Science.gov

Sample records for residence bringing science

  1. Bringing science to business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemetti, Paul

    2005-06-01

    Bringing science to business seems rather straight forward. Technology is constantly moving forward and new inventions are being brought into the market place. Science parks and technology parks have sprung out all around the globe competing against each other and trying to keep their own doors open by bringing in new business, thereby creating much needed income to keep their operations moving forward. However, only a small handful ofthese centers around the world can truly be considered successful. It is the relationship between the scientists, start-up business, local universities, local government, and invited bigger business that allows the parks to succeed. The individual scientist wishing to enter into business or just hoping to get his invention into the pool of potential ideas; which might end up in the hands of an entrepreneur or an established company, is not always that simple. Universal success principles must be embraced to ensure success. One must believe in oneself and to strive for excellence. One must be able to see the other persons viewpoint and adapt and change his behavior in order to succeed. One must learn to create trust as well as learn to trust. Furthermore, one must learn to focus on the why of the process and not on the how. A market must be identified and benefits of local area must be sold to potential investor or business partners. A local success has in part to do with local cooperation.

  2. Bringing science to the people

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is an opinion editorial piece about the International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS). It describes the active role that the ISHS takes in bringing scientific information to people throughout the world. The society holds periodic symposia on 10 different crops and 14 different cross-co...

  3. Bringing Assisted Living Services into Congregate Housing: Residents' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Nancy W.; Oakes, Claudia E.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Bringing state-subsidized assisted living services (ALS) into congregate housing (CH) is a strategy for reducing rates of nursing home placement. This article discusses CH residents' reactions as a new ALS program was introduced in their housing, and it provides recommendations for others who are considering the implementation of similar…

  4. Bringing Space Science into the Kindergarten Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonett, D. M.; Little, K. E.

    2000-01-01

    With the advent of probes to Mars and the construction of the ISS, it is not presumptuous to introduce 5-year-olds to space science. A variety of projects have been implemented to integrate space science into the kindergarten curriculum.

  5. CONASTA Brings Teachers a Kaleidoscope of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teaching Science, 2015

    2015-01-01

    From star systems to social systems, CONASTA 64 connects teachers to researchers and scientists working on the cutting edge of modern science. We asked two CONASTA 64 Keynote speakers, Steven Tingay and Ian Walker to share their passion for their work and their dedication for giving back to the science community.

  6. Bringing values and deliberation to science communication

    PubMed Central

    Dietz, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Decisions always involve both facts and values, whereas most science communication focuses only on facts. If science communication is intended to inform decisions, it must be competent with regard to both facts and values. Public participation inevitably involves both facts and values. Research on public participation suggests that linking scientific analysis to public deliberation in an iterative process can help decision making deal effectively with both facts and values. Thus, linked analysis and deliberation can be an effective tool for science communication. However, challenges remain in conducting such process at the national and global scales, in enhancing trust, and in reconciling diverse values. PMID:23940350

  7. Bringing Science Public Outreach to Elementary Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Lucas; Speck, A.; Tinnin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Many science "museums” already offer fantastic programs for the general public, and even some aimed at elementary school kids. However, these venues are usually located in large cities and are only occasionally used as tools for enriching science education in public schools. Here we present preliminary work to establish exciting educational enrichment environments for public schools that do not easily have access to such facilities. This program is aimed at motivating children's interest in science beyond what they learn in the classroom setting. In this program, we use the experience and experiments/demonstrations developed at a large science museum (in this case, The St. Louis Science Center) and take them into a local elementary school. At the same time, students from the University of Missouri are getting trained on how to present these outreach materials and work with the local elementary schools. Our pilot study has started with implementation of presentations/demonstrations at Benton Elementary School within the Columbia Public School district, Missouri. The school has recently adopted a STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) centered learning system throughout all grade levels (K-5), and is therefore receptive to this effort. We have implemented a program in which we have given a series of scientific demonstrations at each grade level's lunch hour. Further enrichment ideas and plans include: addition demonstrations, hands-on experiments, and question and answer sessions. However, the application of these events would be to compliment the curriculum for the appropriate grade level at that time. The focus of this project is to develop public communications which links science museums, college students and local public schools with an emphasis on encouraging college science majors to share their knowledge and to strengthen their ability to work in a public environment.

  8. Bringing Polar Science to the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruccoli, A.; Madsen, J. M.; Porter, M.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF sponsored IceCube (OPP-0236449) and Teachers Experiencing Antarctica and the Arctic (TEA) projects have developed a model for engaging K-12 teachers in a variety of scientific disciplines using polar science as a unifying theme. An intensive workshop, Science in the Ice, provided teachers with background content knowledge and seed ideas for activities aligned with national teaching standards. These activities were used to support the introduction of authentic science investigations related to current polar research in the classroom. The pilot workshop, sponsored by the NSF supported Math-Science Partnership SCALE (0227016), demonstrated the viability of this approach for involving a continuum of teachers from novice to master in a meaningful professional development model that can lead to sustainable classroom changes. This model for teacher professional development is based on the premise that the most robust educational outreach efforts involve teachers that are prepared, supported, and connected to a network of researchers and educators. This network can also serve to both stimulate interest in polar research and as a vehicle for delivering classroom materials related to the International Polar Year. An overview of Science in the Ice will be provided to show how the natural fascination with extreme environments can be used to introduce on-going research to the classroom from multiple disciplines---glaciology, geology, and astrophysics---with a common thread of polar science. The case for involving teachers now to fully capitalize on the potential of the International Polar Year, by providing professional development opportunities including field experiences with researchers, will be made.

  9. Bringing Planetary Science to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, C. R.

    1999-09-01

    Since I am not fluent in Italian, I won't presume to give a "public" science lecture in Padua (that will happen in the year 2000 before an English-speaking audience). But I will discuss the gap between the arcane practice of planetary research and the yearnings of a poorly educated public to participate in planetary exploration. Education and public outreach (E&PO) is a vital enterprise for our profession to be engaged in. But that does not mean that every researcher needs to become proficient at public communication. Our interdisciplinary field advances because of our diverse talents and we should do what we are good at. It is good that entities like the DPS and NASA are encouraging scientists to engage in E&PO, yet I fear that this endeavor is already, in its infancy, becoming bureaucratized. An E&PO cottage industry is developing, complete with its own jargon and checklists. The essential thing is for us all to realize that science is a human activity, supported by the public as part of our civilization's culture. As we do our science, we should do it with consciousness of our public role and use whatever creative talents we have to synthesize our specialized results for the broader scientific community, to articulate them to science communicators (educators, journalists, writers), and to share them directly with the public.

  10. Researchers Bring Local Science Into Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theuerkauf, Ethan J.; Ridge, Justin T.

    2014-02-01

    The need to communicate scientific research beyond academia is increasing concurrently with a growing emphasis on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) in K-12 education [Breiner et al., 2012]. Connecting scientists with K-12 educators who will share research with students in their classrooms is an effective method for broadening the audience for scientific research. However, establishing connections with teachers can be difficult, as there are few networking opportunities between these two groups without one directly contacting the other.

  11. Basic science curriculum in vascular surgery residency.

    PubMed

    Sidawy, A N; Sumpio, B; Clowes, A W; Rhodes, R S

    2001-04-01

    Recognizing the importance of basic science teaching in surgical education, the leadership of the Association of Program Directors in Vascular Surgery (APDVS) appointed a panel to gather information and to present its findings at the 1999 annual fall meeting of the Apdvs. A questionnaire was distributed to the program directors present. In addition, information was gathered from the American Board of Surgery regarding the basic science content in the vascular surgery item pool on the vascular surgery qualifying examination (VQE). The vascular surgery unit of the surgical resident curriculum was also analyzed. Fifty-three program directors (64%) completed the questionnaire. Although only two program directors felt that their residents were better prepared to answer basic science questions, the results of the Vqe showed that the examinees do not, as a group, perform differently on basic science items than on clinical management questions. In addition, only a minority of program directors (15%) use a specific method to monitor the learning process of their residents. The majority of the program directors responding (75%) felt that they were capable of teaching basic science to residents. Interestingly, almost half the 53 respondents (47%) said that a basic science curriculum should be comprehensive, not exclusively relevant to the clinical setting. Vqe content outline and the vascular surgery unit of the surgical resident curriculum revealed great emphasis on clinically relevant basic science information. The Apdvs panel recommends that a basic science curriculum should be comprehensive, yet clinically pertinent, and completely integrated with the clinical curriculum. In terms of how to teach basic science in vascular residencies, the panel supports teaching conferences that are problem-based with a faculty member acting as the "resource person" and with specific goals set for the conferences. The panel also suggested establishing a Web site that provides a series of

  12. Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K.

    2012-04-01

    Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community Prior to 2008, 5th grade students at two schools of the New Haven Unified School District consistently scored in the bottom 20% of the California State Standards Test for science. Teachers in the upper grades reported not spending enough time teaching science, which is attributed to lack of time, resources or knowledge of science. A proposal was written to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Bay Watershed Education Grant program and funding was received for Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community to address these concerns and instill a sense of stewardship in our students. This program engages and energizes students in learning science and the protection of the SF Bay Watershed, provides staff development for teachers, and educates the community about conservation of our local watershed. The project includes a preparation phase, outdoor phase, an analysis and reporting phase, and teacher training and consists of two complete units: 1) The San Francisco Bay Watershed Unit and 2) the Marine Environment Unit. At the end of year 5, our teachers were teaching more science, the community was engaged in conservation of the San Francisco Bay Watershed and most importantly, student scores increased on the California Science Test at one site by over 121% and another site by 152%.

  13. Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, Kimberly

    2010-05-01

    Prior to 2008, 5th grade students at two schools of the New Haven Unified School District consistently scored in the bottom 20% of the California State Standards Test for science. Teachers in the upper grades reported not spending enough time teaching science, which is attributed to lack of time, resources or knowledge of science. A proposal was written to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Bay Watershed Education Grant program and funding was received for Bringing Science to Life for Students, Teachers and the Community to address these concerns and instill a sense of stewardship in our students. This program engages and energizes students in learning science and the protection of the SF Bay Watershed, provides staff development for teachers, and educates the community about conservation of our local watershed. The project includes a preparation phase, outdoor phase, an analysis and reporting phase, and teacher training and consists of two complete units: 1) The San Francisco Bay Watershed Unit and 2) the Marine Environment Unit. At the end of the three-year program, teachers were teaching more science, the community was engaged in conservation of the San Francisco Bay Watershed and most importantly, student scores increased on the California Science Test at one site by over 70% and another site by 120%.

  14. Using Multimedia to Bring Science News to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Riordan, C.; Stein, B.; Lorditch, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    Creative partnerships between scientists and journalists open new opportunities to bring the excitement of scientific discoveries to wider audiences. Research tells us that the majority of the general public now gets more science and technology news from the Internet than from TV sources (2014 NSF Science and Engineering Indicators). In order to reach these audiences news organizations must embrace multiple forms of multimedia. We will review recent research on how the new multimedia landscape is changing the way that science news is consumed and how news organizations are changing the way they deliver news. News programs like Inside Science, and other examples of new partnerships that deliver research news to journalists, teachers, students, and the general public will be examined. We will describe examples of successful collaborations including an article by a former Newsweek science reporter entitled "My 1975 'Cooling World' Story Doesn't Make Today's Climate Scientists Wrong," which got reprinted in Slate, RealClearScience, and mentioned in Factcheck.org and USA Today.

  15. The Supernova Club: Bringing Space Science to Urban Youths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, P. J.; Pettit, R.; Balsara, D.; Garnavich, P.

    2008-06-01

    The Supernova Club is an experiment aimed at bringing space science to youths, almost all African Americans, from the most severely disadvantaged areas of the South Bend, Indiana, region. It leverages the National Youth Sports Program (NYSP) that, in Summer 2007, brought 100 children, ages 10-16 and living at or below the poverty level, to the Notre Dame campus for a 4-week non-residential summer program. Six contact hours of space science instruction were added to the core curriculum of nutrition, physical fitness, and academic study. At summer's end, 13 high interest/high potential youths were selected to form ``The Supernova Club''-a year-round, after-school, weekly follow-up program.

  16. Bringing Breakthroughs in Science to the Public Through Webcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Carol A.

    2004-06-01

    In the rapidly changing milieu of space science, keeping the public informed and engaged in the progress of science is challenging. Beautiful images, scientific artifacts, and exciting space launches can be a compelling hook but the challenge for scientists and educators is to provide context and basic information that is equally exciting. For the past 5 years, the use of Internet video streaming (webcast) technology has grown in popularity. We have used this technology to bring together scientists, educators and the public to provide virtual access to the research environment for the audience. The growth of new technologies will provide new opportunities for the public to ``get behind the scenes'' of observatories and laboratories to better appreciate the texture of scientific research as well as the scientists and technical personnel engaged in investigative endeavors.

  17. Equity and what secondary science teachers bring to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Barbara Anne

    The demographics of people working in science-based careers do not match the demographics of the larger society. In particular, people who self-identify as Hispanic are underrepresented among working scientists. One reason may be the influence of formal schooling and more specifically, the behaviors of teachers in secondary science classrooms. This study looks at the practices of eight secondary science teachers at two schools at which 62% of the enrolled students declare their ethnicity as Hispanic. All of the teachers have at least three years of experience. Through interviews with the teachers, classroom observation, and interviews with other faculty, this research elucidates typical behaviors and attitudes surrounding teaching science in these settings. In spite of having a deficit view of their students, they all express interest in and concern about the students they teach. Their characterizations of teaching practices and classroom behaviors do not incorporate strategies designed to promote content learning through culturally relevant curriculum. Instead, they use mainstream-situated approaches that develop science content knowledge, vocabulary, procedures, and skills targeted toward high achievement on state and district standardized tests leading toward graduation or success in college. These approaches are consistent with a view of equity that increases the participation of underrepresented groups in science based careers in that it gives students the skills and knowledge they will need in order to successfully pursue these careers. Additionally, they behave in ways that are consistent with equitable strategies such as using inquiry based teaching, serving as role models, and providing a structured learning environment. This research informs the literature base for instructional systems designers by identifying what that teachers situated in culturally diverse classrooms bring to professional development programs targeted toward making secondary science

  18. Marine science: Storms bring ocean nutrients to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palter, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Ships and ocean-observing robots have been used to quantify the amount of nutrients that a storm brings up from the Stygian ocean depths to the sunlit surface -- a first step in assessing how storms affect oceanic biomass production.

  19. From the Moon: Bringing Space Science to Diverse Audiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runyon, C. J.; Hall, C.; Joyner, E.; Meyer, H. M.; M3 Science; E/PO Team

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Apollo missions held a place in the mindset of many Americans - we dared to go someplace where humans had never set foot, a place unknown and beyond our imaginations. These early NASA missions and discoveries resulted in an enhanced public understanding of the Moon. Now, with the human element so far removed from space exploration, students must rely on textbooks, TV's, and computers to build their understanding of our Moon. However, NASA educational materials about the Moon are stale and out-of-date. In addition, they do not effectively address 21st Century Skills, an essential for today's classrooms. Here, we present a three-part model for developing opportunities in lunar science education professional development that is replicable and sustainable and integrates NASA mission-derived data (e.g., Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)/Chandrayaan-1). I) With the return of high resolution/high spatial data from M3/Chandrayaan-1, we can now better explore and understand the compositional variations on the lunar surface. Data and analysis techniques from the imaging spectrometer are incorporated into the M3 Educator's Guide: Seeing the Moon in a New Light. The guide includes an array of activities and lessons to help educators and students understand how NASA is currently exploring the Moon. The guide integrates NASA maps and data into the interactive lessons, bringing the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into the classroom. II) Utilizing the M3 Educator's Guide as well as educational activities from more current NASA lunar missions, we offer two sustained professional development opportunities for educators to explore the Moon through interactive and creative strategies. 1) Geology of the Moon, an online course offered through Montana State University's National Teacher Enhancement Network, is a 3-credit graduate course. 2) Fly Me to the Moon, offered through the College of Charleston's Office of Professional Development in Education, is a two

  20. Taming the Alien Genre: Bringing Science Fiction into the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucher, Kathrine T.; Manning, M. Lee

    2001-01-01

    Notes the popularity of the science fiction/fantasy genre, and offers a definition of these genres. Discusses teachers' reluctance to read or teach science fiction, but emphasizes its appeal and its usefulness. Discusses how teachers can select and use good science fiction books. Offers a checklist for evaluating such books, and suggests 18…

  1. Labs at Elementary Level Help Bring Science Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2008-01-01

    State and district science standards typically call for students to take part in hands-on labs and experiments in the elementary grades. The 1996 National Science Education Standards, which were written by the National Research Council and serve as a reference for many states, emphasize similar activities. Yet the use of even simple labs and…

  2. Stopping to Squell the "Rhosus": Bringing Science Vocabulary to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    A research study conducted in an urban district middle school setting applies cognitive science principles to science vocabulary. Within the context of a personal story told by the lead investigator, the results of the study are shared and suggest that more active, engaging strategies with complex core curriculum may improve retention and…

  3. NSF Public Television Project Brings Science Policy to the People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henig, Robin Marantz

    1979-01-01

    This new half-hour show, produced at KPBS-TV in San Diego, focuses on science policy. Topics include: an interview with White House science advisor Frank Press, the trans-Alaska pipeline, and analysis of the West Coast's future water needs, and the scientific and regulatory debate surrounding short-term mutagenicity tests. (BB)

  4. Bringing Newspaper Reports into the Classroom: Citizenship and Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarman, Ruth; McClune, Billy

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the ASE-Wellcome Trust National Conference on Citizenship Education and Science. Explores some possible approaches to achieving citizenship education through the use of print media. Links with other issues in the forefront of current debates in science education, particularly scientific literacy. (Author/NB)

  5. Bringing Science out of the Lab into the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-03-01

    Science is moving more rapidly than ever; one groundbreaking discovery chases the next at an incredible speed. School teachers have trouble keeping up with the pace, and many pupils call science classes "boring". Today, Europe's major research organisations launch Science in School, the first international, multidisciplinary journal for innovative science teaching, to provide a platform for communication between science teachers, practising scientists and other stakeholders in science education. ESO PR Photo 12/06 ESO PR Photo 12/06 First Issue! "Science is becoming increasingly international and interdisciplinary," says Eleanor Hayes, editor of the journal. "The most exciting development of the day may happen anywhere in any field: students may suddenly want to talk about a discovery on Mars, a medical breakthrough or a natural disaster. On such days it would be a shame not to put the textbooks aside and to capitalise on that curiosity." Published by EIROforum, a partnership between Europe's seven largest intergovernmental research organisations, Science in School will bridge the gap between the worlds of research and schools. One extremely powerful tool to achieve this is the journal's web-based discussion forum that will establish a direct dialogue between science teachers and researchers across national and subject boundaries. Science in School will appear quarterly online and in print and will feature news about the latest scientific discoveries, teaching materials, interviews with inspiring teachers and scientists, reviews of books, films and websites, suggestions for class trips, training opportunities and many other useful resources for science teachers. Contributors to the first issue include the world-renowned neurologist and author Oliver Sachs, and scientists and teachers from nine countries. "We urgently need to engage young people in science. This is why the research community and the European Commission are committed to outreach and education

  6. Life science research in space brings health on Earth.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, A J; DeBakey, M E; Gerzer, R; Hansen, R; Sutton, J; Neiman, S N

    2004-06-01

    Leading scientists and physicians review groundbreaking research that is leading the way to better health care for astronauts and new treatments for medical problems on Earth. This research includes the development and testing of a new Ventricular Assist Device for patients with heart failure awaiting heart transplantation; advancements in telemedicine that bring medical care to remote areas on Earth and aid in the diagnosis and treatment of illness during space flight; advanced technologies, such as a miniature mass spectrometer, cardiac ultrasound equipment, bone imaging, non-invasive High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, non-invasive techniques for blood and tissue chemistry measurements; and advances in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. PMID:15793934

  7. Exploration Station Brings AGU Science to Children and Parents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Paul

    2008-08-01

    More than 20 families from the Fort Lauderdale, Fla., area attended AGU's pilot family science event, ``Exploration Station,'' held on 26 May as part of the 2008 Joint Assembly. During the event-which was organized by AGU's education staff, the Association for Astronomy Education, and the Solar Physics Division of the American Astronomical Association-children and parents had the opportunity to discuss science with researchers and to get involved with many hands-on activities.

  8. New science education initiative brings seismology into the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, Michael W.; Pavlis, Gary L.; Phinney, Robert A.; Steinberg, Daniel; Owens, Thomas J.; Hall-Wallace, Michelle

    Prince Galitsin's invention of the electromagnetic seismograph in 1914 revolutionized the young science of seismology. Now, the venerable research instrument is proving to have an equally powerful impact—in the arena of public education. Over the past 5 years, a number of initiatives have extended the boundaries of seismology research outside the ivory towers of research institutions and into America's schools, museums, and teaching colleges. These initiatives are built on the premise that educational seismology offers a special opportunity for capturing students' innate curiosity for natural phenomena in the world around them, and that this curiosity can be used to teach a wealth of fundamental principles of physics and Earth science. These school-based seismograph stations, now numbering in the hundreds, are demonstrating a growing potential to contribute both to science education and scientific research.

  9. Exploration Station 2010 Brings Science to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawro, Martha; Asher, Pranoti

    2011-04-01

    Exploration Station is a public outreach event held prior to the AGU Fall Meeting each year and is a joint venture between AGU and NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The event features hands-on science activities for the public. This year's event was held in conjunction with the AGU public lecture given by SDO lead project scientist, Dean Pesnell. Many members of the general public attended, including families with children. They were joined by many AGU members, who also enjoyed the exhibits and explored the possible education and outreach activities available within the AGU community. Educators from across AGU were involved, but space physics and planetary sciences were especially well represented.

  10. Behind Waterlust - Bringing marine science, sport and art together

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rynne, P.; Graham, F.

    2013-12-01

    In today's economic climate, it has become increasingly important for scientists to demonstrate the relevance, societal impact, and value of their work. Combined with this financial driver is the inherent human desire to be creative, a characteristic that is often times suppressed when following the scientific method. Created by three marine science graduate students from the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science at the University of Miami, Waterlust is an experiment to demonstrate that the pursuit of creative outlets that engage the general public is both valuable and rewarding for the scientific community.

  11. Project LAUNCH: Bringing Space into Math and Science Classrooms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fauerbach, M.; Henry, D. P.; Schmidt, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Project LAUNCH is a K-12 teacher professional development program, which has been created in collaboration between the Whitaker Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), and the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI). Utilizing Space as the overarching theme it is designed to improve mathematics and science teaching, using inquiry based, hands-on teaching practices, which are aligned with Florida s Sunshine State Standards. Many students are excited about space exploration and it provides a great venue to get them involved in science and mathematics. The scope of Project LAUNCH however goes beyond just providing competency in the subject area, as pedagogy is also an intricate part of the project. Participants were introduced to the Conceptual Change Model (CCM) [1] as a framework to model good teaching practices. As the CCM closely follows what scientists call the scientific process, this teaching method is also useful to actively engage institute participants ,as well as their students, in real science. Project LAUNCH specifically targets teachers in low performing, high socioeconomic schools, where the need for skilled teachers is most critical.

  12. Bringing nursing science to the classroom: a collaborative project.

    PubMed

    Reams, Susan; Bashford, Carol

    2009-01-01

    This project resulted as a collaborative effort on the part of a public school system and nursing faculty. The fifth grade student population utilized in this study focused on the skeletal, muscular, digestive, circulatory, respiratory, and nervous systems as part of their school system's existing science and health curriculum. The intent of the study was to evaluate the impact on student learning outcomes as a result of nursing-focused, science-based, hands-on experiential activities provided by nursing faculty in the public school setting. An assessment tool was created for pretesting and posttesting to evaluate learning outcomes resulting from the intervention. Over a two day period, six classes consisting of 25 to 30 students each were divided into three equal small groups and rotated among three interactive stations. Students explored the normal function of the digestive system, heart, lungs, and skin. Improvement in learning using the pretest and posttest assessment tools were documented. PMID:19161960

  13. Bringing Planetary Science to the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2001-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop another exhibit called Gas Giants. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Gas Giants. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, 3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Gas Giants, a proposed 4000 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  14. The Coalition for Plasma Science: Bringing Plasmas to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Lee

    2003-10-01

    The Coalition for Plasma Science is a group of institutions, organizations, and companies that have joined forces to increase awareness and understanding of plasma science and its many applications and benefits for society. The CPS undertakes a range of activities to support this goal. Members include national laboratories, universities, industries, and individuals. The CPS maintains a web page (http://www.plasmacoalition.org), and has developed several types of plasma-related publications. The web page includes a compilation of evaluated plasma web sites. The evaluations were conducted by teachers and based on national teaching standards. The web site also contains copies of CPS publications including the brochure ''Plasmas are Everywhere.'' Thousands of these brochures are distributed each year, and a poster version is now available. Another publication is the ''About Plasmas'' series. Each of these two-page papers (which is written for a general audience) is about a specific plasma-related topic, such as lighting, fusion, space plasmas and plasma decontamination of biological hazards. Papers on other topics are under development. The CPS also organizes educational luncheon/seminars for Members of Congress and their staff. The most recent seminar was given by David Newman on January 28th of this year and was his ''state of the universe'' address. A second seminar is planned this year on the topic of semiconductor manufacturing. Activities under discussion include a topical science fair award for a project on plasmas and the development of a broad, history-based educational web site.

  15. Resilience by Design: Bringing Science to Policy Makers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Lucile M.

    2015-01-01

    No one questions that Los Angeles has an earthquake problem. The “Big Bend” of the San Andreas fault in southern California complicates the plate boundary between the North American and Pacific plates, creating a convergent component to the primarily transform boundary. The Southern California Earthquake Center Community Fault Model has over 150 fault segments, each capable of generating a damaging earthquake, in an area with more than 23 million residents (Fig. 1). A Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) analysis of the expected losses from all future earthquakes in the National Seismic Hazard Maps (Petersen et al., 2014) predicts an annual average of more than $3 billion per year in the eight counties of southern California, with half of those losses in Los Angeles County alone (Federal Emergency Management Agency [FEMA], 2008). According to Swiss Re, one of the world’s largest reinsurance companies, Los Angeles faces one of the greatest risks of catastrophic losses from earthquakes of any city in the world, eclipsed only by Tokyo, Jakarta, and Manila (Swiss Re, 2013).

  16. Bringing Space Science to the Undergraduate Classroom: NASA's USIP Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Christian, J. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Spencer, E. A.; Gross, J.; Lusk, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    As part of its participation in NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP), a team of engineering and physics students at West Virginia University (WVU) built a series of sounding rocket and balloon missions. The first rocket and balloon missions were flown near-simultaneously in a campaign on June 26, 2014 (image). The second sounding rocket mission is scheduled for October 5, 2015. Students took a course on space science in spring 2014, and followup courses in physics and aerospace engineering departments have been developed since then. Guest payloads were flown from students affiliated with WV Wesleyan College, NASA's IV&V Facility, and the University of South Alabama. Students specialized in electrical and aerospace engineering, and space physics topics. They interacted regularly with NASA engineers, presented at telecons, and prepared reports. A number of students decided to pursue internships and/or jobs related to space science and technology. Outreach to the campus and broader community included demos and flight projects. The physics payload includes plasma density and temperature measurements using a Langmuir and a triple probe; plasma frequency measurements using a radio sounder (WVU) and an impedance probe (U.S.A); and a magnetometer (WVWC). The aerospace payload includes an IMU swarm, a GPS experiment (with TEC capability); a cubesat communications module (NASA IV&V), and basic flight dynamics. Acknowledgments: staff members at NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and at the Orbital-ATK Rocket Center, WV.

  17. Bringing science into river systems cumulative effects assessment practice

    SciTech Connect

    Seitz, Nicole E.; Westbrook, Cherie J.; Noble, Bram F.

    2011-04-15

    Fast-paced watershed change, driven by anthropogenic development, is threatening the sustainability of freshwater resources across the globe. Developments within watersheds interact in a manner that is additive and synergistic over space and time. Such cumulative environmental effects are defined as the results of actions that are individually minor but collectively significant when added to other past, present, and reasonably foreseeable future actions. Cumulative effects assessment (CEA) then is broadly defined as the process of evaluating the potential impacts of such collective actions on the environment and is a requirement in many countries, including in Canada at the federal level under the Canadian Environmental Assessment Act. However, current approaches to CEA for river systems are proving to be ineffective, which is largely attributed to the disconnect between CEA science and practice. We highlight this gap herein by discussing contradictions in the CEA literature, challenges in quantifying cumulative interactions, including overcoming spatiotemporal scale issues, multiple hydrologic and ecological pathways, and lack of predictive analysis. Our analysis shows there is a need for improved CEA for river systems, and in responding to this need we propose a conceptual framework for better integrating science and practice for improved CEA for river systems using one of the most adversely affected rivers basins in Canada, the Athabasca River, as our model. We conclude by addressing the challenges inherent to CEA with the intent of providing scientists with ways to help improve CEA of river systems.

