ineffective reservoir stimulation could result in failing to create a producing reservoir with appropriate productivity index or causing premature thermal breakthrough or short-circuiting which advances the end of geothermal systems. Therefore, Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) should be engineered to secure producing performance and operational sustainability simultaneously.

  6. Assessment of reservoir system variable forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kistenmacher, Martin; Georgakakos, Aris P.

    2015-05-01

    Forecast ensembles are a convenient means to model water resources uncertainties and to inform planning and management processes. For multipurpose reservoir systems, forecast types include (i) forecasts of upcoming inflows and (ii) forecasts of system variables and outputs such as reservoir levels, releases, flood damage risks, hydropower production, water supply withdrawals, water quality conditions, navigation opportunities, and environmental flows, among others. Forecasts of system variables and outputs are conditional on forecasted inflows as well as on specific management policies and can provide useful information for decision-making processes. Unlike inflow forecasts (in ensemble or other forms), which have been the subject of many previous studies, reservoir system variable and output forecasts are not formally assessed in water resources management theory or practice. This article addresses this gap and develops methods to rectify potential reservoir system forecast inconsistencies and improve the quality of management-relevant information provided to stakeholders and managers. The overarching conclusion is that system variable and output forecast consistency is critical for robust reservoir management and needs to be routinely assessed for any management model used to inform planning and management processes. The above are demonstrated through an application from the Sacramento-American-San Joaquin reservoir system in northern California.

  7. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

  8. Considering social and environmental concerns as reservoir operating objectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmant, A.; Georis, B.; Doulliez, P.

    2003-04-01

    Sustainability principles are now widely recognized as key criteria for water resource development schemes, such as hydroelectric and multipurpose reservoirs. Development decisions no longer rely solely on economic grounds, but also consider environmental and social concerns through the so-called environmental and social impact assessments. The objective of this paper is to show that environmental and social concerns can also be addressed in the management (operation) of existing or projected reservoir schemes. By either adequately exploiting the results of environmental and social impact assessments, or by carrying out survey of water users, experts and managers, efficient (Pareto optimal) reservoir operating rules can be derived using flexible mathematical programming techniques. By reformulating the problem as a multistage flexible constraint satisfaction problem, incommensurable and subjective operating objectives can contribute, along with classical economic objectives, to the determination of optimal release decisions. Employed in a simulation mode, the results can be used to assess the long-term impacts of various operating rules on the social well-being of affected populations as well as on the integrity of the environment. The methodology is illustrated with a reservoir reallocation problem in Chile.

  9. Safety drain system for fluid reservoir

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor); Cronise, Raymond J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A safety drain system includes a plurality of drain sections, each of which defines distinct fluid flow paths. At least a portion of the fluid flow paths commence at a side of the drain section that is in fluid communication with a reservoir's fluid. Each fluid flow path at the side communicating with the reservoir's fluid defines an opening having a smallest dimension not to exceed approximately one centimeter. The drain sections are distributed over at least one surface of the reservoir. A manifold is coupled to the drain sections.

  10. Incorporating teleconnection information into reservoir operating policies using Stochastic Dynamic Programming and a Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Sean; Galelli, Stefano; Wilcox, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Water reservoir systems are often affected by recurring large-scale ocean-atmospheric anomalies, known as teleconnections, that cause prolonged periods of climatological drought. Accurate forecasts of these events -- at lead times in the order of weeks and months -- may enable reservoir operators to take more effective release decisions to improve the performance of their systems. In practice this might mean a more reliable water supply system, a more profitable hydropower plant or a more sustainable environmental release policy. To this end, climate indices, which represent the oscillation of the ocean-atmospheric system, might be gainfully employed within reservoir operating models that adapt the reservoir operation as a function of the climate condition. This study develops a Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) approach that can incorporate climate indices using a Hidden Markov Model. The model simulates the climatic regime as a hidden state following a Markov chain, with the state transitions driven by variation in climatic indices, such as the Southern Oscillation Index. Time series analysis of recorded streamflow data reveals the parameters of separate autoregressive models that describe the inflow to the reservoir under three representative climate states ("normal", "wet", "dry"). These models then define inflow transition probabilities for use in a classic SDP approach. The key advantage of the Hidden Markov Model is that it allows conditioning the operating policy not only on the reservoir storage and the antecedent inflow, but also on the climate condition, thus potentially allowing adaptability to a broader range of climate conditions. In practice, the reservoir operator would effect a water release tailored to a specific climate state based on available teleconnection data and forecasts. The approach is demonstrated on the operation of a realistic, stylised water reservoir with carry-over capacity in South-East Australia. Here teleconnections relating

  11. Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Hendron, R.H.; Sinclair, A.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Fracturing and completing deep wells in hot, nonporous crystalline basement rock challenges conventional equipment use, procedures, and techniques common in oil and gas and normal geothermal completions. Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh down-hole environment. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the 2 wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in isolation liners, and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of 3-dimensional fracture growth that requires large volumes of injected water. 20 references.

  12. Fracturing operations in a dry geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Hendron, R.H.; Sinclair, A.R.; Nicholson, R.W.

    1983-01-01

    Fracturing operations at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site initiated unique developments necessary to solve problems caused by an extremely harsh downhole environment. Two deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures are in excess of 600/sup 0/F (315/sup 0/C). The wells were drilled during 1979 to 1981, inclined at 35 degrees, one above the other, and directionally drilled in an azimuthal direction orthogonal to the least principal in-situ crustal stress field. Hydraulic fracturing experiments to connect the two wells have used openhole packers, hydraulic jet notching of the borehole wall, cemented-in insolation liners and casing packers. Problems were encountered with hole drag, high fracture gradients, H/sub 2/S in vent back fluids, stress corrosion cracking of tubulars, and the complex nature of three-dimensional fracture growth that requires very large volumes of injected water. Two fractured zones have been formed by hydraulic fracturing and defined by close-in, borehole deployed, microseismic detectors. Initial operations were focused in the injection wellbore near total depth, where water injection treatments totalling 51,000 bbls (8100 m/sup 3/) were accomplished by pumping through a cemented-in 4-1/2 in. liner/PBR assembly. Retrievable casing packers were used to inject 26,000 bbls (4100 m/sup 3/) in the upper section of the open hole. Surface injection pressures (ISIP) varied from 4000 to 5900 psi (27 to 41 MPa) and the fracture gradient ranged from 0.7 to 0.96 psi/ft.

  13. Efficient operation of a multi-purpose reservoir in Chile: Tradeoffs between irrigation and hydropower production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez Cabrera, J. M., Sr.; Olivares, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    This study proposes a method to develop efficient operational policies for a reservoir the southern Chile. The main water uses in this system are hydropower and irrigation, with conflicting seasonal demands. The conflict between these two uses is currently managed through a so-called "irrigation agreement" which defines a series of operational conditions on the reservoir by restricting volumes used for power production depending on reservoir storage level. Other than that, the reservoir operation is driven by cost-minimization over the power grid. Recent evidence shows an increasing degree of conflict in this basin, which suggests that the static approach of irrigation agreements, might no longer be appropriate. Moreover, this agreement could be revised in light of decreased water availability. This problem poses a challenge related to the spatial scope of analysis. Thus, irrigation benefits are driven by decisions made within the basin, whereas hydropower benefits depend on the operation of the entire power grid. Exploring the tradeoffs between these two water uses involves modeling both scales. The proposed methodology integrates information from both a grid-wide power operations model and a basin-wide agro-economic model into a decision model for optimal reservoir operation. The first model, a hydrothermal coordination tool, schedules power production by each plant in the grid, and allows capturing technical and economic aspects to the operation of hydropower reservoirs. The agro-economic model incorporates economic features of irrigation in the basin, and allows obtaining irrigation water demand functions. Finally, the results of both models are integrated into a single model for optimal reservoir operation considering the tradeoffs between the two uses. The result of the joint operation of water resources, show a flexible coordination of uses, revealing the opportunity cost of irrigation, which it gives the possibility of negotiating transfers of water to

  14. Particle dynamics in high-Alpine proglacial reservoirs modified by pumped-storage operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonalumi, Matteo; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Kaegi, Ralf; Wüest, Alfred

    2011-09-01

    Temperature and suspended particle distribution were surveyed and modeled in two high-Alpine reservoirs in Switzerland, connected by pumped-storage operations for ˜30 years. Due to different glacier coverage of the catchments, the two reservoirs exhibit different particle concentrations and temperatures. After ice-breakup, the lower reservoir with a higher glacier cover in its catchment experiences a higher particle input becoming more turbid than the upper reservoir, which in contrast becomes warmer and thermally more stratified. The pumped-storage operations, which replace the basin volumes annually at least 6 (larger lower basin) to 10 (smaller upper basin) times, modify the physical characteristics of the two reservoirs. This is especially so in winter, when they are ice-covered, without riverine input and at low water level. Our reservoir investigations between 2007 and 2009 and the subsequent particle-balance model show that the upper and lower basins have become more and less turbid, respectively. Pumped-storage operations modify the stratification and particle distribution in both reservoirs and therefore alter the particle outflow and sedimentation. However, on the basis of particle concentrations and reservoir volumes, it is evident that the annually integrated particle release to downstream (˜40% of total) and to overall sedimentation (˜60%) have hardly changed. The budget model was useful in the prediction of particle distribution and sedimentation dynamics in the pumped-storage system. It implies that this approach can be useful for further employment during planning stages of power plants in order to modify and mitigate downstream particle loads in reservoir operations.

  15. Risk-based parameter selection for short-term reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonovic, Slobodan P.; Venema, Henry D.; Burn, Donald H.

    1992-02-01

    A methodology has been developed to determine the optimal operating horizon for short-term reservoir operation. The modelling procedure includes: (1) an adaptive forecasting algorithm; (2) a real-time reservoir operation model; (3) a multiobjective compromise programming algorithm. The compromise programming algorithm utilizes a multiobjective compromise between the conflicting objectives of hydrologic forecast reliability and reservoir operation penalties. The algorithm requires predetermined weights defining the relative importance of the two objectives. This paper presents a risk-based methodology developed to help a decision maker in selecting the appropriate weights. Reliability, vulnerability, and resiliency are used as three risk-based criteria for assisting in selection of the weights. The methodology is presented in the form of a rule-based system designed to aid the user in the selection process. The methodology is illustrated through an application of the technique to the operation of Green Reservoir in Kentucky. The reservoir model is implemented for four different historical periods and its performance in terms of total penalties, reliability, vulnerability, and resiliency is presented as a function of the multi-objective weighting parameters. The rule-based expert system is then used for deriving recommendations regarding the selection of appropriate weights. The paper also discusses the rule-based expert system development tool, used in this research.

  16. Geothermal reservoir technology research at the DOE Idaho Operations Office

    SciTech Connect

    Creed, Bob

    1996-01-24

    Geothermal reservoir technology research projects managed at the Department of Energy Idaho Falls Operations office (DOE-ID) account for a large portion of the Department of Energy funding for reservoir technology research (approximately 7 million dollars in FY-95). DOE-ID managed projects include industry coupled geothermal exploration drilling, cooperative research projects initiated through the Geothermal Technology Organization (GTO), and other geothermal reservoir technology research projects. A solicitation for cost-shared industry coupled drilling has been completed and one zward has been made in FY-95. Another solicitation for industry coupled drilling may be conducted in the spring of 1996. A separate geothermal research technology research, development and demonstration solicitation will result in multiple year awards over the next 2 years. The goals of these solicitations are to ensure competition for federal money and to get the Government and the geothermal industry the most useful information for their research dollars.

  17. Improving multi-objective reservoir operation optimization with sensitivity-informed dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G.; Li, Y.; Zhou, H.

    2015-08-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a sensitivity-informed method for multi-objective operation of reservoir systems, which uses global sensitivity analysis as a screening tool to reduce computational demands. Sobol's method is used to screen insensitive decision variables and guide the formulation of the optimization problems with a significantly reduced number of decision variables. This sensitivity-informed method dramatically reduces the computational demands required for attaining high-quality approximations of optimal trade-off relationships between conflicting design objectives. The search results obtained from the reduced complexity multi-objective reservoir operation problems are then used to pre-condition the full search of the original optimization problem. In two case studies, the Dahuofang reservoir and the inter-basin multi-reservoir system in Liaoning province, China, sensitivity analysis results show that reservoir performance is strongly controlled by a small proportion of decision variables. Sensitivity-informed dimension reduction and pre-conditioning are evaluated in their ability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary optimization. Overall, this study illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the sensitivity-informed method and the use of global sensitivity analysis to inform dimension reduction of optimization problems when solving complex multi-objective reservoir operation problems.

  18. Improving multi-objective reservoir operation optimization with sensitivity-informed problem decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, J. G.; Zhang, C.; Fu, G. T.; Li, Y.; Zhou, H. C.

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a sensitivity-informed method for multi-objective operation of reservoir systems, which uses global sensitivity analysis as a screening tool to reduce the computational demands. Sobol's method is used to screen insensitive decision variables and guide the formulation of the optimization problems with a significantly reduced number of decision variables. This sensitivity-informed problem decomposition dramatically reduces the computational demands required for attaining high quality approximations of optimal tradeoff relationships between conflicting design objectives. The search results obtained from the reduced complexity multi-objective reservoir operation problems are then used to pre-condition the full search of the original optimization problem. In two case studies, the Dahuofang reservoir and the inter-basin multi-reservoir system in Liaoning province, China, sensitivity analysis results show that reservoir performance is strongly controlled by a small proportion of decision variables. Sensitivity-informed problem decomposition and pre-conditioning are evaluated in their ability to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of multi-objective evolutionary optimization. Overall, this study illustrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the sensitivity-informed method and the use of global sensitivity analysis to inform problem decomposition when solving the complex multi-objective reservoir operation problems.

  19. Multi-objective nested algorithms for optimal reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delipetrev, Blagoj; Solomatine, Dimitri

    2016-04-01

    . These algorithms have been denoted as multi-objective nDP (MOnDP), multi-objective nSDP (MOnSDP) and multi-objective nRL (MOnRL). The MOnDP, MOnSDP and MOnRL algorithms were tested at the multipurpose reservoir Knezevo of the Zletovica hydro-system located in the Republic of Macedonia, with eight objectives, including urban water supply, agriculture, ensuring ecological flow, and generation of hydropower. The MOnSDP and MOnRL derived/learned the optimal reservoir policy using 45 (1951-1995) years and were tested on 10 (1995-2005) years historical data, and compared with MOnDP optimal reservoir operation in the same period. The found solutions form the Pareto optimal set in eight dimensional objective function space (since the eight different objectives were considered). The MOnDP was used as a scanning algorithm with 10 sets of varying weights that can identify the most desirable multi-objective solutions and was selected because it is much quicker than MOnSDP and MOnRL. From the 10 sets of weights and their MOnDP results, three sets were selected to be used by MOnSDP and MOnRL. The solutions of both MOnSDP and MOnSDP were compared and the conclusion is that the MOnRL were found to be much better than those of the MOnSDP.

  20. 43 CFR 419.4 - What specific provisions govern operations of the reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of the reservoirs? 419.4 Section 419.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... provisions govern operations of the reservoirs? The specific provisions governing operations of the Truckee River Reservoirs and other reservoirs are contained in the TROA (incorporated by reference at §...

  1. 43 CFR 419.4 - What specific provisions govern operations of the reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... of the reservoirs? 419.4 Section 419.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... provisions govern operations of the reservoirs? The specific provisions governing operations of the Truckee River Reservoirs and other reservoirs are contained in the TROA (incorporated by reference at §...

  2. 43 CFR 419.4 - What specific provisions govern operations of the reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of the reservoirs? 419.4 Section 419.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... provisions govern operations of the reservoirs? The specific provisions governing operations of the Truckee River Reservoirs and other reservoirs are contained in the TROA (incorporated by reference at §...

  3. 43 CFR 419.4 - What specific provisions govern operations of the reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of the reservoirs? 419.4 Section 419.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... provisions govern operations of the reservoirs? The specific provisions governing operations of the Truckee River Reservoirs and other reservoirs are contained in the TROA (incorporated by reference at §...

  4. 43 CFR 419.4 - What specific provisions govern operations of the reservoirs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of the reservoirs? 419.4 Section 419.4 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands... provisions govern operations of the reservoirs? The specific provisions governing operations of the Truckee River Reservoirs and other reservoirs are contained in the TROA (incorporated by reference at §...

  5. Optimization or Simulation? Comparison of approaches to reservoir operation on the Senegal River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raso, Luciano; Bader, Jean-Claude; Pouget, Jean-Christophe; Malaterre, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Design of reservoir operation rules follows, traditionally, two approaches: optimization and simulation. In simulation, the analyst hypothesizes operation rules, and selects them by what-if analysis based on effects of model simulations on different objectives indicators. In optimization, the analyst selects operational objective indicators, finding operation rules as an output. Optimization rules guarantee optimality, but they often require further model simplification, and can be hard to communicate. Selecting the most proper approach depends on the system under analysis, and the analyst expertise and objectives. We present advantage and disadvantages of both approaches, and we test them for the Manantali reservoir operation rule design, on the Senegal River, West Africa. We compare their performance in attaining the system objectives. Objective indicators are defined a-priori, in order to quantify the system performance. Results from this application are not universally generalizable to the entire class, but they allow us to draw conclusions on this system, and to give further information on their application.

  6. Modeling of reservoir operation in UNH global hydrological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiklomanov, Alexander; Prusevich, Alexander; Frolking, Steve; Glidden, Stanley; Lammers, Richard; Wisser, Dominik

    2015-04-01

    Climate is changing and river flow is an integrated characteristic reflecting numerous environmental processes and their changes aggregated over large areas. Anthropogenic impacts on the river flow, however, can significantly exceed the changes associated with climate variability. Besides of irrigation, reservoirs and dams are one of major anthropogenic factor affecting streamflow. They distort hydrological regime of many rivers by trapping of freshwater runoff, modifying timing of river discharge and increasing the evaporation rate. Thus, reservoirs is an integral part of the global hydrological system and their impacts on rivers have to be taken into account for better quantification and understanding of hydrological changes. We developed a new technique, which was incorporated into WBM-TrANS model (Water Balance Model-Transport from Anthropogenic and Natural Systems) to simulate river routing through large reservoirs and natural lakes based on information available from freely accessible databases such as GRanD (the Global Reservoir and Dam database) or NID (National Inventory of Dams for US). Different formulations were applied for unregulated spillway dams and lakes, and for 4 types of regulated reservoirs, which were subdivided based on main purpose including generic (multipurpose), hydropower generation, irrigation and water supply, and flood control. We also incorporated rules for reservoir fill up and draining at the times of construction and decommission based on available data. The model were tested for many reservoirs of different size and types located in various climatic conditions using several gridded meteorological data sets as model input and observed daily and monthly discharge data from GRDC (Global Runoff Data Center), USGS Water Data (US Geological Survey), and UNH archives. The best results with Nash-Sutcliffe model efficiency coefficient in the range of 0.5-0.9 were obtained for temperate zone of Northern Hemisphere where most of large

  7. Implications of the Value of Hydrologic Information to Reservoir Operations--Learning from the Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hejazi, Mohamad Issa

    2009-01-01

    Closing the gap between theoretical reservoir operation and the real-world implementation remains a challenge in contemporary reservoir operations. Past research has focused on optimization algorithms and establishing optimal policies for reservoir operations. In this research, we attempt to understand operators' release decisions by investigating…

  8. Climate Impacts on Reservoir Operations for Fish Sustainability on the Sacramento River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, L.; Caldwell, R. J.; Rajagopalan, B.

    2011-12-01

    The propagation of the endangered winter-run Chinook salmon fishery on the Sacramento River in California is an ongoing concern that may be exacerbated by climate change. The construction of numerous dams on the river (most notably, Shasta Dam and Reservoir in 1945) prevented the salmon from reaching their native cold-water spawning habitat, causing populations to decline. Since 1989, operations at Shasta Dam have attempted to provide cold-water habitat downstream of the dam to promote salmon spawning. We have partnered stochastic weather generation with two-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling of reservoir operations to examine the feasibility of meeting downstream temperature targets for the salmon fishery. Stochastically generated climate and inflow scenarios created with historical data from 1994 to 2007 are input into a CE-QUAL-W2 model of the reservoir that can simulate reservoir operations, including selective withdrawal from multiple gates to meet water delivery and temperature targets. Results of these simulations will be presented. Ultimately, simulated outflows and release temperatures from the reservoir will be used with statistical models of stream temperature to examine the feasibility of meeting Sacramento River temperature targets at Balls Ferry under different future climate scenarios. We also plan to partner reservoir simulation results with bioenergetics scope for growth models to assess impacts of climate and reservoir operations on upstream and downstream fisheries. The goal of the integrated modeling system is to provide seasonal and longer time-scale planning tools to operators on the river that will assist in the maintenance of cold-water supply for salmon. Once complete, the framework will allow testing of alternative operating criteria to meet the thermal requirements on the river.

  9. Optimality conditions for a two-stage reservoir operation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianshi; Cai, Ximing; Wang, Zhongjing

    2011-08-01

    This paper discusses the optimality conditions for standard operation policy (SOP) and hedging rule (HR) for a two-stage reservoir operation problem using a consistent theoretical framework. The effects of three typical constraints, i.e., mass balance, nonnegative release, and storage constraints under both certain and uncertain conditions are analyzed. When all nonnegative constraints and storage constraints are unbinding, HR results in optimal reservoir operation following the marginal benefit (MB) principle (the MB is equal over current and future stages. However, if any of those constraints are binding, SOP results in the optimal solution, except in some special cases which need to carry over water in the current stage to the future stage, when extreme drought is certain and a higher marginal utility exists for the second stage. Furthermore, uncertainty complicates the effects of the various constraints. A higher uncertainty level in the future makes HR more favorable as water needs to be reserved to defend against the risk caused by uncertainty. Using the derived optimality conditions, an algorithm for solving a numerical model is developed and tested with the Miyun Reservoir in China.

  10. Hedging rule for reservoir operations: 2. A numerical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Jiing-Yun; Cai, Ximing

    2008-01-01

    Optimization models for reservoir operation analysis usually use a heuristic algorithm to search for the hedging rule. This paper presents a method that derives a hedging rule from theoretical analysis (J.-Y. You and X. Cai, 2008) with an explicit two-period Markov hydrology model, a particular form of nonlinear utility function, and a given inflow probability distribution. The unique procedure is to embed hedging rule derivation based on the marginal utility principle into reservoir operation simulation. The simulation method embedded with the optimization principle for hedging rule derivation will avoid both the inaccuracy problem caused by trail and error with traditional simulation models and the computational difficulty ("curse of dimensionality") with optimization models. Results show utility improvement with the hedging policy compared to the standard operation policy (SOP), considering factors such as reservoir capacity, inflow level and uncertainty, price elasticity and discount rate. Following the theoretical analysis presented in the companion paper, the condition for hedging application, the starting water availability and ending water availability for hedging, is reexamined with the numerical example; the probabilistic performance of hedging and SOP regarding water supply reliability is compared; and some findings from the theoretical analysis are verified numerically.

  11. An intelligent agent for optimal river-reservoir system management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieker, Jeffrey D.; Labadie, John W.

    2012-09-01

    A generalized software package is presented for developing an intelligent agent for stochastic optimization of complex river-reservoir system management and operations. Reinforcement learning is an approach to artificial intelligence for developing a decision-making agent that learns the best operational policies without the need for explicit probabilistic models of hydrologic system behavior. The agent learns these strategies experientially in a Markov decision process through observational interaction with the environment and simulation of the river-reservoir system using well-calibrated models. The graphical user interface for the reinforcement learning process controller includes numerous learning method options and dynamic displays for visualizing the adaptive behavior of the agent. As a case study, the generalized reinforcement learning software is applied to developing an intelligent agent for optimal management of water stored in the Truckee river-reservoir system of California and Nevada for the purpose of streamflow augmentation for water quality enhancement. The intelligent agent successfully learns long-term reservoir operational policies that specifically focus on mitigating water temperature extremes during persistent drought periods that jeopardize the survival of threatened and endangered fish species.