  18. BioBridge Professional Development: Bringing Innovative Science into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babendure, Jeremy; Thompson, Loren; Peterman, Karen; Teiper, Leanne; Gastil, Heather; Liwanag, Heather; Glenn-Lee, Shelley

    2011-01-01

    The BioBridge Professional Development model was created to bring current and relevant science into the high school classroom. The purpose of this intervention was to connect teachers with relevant science and to create innovative, hands-on activities that engage students, with the goal of increasing student interest in STEM careers. To this end,…

  19. Bringing the Tools of Big Science to Bear on Local Environmental Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronson, Scott; Jones, Keith W.; Brown, Maria

    2013-01-01

    We describe an interactive collaborative environmental education project that makes advanced laboratory facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory accessible for one-year or multi-year science projects for the high school level. Cyber-enabled Environmental Science (CEES) utilizes web conferencing software to bring multi-disciplinary,…

  20. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K–12 Community

    PubMed Central

    Westenberg, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Exposing K–12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), “engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use.” This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K–12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K–12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education PMID:27047585

  1. The Engaged Microbiologist: Bringing the Microbiological Sciences to the K-12 Community.

    PubMed

    Westenberg, David J

    2016-03-01

    Exposing K-12 students to cutting edge science that impacts their daily lives can bring classroom lessons to life. Citizen-science projects are an excellent way to bring high-level science to the classroom and help satisfy one of the cornerstone concepts of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), "engaging in practices that scientists and engineers actually use." This can be a daunting task for teachers who may lack the background or resources to integrate these projects into the classroom. This is where scientific societies such as the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) can play a critical role. ASM encourages its members to engage with the K-12 community by providing networking opportunities and resources for ASM members and K-12 teachers to work together to bring microbiology into the classroom. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. PMID:27047585

  2. Science Flies into the Classroom with UK "Researchers in Residence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinadinos, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Contact between practicing researchers and local school students is a recognised means of furthering student opportunities, encouraging a widespread interest in science and allowing development of teaching and communication skills for the participating scientist. The Researchers in Residence (RinR) scheme is a national initiative that promotes…

  3. Bringing 3D Printing to Geophysical Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boghosian, A.; Turrin, M.; Porter, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    3D printing technology has been embraced by many technical fields, and is rapidly making its way into peoples' homes and schools. While there is a growing educational and hobbyist community engaged in the STEM focused technical and intellectual challenges associated with 3D printing, there is unrealized potential for the earth science community to use 3D printing to communicate scientific research to the public. Moreover, 3D printing offers scientists the opportunity to connect students and the public with novel visualizations of real data. As opposed to introducing terrestrial measurements through the use of colormaps and gradients, scientists can represent 3D concepts with 3D models, offering a more intuitive education tool. Furthermore, the tactile aspect of models make geophysical concepts accessible to a wide range of learning styles like kinesthetic or tactile, and learners including both visually impaired and color-blind students.We present a workflow whereby scientists, students, and the general public will be able to 3D print their own versions of geophysical datasets, even adding time through layering to include a 4th dimension, for a "4D" print. This will enable scientists with unique and expert insights into the data to easily create the tools they need to communicate their research. It will allow educators to quickly produce teaching aids for their students. Most importantly, it will enable the students themselves to translate the 2D representation of geophysical data into a 3D representation of that same data, reinforcing spatial reasoning.

  4. Frontier Fields: A Cost-Effective Approach to Bringing Authentic Science to the Education Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, B.; Lawton, B.; Summers, F.; Ryer, H.

    2015-11-01

    For more than two decades, the Hubble EPO program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the education community and the public, and to engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. Program components include standards-based, curriculum-support materials, exhibits and exhibit components, and professional development workshops. The main underpinnings of the program's infrastructure are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. The Space Telescope Science Institute's Office of Public Outreach is leveraging this existing infrastructure to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community in a cost-effective way. Frontier Fields observations and results have been, and will continue to be, embedded into existing product lines and professional development offerings. We also are leveraging our new social media strategy to bring the science program to the public in the form of an ongoing blog.

  5. Special Advanced Course for Core Sciences to Bring Up Project Leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Kenji; Tabata, Nobuhisa; Gofuku, Akio; Harada, Isao; Takada, Jun

    Special Advanced Course for Core Sciences has been introduced recently to Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Okayama University, to bring up a project leader. The following points are key education goals in this program : (1) knowledge of core sciences, (2) communication ability by using English, and (3) wide viewpoints for researches. In order to accomplish these goals, several lectures for core sciences, patent systems and engineering ethics as well as long term internships by the collaboration with some regional companies have been put in practice. In this paper, we describe the outline of the program, educational effects, and our experiences. Then, we discuss how effective the program is for bringing up an engineer or a scientist who can lead sciences and technologies of their domains. This paper also describes current activities of the program.

  6. Doing Real Science on the Web: Bringing Authentic Investigations to Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Beaudrie, Brian

    1998-01-01

    Discussion of the World Wide Web as a source of information for science instruction focuses on a structure created by the Network Montana Project (NMP) that students can navigate. Highlights include scientific investigation; bringing real data to students; and lesson plans available on the Web created by the NMP. (LRW)

  7. Who Am I? ASE Science Year Resources: Bringing Science Year into the Classroom. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for Science Education, Herts (England).

    This CD-ROM describes how science can be used in schools to show that students can be excited and engaged in science and how science can be integrated into other disciplines. Science Year is a 12-month packed calendar of events, projects and resources, designed to stimulate the imagination about science and technology. Activities include the…

  8. Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS): The Effectiveness of an Afterschool Environmental Science Program for Increasing Female Students' Interest in Science Careers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyler-Wood, Tandra; Ellison, Amber; Lim, Okyoung; Periathiruvadi, Sita

    2012-01-01

    Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS) was an afterschool program for 4th and 5th grade girls that provided authentic learning experiences in environmental science as well as valuable female mentoring opportunities in an effort to increase participants' academic achievement in science. BUGS participants demonstrated significantly greater amounts of…

  9. Can Programming Frameworks Bring Smartphones into the Mainstream of Psychological Science?

    PubMed Central

    Piwek, Lukasz; Ellis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones continue to provide huge potential for psychological science and the advent of novel research frameworks brings new opportunities for researchers who have previously struggled to develop smartphone applications. However, despite this renewed promise, smartphones have failed to become a standard item within psychological research. Here we consider the key issues that continue to limit smartphone adoption within psychological science and how these barriers might be diminishing in light of ResearchKit and other recent methodological developments. We conclude that while these programming frameworks are certainly a step in the right direction it remains challenging to create usable research-orientated applications with current frameworks. Smartphones may only become an asset for psychology and social science as a whole when development software that is both easy to use and secure becomes freely available. PMID:27602010

  10. How Science Works: Bringing the World of Science into the Classroom through Innovative Blended Media Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Windale, Mark

    2010-01-01

    During the past three years, a team from the Centre for Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University, the University of Salford, the University of York, Glasshead and Teachers TV, has been working in collaboration to develop a series of blended media resources to support the teaching and learning of How Science Works (HSW) at Key Stages 3 and…

  11. Bringing Data Science, Xinformatics and Semantic eScience into the Graduate Curriculum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.

    2012-04-01

    Recent advances in acquisition techniques quickly provide massive amount of complex data characterized by source heterogeneity, multiple modalities, high volume, high dimensionality, and multiple scales (temporal, spatial, and function). In turn, science and engineering disciplines are rapidly becoming more and more data driven with goals of higher sample throughput, better understanding/modeling of complex systems and their dynamics, and ultimately engineering products for practical applications. However, analyzing libraries of complex data requires managing its complexity and integrating the information and knowledge across multiple scales over different disciplines. Attention to Data Science is now ubiquitous - The Fourth Paradigm publication, Nature and Science special issues on Data, and explicit emphasis on Data in national and international agency programs, foundations (Keck, Moore) and corporations (IBM, GE, Microsoft, etc.). Surrounding this attention is a proliferation of studies, reports, conferences and workshops on Data, Data Science and workforce. Examples include: "Train a new generation of data scientists, and broaden public understanding" from an EU Expert Group, "…the nation faces a critical need for a competent and creative workforce in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)...", "We note two possible approaches to addressing the challenge of this transformation: revolutionary (paradigmatic shifts and systemic structural reform) and evolutionary (such as adding data mining courses to computational science education or simply transferring textbook organized content into digital textbooks).", and "The training programs that NSF establishes around such a data infrastructure initiative will create a new generation of data scientists, data curators, and data archivists that is equipped to meet the challenges and jobs of the future." Further, interim report of the International Council for Science's (ICSU) Strategic Coordinating

  12. Population Growth in High-Amenity Rural Areas: Does it Bring Socioeconomic Benefits for Long-Term Residents?

    PubMed Central

    Onge, Jarron M. Saint; Hunter, Lori M.; Boardman, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective A widely noted concern with amenity-driven rural population growth is its potential to yield only low-wage service-sector employment for long-term residents, while raising local costs of living. This research examines change in socioeconomic status during the 1990s for long-term residents of high-amenity, high-growth rural counties in the United States. Methods Using longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, in combination with county-level information, we estimate growth-curve models to examine the extent to which the socioeconomic status of long-term residents is associated with amenity-related in-migration. Results We find that, on average, residents in high-growth, amenity-rich rural areas have higher income growth over time and higher levels of initial occupational prestige compared to those from other rural areas, but that socioeconomic gains are primarily for individuals with low baseline prestige. Conclusions The socioeconomic gains made by long-term residents of high-growth, amenity-rich rural areas associated with net in-migration may be limited to individuals with low initial prestige and growth may be due to low-skill service-sector jobs. PMID:21892234

  13. Multimedia: Bringing the Sciences to Life--Experiences with Multimedia in the Life Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavender, Jane F.; Rutter, Steve M.

    "Straight" lecturing as the only method for information delivery was at one time an efficient means of college teaching. Increased enrollment in the biological sciences, the diversity of preparedness of the students, and the variety of learning preferences of the students require new ways of disseminating information and assessing classroom…

  14. Acknowledging the Religious Beliefs Students Bring into the Science Classroom: Using the Bounded Nature of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southerland, Sherry A.; Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    2013-01-01

    Scientific knowledge often appears to contradict many students' religious beliefs. Indeed, the assumptions of science appear contradictory to the metaphysical claims of many religions. This conflict is most evident in discussions of biological evolution. Teachers, in attempts to limit the controversy, often avoid this topic or teach it…

  15. SEA Change: Bringing together Science, Engineering and the Arts at the University of Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perfit, M. R.; Mertz, M. S.; Lavelli, L.

    2014-12-01

    A group of interested and multifaceted faculty, administrators and students created the Science, Engineering, Arts Committee (SEA Change) two years ago at the University of Florida (UF). Recognizing that innovative ideas arise from the convergence of divergent thinkers, the committee seeks to bring together faculty in Science, Engineering, the Arts and others across campus to develop and disseminate innovative ideas for research, teaching and service that will enhance the campus intellectual environment. We meet regularly throughout the year as faculty with graduate and undergraduate students to catalyze ideas that could lead to collaborative or interdisciplinary projects and make recommendations to support innovative, critical and creative work. As an example, the Department of Geological Sciences and the School of Art and Art History collaborated on a competition among UF undergraduate painting students to create artistic works that related to geoscience. Each student gathered information from Geological Sciences faculty members to use for inspiration in creating paintings along with site-specific proposals to compete for a commission. The winning work was three-story high painting representing rock strata and the Florida environment entitled "Prairie Horizontals" that is now installed in the Geoscience building entrance atrium. Two smaller paintings of the second place winner, depicting geologists in the field were also purchased and displayed in a main hallway. Other activities supported by SEA Change have included a collaborative work of UF engineering and dance professors who partnered for the Creative Storytelling and Choreography Lab, to introduce basic storytelling tools to engineering students. A campus-wide gathering of UF faculty and graduate students titled Creative Practices: The Art & Science of Discovery featured guest speakers Steven Tepper, Victoria Vesna and Benjamin Knapp in spring 2014. The Committee plans to develop and foster ideas that will

  16. Master Teachers in Residence: Bringing a Classroom Perspective to Course Reform for NSF's Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative (O-TEC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsey, Sarah; Neathery, Faye; Fholer, Gwen; Weger, Elayne; Voth, Bonnie; Townsend, Joyce; Campbell, DeAnn; Boedecker, Martha

    Master teachers can be influential in course revision. The Oklahoma Teacher Education Collaborative (O-TEC) teacher reform effort is a consortium of nine higher education institutions working with the National Science Foundation's (NSF's) reform effort to produce teachers better equipped for teaching science and mathematics. The reform emphasizes…

  17. Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS): The Effectiveness of an Afterschool Environmental Science Program for Increasing Female Students' Interest in Science Careers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler-Wood, Tandra; Ellison, Amber; Lim, Okyoung; Periathiruvadi, Sita

    2012-02-01

    Bringing Up Girls in Science (BUGS) was an afterschool program for 4th and 5th grade girls that provided authentic learning experiences in environmental science as well as valuable female mentoring opportunities in an effort to increase participants' academic achievement in science. BUGS participants demonstrated significantly greater amounts of gain in science knowledge as measured by the Iowa Test of Basic Skills in Science (ITBS-S). The original BUGS participants and contrasts have now completed high school and entered college, allowing researchers to assess the long-term impact of the BUGS program. Fourteen former BUGS participants completed two instruments to assess their perceptions of science and science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers. Their results were compared to four contrast groups composed entirely of females: 12 former BUGS contrasts, 10 college science majors, 10 non-science majors, and 9 current STEM professionals. Results indicate that BUGS participants have higher perceptions of science careers than BUGS contrasts. There were no significant differences between BUGS participants, Science Majors, and STEM professionals in their perceptions of science and STEM careers, whereas the BUGS contrast group was significantly lower than BUGS participants, Science Majors, and STEM Professionals. Additional results and implications are discussed within.

  18. The Story Behind the Science: Bringing Science and Scientists to Life in Post-Secondary Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clough, Michael P.

    2011-07-01

    With funding from the United States National Science Foundation, 30 historical short stories designed to teach science content and draw students' attention to the nature of science (NOS) have been created for post-secondary introductory astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and physics courses. The project rationale, story development and structure, and freely available stories at the project website are presented.

  19. The Story behind the Science: Bringing Science and Scientists to Life in Post-Secondary Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    With funding from the United States National Science Foundation, 30 historical short stories designed to teach science content and draw students' attention to the nature of science (NOS) have been created for post-secondary introductory astronomy, biology, chemistry, geology, and physics courses. The project rationale, story development and…

  20. Bringing Science to the Public through City-wide Science Festivals and Street Fairs/Supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the Lounsbery Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Brian

    2007-04-01

    Many organizations make an effort to reach the general public and children in the area of science understanding and appreciation. These include museums, universities, professional societies, government agencies, corporations and television networks. When studies are made of the composition of the audiences for many of these outreach programs one finds a great overlap. For example, those who like to go to science museums often enjoy viewing NOVA programs. The challenge is to bring Science to the People in places, times and venues not usual associated with science. For the past six years the Science & the Arts program at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York has made use of the performing arts to bring science to old and new audiences. See http://web.gc.cuny.edu/sciart. While this program has been effective, we have tried additional approaches in new modes and novel sites. In this paper we relate our experience with a citywide science festival, which we operated in New York City in November 2006. This idea was based on the science festival held in Atlanta in conjunction with the APS Centennial in 1999. We will review the history, effectiveness and various styles of Science Festivals in the United States and worldwide. In an even more adventurous outreach effort, in June 2006 our program rented booths at a conventional New York City weekend street fair, offering hands-on science experiences amidst the typical street fair food and wares. Adults and children were delighted to find science in this setting and welcomed the fact that they could get science with their tasty kielbasa sandwiches as well as a bargain on tube sox. Their responses were documented in a video. We will present parts of this video and offer suggestions for adapting this project to other locations

  1. Bringing Terra Science to the People: 10 years of education and public outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riebeek, H.; Chambers, L. H.; Yuen, K.; Herring, D.

    2009-12-01

    The default image on Apple's iPhone is a blue, white, green and tan globe: the Blue Marble. The iconic image was produced using Terra data as part of the mission's education and public outreach efforts. As far-reaching and innovative as Terra science has been over the past decade, Terra education and public outreach efforts have been equally successful. This talk will provide an overview of Terra's crosscutting education and public outreach projects, which have reached into educational facilities—classrooms, museums, and science centers, across the Internet, and into everyday life. The Earth Observatory web site was the first web site designed for the public that told the unified story of what we can learn about our planet from all space-based platforms. Initially conceived as part of Terra mission outreach in 1999, the web site has won five Webby awards, the highest recognition a web site can receive. The Visible Earth image gallery is a catalogue of NASA Earth imagery that receives more than one million page views per month. The NEO (NASA Earth Observations) web site and WMS (web mapping service) tool serves global data sets to museums and science centers across the world. Terra educational products, including the My NASA Data web service and the Students' Cloud Observations Online (S'COOL) project, bring Terra data into the classroom. Both projects target multiple grade levels, ranging from elementary school to graduate school. S'COOL uses student observations of clouds to help validate Terra data. Students and their parents have puzzled over weekly "Where on Earth" geography quizzes published on line. Perhaps the most difficult group to reach is the large segment of the public that does not seek out science information online or in a science museum or classroom. To reach these people, EarthSky produced a series of podcasts and radio broadcasts that brought Terra science to more than 30 million people in 2009. Terra imagery, including the Blue Marble, have

  2. Evaluation of Music And Astronomy Under The Stars: Bringing Science To New Audiences At Music Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, D.; Torff, B.

    2014-07-01

    Evaluations were conducted of the 2009-2012 NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program at outdoor concerts (see the separate MAUS poster at this meeting). MAUS promoted lifelong learning by providing opportunities for the public to look through telescopes, participate in hands-on activities, and view posters, banners, and videos at events where large numbers of people are gathered. Surveys were given to 1.6% of the concertgoers at MAUS events with the participants expressing their level of agreement on a four-point scale with the following statements: “The astronomy at this event has been an enjoyable experience;” “It has been easy to comprehend the astronomy at this event;” “This event has helped me learn new things about astronomy;” “This event has made me want to learn more about astronomy;” and “This event has increased my interest in science.” On a scale where 1 = strongly disagree, 2 = disagree, 3 = agree, and 4 = strongly agree, MAUS received high ratings (>3.34/4) on all outcomes. MAUS successfully reached people at different concerts who had little interest in science. MAUS appealed to concert attendees of both genders, all ages, multiple levels of education, and all musical tastes. MAUS positively influenced the public's knowledge of and interest in astronomy. The high ratings from virtually all respondents indicate that the gains were not restricted to science enthusiasts. The data strongly supports the conclusion that MAUS—bringing astronomy to people at musical events—is effective!

  3. A Podiatric Medical Residency Program in an Academic Health Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogy, Louis T.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The podiatric medical residency program in the Health Science Center at San Antonio provides an intensive exposure for the newly graduated podiatrist to practice in a multidisciplinary environment. Residents become more familiar with general medical and surgical diseases and disorders as well as podiatric pathology. (LBH)

  4. Feeding the preterm infant: opportunities and challenges of bringing science to the bedside.

    PubMed

    Neu, Josef; Bradley, Cristine L; Ding, Zong-Yi; Tucker, Hugh N; Berseth, Carol Lynn

    2013-03-01

    Designing an optimal feeding program for preterm infants is particularly challenging. These infants require individualized feeding plans and frequent medical interventions, and their health status and physical limitations necessitate specialized products. This review highlights the challenges of translating new understandings into practical application and, specifically, the challenges of translating scientific knowledge into available nutritional products that can be used to meet the special needs of preterm infants. All infant formula products are developed for use in a heavily regulated environment, which is not integrated internationally. The regulatory framework for preterm nutrition products can be particularly complex in the areas of composition and the degree of scientific and clinical support required across countries. Registration and approval of products for preterm infants in most countries must address the complexities for a population for which no well-recognized nonclinical safety or efficacy models exist. Mandatory regulatory review for science-based innovative product improvements may require two or more years. In addition, throughout years of development, industry must justify the financial support of programs that serve a small specialty segment of the market. These industry-specific challenges may be neither visible nor appreciated by the general public or health care professionals, and, yet, they are integral to the development process. Effective collaborations among academic scientists, regulatory authorities, and the industry are essential to bring science to the bedside. Without such collaborations, preterm infants, and particularly very low birth weight infants, in the neonatal intensive care unit will not be able to benefit from innovative nutrition interventions designed to improve short- and long-term clinical outcomes. PMID:23445840

  5. Teaching Teachers: Bringing First-Rate Science to the Elementary Classroom. An NSTA Press Journals Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Betty, Ed.

    This document presents a collection of papers published in the "Teaching Teachers" column in the elementary-level journal, "Science and Children." Contents include: (1) "Science is Part of the Big Picture: Teachers Become Science Learners" (Anita Greenwood); (2) "Reaching the Reluctant Science Teacher: Learning How To Teach Inquiry-Based Science"…

  6. Using letters to the editor to try to bring science to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubrecht, Gordon

    2009-10-01

    The local paper here, the Delaware Gazette, publishes many letters from global warming skeptics and people ignorant of energy policy. I explain how I attempt to bring some sense to the situation through reply letters to the editor. Scientists need to express scientific views in public as our duty to fellow citizens.

  7. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout NIRCam Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, L. A.; Higgins, M. L.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2012-03-01

    A long-term collaboration between the JWST’s NIRCam E/PO team and the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona brings STEM activities and concepts to Girl Scout leaders, staff, and volunteers, and in turn to their councils and girls.

  8. Bringing Dinosaur Science to the Junior Girl Scouts Through a College Service-Learning Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guertin, Laura A.; Cao, Edna T.; Craig, Karen A.; George, Alice E.; Goldson, Shana T.; Makatche, Shanon P.; Radusevich, Brett T.; Sandor, Charles W.; Takos, Anya T.; Tuller, Ryan; Williams, James K.; Williams, Michael A.

    2004-12-01

    Undergraduate students in an introductory-level geoscience course successfully designed and conducted a science badge day for the Junior Girl Scouts. With national concerns that girls turn away from science at a young age, a service-learning project was incorporated into a college course with the end result providing a group of girls a positive and fun science-learning experience. A number of science and technology badges exist for the Girl Scouts, yet not many of these badges have been completed because of a lack of confidence the troop leaders have in teaching science and a paucity of scheduled science events for the leaders to take their girls. Junior Girl Scout troops were invited to the Pennsylvania State University Delaware County campus to complete a series of hands-on dinosaur science activities that allowed them to earn the Science in Everyday Life badge. At the conclusion of the badge event, the girls reported a greater interest in science, a desire to learn more science, and a desire to complete additional science-related Girl Scout badges.

  9. How to Bring Solar Energy to Seven Billion People (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Wadia, Cyrus

    2011-04-28

    By exploiting the powers of nanotechnology and taking advantage of non-toxic, Earth-abundant materials, Berkeley Lab's Cyrus Wadia has fabricated new solar cell devices that have the potential to be several orders of magnitude less expensive than conventional solar cells. And by mastering the chemistry of these materials-and the economics of solar energy-he envisions bringing electricity to the 1.2 billion people now living without it.

  10. NASA's Coordinated Efforts to Enhance STEM Education: Bringing NASA Science into the Library

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinke, B. K.; Thomas, C.; Eyermann, S.; Mitchell, S.; LaConte, K.; Hauck, K.

    2015-11-01

    Libraries are community-centered, free-access venues serving learners of all ages and backgrounds. Libraries also recognize the importance of science literacy and strive to include science in their programming portfolio. Scientists and educators can partner with local libraries to advance mutual goals of connecting the public to Earth and Space Science. In this interactive Special Interest Group (SIG) discussion, representatives from the NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Education and Public Outreach (EPO) community's library collaborations discussed the opportunities for partnership with public and school libraries; explored the resources, events, and programs available through libraries; explored NASA science programming and professional development opportunities available for librarians; and strategized about the types of support that librarians require to plan and implement programs that use NASA data and resources. We also shared successes, lessons learned, and future opportunities for incorporating NASA science programming into library settings.

  11. Preparing Mathematics and Science Teachers through a Residency Program: Perceptions and Reflections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garza, Rubén; Werner, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The critical challenge of recruiting, preparing, and retaining high-quality mathematics and science teachers for high-need urban schools is complex. Therefore, identifying factors that support and impede a teaching residency program's implementation may have the potential to build an effective initiative that will benefit all stakeholders.…

  12. NASA'S Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute: An international approach toward bringing science and human exploration together for mutual benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gregory

    2016-07-01

    The NASA Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is a virtual institute focused on research at the intersection of science and explora-tion, training the next generation of lunar scientists, and community development. The institute is a hub for opportunities that engage the larger scientific and exploration communities in order to form new interdis-ciplinary, research-focused collaborations. Its relative-ly large domestic teams work together along with in-ternational partners in both traditional and virtual set-tings to bring disparate approaches together for mutual benefit. This talk will describe the research efforts of the nine domestic teams that constitute the U.S. com-plement of the Institute and how it is engaging the in-ternational science and exploration communities through workshops, conferences, online seminars and classes, student exchange programs and internships. The Institute is centered on the scientific aspects of exploration as they pertain to the Moon, Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and the moons of Mars. It focuses on interdisciplinary, exploration-related science cen-tered around all airless bodies targeted as potential human destinations. Areas of study reported here will represent the broad spectrum of lunar, NEA, and Mar-tian moon sciences encompassing investigations of the surface, interior, exosphere, and near-space environ-ments as well as science uniquely enabled from these bodies. The technical focus ranges from investigations of plasma physics, geology/geochemistry, technology integration, solar system origins/evolution, regolith geotechnical properties, analogues, volatiles, ISRU and exploration potential of the target bodies. SSERVI enhances the widening knowledgebase of planetary research by acting as a bridge between several differ-ent groups and bringing together researchers from the scientific and exploration communities, multiple disci-plines across the full range of planetary sciences, and domestic and

  13. Brandeis Science Posse: Talented Students Bring Diversity to the Field. Carnegie Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theroux, Karen

    2013-01-01

    The Science Posse program at Brandeis University aims to increase the recruitment and retention of students from disadvantaged and underrepresented backgrounds in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines. A grant from Carnegie Corporation helped support the development of the program, which has brought 50 students from…

  14. Bringing ICT to Teach Science Education for Students with Learning Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harish, H. G. Jeya; Kumar, R. Krishna; Raja, B. William Dharma

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the following study was to examine the impact of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in Science classrooms of students with Learning Disabilities. Teachers were positive about the learning benefits and design of the Science curriculum. Students were more critical but still positive about these features. Learning Science…

  15. Bringing Dinosaur Science to the Junior Girl Scouts through a College Service-Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guertin, Laura A.; Cao, Edna T.; Craig, Karen A.; George, Alice E.; Goldson, Shana T.; Makatche, Shanon P.; Radusevich, Brett T.; Sandor, Charles W.; Takos, Anya T.; Tuller, Ryan; Williams, James K.; Williams, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students in an introductory-level geoscience course successfully designed and conducted a science badge day for the Junior Girl Scouts. With national concerns that girls turn away from science at a young age, a service-learning project was incorporated into a college course with the end result providing a group of girls a positive…

  16. Learning To Teach Science for All in the Elementary Grades: What Do Preservice Teachers Bring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howes, Elaine V.

    2002-01-01

    Describes characteristics that may assist prospective elementary teachers in developing effective, inclusive science instruction; link them to requirements for teaching; and suggest how science teacher educators might draw on the strengths of their own students to support teaching practices aimed at universal scientific literacy. Findings describe…

  17. Bringing Climate Change into the Life Science Classroom: Essentials, Impacts on Life, and Addressing Misconceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Amy J.; Stark, Louisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is at the forefront of our cultural conversation about science, influencing everything from presidential debates to Leonardo DiCaprio's 2016 Oscar acceptance speech. The topic is becoming increasingly socially and scientifically relevant but is no closer to being resolved. Most high school students take a life science course but…

  18. Discover the Cosmos - Bringing Cutting Edge Science to Schools across Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doran, Rosa

    2015-03-01

    The fast growing number of science data repositories is opening enormous possibilities to scientists all over the world. The emergence of citizen science projects is engaging in science discovery a large number of citizens globally. Astronomical research is now a possibility to anyone having a computer and some form of data access. This opens a very interesting and strategic possibility to engage large audiences in the making and understanding of science. On another perspective it would be only natural to imagine that soon enough data mining will be an active part of the academic path of university or even secondary schools students. The possibility is very exciting but the road not very promising. Even in the most developed nations, where all schools are equipped with modern ICT facilities the use of such possibilities is still a very rare episode. The Galileo Teacher Training Program GTTP, a legacy of IYA2009, is participating in some of the most emblematic projects funded by the European Commission and targeting modern tools, resources and methodologies for science teaching. One of this projects is Discover the Cosmos which is aiming to target this issue by empowering educators with the necessary skills to embark on this innovative path: teaching science while doing science.

  19. From the APOLLO legacy to Mars, what can the manned exploration programme bring to planetary science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, C.

    Manned space began with the promise of setting foot on the Moon in the first decade of the space age; this was done by the APOLLO project which combined unprecedented technological innovation with space and moon science. The scientific results of APPOLO will be briefly reviewed together with the lessons to be learnt from this unique experience. In the last 34 years, manned space was limited to low earth orbit and it can be reasonably argued that the science return from continuing will be to the maximum incremental, however, the full use of the present space station could still be considered for external instrument platforms as, for example, a planetary telescope. Independently of the science objectives, the Presidential Vision in the United States and the Lisbon declaration of the European Union have led to new manned exploration programmmes returning to the Moon, going to Mars and beyond. The current status of these ambitious projects and their return for planetary science will be reviewed.