  12. The impact of climate change on Fantanele reservoir operating rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrache, Ramona; Galie, Andreea-Cristina

    2014-05-01

    The FP 7 research project ECLISE - Enabling Climate Information Service for Europe has the overall objective to develop an European service that meets the needs of climate information of the Member States of the European Union. In this project, four major areas of impact (cities, coasts, water and energy) are analysed. This paper presents the results of the climate change impact on a reservoir with hydropower use. A case study, for a Romanian reservoir (Fantanele reservoir located on the Somes River corresponding to Mariselu hydropower station), was performed. The operating curves/rules, relying on the monthly average discharges, were designed for current state. The modified discharges derived from hydrological model that assumed four climate models (CNRM_RM5.1_ARPEGE (A), HC_HadRM3Q0_HadCM3Q0 (B), SMHI_RCA3_BCM (C), SMHI_RCA3_ECHAM5 (D)) for future water resources estimation were used to design the modified operating rules in case of climate change. Operation lines in assured regime were determined using "Water Supplies - Demand" balance. The water balance has been achieved, in the cross-section of the Fantanele dam, as difference between natural inflow into the lake and regulated discharge for every 30 years, for each month, of the years 2020-2050, respectively for each of the four cases. In order to assess the future turbinated discharge, needed to be used for the design of future operation rules, the regulated discharges were determined for each month and for each of the four cases, applying graphical - analytical method called "wire stretched". Further, a comparative analysis, on the operation lines, in assured regime designed for the period 1984-2010 (current state) and future state (A, B, C and D cases), was performed. The energy production requires higher water quantities, in all four cases. In addition, the paper will estimate the climate change impact on hydropower production. The amount of energy produced by hydropower station Mariselu was calculated in

  13. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1993-04-09

    The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems - an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSPI) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium-based system where polyacrylamide and xanthan are crosslinked by CR(III) and an organic crosslinked system. Development of the KUSPI system and evaluation and identification of a suitable organic crosslinked system will be done. The laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: development and selection of gelled polymer systems, physical and chemical characterization of gel systems; and mathematical modeling of gel systems.

  14. Improving reservoir conformance using gelled polymer systems

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, P.G.

    1992-12-25

    The general objectives are to (1) to identify and develop gelled polymer systems which have potential to improve reservoir conformance of fluid displacement processes, (2) to determine the performance of these systems in bulk and in porous media, and (3) to develop methods to predict the capability of these systems to recover oil from petroleum reservoirs. This work focuses on three types of gel systems -- an aqueous polysaccharide (KUSP1) system that gels as a function of pH, the chromium-based system where polyacrylamide and xanthan are crosslinked by Cr(III) and an organic crosslinked system. Development of the KUSP1 system and evaluation and, identification of the organic crosslinked system will be conducted. The laboratory research is directed at the fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of the gelation process in bulk form and in porous media. This knowledge will be used to develop conceptual and mathematical models of the gelation process. Mathematical models will then be extended to predict the performance of gelled polymer treatments in oil reservoirs. Progress report are presented for the following tasks: Development and selection of gelled polymer systems; physical and chemical characterization of gel systems; and mathematical modelling of gel systems.

  15. Balancing reservoir creation and seismic hazard in enhanced geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gischig, V.; Wiemer, S.; Alcolea, A.

    2014-09-01

    Fracture shear-dilatancy is an essential process for enhancing the permeability of deep geothermal reservoirs, and is usually accompanied by the radiation of seismic waves. However, the hazard and risk perspective of induced seismicity research typically focuses only on the question of how to reduce the occurrence of induced earthquakes. Here we present a quantitative analysis of seismic hazard as a function of the two key factors defining an enhanced geothermal system: The permeability enhancement, and the size of the stimulated reservoir. Our model has two coupled components: (1) a pressure diffusion model and (2) a stochastic seismicity model. Permeability is increased in the source area of each induced earthquake depending on the amount of slip, which is determined by the magnitude. We show that the few largest earthquakes (i.e. 5-10 events with M ≥ 1.5) contribute more than half of the total reservoir stimulation. The results further indicate that planning and controlling of reservoir engineering operations may be compromised by the considerable variability of maximum observed magnitude, reservoir size, the Gutenberg-Richter b-value and Shapiro's seismogenic index (i.e. a measure of seismic reactivity of a reservoir) that arises from the intrinsic stochastic nature of induced seismicity. We also find that injection volume has a large impact on both reservoir size and seismic hazard. Injection rate and injection scheme have a negligible effect. The impact of site-specific parameters on seismicity and reservoir properties is greater than that of the injected volume. In particular, conditions that lead to high b-values-possibly a low differential stress level-have a high impact on seismic hazard, but also reduce the efficiency of the stimulation in terms of permeability enhancement. Under such conditions, target reservoir permeability can still be achieved without reaching an unacceptable level of seismic hazard, if either the initial reservoir permeability is

  16. The application of hydrometeorological data obtained by remote sensing techniques for multipurpose reservoir operations. [Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warskow, W. L.; Wilson, T. T., Jr.; Kirdar, K.

    1975-01-01

    Watershed snowpack and streamflow data obtained and transmitted by (ERTS) satellite were used in the operational and water management decisions in the Salt River Project. Located in central Arizona, the Project provides water and electric power for the more than 1.1 million residents of the Salt River Valley. The water supply source is a 33,670 square kilometer (13,000 square mile) watershed and 250 deep well pumps. Six storage reservoirs, four of which have hydroelectric capability, located on two river systems have a storage capacity of over 246,600 hectare-meters (2,000,000 AF.). Information from the watershed during the normal runoff period of December to May and more especially during critical periods of high runoff and minimum reservoir storage capacity is necessary for the reservoir operation regimen. Extent of the snowpack, depth of snow, and the condition of the pack were observed in aerial flights over the watershed.

  17. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2006-2007 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program that serves to partially mitigate the loss of anadromous fish that resulted from downstream construction of the hydropower system. The project's goals are to enhance subsistence fishing and educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes and provide resident fishing opportunities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program is also designed to maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was very unproductive this year as a fishery. Fish morphometric and water quality data indicate that the turbidity is severely impacting trout survival. Lake Billy Shaw was very productive as a fishery and received good ratings from anglers. Mountain View was also productive and anglers reported a high number of quality sized fish. Water quality

  18. A finite element simulation system in reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Xiaozhong

    1996-03-01

    Reservoir engineering is performed to predict the future performance of a reservoir based on its current state and past performance and to explore other methods for increasing the recovery of hydrocarbons from a reservoir. Reservoir simulations are routinely used for these purposes. A reservoir simulator is a sophisticated computer program which solves a system of partial differential equations describing multiphase fluid flow (oil, water, and gas) in a porous reservoir rock. This document describes the use of a reservoir simulator version of BOAST which was developed by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research in July, 1991.

  19. Optimality Conditions for A Two-Stage Reservoir Operation Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Cai, X.; Wang, Z.

    2010-12-01

    This paper discusses the optimality conditions for standard operation policy (SOP) and hedging rule (HR) for a two-stage reservoir operation problem within a consistent theoretical framework. The effects of three typical constraints, which are mass balance, non-negative release and storage constraints under both certain and uncertain conditions have been analyzed. When all non-negative constraints and storage constraints are non-binding, HR results in optimal reservoir operation following the marginal benefit (MB) principle (the MB is equal over the two stages); while if any of the non-negative release or storage constraints is binding, in general SOP results in the optimal solution except two special cases. One of them is a complement of the traditional SOP/HR curve, which happens while the capacity constraint is binding; the other is a special hedging rule, which should be employed to carry over all water in the current stage to the future, when extreme drought is certain and higher marginal utility exists for the second stage. Furthermore, uncertainty complicates the effects of the various constraints but in general higher uncertainty level in the future makes HR a more favorable since water needs to be reserved to defense the risk caused by the uncertainty. Using the derived optimality conditions, an algorithm for solving the model numerically has been developed and tested with hypothetical examples.

  20. Assessing the impacts of reservoir operation to floodplain inundation by combining hydrological, reservoir management, and hydrodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateo, Cherry May; Hanasaki, Naota; Komori, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kenji; Kiguchi, Masashi; Champathong, Adisorn; Sukhapunnaphan, Thada; Yamazaki, Dai; Oki, Taikan

    2014-09-01

    A catastrophic flood event which caused massive economic losses occurred in Thailand, in 2011. Several studies have already been conducted to analyze the Thai floods, but none of them have assessed the impacts of reservoir operation on flood inundation. This study addresses this gap by combining physically based hydrological models to explicitly simulate the impacts of reservoir operation on flooding in the Chao Phraya River Basin, Thailand. H08, an integrated water resources model with a reservoir operation module, was combined with CaMa-Flood, a river routing model with representation of flood dynamics. The combined H08-CaMa model was applied to simulate and assess the historical and alternative reservoir operation rules in the two largest reservoirs in the basin. The combined H08-CaMa model effectively simulated the 2011 flood: regulated flows at a major gauging station have high daily NSE-coefficient of 92% as compared with observed discharge; spatiotemporal extent of simulated flood inundation match well with those of satellite observations. Simulation results show that through the operation of reservoirs in 2011, flood volume was reduced by 8.6 billion m3 and both depth and area of flooding were reduced by 40% on the average. Nonetheless, simple modifications in reservoir operation proved to further reduce the flood volume by 2.4 million m3 and the depth and area of flooding by 20% on the average. By modeling reservoir operation with a hydrodynamic model, a more realistic simulation of the 2011 Thai flood was made possible, and the potential of reducing flood inundation through improved reservoir management was quantified.

  1. 43 CFR 8.1 - Lands for reservoir construction and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Lands for reservoir construction and... THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.1 Lands for reservoir construction and operation. The fee title will be acquired to the following: (a) Lands...

  2. 43 CFR 8.1 - Lands for reservoir construction and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lands for reservoir construction and... THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.1 Lands for reservoir construction and operation. The fee title will be acquired to the following: (a) Lands...

  3. 43 CFR 8.1 - Lands for reservoir construction and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lands for reservoir construction and... THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.1 Lands for reservoir construction and operation. The fee title will be acquired to the following: (a) Lands...

  4. 43 CFR 8.1 - Lands for reservoir construction and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lands for reservoir construction and... THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.1 Lands for reservoir construction and operation. The fee title will be acquired to the following: (a) Lands...

  5. 43 CFR 8.1 - Lands for reservoir construction and operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lands for reservoir construction and... THE DEPARTMENTS OF THE INTERIOR AND OF THE ARMY RELATIVE TO RESERVOIR PROJECT LANDS § 8.1 Lands for reservoir construction and operation. The fee title will be acquired to the following: (a) Lands...

  6. The role of predictive uncertainty in the operational management of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todini, E.

    2014-09-01

    The present work deals with the operational management of multi-purpose reservoirs, whose optimisation-based rules are derived, in the planning phase, via deterministic (linear and nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, etc.) or via stochastic (generally stochastic dynamic programming) approaches. In operation, the resulting deterministic or stochastic optimised operating rules are then triggered based on inflow predictions. In order to fully benefit from predictions, one must avoid using them as direct inputs to the reservoirs, but rather assess the "predictive knowledge" in terms of a predictive probability density to be operationally used in the decision making process for the estimation of expected benefits and/or expected losses. Using a theoretical and extremely simplified case, it will be shown why directly using model forecasts instead of the full predictive density leads to less robust reservoir management decisions. Moreover, the effectiveness and the tangible benefits for using the entire predictive probability density instead of the model predicted values will be demonstrated on the basis of the Lake Como management system, operational since 1997, as well as on the basis of a case study on the lake of Aswan.

  7. Solving non-Markovian open quantum systems with multi-channel reservoir coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Broadbent, Curtis J.; Jing, Jun; Yu, Ting; Eberly, Joseph H.

    2012-08-15

    We extend the non-Markovian quantum state diffusion (QSD) equation to open quantum systems which exhibit multi-channel coupling to a harmonic oscillator reservoir. Open quantum systems which have multi-channel reservoir coupling are those in which canonical transformation of reservoir modes cannot reduce the number of reservoir operators appearing in the interaction Hamiltonian to one. We show that the non-Markovian QSD equation for multi-channel reservoir coupling can, in some cases, lead to an exact master equation which we derive. We then derive the exact master equation for the three-level system in a vee-type configuration which has multi-channel reservoir coupling and give the analytical solution. Finally, we examine the evolution of the three-level vee-type system with generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck reservoir correlations numerically. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concept of multi-channel vs. single-channel reservoir coupling is rigorously defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The non-Markovian quantum state diffusion equation for arbitrary multi-channel reservoir coupling is derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An exact time-local master equation is derived under certain conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The analytical solution to the three-level system in a vee-type configuration is found. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The evolution of the three-level system under generalized Ornstein-Uhlenbeck noise is plotted for many parameter regimes.

  8. Demonstrating Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management (INFORM) for Northern California in an Operational Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, K. P.; Graham, N. E.; Georgakakos, A. P.; Yao, H.

    2007-05-01

    Considerable investments have been made toward improving the quality and applicability of climate, synoptic, and hydrologic forecast information. In addition, earlier retrospective studies have demonstrated that the management of water resource systems with large reservoirs can benefit from such information. However, prior to this project no focused program has aimed to quantify and demonstrate these benefits in an operational environment. As a result, few reservoir managers have been able or willing to dedicate the considerable effort required to utilize new approaches and realize the benefits of improved forecast information. The purpose of the Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management (INFORM) Project is to demonstrate increased water-use efficiency in Northern California water resources operations through the innovative application of meteorological/climate, hydrologic and decision science. In accordance with its purpose, the particular objectives of INFORM are to: (a) implement a prototype integrated forecast-management system for the primary Northern California reservoirs, both for individual reservoirs as well as system-wide; and (b) demonstrate the utility of meteorological/climate and hydrologic forecasts through near-real-time tests of the integrated system with actual data and management input, by comparing its economic and other benefits to those accruing from current management practices for the same hydrologic events. To achieve the general objectives of the INFORM project, the authors performed the following technical tasks: (a) Developed, implemented and performed validation of climate, weather, hydrology and decision INFORM components for Northern California with historical data and real-time data; (b) Integrated INFORM system climate, hydrology and decision components and performed initial operational tests producing real-time ensemble forecasts out to lead times of 16 days four times daily for the wet season 2005-2006, and out to 9 months with

  9. Investigation on Reservoir Operation of Agricultural Water Resources Management for Drought Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    Investigation on Reservoir Operation of Agricultural Water Resources Management for Drought Mitigation Chung-Lien Cheng, Wen-Ping Tsai, Fi-John Chang* Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Da-An District, Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC.Corresponding author: Fi-John Chang (changfj@ntu.edu.tw) AbstractIn Taiwan, the population growth and economic development has led to considerable and increasing demands for natural water resources in the last decades. Under such condition, water shortage problems have frequently occurred in northern Taiwan in recent years such that water is usually transferred from irrigation sectors to public sectors during drought periods. Facing the uneven spatial and temporal distribution of water resources and the problems of increasing water shortages, it is a primary and critical issue to simultaneously satisfy multiple water uses through adequate reservoir operations for sustainable water resources management. Therefore, we intend to build an intelligent reservoir operation system for the assessment of agricultural water resources management strategy in response to food security during drought periods. This study first uses the grey system to forecast the agricultural water demand during February and April for assessing future agricultural water demands. In the second part, we build an intelligent water resources system by using the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II), an optimization tool, for searching the water allocation series based on different water demand scenarios created from the first part to optimize the water supply operation for different water sectors. The results can be a reference guide for adequate agricultural water resources management during drought periods. Keywords: Non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-II (NSGA-II); Grey System; Optimization; Agricultural Water Resources Management.

  10. Reservoir release patterns for hydropower operations at the Aspinall Unit on the Gunnison River, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, S.C.L.; McCoy, J.J.; Sedlacek, J.

    1995-05-01

    This report presents the development of reservoir release patterns for the Aspinall Unit, which includes Blue Mesa, Morrow Point, and Crystal Reservoirs on the Gunnison River in Colorado. Release patterns were assessed for two hydropower operational scenarios--seasonally adjusted steady flows and seasonally adjusted high fluctuating flows--and three representative hydrologic years--moderate (1987), dry (1989), and wet (1983). The release patterns for the operational scenarios were developed with the aid of monthly, daily, and hourly reservoir operational models, which simulate the linked operation of the three Aspinall Unit reservoirs. Also presented are reservoir fluctuations and downstream water surface elevations corresponding to the reservoir release patterns. Both of the hydropower operational scenarios evaluated are based on the ecological research flows proposed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for the Aspinall Unit. The first operational scenario allows only seasonally adjusted steady flows (no hourly fluctuations at any dam within one day), whereas the second scenario permits high fluctuating flows from Blue Mesa and Morrow Point Reservoirs during certain times of the year. Crystal Reservoir would release a steady flow within each day under both operational scenarios.

  11. reservoir operation and hydropower generation schemes for regional scale hydrological models: case study in the northeastern united states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.; Rosenzweig, B.

    2013-12-01

    As part of the development of the Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM), we are developing an integrated hydrologic modeling framework that incorporates various aspects of the coupled human-hydrologic system, from supply to demand, into a single framework. This framework provides temporally and spatially explicit information on the regional water system under different scenarios of climate, population, and land use/ land cover change. To support these efforts, we have incorporated two new modules into the Water Balance Model (WBM) that simulate reservoir operation and calculate the hydropower production from dams. Dams and reservoirs are key characteristics of the modern hydrologic system, with a particular impact on natural stream flow, sediment flux, thermal characteristics and biogeochemical fluxes of rivers. In the Northeast Region of the United States alone, the National Inventory of Dams (NID) lists over 12000 reservoirs. Depending on site-specific characteristics of the dam, its watershed and its intended purpose, each will have a specific optimum operating rule. Since no comprehensive dataset of these operating rules exists, we have to simulate them. We developed an Artificial Neural Network and used data from 35 dams for calibration. Approximately 60 % of the dataset was dedicated to training process, 20 % to validation and the other 20 % used for testing. If (t) represents current time, we use three sets of inputs; inflow [It , It-1 , It-2], release in previous months [Rt-1 , Rt-2] and month (Mt), to calculate release from reservoir (Rt). We also used a simple continuity equation for reservoirs by considering the maximum (from NID) and minimum reservoir storage to improve the model's performance in extreme wet and dry events. Using results from WBM we show how reservoirs regionally alter discharge in streams of Northeast United States compared to their natural state. We also are assessing the effects of climate change on water availability and

  12. Restoring Natural Streamflow Variability by Modifying Multi-purpose Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, J.

    2010-12-01

    Multi-purpose reservoirs typically provide benefits of water supply, hydroelectric power, and flood mitigation. Hydroelectric power generations generally do not consume water. However, temporal distribution of downstream flows is highly changed due to hydro-peaking effects. Associated with offstream diversion of water supplies for municipal, industrial, and agricultural requirements, natural streamflow characteristics of magnitude, duration, frequency, timing, and rate of change is significantly altered by multi-purpose reservoir operation. Natural flow regime has long been recognized a master factor for ecosystem health and biodiversity. Restoration of altered flow regime caused by multi-purpose reservoir operation is the main objective of this study. This study presents an optimization framework that modifying reservoir operation to seeking balance between human and environmental needs. The methodology presented in this study is applied to the Feitsui Reservoir, located in northern Taiwan, with main purpose of providing stable water-supply and auxiliary purpose of electricity generation and flood-peak attenuation. Reservoir releases are dominated by two decision variables, i.e., duration of water releases for each day and percentage of daily required releases within the duration. The current releasing policy of the Feitsui Reservoir releases water for water-supply and hydropower purposes during 8:00 am to 16:00 pm each day and no environmental flows releases. Although greater power generation is obtained by 100% releases distributed within 8-hour period, severe temporal alteration of streamflow is observed downstream of the reservoir. Modifying reservoir operation by relaxing these two variables and reserve certain ratio of streamflow as environmental flow to maintain downstream natural variability. The optimal reservoir releasing policy is searched by the multi-criterion decision making technique for considering reservoir performance in terms of shortage ratio

  13. A real-time control framework for urban water reservoirs operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galelli, S.; Goedbloed, A.; Schwanenberg, D.

    2012-04-01

    Drinking water demand in urban areas is growing parallel to the worldwide urban population, and it is acquiring an increasing part of the total water consumption. Since the delivery of sufficient water volumes in urban areas represents a difficult logistic and economical problem, different metropolitan areas are evaluating the opportunity of constructing relatively small reservoirs within urban areas. Singapore, for example, is developing the so-called 'Four National Taps Strategies', which detects the maximization of water yields from local, urban catchments as one of the most important water sources. However, the peculiar location of these reservoirs can provide a certain advantage from the logistical point of view, but it can pose serious difficulties in their daily management. Urban catchments are indeed characterized by large impervious areas: this results in a change of the hydrological cycle, with decreased infiltration and groundwater recharge, and increased patterns of surface and river discharges, with higher peak flows, volumes and concentration time. Moreover, the high concentrations of nutrients and sediments characterizing urban discharges can cause further water quality problems. In this critical hydrological context, the effective operation of urban water reservoirs must rely on real-time control techniques, which can exploit hydro-meteorological information available in real-time from hydrological and nowcasting models. This work proposes a novel framework for the real-time control of combined water quality and quantity objectives in urban reservoirs. The core of this framework is a non-linear Model Predictive Control (MPC) scheme, which employs the current state of the system, the future discharges furnished by a predictive model and a further model describing the internal dynamics of the controlled sub-system to determine an optimal control sequence over a finite prediction horizon. The main advantage of this scheme stands in its reduced

  14. Effects of bubbling operations on a thermally stratified reservoir: implications for water quality amelioration.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, R L; Bonansea, M; Cosavella, A; Monarde, F; Ferreyra, M; Bresciano, J

    2012-01-01

    Artificial thermal mixing of the water column is a common method of addressing water quality problems with the most popular method of destratification being the bubble curtain. The air or oxygen distribution along submerged multiport diffusers is based on similar basic principles as those of outfall disposal systems. Moreover, the disposal of sequestered greenhouse gases into the ocean, as recently proposed by several researchers to mitigate the global warming problem, requires analogous design criteria. In this paper, the influence of a bubble-plume is evaluated using full-scale temperature and water quality data collected in San Roque Reservoir, Argentina. A composite system consisting of seven separated diffusers connected to four 500 kPa compressors was installed at this reservoir by the end of 2008. The original purpose of this air bubble system was to reduce the stratification, so that the water body may completely mix under natural phenomena and remain well oxygenated throughout the year. By using a combination of the field measurements and modelling, this work demonstrates that thermal mixing by means of compressed air may improve water quality; however, if improperly sized or operated, such mixing can also cause deterioration. Any disruption in aeration during the destratification process, for example, may result in a reduction of oxygen levels due to the higher hypolimnetic temperatures. Further, the use of artificial destratification appears to have insignificant influence on reducing evaporation rates in relatively shallow impoundments such as San Roque reservoir. PMID:23109591

  15. Reservoir-Based Drug Delivery Systems Utilizing Microtechnology

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Cynthia L.; Santini, John T.; Langer, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This review covers reservoir-based drug delivery systems that incorporate microtechnology, with an emphasis on oral, dermal, and implantable systems. Key features of each technology are highlighted such as working principles, fabrication methods, dimensional constraints, and performance criteria. Reservoir-based systems include a subset of microfabricated drug delivery systems and provide unique advantages. Reservoirs, whether external to the body or implanted, provide a well-controlled environment for a drug formulation, allowing increased drug stability and prolonged delivery times. Reservoir systems have the flexibility to accommodate various delivery schemes, including zero order, pulsatile, and on demand dosing, as opposed to a standard sustained release profile. Furthermore, the development of reservoir-based systems for targeted delivery for difficult to treat applications (e.g., ocular) has resulted in potential platforms for patient therapy. PMID:22465783

  16. Log-Exponential Reservoir Operating Rules for Global And Regional Hydrological Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proussevitch, A. A.; Shiklomanov, A. I.; Frolking, S. E.; Glidden, S.; Lammers, R. B.; Wisser, D.

    2013-12-01

    Many hydrological models simulate both runoff (Water Balance Model) and discharge (Water Routing) over given river networks (STN, DRT, HydroSHEDS, etc.). But water infrastructure development (dams, inter-basin water transfer lines, irrigation canal networks, etc.) in industrial and post-industrial time frames impose real challenges to the modeling of water routing and prediction of river discharge, especially for large-scale regional and global geographic extents where detailed information about operating rules for such hydro-infrastructure units often do not exist. The global and regional river dam databases used in water routing simulations (e.g. GRanD and NID) provide some limited information on dam construction dates and purposes (e.g. hydropower, irrigation, water supply, flood control, etc.), but do not indicate how these are being operated over the given hydrological year cycle and over extreme low/high in-flow regimes. So the formulation of generic and use-specific reservoir operating rules for regional and global hydrologic simulations are still debated issues for the hydrology modeling community. In our network independent WBM-TrANS model (Water Balance Model-Transport from Anthropogenic and Natural Systems) we have formulated and tested a new Log-Exponential OPerAting Rule for Dams (LEOPARD) that can be readily parameterized for a generic and/or specific dam purpose. The key features of the LEOPARD formulation include a combination of adjustable logarithmic and exponential functions describing the release of water from the reservoirs and other adjustable parameters for minimum storage and two exponent curvature coefficients (one each for logarithmic and exponential functions). In the LEOPARD model the dam discharge/release calculations are normalized to Average Annual Discharge (AAD), which, in turn, is taken as a running average of the past 5 years. The latter is critical to simulate dam fill-up periods and shifts in the hydrological cycle over long

  17. Evaluating National Weather Service Seasonal Forecast Products in Reservoir Operation Case Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielson, A.; Guihan, R.; Polebistki, A.; Palmer, R. N.; Werner, K.; Wood, A. W.

    2014-12-01

    Forecasts of future weather and streamflow can provide valuable information for reservoir operations and water management. A challenge confronting reservoir operators today is how to incorporate both climate and streamflow products into their operations and which of these forecast products are most informative and useful for optimized water management. This study incorporates several reforecast products provided by the Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC) which allows a complete retrospective analysis of climate forecasts, resulting in an evaluation of each product's skill in the context of water resources management. The accuracy and value of forecasts generated from the Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) are compared to the accuracy and value of using an Ensemble Streamflow Predictions (ESP) approach. Using the CFSv2 may offer more insight when responding to climate driven extremes than the ESP approach because the CFSv2 incorporates a fully coupled climate model into its forecasts rather than using all of the historic climate record as being equally probable. The role of forecast updating frequency will also be explored. Decision support systems (DSS) for both Salt Lake City Parley's System and the Snohomish County Public Utility Department's (SnoPUD) Jackson project will be used to illustrate the utility of forecasts. Both DSS include a coupled simulation and optimization model that will incorporate system constraints, operating policies, and environmental flow requirements. To determine the value of the reforecast products, performance metrics meaningful to the managers of each system are to be identified and quantified. Without such metrics and awareness of seasonal operational nuances, it is difficult to identify forecast improvements in meaningful ways. These metrics of system performance are compared using the different forecast products to evaluate the potential benefits of using CFSv2 seasonal forecasts in systems decision making.

  18. The role of water reservoir operation in climate change impact assessments: expanding uncertainties and evolving tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Matteo; Anghileri, Daniela; Castelletti, Andrea; Soncini-Sessa, Rodolfo

    2015-04-01

    Climate change and growing population are expected to severely affect freshwater availability by the end of 21th century. Although many river basins are likely to become more prone to periods of reduced water supply, risking considerable impacts on the society, the economy, and the environment, the operations of many water resource systems are still designed on the basis of the observed historical hydrologic variability. Yet, under changing hydroclimatic forcing, no guarantee exists that policies optimized over the past will not fail in coming years. This work explores the impact of projected climate change and the associated uncertainty on the policy performance for different future time horizons. A perturbed physics ensemble of projected hydroclimatic conditions based on the HadCM3 General Circulation Modelis is used to simulate the whole set of Pareto optimal policies over the different futures. The changes in the overall system performance and the evolution of each single-tradeoff are analyzed to improve our understanding of the system's vulnerabilities. The study is developed on the Red-Thai Binh River system, Vietnam. The Red River Basin is the second largest basin of Vietnam, draining an area of about 169,000 km2, and comprises three main tributaries and several reservoirs, namely SonLa and HoaBinh on the Da River, ThacBa and TuyenQuang on the Lo River. These reservoirs are regulated for maximizing hydropower production, mitigating downstream flood, primarily in Hanoi, and guaranteeing irrigation water supply to the agricultural districts in the delta. We address the challenges of the policy design problem (e.g., dimensionality of the system, number of objectives involved) by adopting the evolutionary multi-objective direct policy search (EMODPS), an approximate dynamic programming method that combines direct policy search, nonlinear approximating networks and multi-objective evolutionary algorithms to design Pareto approximate operating policies for multi

  19. A dual active-restrictive approach to incorporating environmental flow targets into existing reservoir operation rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Jenq-Tzong; Wu, Fu-Chun

    2010-08-01

    Environmental flow schemes may be implemented through active or restrictive strategies. The former may be applied via reservoir releases, and the latter can be executed by reducing water demands. We present a dual active-restrictive approach to devising the optimal reservoir operation rules that aim to secure off-stream water supplies while maximizing environmental benefits. For the active part, a multicomponent environmental flow target (including the minimum and monthly flows) is incorporated in the operation rules. For the restrictive counterpart, we use a novel demands partitioning and prioritizing (DPP) approach to reallocating the demands of various sectors. The DPP approach partitions the existing off-stream demand and newly incorporated environmental demand and reassembles the two as the first- and second-priority demands. Water is reallocated to each demand according to the ratios derived from the prioritized demands. The proposed approach is coupled with a multicriteria optimization framework to seek the optimal operation rules for the existing Feitsui Reservoir system (Taiwan) under various scenarios. The best overall performance is achieved by an optimal dual strategy whose operational parameters are all determined by optimization. The optimal environmental flow target may well be a top-priority constant base flow rather than the variable quantities. The active strategy would outperform the restrictive one. For the former, a top-priority base flow target is essential; for the latter, the off-stream demand can become vanishingly small in compensation for the eliminated base flow target, thus promoting the monthly flow target as nearly the top-priority demand. For either the active or restrictive strategy, a prioritized environmental flow demand would provide a path toward the optimal overall performance. A significantly improved overall performance over the existing operation rules is unlikely if the active and restrictive parameters are both favorable

  20. Developing an Intelligent Reservoir Flood Control Decision Support System through Integrating Artificial Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, L. C.; Kao, I. F.; Tsai, F. H.; Hsu, H. C.; Yang, S. N.; Shen, H. Y.; Chang, F. J.

    2015-12-01

    Typhoons and storms hit Taiwan several times every year and cause serious flood disasters. Because the mountainous terrain and steep landform rapidly accelerate the speed of flood flow, rivers cannot be a stable source of water supply. Reservoirs become one of the most important and effective floodwater storage facilities. However, real-time operation for reservoir flood control is a continuous and instant decision-making process based on rules, laws, meteorological nowcast, in addition to the immediate rainfall and hydrological data. The achievement of reservoir flood control can effectively mitigate flood disasters and store floodwaters for future uses. In this study, we construct an intelligent decision support system for reservoir flood control through integrating different types of neural networks and the above information to solve this problem. This intelligent reservoir flood control decision support system includes three parts: typhoon track classification, flood forecast and adaptive water release models. This study used the self-organizing map (SOM) for typhoon track clustering, nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous inputs (NARX) for multi-step-ahead reservoir inflow prediction, and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for reservoir flood control. Before typhoons landfall, we can estimate the entire flood hydrogragh of reservoir inflow by using SOM and make a pre-release strategy and real-time reservoir flood operating by using ANFIS. In the meanwhile, NARX can be constantly used real-time five-hour-ahead inflow prediction for providing the newest flood information. The system has been successfully implemented Typhoons Trami (2013), Fitow (2013) and Matmo (2014) in Shihmen Reservoir.

  1. Effect of Streamflow Forecast Uncertainty on Real-Time Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Cai, X.; Yang, D.

    2010-12-01

    Various hydrological forecast products have been applied to real-time reservoir operation, including deterministic streamflow forecast (DSF), DSF-based probabilistic streamflow forecast (DPSF), and ensemble streamflow forecast (ESF), which represent forecast uncertainty in the form of deterministic forecast error, deterministic forecast error-based uncertainty distribution, and ensemble forecast errors, respectively. Compared to previous studies that treat these forecast products as ad hoc inputs for reservoir operation models, this paper attempts to model the uncertainties involved in the various forecast products and explores their effect on real-time reservoir operation decisions. In hydrology, there are various indices reflecting the magnitude of streamflow forecast uncertainty; meanwhile, few models illustrate the forecast uncertainty evolution process. This research introduces Martingale Model of Forecast Evolution (MMFE) from supply chain management and justifies its assumptions for quantifying the evolution of uncertainty in streamflow forecast as time progresses. Based on MMFE, this research simulates the evolution of forecast uncertainty in DSF, DPSF, and ESF, and applies the reservoir operation models (dynamic programming, DP; stochastic dynamic programming, SDP; and standard operation policy, SOP) to assess the effect of different forms of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation. Through a hypothetical single-objective real-time reservoir operation model, the results illustrate that forecast uncertainty exerts significant effects. Reservoir operation efficiency, as measured by a utility function, decreases as the forecast uncertainty increases. Meanwhile, these effects also depend on the type of forecast product being used. In general, the utility of reservoir operation with ESF is nearly as high as the utility obtained with a perfect forecast; the utilities of DSF and DPSF are similar to each other but not as efficient as ESF. Moreover

  2. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos A. Fernandez

    2014-09-15

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than ½ of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  3. Reservoir Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of EGS

    DOE Data Explorer

    Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2013-09-25

    EGS field projects have not sustained production at rates greater than ½ of what is needed for economic viability. The primary limitation that makes commercial EGS infeasible is our current inability to cost-effectively create high-permeability reservoirs from impermeable, igneous rock within the 3,000-10,000 ft depth range. Our goal is to develop a novel fracturing fluid technology that maximizes reservoir permeability while reducing stimulation cost and environmental impact. Laboratory equipment development to advance laboratory characterization/monitoring is also a priority of this project to study and optimize the physicochemical properties of these fracturing fluids in a range of reservoir conditions. Barrier G is the primarily intended GTO barrier to be addressed as well as support addressing barriers D, E and I.

  4. Value of long-term streamflow forecasts to reservoir operations for water supply in snow-dominated river catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghileri, D.; Voisin, N.; Castelletti, A.; Pianosi, F.; Nijssen, B.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2016-06-01

    We present a forecast-based adaptive management framework for water supply reservoirs and evaluate the contribution of long-term inflow forecasts to reservoir operations. Our framework is developed for snow-dominated river basins that demonstrate large gaps in forecast skill between seasonal and inter-annual time horizons. We quantify and bound the contribution of seasonal and inter-annual forecast components to optimal, adaptive reservoir operation. The framework uses an Ensemble Streamflow Prediction (ESP) approach to generate retrospective, one-year-long streamflow forecasts based on the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model. We determine the optimal sequence of daily release decisions using the Model Predictive Control (MPC) optimization scheme. We then assess the forecast value by comparing system performance based on the ESP forecasts with the performances based on climatology and perfect forecasts. We distinguish among the relative contributions of the seasonal component of the forecast versus the inter-annual component by evaluating system performance based on hybrid forecasts, which are designed to isolate the two contributions. As an illustration, we first apply the forecast-based adaptive management framework to a specific case study, i.e., Oroville Reservoir in California, and we then modify the characteristics of the reservoir and the demand to demonstrate the transferability of the findings to other reservoir systems. Results from numerical experiments show that, on average, the overall ESP value in informing reservoir operation is 35% less than the perfect forecast value and the inter-annual component of the ESP forecast contributes 20-60% of the total forecast value.

  5. Optimization of operation rule curves and flushing schedule in a reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Fi-John; Lai, Jihn-Sung; Kao, Li-Shan

    2003-06-01

    Flushing sediment through a reservoir has been practiced successfully and found to be inexpensive in many cases. However, the great amount of water consumed in the flushing operation might affect the water supply. To satisfy the water demand and water consumed in the flushing operation, two models combining the reservoir simulation model and the sediment flushing model are established. In the reservoir simulation model, the genetic algorithm (GA) is used to optimize and determine the flushing operation rule curves. The sediment-flushing model is developed to estimate the amount of the flushed sediment volume, and the simulated results update the elevation-storage curve, which can be taken into account in the reservoir simulation model. The models are successfully applied to the Tapu reservoir, which has faced serious sedimentation problems. Based on 36 years historical sequential data, the results show that (i) the simulated flushing operation rule curves model has superior performance, in terms of lower shortage index (SI) and higher flushing efficiency (FE), than that by the original reservoir operation; (ii) the rational and riskless flushing schedule for the Tapu reservoir is suggested to be set within an interval of every 2 or 4 years in the months of May or June.

  6. Increasing Crop Yields in Water Stressed Countries by Combining Operations of Freshwater Reservoir and Wastewater Reclamation Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater resources around the world are increasing in scarcity due to population growth, industrialization and climate change. This is a serious concern for water stressed countries, including those in Asia and North Africa where future food production is expected to be negatively affected by this. To address this problem, we investigate the potential of combining freshwater reservoir and wastewater reclamation operations. Reservoir water is the cheaper source of irrigation, but is often limited and climate sensitive. Treated wastewater is a more reliable alternative for irrigation, but often requires extensive further treatment which can be expensive. We propose combining the operations of a reservoir and a wastewater reclamation plant (WWRP) to augment the supply from the reservoir with reclaimed water for increasing crop yields in water stressed regions. The joint system of reservoir and WWRP is modeled as a multi-objective optimization problem with the double objective of maximizing the crop yield and minimizing total cost, subject to constraints on reservoir storage, spill and release, and capacity of the WWRP. We use the crop growth model Aquacrop, supported by The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), to model crop growth in response to water use. Aquacrop considers the effects of water deficit on crop growth stages, and from there estimates crop yield. We generate results comparing total crop yield under irrigation with water from just the reservoir (which is limited and often interrupted), and yield with water from the joint system (which has the potential of higher supply and greater reliability). We will present results for locations in India and Africa to evaluate the potential of the joint operations for improving food security in those areas for different budgets.

  7. On the effect of operation of the hydropower plant on the water quality of Rapel reservoir, central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossel, V.; De La Fuente, A.

    2013-12-01

    Eutrophication of lakes and reservoirs is a common problem in systems with high incoming loads of nutrients. The consequent algae bloom related to the eutrophication alters the water quality and generates an incompatibility with the tourist and recreational activities. This study is focused on Rapel reservoir: an old, dentritic and monomictic reservoir, located in central Chile (34°S, 71.6°W), that has experienced numerous algae bloom events in the past years produced by high loads of nutrients, sediments and metals. This reservoir was originally constructed in 1968 for hydropower generation without environmental restrictions on its operation. Rapel is part of Chile's Central Interconnected System (SIC), and is controlled by an independent system operator (ISO) that decides the optimal allocation of water by minimizing the SIC's operation cost. As a result of this framework, Rapel reservoir operates based on a hydropeaking scheme, thus producing energy few hours a day while zero outflows are observed the remaining hours, impacting on Rapel river located downstream the reservoir. However, previous research showed that this hydropeaking has important effects on the hydrodynamic of the reservoir as well. Particularly, it enhances vertical mixing nears the dam, and reduces horizontal dispersion. Furthermore, hydropeaking defines the outflows water temperature, and the temperature profile near the dam. As a consequence of this role of hydropeaking on the hydrodynamics and mixing of Rapel reservoir, it is expected to be a link between hydropeaking and water quality. The aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the operation of hydropower plant on the water quality of Rapel reservoir, for which the reservoir system is modeled using the three dimensional hydrodynamic and water quality model ELCOM-CAEDYM. Field data to validate the results and to define boundary and initial conditions are available for the austral summer period of 2009-2010. Different scenarios of

  8. Optimal Reservoir Operation for Hydropower Generation using Non-linear Programming Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Jothiprakash, V.

    2012-05-01

    Hydropower generation is one of the vital components of reservoir operation, especially for a large multi-purpose reservoir. Deriving optimal operational rules for such a large multi-purpose reservoir serving various purposes like irrigation, hydropower and flood control are complex, because of the large dimension of the problem and the complexity is more if the hydropower production is not an incidental. Thus optimizing the operations of a reservoir serving various purposes requires a systematic study. In the present study such a large multi-purpose reservoir, namely, Koyna reservoir operations are optimized for maximizing the hydropower production subject to the condition of satisfying the irrigation demands using a non-linear programming model. The hydropower production from the reservoir is analysed for three different dependable inflow conditions, representing wet, normal and dry years. For each dependable inflow conditions, various scenarios have been analyzed based on the constraints on the releases and the results are compared. The annual power production, combined monthly power production from all the powerhouses, end of month storage levels, evaporation losses and surplus are discussed. From different scenarios, it is observed that more hydropower can be generated for various dependable inflow conditions, if the restrictions on releases are slightly relaxed. The study shows that Koyna dam is having potential to generate more hydropower.

  9. Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

  10. An Intelligent Systems Approach to Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Shahab D. Mohaghegh; Jaime Toro; Thomas H. Wilson; Emre Artun; Alejandro Sanchez; Sandeep Pyakurel

    2005-08-01

    Today, the major challenge in reservoir characterization is integrating data coming from different sources in varying scales, in order to obtain an accurate and high-resolution reservoir model. The role of seismic data in this integration is often limited to providing a structural model for the reservoir. Its relatively low resolution usually limits its further use. However, its areal coverage and availability suggest that it has the potential of providing valuable data for more detailed reservoir characterization studies through the process of seismic inversion. In this paper, a novel intelligent seismic inversion methodology is presented to achieve a desirable correlation between relatively low-frequency seismic signals, and the much higher frequency wireline-log data. Vertical seismic profile (VSP) is used as an intermediate step between the well logs and the surface seismic. A synthetic seismic model is developed by using real data and seismic interpretation. In the example presented here, the model represents the Atoka and Morrow formations, and the overlying Pennsylvanian sequence of the Buffalo Valley Field in New Mexico. Generalized regression neural network (GRNN) is used to build two independent correlation models between; (1) Surface seismic and VSP, (2) VSP and well logs. After generating virtual VSP's from the surface seismic, well logs are predicted by using the correlation between VSP and well logs. The values of the density log, which is a surrogate for reservoir porosity, are predicted for each seismic trace through the seismic line with a classification approach having a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The same methodology is then applied to real data taken from the Buffalo Valley Field, to predict inter-well gamma ray and neutron porosity logs through the seismic line of interest. The same procedure can be applied to a complete 3D seismic block to obtain 3D distributions of reservoir properties with less uncertainty than the geostatistical

  11. A Global Hydrological Model with Reservoir Operation Scheme: Global and Regional Applications (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanasaki, N.; Masaki, Y.; Mateo, C.; Kanae, S.; Oki, T.

    2013-12-01

    More than 45000 large dams have been constructed all over the world, and their total storage capacity exceeds 7000 km3 which corresponds to approximately 20% of the total annual global river discharge. Explicit incorporation of reservoir operation is indispensable for global-/macro-scale hydrological models, since their storage capacity and potential of altering flow regime are too large to neglect. Our presentation consists of three parts. In the first part, the H08 model, a global hydrological model with reservoir operation scheme is introduced. The H08 model includes an algorithm to estimate reservoir operating rules of individual reservoirs. This enables us to apply the model to the regions and periods with no recorded reservoir operation. The key concepts and challenges of the model are discussed. In the second part, the role of reservoirs in water scarcity is globally assessed. In many parts of the world, local people are suffered from temporal variability in precipitation and river flow. The contribution of reservoirs to water scarcity alleviation is quantitatively and globally assessed. The assessment is extended to the future periods utilizing the latest climate and socio-economic scenarios. In the last part, a regional model application is introduced. The Chao Phraya River in Thailand was suffered from a severe flood in 2011. Vast area was inundated for months and the economic damages reached 40 billion USD. The Chao Phraya River has two major reservoirs and their role is crucial for both water use and flood control. The H08 model is substantially enhanced and applied to the basin to reproduce the 2011 floods. The tradeoff between water use and flood control was investigated by changing reservoir operation options.

  12. Real-time reservoir operation considering non-stationary inflow prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, W.; Cai, X.; Wang, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Stationarity of inflow has been a basic assumption for reservoir operation rule design, which is now facing challenges due to climate change and human interferences. This paper proposes a modeling framework to incorporate non-stationary inflow prediction for optimizing the hedging operation rule of large reservoirs with multiple-year flow regulation capacity. A multi-stage optimization model is formulated and a solution algorithm based on the optimality conditions is developed to incorporate non-stationary annual inflow prediction through a rolling, dynamic framework that updates the prediction from period to period and adopt the updated prediction in reservoir operation decision. The prediction model is ARIMA(4,1,0), in which parameter 4 stands for the order of autoregressive, 1 represents a linear trend, and 0 is the order of moving average. The modeling framework and solution algorithm is applied to the Miyun reservoir in China, determining a yearly operating schedule during the period from 1996 to 2009, during which there was a significant declining trend of reservoir inflow. Different operation policy scenarios are modeled, including standard operation policy (SOP, matching the current demand as much as possible), hedging rule (i.e., leaving a certain amount of water for future to avoid large risk of water deficit) with forecast from ARIMA (HR-1), hedging (HR) with perfect forecast (HR-2 ). Compared to the results of these scenarios to that of the actual reservoir operation (AO), the utility of the reservoir operation under HR-1 is 3.0% lower than HR-2, but 3.7% higher than the AO and 14.4% higher than SOP. Note that the utility under AO is 10.3% higher than that under SOP, which shows that a certain level of hedging under some inflow prediction or forecast was used in the real-world operation. Moreover, the impacts of discount rate and forecast uncertainty level on the operation will be discussed.

  13. Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operation and Maintenance, 2005-2006 Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sellman, Jake; Dykstra, Tim

    2009-05-11

    The Duck Valley Reservoirs Fish Stocking and Operations and Maintenance (DV Fisheries) project is an ongoing resident fish program designed to enhance both subsistence fishing, educational opportunities for Tribal members of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes, and recreational fishing facilities for non-Tribal members. In addition to stocking rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in Mountain View, Lake Billy Shaw, and Sheep Creek Reservoirs, the program also intends to afford and maintain healthy aquatic conditions for fish growth and survival, to provide superior facilities with wilderness qualities to attract non-Tribal angler use, and to offer clear, consistent communication with the Tribal community about this project as well as outreach and education within the region and the local community. Tasks for this performance period are divided into operations and maintenance plus monitoring and evaluation. Operation and maintenance of the three reservoirs include fences, roads, dams and all reservoir structures, feeder canals, water troughs and stock ponds, educational signs, vehicles and equipment, and outhouses. Monitoring and evaluation activities included creel, gillnet, wildlife, and bird surveys, water quality and reservoir structures monitoring, native vegetation planting, photo point documentation, control of encroaching exotic vegetation, and community outreach and education. The three reservoirs are monitored in terms of water quality and fishery success. Sheep Creek Reservoir was the least productive as a result of high turbidity levels and constraining water quality parameters. Lake Billy Shaw trout were in poorer condition than in previous years potentially as a result of water quality or other factors. Mountain View Reservoir trout exhibit the best health of the three reservoirs and was the only reservoir to receive constant flows of water.

  14. Exploring increase of flood attenuation potential of reservoirs through simple gates operations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoero, A.; Claps, P.; Ganora, D.; Petaccia, A.

    2012-04-01

    Along with other flood risk mitigation measures, artificial flood storage has been considered as a mean to control flood peaks in mountainous basins, particularly as part of the flood management practices. Classical studies attain the evaluation of the 'natural' flood attenuation potential driven by the portion of volume available above the spillway crest level. These studies allow to reconstruct modified flood frequency curves in sections downstream as modified by this unconditioned type of attenuation. Less understood is the possibility to quantify the additional attenuation potential of reservoirs deriving by simple and standardized gates operations. Unconditioned gates opening in advance with respect to the incoming flood are the typical operations considered in this work. The study has been carried out using a system of 63 artificial reservoirs located in the Northwestern part of Italy, for which a comprehensive set of hydrological and hydraulic data has been collected with the help of the Italian Dams Authority (Registro Italiano Dighe, RID). The main aim of the study is to select the most interesting cases in which gates operation is able to consistently improve flood attenuation, and provide an overview of the effect that these dams exercise on the flood frequency curves of the river sections downstream. For what the 'natural' attenuation potential is concerned, an attenuation index named SFA (Synthetic Flood Attenuation) has been computed on all dams and subsequently used to modify the original frequency curve of the incoming floods. A recent regional statistical method for flood estimation has been used for this purpose. With the help of the same model and of additional information required to describe flood volumes, triangular and power-law synthetic flood hydrographs have been simulated. Gates operation is addressed to a preemptive drawdown, and is conceived as a fixed opening in defined conditions at the flood arrival. Consequently, the maximum

  15. Streamflow forecast uncertainty evolution and its effect on real-time reservoir operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Lu, Weiwei; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Jianzhong; Guo, Shenglian

    2016-09-01

    When employing streamflow forecasting in practical applications, such as reservoir operation, one important issue is to deal with the uncertainty involved in forecasting. Traditional studies dealing with the uncertainty in streamflow forecasting have been limited in describing the evolution of forecast uncertainty. This paper proposes a copula-based uncertainty evolution (CUE) model to describe the evolution of streamflow forecast uncertainty. The generated forecast uncertainty series fits the observed series well in terms of observed mean, standard deviation and skewness. Daily flow with forecast uncertainty are simulated and used to determine the effect of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. Results show that using the forecast inflow coupled with the pre-release module for reservoir operation of TGR in flood season cannot increase the flood risk.

  16. Influence of Reservoir Operation on River Eco-hydrological Regime Variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J.; Wang, Y.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    With the development of reservoir, river hydrological situation has undergone great changes. Liujiaxia and Longyangxia reservoir which all have great regulation ability were constructed in the upper reaches above Lanzhou station of the Yellow River. In view of the Indicator of Hydrologic Alteration (IHA), the Range of Variability Approach ( RVA ) is used to calculate the eco- hydrological characteristic values and analyze the influence of different reservoir operating modes on the variation of eco-hydrological characteristics of the Yellow River upstream. On the whole, the hydrologic regime at each station downstream of the Liujiaxia reservoir has changed obviously, especially that at Lanzhou station. The overall degree of hydrologic alteration with single reservoir (Liujiaxia) was 72. 64%, and the hydrologic alteration degree with two reservoirs joint operation was 78. 90%. Both of them were belong to high change. Also, after joint operation of Liujiaxia and Longyangxia reservoir, the flow in flood season significantly reduce and the number of high and low flow reversals increase, which would influence the living condition of aquatic organism in the Yellow River, and greatly endanger the aquatic species' reproduction.