  20. Bringing Real World Underwater Science, Engineering and Technology in Tomorrow's Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, C.

    2012-04-01

    What do Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs), Ocean Science, Engineering and Technology have in common with science education in today's classroom? They all meet the growing demand for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals in tomorrow's U.S. workforce. Engaging students in real world science experiences will help them develop skills such as critical thinking, problem solving, collaboration, communication, innovation, and creativity. These skills are crucial to building a strong, competitive workforce in an integrated global economy. Fifth grade students from St. Andrew's School of Math and Science in Charleston, SC, USA science classes were introduced to engineering and robotics by using a combination of two underwater ROVs programs from the Office of Naval Research (SeaPerch) and Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE). Students were grouped in teams as "real scientists" to design and construct a ROV. Students selected their role from a list of engineering positions, and researched how to construct the best ROV. Students created blueprints and models of their ROV design. Scientists/engineers from various local agencies were scheduled to come and share their expertise with the students. On World Ocean Day, a presentation was planned for fifth grade students to work closely with kindergarten through fourth grade students. The purpose of the day was two-fold; it provided students the opportunity to peer teach and the opportunity to present their experiences to a wide audience. All students presented their designs and demonstrated their ROV's movement capabilities in child size pools. They also modeled how submersible pilots communicate with scientists and other researchers while operating their newly designed ROV. As a culminating event, students visited a local marine science high school class with similar ROVs and evaluated their engineering designs in a fresh water pond.

  1. University of Washington Mobile Planetarium: Bringing HST Science to Seattle Public Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gailey, Justin; Fraiser, O.; Rosenfield, P.; Byler, E.; Wisniewski, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Digital planetariums are becoming mainstays of astronomy education as projection technology prices fall and planetarium software becomes more powerful and more freely available. In 2010, the University of Washington upgraded their star-ball projector to a digital system that is powered by Microsoft Research’s WorldWide Telescope. To increase the number of underserved elementary and high school students the UW Astronomy department reaches, we obtained an HST education and public outreach grant to create lesson content, offset transportation costs to visit the UW planetarium for Seattle Public School students, and purchase a mobile planetarium to bring to public schools. We present a pilot program to test and evaluate the efficacy of the mobile planetarium in a high school setting.

  2. Bringing You the Moon: Lunar Education Efforts of the Center for Lunar Science and Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaner, A. J.; Shupla, C.; Shipp, S.; Allen, J.; Kring, D. A.; Halligan, E.; LaConte, K.

    2012-01-01

    The Center for Lunar Science and Exploration (CLSE), a collaboration between the Lunar and Planetary Institute and NASA's Johnson Space Center, is one of seven member teams of the NASA Lunar Science Institute. In addition to research and exploration activities, the CLSE team is deeply invested in education and public outreach. Overarching goals of CLSE education are to strengthen the future science workforce, attract and retain students in STEM disciplines, and develop advocates for lunar exploration. The team's efforts have resulted in a variety of programs and products, including the creation of a variety of Lunar Traveling Exhibits and the High School Lunar Research Project, featured at http://www.lpi.usra.edu/nlsi/education/.

  3. Strategic science: new frameworks to bring scientific expertise to environmental disaster response

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stoepler, Teresa Michelle; Ludwig, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Science is critical to society’s ability to prepare for, respond to, and recover from environmental crises. Natural and technological disasters such as disease outbreaks, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, oil spills, and tsunamis require coordinated scientific expertise across a range of disciplines to shape effective policies and protocols. Five years after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, new organizational frameworks have arisen for scientists and engineers to apply their expertise to disaster response and recovery in a variety of capacities. Here, we describe examples of these opportunities, including an exciting new collaboration between the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO) and the Department of the Interior’s (DOI) Strategic Sciences Group (SSG).

  4. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout and NIRCam Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebofsky, Larry A.; Higgins, M. L.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N. R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2003, the University of Arizona's (UA) NIRCam E/PO team (NASA James Webb Space Telescope) and the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council began a long-term collaboration to bring astronomy activities and concepts to Girl Scout leaders, staff, and volunteers and, in turn, to their councils and girls, i.e., to train the trainers. Nationally, our goal is to reach leaders in all councils. To date, this program has reached nearly 200 adults from 39 councils nationwide (plus Guam and Korea), bringing together leaders, UA graduate students, and NIRCam scientists and educators to experience Arizona's dark skies. Locally, our goal is to provide Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education to girls of all ages throughout southern Arizona. To accomplish this in astronomy, we have additional ongoing collaborations with the Planetary Science Institute, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and, most recently with the Amphitheater School District. One of the programs that we have been recently emphasizing is Family Science and Astronomy Nights. These programs can be run at our local Girl Scout facility or can be incorporated into programs that we are running in local schools. Our near-term goal is to provide a series of interconnected activities that can be done in classrooms, in afterschool programs, as part of the Family Science and Astronomy Nights, or in summer astronomy camps. Our long-term goal is to empower girls ultimately to become leaders who are excited about the night sky and can take lead roles presenting activities and facilitating astronomy nights. Our poster will display a variety of the activities we have refined and developed through this progam: scale models of the Solar System and beyond, classifying Solar System objects, a portable human orrery, observing the night sky with and without telescopes, constellation transformations, and constellation sorting cards.NIRCam E/PO website: http://zeus.as.arizona.edu/ dmccarthy/GSUSA

  5. In the Zone--Bringing Science to the Olympic Games for Students in 2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Leah; Atkinson, Melissa; Schofield, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    The Wellcome Trust is running a national engagement and education initiative inspired by the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. "In the Zone" involves sending practical science kits to every UK school and college. Here, we discuss the development of the school activities and how the feedback from pilot schools helped to shape the final…

  6. Where's the Chicken? Virtual Reality Brings Poultry Science to the Community College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloepper, Marcia Owens; Zweiacher, Ed; Curtis, Pat; Evert, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights how two institutions--Redlands Community College (RCC) and Auburn University--teamed up to create a virtual world called Eagle Island, where learners enter to learn all they need to know about poultry science. Eagle Island, located in Second Life, provides an opportunity to tour a real-life food processing…

  7. Bringing Computational Thinking into the High School Science and Math Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trouille, Laura; Beheshti, E.; Horn, M.; Jona, K.; Kalogera, V.; Weintrop, D.; Wilensky, U.; University CT-STEM Project, Northwestern; University CenterTalent Development, Northwestern

    2013-01-01

    Computational thinking (for example, the thought processes involved in developing algorithmic solutions to problems that can then be automated for computation) has revolutionized the way we do science. The Next Generation Science Standards require that teachers support their students’ development of computational thinking and computational modeling skills. As a result, there is a very high demand among teachers for quality materials. Astronomy provides an abundance of opportunities to support student development of computational thinking skills. Our group has taken advantage of this to create a series of astronomy-based computational thinking lesson plans for use in typical physics, astronomy, and math high school classrooms. This project is funded by the NSF Computing Education for the 21st Century grant and is jointly led by Northwestern University’s Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics (CIERA), the Computer Science department, the Learning Sciences department, and the Office of STEM Education Partnerships (OSEP). I will also briefly present the online ‘Astro Adventures’ courses for middle and high school students I have developed through NU’s Center for Talent Development. The online courses take advantage of many of the amazing online astronomy enrichment materials available to the public, including a range of hands-on activities and the ability to take images with the Global Telescope Network. The course culminates with an independent computational research project.

  8. Science Fair Projects Bring It All Together: Collaboration, Information Literacy, and Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Terrence E., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the role of school library media specialists in helping students with science fair projects. Topics include selecting a topic; reviewing basic library resources, including print and electronic; remote access to databases; locating information on the Web; word processing and presentation software; and relevant Web sites. (LRW)

  9. Bringing the Science of Team Training to School-Based Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benishek, Lauren E.; Gregory, Megan E.; Hodges, Karin; Newell, Markeda; Hughes, Ashley M.; Marlow, Shannon; Lacerenza, Christina; Rosenfield, Sylvia; Salas, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Teams are ubiquitous in schools in the 21st Century; yet training for effective teaming within these settings has lagged behind. The authors of this article developed 5 modules, grounded in the science of team training and adapted from an evidence-based curriculum used in medical settings called TeamSTEPPS®, to prepare instructional and…

  10. Research Based Science Education: Bringing Authentic Scientific Research into the Secondary Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayers, J.

    2003-12-01

    Teachers and students at Northview High School in Brazil, Indiana have the opportunity to engage in authentic scientific research through our participation in two national projects, TLRBSE and PEPP. Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is a teacher professional development and retention program coupled with authentic scientific research projects in astronomy. Teacher-Leaders are trained in research-based pedagogy and serve as mentors to less experienced colleagues and work with students to develop science research methods and research projects for the classroom. Astronomical data collected at Kitt Peak by astronomers and teachers is made available on CD for classroom use. Northview is in its second year as a TLRBSE school. The Princeton Earth Physics Project (PEPP) trains mentor teachers in fundamentals of research in seismology. Teachers and students then gain hands on experience in science research through operation of a research quality seismic station sited at the high school. Data from the Northview seismometer are stored locally and also transmitted over the Internet to a database at Indiana University. Students have access to local data as well as seismic databases accessible through the Internet to use for research projects. The Northview Seismic Station has been in operation since 1998. In this presentation, I will describe how these projects have been incorporated into the physics and earth science programs at Northview High School. I will discus how our teachers and students have benefited from the opportunity to take part in hands-on scientific research under the guidance of university faculty. In particular, I will describe our participation in a regional seismic network through seismic data acquisition, data analysis using seismological software, and students' experiences in a university-based student research symposium. I reflect on the some of the successes and barriers to high-school teachers' and students' involvement in

  11. GeoBus: bringing experiential Earth science learning to secondary schools in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, C. J.; Robinson, R. A. J.; Roper, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary (middle and high) schools by providing teaching support to schools that have no or little expertise of teaching Earth science, to share the outcomes of new science research and the experiences of young researchers with school pupils, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Over 30,000 pupils will have been involved in experiential Earth science learning activities by December 2014, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The challenge with secondary school experiential learning as outreach is that activities need to be completed in either 50 or 80 minutes to fit within the school timetables in the UK, and this can limit the amount of hands-on activities that pupils undertake in one session. However, it is possible to dedicate a whole or half day of linked activities to Earth science learning in Scotland and this provides a long enough period to undertake field work, conduct group projects, or complete more complicated experiments. GeoBus has developed a suite of workshops that all involve experiential learning and are targeted for shorter and longer time slots, and the lessons learned in developing and refining these workshops to maximise the learning achieved will be presented. Three potentially unsurprising observations hold true for all the schools that GeoBus visits: young learners like to experiment and use unfamiliar equipment to make measurements, the element of competition stimulates learners to ask questions and maintain focus and enthusiasum

  12. GeoBus: bringing Earth science learning to secondary schools in the UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Ruth; Roper, Kathryn; Pike, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    GeoBus (www.geobus.org.uk) is an educational outreach project that was developed in 2012 by the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at the University of St Andrews, and it is sponsored jointly by industry and the UK Research Councils (NERC and EPSRC). The aims of GeoBus are to support the teaching of Earth Science in secondary (middle and high) schools by providing teaching support to schools that have no or little expertise of teaching Earth science, to share the outcomes of new science research and the experiences of young researchers with school pupils, and to provide a bridge between industry, higher education institutions, research councils and schools. Since its launch, GeoBus has visited over 160 different schools across the length and breadth of Scotland. Almost 35,000 pupils will have been involved in experiential Earth science learning activities by April 2015, including many in remote and disadvantaged regions. The challenge with secondary school experiential learning as outreach is that activities need to be completed in either 50 or 80 minutes to fit within the school timetables in the UK, and this can limit the amount of hands-on activities that pupils undertake in one session. However, it is possible to dedicate a whole or half day of linked activities to Earth science learning within the Scotland Curriculum for Excellence, and this provides a long enough period to undertake field work, conduct group projects, or complete more complicated experiments. GeoBus has developed a suite of workshops that all involve experiential learning and are targeted for shorter and longer time slots, and the lessons learned in developing and refining these workshops to maximise the learning achieved will be presented. A key aim of GeoBus is to incorporate research outcomes directly into workshops, and to involve early career researchers in project development. One example that is currently in progress is a set of hydrology workshops that focus on the water

  13. Emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

    PubMed

    Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Mohammadifar, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, educators pay attention to emotional intelligence which is defined as the ability to monitor and explain one's own and other's emotional experience and feelings to differentiate between them as well as applying necessary information for determining thoughts and actions. The goal of this study was to determine emotional intelligence of medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. By means of two stage cluster sampling, 98 medical residents of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were selected. Participants were asked to fill valid and reliable Persian version of Emotional Quotient inventory (EQ-i) questionnaire which had been developed due to Bar-On model. Seventy two filled-up questionnaires were returned (RR=73%). Mean EI score of all participants was 319.94 ± 32.4. Mean EI score was not significantly different between male and female also, single and married participants. EI did not differ significantly in residents in respect to their discipline. Mean responsibility subscale differ significantly between male and female participants (P=0.008). Multiple regression analysis showed that happiness subscale is a predictive factor for total EI score (B=-0.32, P=0.009). Responsibility subscale differed significantly between men and women participants and happiness subscale was a good predictor for emotional intelligence score. These factors should be considered in education of medical residents. PMID:23605604

  14. Bringing the Heavens Down to Earth: How to Talk to Normal People About Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plait, Philip

    2013-04-01

    For some, talking about science to the public is more difficult - and more daunting - than actually doing the science. Not everyone can be a great public speaker, but there are ways to make the task easier, more productive, and more fun. Above all, the most important thing to remember is that your audience is not made up of scientists! They may not be familiar with the jargon, the purpose, or the conclusions of your work, so it's your job to make sure what you're saying is actually communicated to them. The good news is, they want to know. That's why they're there. All you have to do is be understood.

  15. ACS/WFC Pixel Stability – Bringing the Pixels Back to the Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borncamp, David; Grogin, Norman A.; Bourque, Matthew; Ogaz, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Electrical current that has been trapped within the lattice structure of a Charged Coupled Device (CCD) can be present through multiple exposures, which will have an adverse effect on its science performance. The traditional way to correct for this extra charge is to take an image with the camera shutter closed periodically throughout the lifetime of the instrument. These images, generally referred to as dark images, allow for the characterization of the extra charge that is trapped within the CCD at the time of observation. This extra current can then be subtracted out of science images to correct for the extra charge that was there at this time. Pixels that have a charge above a certain threshold of current are marked as “hot” and flagged in the data quality array. However, these pixels may not be "bad" in the traditional sense that they cannot be reliably dark-subtracted. If these pixels are shown to be stable over an anneal period, the charge can be properly subtracted and the extra noise from this dark current can be taken into account. We present the results of a pixel history study that analyzes every pixel of ACS/WFC individually and allows pixels that were marked as bad to be brought back into the science image.

  16. Bringing climate sciences to the general public with the Climanosco initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourqui, Michel; Bolduc, Cassandra; Charbonneau, Paul; Charrière, Marie; Hill, Daniel; Lòpez Gladko, Angélica; Loubet, Enrique; Roy, Philippe; Winter, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the first months of operation of the scientists-initiated Climanosco.org platform. The goal of this initiative is to bridge climate sciences with the general public by building a network of climate scientists and citizens around the world, by stimulating the writing of quality climate science articles in non-scientific language, and by publishing these articles in an open-access, multilingual format. For the climate scientist, this platform will offer a simple and reliable channel to disseminate research results to the general public. High standards are enforced by: a) requiring that the main author is an active climate scientist, and b) an innovative peer-review process involving scientific and non-scientific referees with distinct roles. Direct participation of non-scientists is allowed through co-authoring, peer-reviewing, language translation. Furthermore, public engagement is stimulated by allowing non-scientists to invite manuscripts to be written by scientists on topics of their concern. The targeted public includes journalists, teachers, students, local politicians, economists, members of the agriculture sector, and any other citizens from around the world with an interest in climate sciences. The initiative is now several months into operations. In this paper, I will discuss what we have achieved so far and what we plan for the next future.

  17. A case study of second-career alternatively certified science teachers: What research and educational experiences and understanding of nature of science do they bring to classroom practices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Judith Richards

    This multiple case study examined second-career lateral entry middle school science teachers to see what research and educational experiences and understanding of nature of science they bring to their classroom practices. I examined four alternatively certified, second-career middle school science teachers in a large urban southeastern school district. I found in this study that these teachers understanding of nature of science as displayed through their classroom practices was impacted by their scientific research experiences and exposure to direct instruction of nature of science (NOS). This study determined each participants understanding of nature of science through the Views of Nature of Science (VNOS) B Test and found out how they acquired their NOS through a background questionnaire and a semi-structured interview. I observed each classroom to determine if these teachers were implementing NOS classroom practices. This study had mixed results and found that two of the four teachers were more informed about the NOS and demonstrated these practices in their classrooms. This study explains how these teachers acquired their NOS and what practices they demonstrated in their classroom.

  18. The Art Of Planetary Science: An Exhibition - Bringing Together The Art And Science Communities To Engage The Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molaro, Jamie; Keane, Jamies; Peacock, Sarah; Schaefer, Ethan; Tanquary, Hannah

    2014-11-01

    The University of Arizona’s Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) presents the 2nd Annual The Art of Planetary Science: An Exhibition (TAPS) on 17-19 October 2014. This art exhibition and competition features artwork inspired by planetary science, alongside works created from scientific data. It is designed to connect the local art and science communities of Tucson, and engage the public together in celebration of the beauty and elegance of the universe. The exhibition is organized by a team of volunteer graduate students, with the help of LPL’s Space Imaging Center, and support from the LPL administration. Last year’s inaugural event featured over 150 works of art from 70 artists and scientists. A variety of mediums were represented, including paintings, photography, digital prints, sculpture, glasswork, textiles, film, and written word. Over 300 guests attended the opening. Art submission and event attendance are free, and open to anyone.The primary goal of the event is to present a different side of science to the public. Too often, the public sees science as dull or beyond their grasp. This event provides scientists the opportunity to demonstrate the beauty that they find in their science, by creating art out of their scientific data. These works utilized, for example, equations, simulations, visual representations of spacecraft data, and images of extra-terrestrial material samples. Viewing these works alongside more traditional artwork inspired by those same scientific ideas provided the audience a more complex, multifaceted view of the content that would not be possible viewing either alone. The event also provides a way to reach out specifically to the adult community. Most science outreach is targeted towards engaging children in STEM fields. While this is vital for the long term, adults have more immediate control over the perception of science and public policy that provides funding and research opportunities to scientists. We hope this event raises

  19. Bringing the High Energy Universe into Focus: Science Highlights from the NuSTAR Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, the first focusing high-energy X-ray (3 - 79 keV) telescope in orbit, extends sensitive X-ray observations above the band pass where Chandra and XMM-Newton operate. With an unprecedented combination of sensitivity, spectral and imaging resolution above 10 keV, NuSTAR is advancing our understanding of black holes, neutron stars, and supernova remnants. I will describe the mission, and present science highlights to-date from the two-year baseline mission.

  20. Bring the catchment hydrology and carbon science together: a simple ecosystem water use efficiency model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lei; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Ying-Ping; Chiew, Francis; Canadell, Josep

    2016-04-01

    Water use efficiency (WUE) defined as carbon uptake per unit of water loss by plants or ecosystems is one of most important functional properties in plant sciences. While theory of WUE is quite advanced at leaf-scale, but quite limited at ecosystem scale because of the complexity of interactions among vegetation, soil and climate. In this study, we developed one simple equation for estimating ecosystem WUE with 2 parameters and 5 variables. Using this simple model, we can explain why ecosystem WUE peaks at about 60N, 20N and tropical region globally. Estimated global ecosystem WUE agrees very well with other independent estimates in both magnitude and spatial variability. We also demonstrated that this model can be used to predict quite accurately the global gross primary production (GPP) when estimates of ecosystem water use are available. We estimated global mean annual GPP as 120.7±10.1 Pg(C) year‑1 based on 7 independent estimates of global evapotranspiration. Further analysis shows both global ecosystem WUE and GPP have increased over the last three decades. About 90% of the increased trend in WUE is attributed to increased atmosphere CO2. Increases in GPP is largely driven by increasing WUE. Therefore this simple model provide an important link of catchment hydrology with carbon science community and as an independent approach for estimating ecosystem photosynthetic carbon production from traditional catchment hydrological measurements.

  1. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM): Bringing NASA's Earth System Science Program to the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall using a variety of remote sensing instrumentation, including the first spaceborne rain-measuring radar. Since the energy released when tropical rainfall occurs is a primary "fuel" supply for the weather and climate "engine"; improvements in computer models which predict future weather and climate states may depend on better measurements of global tropical rainfall and its energy. In support of the STANYS conference theme of Education and Space, this presentation focuses on one aspect of NASA's Earth Systems Science Program. We seek to present an overview of the TRMM mission. This overview will discuss the scientific motivation for TRMM, the TRMM instrument package, and recent images from tropical rainfall systems and hurricanes. The presentation also targets educational components of the TRMM mission in the areas of weather, mathematics, technology, and geography that can be used by secondary school/high school educators in the classroom.

  2. Bringing Engineering Design into High School Science Classrooms: The Heating/Cooling Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apedoe, Xornam S.; Reynolds, Birdy; Ellefson, Michelle R.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2008-10-01

    Infusing engineering design projects in K-12 settings can promote interest and attract a wide range of students to engineering careers. However, the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability to standards leaves little room to incorporate engineering design into K-12 classrooms. We argue that design-based learning, the combination of scientific inquiry and engineering design, is an approach that can be used to meet both K-12 educators' and engineering advocates' goals. This paper describes an 8-week high school curriculum unit, the Heating/Cooling System, in which engineering design is used to teach students central and difficult chemistry concepts such as atomic interactions, reactions, and energy changes in reactions. The goals of the paper are to (1) describe this successful design-based unit, (2) provide guidelines for incorporating design-based learning into other science topics, and (3) provide some evidence of its value for teaching difficult chemistry concepts and increasing interest in engineering careers.

  3. Computer Based Assessment (CBA): Perception of residents at Dow University of Health Sciences

    PubMed Central

    Jawaid, Masood; Moosa, Foad Ali; Jaleel, Farhat; Ashraf, Junaid

    2014-01-01

    Background and objective : During the past few years, Computer-based assessment (CBA) has gained popularkity as a testing modality. This assessment offers several advantages over paper based assessment (PBA) testing. The objective of this study was to find out residents’ perception of this method of assessment. Methods : The post graduate residents of Dow University of Health Sciences in the field of Surgery, Medicine, Gynecology and Obstetrics experienced their first formative Computer-based assessment (CBA) in year 2013.Immediately after formative CBA, an anonymous paper based questionnaire was distributed amongst the residents and response was sought for their self-perceived computer usage competence before starting residency, perceptions regarding CBA method and to determine their preference for PBA or CBA in future assessment preferences. Results: Total 173 residents completed the questionnaire. More than half of residents, 56.1% had no prior experience of CBA. Three fourth, 76.4% of the residents were less than confident before sitting in CBA, while after completing CBA, 64.8% were either confident or extremely confident for CBA. Most common problem encountered by students was logging in 28.9%. More students (53.2%) believed that paper assessment took longer to complete than CBA. Majority of the students (61.8%) rated CBA as better than PBA despite experiencing it for the first time. Conclusion: Resident’s perception for CBA is good and they recommend its use in future assessment as well. However, to take maximal advantage of this technology, faculty should be trained to develop questions not only with text and pictures but with audio and video support. PMID:25097497

  4. Bringing atmospheric sciences to middle/high school students and teachers through the Penn State Weather Camp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Syrett, W.; Knight, P.

    2002-05-01

    A one-week resident camp during the summer has been developed that provides students and teachers with hands-on instruction and classroom lessons. Students entering 8th through 10th grades are selected for the camp and special efforts are made in having traditionally underrepresented groups participate in the Weather Camp. The contents of the camp include: balloon launches, contouring exercises, simple forecasting techniques, understanding past and future climatic conditions, a climate change debate, tours of private and government weather organizations. One special highlight of the camp is the making of a weather forecast in the TV studio that is taped and given to the weather camper. The weather camp for teachers is being launched in the summer of 2002 with the goal of hosting 15-24 teachers. Teachers can receive two credits during the weather camp assuming that 60 hours of in-class and out of class work is completed. Efforts and strategies are being made to bring teachers from rural and urban settings in order to take their experiences back to their classrooms. Highlights of the first year of the weather camp are presented along with second year and future efforts.

  5. The Power Plant Mapping Student Project: Bringing Citizen Science to Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayne, K.; Oda, T.; Gurney, K. R.; O'Keeffe, D.; Petron, G.; Tans, P. P.; Frost, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    An emission inventory (EI) is a conventional tool to quantify and monitor anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases and air pollutants into the atmosphere. Gridded EI can visually show geographical patterns of emissions and their changes over time. These patterns, when available, are often determined using location data collected by regional governments, industries, and researchers. Datasets such as Carbon Monitoring and Action (CARMA, www.carma.org) are particularly useful for mapping emissions from large point sources and have been widely used in the EI community. The EI community is aware of potentially significant errors in the geographical locations of point sources, including power plants. The big challenge, however, is to review tens of thousands of power plant locations around the world and correct them where needed. The Power Plant Mapping Student Project (PPMSP) is a platform designed for students in 4th through 12th grade to improve the geographical location of power plants indicated in existing datasets to benefit international EI research. In PPMSP, we use VENTUS, a web-based platform (http://ventus.project.asu.edu/) that invites citizens to contribute power plant location data. Using VENTUS, students view scenes in the vicinity of reported power plant coordinates on Google Maps. Students either verify the location of a power plant or search for it within a designated radius using various indicators, an e-guide, and a power plant photo gallery for assistance. If the power plant cannot be found, students mark the plant as unverified. To assure quality for research use, the project contains multiple checkpoints and levels of review. While participating in meaningful research that directly benefits the EI research community, students are engaged in relevant science curricula designed to meet each grade level's Next Generation Science Standards. Students study energy, climate change, the atmosphere, and geographical information systems. The curricula is

  6. Bringing Astronomy Directly to People Who Do Not Come to Star Parties, Science Museums, or Science Festivals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubowich, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    My successful programs have included telescope observations, hands-on activities, and edible astronomy demonstrations for: outdoor concerts or music festivals; the National Mall; churches, synagogues, seminaries, or clergy conferences; the Ronald McDonald House of Long Island (New Hyde Park, NY), the Winthrop University Hospital Children’s Medical Center (Mineola, NY); the Fresh Air Fund summer camps; a Halloween star party with costumed kids looking through telescopes; a Super Bowl Star Party; the World Science Festival (NYC); the Princeton University Science and Engineering Expo; the USA Science and Engineering Festival; and the NYC Columbus Day Parade. These outreach activities have reached thousands of people including many young girls. Information was also provided about local science museums, citizen science projects, astronomy educational sites, and astronomy clubs to encourage learning after these events. In 2010 I created Astronomy Night on the National Mall (co-sponsored the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy) with the participation of astronomy clubs, Chandra X-Ray Center, STScI, NASA, NOAO, NSF and the National Air and Space Museum. Since 2009 my NASA-funded Music and Astronomy Under the Stars (MAUS) program has brought astronomy to 50,000 music lovers who attended the Central Park Jazz, Newport Folk, Tanglewood, or Ravinia music festivals or classical, folk, rock, pop, opera, or county-western concerts in local parks assisted by astronomy clubs. MAUS is an evening, nighttime, and cloudy weather traveling astronomy program combining solar, optical, and radio telescope observations; a live image projection system; large outdoor posters and banners; videos; and hands-on activities before and after the concerts or at intermission. Yo-Yo-Ma and the Chicago Symphony or Boston Symphony Orchestras, the McCoy Tyner Quartet with Ravi Coltrane, Esperanza Spalding, the Stanley Clarke Band, Phish, Blood Sweat and Tears, Deep Purple, Patti Smith

  7. Bringing the Social Sciences to Health Policy: An Appreciation of David Mechanic.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Carol A; Gray, Bradford H

    2016-08-01

    David Mechanic has been a pioneering leader in the social and behavioral sciences of health, health services, and health and mental health policy for more than fifty years. One of David's most distinctive qualities has been his vision in identifying trends and defining new research areas and perspectives in health care policy. His early work on how methods of physician payment by capitation and fee-for-service in England and the United States affected physicians' responses to patients and patient care addressed present challenges and many ongoing studies of payment mechanisms. His papers on rationing of health care established a framework for examining alternative allocation mechanisms and just decision making. Influential papers dealt with risk selection, policy challenges in managed care, reducing racial disparities, trust relationships between patients, doctors, and the public and health institutions, and the predicaments of health reform. Focusing on the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, David explored its opportunities and challenges especially in providing comprehensive and effective behavioral health services. A hallmark of his work has been his redirecting our attention to the most severely ill and those in greatest need. Less visible is the leadership and institution building endeavors and the many honors David has received. PMID:27127251

  8. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE): Enhancing Scientific Communication by Bringing STEM Research into the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, D.; Radencic, S.; Funderburk, W. K.; Walker, R. M.; Jackson, B. S.; Dawkins, K. S.; Schmitz, D.; Bruce, L. M.; McNeal, K.