  17. Operations management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandli, A. E.; Eckelkamp, R. E.; Kelly, C. M.; Mccandless, W.; Rue, D. L.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of an operations management system is to provide an orderly and efficient method to operate and maintain aerospace vehicles. Concepts are described for an operations management system and the key technologies are highlighted which will be required if this capability is brought to fruition. Without this automation and decision aiding capability, the growing complexity of avionics will result in an unmanageable workload for the operator, ultimately threatening mission success or survivability of the aircraft or space system. The key technologies include expert system application to operational tasks such as replanning, equipment diagnostics and checkout, global system management, and advanced man machine interfaces. The economical development of operations management systems, which are largely software, will require advancements in other technological areas such as software engineering and computer hardware.

  18. Irrigation Systems Operation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective operation of an irrigation system requires matching the operational characteristics of a system to the soil, crop, field, and water supply. Each of these components will affect the quality of the irrigation system performance. The performance measures used to characterize the irrigation sy...

  19. Network operating system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Long-term and short-term objectives for the development of a network operating system for the Space Station are stated. The short-term objective is to develop a prototype network operating system for a 100 megabit/second fiber optic data bus. The long-term objective is to establish guidelines for writing a detailed specification for a Space Station network operating system. Major milestones are noted. Information is given in outline form.

  20. Payload operation television system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Payload Operation Television System is a high performance closed-circuit TV system designed to determine the feasibility of using TV to augment purely visual monitoring of operations, and to establish optimum system design of an operating unit which can ultimately be used to assist the operator of a remotely manipulated space-borne cargo loading device. The TV system assembled on this program is intended for laboratory experimentation which would develop operational techniques and lead to the design of space-borne TV equipment whose purpose would be to assist the astronaut-operator aboard a space station to load payload components. The equipment consists principally of a good quality TV camera capable of high resolving power; a TV monitor; a sync generator for driving camera and monitor; and two pan/tilt units which are remotely controlled by the operator.

  1. The use of the LANDSAT data collection system and imagery in reservoir management and operation. [Maine, Vermont, New Hamphire, Canada, St. John River, Beech Ridge, Merrimack River, and Franklin Falls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, S. (Principal Investigator); Buckelew, T. D.; Mckim, H. L.; Merry, C. J.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An increase in the data collection system's (DCS) ability to function in the flood control mission with no additional manpower was demonstrated during the storms which struck New England during April and May of 1975 and August 1976. It was found that for this watershed, creditable flood hydrographs could be generated from DCS data. It was concluded that an ideal DCS for reservoir regulation would draw features from LANDSAT and GOES. MSS grayscale computer printout and a USGS topographic map were compared, yielding an optimum computer classification map of the wetland areas of the Merrimack River estuary. A classification accuracy of 75% was obtained for the wetlands unit, taking into account the misclassified and the unclassified pixels. The MSS band 7 grayscale printouts of the Franklin Falls reservoir showed good agreement to USGS topographic maps in total area of water depicted at the low water reservoir stage and at the maximum inundation level. Preliminary analysis of the LANDSAT digital data using the GISS computer algorithms showed that the radiance of snow cover/vegetation varied from approximately 20 mW/sq cm sr in nonvegetated areas to less than 4 mW/sq cm sr for densely covered forested area.

  2. Modelling Escherichia coli concentration in a wastewater reservoir using an operational parameter MRT%FE and first order kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cirelli, Giuseppe Luigi; Consoli, Simona; Juanicó, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    The operational parameter MRT%FE, representing the mean residence time of different ages fractions of effluent within a completely mixed reactor, was evaluated and integrated with first order kinetics. The parameter was used to model Escherichia coli concentrations in a municipal wastewater reservoir managed under different operating conditions (continuous and discontinuous). The study was conducted during 2004-2005 in a reservoir receiving effluents from the activated sludge treatment plant of Caltagirone (Eastern Sicily - Italy). The analytical approach is applied to the hydraulic state variables of the system (daily stored volumes, inlet and outlet flows), and the physical-chemical (pH, temperature, EC, TSS, BOD(5), COD) and bacteriological wastewater parameters (E. coli, FC, FS). In order to evaluate the reliability of the proposed approach, predicted E. coli concentrations within the reservoir were compared with measured ones by the correlation coefficient, F-test and Sperman's index. The study included the evaluation of die-off coefficient K(T) (d(-1)), light extinction coefficient K (m(-1)) and their relationships with climatic factors. Results of the study confirm that E. coli removal is related to the fractions of fresh effluent remaining each day within the reservoir with MRT%FE of about 5-8d, significantly lower than the nominal detention time (about 27d). The E. coli die-off coefficient (K(T)) was higher during system discontinuous operations and correlated with incident solar radiation and water temperature. PMID:18222594

  3. Application of Decision Tree to Obtain Optimal Operation Rules for Reservoir Flood Control Considering Sediment Desilting-Case Study of Tseng Wen Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ShiouWei, L.

    2014-12-01

    Reservoirs are the most important water resources facilities in Taiwan.However,due to the steep slope and fragile geological conditions in the mountain area,storm events usually cause serious debris flow and flood,and the flood then will flush large amount of sediment into reservoirs.The sedimentation caused by flood has great impact on the reservoirs life.Hence,how to operate a reservoir during flood events to increase the efficiency of sediment desilting without risk the reservoir safety and impact the water supply afterward is a crucial issue in Taiwan.  Therefore,this study developed a novel optimization planning model for reservoir flood operation considering flood control and sediment desilting,and proposed easy to use operating rules represented by decision trees.The decision trees rules have considered flood mitigation,water supply and sediment desilting.The optimal planning model computes the optimal reservoir release for each flood event that minimum water supply impact and maximum sediment desilting without risk the reservoir safety.Beside the optimal flood operation planning model,this study also proposed decision tree based flood operating rules that were trained by the multiple optimal reservoir releases to synthesis flood scenarios.The synthesis flood scenarios consists of various synthesis storm events,reservoir's initial storage and target storages at the end of flood operating.  Comparing the results operated by the decision tree operation rules(DTOR) with that by historical operation for Krosa Typhoon in 2007,the DTOR removed sediment 15.4% more than that of historical operation with reservoir storage only8.38×106m3 less than that of historical operation.For Jangmi Typhoon in 2008,the DTOR removed sediment 24.4% more than that of historical operation with reservoir storage only 7.58×106m3 less than that of historical operation.The results show that the proposed DTOR model can increase the sediment desilting efficiency and extend the

  4. Dynamic control of flood limited water level for reservoir operation by considering inflow uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Chen, Guiya

    2010-09-01

    SummaryAccording to the Chinese Flood Control Act, reservoir water levels generally are not allowed to exceed the flood limited water level (FLWL) during flood season in order to offer adequate storage for flood prevention. However, the operation rules based on the current FLWL have neglected meteorological and real-time flood forecasting information and give too much priority to low probability floods. For floodwater utilization, dynamic control of reservoir FLWL is a valuable and effective methodology to compromise between flood control and conservation for reservoir operation during the flood season. The dynamic control bound is a fundamental key element for implementing reservoir FLWL dynamic control operation. In this paper, a dynamic control operation model that considers inflow uncertainty, i.e. the inflow forecasting error and uncertainty of the flood hydrograph shape is proposed and developed. The model consists of three modules: the first one is a pre-release module, which is used to estimate the upper boundary of dynamic control bound on basis of inflow forecasting results; the second one is a refill operation module, which is used to retain recession flood, and the third one is a risk analysis module, which is used to assess flood risk. The acceptable flood control operation risk constraints and quantificational analysis methods are given, and the dynamic control bound of reservoir FLWL is estimated by using Monte Carlo simulation. The China's three gorges reservoir (TGR) is selected as a case study. A multiple-input single-output linear systematic model is chosen for inflow forecasting of the TGR, and the future inflows are derived from gauged records by assuming that the inflow forecasting error follows a normal distribution. The application results show that the dynamic control of reservoir FLWL can effectively increase hydropower generation and the floodwater utilization rate without increasing flood control risk.

  5. Operational Precipitation prediction in Support of Real-Time Flash Flood Prediction and Reservoir Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, K. P.

    2006-05-01

    The presentation will outline the implementation and performance evaluation of a number of national and international projects pertaining to operational precipitation estimation and prediction in the context of hydrologic warning systems and reservoir management support. In all cases, uncertainty measures of the estimates and predictions are an integral part of the precipitation models. Outstanding research issues whose resolution is likely to lead to improvements in the operational environment are presented. The presentation draws from the experience of the Hydrologic Research Center (http://www.hrc-lab.org) prototype implementation projects at the Panama Canal, Central America, Northern California, and South-Central US. References: Carpenter, T.M, and K.P. Georgakakos, "Discretization Scale Dependencies of the Ensemble Flow Range versus Catchment Area Relationship in Distributed Hydrologic Modeling," Journal of Hydrology, 2006, in press. Carpenter, T.M., and K.P. Georgakakos, "Impacts of Parametric and Radar Rainfall Uncertainty on the Ensemble Streamflow Simulations of a Distributed Hydrologic Model," Journal of Hydrology, 298, 202-221, 2004. Georgakakos, K.P., Graham, N.E., Carpenter, T.M., Georgakakos, A.P., and H. Yao, "Integrating Climate- Hydrology Forecasts and Multi-Objective Reservoir Management in Northern California," EOS, 86(12), 122,127, 2005. Georgakakos, K.P., and J.A. Sperfslage, "Operational Rainfall and Flow Forecasting for the Panama Canal Watershed," in The Rio Chagres: A Multidisciplinary Profile of a Tropical Watershed, R.S. Harmon, ed., Kluwer Academic Publishers, The Netherlands, Chapter 16, 323-334, 2005. Georgakakos, K. P., "Analytical results for operational flash flood guidance," Journal of Hydrology, doi:10.1016/j.jhydrol.2005.05.009, 2005.

  6. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  7. Fuzzy State Reservoir Operation Model for Irrigation with Gridded Rainfall Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, S.; Mujumdar, P. P.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents development and application of a fuzzy state dynamic programming model for irrigation of multiple crops. A fuzzy stochastic dynamic programming (FSDP) model is developed in which the reservoir storage and soil moisture of the crops are considered as fuzzy numbers, and the reservoir inflow is considered as a stochastic variable. The reservoir operation model is integrated with a daily water allocation model which results in daily variations of allocated water, soil moisture, and crop evapotranspiration (ET) deficits. A short term real time operation model is also developed for irrigation of multiple crops with the following distinguishing features with respect to the FSDP model: a) Apart from inclusion of fuzziness in reservoir storage and in soil moisture of crops, spatial variations in rainfall and soil moisture of crops are included in the model by considering gridded command area with a grid size of 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude, b) The water allocation model and soil moisture balance equations are integrated with the real time operation model with consideration of ponding water depth for Paddy crop, and c) The release policy is developed using forecasted daily rainfall data of each grid and is implemented for the current time period using actual 10-day inflow and actual daily rainfall of each grid. A case study of an existing Bhadra Reservoir in Karnataka, India is chosen for the model application. The results are found to be more acceptable for the case study than those of the classical stochastic dynamic model and the standard operating policy model, in terms of ten-day releases from the reservoir and evapotranspiration deficit. Consideration of irrigation decisions on a daily basis and the gridded command area are shown to result in a better performance of the reservoir operation models.

  8. Screening reservoir systems by considering the efficient trade-offs—informing infrastructure investment decisions on the Blue Nile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geressu, Robel T.; Harou, Julien J.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-reservoir system planners should consider how new dams impact downstream reservoirs and the potential contribution of each component to coordinated management. We propose an optimized multi-criteria screening approach to identify best performing designs, i.e., the selection, size and operating rules of new reservoirs within multi-reservoir systems. Reservoir release operating rules and storage sizes are optimized concurrently for each separate infrastructure design under consideration. Outputs reveal system trade-offs using multi-dimensional scatter plots where each point represents an approximately Pareto-optimal design. The method is applied to proposed Blue Nile River reservoirs in Ethiopia, where trade-offs between total and firm energy output, aggregate storage and downstream irrigation and energy provision for the best performing designs are evaluated. This proof-of concept study shows that recommended Blue Nile system designs would depend on whether monthly firm energy or annual energy is prioritized. 39 TWh/yr of energy potential is available from the proposed Blue Nile reservoirs. The results show that depending on the amount of energy deemed sufficient, the current maximum capacities of the planned reservoirs could be larger than they need to be. The method can also be used to inform which of the proposed reservoir type and their storage sizes would allow for the highest downstream benefits to Sudan in different objectives of upstream operating objectives (i.e., operated to maximize either average annual energy or firm energy). The proposed approach identifies the most promising system designs, reveals how they imply different trade-offs between metrics of system performance, and helps system planners asses the sensitivity of overall performance to the design parameters of component reservoirs.

  9. Evaluation of power generation operations in response to changes in surface water reservoir storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, Ashlynn S.; Webber, Michael E.

    2013-06-01

    We used a customized, river basin-based model of surface water rights to evaluate the response of power plants to drought via simulated changes in reservoir storage. Our methodology models surface water rights in 11 river basins in Texas using five cases: (1) storage decrease of existing capacity of 10%, (2) storage decrease of 50%, (3) complete elimination of storage, (4) storage increase of 10% (all at existing locations), and (5) construction of new reservoirs (at new locations) with a total increase in baseline reservoir capacity for power plant cooling of 9%. Using the Brazos River basin as a sample, we evaluated power generation operations in terms of reliability, resiliency, and vulnerability. As simulated water storage decreases, reliability generally decreases and resiliency and vulnerability remain relatively constant. All three metrics remain relatively constant with increasing reservoir storage, with the exception of one power plant. As reservoir storage changes at power plants, other water users in the basin are also affected. In general, decreasing water storage is beneficial to other water users in the basin, and increasing storage is detrimental for many other users. Our analysis reveals basin-wide and individual power plant-level impacts of changing reservoir storage, demonstrating a methodology for evaluation of the sustainability and feasibility of constructing new reservoir storage as a water and energy management approach.

  10. In the Way of Peacemaker Guide Curve between Water Supply and Flood Control for Short Term Reservoir Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, G.; Sensoy, A.; Yavuz, O.; Sorman, A. A.; Gezgin, T.

    2012-04-01

    Effective management of a controlled reservoir system where it involves multiple and sometimes conflicting objectives is a complex problem especially in real time operations. Yuvacık Dam Reservoir, located in the Marmara region of Turkey, is built to supply annual demand of 142 hm3 water for Kocaeli city requires such a complex management strategy since it has relatively small (51 hm3) effective capacity. On the other hand, the drainage basin is fed by both rainfall and snowmelt since the elevation ranges between 80 - 1548 m. Excessive water must be stored behind the radial gates between February and May in terms of sustainability especially for summer and autumn periods. Moreover, the downstream channel physical conditions constraint the spillway releases up to 100 m3/s although the spillway is large enough to handle major floods. Thus, this situation makes short term release decisions the challenging task. Long term water supply curves, based on historical inflows and annual water demand, are in conflict with flood regulation (control) levels, based on flood attenuation and routing curves, for this reservoir. A guide curve, that is generated using both water supply and flood control of downstream channel, generally corresponds to upper elevation of conservation pool for simulation of a reservoir. However, sometimes current operation necessitates exceeding this target elevation. Since guide curves can be developed as a function of external variables, the water potential of a basin can be an indicator to explain current conditions and decide on the further strategies. Besides, releases with respect to guide curve are managed and restricted by user-defined rules. Although the managers operate the reservoir due to several variable conditions and predictions, still the simulation model using variable guide curve is an urgent need to test alternatives quickly. To that end, using HEC-ResSim, the several variable guide curves are defined to meet the requirements by

  11. SWOT Data Assimilation for Operational Reservoir Management on the Upper Niger River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, S.; Polebistki, A.; Brown, C.; Belaud, G.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will provide two-dimensional maps of water elevation for rivers with width greater than 100 m globally. We describe a modeling framework and an automatic control algorithm that prescribe optimal releases from the Selingue dam in the Upper Niger River Basin, with the objective of understanding how SWOT data might be used to the benefit of operational water management. The modeling framework was used in a twin experiment to simulate the "true" system state and an ensemble of model states derived using corrupted meteorological forcings. Virtual SWOT observations of reservoir and river levels were assimilated into the model with a repeat cycle of 21 days. The updated state was used to initialize a Model Predictive Control (MPC) algorithm that computed the optimal reservoir release that meets a minimum flow requirement 300 km downstream of the dam at the entrance of the environmentally sensitive Niger Inner Delta. The data assimilation results indicate that the model updates had a positive effect on estimates of both water level and discharge. The "persistence", which describes the duration of the assimilation effect, was clearly improved by integrating a smoother into the assimilation procedure. We compared performances of the MPC with SWOT data assimilation to an open-loop MPC simulation. Results show that the assimilation of SWOT data resulted in substantial improvements in the performances of the Selingue Dam management with a greater ability to meet environmental requirements and a lower volume of water released from the dam.

  12. SWOT data assimilation for operational reservoir management on the upper Niger River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, S.; Polebistki, A.; Brown, C.; Belaud, G.; Lettenmaier, D. P.

    2015-01-01

    The future Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will provide two-dimensional maps of water elevation for rivers with width greater than 100 m globally. We describe a modeling framework and an automatic control algorithm that prescribe optimal releases from the Selingue dam in the Upper Niger River Basin, with the objective of understanding how SWOT data might be used to the benefit of operational water management. The modeling framework was used in a twin experiment to simulate the "true" system state and an ensemble of corrupted model states. Virtual SWOT observations of reservoir and river levels were assimilated into the model with a repeat cycle of 21 days. The updated state was used to initialize a Model Predictive Control (MPC) algorithm that computed the optimal reservoir release that meets a minimum flow requirement 300 km downstream of the dam. The data assimilation results indicate that the model updates had a positive effect on estimates of both water level and discharge. The "persistence," which describes the duration of the assimilation effect, was clearly improved (greater than 21 days) by integrating a smoother into the assimilation procedure. We compared performances of the MPC with SWOT data assimilation to an open-loop MPC simulation. Results show that the data assimilation resulted in substantial improvements in the performances of the Selingue dam management with a greater ability to meet environmental requirements (the number of days the target is missed falls to zero) and a minimum volume of water released from the dam.

  13. Using ensemble streamflow prediction in the reservoir operation during drought by implicit and explicit stochastic optimization: case study in Shihmen Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Kuan-wen; Jiing-Yun You, Gene; Jang, Jiun-Huei

    2016-04-01

    One of the important goals of water resource management is the establishment of realistic reservoir operating policies for water allocation, especially during periods of drought. In the context of short-term (a few months) water management such as drought, we need to predict the future inflow and allocate current and future water resource to avoid severe economic loss. Because the future flow condition in uncertain, applying the stochastic optimization technique is common in guide reservoir operation. This study is trying to use the ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP) in reservoir operation during drought. We develop reservoir operation model based on two stochastic optimization frameworks, the explicit stochastic optimization (ESO) or implicit stochastic optimization (ISO). Because the forecast is updated time by time, the rolling process is adapted, the decision process is ''rolled over'' every periods and extended into the future. This study use Shihmen Reservoir as a case study. The ensemble streamflow prediction is produced and provided by National Science and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR). Not only expect to provide an appropriate framework in integrating streamflow forecast a reservoir operation during drought, we also aim to compare the ISO and ESO to identify their advantages and disadvantages. As a result, the streamflow forecast can directly contribute, rather than just be kept in mind, in the reservoir operation during drought period.

  14. A Decision Support System (talsim) For Integrated Management of Reservoir Controlled Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lohr, H.; Ostrowski, M.; Leichtfuss, A.

    Both, the European Water Framework Directives and the discussion of the report of the world commission on dams (WCD-Report) ask for efficient and transparent decision support tools for rivers and river basins controlled by reservoir systems. It is evident that in contrast to historical planning conditions new objectives according to sustain- ability criteria have to be considered. Also, climate and land use changes have to be considered to account for changes of the hydrological cycle. In addition to river basin management dam safety has become a major issue in recent European discussions. In most cases decision support systems for reservoir systems have been individually tai- lored systems being only applicable to the system they had been developed for. Any transfer to other systems was strongly restricted as system definition and operation rules were implemented in the program code. Thus, a generic DSS for reservoir sys- tems modelling and optimisation is required to serve as a basic tool to support reser- voir operators and water administration to account for new objectives under changing boundary conditions. During the last six years a DSS for reservoir systems including their catchments and river reaches has been developed to fulfill these requirements (named TALSIM). The work has been supported by the Environmental Agency of the German Federal State of North-Rhine Westfalia. During the development and test phases the DSS has been applied to several reservoir systems in Germany and Africa. At present it is applied to one of the most complex German systems. The scope of the presentation is to present - the new requirements for decision making procedures in reservoir management - the structure of the TALSIM DSS including simulation and optimisation modules - completed and ongoing case studies

  15. 45. STEEL RESERVOIR TANKS FOR NEW SPRINGFED WATER SYSTEM INSTALLED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. STEEL RESERVOIR TANKS FOR NEW SPRING-FED WATER SYSTEM INSTALLED IN 1982. LOCATED IN WAIHANAU VALLEY, THIS REPLACED THE WAIKOLU SYSTEM AND PROVIDES A MORE CONSISTENT AND CLEAN WATER SUPPLY FOR KALAUPAPA. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  16. AI techniques for optimizing multi-objective reservoir operation upon human and riverine ecosystem demands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Ping; Chang, Fi-John; Chang, Li-Chiu; Herricks, Edwin E.

    2015-11-01

    Flow regime is the key driver of the riverine ecology. This study proposes a novel hybrid methodology based on artificial intelligence (AI) techniques for quantifying riverine ecosystems requirements and delivering suitable flow regimes that sustain river and floodplain ecology through optimizing reservoir operation. This approach addresses issues to better fit riverine ecosystem requirements with existing human demands. We first explored and characterized the relationship between flow regimes and fish communities through a hybrid artificial neural network (ANN). Then the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) was established for river flow management over the Shihmen Reservoir in northern Taiwan. The ecosystem requirement took the form of maximizing fish diversity, which could be estimated by the hybrid ANN. The human requirement was to provide a higher satisfaction degree of water supply. The results demonstrated that the proposed methodology could offer a number of diversified alternative strategies for reservoir operation and improve reservoir operational strategies producing downstream flows that could meet both human and ecosystem needs. Applications that make this methodology attractive to water resources managers benefit from the wide spread of Pareto-front (optimal) solutions allowing decision makers to easily determine the best compromise through the trade-off between reservoir operational strategies for human and ecosystem needs.

  17. Hot-dry-rock geothermal-reservoir fracturing initial field operations - 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.; Pettitt, R.A.; Matsunaga, I.; Dreesen, D.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Sinclair, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Initial fracturing operations were conducted during 1982 to create a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir at the Los Alamos Fenton Hill site. A preliminary work-over/cleaning operation in November to December 1981 had cleared the injection well, EE-2, and a detailed, comprehensive plan was prepared to accomplish the objectives of hydraulically connecting the injection and production wells. In January 1982, open-hole reservoir sections of both the production and injection wells were pressurized below the 9-5/8 in. casing. The injection well, EE-2, did not take fluid at 2200 psi, but the production well, EE-3, had a lost circulation zone and took water over a 240 ft zone immediately below the production casing. Subsequent field operations from May through December 14, 1982 involved ten major hydraulic injection and/or equipment tests. These ranged from 14,180 ft (4322 m) deep open-hole packer tests to installation of a cemented-in liner/PBR system. Injections of up to 1.3 x 10 gals. were performed in the injection well. Both wells were fractured in zones just below the production casings. Although several large volume injections were accomplished, hydraulic communication between wells was not achieved. Severe hardware problems were encountered due to temperature limitations, the high fracture gradient (breakdown and injection pressures), and the presence of CO/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S during fracture back-flow and well venting. On-line and post-test analyses of seismic monitoring confirmed that fractures were created in each well that converged on, but did not intersect, the neighboring well.

  18. An assessment of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir, Philippines, at high-pressure operating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sarmiento, Z.F.; Aquino, B.G.; Aunzo, Z.P.; Rodis, N.O.; Saw, V.S.

    1993-10-01

    An evaluation of the Tongonan geothermal reservoir was conducted to improve the power recovery through reservoir and process optimization. The performance of the existing production wells was reviewed and the response of the field based on the anticipated production levels was simulated at various operating conditions. The results indicate that the Tongonan geothermal reservoir can be exploited at a high pressure operating condition with substantial improvement in the field capacity. The authors calculate that the Upper Mahiao and the Malitbog sectors of the Tongonan field are capable of generating 395 MWe at 1.0 MPa abs., on top of the existing 112.5 MWe plant, compared with 275 MWe if the field is operated at 0.6 MPa abs. The total capacity for the proposed Leyte A 640 MWe expansion can be generated from these sectors with the additional power to be tapped from Mahanagdong and Alto Peak sectors.