    2014-12-01

    INSPIRE, a five-year partnership between Mississippi State University and three local school districts, is designed to strengthen the communication skills of graduate Fellows in geosciences, physics, astronomy, chemistry, and engineering as they incorporate their research into inquiry-based lessons in 7th - 12th grade science and math classrooms. All lesson plans designed and taught by the graduate Fellows must include one or more connections to their research, and these connections must be demonstrated to the students during the lessons. International research partnerships with Australia, the Bahamas, England, and Poland provide valuable opportunities for graduate Fellows to conduct field work abroad and allow our partner teachers to have authentic research experiences that they can bring back to their classrooms. Program effectiveness has been examined using pre- and post-year attitudinal surveys, formal lesson plan documents, Fellow and teacher journals, focus group meetings with a project evaluator, and direct observation of Fellow-led classroom activities. Analyses of data gathered during the past four years of the partnership will be presented that examine the diversity in approaches taken by Fellows to communicate big ideas, changes in the ability of Fellows to find connections between their research and classroom lessons while keeping them aligned with state and national standards, and the quality of the mentorship provided to the Fellows by our partner teachers. INSPIRE is funded by the Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellowship Program of the National Science Foundation (Award No. DGE-0947419).

  9. A Balancing Act in the Third Space: Graduate-Level Earth Science in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirakparvar, N. Alex

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a museum-based urban teacher-residency (UTR) program's approach to building subject-specific content knowledge and research experience in Earth Science teacher candidates. In the museum-based program, graduate-level science courses and research experiences are designed and implemented specifically for the UTR by active Earth…

  10. "We Found the 'Black Spots' on Campus on Our Own": Development of Inquiry Skills in Primary Science Learning with BYOD (Bring Your Own Device)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Yanjie

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a study situated in a one-year project "Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) for Mobile Knowledge Building," aiming at investigating how primary school students developed their inquiry skills in science learning in BYOD-supported learning environments. Student perceptions of the BYOD-supported inquiry experience were also…

  11. The articulation of integration of clinical and basic sciences in concept maps: differences between experienced and resident groups.

    PubMed

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    2016-08-01

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are hypothesized to be less complex, to reveal more tacit basic science concepts and these basic science concepts are expected to be used for the organization of the maps. These hypotheses are derived from studies about knowledge development of individuals. However, integrated curricula require a high degree of cooperation between clinicians and basic scientists. This study examined whether there are consistent variations regarding the articulation of integration when groups of experienced clinicians and basic scientists and groups of residents and basic scientists-in-training construct concept maps. Seven groups of three clinicians and basic scientists on experienced level and seven such groups on resident level constructed concept maps illuminating clinical problems. They were guided by instructions that focused them on articulation of integration. The concept maps were analysed by features that described integration. Descriptive statistics showed consistent variations between the two expertise levels. The concept maps of the resident groups exceeded those of the experienced groups in articulated integration. First, they used significantly more links between clinical and basic science concepts. Second, these links connected basic science concepts with a greater variety of clinical concepts than the experienced groups. Third, although residents did not use significantly more basic science concepts, they used them significantly more frequent to organize the clinical concepts. The conclusion was drawn that not all hypotheses could be confirmed and that the resident concept maps were more elaborate than expected. This article discusses the implications for the role that residents and

  12. News Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-11-01

    Astronomy: Science and beauty combined Africa: Physics technicians offer valuable skills Conference: ESERA2013 brings researchers together in Cyprus Physics Olympiad: UK team bring home more medals from the Physics Olympics in Copenhagen Physics Tournament: IOC backs Shrewsbury to host IYPT 2014 Conference: MPTL18 looks at the latest multimedia developments Workshop: The selective absorption of light Science on Stage: Illuminating Science Education in London in 2015

  13. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education: STEM Graduate Students Bring Current Research into 7th-12th Grade Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radencic, S.; Dawkins, K. S.; Jackson, B. S.; Walker, R. M.; Schmitz, D.; Pierce, D.; Funderburk, W. K.; McNeal, K.

    2014-12-01

    Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE), a NSF Graduate K-12 (GK-12) program at Mississippi State University, pairs STEM graduate students with local K-12 teachers to bring new inquiry and technology experiences to the classroom (www.gk12.msstate.edu). The graduate fellows prepare lessons for the students incorporating different facets of their research. The lessons vary in degree of difficulty according to the content covered in the classroom and the grade level of the students. The focus of each lesson is directed toward the individual research of the STEM graduate student using inquiry based designed activities. Scientific instruments that are used in STEM research (e.g. SkyMaster weather stations, GPS, portable SEM, Inclinometer, Soil Moisture Probe, Google Earth, ArcGIS Explorer) are also utilized by K-12 students in the activities developed by the graduate students. Creativity and problem solving skills are sparked by curiosity which leads to the discovery of new information. The graduate students work to enhance their ability to effectively communicate their research to members of society through the creation of research linked classroom activities, enabling the 7-12th grade students to connect basic processes used in STEM research with the required state and national science standards. The graduate students become respected role models for the high school students because of their STEM knowledge base and their passion for their research. Sharing enthusiasm for their chosen STEM field, as well as the application techniques to discover new ideas, the graduate students stimulate the interests of the classroom students and model authentic science process skills while highlighting the relevance of STEM research to K-12 student lives. The measurement of the student attitudes about science is gathered from pre and post interest surveys for the past four years. This partnership allows students, teachers, graduate students, and the public to

  14. The Articulation of Integration of Clinical and Basic Sciences in Concept Maps: Differences between Experienced and Resident Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vink, Sylvia; van Tartwijk, Jan; Verloop, Nico; Gosselink, Manon; Driessen, Erik; Bolk, Jan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the content of integrated curricula, clinical concepts and the underlying basic science concepts need to be made explicit. Preconstructed concept maps are recommended for this purpose. They are mainly constructed by experts. However, concept maps constructed by residents are hypothesized to be less complex, to reveal more tacit basic…

  15. Bringing Astronomy Activities and Science Content to Girls Locally and Nationally: A Girl Scout and NIRCam Collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, M. L.; Lebofsky, L. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Lebofsky, N.

    2013-04-01

    In 2003, the University of Arizona's (UA) NIRCam EPO team (NASA James Webb Space Telescope's Near-Infrared Camera) and the Girl Scouts of Southern Arizona began a long-term collaboration to bring STEM and astronomy activities and concepts to adult Girl Scout volunteers and staff and, in turn, their councils and girls, i.e., to train the trainers. Nationally, our goal is to reach adult volunteers and staff in all 112 councils. To date, this program has reached nearly 240 adults from 78 councils in 41 states, DC, Guam, and Japan, bringing together adult volunteers and staff, UA graduate students, and NIRCam scientists and educators to experience Arizona's dark skies.

  16. Bringing Science to Bear--On Peace, Not War: Elaborating on Psychology's Potential to Promote Peace

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leidner, Bernhard; Tropp, Linda R.; Lickel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We argue that psychological and contextual factors play important roles in bringing about, facilitating, and escalating violent conflict. Yet rather than conclude that violent conflict is inevitable, we believe psychology's contributions can extend beyond understanding the origins and nature of violent conflict, to promote nonviolence and…

  17. News Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-03-01

    Conference: Physics brings the community together Training: CERN trains physics teachers Education: World conference fosters physics collaborations Lecture: Physics education live at ASE Prize: Physics teacher wins first Moore medal Festival: European presidents patronize Science on Stage festival Videoconference: Videoconference brings Durban closer to the classroom

  18. Bringing STEM to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkeihiser, Mike; Ray, Dori

    2013-01-01

    The interdisciplinary approach that science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) projects inspire in both teachers and students "brings to light a larger picture that promotes real-world scientific applications, which has in turn been shown to increase undergraduate persistence in STEM." The high school students have been warned…

  19. Scalable Game Design: A Strategy to Bring Systemic Computer Science Education to Schools through Game Design and Simulation Creation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repenning, Alexander; Webb, David C.; Koh, Kyu Han; Nickerson, Hilarie; Miller, Susan B.; Brand, Catharine; Her Many Horses, Ian; Basawapatna, Ashok; Gluck, Fred; Grover, Ryan; Gutierrez, Kris; Repenning, Nadia

    2015-01-01

    An educated citizenry that participates in and contributes to science technology engineering and mathematics innovation in the 21st century will require broad literacy and skills in computer science (CS). School systems will need to give increased attention to opportunities for students to engage in computational thinking and ways to promote a…

  20. Diversity in Libraries: Academic Residency Programs. Contributions in Librarianship and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogell, Raquel V., Ed.; Gruwell, Cindy A., Ed.

    This book contains 15 essays written by 19 librarians who participated in minority residency programs in academic libraries and 5 essays written by 6 professionals who served as residency program administrators. The following essays are included: (1) "The University of California, Santa Barbara Fellowship--A Program in Transition" (Detrice…

  1. NASA's New Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: Bringing Communities and Resources Together to Increase Effectiveness and Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Denise A.; Mendez, B.; Shipp, S.; Schwerin, T.; Stockman, S.; Cooper, L. P.; Sharma, M.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists, engineers, educators, and public outreach professionals have a rich history of creatively using NASA's pioneering scientific discoveries and technology to engage and educate youth and adults nationwide in core science, technology, engineering, and mathematics topics. We introduce four new Science Education and Public Outreach Forums that will work in partnership with the community and NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) to ensure that current and future SMD-funded education and public outreach (E/PO) activities form a seamless whole, with easy entry points for general public, students, K-12 formal and informal science educators, faculty, scientists, engineers, and E/PO professionals alike. The new Science Education and Public Outreach Forums support the astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and Earth science divisions of NASA SMD in three core areas: 1) E/PO community engagement and development activities will provide clear paths of involvement for scientists and engineers interested - or potentially interested - in participating in SMD-funded E/PO activities. Collaborations with scientists and engineers are vital for infusing current, accurate SMD mission and research findings into educational products and activities. Forum activities will also yield readily accessible information on effective E/PO strategies, resources, and expertise; context for individual E/PO activities; and opportunities for collaboration. 2) A rigorous analysis of SMD-funded K-12 formal, informal, and higher education products and activities will help the community and SMD to understand how the existing collection supports education standards and audience needs, and to strategically identify areas of opportunity for new materials and activities. 3) Finally, a newly convened Coordinating Committee will work across the four SMD science divisions to address systemic issues and integrate related activities. By supporting the NASA E/PO community and facilitating coordination of E

  2. Bringing science to medicine: an interview with Larry Weed, inventor of the problem-oriented medical record

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F; McGowan, Julie; Ash, Joan S; Weed, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    Larry Weed, MD is widely known as the father of the problem-oriented medical record and inventor of the now-ubiquitous SOAP (subjective/objective/assessment/plan) note, for developing an electronic health record system (Problem-Oriented Medical Information System, PROMIS), and for founding a company (since acquired), which developed problem-knowledge couplers. However, Dr Weed's vision for medicine goes far beyond software—over the course of his storied career, he has relentlessly sought to bring the scientific method to medical practice and, where necessary, to point out shortcomings in the system and advocate for change. In this oral history, Dr Weed describes, in his own words, the arcs of his long career and the work that remains to be done. PMID:24872343

  3. Bringing science to medicine: an interview with Larry Weed, inventor of the problem-oriented medical record.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F; McGowan, Julie; Ash, Joan S; Weed, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    Larry Weed, MD is widely known as the father of the problem-oriented medical record and inventor of the now-ubiquitous SOAP (subjective/objective/assessment/plan) note, for developing an electronic health record system (Problem-Oriented Medical Information System, PROMIS), and for founding a company (since acquired), which developed problem-knowledge couplers. However, Dr Weed's vision for medicine goes far beyond software--over the course of his storied career, he has relentlessly sought to bring the scientific method to medical practice and, where necessary, to point out shortcomings in the system and advocate for change. In this oral history, Dr Weed describes, in his own words, the arcs of his long career and the work that remains to be done. PMID:24872343

  4. The Space Weather Monitor Project: Bringing Hands-on Science to Students of the Developing World for the IHY2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrer, D. K.; Rabello-Soares, M. C.; Morrow, C.

    2006-08-01

    Stanford's Solar Center, Electrical Engineering Department, and local educators have developed inexpensive Space Weather Monitors that students around the world can use to track solar-induced changes to the Earth's ionosphere. Through the United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) and the IHY Education and Public Outreach Program, our Monitors are being deployed to 191 countries for the International Heliophysical Year, 2007. In partnership with Chabot Space and Science Center, we are designing and developing classroom and educator support materials to accompany the distribution. Materials will be culturally sensitive and will be translated into the six official languages of the United Nations (Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish). Monitors will be provided free of charge to developing nations and can be set up anywhere there is access to power.

  5. #ClimateEdCommunity : Field Workshops Bring Together Teachers and Researchers to Make Meaning of Science and Classroom Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartholow, S.; Warburton, J.; Wood, J. H.; Steiner, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Seeing Understanding and Teaching: Climate Change in Denali is a four-day immersive teacher professional development course held in Denali National Park. Developed through three partner organizations, the course aims to develop teachers' skills for integrating climate change content into their classrooms. This presentation aims to share tangible best practices for linking researchers and teachers in the field, through four years of experience in program delivery and reported through a published external evaluation. This presentation will examine the key aspects of a successful connection between teachers, researchers, science, and classrooms: (1) Inclusion of teacher leaders, (2) dedicated program staff, (3) workshop community culture, and will expose barriers to this type of collaboration including (1) differences in learning style, (2) prior teaching experience, (3) existing/scaffolding understanding of climate change science, and (4) accessibility of enrollment and accommodations for the extended learning experience. Presentation Content Examples:Participants overwhelmingly value the deep commitment this course has to linking their field experience to the classroom attributing to the role of a teacher-leader; an expert science teacher with first-hand field research experience in the polar regions. The goal of including a teacher-leader is to enhance translatability between fieldwork and the classroom. Additionally, qualitative aspects of the report touches on the intangible successes of the workshop such as: (1) the creation of a non-judgmental learning atmosphere, (2) addressing accessibility to science learning tools in rural and under-served communities, (3) defining successful collaboration as making meaning together through exploratory questioning while in the field (4) discussed the social and cultural implications of climate change, and the difficulty of navigating these topics in educational and/or multicultural spaces. Next Steps? Create a #Climate

  6. Bringing Field Geology to a High School Audience: Connecting to the Next Generation of Scientific Minds through Science Olympiad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, A. M.; Schroeder, D. M.; Van Hecke, M.

    2011-12-01

    Over the past 27 years, Science Olympiad has grown from a collection of motivated high school teachers to one of the most respected high school science competitions in the nation. With more than 240,000 students competing on over 6,000 high school and 10,000 elementary teams, this organization has brought many minority students to science and highlighted some of the brightest rising scientific minds. Many competitors get involved with scientific research early in their undergraduate careers in the areas of their events, some even moving on to graduate degrees (such as the two PhD candidates / Science Olympiad alumni involved in the creation of the new Geologic Mapping event). In the past, there have been a number of events that focused on geologic concepts - Dynamic Planet, Fossils, and Remote Sensing - but none that have required the integrative, problem-solving skills associated with the creation and use of geologic maps. This year, Geologic Mapping is being introduced as a trial event to fill that void. For the event, students will demonstrate understanding in the construction and use of topographic maps, geologic maps, and seismic reflection profiles and their use in forming interpretations regarding geohazard risk and subsurface structure. By focusing on these two avenues, the students can apply their basic knowledge to higher-level tasks in a few areas rather than simply answering questions about everything from seismology to soil science. In order for students to problem solve and form interpretations for geologic concepts, they will naturally need to have an understanding of the major concepts of geology, but a large component of the exams would be solving problems that require students to integrate this knowledge with common geologic mapping practices. Information will be presented to students in such formats as topographic maps, USGS quadrangles, geologic maps, drill cores, seismic reflection profiles, or stereonet plots. Students will then be presented

  7. Bringing Real-Life Marine Science Experience to the Classroom: Results From a Teacher in the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavias, J. A.; Kelly, R. P.

    2008-12-01

    Many public school science teachers are "textbook" teachers who lack basic research experience. Conversely, many scientists fail to relate their findings back to the general public in a meaningful way. The ARMADA project, funded by the National Science Foundation, is an effective program that exposes teachers to real-world oceanographic experiences. Additionally, the ARMADA project provides opportunities for teachers to pass on first hand experiences from the research community to their classrooms. After participating in a month long cruise aboard the USCGC Healy during July 2008 as part of the Bering Sea Ecosystem Study (BEST), a new appreciation for field research was developed. As part of a group from the University of Rhode Island Graduate School of Oceanography, first hand experience was gained on how marine scientists study the effects of global climate change in the Bering Sea. These experiences at sea have resulted in changes to the marine biology class curriculum to include the tools and techniques used by marine scientists to conduct their work. One lesson in particular discusses anthropogenic impacts on polar regions. In addition, students' attitudes toward the class have changed. For example, a lesson on global climate change from a teacher who has first hand experience of climate change research is far more effective than from one who lacks it. The effect of having a teacher who has unique field experience in front of the classroom on students is immeasurable. In addition, the presence of a teacher at sea encourages the scientists to reduce their work to the most significant observations and conclusions on a daily basis during the cruise, helping to prepare the scientists for future public communications. In this manner, the gap between science research and public education is reduced.

  8. Windows to the Universe: an Internet Resource Bringing the Earth and Space Sciences to the General Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, R. M.; Alexander, C. J.; Burek, M.; Kozyra, J.; Lenhart, E.; Linker, J.; Mastie, D.; Ceritelli, M.; Thoenes, H.; Orselli, P.; Weymouth, T.

    1997-07-01

    Windows to the Universe is a World Wide Web site that presents information about the Earth and Space sciences as well as related historical and cultural topics to the general public in an attractive and user-friendly way. The site makes extensive use of graphically annotated button panels to allow intuitive navigation through the site. The site is graphics intensive, providing access to a rich archive of images, movies, animations and data collected by satellites, spacecraft, and ground-based instruments. Intended primarily as an innovative information resource for museums, libraries, and classrooms, content within Windows to the Universe is developed to complement K-12 science education needs. Content is available at three levels of sophistication, approximating the elementary, middle, and high school levels, and resources are available on-line for teachers including standards-based keyword search capabilities and classroom activities. Supplementary CD-ROMs are available for Mac and Windows-95 platforms that allow rapid access to images on the site, rather than requiring the user to download images over the Internet. This award-winning site is funded by the NASA Public Use of Remote Sensing Data Bases Program.

  9. In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle: A STEM Partnership Between Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Office of Naval Research and Middle School Science Students Bringing Next Generation Science Standards into the Classroom through Ocean Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brice, D.; Appelgate, B., Jr.; Mauricio, P.

    2014-12-01

    Now in its tenth year, "In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle" (IFRR) is a middle school science education program that draws student interest, scientific content and coherence with Next Generation Science Standards from real-time research at sea in fields of physical science. As a successful collaboration involving Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO),Office of Naval Research (ONR), and San Marcos Middle School (SMMS), IFRR brings physical oceanography and related sciences to students at the San Marcos Middle School in real-time from research vessels at sea using SIO's HiSeasNet satellite communication system. With a generous grant from ONR, students are able to tour the SIO Ships and spend a day at sea doing real oceanographic data collection and labs. Through real-time and near-realtime broadcasts and webcasts, students are able to share data with scientists and gain an appreciation for the value of Biogeochemical research in the field as it relates to their classroom studies. Interaction with scientists and researchers as well as crew members gives students insights into not only possible career paths, but the vital importance of cutting edge oceanographic research on our society. With their science teacher on the ship as an education outreach specialist or ashore guiding students in their interactions with selected scientists at sea, students observe shipboard research being carried out live via videoconference, Skype, daily e-mails, interviews, digital whiteboard sessions, and web interaction. Students then research, design, develop, deploy, and field-test their own data-collecting physical oceanography instruments in their classroom. The online interactive curriculum models the Next Generation Science Standards encouraging active inquiry and critical thinking with intellectually stimulating problem- solving, enabling students to gain critical insight and skill while investigating some of the most provocative questions of our time, and seeing scientists as

  10. The relationship between cultural intelligence and social compatibility in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students

    PubMed Central

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Soltani, Batoul

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cultural intelligence and social compatibility are two acquired processes that their education and reinforcement between dormitory's students who have inter cultural interactions with each other can conclude with results that tension diminution, inter cultural contrast and conflict, social divisions and consequently healthy and peaceful relationships and governance and finally mental peace, and health are of its most important. Hence, the research has been occurring in order to the determination of cultural intelligence relationship with the social compatibility of Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students in 2012. Materials and Methods: The research method is descriptive-correlation, and its population is composed of all Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories resident students in 2012 that were totally 2500 persons. The two steps sampling method have been used, group sampling and random sampling has been occurring at first and second steps and totally 447 persons were selected. Research data were collected via Earley and Ang cultural intelligence questionnaire with 0.76 Cronbach's alpha Coefficient and California social compatibility standard questionnaire with higher than 0.70 Cronbach's alpha factor. Questionnaire data have been analyzed with the SPSS software and results have been presented in the shape of descriptions and statistics. Findings: Results showed that there is a direct significant relationship (P < 0.001) between cultural intelligence and the social adjustment in students living in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences dormitories and also there is a direct significant relationship in the level of (P < 0.05) between cognitive and motivational dimensions of cultural intelligence; however, there is no significant relationship between cognitive and behavioral dimensions of cultural intelligence and social adjustment (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Cultural intelligence and cognitive and motivational

  11. Bringing Students To Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Gilbert

    2013-05-01

    The Telescopes In Education (TIE) Program was the pioneer in robotic astronomy. The first users came online in the spring of 1993. The TIE program was dedicated to K-14 students with the hope of inspiring them to develop a greater appreciation for math, science, and engineering through their participation in astronomy. The program was very successful through 2005 when NASA felt there were enough robotic telescopes in the community to support the students into the future. During the 12 years of supported operations, TIE had over one hundred thousand student operations. TIE then started working with Universities in Australia to help move their students towards careers in the sciences and engineering. We discovered that students in the middle schools were the ones that should be focused on, to successfully bring them into the sciences and engineering. We have crafted a system that should be very successful in this endeavor.

  12. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation): Facilitating Partnerships that Work to Bring Earth Science Data into Educational Settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freuder, R.; Ledley, T. S.; Dahlman, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation, http://www.esipfed.org) formed seven years ago and now with 77 member organizations is working to "increase the quality and value of Earth science products and services .for the benefit of the ESIP Federation's stakeholder communities." Education (both formal and informal) is a huge audience that we serve. Partnerships formed by members within the ESIP Federation have created bridges that close the gap between Earth science data collection and research and the effective use of that Earth science data to explore concepts in Earth system science by the educational community. The Earth Exploration Toolbook is one of those successful collaborations. The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET, http://serc.carleton.edu/eet) grew out of a need of the educational community (articulated by the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) community) to have better access to Earth science data and data analysis tools and help in effectively using them with students. It is a collection of web-accessible chapters, each featuring step-by-step instructions on how to use an Earth science dataset and data analysis tool to investigate an issue or concept in Earth system science. Each chapter also provides the teacher information on the outcome of the activity, grade level, standards addressed, learning goals, time required, and ideas for exploring further. The individual ESIP Federation partners alone could not create the EET. However, the ESIP Federation facilitated the partnering of members, drawing from data providers, researchers and education tool developers, to create the EET. Interest in the EET has grown since it went live with five chapters in July 2003. There are currently seven chapters with another six soon to be released. Monthly online seminars in which over a hundred educators have participated have given very positive feedback. Post workshop surveys from our telecon-online workshops indicate that

  13. Bringing Imagination Back to Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linfield, Rachel Sparks

    2007-01-01

    Albert Einstein once said, "Imagination is more important than knowledge." In order to develop his theories, he had to use his imagination and go beyond the facts generally accepted. He needed time to think and to imagine. Knowledge has a valuable part to play, but the current emphasis in England on end-of-key-stage assessments and National…

  14. Current state of professional and core competency in pediatric residency program at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences: A local survey

    PubMed Central

    EBRAHIMI, SEDIGHEH; REZAEE, RITA

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Accreditation assesses performance, or capacity to perform, against predetermined standards. It typically combines external quality assurance, through a process of peers review, with elements of self-regulation through internal and self-directed assessment. This study is an attempt to identify the quality of pediatrics residency educational programs regarding predetermined standards. Methods This descriptive-analytical evaluation study of applied type was conducted during 2010 and 2011 in the pediatrics department of Shiraz Medical School, Iran. The assessment process occurred in several phases; at first an assessment model for a residency educational development and a series of educational criteria and indices were created based on WFME Standards. Multiple methods including a self-assessment questionnaire and several checklists were used to collect data, whereas systematic site visit, peer review and document reviewing were conducted with survey team. Due to limitation of the statistical society, all faculty members (n=34) and residents (n=41) of the pediatric department were asked to complete the survey. At last, descriptive and deductive statistics data analysis was performed using SPSS version 14.  Results According to the records available in assessing program quality, it seems that the input criteria were desirable for the program based on the residents’ viewpoints (86.6 %).There were proper physical facilities for them to meet the residency program goals.  The study indicated that the learning environment needed to be revised for the educational needs (Likert scale: 2.96±1.05). The peer evaluation team demonstrated achievement of mission fulfillment in the context of the objectives and indicators by meeting the desired themes.  In spite of some weaknesses in the process criteria, the criteria for output indicators were good according to the report (more than desired level of 75-80%). Conclusion Accreditation is an important step towards

  15. Bringing Reality into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heck, Andre

    2009-01-01

    Technology offers ample opportunities to bring reality into the classroom. Students and teachers nowadays have many tools to work in an authentic way with real data in mathematics and science education. However, much research and development are still needed to create a consistent learning trajectory out of the many exciting single activities.…

  16. Bringing soil science to society after catastrophic events such as big forest fires. Some examples of field approaches in Spanish Mediterranean areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Vicky; Cerdà, Artemi; García-Orenes, Fuensanta; Moltó, Jorge; Chrenkovà, Katerina; Torres, Pilar; Lozano, Elena; Jimenez-Pinilla, Patricia; Jara-Navarro, Ana B.

    2015-04-01

    participation of people on the days when we started field research with installation of plots and soil samplings, field trips with volunteers of some NGO's, etc., are some of examples of what we will show in this presentation of how to bring soil science to society. Acknowledgements: to the "Ministerio de Economía and Competitividad" of Spanish Government for finance the POSTFIRE project (CGL2013- 47862-C2-1-R), FUEGORED, Spanish Soil Science Society, Alcoi and Javea councils, Botánica Mediterrànea, ACIF Alcoi, ACIF Marina Alta, Xàbia Viva, Montgó Viu, and Sierra de Mariola and Montgó Natural Parks for their collaboration.

  17. Resident's Morning Report: An Opportunity to Reinforce Principles of Biomedical Science in a Clinical Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brass, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    The principles of biochemistry are core to understanding cellular and tissue function, as well as the pathophysiology of disease. However, the clinical utility of biochemical principles is often obscure to clinical trainees. Resident's Morning Report is a common teaching conference in which residents present clinical cases of interest to a…

  18. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients. PMID:25128009

  19. Bringing physics to life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    `I'm doing a physics that is pulling me towards it.' `I like the course being more up to date.' `You learn the physics but you also think ``well I actually see a point in knowing this physics''.' `This course presents physics in a more interesting way as it focuses on practical activity and applications of physics.' `The industrial visit gives students the opportunity to look for science in action.' These are just some of the comments from students and teachers piloting the new Salters Horners Advanced Physics course (SHAP). Contexts and applications drive the course, providing interest and motivation for students and alerting them to some of the many career areas that involve physics. For example, the operation of a CD player leads to a study of waves and superposition; archaeological surveying and analysis brings in d.c. circuitry and x-ray diffraction; consideration of safety in rail transport involves learning about mechanics and electromagnetism. The course is produced by a team directed from the University of York and funded by a consortium of industrial and charitable sponsors. It is examined by Edexcel and support materials are published by Heinemann. The pilot, involving some 50 centres, began in September 1998 with the new subject core and the AS qualification intermediate between GCSE and the full A-level standard. The course has been fully approved by QCA, and from September 2000 it will be open to all. For comprehensive information about SHAP, visit the project's website: www.york.ac.uk/org/seg/salters/physics . Pilot materials for students, teachers and technicians are available from Heinemann. They will be re-edited and published in full colour for September 2000. Members of the team will attend the annual ASE meeting in Leeds this month; there will be a talk and a hands-on workshop where student activities can be sampled. Materials will be on view at the University of York stand. In addition, Edexcel and the York team are running a series of

  20. NASA's Science Education and Public Outreach Forums: Bringing Communities and Resources Together to Increase Effectiveness and Sustainability of E/PO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Mangala; Smith, D.; Mendez, B.; Shipp, S.; Schwerin, T.; Stockman, S.; Cooper, L.

    2010-03-01

    The AAS-HEAD community has a rich history of involvement in education and public outreach (E/PO). HEAD members have been using NASA science and educational resources to engage and educate youth and adults nationwide in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics topics. Four new Science Education and Public Outreach Forums ("Forums") funded by NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) are working in partnership with the research and education community to ensure that current and future SMD-funded E/PO activities form a seamless whole, with easy entry points for scientists, engineers, faculty, students, K-12 formal and informal science educators, general public, and E/PO professionals alike. These Forums support the astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary and Earth science divisions of NASA SMD in three core areas: 1) E/PO community engagement and development to facilitate clear paths of involvement for scientists, engineers and others interested - or potentially interested - in participating in SMD-funded E/PO activities. Collaborations with science professionals are vital for infusing current, accurate SMD mission and research findings into educational products and activities. Forum activities will yield readily accessible information on effective E/PO strategies, resources, and expertise; context for individual E/PO activities; and opportunities for collaboration. 2) A rigorous analysis of SMD-funded E/PO products and activities to help understand how the existing collection supports education standards and audience needs and to identify areas of opportunity for new materials and activities. K-12 formal, informal, and higher education products and activities are included in this analysis. 3) Finally, to address E/PO-related systemic issues and coordinate related activities across the four SMD science divisions. By supporting the NASA E/PO community and facilitating coordination of E/PO activities within and across disciplines, the SMD-Forum partnerships will

  1. Bringing Your Baby Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... avoid suffocation. Chances are much better that you'll bring home a calm, contented baby if you ... by the manufacturer before the second birthday, you'll need to use a convertible seat designed for ...

  2. Bringing cancer care home.

    PubMed

    Treco-Jones, S

    1991-01-01

    Community hospitals in the South are seeing new and more cancer patients. Hospitals aggressively seeking new and faster methods to treat patients in their home towns bring benefits to both. PMID:10115667

  3. Bringing nursing to the public.

    PubMed

    Kazis, Cornelia; Schwendimann, René

    2009-11-01

    For the past 5 years, an unusual program has been evolving in the University of Basel's Institute of Nursing Science master's program in Basel, Switzerland. A special course designed to help nurses master public communication skills requires students to play the roles of journalist, exhibition curator, conference organizer, radio reporter, and news producer. Two faculty members, an experienced radio and newspaper journalist and a nurse scientist, teach and support the students. By developing their competence in media relations, participants prepare themselves to tackle the course's long-term goal of bringing the nursing profession into the public eye. PMID:19731893

  4. Out before the Game Begins: Hispanic Leaders Talk about What's Needed to Bring More Hispanic Youngsters into Science, Technology and Math Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasbarra, Paul; Johnson, Jean

    2008-01-01

    Hispanics are one of the largest and fastest-growing minority groups in the United States. Projections indicate a need for an increase of 20% of practicing engineers by 2010. Despite the growing number of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) careers in the American economy, education statistics suggest that too few Hispanic students…

  5. IPY: Engaging Antarctica: Bringing Antarctic Geoscience to the Public Through a NOVA Documentary and an Innovative Flexible Exhibit for Informal Science Education Venues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, F.; Diamond, J.; Levy, R.; Berg, M.; Dahlman, L.; Jackson, J.

    2006-12-01

    IPY: Engaging Antarctica is an informal science education project designed to increase the general public's understanding of scientific research conducted in Antarctica. The project focuses specifically on the multi- national, NSF-funded Antarctic Drilling Project (ANDRILL). The ANDRILL project is the newest geological drilling program in an ongoing effort to recover stratigraphic records from Antarctica. ANDRILL's primary objectives are to investigate Antarctica's role in global environmental change over the past 65 million years and to better understand its future response to global changes. Additionally, through ANDRILL's Research Immersion for Science Educators program (ARISE), 12 science educators from four countries will work on science research teams in Antarctica and produce educational materials that feature Antarctic geoscience. The Engaging Antarctica project will produce both a NOVA television documentary and an innovative informal learning exhibit. The documentary, Antarctica's Icy Secrets, will provide a geological perspective on how Antarctica continues to play a major role in affecting global climate by altering ocean currents and sea levels. The learning exhibit, one that blends standards- and inquiry-based learning with the latest information technologies, is coined the Flexhibit. The Engaging Antarctica Flexhibit will provide a digital package of high resolution images for banners as well as learning activities and ideas for exhibit stations that can be implemented by youth groups. Flexhibit images will feature ANDRILL scientists at work, and audio files, available as podcasts, will tell scientists' stories in their own words, speaking directly to the public about the joys and challenges of Antarctic geological research.

  6. From the Horse's Mouth: A Unique Resource for Bringing NGSS Standards on the Nature and Process of Science to Life via Educational Access to Videos of Scientists Communicating with Each Other

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrow, C. A.; Katzenberger, J.; Osenga, E. C.; Arnott, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    "From the Horse's Mouth' (FTHM) is a standards-aligned educational website that is being developed by the Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) with NSF support for purposes of both formal and informal education. The project allows students, teachers, and the public to become '(horse) flies on the wall' as science communication on key global change issues is practiced by leading scientists from around the world. The website will offer a uniquely valuable resource for explicitly addressing educational standards about science as human endeavor, the nature of science, the process of science, and cross cutting themes such as systems and cycles. The source material for the FTHM website is more than 1200 hours of video documentation of scientists communicating with each other about both foundational and emerging global change topics at 50 AGCI interdisciplinary workshops (N~25-30 participants/workshop) over the past 24 years. Scientists from more than 35 countries have presented in AGCI workshops on a broad array of topics in Earth system science. The FTHM project team has been scouring the AGCI archive for excerpts (2-8 min) with exceptional educational potential that well illustrate the values, nature, and process of the scientific endeavor in the context of engaging multi-disciplinary topics and concepts. The website surrounds these clips with supporting materials that help the viewer comprehend the communication of scientific concepts and, most importantly, identify key elements of the scientific process. The FTHM website will provide a unique resource for teachers and teacher educators to bring to life the nature of scientific discourse and the process of science that is so important to fulfilling the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). This work was supported by NSF grant GEO-1035125.

  7. Resident recruitment.

    PubMed

    Longmaid, H Esterbrook

    2003-02-01

    This article has introduced the reader to the critical components of successful recruitment of radiology residents. With particular attention to the ACGME institutional and program requirements regarding resident recruitment, and an explanation of the support systems (ERAS and NRMP) currently available to those involved in applicant review and selection, the article has sought to delineate a sensible approach to recruitment. Successful recruiters have mastered the essentials of these programs and have learned to adapt the programs to their needs. As new program directors work with their departments' resident selection committees, they will identify the factors that faculty and current residents cite as most important in the successful selection of new residents. By structuring the application review process, exploiting the power of the ERAS, and crafting a purposeful and friendly interview process, radiology residency directors can find and recruit the residents who best match their programs. PMID:12585436

  8. Will our Current Data Rescue, Curation and Preservation Practices bring us out of the Digital Dark Ages and into the Renaissance of Multi-Source Science? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyborn, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The emergence of the fourth paradigm of data intensive science in 2007 showed great promise: it offered a new fundamental methodology in scientific exploration in which researchers would be able to harness the huge increase in data volumes coming from new and more powerful instruments that were collecting data at unprecedented rates and at ever increasing resolutions. Given the potential this new methodology offered, decadal challenges were issued to the Earth and Space Science community to come together and work on problems such as impacts of climate change; sustainably exploiting scarce water, mineral and petroleum resources; and protecting our communities through better prediction of the behaviour of natural hazards. Such challenges require the capability to integrate heterogeneous data sets, from multiple sources, across multiple domains and at low transactional cost. To help realise these visions significant investments were made globally in cyberinfrastructures (computer centres, research clouds, data stores, high speed networks, etc.). Combined, these infrastructures are now capable of analysing petabyte size chunks of data, and the climate community is close to operating at exascale. But have we actually realised the vision of data intensive science? The simple reality is that data intensive science requires the capability to find and analyse large volumes of data in real time via machine to machine interactions. It is not necessarily just about ';Big Data' sets collected from remote instruments such as satellites or sensor networks. ';Long Tail' data sets, traditionally the output of small science campaigns, are vital to calibrating large data sets and need to be stored so that they can be reused and repurposed in ways beyond what the original collector of the data intended they be used for. Particularly for meaningful time series analysis in environmental sciences, there is the additional challenge to store and manage data through decades of multiple

  9. Bring an axe and your wildest dreams: Post-apocalyptic desires, science distrust, and the de(con)struction of a zombie story

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Samantha Jo

    Observing the current popularity of the zombie narrative in American culture, this thesis explores the questions "why zombie?" and "why now?" through a combination of research and the creation of an original zombie story. Moving beyond existing criticism which argues that the zombie transforms to fit each generation's specific fears, I argue that zombie movies, novels, and video games from George A. Romero-onwards continually speak to a distrust of science and scientific progress while additionally romanticizing the post-apocalyptic landscape. Consequently, the zombie's unprecedented mainstream popularity over the last fifteen years could be read as symptomatic of this distrust intensifying, paralleling an increasing politicization of science and a rise in apocalyptic thinking within the public sphere. Through the deconstruction of my own zombie story, I uncover not only what these timely narratives tell us about our perceptions of the future, but also how they can help us change them.

  10. Bringing Psychology to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdam, Dale

    1987-01-01

    Describes a set of exercises called Bringing Psychology to Life (BPL), which is designed to engage introductory psychology students in learning course and textbook content by having them develop psychological explanations for events in their lives. Maintains that BPL is an excellent icebreaker for graduate teaching assistants and a vehicle for…

  11. Bringing down the trash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    The density of junk orbiting the Earth is at or near a critical value beyond which this man-made debris will self-perpetuate, forming many smaller pieces that are even more of a problem. Stephen Ornes reports on the latest ideas about how to bring down the trash.

  12. Bringing Women Into Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Francine E., Ed.; Strober, Myra H., Ed.

    Intended to encourage and assist top management in bringing more women into upper management positions, the document provides an intellectual understanding of the issues and practical information on how to implement change. Nine chapters include: (1) "Institutional Barriers: What Keeps Women Out of the Executive Suite?" Cynthia Fuchs Epstein,…

  13. Bringing Scientists to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how he brings scientists to life when he visits schools. Having retired from teaching Drama and Theatre Studies in Liverpool for more than thirty years, the author set up his one-man Theatre-in-Education company, Blindseer Productions, and now takes his portrayals of Darwin, Galileo and Einstein to schools…

  14. Teachers Shift Instructional Approaches to Bring "Next Generation" into Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2013-01-01

    Well before the Next Generation Science Standards became final last month, teachers in pockets around the country were already exploring the vision for science education espoused by the document and bringing elements of that approach to the classroom. The new standards call for bringing greater depth to K-12 students' understanding of the subject…

  15. Bringing the Story Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Ian B.

    2006-01-01

    Science is a story, a narrative, and scientists are storytellers. Teaching is quite possibly the ultimate in storytelling so if one is teaching science he/she is already storytelling. Using a story to set up a science topic is effective. One can engage the brains of the audience, paint the scene, let them realise why the idea or work is important…

  16. ‘Building Core Knowledge - Reconstructing Earth History’: Transforming Undergraduate Instruction by Bringing Ocean Drilling Science on Earth History and Global Climate Change into the Classroom (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. John, K.; Leckie, R. M.; Jones, M. H.; Pound, K. S.; Pyle, E.; Krissek, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    This NSF-funded, Phase 1 CCLI project effectively integrates scientific ocean drilling data and research (DSDP-ODP-IODP-ANDRILL) with education. We have developed, and are currently testing, a suite of data-rich inquiry-based classroom learning materials based on sediment core archives. These materials are suitable for use in introductory geoscience courses that serve general education students, early geoscience majors, and pre-service teachers. 'Science made accessible' is the essence of this goal. Our team consists of research and education specialists from institutions ranging from R1 research to public liberal arts to community college. We address relevant and timely ‘Big Ideas’ with foundational geoscience concepts and climate change case studies, as well transferable skills valued in professional settings. The exercises are divided into separate but inter-related modules including: introduction to cores, seafloor sediments, microfossils and biostratigraphy, paleomagnetism and magnetostratigraphy, climate rhythms, oxygen-isotope changes in the Cenozoic, past Arctic and Antarctic climates, drill site selection, interpreting Arctic and Antarctic sediment cores, onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation, onset of Antarctic glaciation, and the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Each module has several parts, and each is designed to be used in the classroom, laboratory, or assigned as homework. All exercises utilize authentic data. Students work with scientific uncertainty, practice quantitative and problem-solving skills, and expand their basic geologic and geographic knowledge. Students have the opportunity to work individually and in groups, evaluate real-world problems, and formulate hypotheses. Initial exercises in each module are useful to introduce a topic, gauge prior knowledge, and flag possible areas of student misconception. Comprehensive instructor guides provide essential background information, detailed answer keys, and alternative implementation

  17. DNA Barcoding Investigations Bring Biology to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musante, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how DNA barcoding investigations bring biology to life. Biologists recognize the power of DNA barcoding not just to teach biology through connections to the real world but also to immerse students in the exciting process of science. As an investigator in the Program for the Human Environment at Rockefeller University in New…

  18. Bringing Technology into Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettlili, Nouredine

    2009-05-01

    Through our outreach initiative at Jacksonville State University, we have been supporting a number of school districts in Northeast Alabama to improve the teaching of physics at the high school level. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major pressing local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. The main aim of project IMPACTSEED is to help teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama Course of Study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of program. In this presentation, we want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to physics classrooms. We have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms, most notably through a series of make-and-take technology workshops that were developed over several years of research. In turn, when the teachers assign these make-an-take projects to their students, the students will be able to see first-hand---by doing, rather than being told---that physics is not a dry, abstract subject. We found this approach to be particularly effective in heightening the students' interest in math and science.

  19. Permanent resident

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, John F.

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff. PMID:27193992

  20. Bringing science to the art of strategy.

    PubMed

    Lafley, A G; Martin, Roger L; Rivkin, Jan W; Siggelkow, Nicolaj

    2012-09-01

    Many managers feel doomed to trade off the futile rigor of ordinary strategic planning for the hit-or-miss creativity of the alternatives. In fact, the two can be reconciled to produce novel but realistic strategies. The key is to recognize that conventional strategic planning, for all its analysis, is not actually scientific-it lacks the careful generation and testing of hypotheses that are at the heart of the scientific method. The authors outline a strategy-making process that combines rigor and creativity. A team begins by formulating options, or possibilities, and asks what must be true for each to succeed. Once it has listed all the conditions, it assesses their likelihood and thereby identifies the barriers to each choice. The team then tests the key barrier conditions to see which hold true. From here, choosing a strategy is simple: The group need only review the test results and choose the possibility with the fewest serious barriers. This is the path P&G took in the late 1990s, when it was looking to become a major global player in skin care. After testing the barrier conditions for several possibilities, it opted for a bold strategy that might never have surfaced in the traditional process: reinventing Olay as a prestigelike product also sold to mass consumers. The new Olay succeeded beyond expectations-showing what can happen when teams shift from asking "What is the right answer" and focus instead on figuring out "What are the right questions?". PMID:22953562

  1. Bringing Science Research into Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allwood, Dan A.; Dean, Julian; Bryan, Matthew T.; Baker, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Finite element modelling software has been used to allow secondary school students to study nanoscale magnetic materials for hard drive recording applications. The students were introduced to the basic concepts of finite element modelling using a freely available internet game before modelling the magnetization reversal of single magnetic grains.…

  2. Bringing up Gender: Academic Abjection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Emily F.

    2014-01-01

    The principal questions raised in this article are: what does it mean to bring up the topic of gender in a space where it is not known, and how can this moment of bringing up gender--or not bringing it up--be conceptualised? The article departs from the thoughts and questions that were provoked by an interview conducted with a Gender Studies…

  3. Bringing Cairo home.

    PubMed

    Clinton, B

    1994-01-01

    US President Bill Clinton as the keynote speaker of a two-day forum addressing population challenges noted how there was less discord among representatives of the 174 countries to the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development than among the 535 members of Congress. He addressed the impacts and challenges of a growing population, and emphasized the importance of bringing the spirit of the Cairo conference home to help reduce population pressures in the US. Excerpts from his speech are presented. Innovation, commitment, and determination are needed to reduce population growth and provide economic opportunity, education, and basic health care in this era of regional hunger, lack of sanitation, and lack of trained medical personnel. Clinton stressed the important role of families in creating a better world and our mutual responsibility to each other. The contributions of women to society and the labor force should be acknowledged. Finally, Clinton also heralded participation in the conference as a step toward advancing our vision of sustainable development and stabilized population growth. PMID:12345671

  4. Bringing Gravity to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norsk, P.; Shelhamer, M.

    2016-01-01

    This panel will present NASA's plans for ongoing and future research to define the requirements for Artificial Gravity (AG) as a countermeasure against the negative health effects of long-duration weightlessness. AG could mitigate the gravity-sensitive effects of spaceflight across a host of physiological systems. Bringing gravity to space could mitigate the sensorimotor and neuro-vestibular disturbances induced by G-transitions upon reaching a planetary body, and the cardiovascular deconditioning and musculoskeletal weakness induced by weightlessness. Of particular interest for AG during deep-space missions is mitigation of the Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome that the majority of astronauts exhibit in space to varying degrees, and which presumably is associated with weightlessness-induced fluid shift from lower to upper body segments. AG could be very effective for reversing the fluid shift and thus help prevent VIIP. The first presentation by Dr. Charles will summarize some of the ground-based and (very little) space-based research that has been conducted on AG by the various space programs. Dr. Paloski will address the use of AG during deep-space exploration-class missions and describe the different AG scenarios such as intra-vehicular, part-of-vehicle, or whole-vehicle centrifugations. Dr. Clement will discuss currently planned NASA research as well as how to coordinate future activities among NASA's international partners. Dr. Barr will describe some possible future plans for using space- and ground-based partial-G analogs to define the relationship between physiological responses and G levels between 0 and 1. Finally, Dr. Stenger will summarize how the human cardiovascular system could benefit from intermittent short-radius centrifugations during long-duration missions.

  5. Bringing Geoethics into Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Bobrowsky, Peter; Kieffer, Susan; Peppoloni, Silvia; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The responsibility and role of the scientific community in the proper exploitation of natural resources, in the defense against natural hazards and in building geoeducational strategies for the population are key themes of Geoethics. But, what is the awareness among Geoscientists about the importance of an ethical debate within Earth Sciences? With the goal to increase this awareness, in 2012 the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics was founded (http://www.iapg.geoethics.org). The IAPG aims to join forces of geoscientists all over the world, by creating an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for promoting Geoethics themes through scientific publications and conferences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics, for focusing on case-studies to be taken as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. The IAPG has obtained the status of affiliated organization by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), it is among the collaborative organizations of the IUGS - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism (TGGGP), and it has been recognized as an International Associate Organization of the American Geosciences Institute (AGI). The IAPG network is growing fast and currently it is going to reach 500 members in more than 75 countries in 5 continents. The IAPG is working to offer its contribution in building a framework of values for a new model of development, more respectful towards the Geosphere. After 2 years of successful results and numerous ongoing activities, IAPG appears to be on the right way in promoting new ideas to research and practice geosciences. This work aims to give an overview on the IAPG activities, to illustrate the IAPG impact on public through web-statistics, to present publications, events and other initiatives on Geoethics carried out by its members.

  6. Bringing in the Reinforcements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    What do NASA and ballistics have in common? More than the average person may know. Everyday, millions of Americans drive in vehicles, cross over bridges, and fly in airplanes without knowing just how important NASA s role in studying ballistics is in making these actions viable and safe for them. At Glenn Research Center s Ballistic Impact Facility, NASA scientists and engineers study the dynamics of high-speed projectiles and their impact on targets to create materials and structures that are smarter, lighter, and stronger. By applying the science of ballistics to new developments, these researchers are taking major steps in preventing catastrophic events. The Ballistic Impact Facility s main features are a 40-foot-long gas gun that can launch projectiles at speeds over 1,000 miles per hour and highspeed cameras that can capture up to 250 million images per second.

  7. Bringing Space Scientists, Teachers, and Students Together With The CINDI E/PO Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urquhart, M.; Hairston, M.

    2007-12-01

    We will report on the activities, challenges, and successes of the ongoing collaboration between the William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences (CSS) and the Department of Science/Mathematics Education (SME) at the University of Texas at Dallas. At the core of our partnership is the Education and Public Outreach program for the Coupled Ion / Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) instrument. CINDI is a NASA-funded program on the Air Force's Communication / Navigation Outage Forecast Satellite (C/NOFS) which will be launched in summer 2008. The CSS faculty and research scientists and the SME faculty and students have created a dynamic program that brings scientists and K-12 teachers together. Our activities include middle and high school curriculum development, teachers workshops, graduate course work for teachers, creation of the popular "Cindi in Space" educational comic book, and bringing K-12 teachers and students to work and/or visit with the CINDI scientists. We will present the outcomes of this collaborative effort as well as our recent experience of having a physics teacher from a local high school as our Teacher in Residence at CSS in summer 2007.

  8. Bringing Rural Sociology Back In.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, William W.; Gilbert, Jess

    1985-01-01

    Raises questions about current rural sociology from a critical theory perspective. Provides a brief historical analysis of its theoretical and applied roots. Suggests interweaving of research, practice, and advocacy as way to bring rural sociologists back into policy making. (LFL)

  9. Bringing Globalization into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billings, Nancy Carter

    2006-01-01

    Some of the most effective resources for bringing the concept of globalization into the classroom is through the personal and professional experiences of the classroom teacher, the personal experiences of students from diverse cultures, the inclusion of curriculum activities with a global context, and the involvement of guest speakers with global…

  10. Bringing Reading Research to Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKeown, Margaret G., Ed.; Kucan, Linda, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    This book brings together some of the world's foremost literacy scholars to discuss how research influences what teachers actually do in the classroom. Chapters describe the current state of knowledge about such key topics as decoding, vocabulary, comprehension, digital literacies, reading disabilities, and reading reform. At the same time, the…

  11. Bringing Bart Simpson to School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Catherine Ann; Wigmore, Barbara A.

    Teachers are challenged by contradictory demands on curricular time. The social needs children bring to school sometimes collide with basic literacy instruction priorities. This research addressed concerns about television violence via a project that encouraged children to log their television viewing and write in daily journals their perceptions…

  12. News CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-09-01

    CPD Event: Teaching day gives new perspectives Workshop: IOP network devolops its ideas Conference: Conference offers much to teachers Event: Physics is made easy in Liverpool Communication: IOSTE debates the complexities of STE Conference: Teaching event excites in Exeter Meeting Invitation: Wales physics meeting invites bookings CPD Event: Science teachers get hands on with development Research: Conference highlights liquid crytstal research in teaching Education: Teachers give positive feedback Science Fair: Science fair brings physics to students Teaching: Conference explores trends in teaching Forthcoming events

  13. Bringing Seismological Research into the School Setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlis, G. L.; Hamburger, M. W.

    2004-12-01

    One of the primary goals of educational seismology programs is to bring inquiry-based research to the middle- and high-school classroom setting. Although it is often stated as a long-term goal of science outreach programs, in practice there are many barriers to research in the school setting, among them increasing emphasis on test-oriented training, decreasing interest and participation in science fairs, limited teacher confidence and experience for mentoring research, insufficient student preparedness for research projects, and the short term of university involvement (typically limited to brief one-day encounters). For the past three+ years we have tried to address these issues through a focused outreach program we have called the PEPP Research Fellows Program. This is treated as an honors program in which high school teachers in our group nominate students with interests in science careers. These students are invited to participate in the program, and those who elect to take part participate in a one-day education and training session in the fall. Rather than leave research projects completely open, we direct the students at toward one of two specific, group-oriented projects (in our case, one focusing on local recordings of mining explosions, and a second on teleseismic body-wave analysis), but we encourage them to act as independent researchers and follow topics of interest. The students then work on seismic data from the local educational network or from the IRIS facilities. Following several months of informal interaction with teachers and students (email, web conferencing, etc.), we bring the students and teachers to our university for a weekend research symposium in the spring. Students present their work in oral or poster form and prizes are given for the best papers. Projects range from highly local projects (records of seismic noise at school X) to larger-scale regional projects (analysis of teleseismic P-wave delays at PEPP network stations) From 20 to

  14. Bringing Out Head Start Talents (BOHST). Talent Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundsen, Jane; And Others

    Designed for preschoolers identified as talented by the Bringing Out Head Start Talents (BOHST) project, the small-group lessons contained in this manual focus on nine areas of talent programming and are presented in color-coded sections: creative, intellectual, leadership, art, music, reading, math, science, and psychomotor talent development.…

  15. The Chemedian Brings Laughter to the Chemistry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitkamp, Emma; Burnet, Frank

    2007-01-01

    "The Chemedian and the Crazy Football Match" is a comic strip developed by the authors to bring humor to aspects of the UK primary science curriculum. The comic strip was tested in six English primary school classes (years 3-5; ages 7-10); over 150 children participated in the project, together with six teachers. Children found the comic strip fun…

  16. Partnership Brings Educational Exhibits, Events, and Resources from Seven National Research Laboratories to the Public in a New Retail Center: The Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R.; Carbone, L.; Vangundy, S.; Adams, L.; Becker, K.; Cobabe-Ammanns, E.; Curtis, L.; Dusenbery, P.; Foy, R.; Himes, C.; Howell, C.; Knight, C.; Morehouse, R.; Koch, L.; O'Brian, T.; Rooney, J.; Schassburger, P.

    2006-12-01

    Federally Funded Research and Development Centers and universities are challenged to disseminate their educational resources to national audiences, let alone to find ways to collaborate with each other while engaging with the schools and public in their local communities. A unique new partnership involving seven world renowned research laboratories and a commercial land developer in the Denver Metropolitan is celebrating the unveiling of exhibits, web kiosk portals, and public science education events in a shopping mall. The October 2006 opening of the Twenty Ninth Street retail sales center (formerly Crossroad Mall) in Boulder, Colorado, has revitalized 60 acres in the heart of the city. It offers outdoor plazas that accommodate science education installations and lab-sponsored public events. The goal of the partnership is to celebrate the long-standing contributions of research laboratories to the community, increase awareness of each institution's mission, and entice visitors of all ages to learn more about science, mathematics, engineering, technology and related educational opportunities and careers. We describe how the public is responding to the Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street, summarize lessons learned about this ambitious science education collaboration, and plans to sustain public and the K-12 community interest into the future. Partners in the Wonders of Science at Twenty Ninth Street include the JILA at the University of Colorado, the National Center for Atmospheric Research, National Institute for Science and Technology, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, the University of Colorado's Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, Space Science Institute, and Westcor, the shopping mall's developer.

  17. [Pregnancy during residency].

    PubMed

    Maas, S M; van 't Hoff, B W; Rings, E H; van der Waals, F W; Büller, H A

    1992-12-19

    The number of female residents in the Netherlands has steadily increased in recent years. Due to the increased time on waiting lists to enter residency programmes and to the increased duration of training, female residents will be older during their residencies. This will probably result in an increased number of pregnancies during residencies. A questionnaire regarding pregnancy during residency was sent to 191 residents in two university hospitals in the Netherlands. The response rate was 74.3%. Fifty percent of the male and only 19% of the female residents had children. No negative effects of a pregnancy on their training were experienced or anticipated by the residents. However, a negative effect on the functioning of the department was expected. No formal provisions, like replacements were available and many solutions to replace pregnant colleagues depended on the flexibility of the colleagues. The wish to have children was high and equally distributed among male and female residents, 92% and 96%, resp. Given the difficulty to seek a permanent position and to have children after residency, the choice of many female residents will be to have their children during residency. This increase in number of pregnancies requires anticipation of the residency programme directors. They should take the lead in proposing adequate regulations. PMID:1470257

  18. [Medical ethics in residency training].

    PubMed

    Civaner, Murat; Sarikaya, Ozlem; Balcioğlu, Harun

    2009-04-01

    Medical ethics education in residency training is one of the hot topics of continuous medical education debates. Its importance and necessity is constantly stressed in declarations and statements on national and international level. Parallel to the major structural changes in the organization and the finance model of health care system, patient-physician relationship, identity of physicianship, social perception and status of profession are changing. Besides, scientific developments and technological advancements create possibilities that never exists before, and bring new ethical dilemmas along with. To be able to transplant human organs has created two major problems for instance; procurement of organs in sufficient numbers, and allocating them to the patients in need by using some prioritizing criteria. All those new and challenging questions force the health care workers to find authentic and justifiable solutions while keeping the basic professional values. In that sense, proper medical ethics education in undergraduate and postgraduate term that would make physician-to-be's and student-physicians acquire the core professional values and skill to notice, analyze and develop justifiable solutions to ethical problems is paramount. This article aims to express the importance of medical ethics education in residency training, and to propose major topics and educational methods to be implemented into. To this aim, first, undergraduate medical education, physician's working conditions, the exam of selection for residency training, and educational environment were revised, and then, some topics and educational methods, which are oriented to educate physicians regarding the professional values that they should have, were proposed. PMID:19357056

  19. Bringing Industry to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoachlander, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Multiple pathways connect college-preparatory curriculums with exceptional career and technical education, motivating students to learn by helping them answer the question, Why do I need to know this? Real-world learning is organized around such industry sectors as finance and business; health science and medical technology; building and…

  20. From the field to classrooms: Scientists and educators collaborating to develop K-12 lessons on arctic carbon cycling and climate change that align with Next Generation Science Standards, and informal outreach programs that bring authentic data to informal audiences.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinker, R.; Cory, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) calls for students across grade levels to understand climate change and its impacts. To achieve this goal, the NSF-sponsored PolarTREC program paired an educator with scientists studying carbon cycling in the Arctic. The data collection and fieldwork performed by the team will form the basis of hands-on science learning in the classroom and will be incorporated into informal outreach sessions in the community. Over a 16-day period, the educator was stationed at Toolik Field Station in the High Arctic. (Toolik is run by the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Institute of Arctic Biology.) She participated in a project that analyzed the effects of sunlight and microbial content on carbon production in Artic watersheds. Data collected will be used to introduce the following NGSS standards into the middle-school science curriculum: 1) Construct a scientific explanation based on evidence. 2) Develop a model to explain cycling of water. 3) Develop and use a model to describe phenomena. 4) Analyze and interpret data. 5) A change in one system causes and effect in other systems. Lessons can be telescoped to meet the needs of classrooms in higher or lower grades. Through these activities, students will learn strategies to model an aspect of carbon cycling, interpret authentic scientific data collected in the field, and conduct geoscience research on carbon cycling. Community outreach sessions are also an effective method to introduce and discuss the importance of geoscience education. Informal discussions of firsthand experience gained during fieldwork can help communicate to a lay audience the biological, physical, and chemical aspects of the arctic carbon cycle and the impacts of climate change on these features. Outreach methods will also include novel use of online tools to directly connect audiences with scientists in an effective and time-efficient manner.