  19. Stage-wise optimizing operating rules for flood control in a multi-purpose reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Frederick N.-F.; Wu, Chia-Wen

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a generic framework of release rules for reservoir flood control operation during three stages. In the stage prior to flood arrival, the rules indicate the timing and release discharge of pre-releasing reservoir storage to the initial level of flood control operation. In the stage preceding the flood peak, the rules prescribe the portion of inflow to be detained to mitigate downstream flooding, without allowing the water surface level of reservoir to exceed the acceptable safety level of surcharge. After the flood peak, the rules suggest the timing for stepwise reduction of the release flows and closing the gates of spillways and other outlets to achieve the normal level of conservation use. A simulation model is developed and linked with BOBYQA, an efficient optimization algorithm, to determine the optimal rule parameters in a stage-wise manner. The release rules of Shihmen Reservoir of Taiwan are established using inflow records of 59 historical typhoons and the probable maximum flood. The deviations from target levels at the end of different stages of all calibration events are minimized by the proposed method to improve the reliability of flood control operation. The optimized rules satisfy operational objectives including dam safety, flood mitigation, achieving sufficient end-of-operation storage for conservation purposes and smooth operation.

  20. Prospects and challenges in integrating reservoir operation in a global surface water dynamic modeling framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getirana, A.; Sulistioadi, Y. B.; Van Den Hoek, J.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    For hundreds of years, humans have altered river flow regimes all over the world with the construction of dams for hydropower generation, water supply, irrigation, navigation, and other reasons. Reservoirs resulting from dams usually have a high impact on the surrounding area by permanently flooding riparian habitat, changing river flow dynamics and soil moisture, disturbing riverine activities and fish migration, imposing the relocation of human settlements, and increasing methane emission due to submerged organic matter. The representation of these anthropogenic activities in numerical models has been the subject of several studies. However, access to reservoir operational data is often limited, preventing us from developing a consistent global scale river flow dynamic model and its physical interactions with the atmosphere and soil. Recent advances in radar altimetry (RA) data acquisition enable us to accurately monitor reservoirs in regions where distribution to information has long been restricted due to data share policies. In this study, we evaluate the potential of integrating RA data into reservoir operational modeling. Spaceborne remotely sensed data collected by the Envisat radar altimeter (2002-2010), IceSAT GLAS lidar (2003-2009), and daily inflow, outflow and water elevation data collected in situ since 2005 have been analyzed across 28 reservoirs on various Brazilian rivers. Changes in the reservoir surface water elevation from each of these data sources are compared and differences are examined with respect to seasonality and accuracy. A reservoir operation algorithm capable of integrating RA data is presented and evaluated. We discuss prospects and challenges for implementing the algorithm in a global-scale river routing scheme in order to improve our process-level understanding on river dynamics and variability.

  1. A stochastic conflict resolution model for water quality management in reservoir river systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerachian, Reza; Karamouz, Mohammad

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, optimal operating rules for water quality management in reservoir-river systems are developed using a methodology combining a water quality simulation model and a stochastic GA-based conflict resolution technique. As different decision-makers and stakeholders are involved in the water quality management in reservoir-river systems, a new stochastic form of the Nash bargaining theory is used to resolve the existing conflict of interests related to water supply to different demands, allocated water quality and waste load allocation in downstream river. The expected value of the Nash product is considered as the objective function of the model which can incorporate the inherent uncertainty of reservoir inflow. A water quality simulation model is also developed to simulate the thermal stratification cycle in the reservoir, the quality of releases from different outlets as well as the temporal and spatial variation of the pollutants in the downstream river. In this study, a Varying Chromosome Length Genetic Algorithm (VLGA), which has computational advantages comparing to other alternative models, is used. VLGA provides a good initial solution for Simple Genetic Algorithms and comparing to Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) reduces the number of state transitions checked in each stage. The proposed model, which is called Stochastic Varying Chromosome Length Genetic Algorithm with water Quality constraints (SVLGAQ), is applied to the Ghomrud Reservoir-River system in the central part of Iran. The results show, the proposed model for reservoir operation and waste load allocation can reduce the salinity of the allocated water demands as well as the salinity build-up in the reservoir.

  2. An Integrated Risk Approach for Assessing the Use of Ensemble Streamflow Forecasts in Hydroelectric Reservoir Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, T. S.; Wigmosta, M.; Barco, J.; Voisin, N.; Bier, A.; Coleman, A.; Skaggs, R.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents an integrated risk approach using ensemble streamflow forecasts for optimizing hydro-electric power generation. Uncertainty in the streamflow forecasts are translated into integrated risk by calculating the deviation of an optimized release schedule that simultaneously maximizes power generation and environmental performance from release schedules that maximize the two objectives individually. The deviations from each target are multiplied by the probability of occurrence and then summed across all probabilities to get the integrated risk. The integrated risk is used to determine which operational scheme exposes the operator to the least amount of risk or conversely, what are the consequences of basing future operations on a particular prediction. Decisions can be made with regards to the tradeoff between power generation, environmental performance, and exposure to risk. The Hydropower Seasonal Concurrent Optimization for Power and Environment (HydroSCOPE) model developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to model the flow, temperature, and power generation and is coupled with the DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) optimization package to identify the maximum potential power generation, the maximum environmental performance, and the optimal operational scheme that maximizes both for each instance of the ensemble forecasts. The ensemble forecasts were developed in a collaborative effort between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the University of Washington to develop an Enhanced Hydrologic Forecasting System (EHFS) that incorporates advanced ensemble forecasting approaches and algorithms, spatiotemporal datasets, and automated data acquisition and processing. Both the HydroSCOPE model and the EHFS forecast tool are being developed as part of a larger, multi-laboratory water-use optimization project funded through the US Department of Energy. The simulations were based on the

  3. Regime-shifting streamflow processes: Implications for water supply reservoir operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, S. W. D.; Galelli, S.

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the extent to which regime-like behavior in streamflow time series impacts reservoir operating policy performance. We begin by incorporating a regime state variable into a well-established stochastic dynamic programming model. We then simulate and compare optimized release policies—with and without the regime state variable—to understand how regime shifts affect operating performance in terms of meeting water delivery targets. Our optimization approach uses a Hidden Markov Model to partition the streamflow time series into a small number of separate regime states. The streamflow persistence structures associated with each state define separate month-to-month streamflow transition probability matrices for computing penalty cost expectations within the optimization procedure. The algorithm generates a four-dimensional array of release decisions conditioned on the within-year time period, reservoir storage state, inflow class, and underlying regime state. Our computational experiment is executed on 99 distinct, hypothetical water supply reservoirs fashioned from the Australian Bureau of Meteorology's Hydrologic Reference Stations. Results show that regime-like behavior is a major cause of suboptimal operations in water supply reservoirs; conventional techniques for optimal policy design may misguide the operator, particularly in regions susceptible to multiyear drought. Stationary streamflow models that allow for regime-like behavior can be incorporated into traditional stochastic optimization models to enhance the flexibility of operations.

  4. Impacts of operation of CVP regulating reservoirs on water temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Vail, L.W.

    1996-06-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) markets and transmits electric power throughout 15 western states. Western's Sierra Nevada Customer Service Region (Sierra Nevada Region) markets approximately 1,480 megawatts (MW) of firm power (and 100 MW of seasonal peaking capacity) from the Central Valley Project (CVP) and other sources and markets available nonfirm power from the Washoe Project. Western's mission is to sell and deliver electricity generated from CVP powerplants. The hydroelectric facilities of the CVP are operated by the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation). Reclamation manages and releases water in accordance with the various acts authorizing specific projects and with enabling legislation. Western's capacity and energy sales must be in conformance with the laws that govern its sale of electrical power. Further, Western's hydropower operations at each facility must comply with minimum and maximum flows and other constraints set by Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, or other agencies, acting in accord with law or policy.

  5. A VIRTUAL OPERATING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Dennis E.; Scherrer, Deborah K.; Sventek, Joseph S.

    1980-05-01

    Significant progress toward disentangling computing environments from their under lying operating systern has been made. An approach is presented that achieves inter-system uniformity at all three levels of user interface - virtual machine, utilities, and command language. Under specifiable conditions, complete uniformity is achievable without disturbing the underlying operating system. The approach permits accurate computation of the cost to move both people and software to a new system. The cost of moving people is zero, and the cost of moving software is equal to the cost of implementing a virtual machine. Efficiency is achieved through optimization of the primitive functions.

  6. Estimating irrigation water demand using an improved method and optimizing reservoir operation for water supply and hydropower generation: a case study of the Xinfengjiang reservoir in southern China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Yiping; Chen, Ji

    2013-01-01

    The ever-increasing demand for water due to growth of population and socioeconomic development in the past several decades has posed a worldwide threat to water supply security and to the environmental health of rivers. This study aims to derive reservoir operating rules through establishing a multi-objective optimization model for the Xinfengjiang (XFJ) reservoir in the East River Basin in southern China to minimize water supply deficit and maximize hydropower generation. Additionally, to enhance the estimation of irrigation water demand from the downstream agricultural area of the XFJ reservoir, a conventional method for calculating crop water demand is improved using hydrological model simulation results. Although the optimal reservoir operating rules are derived for the XFJ reservoir with three priority scenarios (water supply only, hydropower generation only, and equal priority), the river environmental health is set as the basic demand no matter which scenario is adopted. The results show that the new rules derived under the three scenarios can improve the reservoir operation for both water supply and hydropower generation when comparing to the historical performance. Moreover, these alternative reservoir operating policies provide the flexibility for the reservoir authority to choose the most appropriate one. Although changing the current operating rules may influence its hydropower-oriented functions, the new rules can be significant to cope with the increasingly prominent water shortage and degradation in the aquatic environment. Overall, our results and methods (improved estimation of irrigation water demand and formulation of the reservoir optimization model) can be useful for local watershed managers and valuable for other researchers worldwide.

  7. Rapid Responses of Groundwater Systems in Reservoir Sediment Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskiy, M.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    Phreatic aquifers that develop within reservoir sediment deposits contribute to the water and mass balances of reservoir systems and in turn strongly influence their ecology. As a case study, we examine the response of an aquifer formed within the sediment deposit of Searsville Reservoir (California, U.S.A.) using data from a set of 18 piezometers installed in the deposit and the adjacent native material. Searsville Reservoir is located in the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve of Stanford University in the low foothills of the Santa Cruz Mountains. As is typical of Mediterranean climates, almost all precipitation occurs as rain in the winters, and summers are dry. Approximately weekly data are available from the piezometers, in addition to high-frequency streamflow and meteorological data collected in the vicinity of the reservoir. High-frequency pressure head data at some of the piezometer locations are also available for portions of the record. We combine time series and spatial analysis to explore how the water table responds to precipitation and evaporation patterns. Analysis reveals that fluctuations in the water table are highly responsive to precipitation and evaporation stimuli, with more muted responses to reservoir water surface elevation and streamflow across the sediment surface. Spatially, we see distinct patterns across the sediment body, along with consistent, periodic reversals in direction of groundwater flow at some locations. Temporally, in addition to rapid responses during rainfall events, we observe diurnal fluctuations due to evapotranspiration and a seasonal signal tempered by water surface regulation at the dam. Taken together, our data reveal reservoir sediment deposits to be dynamic ecohydrologic environments over multiple scales.

  8. Optimizing long-term reservoir operation through multi-tier interactive genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.-W.; Chang, L.-C.; Chang, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    For long-term reservoir planning and management problems, the reservoir optimal operation in each period is commonly searched year by year. The search domain for the initial reservoir storage for each year is limited to certain ranges, the over-year conditions cannot be adequately delivered over time, and therefore such operation fails to integrate the conditions of all the considered years as a whole situation. In this study, a multi-tier interactive genetic algorithm (MIGA) was applied to searching the long-term reservoir optimal solution. MIGA can decompose a large-scale task into several small-scale sub-tasks with GAs applied to each sub-task, where the multi-tier optimal solutions mutually interact among individual sub-tasks to produce the optimal solution for the original task. In such way, the long-term reservoir operation task can be divided into several independent single-year tasks; therefore, the difficulty of the optimal search for a great number of decision variables can dramatically be reduced. The Shihmen Reservoir in northern Taiwan was used as a case study, and the long-term optimal reservoir storages (decision variables) were investigated. The objective was to best satisfy water demands in the downstream area; and a 10-day period, the traditional time frame in Chinese agricultural society, was used as a time step. According to this time scale, there were two cases with different time intervals (variables): Case I- five relative drought consecutive years (2001 to 2006) with 180 variables (i.e. 36×5=180); and Case II- twenty consecutive years (1986 to 2006) with 720 variables (i.e. 36×20=720). For the purpose of comparison, a simulation based on the reservoir operating rule curves and a sole GA search would be implemented to find the solutions. In Case I, despite the number of the decision variables which was 180, the sole GA could still well search the optimal solution. In Case II (720 variables), the sole GA could not reach the optimal solution

  9. Adaptive Regulation of the Northern California Reservoir System for Water, Energy, and Environmental Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgakakos, A. P.; Kistenmacher, M.; Yao, H.; Georgakakos, K. P.

    2014-12-01

    The 2014 National Climate Assessment of the US Global Change Research Program emphasizes that water resources managers and planners in most US regions will have to cope with new risks, vulnerabilities, and opportunities, and recommends the development of adaptive capacity to effectively respond to the new water resources planning and management challenges. In the face of these challenges, adaptive reservoir regulation is becoming all the more ncessary. Water resources management in Northern California relies on the coordinated operation of several multi-objective reservoirs on the Trinity, Sacramento, American, Feather, and San Joaquin Rivers. To be effective, reservoir regulation must be able to (a) account for forecast uncertainty; (b) assess changing tradeoffs among water uses and regions; and (c) adjust management policies as conditions change; and (d) evaluate the socio-economic and environmental benefits and risks of forecasts and policies for each region and for the system as a whole. The Integrated Forecast and Reservoir Management (INFORM) prototype demonstration project operated in Northern California through the collaboration of several forecast and management agencies has shown that decision support systems (DSS) with these attributes add value to stakeholder decision processes compared to current, less flexible management practices. Key features of the INFORM DSS include: (a) dynamically downscaled operational forecasts and climate projections that maintain the spatio-temporal coherence of the downscaled land surface forcing fields within synoptic scales; (b) use of ensemble forecast methodologies for reservoir inflows; (c) assessment of relevant tradeoffs among water uses on regional and local scales; (d) development and evaluation of dynamic reservoir policies with explicit consideration of hydro-climatic forecast uncertainties; and (e) focus on stakeholder information needs.This article discusses the INFORM integrated design concept, underlying

  10. Payload operation television system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The TV system assembled is intended for laboratory experimentation which would develop operational techniques and lead to the design of space-borne TV equipment whose purpose would be to assist the astronaut-operator aboard a space station to load payload components. The TV system assembled for this program is a black and white, monocular, high performance system. The equipment consists principally of a good quality TV camera capable of high resolving power; a TV monitor; a sync generator for driving camera and monitor; and two pan/tilt units which are remotely controlled by the operator. One pan/tilt unit provides control of the pointing of the camera, the other similarly controls the position of a simulated payload.

  11. Effects of operation of Raccoon Mountain pumped-storage project on Nickajack Reservoir flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.; Price, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The results from a study to determine the effects of Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant operations on flow conditions within Nickajack Reservoir are presented. Computer simulations and field studies have shown that flow reversals occur in Nickajack Reservoir as a result of the power peaking operations of the Nickajack and Chickamauga hydroelectric plants, both situated on the Tennessee River. The primary cause of these reversals is attributable to shutdowns of the Chickamauga turbines. The focus of this study is on flow reversals near the Moccasin Bend sewage treatment plant and near the Tennessee American water treatment plant, both of which are located on the Tennessee River near Chattanooga. Results from the study show that, under normal and extreme operating conditions at Chickamauga and Nickajack Dams, operation of the Raccoon Mountain Pumped-Storage Plant has no appreciable influence on flow reversals at the two plant sites.

  12. Targeted electrohydrodynamic printing for micro-reservoir drug delivery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jin Bum; Som Yang, Da; Park, Yong-il; Ryu, WonHyoung

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic drug delivery systems consisting of a drug reservoir and microfluidic channels have shown the possibility of simple and robust modulation of drug release rate. However, the difficulty of loading a small quantity of drug into drug reservoirs at a micro-scale limited further development of such systems. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) printing was employed to fill micro-reservoirs with controlled amount of drugs in the range of a few hundreds of picograms to tens of micrograms with spatial resolution of as small as 20 µm. Unlike most EHD systems, this system was configured in combination with an inverted microscope that allows in situ targeting of drug loading at micrometer scale accuracy. Methylene blue and rhodamine B were used as model drugs in distilled water, isopropanol and a polymer solution of a biodegradable polymer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Also tetracycline-HCl/DI water was used as actual drug ink. The optimal parameters of EHD printing to load an extremely small quantity of drug into microscale drug reservoirs were investigated by changing pumping rates, the strength of an electric field and drug concentration. This targeted EHD technique was used to load drugs into the microreservoirs of PDMS microfluidic drug delivery devices and their drug release performance was demonstrated in vitro.

  13. Assessment of Short Term Flood Operation Strategies Using Numerical Weather Prediction Data in YUVACΙK DAM Reservoir, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uysal, G.; Yavuz, O.; Sensoy, A.; Sorman, A.; Akgun, T.; Gezgin, T.

    2011-12-01

    Yuvacik Dam Reservoir Basin, located in the Marmara region of Turkey with 248 km2 drainage area, has steep topography, mild and rainy climate thus induces high flood potential with fast flow response, especially to early spring and fall precipitation events. Moreover, the basin provides considerable snowmelt contribution to the streamflow during melt season since the elevation ranges between 80 - 1548 m. The long term strategies are based on supplying annual demand of 142 hm3 water despite a relatively small reservoir capacity of 51 hm3. This situation makes short term release decisions as the challenging task regarding the constrained downstream safe channel capacity especially in times of floods. Providing the demand of 1.5 million populated city of Kocaeli is the highest priority issue in terms of reservoir management but risk optimization is also required due to flood regulation. Although, the spillway capacity is 1560 m3/s, the maximum amount of water to be released is set as 100 m3/s by the regional water authority taking into consideration the downstream channel capacity which passes through industrial region of the city. The reservoir is a controlled one and it is possible to hold back the 15 hm3 additional water by keeping the gates closed. Flood regulation is set to achieve the maximum possible flood attenuation by using the full flood-control zone capacity in the reservoir before making releases in excess of the downstream safe-channel capacity. However, the operators still need to exceed flood regulation zones to take precautions for drought summer periods in order to supply water without any shortage that increases the risk in times of flood. Regarding to this circumstances, a hydrological model integrated reservoir modeling system, is applied to account for the physical behavior of the system. Hence, this reservoir modeling is carried out to analyze both previous decisions and also the future scenarios as a decision support tool for operators. In the

  14. Crop yield summary for three wetland reservoir subirrigation systems in northwest Ohio

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetland Reservoir Subirrigation Systems (WRSIS) are innovative agricultural water management and recycling systems comprised of three main components; a constructed wetland, a water storage reservoir, and cropland containing subsurface drainage pipe systems. Surface runoff and subsurface drainage f...

  15. Impact of Climate Change on Mercury Transport along the Carson River-Lahontan Reservoir System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flickinger, A.; Carroll, R. W. H.; Warwick, J. J.; Schumer, R.

    2014-12-01

    Historic mining practices have left the Carson River and Lahontan Reservoir (CRLR) system contaminated with high levels of mercury (Hg). Hg levels in Lahontan Reservoir planktivorous and predatory fish exceed federal consumption limits. Inputs of Hg to the system are mainly a result of erosion during high flow and diffusion from sediment during low flow, and the relationships between streamflow and both mercury transport and bioaccumulation are non-linear. The United States Bureau of Reclamation has produced future streamflow estimates for 2000-2099 using 112 CMIP3 climate projections and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model. VIC results suggest that the hydrology of the system is likely to experience higher frequencies of both high and low extreme flows, and the monthly averages of future flows are expected to be higher in the winter and lower in the summer compared to observed flows. VIC daily streamflow estimates are biased-corrected using an empirical cumulative distribution function to match observed data over the historic period of 1950-1999. Future reservoir stage and outflows are modeled assuming reservoir operations are a function of river/canal inflows, previous reservoir stage and downstream agricultural demands. VIC and reservoir flows drive the CRLR Hg transport model (RIVMOD, WASP5, and MERC4). Daily output for both total and dissolved inorganic Hg and methylmercury (MeHg) are averaged at the decadal timescale to assess changes and uncertainty in predicted spatial and temporal Hg species water column concentrations as a function of altered hydrology with respect to changing climate. Future research will use CRLR output in a bioenergetics and Hg mass balance model for Sacramento blackfish (Orthodon microlepidotus), a filter feeding cyprinid found in Lahontan Reservoir. These future simulations will help to assess possible changes in ecosystem health with respect to hydrologic conditions and associated changes to Hg transport.

  16. Multi-criteria objective based climate change impact assessment for multi-purpose multi-reservoir systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ruben; Schütze, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Water resources systems with reservoirs are expected to be sensitive to climate change. Assessment studies that analyze the impact of climate change on the performance of reservoirs can be divided in two groups: (1) Studies that simulate the operation under projected inflows with the current set of operational rules. Due to non adapted operational rules the future performance of these reservoirs can be underestimated and the impact overestimated. (2) Studies that optimize the operational rules for best adaption of the system to the projected conditions before the assessment of the impact. The latter allows for estimating more realistically future performance and adaption strategies based on new operation rules are available if required. Multi-purpose reservoirs serve various, often conflicting functions. If all functions cannot be served simultaneously at a maximum level, an effective compromise between multiple objectives of the reservoir operation has to be provided. Yet under climate change the historically preferenced compromise may no longer be the most suitable compromise in the future. Therefore a multi-objective based climate change impact assessment approach for multi-purpose multi-reservoir systems is proposed in the study. Projected inflows are provided in a first step using a physically based rainfall-runoff model. In a second step, a time series model is applied to generate long-term inflow time series. Finally, the long-term inflow series are used as driving variables for a simulation-based multi-objective optimization of the reservoir system in order to derive optimal operation rules. As a result, the adapted Pareto-optimal set of diverse best compromise solutions can be presented to the decision maker in order to assist him in assessing climate change adaption measures with respect to the future performance of the multi-purpose reservoir system. The approach is tested on a multi-purpose multi-reservoir system in a mountainous catchment in Germany. A

  17. What is the Effect of Interannual Hydroclimatic Variability on Water Supply Reservoir Operations?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galelli, S.; Turner, S. W. D.

    2015-12-01

    Rather than deriving from a single distribution and uniform persistence structure, hydroclimatic data exhibit significant trends and shifts in their mean, variance, and lagged correlation through time. Consequentially, observed and reconstructed streamflow records are often characterized by features of interannual variability, including long-term persistence and prolonged droughts. This study examines the effect of these features on the operating performance of water supply reservoirs. We develop a Stochastic Dynamic Programming (SDP) model that can incorporate a regime-shifting climate variable. We then compare the performance of operating policies—designed with and without climate variable—to quantify the contribution of interannual variability to standard policy sub-optimality. The approach uses a discrete-time Markov chain to partition the reservoir inflow time series into small number of 'hidden' climate states. Each state defines a distinct set of inflow transition probability matrices, which are used by the SDP model to condition the release decisions on the reservoir storage, current-period inflow and hidden climate state. The experimental analysis is carried out on 99 hypothetical water supply reservoirs fed from pristine catchments in Australia—all impacted by the Millennium drought. Results show that interannual hydroclimatic variability is a major cause of sub-optimal hedging decisions. The practical import is that conventional optimization methods may misguide operators, particularly in regions susceptible to multi-year droughts.

  18. Mapping 3D thin shale and permeability pathway within a reservoir system: Case study from the Sleipner Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponfa Bitrus, Roy; Iacopini, David; Bond, Clare

    2016-04-01

    Reservoir architecture plays an integral part of seismic reservoir characterization. The characteristics of a reservoir which includes its external and internal geometry are important as they influence the production and development strategy employed in the oil and gas sector. Reservoir architecture is defined by the interpretation of seismic data, thus identifying the basic structural and stratigraphic geometrical framework of a trapping and flow system for hydrocarbon and fluids. One major issue though is the interpretation of thin shales and identification of permeability pathways within the reservoir system. This paper employs a method using attributes to map thin shales and identify permeability pathways or transmissitives that exist within a reservoir taking into consideration the seismic resolution and available data. Case study is the Utsira Formation in the Sleipner field, Norwegian North sea. The Utsira formation presents a classic case of thin beds within a sandstone formation and transmissitives that exist as chimneys within the formation. A total of 10 intra reservoir horizon units of shales where interpreted using complex trace seismic attributes. These interpreted horizons where further analysed through spectral decomposition to reveal possible facies distribution and unit thickness within the horizon. Reservoir transmissitives identified as vertical curvilinear structures were also analysed using unique seismic attributes in other to delineate their extent and characterise their occurrence These interpreted shales and pathway transmissitives illuminate the geometry of the formation, the reservoir heterogeneities on a finer-scale and, in the long term, constrain the migration prediction of reservoir fluids, hydrocarbons and injected CO2 when matched across a 4D seismic data survey. As such, useful insights into the key elements operating within the reservoir can be provided, giving a good indication of the long and short term reservoir performance.