  1. Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Linda E., Ed.

    This document contains the following papers on science instruction and technology: "A 3-D Journey in Space: A New Visual Cognitive Adventure" (Yoav Yair, Rachel Mintz, and Shai Litvak); "Using Collaborative Inquiry and Interactive Technologies in an Environmental Science Project for Middle School Teachers: A Description and Analysis" (Patricia…

  2. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  3. Bringing customers into the boardroom.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Gail J; Court, David; Quelch, John A; Crawford, Blair

    2004-11-01

    Misguided marketing strategies have destroyed more shareholder value than shoddy accounting or shady fiscal practices. Yet marketing functions typically reside deep in the organization, far from the executive suite and boardroom, and they are often poorly aligned with corporate strategy. Boards of directors, it would seem, have compelling reasons to monitor their companies' marketing activities. The authors argue that boards lack a clear understanding of how their companies are meeting customers' needs and how their marketing strategies drive (or often fail to drive) top-line growth. To help remedy that problem, they've devised a "marketing dashboard," a series of management reports that could give the board this critical knowledge. The dashboard has three parts, each of which the board should review regularly. The first part tracks the company's main business drivers--those business conditions that, when manipulated or otherwise changed, will directly and predictably affect the company's performance. The second part describes the specific innovations in a pipeline of growth ideas that will allow the company to reach its short- and long-term revenue goals. And the third part provides an overview of the company's marketing skill set so the board can determine not only if the company has enough marketing talent but also if it has the right marketing talent. Unlike isolated measures of marketing performance that are often insufficient, irrelevant, or misleading, the dashboard allows the board to quickly and routinely assess the effectiveness of its company's marketing strategies. Armed with a clear understanding of marketing's role and performance, the board can expose inadequate marketing campaigns, direct management to address the problem, and monitor progress. PMID:15559447

  4. NewsMars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-03-01

    Mars: Express journey to Mars ASE 2003: Knocked out by meteorites Events: Sun-Earth Day ASE 2003: Fun Physics - popular as ever Appointments: Sykes to bring science to the people UK Science Education: The future's bright, the future's science ASE 2003: A grand finale for Catherine Teaching Resources: UK goes to the planets Cambridge Physics Update: Basement physics Conferences: Earth Science Teachers' Association Conference 2003 New Website: JESEI sets sail GIREP: Teacher education seminar Malaysia: Rewards for curriculum change Cambridge Physics Update: My boomerang will come back! Teaching Resources: Widening particiption through ideas and evidence with the University of Surrey Wales: First Ffiseg Events: Nuna: Solar car on tour Physics on Stage: Physics on Stage 3 embraces life Symposium: In what sense a nuclear 'debate'? Gifted and Talented: Able pupils experiencing challenging science Australia: ISS flies high Down Under

  5. Rewarding the Resident Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Jennifer M.; Drake, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Residents routinely make significant contributions to the education of medical students. However, little attention has been paid to rewarding these individuals for their involvement in these academic activities. This report describes a program that rewards resident teachers with an academic appointment as a Clinical Instructor. The residents…

  6. Residency Decisions: Another Look.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Barry S.

    The process of determining student's residency status for fee payment at the University of Nevada-Reno is described and supplemental information forms that are used at the university are included. At the University of Nevada-Reno, residency decisions are the responsibility of admissions office professional staff. The university has a formal…

  7. Life After Residency.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2016-04-01

    Many residents don't receive any formal business training. The University of Texas at Austin Dell Medical School created a crash course to teach residents some of the business and job-hunting basics they'll need. PMID:27049910

  8. I Am Your Researcher in Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardwicke, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Education is the most powerful tool to prepare young people for an exciting and uncertain future. Science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) must be at the forefront of education in order to address the most important challenges facing society. This article discusses Researchers in Residence, a unique scheme that has a proven track…

  9. Insite. Fourth Annual Report to the Ford Foundation (July 1, 1966-June 30, 1967). Part II, Student Enrollment and Records, Student Counseling, Resident Teaching Placement, Resident Teaching, Seminar on the Implications of the Social Sciences, Seminar on the Role of the Humanities, Creative Arts Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, John R.; And Others

    This 2nd part of a 4-part report on the 3rd year of the Instructional Systems in Teacher Education (Insite) Project consists of several reports by the project staff, including "Student Enrollment and Records, Counseling, Resident Teaching Placement," by John R. Beck; "Resident Teaching," by R. Bruce McQuigg; "Seminar on the Implications of the…

  10. Facilty Focus: Residence Halls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnewell, James F., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Western Ridge Residence at Colorado College and Beard Hall at Wheaton College. The buildings feature multiple levels that take advantage of views and also help create a "homey" feeling. (EV)

  11. Technology in Residence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  12. Emotional Intelligence and Selection to Administrative Chief Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilpatrick, Charlie C.; Doyle, Peter D.; Reichman, Eric F.; Chohan, Lubna; Uthman, Margaret O.; Orejuela, Francisco J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors sought to determine whether emotional intelligence, as measured by the BarOn Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i), is associated with selection to administrative chief resident. Method: Authors invited senior-year residents at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to participate in an observational…

  13. An Investigation of Psychiatry Residents' Important Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Jody

    2011-01-01

    This research study was conducted to explore the phenomenon of the third-year experiences of the psychiatry residents. A review of the literature identified themes and subthemes related to the third-year of psychiatry education. The study was conducted at a university health science center. Data were collected from five residents using participant…

  14. POLAR-PALOOZA Polar Researchers and Arctic Residents Engage, Inform and Inspire Diverse Public Audiences by sharing Polar Science and Global Connections during the International Polar Year, using a New Model of Informal Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2006-12-01

    (Please note that the POLAR-PALOOZA initiative described in this Abstract is-as of 9/7/2006-"pending" for possible support from NSF and NASA as part of this year's IPY solicitation. Subject to decisions expected by 9/30, this presentation would either be withdrawn, or amplified with specific participants, locations and dates.) Despite the success of well-regarded movies like "March of the Penguins", the polar regions remain a great unknown for most people. Public knowledge about the Arctic and Antarctic, and the critical role of the Poles in the entire Earth system, is nonexistent, incomplete or burdened with misperceptions. The International Polar Years of 2007-2009-and associated "I*Y" science years such as IHY, IYPE and eGY-present a unique opportunity to change this. The people who can best effect this change are those who know the Poles best, through living or working there. Based on innovative but proven models, POLAR-PALOOZA will use three complementary strategies to engage, inform and inspire large public audiences. (1) A national tour, under the working title "Stories from a Changing Planet", will include in-person presentations at science centers, museums, libraries and schools across North America, including Canada and Mexico. The presentations will be augmented by High Definition Video taped on location at the Poles, audio and video podcasts, and special education and outreach activities for targeted audiences. "Stories from a Changing Planet" will provide diverse audiences with an exciting opportunity to meet and interact directly with polar experts, and to appreciate why the Poles and the research done there are directly relevant to their lives. (2) The "HiDef Video Science Story Capture Corps" is a team of professional videographers, using the latest generation of low-cost, high-quality cameras, deployed to both Poles. They will document the work of multiple researchers and projects, rather than focusing on one topic for a single broadcast program

  15. A Kindergarten Teacher Bringing Science to a Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Becky; Galindo, Ed; Shockey, Tod

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA) sponsored professional development of educators in the NASA Summer of Innovation (SOI) program. The Idaho, Montana, and Utah (IMU-SOI) program worked with educators and students from thirteen Native American communities. The summer sessions were focused on problem based learning and…

  16. Bringing Science To Life through Community-Based Watershed Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahue, Timothy P.; Lewis, Lisa Bryce; Price, Lawrence F.; Schmidt, David C.

    1998-01-01

    Delineates four elements of successful student-scientist partnerships: (1) use of an inquiry-based approach; (2) employment of authentic, community-based investigations; (3) student in the role of scientist; and (4) student in the role educator. Contains 17 references. (DDR)

  17. Bringing Science to Life Through Community-Based Watershed Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Timothy P.; Lewis, Lisa Bryce; Price, Lawrence F.; Schmidt, David C.

    1998-03-01

    Four elements of successful student-scientist partnerships (SSPs) have been identified through experience in a wide variety of educational settings. SSPs should: use an inquiry-based approach to education; be built around authentic, community-based investigations; let students be scientists; and allow scientists to be educators. Each element is discussed and illuminated with examples from case studies of watershed education programs that are based on an interdisciplinary, action-oriented watershed education model developed by the Global Rivers Environmental Education Network (GREEN).

  18. Selective hair therapy: bringing science to the fiction.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2014-02-01

    Investigations on carrier-based drug delivery systems for higher selectivity in hair therapy have clearly evolved from dye release and model studies to highly sophisticated approaches, many of which specifically tackle hair indications and the delivery of hair-relevant molecules. Here, we group recent hair disease-oriented work into efforts towards (i) improved delivery of conventional drugs, (ii) delivery of novel drug classes, for example biomolecules and (iii) targeted delivery on the cellular/molecular level. Considering the solid foundation of experimental work, it does not take a large step outside the current box of thinking to follow the idea of using large carriers (>500 nm, unlikely to penetrate as a whole) for follicular penetration, retention and protection of sensitive compounds. Yet, reports on particles <200 nm being internalized by keratinocytes and dendritic cells at sites of barrier disruption (e.g., hair follicles) combined with recent advances in nanodermatology add interesting new facets to the possibilities carrier technologies could offer, for example, unprecedented levels of selectivity. The authors provide thought-provoking ideas on how smart delivery technologies and advances in our molecular understanding of hair pathophysiology could result in a whole new era of hair therapeutics. As the field still largely remains in preclinical investigation, determined efforts towards production of medical grade material and truly translational work are needed to demonstrate surplus value of carrier systems for clinical applications. PMID:24387677

  19. School-Community Collaborations: Bringing Authentic Science into Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, John Cripps; Tytler, Russell; Symington, David

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in collaborative arrangements between schools and community scientists to enhance student engagement with learning. We describe research in which we identify a wide range of such collaborations in Australia, and investigate through interviews with community participants their perspectives on the purposes of…

  20. Healthy Family 2009: Bringing in Baby

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Healthy Family 2009 Bringing in Baby Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... Down syndrome and other common genetic disorders, inherited family conditions, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy, or disorders ...

  1. Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... 160228.html Amish Lifestyle Brings Unexpected Benefit: Less Asthma Finding suggests exposing kids to lots of allergens, ... rest of the population -- much lower rates of asthma. "We found Amish children had extremely low levels ...

  2. Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last

    MedlinePlus

    ... External link, please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Exercise Brings Bone Benefits that Last Building bone as ... lose bone. Studies of animals have shown that exercise during periods of rapid growth can lead to ...

  3. Teaching professionalism to residents.

    PubMed

    Klein, Eileen J; Jackson, J Craig; Kratz, Lyn; Marcuse, Edgar K; McPhillips, Heather A; Shugerman, Richard P; Watkins, Sandra; Stapleton, F Bruder

    2003-01-01

    The need to teach professionalism during residency has been affirmed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which will require documentation of education and evaluation of professionalism by 2007. Recently the American Academy of Pediatrics has proposed the following components of professionalism be taught and measured: honesty/integrity, reliability/responsibility, respect for others, compassion/empathy, self-improvement, self-awareness/knowledge of limits, communication/collaboration, and altruism/advocacy. The authors describe a curriculum for introducing the above principles of professionalism into a pediatrics residency that could serve as a model for other programs. The curriculum is taught at an annual five-day retreat for interns, with 11 mandatory sessions devoted to addressing key professionalism issues. The authors also explain how the retreat is evaluated and how the retreat's topics are revisited during the residency, and discuss general issues of teaching and evaluating professionalism. PMID:12525406

  4. Financing Residency Training Redesign

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Patricia A.; Waller, Elaine; Green, Larry A.; Crane, Steven; Garvin, Roger D.; Pugno, Perry A.; Kozakowski, Stanley M.; Douglass, Alan B.; Jones, Samuel; Eiff, M. Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Background Redesign in the health care delivery system creates a need to reorganize resident education. How residency programs fund these redesign efforts is not known. Methods Family medicine residency program directors participating in the Preparing Personal Physicians for Practice (P4) project were surveyed between 2006 and 2011 on revenues and expenses associated with training redesign. Results A total of 6 university-based programs in the study collectively received $5,240,516 over the entire study period, compared with $4,718,943 received by 8 community-based programs. Most of the funding for both settings came from grants, which accounted for 57.8% and 86.9% of funding for each setting, respectively. Department revenue represented 3.4% of university-based support and 13.1% of community-based support. The total average revenue (all years combined) per program for university-based programs was just under $875,000, and the average was nearly $590,000 for community programs. The vast majority of funds were dedicated to salary support (64.8% in university settings versus 79.3% in community-based settings). Based on the estimated ratio of new funding relative to the annual costs of training using national data for a 3-year program with 7 residents per year, training redesign added 3% to budgets for university-based programs and about 2% to budgets for community-based programs. Conclusions Residencies undergoing training redesign used a variety of approaches to fund these changes. The costs of innovations marginally increased the estimated costs of training. Federal and local funding sources were most common, and costs were primarily salary related. More research is needed on the costs of transforming residency training. PMID:26140119

  5. An Assigned Teaching Resident Rotation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels-Brady, Catherine; Rieder, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors' adult psychiatry residency training program identified several educational needs for residents at their institution. Junior residents needed enhanced learning of clinical interviewing skills and learning connected to the inpatient psychiatry ward rotations, and senior residents needed opportunities to prepare for the…

  6. Interprofessional Integrative Medicine Training for Preventive Medicine Residents.

    PubMed

    Cowen, Virginia S; Thomas, Pauline A; Gould-Fogerite, Susan E; Passannante, Marian R; Mahon, Gwendolyn M

    2015-11-01

    Integrative medicine training was incorporated into the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School Preventive Medicine residency at the Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences Newark Campus as a collaboration between the Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and the School of Health Related Professions. Beginning in 2012, an interdisciplinary faculty team organized an Integrative Medicine program in a Preventive Medicine residency that leveraged existing resources across Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. The overarching aim of the programs was to introduce residents and faculty to the scope and practice of integrative medicine in the surrounding Newark community and explore evidence-based research on integrative medicine. The faculty team tapped into an interprofessional network of healthcare providers to organize rotations for the preventive medicine residents that reflected the unique nature of integrative medicine in the greater Newark area. Residents provided direct care as part of interdisciplinary teams at clinical affiliates and shadowed health professionals from diverse disciplines as they filled different roles in providing patient care. The residents also participated in research projects. A combination of formal and informal programs on integrative medicine topics was offered to residents and faculty. The Integrative Medicine program, which ran from 2013 through 2014, was successful in exposing residents and faculty to the unique nature of integrative medicine across professions in the community served by Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences. PMID:26477901

  7. Geodesy Brings the Geoscience Community Together as Geophysicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittross, S.; Rowan, L. R.; MacPherson-Krutsky, C. C.; Morris, A. R.; Bartel, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geodesy, the science of determining Earth's shape, gravity field and rotation, has been in existence for millennia. Today, few geoscientists identify with the pure science of geodesy, though many use geodetic tools and data for their research. In 2014, we interviewed members of the UNAVCO community and asked, "Do you call yourself a geodesist?" Most replied that they used geodesy, but would call themselves "geophysicists". This "use of geodesy" for other fields of study, particularly for geophysics-related fields, is consistent with an analysis of AGU's sections and focus groups. Additional analysis of geoscience departments at U.S. universities would suggest a similar trend. The expanding use of geodetic tools and geodetic data for many fields of research such as geophysics, tectonophysics, geodynamics, space physics, geology, geomorphology, seismology, hydrology, volcanology, glaciology, paleontology, paleoseismology, structural geology, meteorology, ecology, archaeology, oceanography, geography, soil science, atmospheric science, and snow science, may provide an approach to bringing diverse fields together under the moniker of geoscience and geoscientists. Scientists using a shared approach to research and education might be able to see themselves under the broader identity of geoscientist. The hurdle to making this transformation towards a larger shared voice in public discourse, is the more common use of "geophysicist" among the geodesy community, which is tied to the strong foundation of physics and mathematics needed to work with geodetic data and tools.

  8. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    PubMed

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied. PMID:17152604

  9. The Residence Life Cinema.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dungan, Jane Fidler; Elion, Audrey; Gusmano, Phil

    1997-01-01

    Explores the implementation, results, and the limitations of the Residence Life Cinema program at the University of Memphis. Claims that such programs offer an innovative method for fostering student development by utilizing movies to stimulate affective and cognitive processes in students--processes that may not occur without a catalyst. (RJM)

  10. Selection of Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, J. David, III; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Selection data for all Medical University of South Carolina anesthesiology residency applicants (about 200 per year) and the 8 selected per year were compared for 4 years. Results showed standardized test scores, grades, and class ranks of those selected were not higher than of others, but interview and recommendation scores were higher.…

  11. Skeptical Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Alan J.; Barnhart, Carolyn M.; Parejko, Ken S.; Schultz, Forrest S.; Schultz, Steven E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the legitimacy of teaching about astrology, extrasensory perception, UFOs, touch therapy, cloning dinosaurs, or any other unusual claims in the classroom. Suggests that bringing unusual claims to the science classroom is an opportunity to motivate students in the principles of scientific thought. (SAH)

  12. Violence against surgical residents.

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, C B; Rizzo, A G

    1997-01-01

    Violence against hospital personnel is underreported (less than one in five assaults), and accurate statistics as to the rate of violence against hospital personnel are thus difficult to establish. In the psychiatric discipline, an abundance of information has been published regarding violence in the health care setting, but few studies have examined violence outside psychiatric hospitals or by patients not diagnosed with psychiatric ailments. Using a survey that elicits information about workplace violence, we sought to gauge the prevalence of violent acts affecting general hospital workers who treat victims of violence on a daily basis. The survey was completed by a cohort of surgical staff nationwide (475 responses from 57 residency programs). Two hundred and eighty residents reported having witnessed one or more physical attacks, and 179 reported having been attacked. Violent acts were more likely to be committed in a public hospital than a private institution (P = 0.05). As shown in previous research, most attacks occurred in the emergency room (P = 0.01); the wards and parking lot were next in frequency. Women residents were more likely than men to call hospital security to intervene in a potentially violent situation (P = 0.04), and junior residents (postgraduate years 1-4) were more likely to be attacked than senior residents (> or = 5 years) (P = 0.04). The attacker was most likely to be a young black male between ages 19 and 30 (P = 0.01). We found no statistical relationship between the attacker and the victim regarding sex or race. Of the 475 respondents, 470 reported that they carry a gun themselves or know someone in the hospital environment who carries a gun. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291743

  13. April showers bring May flowers…and May rains bring botrytis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As the old saying goes “April showers bring May flowers” and to the greenhouse production industry May brings “color” to the greenhouse in the form of flowers which are good for both spring sales and Botrytis. This should not come as anything new to the seasoned grower, but hopefully will serve as ...

  14. Global Health Simulation During Residency.

    PubMed

    Rosenman, Jane R; Fischer, Philip R; Arteaga, Grace M; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M; Pitt, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  15. Global Health Simulation During Residency

    PubMed Central

    Rosenman, Jane R.; Fischer, Philip R.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Hulyalkar, Manasi; Butteris, Sabrina M.; Pitt, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Resident participation in international health electives (IHEs) has been shown to be beneficial, yet not all residents have the opportunity to participate. We sought to determine whether participating in simulated global health cases, via the standardized Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, was useful for all pediatric residents, not merely those planning to go on an IHE. Pediatric residents in our program took part in 2 SUGAR cases and provided feedback via an online survey. Thirty-six of 40 residents participated (90%); 72% responded to the survey. Three of 10 residents not previously planning to work in resource-limited settings indicated participation in SUGAR made them more likely to do so. Nearly all residents (88%) felt SUGAR should be part of the residency curriculum. All felt better prepared for working cross-culturally. While designed to prepare trainees for work in resource-limited settings, SUGAR may be beneficial for all residents. PMID:27583300

  16. Science Shorts: "Sounds" Like Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnone, Kathryn; Morris, Bethany

    2014-01-01

    It seems each new school year brings its own opportunities to grow as an educator. As teachers in a STEM focused school that serves primarily at-risk students, the authors face a new challenge in rethinking their instruction to align with the "Next Generation Science Standards". This involves changing the focus of units previously taught…

  17. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  18. Bringing the Ocean into the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Pat; Sullivan, Babs; Whitfield, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    Describes a year-long, schoolwide project that brings the ocean environment into the classroom and develops cross-disciplinary understandings for students. Presents details of the physical environment within the school, the history of the project, and the rationale and advantages. (DDR)

  19. Digitizing Brings New Life to Video Collections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2008-01-01

    Talk of mass digitization generally brings to mind large-scale projects to scan huge collections of books. The Google Library Print project, the Open Content Alliance, and others have taken on incredibly ambitious projects to digitize enormous numbers of books in some of the world's biggest libraries. Digitization of book collections stands to…

  20. Bringing Research Tools into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shubert, Charles; Ceraj, Ivica; Riley, Justin

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of computer technology used for research is creating the need to change the way classes are taught in higher education. "Bringing Research Tools into the Classroom" has become a major focus of the work of the Office of Educational Innovation and Technology (OEIT) for the Dean of Undergraduate Education (DUE) at the Massachusetts…

  1. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  2. Endodontic treatment of the pregnant patient: Knowledge, attitude and practices of dental residents

    PubMed Central

    Ibhawoh, Louis; Enabulele, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In order to control serious pulpal pain following odontogenic infections in pregnant women, endodontic treatment may become necessary. The aim of this study was to assess the perception of dentists about rendering endodontic treatment to pregnant women. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of resident doctors in the different dental specialties in Nigeria preparing for the various levels of the fellowship examinations of the West Africa College of Surgeons and the National Postgraduate Medical College of Nigeria. Data were collected by the means of a 17-itemed questionnaire which sought information on respondents' demography, their considerations while rendering endodontic treatment to the pregnant patients and their perceptions of the safety of endodontic treatment in pregnancy. The data collected were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Science version 21.0. Results: With regards to the safety of endodontic treatment during pregnancy, 91.8% considered it safe, and this was not statistically significant in relation to the specialty or status of the respondent. Majority (77.0%) agreed they would undertake a root canal treatment on a pregnant patient with all respondents in restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, periodontics, and pedodontics in the affirmative while all in oral pathology would refuse to do such (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Dental residents are aware of the safety of endodontic treatment in pregnant women. However, gaps exist in their knowledge, bringing to the fore, the need for inclusion of pregnancy-specific training in the dental postgraduate curriculum. PMID:26778880

  3. Science as Golem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinch, Trevor

    1996-01-01

    A new view of science that goes beyond conventional perceptions of science as either good or bad is proposed. The new perspective sees science as process rather than product, bringing together scientific skills and human insight. It is seen as important for the public to understand that expert disagreement is part of the scientific enterprise.…

  4. Seeing the Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughn, Meredith Houle; Gatling, Anne

    2013-01-01

    English language learners (ELLs) bring a wealth of knowledge to science classrooms, yet often that knowledge is untapped by traditional instruction and assessment. As classrooms become increasingly diverse, it is critical to recognize the depth of understandings ELLs bring to classrooms to explain the scientific world around them. English language…

  5. Implementing the 2009 Institute of Medicine recommendations on resident physician work hours, supervision, and safety.

    PubMed

    Blum, Alexander B; Shea, Sandra; Czeisler, Charles A; Landrigan, Christopher P; Leape, Lucian

    2011-01-01

    Institute of Medicine report has been largely confined to the medical education community, led by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). To begin gathering these perspectives and developing a plan to implement safer work hours for resident physicians, a conference entitled "Enhancing sleep, supervision and safety: What will it take to implement the Institute of Medicine recommendations?" was held at Harvard Medical School on June 17-18, 2010. This White Paper is a product of a diverse group of 26 representative stakeholders bringing relevant new information and innovative practices to bear on a critical patient safety problem. Given that our conference included experts from across disciplines with diverse perspectives and interests, not every recommendation was endorsed by each invited conference participant. However, every recommendation made here was endorsed by the majority of the group, and many were endorsed unanimously. Conference members participated in the process, reviewed the final product, and provided input before publication. Participants provided their individual perspectives, which do not necessarily represent the formal views of any organization. In September 2010 the ACGME issued new rules to go into effect on July 1, 2011. Unfortunately, they stop considerably short of the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and those endorsed by this conference. In particular, the ACGME only applied the limitation of 16 hours to first-year resident physicans. Thus, it is clear that policymakers, hospital administrators, and residency program directors who wish to implement safer health care systems must go far beyond what the ACGME will require. We hope this White Paper will serve as a guide and provide encouragement for that effort. RESIDENT PHYSICIAN WORKLOAD AND SUPERVISION: By the end of training, a resident physician should be able to practice independently. Yet much of resident physicians' time is dominated by tasks with little

  6. Bringing Breast Cancer Technologies to Market | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    CCR research is recognized in novel competition to encourage the commercialization of breast cancer inventions. Editor’s note: This article was originally published in CCR Connections (Volume 8, No. 1). The Breast Cancer Startup Challenge was named one of six finalists in the HHS Innovates Award Competition, and was one of three finalists recognized by HHS Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell and Deputy Secretary Bill Corr. For more information on the Challenge, see previous article on the Poster website. Start-up companies are instrumental in bringing the fruits of scientific research to market. Recognizing an opportunity to bring entrepreneurial minds to bear on the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer, the Avon Foundation for Women partnered with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation to launch the Breast Cancer Startup Challenge.

  7. Save Russian science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigel'Man, Mikhail

    2007-03-01

    Despite 15 years of turbulent change, 'brain drain' and a shortage of research funds, Russian science has survived, although in a much diminished state. International investment and collaboration over the next ten years could bring it back from the brink.

  8. Data Nuggets: Bringing Real Data into the Classroom to Unearth Students' Quantitative & Inquiry Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultheis, Elizabeth H.; Kjelvik, Melissa K.

    2015-01-01

    Current educational reform calls for increased integration between science and mathematics to overcome the shortcomings in students' quantitative skills. Data Nuggets (free online resource, http://datanuggets.org) are worksheets that bring data into the classroom, repeatedly guiding students through the scientific method and making claims…

  9. Frontier Fields: Bringing the Distant Universe into View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisenhamer, Bonnie; Lawton, Brandon L.; Summers, Frank; Ryer, Holly

    2014-06-01

    The Frontier Fields is a multi-cycle program of six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters that will be taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The three-year long collaborative program centers on observations from NASA’s Great Observatories, who will team up to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically see. Because of the unprecedented views of the universe that will be achieved, the Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. For example, the program provides an opportunity to look back on the history of deep field observations and how they changed (and continue to change) astronomy, while exploring the ways astronomers approach big science problems. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach has initiated an education and public outreach (E/PO) project to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields program - providing a behind-the-scenes perspective of this observing initiative. This poster will highlight the goals of the Frontier Fields E/PO project and the cost-effective approach being used to bring the program’s results to both the public and educational audiences.