  19. Improving the robustness of a multi-reservoir system to climate change using multi-objective optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ruben; Schütze, Niels

    2013-04-01

    Current climate circulation models simulate a climate change induced increase of temperatures and a decreasing amount of precipitation in the region of Saxony (Germany) in summer. Consequently, the operation of reservoirs has to consider decreasing inflows, more severe drought periods as well as increasing demands for water. New management strategies for the reservoirs are required to adapt to these new pressuring conditions and to meet the future demands of all water sectors and simultaneously providing flood protection. This study combines multi-objective optimization and Monte Carlo simulation for finding effective management strategies for multi-purpose reservoirs and multi-reservoir systems. To achieve robust operating strategies (rule curves and diversions) a new framework is developed which comprises (i) the physically based rainfall-runoff model WaSiM-ETH (ii) a time series model for the generation of a large number of synthetic inflow time series, (iii) a comprehensive reservoir model, (iv) an adapted multi-objective optimization algorithm and advanced visualization methods for a compact presentation of the results for the decision maker. In a real case application the new framework is used to find operating strategies to potential impacts of the projected climate change for the multi-purpose multi-reservoir system Klingenberg - Lehnmühle - Rauschenbach in the Ore Mountains (Saxony, Germany). The automatically calibrated model WaSiM-ETH is applied to different climatic conditions of the time periods of the WETTREG-2010 climate model and the IPCC CO2 emission scenarios A1B, B1 and A2 for generating reservoir inflows. In addition to the climate change scenarios different scenarios describing increased demands or enlarged flood protection zones are considered. The overall robustness of the multi-reservoir system operation is quantified and possible intensifications of trade-offs between management goals or reservoir utilizations are shown.

  20. Simulating California reservoir operation using the classification and regression-tree algorithm combined with a shuffled cross-validation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tiantian; Gao, Xiaogang; Sorooshian, Soroosh; Li, Xin

    2016-03-01

    The controlled outflows from a reservoir or dam are highly dependent on the decisions made by the reservoir operators, instead of a natural hydrological process. Difference exists between the natural upstream inflows to reservoirs and the controlled outflows from reservoirs that supply the downstream users. With the decision maker's awareness of changing climate, reservoir management requires adaptable means to incorporate more information into decision making, such as water delivery requirement, environmental constraints, dry/wet conditions, etc. In this paper, a robust reservoir outflow simulation model is presented, which incorporates one of the well-developed data-mining models (Classification and Regression Tree) to predict the complicated human-controlled reservoir outflows and extract the reservoir operation patterns. A shuffled cross-validation approach is further implemented to improve CART's predictive performance. An application study of nine major reservoirs in California is carried out. Results produced by the enhanced CART, original CART, and random forest are compared with observation. The statistical measurements show that the enhanced CART and random forest overperform the CART control run in general, and the enhanced CART algorithm gives a better predictive performance over random forest in simulating the peak flows. The results also show that the proposed model is able to consistently and reasonably predict the expert release decisions. Experiments indicate that the release operation in the Oroville Lake is significantly dominated by SWP allocation amount and reservoirs with low elevation are more sensitive to inflow amount than others.

  1. Towards an optimal integrated reservoir system management for the Awash River Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Ruben; Gebretsadik, Henok Y.; Schütze, Niels

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the Kessem-Tendaho project is completed to bring about socioeconomic development and growth in the Awash River Basin, Ethiopia. To support reservoir Koka, two new reservoirs where built together with extensive infrastructure for new irrigation projects. For best possible socioeconomic benefits under conflicting management goals, like energy production at three hydropower stations and basin wide water supply at various sites, an integrated reservoir system management is required. To satisfy the multi-purpose nature of the reservoir system, multi-objective parameterization-simulation-optimization model is applied. Different Pareto-optimal trade-off solutions between water supply and hydro-power generation are provided for two scenarios (i) recent conditions and (ii) future planned increases for Tendaho and Upper Awash Irrigation projects. Reservoir performance is further assessed under (i) rule curves with a high degree of freedom - this allows for best performance, but may result in rules curves to variable for real word operation and (ii) smooth rule curves, obtained by artificial neuronal networks. The results show no performance penalty for smooth rule curves under future conditions but a notable penalty under recent conditions.

  2. Hydrologic, Ecologic and Livelihood Impact Assessment of a System of Small Reservoirs in Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Vogel, R. M.; Kirshen, P. H.; Walker, P.

    2012-12-01

    In Ghana, the short rainy season is marked by large fluctuations in arrival time, duration and intensity of rainfall, resulting in large inter-year variations in river flow and water availability. Many small reservoirs are built to deal with this variation by providing storage of water in the rainy season. This water is then used during the dry season for various activities, such as small-scale irrigation, domestic uses and livestock watering, to improve livelihood. However, small reservoir development has been made in a spontaneous fashion without concern for their integrated impacts and many of them have deteriorated over time due to poor maintenance. This is further confounded by the lack of a complete inventory of the reservoirs, because their construction was funded by different agencies, at different times, with little coordinated effort among the agencies to facilitate a regional optimization of investments. When an individual small reservoir is considered, alteration to the entire watershed is not significant. However, when considered as a system, together the small reservoirs store a significant quantity of water and influence downstream flows. The small reservoirs have rarely been considered as a system, thus little consideration has been given to their collective impact on the environment and livelihoods of the local population in the long term. Furthermore, the impact is difficult to quantify given the diffuse nature of the small reservoirs. Therefore, this study was set up to investigate the effect of the small reservoirs as a system, and intended to contribute to the limited number of studies available in literature on small reservoirs in developing countries. Using data collected in the Upper East Region of Ghana in 2007 and 2008, hydrological modeling, statistical analyses and institutional analyses were conducted to 1) assess the hydrologic, ecologic and livelihood impact of a large ensemble of small reservoirs; 2) formulate appropriate water

  3. Reservoir Operations and Flow Modeling to Support Decision Making in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinodoz, H. A.

    2006-12-01

    About five percent of the US population depends on the waters from the Delaware River Basin for its water supply, including New York City and Philadelphia. Water management in the basin is governed by a compact signed in 1961 by the four basin states and the federal government. The compact created the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) and gave it broad powers to plan, regulate, and manage the development of the basin water resources. The compact also recognized a pre-existing (1954) U.S. Supreme Court Decree that grants the City of New York the right to export up to 800 million gallons per day out of the basin, provided that a prescribed minimum flow is met at Montague, New Jersey for the use of the lower-basin states. The Delaware River Basin Compact also allows the DRBC to adjust the releases and diversions under the Decree, subject to the unanimous consent of the decree parties. This mechanism has been used several times over the last 30 years, to implement and modify rules governing drought operations, instream flows, minimum flow targets, and control of salinity intrusion. In every case, decision makers have relied upon extensive modeling of alternative proposals, using a basin-wide daily flow model. Often, stakeholders have modified and used the same model to test and refine their proposals prior to consideration by the decision makers. The flow model has been modified over the years, to simulate new features and processes in a river system partially controlled by more than ten reservoirs. The flow model has proved to be an adaptable tool, able to simulate the dynamics of a complex system driven by conflicting objectives. This presentation reviews the characteristics of the daily flow model in its current form, discuss how model simulations are used to inform the decision-making process, and provide a case study of a recent modification of the system-wide drought operating plan.

  4. Constructing optimized binary masks for reservoir computing with delay systems.

    PubMed

    Appeltant, Lennert; Van der Sande, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Fischer, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a novel bio-inspired computing method, capable of solving complex tasks in a computationally efficient way. It has recently been successfully implemented using delayed feedback systems, allowing to reduce the hardware complexity of brain-inspired computers drastically. In this approach, the pre-processing procedure relies on the definition of a temporal mask which serves as a scaled time-mutiplexing of the input. Originally, random masks had been chosen, motivated by the random connectivity in reservoirs. This random generation can sometimes fail. Moreover, for hardware implementations random generation is not ideal due to its complexity and the requirement for trial and error. We outline a procedure to reliably construct an optimal mask pattern in terms of multipurpose performance, derived from the concept of maximum length sequences. Not only does this ensure the creation of the shortest possible mask that leads to maximum variability in the reservoir states for the given reservoir, it also allows for an interpretation of the statistical significance of the provided training samples for the task at hand. PMID:24406849

  5. Constructing optimized binary masks for reservoir computing with delay systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appeltant, Lennert; van der Sande, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Fischer, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    Reservoir computing is a novel bio-inspired computing method, capable of solving complex tasks in a computationally efficient way. It has recently been successfully implemented using delayed feedback systems, allowing to reduce the hardware complexity of brain-inspired computers drastically. In this approach, the pre-processing procedure relies on the definition of a temporal mask which serves as a scaled time-mutiplexing of the input. Originally, random masks had been chosen, motivated by the random connectivity in reservoirs. This random generation can sometimes fail. Moreover, for hardware implementations random generation is not ideal due to its complexity and the requirement for trial and error. We outline a procedure to reliably construct an optimal mask pattern in terms of multipurpose performance, derived from the concept of maximum length sequences. Not only does this ensure the creation of the shortest possible mask that leads to maximum variability in the reservoir states for the given reservoir, it also allows for an interpretation of the statistical significance of the provided training samples for the task at hand.

  6. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  7. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  8. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510 Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements? All subpart H systems which...

  9. Synergistic gains from the multi-objective optimal operation of cascade reservoirs in the Upper Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Tao; Chang, Jian-xia; Chang, Fi-John; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Yi-min; Chen, Guang-sheng

    2015-04-01

    The Yellow River, known as China's "mother river", originates from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau and flows through nine provinces with a basin area of 0.75 million km2 and an annual runoff of 53.5 billion m3. In the last decades, a series of reservoirs have been constructed and operated along the Upper Yellow River for hydropower generation, flood and ice control, and water resources management. However, these reservoirs are managed by different institutions, and the gains owing to the joint operation of reservoirs are neither clear nor recognized, which prohibits the applicability of reservoir joint operation. To inspire the incentive of joint operation, the contribution of reservoirs to joint operation needs to be quantified. This study investigates the synergistic gains from the optimal joint operation of two pivotal reservoirs (i.e., Longyangxia and Liujiaxia) along the Upper Yellow River. Synergistic gains of optimal joint operation are analyzed based on three scenarios: (1) neither reservoir participates in flow regulation; (2) one reservoir (i.e., Liujiaxia) participates in flow regulation; and (3) both reservoirs participate in flow regulation. We develop a multi-objective optimal operation model of cascade reservoirs by implementing the Progressive Optimality Algorithm-Dynamic Programming Successive Approximation (POA-DPSA) method for estimating the gains of reservoirs based on long series data (1987-2010). The results demonstrate that the optimal joint operation of both reservoirs can increase the amount of hydropower generation to 1.307 billion kW h/year (about 594 million USD) and increase the amount of water supply to 36.57 billion m3/year (about 15% improvement). Furthermore both pivotal reservoirs play an extremely essential role to ensure the safety of downstream regions for ice and flood management, and to significantly increase the minimum flow in the Upper Yellow River during dry periods. Therefore, the synergistic gains of both reservoirs can be

  10. A parallel dynamic programming algorithm for multi-reservoir system optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Wei, Jiahua; Li, Tiejian; Wang, Guangqian; Yeh, William W.-G.

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops a parallel dynamic programming algorithm to optimize the joint operation of a multi-reservoir system. First, a multi-dimensional dynamic programming (DP) model is formulated for a multi-reservoir system. Second, the DP algorithm is parallelized using a peer-to-peer parallel paradigm. The parallelization is based on the distributed memory architecture and the message passing interface (MPI) protocol. We consider both the distributed computing and distributed computer memory in the parallelization. The parallel paradigm aims at reducing the computation time as well as alleviating the computer memory requirement associated with running a multi-dimensional DP model. Next, we test the parallel DP algorithm on the classic, benchmark four-reservoir problem on a high-performance computing (HPC) system with up to 350 cores. Results indicate that the parallel DP algorithm exhibits good performance in parallel efficiency; the parallel DP algorithm is scalable and will not be restricted by the number of cores. Finally, the parallel DP algorithm is applied to a real-world, five-reservoir system in China. The results demonstrate the parallel efficiency and practical utility of the proposed methodology.

  11. Pyrolaser Operating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Floyd E., III

    1994-01-01

    Software provides for control and acquisition of data from optical pyrometer. There are six individual programs in PYROLASER package. Provides quick and easy way to set up, control, and program standard Pyrolaser. Temperature and emisivity measurements either collected as if Pyrolaser in manual operating mode or displayed on real-time strip charts and stored in standard spreadsheet format for posttest analysis. Shell supplied to allow macros, which are test-specific, added to system easily. Written using Labview software for use on Macintosh-series computers running System 6.0.3 or later, Sun Sparc-series computers running Open-Windows 3.0 or MIT's X Window System (X11R4 or X11R5), and IBM PC or compatible computers running Microsoft Windows 3.1 or later.

  12. System-reservoir dynamics of quantum and classical correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Maziero, J.; Celeri, L. C.; Serra, R. M.; Werlang, T.; Fanchini, F. F.

    2010-02-15

    We examine the system-reservoir dynamics of classical and quantum correlations in the decoherence phenomenon within a two-qubit composite system interacting with two independent environments. The most common noise channels (amplitude damping, phase damping, bit flip, bit-phase flip, and phase flip) are analyzed. By analytical and numerical analyses we find that, contrary to what is usually stated in the literature, decoherence may occur without entanglement between the system and the environment. We also show that, in some cases, the bipartite quantum correlation initially present in the system is completely evaporated and not transferred to the environments.

  13. Enhanced genetic algorithm optimization model for a single reservoir operation based on hydropower generation: case study of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-Aqeeli, Yousif H; Lee, T S; Abd Aziz, S

    2016-01-01

    Achievement of the optimal hydropower generation from operation of water reservoirs, is a complex problems. The purpose of this study was to formulate and improve an approach of a genetic algorithm optimization model (GAOM) in order to increase the maximization of annual hydropower generation for a single reservoir. For this purpose, two simulation algorithms were drafted and applied independently in that GAOM during 20 scenarios (years) for operation of Mosul reservoir, northern Iraq. The first algorithm was based on the traditional simulation of reservoir operation, whilst the second algorithm (Salg) enhanced the GAOM by changing the population values of GA through a new simulation process of reservoir operation. The performances of these two algorithms were evaluated through the comparison of their optimal values of annual hydropower generation during the 20 scenarios of operating. The GAOM achieved an increase in hydropower generation in 17 scenarios using these two algorithms, with the Salg being superior in all scenarios. All of these were done prior adding the evaporation (Ev) and precipitation (Pr) to the water balance equation. Next, the GAOM using the Salg was applied by taking into consideration the volumes of these two parameters. In this case, the optimal values obtained from the GAOM were compared, firstly with their counterpart that found using the same algorithm without taking into consideration of Ev and Pr, secondly with the observed values. The first comparison showed that the optimal values obtained in this case decreased in all scenarios, whilst maintaining the good results compared with the observed in the second comparison. The results proved the effectiveness of the Salg in increasing the hydropower generation through the enhanced approach of the GAOM. In addition, the results indicated to the importance of taking into account the Ev and Pr in the modelling of reservoirs operation. PMID:27390638

  14. Morphological impact of river below dam due to reservoir desiltation operation in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H. W.; Lee, F. Z.; Lai, J. S.; Huang, C. C.; Kang, S. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The morphological impact of river below dams due to such reservoir desiltation operation was considered and Shihmen reservoir was adopted to discuss such issue due to the new sediment venting tunnel was implemented from 2013 in this study. The Shihmen reservoir had a natural drainage area of 762.4 km2 and located at the northern Taiwan. Due to serious sediment deposition problem from 2004 induced by Typhoon AERE, the stratified withdraw facility was built at dam site to avoid the lack of public water and the one of venting tunnel of power plant was designed to vent turbidity current (Fig. 1(a)). In 2013, the sediment venting tunnel was first operated during Typhoon Soulik and abundant sediment was released to the downstream river. The 2D numerical model with sediment transport consideration was adopted to investigate morphological impact of downstream river, especially at Jiangzicui area in Fig. 1(b). Due to ecological wet land, flood diversion work and ferry boat transportation were concentrated in this area, the sediment transportation and morphological impact is important to be realized. The Fig. 1(b) shows the original morphological bed form before sediment releasing from sediment venting tunnel and Fig. 1(c) shows the simulation results after sediment releasing from sediment venting. It seems 0.2 m morphological changing due to this operation. Fig. 1(d) is the field morphological survey after Typhoon Soulik and comparison to Fig. 1 (b), not significantly deposition or erosion is observed. According to the grain size of released sediment from Shihmen reservoir, d50 is approximately 10 μm and it is belonged to fine sediment. Therefore, the released sediment is classified clay and for the morphological impact is not significantly. So, morphological impact of downstream river below Shihmen dam due to reservoir desiltation operation is unapparent after Typhoon Soulik at Jiangzicui area. Keywords: venting tunnel, turbid current, morphological impact, 2D numerical

  15. An Analytical Method for Deriving Reservoir Operation Curves to Maximize Social Benefits from Multiple Uses of Water in the Willamette River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. M.; Jaeger, W. K.; Jones, J. A.

    2013-12-01

    A central characteristic of large river basins in the western US is the spatial and temporal disjunction between the supply of and demand for water. Water sources are typically concentrated in forested mountain regions distant from municipal and agricultural water users, while precipitation is super-abundant in winter and deficient in summer. To cope with these disparities, systems of reservoirs have been constructed throughout the West. These reservoir systems are managed to serve two main competing purposes: to control flooding during winter and spring, and to store spring runoff and deliver it to populated, agricultural valleys during the summer. The reservoirs also provide additional benefits, including recreation, hydropower and instream flows for stream ecology. Since the storage capacity of the reservoirs cannot be used for both flood control and storage at the same time, these uses are traded-off during spring, as the most important, or dominant use of the reservoir, shifts from buffering floods to storing water for summer use. This tradeoff is expressed in the operations rule curve, which specifies the maximum level to which a reservoir can be filled throughout the year, apart from real-time flood operations. These rule curves were often established at the time a reservoir was built. However, climate change and human impacts may be altering the timing and amplitude of flood events and water scarcity is expected to intensify with anticipated changes in climate, land cover and population. These changes imply that reservoir management using current rule curves may not match future societal values for the diverse uses of water from reservoirs. Despite a broad literature on mathematical optimization for reservoir operation, these methods are not often used because they 1) simplify the hydrologic system, raising doubts about the real-world applicability of the solutions, 2) exhibit perfect foresight and assume stationarity, whereas reservoir operators face

  16. Operating systems. [of computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.; Brown, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A counter operating system creates a hierarchy of levels of abstraction, so that at a given level all details concerning lower levels can be ignored. This hierarchical structure separates functions according to their complexity, characteristic time scale, and level of abstraction. The lowest levels include the system's hardware; concepts associated explicitly with the coordination of multiple tasks appear at intermediate levels, which conduct 'primitive processes'. Software semaphore is the mechanism controlling primitive processes that must be synchronized. At higher levels lie, in rising order, the access to the secondary storage devices of a particular machine, a 'virtual memory' scheme for managing the main and secondary memories, communication between processes by way of a mechanism called a 'pipe', access to external input and output devices, and a hierarchy of directories cataloguing the hardware and software objects to which access must be controlled.

  17. A spatial assessment of hydrologic alteration caused by dams in the Northeastern United States using a Neural Network based daily reservoir operation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehsani, N.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Fekete, B. M.; Rosenzweig, B.; Tessler, Z. D.

    2014-12-01

    Considering the impacts of dams on natural hydrology and ecosystems, it is important to be able to simulate their behavior and effects in hydrological and ecological models. Overlooking human engineering of river systems may significantly affect modelling results and impact decisions addressing water management issues. Simulating reservoir operation at the regional and global scale remains a challenge in water resource and environmental science. There are numerous studies that model the operating rules of a single or small cluster of dams based on available observed data or that try to find an optimized set of rules for their operation based on their characteristics and intended purpose. On the other hand, there are few works that consider the operation of dams for regional and global hydrological models. One major problem in modeling dams operation in such large-scale systems is the lack of efficient algorithms for modelling reservoir operation. Depending on site-specific characteristics of the dam, its watershed and its intended purpose, each dam has a specific and optimum operating rule; as a result, effective simulation of their operation is not a trivial task when hundreds and thousands of dams exist in the area of study. As part of the development of the Northeast Regional Earth System Model (NE-RESM), we are developing an integrated hydrological modeling framework that incorporates various aspects of the coupled human-hydrologic system, from supply to demand, into a single framework. We use an Artificial Neural Network to develop an accurate yet generalized daily operating rule with minimal input requirements that is suitable for use in large scale hydrological models. We implement this reservoir operating scheme into WBMplus and study how dams alter natural hydrology of the Northeastern United States. We also show how climate change impacts the operation of reservoirs and hence availability of water in the region by the end of the 21st century.

  18. Better Redd than Dead: Optimizing Reservoir Operations for Wild Fish Survival During Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, L. E.; Lund, J. R.; Quiñones, R.

    2014-12-01

    Extreme droughts are difficult to predict and may incur large economic and ecological costs. Dam operations in drought usually consider minimizing economic costs. However, dam operations also offer an opportunity to increase wild fish survival under difficult conditions. Here, we develop a probabilistic optimization approach to developing reservoir release schedules to maximize fish survival in regulated rivers. A case study applies the approach to wild Fall-run Chinook Salmon below Folsom Dam on California's American River. Our results indicate that releasing more water early in the drought will, on average, save more wild fish over the long term.

  19. Reducing the Need for Accurate Stream Flow Forecasting for Water Supply Planning by Augmenting Reservoir Operations with Seawater Desalination and Wastewater Recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, R.; Ng, T. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate stream flow forecasts are critical for reservoir operations for water supply planning. As the world urban population increases, the demand for water in cities is also increasing, making accurate forecasts even more important. However, accurate forecasting of stream flows is difficult owing to short- and long-term weather variations. We propose to reduce this need for accurate stream flow forecasts by augmenting reservoir operations with seawater desalination and wastewater recycling. We develop a robust operating policy for the joint operation of the three sources. With the joint model, we tap into the unlimited reserve of seawater through desalination, and make use of local supplies of wastewater through recycling. However, both seawater desalination and recycling are energy intensive and relatively expensive. Reservoir water on the other hand, is generally cheaper but is limited and variable in its availability, increasing the risk of water shortage during extreme climate events. We operate the joint system by optimizing it using a genetic algorithm to maximize water supply reliability and resilience while minimizing vulnerability subject to a budget constraint and for a given stream flow forecast. To compute the total cost of the system, we take into account the pumping cost of transporting reservoir water to its final destination, and the capital and operating costs of desalinating seawater and recycling wastewater. We produce results for different hydro climatic regions based on artificial stream flows we generate using a simple hydrological model and an autoregressive time series model. The artificial flows are generated from precipitation and temperature data from the Canadian Regional Climate model for present and future scenarios. We observe that the joint operation is able to effectively minimize the negative effects of stream flow forecast uncertainty on system performance at an overall cost that is not significantly greater than the cost of a

  20. Analysis of information systems for hydropower operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, R. L.; Becker, L.; Estes, J.; Simonett, D.; Yeh, W. W. G.

    1976-01-01

    The operations of hydropower systems were analyzed with emphasis on water resource management, to determine how aerospace derived information system technologies can increase energy output. Better utilization of water resources was sought through improved reservoir inflow forecasting based on use of hydrometeorologic information systems with new or improved sensors, satellite data relay systems, and use of advanced scheduling techniques for water release. Specific mechanisms for increased energy output were determined, principally the use of more timely and accurate short term (0-7 days) inflow information to reduce spillage caused by unanticipated dynamic high inflow events. The hydrometeorologic models used in predicting inflows were examined to determine the sensitivity of inflow prediction accuracy to the many variables employed in the models, and the results used to establish information system requirements. Sensor and data handling system capabilities were reviewed and compared to the requirements, and an improved information system concept outlined.

  1. Aircraft Operations Classification System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlow, Charles; Zhu, Weihong

    2001-01-01

    Accurate data is important in the aviation planning process. In this project we consider systems for measuring aircraft activity at airports. This would include determining the type of aircraft such as jet, helicopter, single engine, and multiengine propeller. Some of the issues involved in deploying technologies for monitoring aircraft operations are cost, reliability, and accuracy. In addition, the system must be field portable and acceptable at airports. A comparison of technologies was conducted and it was decided that an aircraft monitoring system should be based upon acoustic technology. A multimedia relational database was established for the study. The information contained in the database consists of airport information, runway information, acoustic records, photographic records, a description of the event (takeoff, landing), aircraft type, and environmental information. We extracted features from the time signal and the frequency content of the signal. A multi-layer feed-forward neural network was chosen as the classifier. Training and testing results were obtained. We were able to obtain classification results of over 90 percent for training and testing for takeoff events.

  2. The Bakken-An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect

    Sarg, Frederick

    2012-03-01

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. Results from the lithofacies, mineral, and fracture analyses of this study were used to construct a dual porosity Petrel geo-model for a portion of the Elm Coulee Field. In this field, dolomitization enhances reservoir porosity and permeability. First year cumulative production helps locate areas of high well productivity and in deriving fracture swarm distribution. A fracture model was developed based on high productivity well distribution, and regional fracture distribution, and was combined with favorable matrix properties to build a dual porosity geo-model.

  3. GestAqua.AdaPT - Mediterranean river basin modeling and reservoir operation strategies for climate change adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre Diogo, Paulo; Nunes, João Pedro; Marco, Machado; Aal, Carlo; Carmona Rodrigues, António; Beça, Pedro; Casanova Lino, Rafael; Rocha, João; Carvalho Santos, Cláudia

    2016-04-01

    Climate change (CC) scenarios for the Mediterranean region include an increase in the frequency and intensity of extreme weather events such as drought periods. higher average temperatures and evapotranspiration, combined with the decrease of annual precipitation may strongly affect the sustainability of water resources. In face of these risks, improving water management actions? by anticipating necessary operational measures is required to insure water quantity and quality according to the needs of the populations and irrigation in agriculture. This is clearly the case of the Alentejo region, southern Portugal, where present climatic conditions already pose significant challenges to water resources stakeholders, mainly from the agricultural and the urban supply sectors. With this in mind, the GestAqua.AdaPT project is underway during 2015 and 2016, aiming at analyzing CC impacts until 2100 and develop operational procedures to ensure water needs are adequately satisfied in the Monte Novo and Vigia reservoirs, which supply water for the city of Évora and nearby irrigation systems. Specific project objectives include: a) defining management and operational adaptation strategies aiming to ensure resource sustainability, both quantitatively and qualitatively; b) evaluate future potential costs and available alternatives to the regional water transfer infrastructure linked with the large Alqueva reservoir implemented in 2011; c) defining CC adaptation strategies to reduce irrigation water needs and d) identification of CC adaptation strategies which can be suitable also to other similar water supply systems. The methodology is centered on the implementation of a cascade of modeling tools, allowing the integrated simulation of the multiple variables under analysis. The project is based on CC scenarios resulting from the CORDEX project for 10 combinations of Global and regional climate models (GCMs and RCMs). The study follows by using two of these combinations

  4. Operating multireservoir hydropower systems for downstream water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    Hydropower reservoir operations often impact tailwater quality and water quality in the stream or river below the impoundment for many miles. Determining optimal operating strategies for a system of hydropower reservoirs involves solving a highly dimensional nonlinear, nonconvex optimization problem. This research adds the additional complexities of downstream water quality considerations within the optimization formulation to determine operating strategies for a system of hydropower reservoirs operating in series (tandem) or parallel. The formulation was used to determine operating strategies for six reservoirs of the upper Cumberland river basin in Tennessee and Kentucky. Significant dissolved oxygen (DO) violations occur just upstream of Nashville, Tennessee below Old Hickory dam during the months of August and September. Daily reservoir releases were determined for the period of June through September which would produce the maximum hydropower revenue while meeting downstream water quality objectives. Optimal releases for three operational strategies were compared to historical operations for the years 1985, 1986, and 1988. These strategies included: spilling as necessary to meet water quality criteria, near normal operation (minimal spills), and drawdown of reservoirs as necessary to meet criteria without spills. Optimization results showed an 8% to 15% hydropower loss may be necessary to meet water quality criteria through spills and a 2% to 9% improvement in DO below Old Hickory may be possible without significant spills. Results also showed that substantial increases in initial headwater elevations would be necessary to meet daily DO criteria and avoid spills. The optimal control theory algorithm used to solve the problem proved to be an efficient and robust solver of this large optimization problem.

  5. Negotiating designs of multi-purpose reservoir systems in international basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geressu, Robel; Harou, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Given increasing agricultural and energy demands, coordinated management of multi-reservoir systems could help increase production without further stressing available water resources. However, regional or international disputes about water-use rights pose a challenge to efficient expansion and management of many large reservoir systems. Even when projects are likely to benefit all stakeholders, agreeing on the design, operation, financing, and benefit sharing can be challenging. This is due to the difficulty of considering multiple stakeholder interests in the design of projects and understanding the benefit trade-offs that designs imply. Incommensurate performance metrics, incomplete knowledge on system requirements, lack of objectivity in managing conflict and difficulty to communicate complex issue exacerbate the problem. This work proposes a multi-step hybrid multi-objective optimization and multi-criteria ranking approach for supporting negotiation in water resource systems. The approach uses many-objective optimization to generate alternative efficient designs and reveal the trade-offs between conflicting objectives. This enables informed elicitation of criteria weights for further multi-criteria ranking of alternatives. An ideal design would be ranked as best by all stakeholders. Resource-sharing mechanisms such as power-trade and/or cost sharing may help competing stakeholders arrive at designs acceptable to all. Many-objective optimization helps suggests efficient designs (reservoir site, its storage size and operating rule) and coordination levels considering the perspectives of multiple stakeholders simultaneously. We apply the proposed approach to a proof-of-concept study of the expansion of the Blue Nile transboundary reservoir system.

  6. Real-time Reservoir Operation Based on a Combination of Long-term and Short-term Optimization and Hydrological Ensemble Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, P.; Tilmant, A.; Boucher, M.; Anctil, F.

    2012-12-01

    In a reservoir system, benefits are usually increased if the system is operated in a coordinated manner. However, despite ever increasing computational power available to users, the optimization of a large system of reservoirs and hydropower stations remains a challenge, especially if uncertainties are included. When applying optimization methods, such as stochastic dynamic programming, the size of a problem becomes quickly too large to be solved. This situation is also known as the curse of dimensionality which limits the applicability of SDP to systems involving only two to three reservoirs. The fact that by design most reservoirs serve multiple purposes adds another difficulty when the operation is to be optimized. A method which is able to address the optimization of multi-purpose reservoirs even in large systems is stochastic dual dynamic programming (SDDP). This approximative dynamic programming technique represents the future benefit function with a number of hyperplanes. The SDDP model developed in this study maximizes the expected net benefits associated with the operation of a reservoir system on a midterm horizon (several years, monthly time step). SDDP provides, at each time step, estimates of the marginal water value stored in each reservoir. Reservoir operators, however, are interested in day-to-day decisions. To provide an operational optimization framework tailored for short-term decision support, the SDDP optimization can be coupled with a short-term nonlinear programming optimization using hydrological ensemble forecasts. The short-term objective therefore consists of the total electricity production within the forecast horizon and the total value of water stored in all the reservoirs. Thus, maximizing this objective ensures that a short-term decision does not contradict the strategic planning. This optimization framework is implemented for the Gatineau river basin, a sub-basin of the Ottawa river north of the city of Ottawa. The Gatineau river

  7. Scale-up in Poroelastic System and Applications to Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Berryman, J G

    2003-07-01

    A fundamental problem of heterogeneous systems is that the macroscale behavior is not necessarily well-described by equations familiar to us at the meso- or microscale. In relatively simple cases like electrical conduction and elasticity, it is hue that the equations describing macroscale behavior take the same form as those at the microscale. But in more complex systems, these simple results do not hold. Consider fluid flow in porous media where the microscale behavior is well-described by Navier-Stokes' equations for liquid in the pores while the macroscale behavior instead obeys Darcy's equation. Rigorous methods for establishing the form of such equations for macroscale behavior include multiscale homogenization methods and also the volume averaging method. In addition, it has been shown that Biot's equations of poroelasticity follow in a scale-up of the microscale equations of elasticity coupled to Navier-Stokes. Laboratory measurements have shown that Biot's equations indeed hold for simple systems but heterogeneous systems can have quite different behavior. So the question arises whether there is yet another level of scale-up needed to arrive at equations valid for the reservoir scale? And if so, do these equations take the form of Biot's equations or some other form? We will discuss these issues and show that the double-porosity equations play a special role in the scale-up to equations describing reservoir behavior, for fluid pumping, geomechanics, as well as seismic wave propagation.

  8. Risk analyses for a water-supply system; Occoquan Reservoir, Fairfax and Prince William Counties, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hirsch, Robert M.

    1978-01-01

    Two techniques for evaluation risks in the operation of a water-supply system are demonstrated. Both rely on reconstructed historical streamflow data to develop estimates of the probabilities of certain specific events occurring in the future. These techniques are applied to the Occoquan Reservoir in Fairfax and Prince William Counties, Va., which was experiencing an unprecedented low level of storage in the autumn of 1977. In the first technique, the general risk analysis model (GRAM), simulations of the reservoir 's contents are carried out under a set of assumptions about withdrawal rates and emergency procedures. The results of the GRAM simulation for the Occoquan Reservoir are in the form of estimates of the probabilities that in any year certain emergency procedures will have to be invoked. These estimates are given for a range of rates of withdrawals and for four different stages of emergency actions. The second technique is position analysis. In this procedure probability distributions of future storages are estimated under existing storage conditions and an assumed rate of withdrawal from the reservoir. The position analysis which was initialized at the October 1, 1977, conditions indicates that the probability of entering a Stage III emergency (the prohibition of all uses of water nonessential to life, health, and safety) in the autumn of 1977 or winter of 1978 was 10 percent at that time. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. DYNAMIC RESPONSE OF STREAM TEMPERATURES TO BOUNDARY AND INFLOW PERTURBATION DUE TO RESERVOIR OPERATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2008-05-01

    Dams and reservoir operations modify natural stream behaviour and affect the downstream characteristics such as mean temperatures and diurnal temperature amplitudes. Managing phase effects due to reservoir operation and the associated amplification of daily maximum temperatures in the downstream reaches remains a challenge. An analytical approach derived from a one-dimensional heat advection and dispersion equation with surface heating in the form of equilibrium temperature was developed to examine the potential for restoration of natural stream temperatures. The analytical model was validated with observed temperature data collected in the Clackamas River, Oregon, and was used to highlight key downstream temperature behaviour characteristics. Mean stream temperatures below the dam are relatively stable and upon deviating from natural stream mean temperatures, return asymptotically to their natural state. In contrast, the amplitudes of daily temperature variation are highly sensitive to the phase differences induced by the dam and could nearly double in natural amplitude within the first 24 h. The analysis showed that restoring average stream temperatures to natural levels through structural and operational modifications at the dam may not be sufficient as phase-induced temperatures maximums would continue to persist

  10. Strategies to diagnose and control microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.A.; Derr, R.M.; Pope, D.H.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen sulfide production (souring) in natural gas storage reservoirs and produced water systems is a safety and environmental problem that can lead to operational shutdown when local hydrogen sulfide standards are exceeded. Systems affected by microbial souring have historically been treated using biocides that target the general microbial community. However, requirements for more environmentally friendly solutions have led to treatment strategies in which sulfide production can be controlled with minimal impact to the system and environment. Some of these strategies are based on microbial and/or nutritional augmentation of the sour environment. Through research sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) in Chicago, Illinois, methods have been developed for early detection of microbial souring in natural gas storage reservoirs, and a variety of mitigation strategies have been evaluated. The effectiveness of traditional biocide treatment in gas storage reservoirs was shown to depend heavily on the methods by which the chemical is applied. An innovative strategy using nitrate was tested and proved ideal for produced water and wastewater systems. Another strategy using elemental iodine was effective for sulfide control in evaporation ponds and is currently being tested in microbially sour natural gas storage wells.

  11. Evaluating Geothermal Potential in Germany by Numerical Reservoir Modeling of Engineered Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Charitra; Vogt, Christian; Clauser, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    We model hypothetical Engineered Geothermal System (EGS) reservoirs by solving coupled partial differential equations governing fluid flow and heat transport. Building on EGS's strengths of inherent modularity and storage capability, it is possible to implement multiple wells in the reservoir to extend the rock volume accessible for circulating water in order to increase the heat yield. By varying parameters like flow rates and well-separations in the subsurface, this study looks at their long-term impacts on the reservoir development. This approach allows us to experiment with different placements of the engineered fractures and propose several EGS layouts for achieving optimized heat extraction. Considering the available crystalline area and accounting for the competing land uses, this study evaluates the overall EGS potential and compares it with those of other used renewables in Germany. There is enough area to support 13450 EGS plants, each with six reversed-triplets (18 wells) and an average electric power of 35.3MWe. When operated at full capacity, these systems can collectively supply 4155TWh of electric energy in one year which would be roughly six times the electric energy produced in Germany in the year 2011. Engineered Geothermal Systems make a compelling case for contributing towards national power production in a future powered by a sustainable, decentralized energy system.

  12. System-reservoir theory with anharmonic baths: a perturbative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadra, Chitrak; Banerjee, Dhruba

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we develop the formalism of a general system coupled to a reservoir (the words ‘bath’ and ‘reservoir’ will be used interchangeably) consisting of nonlinear oscillators, based on perturbation theory at the classical level, by extending the standard Zwanzig approach of elimination of bath degrees of freedom order by order in perturbation. We observe that the fluctuation dissipation relation (FDR) of the second kind in its standard form for harmonic baths gets modified due to the nonlinearity and this is manifested through higher powers of {{k}\\text{B}}T in the expression for two-time noise correlation. On the flip side, this very modification allows us to define a dressed (renormalized) system-bath coupling that depends on the temperature and the nonlinear parameters of the bath in such a way that the structure of the FDR (of the second kind) is maintained. As an aside, we also observe that the first moment of the noise arising from a nonlinear bath can be non-zero, even in the absence of any external drive, if the reservoir potential is asymmetric with respect to one of its minima, about which one builds up the perturbation theory.

  13. A multiprocessor operating system simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, G.M.; Campbell, R.H. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT and T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the Choices family of operating systems for loosely and tightly coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  14. A Multiprocessor Operating System Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gary M.; Campbell, Roy H.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes a multiprocessor operating system simulator that was developed by the authors in the Fall semester of 1987. The simulator was built in response to the need to provide students with an environment in which to build and test operating system concepts as part of the coursework of a third-year undergraduate operating systems course. Written in C++, the simulator uses the co-routine style task package that is distributed with the AT&T C++ Translator to provide a hierarchy of classes that represents a broad range of operating system software and hardware components. The class hierarchy closely follows that of the 'Choices' family of operating systems for loosely- and tightly-coupled multiprocessors. During an operating system course, these classes are refined and specialized by students in homework assignments to facilitate experimentation with different aspects of operating system design and policy decisions. The current implementation runs on the IBM RT PC under 4.3bsd UNIX.

  15. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report for Lower Watts Bar Reservoir Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    This document is the combined Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study Report for the lower Watts Bar Reservoir (LWBR) Operable Unit (OU). The LWBR is located in Roane, Rhea, and Meigs counties, Tennessee, and consists of Watts Bar Reservoir downstream of the Clinch river. This area has received hazardous substances released over a period of 50 years from the US Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), a National Priority List site established under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). As required by this law, the ORR and all off-site areas that have received contaminants, including LWBR, must be investigated to determine the risk to human health and the environment resulting from these releases, the need for any remedial action to reduce these risks, and the remedial actions that are most feasible for implementation in this OU. Contaminants from the ORR are primarily transported to the LWBR via the Clinch River. There is little data regarding the quantities of most contaminants potentially released from the ORR to the Clinch River, particularly for the early years of ORR operations. Estimates of the quantities released during this period are available for most radionuclides and some inorganic contaminants, indicating that releases 30 to 50 years ago were much higher than today. Since the early 1970s, the release of potential contaminants has been monitored for compliance with environmental law and reported in the annual environmental monitoring reports for the ORR.

  16. Reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tezuka, Miwa; Kanno, Kazutaka; Bunsen, Masatoshi

    2016-08-01

    Reservoir computing is a machine-learning paradigm based on information processing in the human brain. We numerically demonstrate reservoir computing with a slowly modulated mask signal for preprocessing by using a mutually coupled optoelectronic system. The performance of our system is quantitatively evaluated by a chaotic time series prediction task. Our system can produce comparable performance with reservoir computing with a single feedback system and a fast modulated mask signal. We showed that it is possible to slow down the modulation speed of the mask signal by using the mutually coupled system in reservoir computing.

  17. SPECTR System Operational Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    W.H. Landman Jr.

    2011-08-01

    This report overviews installation of the Small Pressure Cycling Test Rig (SPECTR) and documents the system operational testing performed to demonstrate that it meets the requirements for operations. The system operational testing involved operation of the furnace system to the design conditions and demonstration of the test article gas supply system using a simulated test article. The furnace and test article systems were demonstrated to meet the design requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Therefore, the system is deemed acceptable and is ready for actual test article testing.

  18. Two Monthly Continuous Dynamic Model Based on Nash Bargaining Theory for Conflict Resolution in Reservoir System

    PubMed Central

    Homayounfar, Mehran; Zomorodian, Mehdi; Martinez, Christopher J.; Lai, Sai Hin

    2015-01-01

    So far many optimization models based on Nash Bargaining Theory associated with reservoir operation have been developed. Most of them have aimed to provide practical and efficient solutions for water allocation in order to alleviate conflicts among water users. These models can be discussed from two viewpoints: (i) having a discrete nature; and (ii) working on an annual basis. Although discrete dynamic game models provide appropriate reservoir operator policies, their discretization of variables increases the run time and causes dimensionality problems. In this study, two monthly based non-discrete optimization models based on the Nash Bargaining Solution are developed for a reservoir system. In the first model, based on constrained state formulation, the first and second moments (mean and variance) of the state variable (water level in the reservoir) is calculated. Using moment equations as the constraint, the long-term utility of the reservoir manager and water users are optimized. The second model is a dynamic approach structured based on continuous state Markov decision models. The corresponding solution based on the collocation method is structured for a reservoir system. In this model, the reward function is defined based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Indeed, it is used to yield equilibrium in every proper sub-game, thereby satisfying the Markov perfect equilibrium. Both approaches are applicable for water allocation in arid and semi-arid regions. A case study was carried out at the Zayandeh-Rud river basin located in central Iran to identify the effectiveness of the presented methods. The results are compared with the results of an annual form of dynamic game, a classical stochastic dynamic programming model (e.g. Bayesian Stochastic Dynamic Programming model, BSDP), and a discrete stochastic dynamic game model (PSDNG). By comparing the results of alternative methods, it is shown that both models are capable of tackling conflict issues in water allocation

  19. Two Monthly Continuous Dynamic Model Based on Nash Bargaining Theory for Conflict Resolution in Reservoir System.

    PubMed

    Homayounfar, Mehran; Zomorodian, Mehdi; Martinez, Christopher J; Lai, Sai Hin

    2015-01-01

    So far many optimization models based on Nash Bargaining Theory associated with reservoir operation have been developed. Most of them have aimed to provide practical and efficient solutions for water allocation in order to alleviate conflicts among water users. These models can be discussed from two viewpoints: (i) having a discrete nature; and (ii) working on an annual basis. Although discrete dynamic game models provide appropriate reservoir operator policies, their discretization of variables increases the run time and causes dimensionality problems. In this study, two monthly based non-discrete optimization models based on the Nash Bargaining Solution are developed for a reservoir system. In the first model, based on constrained state formulation, the first and second moments (mean and variance) of the state variable (water level in the reservoir) is calculated. Using moment equations as the constraint, the long-term utility of the reservoir manager and water users are optimized. The second model is a dynamic approach structured based on continuous state Markov decision models. The corresponding solution based on the collocation method is structured for a reservoir system. In this model, the reward function is defined based on the Nash Bargaining Solution. Indeed, it is used to yield equilibrium in every proper sub-game, thereby satisfying the Markov perfect equilibrium. Both approaches are applicable for water allocation in arid and semi-arid regions. A case study was carried out at the Zayandeh-Rud river basin located in central Iran to identify the effectiveness of the presented methods. The results are compared with the results of an annual form of dynamic game, a classical stochastic dynamic programming model (e.g. Bayesian Stochastic Dynamic Programming model, BSDP), and a discrete stochastic dynamic game model (PSDNG). By comparing the results of alternative methods, it is shown that both models are capable of tackling conflict issues in water allocation

  20. Transportation System Concept of Operations

    SciTech Connect

    N. Slater-Thompson

    2006-08-16

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, authorized the DOE to develop and manage a Federal system for the disposal of SNF and HLW. OCRWM was created to manage acceptance and disposal of SNF and HLW in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. This responsibility includes managing the transportation of SNF and HLW from origin sites to the Repository for disposal. The Transportation System Concept of Operations is the core high-level OCRWM document written to describe the Transportation System integrated design and present the vision, mission, and goals for Transportation System operations. By defining the functions, processes, and critical interfaces of this system early in the system development phase, programmatic risks are minimized, system costs are contained, and system operations are better managed, safer, and more secure. This document also facilitates discussions and understanding among parties responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Transportation System. Such understanding is important for the timely development of system requirements and identification of system interfaces. Information provided in the Transportation System Concept of Operations includes: the functions and key components of the Transportation System; system component interactions; flows of information within the system; the general operating sequences; and the internal and external factors affecting transportation operations. The Transportation System Concept of Operations reflects OCRWM's overall waste management system policies and mission objectives, and as such provides a description of the preferred state of system operation. The description of general Transportation System operating functions in the Transportation System Concept of Operations is the first step in the OCRWM systems engineering process, establishing the starting point for the lower level

  1. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P.

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  2. Relationship between Dongting Lake and surrounding rivers under the operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Lucheng; Chen, Jiansheng; Zhang, Shiyin; Huang, Dewen; Li, Ling

    2015-01-01

    The natural flow properties of the Yangtze River have been changed completely following the construction of the Three Gorges Dam. The dam's operation has affected the resources and environment in the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River, changing the hydrological conditions and ecological environment of the Dongting Lake. During three different dispatching periods of the reservoir, we took triplicate samples of the river and lake water. All the samples were analysed for δ(2)H and δ(18)O to determine the relationship between the lake and the Yangtze River (and other rivers), and to evaluate objectively the influence of the dam's operation on the lake. During the period of water-supply dispatch, the Four Rivers and Miluo River are the main recharge sources of the lake. During the flood-storage dispatching period, the Dongting Lake is recharged largely by the Three Outlets and the Four Rivers, whereas during the period of water-storage dispatch, most of the lake's water originates from the Miluo, Xiang, Zi, and Yuan rivers. Although the Yangtze River only contributes significantly to the lake's recharge through the Three Outlets during the flood-storage dispatching period, the lake discharges large amounts of water into the Yangtze River during all three periods. Through the operation of the reservoir, it should be ensured that the water level of the Dongting Lake is not too low during the dry season, nor too high during the wet season, thus preventing the lake region from future flood and drought disasters. PMID:25780859

  3. NORAD operational system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brach, D.

    1985-01-01

    There are three aspects to the Space Defense Mission: satellite surveillance, satellite protection and satellite negation. The focus of this report is on space surveillance and detection as currently accomplished by both ground and space based assets. The evolution of the space surveillance system is described. The characteristics of the current space surveillance system are also described.

  4. Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yanchik, Nicholas J.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the concept of the Operating System Abstraction Layer (OSAL) and its benefits. The OSAL is A small layer of software that allows programs to run on many different operating systems and hardware platforms It runs independent of the underlying OS & hardware and it is self-contained. The benefits of OSAL are that it removes dependencies from any one operating system, promotes portable, reusable flight software. It allows for Core Flight software (FSW) to be built for multiple processors and operating systems. The presentation discusses the functionality, the various OSAL releases, and describes the specifications.

  5. Mineral trapping of CO2 in operated geothermal reservoirs - Numerical simulations on various scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Michael; Stanjek, Helge; Peiffer, Stefan; Clauser, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    the combination of geothermal energy production and CO2 storage is not economical. Acknowledgements: The work presented here was part of the CO2Trap project in the research and development program GEOTECHNOLOGIEN funded by the German Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the German Research Foundation (DFG) (grant 03G0614A-C). References Back M., Kühn M., Stanjek H., Peiffer S. (2008) Reactivity of alkaline lignite fly ashes towards CO2 in water. Environmental Science & Technology 42(12), 4520-4526, doi: 10.1021/es702760v. Kühn M., Clauser C. (2006) Mineral trapping of CO2 in geothermal reservoirs. Chemie Ingenieur Technik 78(4), 425-434, doi: 10.1002/cite.200600019 (in German). Kühn M., Clauser C., Vosbeck K., Stanjek H., Meyn V., Back M., Peiffer S. (2009) Mineral trapping of CO2 in operated hydrogeothermal reservoirs. In: Grobe M., Pashin J. C., Dodge R. L. (eds.) Carbon dioxide sequestration in geological media—State of the science: AAPG Studies in Geology 59, p. 545-552.