  10. Resident memory T cells in human health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Rachael A.

    2015-01-01

    Resident memory T cells are non-recirculating memory T cells that persist long term in epithelial barrier tissues, including the gastrointestinal tract, lung, skin and reproductive tract. Resident memory T cells persist in the absence of antigens, have impressive effector functions and provide rapid on-site immune protection against known pathogens in peripheral tissues. A fundamentally distinct gene expression program differentiates resident memory T cells from circulating T cells. Although these cells likely evolved to provide rapid immune protection against pathogens, autoreactive, aberrantly activated and malignant resident memory cells contribute to numerous human inflammatory diseases including mycosis fungoides and psoriasis. This review will discuss both the science and medicine of resident memory T cells, exploring how these cells contribute to healthy immune function and discussing what is known about how these cells contribute to human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. PMID:25568072

  11. I'll Bring the Popcorn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blickenstaff, Jacob Clark

    2011-01-01

    Movie clips can provide data for content-rich problem solving, show students exotic phenomena, allow them to apply science concepts in a new setting, and foster connections between science and the humanities. Though the latest release will have the advantage of pop-culture currency, films old enough to be released on DVD give teachers more…

  12. Medical humanities: a resident doctor's perspective.

    PubMed

    Pauranik, Anvita

    2012-01-01

    The barrage of competitive examinations, overwork, sleep deprivation, and the pressure of expectations all combine to destroy the dreams that resident doctors have when they start medical school. The empathy they had before entering this field fades away, and they eventually become insensitive to their patients. Medical humanities may be the means to halt this trend. Sensitising young minds, using the arts, literature, history and lessons on social issues, may bring about a paradigm shift in these doctors' outlook towards their patients. However, for the humanities to be integrated into medical education, the current curriculum must be modified and made more clinically and socially relevant. Further, the humanities cannot be taught in lecture halls; they need to be integrated into all aspects of medical school. For this, the medical school faculty should be sensitised to, and trained in, humanities education. PMID:22864072

  13. Bringing Planetary Data into Learning Environments: A Community Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipp, S.; Higbie, M.; Lowes, L.

    2005-12-01

    Recognizing the need to communicate scientific findings, and the power of using real planetary data in educational settings to engage students in Earth and space science in meaningful ways, the South Central Organization of Researchers and Educators and the Solar System Exploration Education Forum, part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate's Support Network, have established the Planetary Data in Education (PDE) Initiative. The Initiative strives to: 1) Establish a collaborative community of educators, education specialists, curriculum developers, tool developers, learning technologists, scientists, and data providers to design and develop educationally appropriate products; 2) Build awareness in the broader educational and scientific community of existing programs, products, and resources; 3) Address issues hindering the effective use of planetary data in formal and informal educational settings; and 4) Encourage partnerships that leverage the community's expertise The PDE community has hosted two conferences exploring issues in using data in educational settings. The community recognizes that data are available through venues such as the Planetary Data Systems (PDS), but not in a format that the end-user in a formal or informal educational setting can digest; these data are intended for the scientific audience. Development of meaningful educational programs using planetary data requires design of appropriate learner interfaces and involvement of data providers, product developers, learning technologists, scientists, and educators. The PDE community will participate in the development of Earth Exploration Toolbooks during the DLESE Data Services Workshop and will host a workshop in the summer of 2006 to bring together small groups of educators, data providers, and learning technologists, and scientists to design and develop products that bring planetary data into educational settings. In addition, the PDE community hosts a Web site that presents elements

  14. Stress in Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    Sources and levels of stress, as well as coping mechanisms, perceived by residents in both years of a two-year family practice residency program in Toronto are described. In addition, differences between first- and second-year residents, and between women and men residents, regardless of year, are examined. Results of the survey indicate that the levels of stress are relatively high throughout the two years of residency training. The three most stressful aspects of being a resident are time pressures, fatigue, and lack of self-confidence. Female residents appear to report a higher level of stress than males, especially in trying to combine a personal and a professional life. Specific coping mechanisms include talking to others, adjusting attitudes and feelings, or strategic use of time. Recommendations aimed at helping family medicine residency programs deal with the problem of stress in residents are suggested. A current major province-wide research study including all interns and residents in Ontario is described. PMID:21267263

  15. Science for What Public? Addressing Equity in American Science Museums and Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Noah Weeth; Meshoulam, David

    2014-01-01

    Science museums and science centers exist (in large part) to bring science to the public. But what public do they serve? The challenge of equity is embodied by the gulf that separates a museum's actual public and the more diverse publics that comprise our society. Yet despite growing scholarly interest in museums and science centers, few…

  16. Bringing the environment down to earth.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, F L

    1999-01-01

    The debate on business and the environment has typically been framed in simple yes-or-no terms: "Does it pay to be green?" But the environment, like other business issues, requires a more complex approach--one that demands more than such all-or-nothing thinking. Managers need to ask instead, "Under what circumstances do particular kinds of environmental investments deliver returns to shareholders?" This article presents five approaches that managers can take to identify those circumstances and integrate the environment into their business thinking. These approaches will enable companies with the right industry structure, competitive position, and managerial skills to reconcile their responsibility to shareholders with the pressure to be faithful stewards of the earth's resources. Some companies can distance themselves from competitors by differentiating their products and commanding higher prices for them. Others may be able to "manage" their competitors by imposing a set of private regulations or by helping to shape the rules written by government officials. Still others may be able to cut costs and help the environment simultaneously. Almost all can learn to improve their management of risk and thus reduce the outlays associated with accidents, lawsuits, and boycotts. And some companies may even be able to make systemic changes that will redefine competition in their markets. All five approaches can help managers bring the environment down to earth. And that means bringing the environment back into the fold of business problems and determining when it really pays to be green. PMID:10539206

  17. Resident Exposure to Peripheral Nerve Surgical Procedures During Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Gil, Joseph A; Daniels, Alan H; Akelman, Edward

    2016-05-01

    Background Variability in case exposures has been identified for orthopaedic surgery residents. It is not known if this variability exists for peripheral nerve procedures. Objective The objective of this study was to assess ACGME case log data for graduating orthopaedic surgery, plastic surgery, general surgery, and neurological surgery residents for peripheral nerve surgical procedures and to evaluate intraspecialty and interspecialty variability in case volume. Methods Surgical case logs from 2009 to 2014 for the 4 specialties were compared for peripheral nerve surgery experience. Peripheral nerve case volume between specialties was performed utilizing a paired t test, 95% confidence intervals were calculated, and linear regression was calculated to assess the trends. Results The average number of peripheral nerve procedures performed per graduating resident was 54.2 for orthopaedic surgery residents, 62.8 for independent plastic surgery residents, 84.6 for integrated plastic surgery residents, 22.4 for neurological surgery residents, and 0.4 for surgery residents. Intraspecialty comparison of the 10th and 90th percentile peripheral nerve case volume in 2012 revealed remarkable variability in training. There was a 3.9-fold difference within orthopaedic surgery, a 5.0-fold difference within independent plastic surgery residents, an 8.8-fold difference for residents from integrated plastic surgery programs, and a 7.0-fold difference within the neurological surgery group. Conclusions There is interspecialty and intraspecialty variability in peripheral nerve surgery volume for orthopaedic, plastic, neurological, and general surgery residents. Caseload is not the sole determinant of training quality as mentorship, didactics, case breadth, and complexity play an important role in training. PMID:27168883

  18. The development of a TED-Ed online resident research training program

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Katherine A.; Pound, Catherine M.; Peddle, Beth; Tokarewicz, Jaclyn; Eady, Kaylee

    2014-01-01

    Background Pediatric health research is important for improving the health and well-being of children and their families. To foster the development of physicians’ research competencies, it is vital to integrate practical and context-specific research training into residency programs. Purpose To describe the development of a resident research training program at one tertiary care pediatric academic health sciences center in Ontario, Canada. Methods We surveyed residents and pediatricians/research staff to establish the need and content for a resident research training program. Results Residents and resident research supervisors agreed or strongly agreed that research training is important for residents. However, few residents and supervisors believed that their academic health sciences center provided adequate training and resources to support resident research. As such, an online resident research training program was established. Residents and supervisors agreed that the program should focus on the following topics: 1) critically evaluating research literature, 2) writing a research proposal, 3) submitting an application for research funding, and 4) writing a manuscript. Discussion This highly accessible, context-specific, and inexpensive online program model may be of interest and benefit to other residency programs as a means to enhance residents’ scholarly roles. A formal evaluation of the research training program is now underway. PMID:25526717

  19. Blueshift: Bringing the Universe Closer to the Public Through Podcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Sara E.; Krishnamurthi, A.

    2008-05-01

    Each day, millions of people tune into podcasts, internet-based broadcasts of audio content generated by individuals and organizations around the world. NASA has created a variety of podcasts to share its rich science, technology, and exploration accomplishments. The Astrophysics Science Division at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center produces a podcast, Blueshift, to provide listeners with a "backstage pass” to what's happening within the division. Content includes interviews, audio scrapbooks, and other stories that give the public access to groundbreaking discoveries, innovative technology, new missions, and what it's like to work at NASA. Podcasting engages a diverse audience that includes all ages and equal numbers of male and female listeners. Currently a rising technology, studies show more people are creating and listening to podcasts each year. Audio provides an experience that websites and visual imagery alone cannot, and Blueshift seeks to engage its listeners with the sounds of NASA. Each episode is 15-20 minutes in length, covering a variety of topics, and supported by an episode guide and supplementary content available on the podcast's website. The average episode is downloaded by almost 4,000 listeners in the United States and abroad. During the International Year of Astronomy, podcasts can engage the public with audio content about astronomical history, STEM content, and current events and activities for IYA. Blueshift is looking forward to bringing the Universe closer to its listeners with unique "behind-the-scenes” NASA content as we approach this monumental anniversary in astronomy.

  20. Bringing a military approach to teaching.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Despite having only established the company nine years ago, the founders of Kidderminster-based Avensys Medical believe the company now offers not only one of the UK's most comprehensive maintenance, repair, consultancy, and equipment audit services for medical and dental equipment, but also one of the most tailored training portfolios for electro-biomedical (EBME) engineers working in healthcare settings to enable them to get the best out of such equipment, improve patient safety, optimise service life, and save both the NHS and private sector money. As HEJ editor, Jonathan Baillie, discovered on meeting one of the two co-founders, ex-Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers (REME) artificer sergeant-major (ASM) and MoD engineering trainer, Robert Strange, many of the company's key trainers have a strong military background, and it is the rigorous and disciplined approach this enables them to bring to their training that he believes singles the company out. PMID:26268025

  1. Sexual Education for Psychiatric Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; Scott, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors seek to promote sexuality curriculum development in departments of psychiatry. Methods: The authors first focus on educational philosophy about what residents can be taught about sexual topics and then provide numerical and narrative resident evaluation data following a 6-month, half day per week rotation in a sexuality…

  2. Substance Abuse by Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutsky, Irving; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The analysis of 183 responses to a survey of former anesthesiology residents of the Medical College of Wisconsin found that 29 had been self-administered problematic substance abusers during their residencies, 23 had been alcohol dependent, and 6 had been drug dependent. More than 85 percent of respondents considered the drug policy information…

  3. Medical Residency Goes to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boatright, Beth; Gallucci, Chrysan; Swanson, Judy; Van Lare, Michelle; Yoon, Irene

    2009-01-01

    The Highline School District, located roughly 10 miles south of Seattle, Washington, has begun to implement a residency model for professional learning. Like the medical model, current teachers often traveled from other schools to be "in residency" at a previously selected classroom for six half-day sessions during the 2005-06 school year. Some…

  4. Resident Care Guide. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodbridge State School, NJ.

    The third edition of the Woodbridge State School Cottage Life Department Resident Care Guide is explained to be a developmental status scale devised in 1969 as part of a 5-year study for the purposes of measuring the entire population's self-help training abilities. The department is said to serve 954 residents; 424 are non-ambulatory and 530 are…

  5. Residence Hall Seating That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2003-01-01

    Describes the seating chosen for residence halls at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of New England. The seating required depends on ergonomics, aesthetics, durability, cost, and code requirements. In addition, residence halls must have a range of seating types to accommodate various uses. (SLD)

  6. Caldecott Connections to Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glandon, Shan

    This volume brings award-winning literature to all areas of the science curriculum. The lesson plan format includes the four stages of engagement, elaboration, exploration, and connection. Each story is followed by activities that make connections between literature, science, and the arts. Chapters include: (1) "Frog Went A-Courtin'," which…

  7. Mountain Science. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimmons, Carol

    This is the second in a series of books that provide high-interest reading material for rural adults who read below the seventh-grade level. The book provides information on science, technology, and the environment for the people of Appalachia and other rural areas, helping to bring the concepts and meaning of science within their grasp. Many of…

  8. Ecological Restoration: Bringing Back the Prairie.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield

    1997-01-01

    Defines ecological restoration and offers a plan for prairie restoration as a schoolyard project. Steps include researching and planning the site, preparation and planting, and continuing management of the site. Ecological concepts in this activity also relate to science, language arts, math, social studies, art, and music for K-12 students. (AIM)

  9. What Can Neuroscience Bring to Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Educational neuroscience promises to incorporate emerging insights from neuroscience into education, and is an exiting renovation of cognitive science in education. But unlike cognitive neuroscience--which aims to explain how the mind is embodied--educational neuroscience necessarily incorporates values that reflect the kind of citizen and the…

  10. Bring Engineering to Life: Pergola Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorrell, Abby; Berkeihiser, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The Family and Consumer Science (FCS) Department at Charles F. Patton Middle School in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, planted a garden to provide students with an organic horticulture experience. Although the garden provided the FCS Department space to grow plants, Patton Middle School FCS teachers Betsy Ballard and Kim Hislert believed it…

  11. Reliability and accuracy of resident evaluations of surgical faculty.

    PubMed

    Risucci, D A; Lutsky, L; Rosati, R J; Tortolani, A J

    1992-09-01

    This study examines the reliability and accuracy of ratings by general surgery residents of surgical faculty. Twenty-three of 33 residents anonymously and voluntarily evaluated 62 surgeons in June, 1988; 24 of 28 residents evaluated 64 surgeons in June, 1989. Each resident rated each surgeon on a 5-point scale for each of 10 areas of performance: technical ability, basic science knowledge, clinical knowledge, judgment, peer relations, patient relations, reliability, industry, personal appearance, and reaction to pressure. Reliability analyses evaluated internal consistency and interrater correlation. Accuracy analyses evaluated halo error, leniency/severity, central tendency, and range restriction. Ratings had high internal consistency (coefficient alpha = 0.97). Interrater correlations were moderately high (average Pearson correlation = 0.63 among raters). Ratings were generally accurate, with halo error most prevalent and some evidence of leniency. Ratings by chief residents had the least halo. Results were generally replicable across the two academic years. We conclude that anonymous ratings of surgical faculty by groups of residents can provide a reliable and accurate evaluation method, ratings by chief residents are most accurate, and halo error may pose the greatest threat to accuracy, pointing to the need for greater definition of evaluation items and scale points. PMID:10121283

  12. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training.

    PubMed

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  13. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    PubMed Central

    Shweiki, Ehyal; Martin, Niels D; Beekley, Alec C; Jenoff, Jay S; Koenig, George J; Kaulback, Kris R; Lindenbaum, Gary A; Patel, Pankaj H; Rosen, Matthew M; Weinstein, Michael S; Zubair, Muhammad H; Cohen, Murray J

    2015-01-01

    Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people’s choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. PMID:25995656

  14. EarthObserver: Bringing the world to your fingertips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, W. B.; Goodwillie, A. M.; Coplan, J.; Carbotte, S. M.; Arko, R. A.; Ferrini, V.; O'hara, S. H.; Chan, S.; Bonczkowski, J.; Nitsche, F. O.; Morton, J. J.; McLain, K.; Weissel, R.

    2011-12-01

    EarthObserver (http://www.earth-observer.org/), developed by the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, brings a wealth of geoscience data to Apple iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch mobile devices. Built around an easy-to-use interface, EarthObserver allows users to explore and visualise a wide range of data sets superimposed upon a detailed base map of land elevations and ocean depths - tapping the screen will instantly return the height or depth at that point. A simple transparency function allows direct comparison of built-in content. Data sets include high-resolution coastal bathymetry of bays, sounds, estuaries, harbors and rivers; geological maps of the US states and world - tapping the screen displays the rock type, and full legends can be viewed; US Topo sheets; and, geophysical content including seafloor crustal age and sediment thickness, earthquake and volcano data, gravity and magnetic anomalies, and plate boundary descriptions. The names of physiographic features are automatically displayed. NASA Visible Earth images along with ocean temperature, salinity and productivity maps and precipitation information expose data sets of interest to the atmospheric, oceanic and biological communities. Natural hazard maps, population information and political boundaries allow users to explore impacts upon society. EarthObserver, so far downloaded by more than 55,000 users, offers myriad ways for educators at all levels to bring research-quality geoscience data into the learning environment, whether for use as an in-class illustration or for extensive exploration of earth sciences data. By using cutting-edge mobile app technology, EarthObserver boosts access to relevant earth science content. The EarthObserver base map is the Global Multi-Resolution Topography digital elevation model (GMRT; http://www.marine-geo.org/portals/gmrt/), also developed at LDEO and updated regularly. It provides land elevations with horizontal resolution as high as 10m for

  15. A Novel Approach to Medicine Training for Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onate, John; Hales, Robert; McCarron, Robert; Han, Jaesu; Pitman, Dorothy

    2008-01-01

    Objective: A unique rotation was developed to address limited outpatient internal medicine training in psychiatric residency by the University of California, Davis, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which provides medical care to patients with mental illness. Methods: The number of patients seen by the service and the number of…

  16. Cross-Cultural Psychiatric Residency Training: The Oregon Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehnlein, James K.; Leung, Paul K.; Kinzie, John David

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe the goals and structure of cross-cultural psychiatric training at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU). This training in core knowledge, skills, and attitudes of cultural psychiatry over the past three decades has included medical students, residents, and fellows, along with allied…

  17. Bringing education to your virtual doorstep

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaurov, Vitaliy

    2013-03-01

    We currently witness significant migration of academic resources towards online CMS, social networking, and high-end computerized education. This happens for traditional academic programs as well as for outreach initiatives. The talk will go over a set of innovative integrated technologies, many of which are free. These were developed by Wolfram Research in order to facilitate and enhance the learning process in mathematical and physical sciences. Topics include: cloud computing with Mathematica Online; natural language programming; interactive educational resources and web publishing at the Wolfram Demonstrations Project; the computational knowledge engine Wolfram Alpha; Computable Document Format (CDF) and self-publishing with interactive e-books; course assistant apps for mobile platforms. We will also discuss outreach programs where such technologies are extensively used, such as the Wolfram Science Summer School and the Mathematica Summer Camp.

  18. Bringing mask repair to the next level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edinger, K.; Wolff, K.; Steigerwald, H.; Auth, N.; Spies, P.; Oster, J.; Schneider, H.; Budach, M.; Hofmann, T.; Waiblinger, M.

    2014-10-01

    Mask repair is an essential step in the mask manufacturing process as the extension of 193nm technology and the insertion of EUV are drivers for mask complexity and cost. The ability to repair all types of defects on all mask blank materials is crucial for the economic success of a mask shop operation. In the future mask repair is facing several challenges. The mask minimum features sizes are shrinking and require a higher resolution repair tool. At the same time mask blanks with different new mask materials are introduced to optimize optical performance and long term durability. For EUV masks new classes of defects like multilayer and phase defects are entering the stage. In order to achieve a high yield, mask repair has to cover etch and deposition capabilities and must not damage the mask. These challenges require sophisticated technologies to bring mask repair to the next level. For high end masks ion-beam based and e-based repair technologies are the obvious choice when it comes to the repair of small features. Both technologies have their pro and cons. The scope of this paper is to review and compare the performance of ion-beam based mask repair to e-beam based mask repair. We will analyze the limits of both technologies theoretically and experimentally and show mask repair related performance data. Based on this data, we will give an outlook to future mask repair tools.

  19. Learning styles of orthodontic residents.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Janeen M; Fallis, Drew W; Peel, Jennifer L; Murchison, David F

    2009-03-01

    Significant challenges face many orthodontic residency programs, particularly a shortage of full-time experienced faculty members. Due to this shortage, it is critical that program directors design comprehensive curricula that incorporate the most effective and efficient teaching methods. It is theorized that teaching effectiveness and efficiency are optimized when the course design and content closely match students' learning preferences. This survey study was designed to distinguish the learning preferences of orthodontic residents utilizing Felder and Soloman's Index of Learning Styles, which assesses student learning preferences in four dimensions using dichotomous scales, thereby providing insight into how teaching strategies can best be structured. As a secondary focus, additional questions on the survey were asked to gain information about residents' access to the Internet and comfort level with online learning so as to address acceptance of web-based courses in response to the shortage of full-time faculty members. Orthodontic residents, contacted via email, were requested to complete an online survey; 261 responses were collected. The results indicate that orthodontic residents are highly visual learners and show a preference for sensing and sequential learning strategies. In terms of information technology, the residents are comfortable with and have adequate access to current technological assets; therefore, they may be well suited for inclusion of computer-based teaching modules and other multimedia devices in their residency curriculum. PMID:19289721

  20. Clinical Poems and Clinical Conversations: Some Thoughts on Working with Family Medicine Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Howard F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment in which Family Medicine residents composed, read, and discussed their poems as a way of bringing to life their often complex relationships with patients. It argues that this approach mobilizes the physicians' own creativity in the service of reflective practice and improved doctor-patient relationships. This…

  1. Ready2Teach: Shifts in Teacher Preparation through Residency and Situated Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nivens, Ryan Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Residency models for education in the medical profession have existed for many years. Nationwide, policies are being implemented to bring this model to the field of teacher preparation. How this plays out within education programs is less researched, and there is a need to document the transition from traditional teacher education, that is,…

  2. Science Safaris: Developing Bold Academic Explorers outside the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilbronner, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Science, like most subjects, can only come alive when students are actively engaged in real-life pursuits that interest and challenge them (VanTassel-Baska and Bass 1998). Here the author describes how she was able to bring science to life for her middle school students through a series of Science Safaris--inquiry-based excursions to a variety of…

  3. Bringing the Unidata IDV to the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, W. I.; Oxelson Ganter, J.

    2015-12-01

    Maintaining software compatibility across new computing environments and the associated underlying hardware is a common problem for software engineers and scientific programmers. While traditional software engineering provides a suite of tools and methodologies which may mitigate this issue, they are typically ignored by developers lacking a background in software engineering. Causing further problems, these methodologies are best applied at the start of project; trying to apply them to an existing, mature project can require an immense effort. Visualization software is particularly vulnerable to this problem, given the inherent dependency on particular graphics hardware and software API's. As a result of these issues, there exists a large body of software which is simultaneously critical to the scientists who are dependent upon it, and yet increasingly difficult to maintain.The solution to this problem was partially provided with the advent of Cloud Computing; Application Streaming. This technology allows a program to run entirely on a remote virtual machine while still allowing for interactivity and dynamic visualizations, with little-to-no re-engineering required. When coupled with containerization technology such as Docker, we are able to easily bring the same visualization software to a desktop, a netbook, a smartphone, and the next generation of hardware, whatever it may be.Unidata has been able to harness Application Streaming to provide a tablet-compatible version of our visualization software, the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). This work will examine the challenges associated with adapting the IDV to an application streaming platform, and include a brief discussion of the underlying technologies involved.

  4. Integrated system brings hospital data together.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K F

    1987-10-01

    Healthcare industry changes during the 1980s--increased competition and alterations in the Medicare payment methodology--place new and more complex demands on a hospital's information systems, which often fall short of meeting those demands. These systems were designed for financial reporting, billing, or providing clinical data, and few of them are capable of linking with other unrelated systems. Today's hospital manager needs timely and simultaneous access to data from a variety of sources within the hospital. All the elements to accomplish this are collected somewhere in the hospital, but finding them and bringing them together is difficult. The key to the efficient management and use of data bases is in understanding the fundamental concept of relational data bases, which is the capability of linking or joining separate data files through a common data element in each file. In this way, data files may be integrated into a "related" data base. Any number of separate files, or tables, may exist within a "relational" data base as long as a series of threads links them. A strategic management information data base includes the information necessary to analyze, understand, and manage the hospital's markets, products, resources, and profitability. The major components of this information system are the case mix and cost accounting, budgeting, and modeling systems. The case mix and cost accounting factors involve managing concrete pieces of data, whereas the budgeting and modeling factors manipulate data to create a scenario. The strategic management information data base is the foundation of a hospital's decision support system, which is rapidly moving into the category of a necessary tool of the hospital manager's trade. PMID:10301918

  5. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT,J.

    2004-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security.

  6. MarsQuest Online: Bringing exploration to the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harold, J.; Dusenbery, P.

    2004-12-01

    The last decade has seen an unprecedented number of missions to Mars. From orbiters to landers, we have been treated to an extraordinary series of views of the red planet. In 1997, the MarsQuest traveling exhibit was launched to help bring those views to the public. Three years later NSF funded MarsQuest Online (www.marsquestonline.org), a web project designed to extend the reach and scope of the MarsQuest exhibit. A partnership between TERC, the Space Science Institute, and JPL, MarsQuest Online provides visitors with a wide range of activities that incorporate imagery and data from Mars spacecraft. Activities challenge visitors to recognize which planet a picture is from, or identify features in high resolution imagery. Topographic and image data from Mars Global Surveyor are combined in 3D globes of Earth and Mars, allowing visitors to vertically stretch the planets while locating highest and lowest points, volcanoes, etc. While not designed specifically as a "citizen science" program, two parts of the site - the MER image archive, and the global 3D system -- could hold great potential for such activities. The MER image archive incorporates a real-time feed of raw images from the rover missions. Images are sortable by Mars day and camera, while a combination of panoramas and overhead views allow visitors to view the images in context and explore Mars along with the rovers. The global 3D system, still in development, is an expansion of the 3D activities currently on the site. This system will tap a global set of high resolution image and topographic tiles produced by JPL. This will allow visitors to fly seamlessly over Mars in 3D at the full resolution of these datasets. In addition, the system will include an annotation system to allow for the authoring of "tours" of the planet. We will discuss both of the site components, their capabilities, and potential for the future.

  7. Measuring "humanism" in medical residents.

    PubMed

    Merrill, J M; Boisaubin, E V; Laux, L; Lynch, E C; Roessler, R; Thornby, J I

    1986-02-01

    The American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) has charged directors of residency programs with evaluating "humanistic attributes" in residents seeking certification. To investigate whether traditional measures of residents' performance assess humanistic attributes, 38 second- and third-year medical residents completed the Totalitarian-Authoritarian-Dogmatism (TAD) and Rokeach tests for attitudinal assessment. Five primary sources were used to measure performance. When the measures of performance and attitude were correlated, two negative correlations with "antipathy toward patients" were found: professional maturity (r = -.43, P less than .01) and compassion and concern for patients (r = -.35, P less than .04). The TAD Opinionnaire and the special performance evaluation detect "nonhumanistic dimensions" that routine faculty assessments do not. Since the new Likert scale distributed by ABIM does not differ materially from the rating form used at Baylor for 2 1/2 years, it is unlikely that "humanistic attributes" will be measured by the ABIM's new scale. PMID:3945843

  8. The Optometric Residency: Its Bloom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleything, Willard B.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines for proposed residencies in optometry are presented for pediatric, rehabilitative, and hospital optometry. Their significance in terms of costs, patient population, faculty expertise, and critical mass are discussed. (JMF)

  9. Assuring professional pastoral care for every nursing home resident.

    PubMed

    Knight, B

    1999-01-01

    Ministry to persons in nursing homes is built on two mandates: "... He has sent me to bring good news to the oppressed, to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and release to the prisoners; ... to comfort all who mourn ..." (Isaiah 61:1-3). The federal government provides the second: "Quality of Life. A facility must care for its residents in a manner and in an environment that promotes maintenance or enhancement of each resident's quality of life" (OBRA '87, Guidance to Surveyors in Long Term Care Facilities, Code of Federal Regulations, Health Care Financing Administration, 1995, section 483.15, F240). This article discusses both the religious and the U.S. political history of caring for the old and frail. It concludes by describing political efforts in one state to increase the quality of that care and pastoral efforts to support the nursing assistants in long-term care facilities. PMID:10387595

  10. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  11. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  12. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  13. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  14. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must...

  15. The Fin Art of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes, Nina Christiane

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Japanese fish printing brings interdisciplinary science and culture to the classroom. Presents an activity on fish printing that provides students with a tactile, concrete experience and explores what fish feel like and how their scales are arranged. (ASK)

  16. Residency for Transition Into Practice: An Essential Requirement for New Graduates From Basic RN Programs.

    PubMed

    Goode, Colleen J; Reid Ponte, Patricia; Sullivan Havens, Donna

    2016-02-01

    Nurse residency programs have been developed with the goal of helping newly licensed nurses successfully transition to independent practice. The authors propose that all newly licensed nurses hired in acute care hospitals be required to complete an accredited residency program. An evidence table examines the state of the science related to transition-to-practice programs and provides the basis for recommendations. PMID:26771476

  17. Smart Technology Brings Power to the People

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerstrom, Donald J.; Gephart, Julie M.

    2006-12-01

    Imagine you’re at home one Saturday morning on the computer, as your son takes a shower, your daughter is watching TV, and a load of laundry is in your washer and dryer. Meanwhile, the fragrance of fresh-brewed coffee fills the house. You hear a momentary beep from the dryer that tells you that if you were to look, a high-energy price indicator would be displayed on the front panels of some of your favorite appliances. This tells you that you could save money right now by using less energy. (You’ve agreed to this arrangement to help your utility avoid a substation upgrade. In return, you get a lower rate most of the time.) So you turn off some of the unneeded lights in your home and opt to wait until evening to run the dishwasher. Meanwhile, some of your largest appliances have automatically responded to this signal and have already reduced your home’s energy consumption, saving you money. On January 11, 2006, demonstration projects were launched in 200 homes in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States to test and speed adoption of new smart grid technologies that can make the power grid more resilient and efficient. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory in Richland, Washington, is managing the yearlong study called the Pacific Northwest GridWise™ Testbed Demonstration, a project funded primarily by DOE. Through the GridWise™ Demonstration projects, researchers are gaining insight into energy consumers’ behavior while testing new technologies designed to bring the electric transmission system into the information age. Northwest utilities, appliance manufacturers and technology companies are also supporting this effort to demonstrate the devices and assess the resulting consumer response. A combination of devices, software and advanced analytical tools will give homeowners more information about their energy use and cost, and we want to know if this will modify their behavior. Approximately 100

  18. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  19. 24 CFR 964.140 - Resident training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...: (1) Community organization and leadership training; (2) Organizational development training for Resident Management Corporations and duly elected Resident Councils; (3) Public housing policies,...