  6. Detection of the water reservoir in a forming planetary system.

    PubMed

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Bergin, Edwin A; Brinch, Christian; Cleeves, L Ilsedore; Fogel, Jeffrey K J; Blake, Geoffrey A; Dominik, Carsten; Lis, Dariusz C; Melnick, Gary; Neufeld, David; Panić, Olja; Pearson, John C; Kristensen, Lars; Yildiz, Umut A; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2011-10-21

    Icy bodies may have delivered the oceans to the early Earth, yet little is known about water in the ice-dominated regions of extrasolar planet-forming disks. The Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared on board the Herschel Space Observatory has detected emission lines from both spin isomers of cold water vapor from the disk around the young star TW Hydrae. This water vapor likely originates from ice-coated solids near the disk surface, hinting at a water ice reservoir equivalent to several thousand Earth oceans in mass. The water's ortho-to-para ratio falls well below that of solar system comets, suggesting that comets contain heterogeneous ice mixtures collected across the entire solar nebula during the early stages of planetary birth. PMID:22021851

  7. The embedded operating system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    This progress report describes research towards the design and construction of embedded operating systems for real-time advanced aerospace applications. The applications concerned require reliable operating system support that must accommodate networks of computers. The report addresses the problems of constructing such operating systems, the communications media, reconfiguration, consistency and recovery in a distributed system, and the issues of realtime processing. A discussion is included on suitable theoretical foundations for the use of atomic actions to support fault tolerance and data consistency in real-time object-based systems. In particular, this report addresses: atomic actions, fault tolerance, operating system structure, program development, reliability and availability, and networking issues. This document reports the status of various experiments designed and conducted to investigate embedded operating system design issues.

  8. Evaporation from seven reservoirs in the Denver water-supply system, central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ficke, John F.; Adams, D. Briane; Danielson, T.W.

    1977-01-01

    Seven reservoirs in central Colorado, operated by the Denver Board of Water Commissioners, were studied during 1967-73 to determine evaporation losses. These reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, Gross, Antero, Cheesman, Williams Fork, and Ralston, are located on both sides of the Continental Divide. Methods for computing evaporation include energy-budget, mass-transfer, and pan relationships. Three reservoirs, Elevenmile Canyon, Dillon, and Gross, had mass-transfer coefficients calibrated by energy-budget studies. At the remaining reservoirs, an empirical technique was used to estimate the mass-transfer coefficient. The enery-budget-calibrated methods give the most accurate evaporation values; the empirical coefficients give only a best estimate of evaporation. All reservoirs should be calibrated by energy-budget studies. The pan method of computing evaporation is the least reliable method because of problems of advected energy through the sides of the pan, representative pan exposure , and the irregularity of ratios of reservoir to pan evaporation. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. A Descriptive Decision Process Model for Hierarchical Management of Interconnected Reservoir Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adigüzel, R. Ä.°Lker; CoşKunoǧLu, Osman

    1984-07-01

    A significant limitation of prescriptive optimization models is that their formulation is disassociated from the behavioral and organizational attributes of the problem addressed. In an attempt to alleviate this limitation a decision process model is formulated directly within a framework of decision agents involved in integrated long- and short-term planning and management of multipurpose and multireservoir system operations. The resulting model is ierarchical, multilevel, multilayer, and decentralized. As such it is descriptive of a reservoir system managed and operated by geographically separated multiple agents with different authorities and responsibilities. Robustness and performance of the model is investigated by using the Shasta-Trinity system of California as an example. Results are encouraging for the descriptive as well as prescriptive relevance of the model.

  10. The Heritage of the Operational Usda/nasa Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkett, C. M.; Beckley, B. D.; Reynolds, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite radar altimetry has the ability to monitor variations in surface water height for large lakes and reservoirs. A clear advantage is the provision of data where in situ data are lacking or where there is restricted access to ground-based measurements. A USDA/NASA funded program is performing altimetric monitoring of the largest lakes and reservoirs around the world. The near-real time height measurements are currently derived from NASA/CNES Jason-2/OSTM mission data. Archived data are also utilized from the NASA/CNES Topex/Poseidon and Jason-1 missions, the NRL GFO mission, and the ESA ENVISAT mission. Lake level products are output within 1-2 weeks after satellite overpass, a time delay which will improve to a few days as the project moves into its next phase. The USDA/FAS utilize the products for assessing irrigation potential (and thus crop production estimates), and for general observation of high-water status and short-term drought. Other end-users explore the products to study climate trends, observe anthropogenic effects, and to consider water management and regional security issues. This presentation explores the heritage of the Global Reservoir and Lake Monitor (GRLM) which has its origins in the field of ocean surface topography and the exploration of radar altimetry techniques over non-ocean surfaces. The current system closely follows the software design of the historical NASA Ocean Pathfinder Project and utilizes a global lakes catalogue that was created for climate change/aridity studies. The output of lake level products, imagery and information also echoes an earlier trial (UNDP-funded) lakes database which first offered altimetric products via the world wide web and which enabled world-wide interest to be both assessed and highlighted.;

  11. CO2/brine migrations in a laterally closed reservoir system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.; Han, W.; Lee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Geologic CO2 storage is considered as a promising solution for the mitigation of global CO2 emission levels. In assessing pressure and/or CO2 saturation distribution in a reservoir scale system, many studies have assumed that geologic formations consist of impermeable upper and lower boundaries to both supercritical CO2 and brine, and laterally open system. Under these conditions, the primary direction of brine flow is horizontal, as CO2 displaces the brine. However, in certain geologic situations, storage formation may laterally be compartmented due to presence of low-permeability zones creating a closed system. In this study we intended to assess the CO2/brine fluxes between the targeted storage formation and the upper and lower seals in a laterally closed reservoir system. The simulations were conducted using TOUGH2 with ECO2N module. A hypothetical two-dimensional radial model was designed to assess the spatial distribution of pressure build-up and the supercritical CO2 plume over time in a laterally closed system. The storage formation of 100 m thickness is radially extended to 10,000m and is located at 1,000 m below from the ground surface bounded by overlying and underlying seals of 100 m thickness. The CO2 injection rate was set to be 30 kg/s and the life-time of this hypothetical project was 30 years (10 years of injection followed by 20 years of monitoring period). The simulation results showed distinct CO2/brine flow regimes at three different zones; the dry-out zone, the two-phase zone, and the brine zone. At the dry-out zone, the direction of CO2 flux was from the storage formation toward the overlying and underlying seals while the brine flux was from the over- and underlying seals toward the storage formation. The CO2 and brine fluxes per unit area showed respectively up to 6×10-5 kg/s/m2 and 1×10-4 kg/s/m2 during the injection period, and decreased after injection ceased. At the two-phase zone, the CO2/brine migration was similar to that at dry

  12. Integrated oil and reservoir database system for geological and petroleum engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.Y.; Schneider, R.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Lake, L.W.

    1984-08-01

    As the data available to explorers and operators increase and when timeliness and accuracy of record keeping are of concern, the need for a more efficient data handling technique has prompted research in the application of database technology in the oil industry. In this thesis, a database is developed to cover areas in exploration, drilling, production, scout tickets and well logs. Salient characteristics of wells and reservoirs are investigated and a global structure is obtained. The relationship between well and reservoir is found to be a many-to-many type. Out of the three widely accepted data models (hierarchical, network, and relational), the relational model was chosen in our approach because of its easiness to use and ability to implement the many-to-many relationship. A set of criteria for evaluation of logical database design methodologies is presented and a modified entity-relationship approach is used. The global structure of the database is implemented in VAX/VMS INGRES, a commercial relational database management system. The database model and the data dictionary are tested through an application to the data of two reservoirs provided by Conoco Oil Inc. and Shell Oil Co. 88 references, 27 figures, 9 tables.

  13. Integrated oil and reservoir database system for geological and petroleum engineering. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.Y.; Schneider, R.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Lake, L.W.

    1984-12-01

    As the data available to explorers and operators increase and when timeliness and accuracy of record keeping are of concern, the need for a more efficient data handling technique has prompted research in the applications of database technology in the oil industry. In this thesis, a database is developed to cover areas in exploration, drilling, production, scout tickets and well logs. Salient characteristics of wells and reservoirs are investigated and a global structure is obtained. The relationship between well and reservoir is found to be a many-to-many type. Out of the three widely accepted data models (hierarchical, network, and relational), the relational model was chosen in our approach because of its easiness to use and ability to implement the many-to-many relationship. A set of criteria for evaluation of logical database design methodologies is presented and a modified entity-relationship approach is used. The global structure of the database is implemented in VAX/VMS INGRES, a commercial relational database management system. The database model and the data dictionary are tested through an application to the data of two reservoirs provided by Conoco Oil Inc. and Shell Oil Co. 88 references, 27 figures, 9 tables.

  14. The embedded operating system project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The design and construction of embedded operating systems for real-time advanced aerospace applications was investigated. The applications require reliable operating system support that must accommodate computer networks. Problems that arise in the construction of such operating systems, reconfiguration, consistency and recovery in a distributed system, and the issues of real-time processing are reported. A thesis that provides theoretical foundations for the use of atomic actions to support fault tolerance and data consistency in real-time object-based system is included. The following items are addressed: (1) atomic actions and fault-tolerance issues; (2) operating system structure; (3) program development; (4) a reliable compiler for path Pascal; and (5) mediators, a mechanism for scheduling distributed system processes.

  15. Modeling Multi-Reservoir Hydropower Systems in the Sierra Nevada with Environmental Requirements and Climate Warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rheinheimer, David Emmanuel

    generally well simulated, mostly limited by the accuracy of inflow hydrology. System-wide hydropower generation is reduced by 9% with 6 °C warming. Most reductions in hydropower generation occur in the highly productive watersheds in the northern Sierra Nevada. The central Sierra Nevada sees less reduction in annual runoff and can adapt better to changes in runoff timing. Generation in southern watersheds is expected to decrease. System-wide, reservoirs adapt to capture earlier runoff, but mostly decrease in mean reservoir storage with warming due to decreasing annual runoff. Second, a multi-reservoir optimization model is developed using linear programming that considers the minimum instream flows (MIFs) and weekly down ramp rates (DRRs) in the Upper Yuba River in the northern Sierra Nevada. Weekly DRR constraints are used to mimic spring snowmelt flows, which are particularly important for downstream ecosystems in the Sierra Nevada but are currently missing due to the influence of dams. Trade-offs between MIFs, DRRs and hydropower are explored with air temperature warming (+0, 2, 4 and 6 °C). Under base case operations, mean annual hydropower generation increases slightly with 2 °C warming and decreases slightly with 6 °C warming. With 6 °C warming, the most ecologically beneficial MIF and DRR reduce hydropower generation 5.5% compared to base case operations and a historical climate, which has important implications for re-licensing the hydropower project. Finally, reservoir management for downstream temperatures is explored using a linear programming model to optimally release water from a reservoir using selective withdrawal. The objective function is to minimize deviations from desired downstream temperatures, which are specified to mimic the natural temperature regime in the river. One objective of this study was to develop a method that can be readily integrated into a basin-scale multi-reservoir optimization model using a network representation of system

  16. Operational resilience of reservoirs to climate change, agricultural demand, and tourism: A case study from Sardinia.

    PubMed

    Mereu, Simone; Sušnik, Janez; Trabucco, Antonio; Daccache, Andre; Vamvakeridou-Lyroudia, Lydia; Renoldi, Stefano; Virdis, Andrea; Savić, Dragan; Assimacopoulos, Dionysis

    2016-02-01

    Many (semi-) arid locations globally, and particularly islands, rely heavily on reservoirs for water supply. Some reservoirs are particularly vulnerable to climate and development changes (e.g. population change, tourist growth, hydropower demands). Irregularities and uncertainties in the fluvial regime associated with climate change and the continuous increase in water demand by different sectors will add new challenges to the management and to the resilience of these reservoirs. The resilience of vulnerable reservoirs must be studied in detail to prepare for and mitigate potential impacts of these changes. In this paper, a reservoir balance model is developed and presented for the Pedra e' Othoni reservoir in Sardinia, Italy, to assess resilience to climate and development changes. The model was first calibrated and validated, then forced with extensive ensemble climate data for representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5, agricultural data, and with four socio-economic development scenarios. Future projections show a reduction in annual reservoir inflow and an increase in demand, mainly in the agricultural sector. Under no scenario is reservoir resilience significantly affected, the reservoir always achieves refill. However, this occurs at the partial expenses of hydropower production with implications for the production of renewable energy. There is also the possibility of conflict between the agricultural sector and hydropower sector for diminishing water supply. Pedra e' Othoni reservoir shows good resilience to future change mostly because of the disproportionately large basin feeding it. However this is not the case of other Sardinian reservoirs and hence a detailed resilience assessment of all reservoirs is needed, where development plans should carefully account for the trade-offs and potential conflicts among sectors. For Sardinia, the option of physical connection between reservoirs is available, as are alternative water supply measures

  17. Biogeochemistry of mercury in a river-reservoir system: impact of an inactive chloralkali plant on the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir, Virginia and Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrand, S. G.; Lindberg, S. E.; Turner, R. R.; Huckabee, J. W.; Strand, R. H.; Lund, J. R.; Andren, A. W.

    1980-08-01

    Elevated mercury concentrations in fish species from the North Fork of the Holston River were observed in the early 1970's. The source of the mercury was a chloralkali plant which had ceased operation in 1972. Mercury continues to be released to the river from two large (approx. 40-ha) waste disposal ponds at the plant site. This report presents results of a study of the emission of mercury to the environment from the abandoned waste ponds and of the distribution of mercury in water, sediment, and biota of the Holston River-Cherokee Reservoir System in Virginia and eastern Tennessee.

  18. Statistical modelling of forecast errors for multiple lead-times and a system of reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engeland, Kolbjorn; Steinsland, Ingelin; Kolberg, Sjur

    2010-05-01

    Water resources management, e.g. operation of reservoirs, is amongst others based on forecasts of inflow provided by a precipitation-runoff model. The forecasted inflow is normally given as one value, even though it is an uncertain value. There is a growing interest to account for uncertain information in decision support systems, e.g. how to operate a hydropower reservoir to maximize the gain. One challenge is to develop decision support systems that can use uncertain information. The contribution from the hydrological modeler is to derive a forecast distribution (from which uncertainty intervals can be computed) for the inflow predictions. In this study we constructed a statistical model for the forecast errors for daily inflow into a system of four hydropower reservoirs in Ulla-Førre in Western Norway. A distributed hydrological model was applied to generate the inflow forecasts using weather forecasts provided by ECM for lead-times up to 10 days. The precipitation forecasts were corrected for systematic bias. A statistical model based on auto-regressive innovations for Box-Cox-transformed observations and forecasts was constructed for the forecast errors. The parameters of the statistical model were conditioned on climate and the internal snow state in the hydrological model. The model was evaluated according to the reliability of the forecast distribution, the width of the forecast distribution, and efficiency of the median forecast for the 10 lead times and the four catchments. The interpretation of the results had to be done carefully since the inflow data have a large uncertainty.

  19. The Bakken - An Unconventional Petroleum and Reservoir System

    SciTech Connect

    Sarg, J.

    2011-12-31

    An integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Bakken Petroleum System, in the Williston basin of North Dakota and Montana indicates that: (1) dolomite is needed for good reservoir performance in the Middle Bakken; (2) regional and local fractures play a significant role in enhancing permeability and well production, and it is important to recognize both because local fractures will dominate in on-structure locations; and (3) the organic-rich Bakken shale serves as both a source and reservoir rock. The Middle Bakken Member of the Bakken Formation is the target for horizontal drilling. The mineralogy across all the Middle Bakken lithofacies is very similar and is dominated by dolomite, calcite, and quartz. This Member is comprised of six lithofacies: (A) muddy lime wackestone, (B) bioturbated, argillaceous, calcareous, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (C) planar to symmetrically ripple to undulose laminated, shaly, very fine-grained siltstone/sandstone, (D) contorted to massive fine-grained sandstone, to low angle, planar cross-laminated sandstone with thin discontinuous shale laminations, (E) finely inter-laminated, bioturbated, dolomitic mudstone and dolomitic siltstone/sandstone to calcitic, whole fossil, dolomitic lime wackestone, and (F) bioturbated, shaly, dolomitic siltstone. Lithofacies B, C, D, and E can all be reservoirs, if quartz and dolomite-rich (facies D) or dolomitized (facies B, C, E). Porosity averages 4-8%, permeability averages 0.001-0.01 mD or less. Dolomitic facies porosity is intercrystalline and tends to be greater than 6%. Permeability may reach values of 0.15 mD or greater. This appears to be a determinant of high productive wells in Elm Coulee, Parshall, and Sanish fields. Lithofacies G is organic-rich, pyritic brown/black mudstone and comprises the Bakken shales. These shales are siliceous, which increases brittleness and enhances fracture potential. Mechanical properties of the Bakken reveal that the shales have similar

  20. Operator Performance Support System (OPSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conklin, Marlen Z.

    1993-01-01

    In the complex and fast reaction world of military operations, present technologies, combined with tactical situations, have flooded the operator with assorted information that he is expected to process instantly. As technologies progress, this flow of data and information have both guided and overwhelmed the operator. However, the technologies that have confounded many operators today can be used to assist him -- thus the Operator Performance Support Team. In this paper we propose an operator support station that incorporates the elements of Video and Image Databases, productivity Software, Interactive Computer Based Training, Hypertext/Hypermedia Databases, Expert Programs, and Human Factors Engineering. The Operator Performance Support System will provide the operator with an integrating on-line information/knowledge system that will guide expert or novice to correct systems operations. Although the OPSS is being developed for the Navy, the performance of the workforce in today's competitive industry is of major concern. The concepts presented in this paper which address ASW systems software design issues are also directly applicable to industry. the OPSS will propose practical applications in how to more closely align the relationships between technical knowledge and equipment operator performance.

  1. The Saguaro distributed operating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, Gregory R.; Schlichting, Richard D.

    1989-05-01

    The progress achieved over the final year of the Saguaro distributed operating system project is presented. The primary achievements were in related research, including SR distributed programming language, the MLP system for constructing distributed mixed-language programs, the Psync interprocess communication mechanism, a configurable operating system kernal called the x-kernal, and the development of language mechanisms for performing failure handling in distributed programming languages.

  2. Network operating system focus technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    An activity structured to provide specific design requirements and specifications for the Space Station Data Management System (DMS) Network Operating System (NOS) is outlined. Examples are given of the types of supporting studies and implementation tasks presently underway to realize a DMS test bed capability to develop hands-on understanding of NOS requirements as driven by actual subsystem test beds participating in the overall Johnson Space Center test bed program. Classical operating system elements and principal NOS functions are listed.

  3. The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation's use of Climate Information Products to support Reservoir Operations and Water Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brekke, L. D.

    2007-12-01

    Climate forecast information plays an integral role in Reclamation's operation of surface water systems located throughout the western United States. These systems include over 300 reservoirs, 16000 miles of canals, and 245 million acre-feet of storage capacity. Combined, their operation leads to approximately $9 billion in annual agricultural benefits, enough energy to supply 6 million homes, 308 public recreation areas, and billions of dollars in avoided flood damages. Reclamation's use of climate information varies with decision application, which might be characterized by lead- time, application horizon, and reversibility. This presentation will provide an overview of Reclamation's short- to long-term climate-affected decisions, where and why climate information products are currently used, where products are desired but are absent, and where products are available but are not used for various reasons. The presentation will also highlight lessons learned from recent efforts to introduce new uses of climate forecast information in Reclamation decision processes (e.g., use of short-lead teleconnections to potentially support Spring season flood control management in the Pacific Northwest, use of CPC local 3-month temperature outlooks to support Summer-Autumn stream temperature management in California, and development of downscaled WCRP CMIP3 climate projections to support long-term system evaluations throughout Reclamation's service regions).

  4. Nitrogen management in reservoir catchments through constructed wetland systems.

    PubMed

    Tunçiper, B; Ayaz, S C; Akça, L; Samsunlu, A

    2005-01-01

    In this study, nitrogen removal was investigated in pilot-scale subsurface flow (SSF) and in free water surface flow (FWS) constructed wetlands installed in the campus of TUBITAK-Marmara Research Center, Gebze, near Istanbul, Turkey. The main purposes of this study are to apply constructed wetlands for the protection of water reservoirs and to reuse wastewater. Experiments were carried out at continuous flow reactors. The effects of the type of plants on the removal were investigated by using emergent (Canna, Cyperus, Typhia spp., Phragmites spp., Juncus, Poaceae, Paspalum and Iris.), submerged (Elodea, Egeria) and floating (Pistia, Salvina and Lemna) marsh plants at different conditions. During the study period HLRs were 30, 50, 70, 80 and 120 L m(2)d(-1) respectively. The average annual NH4-N, NO(3)-N, organic N and TN treatment efficiencies in SSF and FWS wetlands are 81% and 68%, 37% and 49%, 75% and 68%, 47% and 53%, respectively. Nitrification, denitrification and ammonification rate constant (k20) values in SSF and FNS systems have been found as 0.898 d(-1) and 0.541 d(-1), 0.488 d(-1) and 0.502 d(-1), 0.986 d(-1) and 0.908 respectively. Two types of the models (first-order plug flow and multiple regression) were tried to estimate the system performances. PMID:16114631

  5. Reducing the phase sensitivity of laser-based optical reservoir computing systems.

    PubMed

    Nguimdo, Romain Modeste; Verschaffelt, Guy; Danckaert, Jan; Van der Sande, Guy

    2016-01-25

    Optical implementations of reservoir computing systems are very promising because of their high processing speeds and the possibility to process several tasks in parallel. These systems can be implemented using semiconductor lasers subject to optical delayed feedback and optical injection. While the amount of the feedback/injection can be easily controlled, it is much more difficult to control the optical feedback/injection phase. We present extensive numerical investigations of the influence of the feedback/injection phases on laser-based reservoir computing systems with feedback. We show that a change in the phase can lead to a strong reduction in the reservoir computing system performance. We introduce a new readout layer design that -at least for some tasks- reduces this sensitivity to changes in the phase. It consists in optimizing the readout weights from a coherent combination of the reservoir's readout signal and its delayed version rather than only from the reservoir's readout signal as is usually done. PMID:26832506

  6. Geysers reservoir studies

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

    1993-04-01

    LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

  7. Planning Systems for Distributed Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maxwell, Theresa G.

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph representation presents an overview of the mission planning process involving distributed operations (such as the International Space Station (ISS)) and the computer hardware and software systems needed to support such an effort. Topics considered include: evolution of distributed planning systems, ISS distributed planning, the Payload Planning System (PPS), future developments in distributed planning systems, Request Oriented Scheduling Engine (ROSE) and Next Generation distributed planning systems.

  8. An Operational System of Grading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawain, T. H.; Lindsey, G. H.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the trial of an operational grading system at the Naval Postgraduate School. Indicates that the new plan is characterized by giving the marginal student a grace period of one quarter before the final judgment of his performance. (CC)

  9. Optimization of Integrated Reservoir, Wellbore, and Power Plant Models for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peluchette, Jason

    Geothermal energy has the potential to become a substantially greater contributor to the U.S. energy market. An adequate investment in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technology will be necessary in order to realize the potential of geothermal energy. This study presents an optimization of a waterbased Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) modeled for AltaRock Energy's Newberry EGS Demonstration location. The optimization successfully integrates all three components of the geothermal system: (1) the present wellbore design, (2) the reservoir design, and (3) the surface plant design. Since the Newberry EGS Demonstration will use an existing well (NWG 55-29), there is no optimization of the wellbore design, and the aim of the study for this component is to replicate the present wellbore conditions and design. An in-house wellbore model is used to accurately reflect the temperature and pressure changes that occur in the wellbore fluid and the surrounding casing, cement, and earth during injection and production. For the reservoir design, the existing conditions, such as temperature and pressure at depth and rock density, are incorporated into the model, and several design variables are investigated. The engineered reservoir is modeled using the reservoir simulator TOUGH2 while using the graphical interface PetraSim for visualization. Several fracture networks are investigated with the goal of determining which fracture network yields the greatest electrical output when optimized jointly with the surface plant. A topological optimization of the surface is completed to determine what type of power plant is best suited for this location, and a parametric optimization of the surface plant is completed to determine the optimal operating conditions. The conditions present at the Newberry, Oregon EGS project site are the basis for this optimization. The subsurface conditions are favorable for the production of electricity from geothermal energy with rock temperatures exceeding

  10. 40 CFR 141.510 - Is my system subject to the new finished water reservoir requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... finished water reservoir requirements? 141.510 Section 141.510 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Enhanced Filtration and Disinfection-Systems Serving Fewer Than 10,000 People Finished Water Reservoirs § 141.510...