  20. ISSLIVE! Bringing the Space Station to Every Generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Philip D.; Price, Jennifer B.; Severance, Mark; Blue, Regina; Khan, Ahmed; Healy, Matthew D.; Ehlinger, Jesse B.

    2011-01-01

    traditional education system, ISSLive! provides a single, interactive, and engaging experience to learn about the ISS and its role in space exploration, international collaboration, and science. While traditional students are using ISSLive! in the classroom, their parents, grandparents, and friends are using it at home. ISSLive! truly brings the daily operations of the ISS into the daily lives of the public from every generation.

  1. Community Efforts Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Kastens, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Individual, departmental and community efforts have all played a major role in developing a thriving research effort addressing thinking and learning in the geosciences. Community efforts have been effective in elevating the importance of the field, defining a research agenda, fostering collaborations with cognitive science and education communities, building capacity within the geosciences, and developing reviewer awareness of the importance and opportunities within geoscience education research. Important community efforts include a call for geoscience education research in the 1997 NSF report Geoscience Education: A Recommended Strategy and in the subsequent 2000 NSF report ‘Bridges: Connecting Research and Education in the Earth System Sciences’. A research agenda and supporting recommendations for collaboration and capacity building were jointly developed by geoscience educators, cognitive scientists and education researchers at the 2002 NSF/Johnson Foundation funded workshop Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences. This research agenda emphasized studies of geoscience expertise, learning pathways (and their challenges) that are critical to the development of that expertise, and materials and environments that support this learning, with a focus on learning in the field and from large data sets, complex systems and deep time, spatial skills, and the synthesis of understanding from multiple sources of incomplete data. Collaboration and capacity building have been further supported by the NAGT sponsored professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” with workshops bringing together cognitive scientists, educators and geoscientists on topics including developing on-line learning resources, teaching with visualizations, the role of the affective domain in geoscience learning, teaching metacognition, and teaching with data. 40 successful educational research proposals are attributed to participation in On the Cutting Edge. An NSF funded

  2. Overwork Among Residents in India: A Medical Resident's Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Gulrez S.; Azhar, Abdullah Z.; Azhar, Ahmad S.

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that medical residents who do most of the hard work in big hospitals and medical colleges are overworked. A hierarchical organizational structure, staffing patterns, and fear of failure in examinations leads to overwork among residents going unreported. This can lead to poor academic performance and research work. Gaps in communication have serious implications on patient health. Undesirable practices like LAMA (leave against medical advice) also result from overwork. Issues of pay and contracts including mandatory service need to be looked into carefully. National and international recommendations on work hours have consistently been ignored. The solutions suggested are simple and easy to implement. PMID:24479024

  3. Ethics education for dermatology residents.

    PubMed

    Bercovitch, Lionel; Long, Thomas P

    2009-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada both require the teaching and demonstration of general competencies, which include professionalism and ethics as a condition of training program accreditation and specialty certification, respectively. Residents in dermatology and other specialties perceive their training in ethics is inadequate in numerous areas. Residents and specialists in dermatology encounter numerous ethical and professional issues throughout their workday. A dermatoethics curriculum was developed at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University in 2001 to address the need for training in bioethics and professionalism. The subject matter of the curriculum and didactic methods are reviewed. Guidelines for effective teaching of ethics and professionalism to dermatology residents are presented. It is important to make the teaching sessions relevant to the residents' day-to-day work experiences and personal needs. Honesty and openness on the part of faculty and trainees is important. Although informality fosters such exchanges, the sessions should be a learning experience. Resources outside the residency program should be used as necessary. Evaluation of ethics and professionalism in trainees is addressed. PMID:19539170

  4. Discovering indigenous science: Implications for science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snively, Gloria; Corsiglia, John

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous science relates to both the science knowledge of long-resident, usually oral culture peoples, as well as the science knowledge of all peoples who as participants in culture are affected by the worldview and relativist interests of their home communities. This article explores aspects of multicultural science and pedagogy and describes a rich and well-documented branch of indigenous science known to biologists and ecologists as traditional ecological knowledge (TEK). Although TEK has been generally inaccessible, educators can now use a burgeoning science-based TEK literature that documents numerous examples of time-proven, ecologically relevant, and cost effective indigenous science. Disputes regarding the universality of the standard scientific account are of critical importance for science educators because the definition of science is a de facto gatekeeping device for determining what can be included in a school science curriculum and what cannot. When Western modern science (WMS) is defined as universal it does displace revelation-based knowledge (i.e., creation science); however, it also displaces pragmatic local indigenous knowledge that does not conform with formal aspects of the standard account. Thus, in most science classrooms around the globe, Western modern science has been taught at the expense of indigenous knowledge. However, because WMS has been implicated in many of the world's ecological disasters, and because the traditional wisdom component of TEK is particularly rich in time-tested approaches that foster sustainability and environmental integrity, it is possible that the universalist gatekeeper can be seen as increasingly problematic and even counter productive. This paper describes many examples from Canada and around the world of indigenous people's contributions to science, environmental understanding, and sustainability. The authors argue the view that Western or modern science is just one of many sciences that need to be

  5. Bring Life into Learning: Create a Lasting Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graves, Donald H.

    Aiming to bring a new sense of adventure to teaching and learning by focusing on the lives of historical figures, artists, and scientists, this book is a "how-to" for teaching the most important lesson of all: becoming human. Each chapter includes several "Actions" designed to bring the human aspect of various disciplines center stage while…

  6. On resident duty hour restrictions and neurosurgical training: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bina, Robert W; Lemole, G Michael; Dumont, Travis M

    2016-03-01

    Within neurosurgery, the national mandate of the 2003 duty hour restrictions (DHR) by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has been controversial. Ensuring the proper education and psychological well-being of residents while fulfilling the primary purpose of patient care has generated much debate. Most medical disciplines have developed strategies that address service needs while meeting educational goals. Additionally, there are numerous studies from those disciplines; however, they are not specifically relevant to the needs of a neurosurgical residency. The recent implementation of the 2011 DHR specifically aimed at limiting interns to 16-hour duty shifts has proven controversial and challenging across the nation for neurosurgical residencies--again bringing education and service needs into conflict. In this report the current literature on DHR is reviewed, with special attention paid to neurosurgical residencies, discussing resident fatigue, technical training, and patient safety. Where appropriate, other specialty studies have been included. The authors believe that a one-size-fits-all approach to residency training mandated by the ACGME is not appropriate for the training of neurosurgical residents. In the authors' opinion, an arbitrary timeline designed to limit resident fatigue limits patient care and technical training, and has not improved patient safety. PMID:26473789

  7. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. PMID:20795597

  8. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  9. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  10. 28 CFR 115.233 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.233 Section 115... STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Training and Education § 115.233 Resident education... resident is transferred to a different facility. (c) The agency shall provide resident education in...

  11. Predictors of Success in an Anesthesiology Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrick, Shirley S.; Crumrine, Robert S.

    1986-01-01

    Factors that contributed to successful residency performance by anesthesiology residents were examined in order to assist the program's selection committee in developing selection criteria. The best predictor of a resident's academic average in the anethesiology program was the number of years the resident had spent in other specialities.…

  12. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  13. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights. The resident has a right to a dignified existence, self...) Exercise of rights. (1) The resident has the right to exercise his or her rights as a resident of...

  14. Moving Carbon, Changing Earth: Bringing the Carbon Cycle to Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabel, I.; Duggan-Haas, D.; Ross, R. M.; Stricker, B.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2014-12-01

    The carbon cycle presents challenges to researchers - in how to understand the complex interactions of fluxes, reservoirs, and systems - and to outreach professionals - in how to get across the complexity of the carbon cycle and still make it accessible to the public. At Cornell University and the Museum of the Earth in Ithaca, NY, researchers and outreach staff tackled these challenges together through a 2013 temporary museum exhibition: Moving Carbon, Changing Earth. Moving Carbon, Changing Earth introduced visitors to the world of carbon and its effect on every part of our lives. The exhibit was the result of the broader impacts portion of an NSF grant awarded to Natalie Mahowald, Professor in the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Cornell University, who has been working with a team to improve simulations of regional and decadal variability in the carbon cycle. Within the exhibition, visitors used systems thinking to understand the distribution of carbon in and among Earth's systems, learning how (and how quickly or slowly) carbon moves between and within these systems, the relative scale of different reservoirs, and how carbon's movement changes climate and other environmental dynamics. Five interactive stations represented the oceans, lithosphere, atmosphere, biosphere, and a mystery reservoir. Puzzles, videos, real specimens, and an interview with Mahowald clarified and communicated the complexities of the carbon cycle. In this talk we'll present background information on Mahowald's research as well as photos of the exhibition and discussion of the components and motivations behind them, showing examples of innovative ways to bring a complex topic to life for museum visitors.

  15. [Basic research during residency in Israel: is change needed?].

    PubMed

    Fishbain, Dana; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Ashkenazi, Shai

    2013-10-01

    A six-month research period is a mandatory part of the residency training program in most basic specialties in Israel and is named: the "basic science period". This is the only period in an Israeli physician's medical career which is dedicated strictly to research, accentuating the importance of medical research to the quality of training and level of medicine in Israel. From another point of view, one may argue that in an era of shortage of physicians on the one hand and the dizzying rate of growth in medical knowledge on the other hand, every moment spent training in residency is precious, therefore, making the decision of whether to dedicate six months for research becomes ever more relevant. This question is currently raised for discussion once again by the Scientific Council of the Israeli Medical Association. The Scientific Council lately issued a call for comments sent to all Israeli physicians, asking their opinion on several key questions regarding basic science research. Learning the public's opinion will serve as a background for discussion. A total of 380 physicians responded to the call and specified their standpoint on the subject, among them heads of departments, units and clinics, senior physicians and residents. The findings pointed to strong support in maintaining the research period as part of residency training due to its importance to medical training and medicine, although half the respondents supported the use of various alternative formats for research together with the existing format. Those alternative format suggestions will be thoroughly reviewed. A smaller group of respondents supported allowing residents a choice between two tracks--with or without a research period, and only a few were in favor of canceling the research requirement altogether. The writers maintain that the "basic science period" of research during residency training is vital and its contribution to the high level of specialists and high level of medicine requires its

  16. The basket trainer: A homemade laparoscopic trainer attainable to every resident

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Nidal

    2010-01-01

    Laparoscopic trainers have been proved to be effective to improve skills of laparoscopic surgery; they are usually installed at hospital in the surgical department with limited access hours, usually inconvenient to the schedule of the resident. Simple trainer boxes are necessary for residents who desire developing their skills at home independently to the venue and hours of surgical departments. Our goal is to bring the laparoscopic trainer to the desktop of the surgical resident by making it very cheap, small, light, secure and easy to construct. We describe a model of laparoscopic trainer using steel basket which, we believe, meets all of the above-mentioned requirements. It is accessible to any personal budget and can be constructed with a minimum of hand skill. It is small and light enough to permit its daily use on the desktop of the resident for a couple of hours, then after it can be stocked in any locker. PMID:20585486

  17. Predictors of Residence Hall Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arboleda, Ana; Wang, Yongyi; Shelley, Mack C., II; Whalen, Donald F.

    2003-01-01

    Residence hall students' (N = 1,186, 52% male, 90% White, 66% freshmen) involvement in their living community is influenced significantly by precollege student characteristics (gender, ethnicity), classification, attitudes (toward hall director, house cabinet, academic comfort, social environment, group study), and environmental variables (noise,…

  18. Cleaner in Hall of Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotel and Catering Industry Training Board, Wembley (England).

    This syllabus is intended for the use of training personnel in drawing up training programs for cleaners in halls of residence. Its main objective is to produce fully trained cleaners, thereby maintaining and raising standards. The syllabus is divided into three sections: Introduction to Housekeeping Employees, and Tasks Performed by the Majority…

  19. Aspiring Teachers Take up Residence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honawar, Vaishall

    2008-01-01

    The Boston Teacher Residency program is a yearlong, selective preparation route that trains aspiring teachers, many of them career-changers, to take on jobs in some of the city's highest-needs schools. The program, which fits neither of the two most common types of teacher preparation--alternative routes and traditional teacher education…

  20. Science policy fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    To encourage scientists to contribute to public policy issues that involve the natural sciences, the Brookings Institution in Washington, D.C., has established a Science Policy Fellowship program, slated to begin with the 1981-1982 academic year. The program will bring senior scientists to Washington for 1 year to work with the Brookings staff on science policy issues.Fellowships will be awarded annually to three scientists from among candidates nominated by an advisory committee, by departments of natural science at universities and private research institutions, and by the public sector. The new program is supported by a 3-year grant from the Sloan Foundation.

  1. The JOVE initiative - A NASA/university Joint Venture in space science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, F.; Chappell, R.

    1990-01-01

    The JOVE (NASA/university Joint Venture in space science) initiative is a point program between NASA and institutions of higher education whose aim is to bring about an extensive merger between these two communities. The project is discussed with emphasis on suggested contributions of partnership members, JOVE process timeline, and project schedules and costs. It is suggested that NASA provide a summer resident research associateship (one ten week stipend); scientific on-line data from space missions; an electronic network and work station, providing a link to the data base and to other scientists; matching student support, both undergraduate and graduate; matching summer salary for up to three faculty participants; and travel funds. The universities will be asked to provide research time for faculty participants, matching student support, matching summer salary for faculty participants, an instructional unit in space science, and an outreach program to pre-college students.

  2. The Jefferson Science Fellows (JSF) program at the US Department of State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Roy

    2014-09-01

    In 2004 the US Department of State and the National Academies established the Jefferson Science Fellows program, to bring tenured faculty in sciences, engineering, and medicine to the Department of State or USAID for a year in residence, with continuing connections. Over twenty physical scientists have been Fellows, working in a wide variety of offices on a broad range of topics. The main advantage to Fellows is the opportunity to make an impact on important national and international issues, applying skills and judgments gained through their research, teaching, and service. The JSF experience can also create broader horizons for physicists, especially beyond the laboratory. The selection process and examples, including my own, will be described. Information can be found at //sites.nationalacademies.org/PGA/Jefferson/.

  3. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  4. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  5. Science Education Resources for Families. Science Education Resources. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    Science is everywhere and should be learned inside as well as outside of the science classroom. This document provides a list of science resources to help parents bring the scientist out in their child. The article includes information on the following topics: (1) Sources of Science Activities; (2) Reading, Television, and Video Resources in…

  6. 3. Buoy tender crew mates work to bring a navigational ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Buoy tender crew mates work to bring a navigational buoy aboard for servicing. - U.S. Coast Guard Buoy Tenders, 180' Class, U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, 2100 Second Street Southwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  7. 10. ELECTRICAL SWITCHING STATION FOR IRON MOUNTAIN BRINGS ELECTRICITY FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ELECTRICAL SWITCHING STATION FOR IRON MOUNTAIN BRINGS ELECTRICITY FROM HOOVER DAM COMPLEX. - Iron Mountain Pump Plant, South of Danby Lake, north of Routes 62 & 177 junction, Rice, San Bernardino County, CA

  8. 32. Coffee bean sluiceway on ground floor showing chute bringing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Coffee bean sluiceway on ground floor showing chute bringing beans from first floor hopper. HAER PR, 6-MAGU, 1B-17 - Hacienda Buena Vista, PR Route 10 (Ponce to Arecibo), Magueyes, Ponce Municipio, PR

  9. Major Ups and Downs: Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings

    MedlinePlus

    ... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Major Ups and Downs Bipolar Disorder Brings Extreme Mood Swings Most people feel happy ... Strike Out Stroke Wise Choices Links Dealing with Bipolar Disorder If you have bipolar disorder, get treatment and ...

  10. Climate Change May Bring More Tainted Shellfish to Northern Seas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160300.html Climate Change May Bring More Tainted Shellfish to Northern Seas ... must be monitored "in the light of ongoing climate change, especially in coastal areas most heavily affected by ...

  11. Blooming Trees Can Bring Misery to Allergy Sufferers

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157872.html Blooming Trees Can Bring Misery to Allergy Sufferers But expert ... 20, 2016 SUNDAY, March 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Tree pollen season has arrived, but there are a ...

  12. Marine Science Comes Alive.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dorothy

    1996-01-01

    A new state-of-the-art marine science laboratory at Eckerd College (Florida) is a study in the power of research, teamwork, attention to detail, and cost control. A redundant piping system brings sea water directly to the students. Once a week the pipes that previously held sea water are flushed and refilled with fresh water. (MLF)

  13. The Science of HIV.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiSpezio, Michael

    This book is the first curriculum developed to bring cutting edge research on the HIV virus into science classrooms. The book and video are coordinated to provide a range of learning opportunities--labs, activities, readings, model design, guided discussions and, in the video, a way to see research in action. Both the book and video emphasize the…

  14. Redesigning journal club in residency.

    PubMed

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  15. Redesigning journal club in residency

    PubMed Central

    Al Achkar, Morhaf

    2016-01-01

    The gap between production and implementation of knowledge is the main reason for the suboptimal quality of health care. To eliminate this gap and improve the quality of patient care, journal club (JC) in graduate medical education provides an opportunity for learning the skills of evidence-based medicine. JC, however, continues to face many challenges mainly due to poorly defined goals, inadequate preparation, and lack of interest. This article presents an innovative model to prepare and present JC based on three pillars: dialogical learning through group discussion, mentored residents as peer teachers, and including JC as part of a structured curriculum to learn evidence-based medicine. This engaging model has the potential to transform JC from a moribund session that is daunting for residents into a lively discussion to redefine clinical practice using the most current evidence. PMID:27313486

  16. Safety in the Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online Submission, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this K-12 science safety resource is to bring together information needed by administrators, planners, teachers and support staff to help them make sound decisions regarding science safety. The document identifies areas for decision making and action at a variety of levels. It supports planning and action by providing information on…

  17. Science Magic: Making a Difference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidel, L. L.

    2004-01-01

    In this narrative article, the author fondly takes a look back at her own personal experiences with a memorable science teacher who showed his students that science was a living, breathing world. Whether he assigned his class to collect water samples from local ponds (to look at microscopic organisms), bring in rocks to class for identification,…

  18. Residential learning communities as a tool for increasing interest in the Earth and Environmental Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, L. K.; Burmeister, K. C.; Colafrancesco, K.; Brodie, C.; Jacobson, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Residence for Earth and Environmental Living and Learning (REELL), a residential learning community (RLCs) established at the University of the Pacific in 2008-2009, has proven to be an effective tool for increasing interest in the Earth and environmental sciences. RLCs bring together students that share a theme-based interest and are given an opportunity to live together in a common space within a campus residence hall. The 2008-2009 REELL group comprised representatives from a wide range of degree programs, and included 16 freshmen, a junior peer advisor, and a senior residential advisor. Student participants in the REELL community work closely with their peers, faculty, and staff on academic, social, and outreach programs designed to increase interest and awareness in the Earth & environment. REELL activities include regular meetings, sponsored movies, guest speakers, field trips, campus exchange events, and outreach activities. These activities are arranged around a yearlong research project that is designed and implemented by the student participants. Preliminary results suggest that activity- and project-related interactions during the 2008-2009 REELL program year are an effective way to establish connections between among students, faculty, and administration and have increased interest and participation in Earth and Environmental Science courses and programs. Studies of RLCs implemented in a wide variety of colleges and university settings demonstrate that these programs successfully foster the development of leadership, social, and academic skills in student participants. The REELL community at the University of the Pacific is based upon the successful the Honors RLC. The well-established Honors RLC is a perfect example of how such programs can increase social and academic development. Like the REELL program, the Honors RLC brings together first and second year honors students in a single residence hall. Their participation in the Honors RLC provides

  19. Boundless Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilhaus, F.

    2009-04-01

    Our science is critical to understanding the future prospects for life. The laboratory for natural sciences encompasses our planet and reaches into the solar system. The forces of nature respect no boundaries. But, we who try to understand these forces are handicapped by national, political, language, religious, and other concocted barriers. These barriers limit both our effectiveness as scientists and our ability to reach those outside our community who need to know what we have uncovered about our environment. An unencumbered worldwide scientific community has been an objective with limited successes for too long. Action began in earnest after the first world war with the formation of the various scientific Unions and ICSU. Fifty years later Keith Runcorn initiated another approach, when he proposed what quickly became EGS and which has grown and evolved with the merger with EUG. To be truly effective we need to communicate and share comfortably with colleagues worldwide. Personal relationships and trust are required. We count on a high level of ethical behavior within our community. We individually must also be constantly vigilant for the encroachment of the manmade barriers that have held back science through time immemorial. Our scientific organizations cannot achieve this alone. They will facilitate, however, the onus is on each of us to reach out and form interlocking informal communities, which will bring our whole planet-wide community together at many overlapping levels. When we achieve this community, our science will more bountiful and better address the needs of human society.

  20. Bringing New Ph.D.s Together for Interdisciplinary Climate Change Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phelan, Liam; Jones, Holly; Marlon, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is complex and thus requires interdisciplinary research, and new scholars are rising to that challenge. The Dissertations Initiative for the Advancement of Climate Change Research (DISCCRS (pronounced "discourse"); see http://www.disccrs.org) brings together select groups of recent PhD graduates to encourage interdisciplinary work on climate change. The DISCCRS Symposium VII held just outside of Colorado Springs, Colo., brought together 33 graduates from fields as diverse as climatology, ecology, anthropology, and political science for an intensive week of cross-disciplinary engagement in activities like facilitation and leadership training, collaborative research development, peer networking, communication training, and analysis of working group processes.

  1. The Role of Religious and Scientific Leaders in Bringing Awareness to the Urgency of Climate Change.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, V.

    2015-12-01

    The release of the Encyclical by Pope Francis has opened a powerful new venue to bring forth the urgency of climate change to the public. The background work that preceded the encyclical was several years in the making. The Church has its own Science Academy, known as the Pontifical Academy of Sciences, consisting of 80 members from around the world with more than a third Nobel Laureates. The members are chosen for their scientific excellence (like most science academies of the world) and not for their religious affiliations. This academy organized a series of scientific meetings for the last 5 years, culminating in a 2014 workshop entitled: Sustainable Humanity, Sustainable Nature , Our Responsibility, jointly organized with the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences. This meeting of the world's thought leaders in natural and Social sciences, came to a remarkable set of conclusions: Climate Change has become a moral issue. A fundamental change in our attitude towards natue and towards each other is required to solve the problem. Religious leaders can have a transformational effect by mobilizing public opinion for actions to stabilize climate change and protect the people. Being a council member of the Pontifical Academy and watching from within the powerful moral voice of Pope Francis, I conclude that this partnership with religion is a powerful new venue for those researchers, reticent about publicly voicing their grave concerns to pursue. We are going to bring massive public support for urgent actions only when the impacts of climate change and its origins are taught in every church, every temple, every mosque, every synagogue, and other places of worship.

  2. Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

  3. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  4. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  5. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  6. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  7. 38 CFR 51.110 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.110 Resident assessment. The...) Review of assessments. The nursing facility management must examine each resident no less than once...

  8. Outreach and education in urban Los Angeles Schools: integration of research into middle and high school science curriculum through the NSF GK-12 SEE-LA program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, J. C.; Hogue, T. S.; Moldwin, M. B.; Nonacs, P.

    2012-12-01

    A National Science Foundation Graduate Teaching Fellows in K- 12 Education program at UCLA (SEE-LA; http://measure.igpp.ucla.edu/GK12-SEE-LA/ ) partners UCLA faculty and graduate students (fellows) with urban middle and high school science teachers and their students to foster programs of science and engineering exploration that bring the environment of Los Angeles into the classroom. UCLA science and engineering graduate fellows serve as scientists-in-residence at four partner schools to integrate inquiry-based science lessons, facilitate advancements in science content teaching, and ultimately, to improve their own science communication skills. As part of their fellowship, graduate students are required to develop three "major" lessons, including one based on their PhD research at UCLA. During the first four years of the project, the SEE-LA fellows have developed a range of research-based activities, including lessons on sustainable fisheries, ecosystems and remote sensing, earthquakes, urban water quality including invertebrate observations, and post-fire soil chemistry, among others. This presentation will provide an overview of the SEE-LA GK-12 program and development of research lessons that also address California State Science Standards. We also discuss potential sustainability of GK-12 type outreach and education programs. The SEE-LA program has provided development of graduate student communication and teaching skills while also contributing significantly to the integration of science education into K-12 curriculum in Los Angeles schools.

  9. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.20 Resident assessment. The facility must conduct initially and periodically a... resident's immediate care. (b) Comprehensive assessments—(1) Resident assessment instrument. A...

  10. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying...

  11. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying...

  12. Residency and In-State Tuition. Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Persons classified as residents for higher education purposes under Texas law may pay in-state tuition. Although Texas does not have any programs specifically for undocumented students, some undocumented persons are among those who are eligible for in-state tuition under current residency statutes. The residency statutes for higher education…

  13. Recommendations for nurse practitioner residency programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kameka; Poppe, Anne; Kaminetzky, Catherine; Wipf, Joyce; Woods, Nancy Fugate

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and prioritize critical aspects needed in the design and execution of new nurse practitioner (NP) residency programs. Subjects answered a series of questions on formulating residency programs and on key outcomes and cost measures related to their sustainability. These results serve as potential guideposts for future work in NP residency standardization and sustainability development. PMID:25501654

  14. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  15. Toolbox for Evaluating Residents as Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, John H.; Ismail, Nadia; Mian, Ayesha; Dewey, Charlene

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors review existing assessment tools related to evaluating residents' teaching skills and teaching effectiveness. Methods: PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched using combinations of keywords including "residents," "residents as teachers," "teaching skills," and "assessments" or "rating scales." Results: Eleven evaluation…

  16. Otolaryngology residency and fellowship training. The resident's perspective.

    PubMed

    Miller, R H

    1994-10-01

    Based on the success rate of US otolaryngology graduates on the American Board of Otolaryngology Certification Examination, it would appear that otolaryngology training is quite good. However, it is not clear that all aspects of training are equal in quality, not only between programs but also within a single program. One indication that there may be areas of weakness is the fact that despite the perceived national shortages of primary care physicians in the United States and the overabundance of specialists, 25% of the approximately 260 graduating otolaryngology residents extend their training beyond specialty training to subspecialty levels (Manpower Committee of the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, unpublished data obtained from chief resident questionnaires, 1990-1992). The most popular area of fellowship training is facial plastic surgery, followed by neurotology and head and neck oncology. Pediatric otolaryngology fellowships make up most of the balance. Most of the fellowships are well structured and are 1 year in duration. Others are more like apprenticeships and may be of shorter duration. A few are 2 years long and include a significant research commitment reserved for individuals entering academic practice. PMID:7917188

  17. A Constructive Alternativist View of Children's Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, D. Michael

    Part of the Concepts in Science Project at the University of Surrey is to explore the complex structure and organization of ideas and meaning that children bring with them to their science lessons. To examine these ideas and meanings, a distinction is made between children's intuitive understanding of their world (children's science) and the…

  18. Partners in Science. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    Partners in Science students, aided by community professionals, learn science by designing and conducting their own research. Partners in Science brings the community and schools closer together through a mentorship program. Scientists, in fields ranging from wildlife biology to space physics, are in frequent contact with classes and home-schooled…

  19. Teaching Tips Innovations in Undergraduate Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Druger, Marvin; Crow, Linda

    2004-01-01

    Like a spirited idea exchange among experienced professors, "Teaching Tips: Innovations in Undergraduate Science Instruction" brings the best thinking from campuses nationwide about how to engage undergraduate science students. Published to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the founding of the Society for College Science Teachers (SCST), "Tips"…

  20. Bringing the Great American Eclipse of 2017 to Audiences across the Nation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, C. A.; Mayo, L.; Cline, T. D.; Ng, C.; Stephenson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse across America will be seen by an estimated 500 million people from northern Canada to South America as well as parts of western Europe and Africa. Through This "Great American Eclipse" NASA in partnership with Google, the American Parks Network, American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical League, and numerous other science, education, outreach, and public communications groups and organizations will develop the approaches, resources, partnerships, and technology applications necessary to bring the excitement and the science of the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse across America to formal and informal audiences in the US and around the world. This effort will be supported by the highly visible and successful Sun Earth Days program and will be the main theme for Sun-Earth Days 2017.This presentation will discuss NASA's education and communication plans for the eclipse and will detail a number of specific programs and partnerships being leveraged to enhance our reach and impact.

  1. Beautiful Science: Worth a Visit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    For those in the profession of teaching physics who reside in or plan to visit the Los Angeles area, I would highly recommend a trip to the Huntington Library in San Marino, specifically to a permanent exhibit entitled "Beautiful Science: Ideas that Changed the World" in the Dibner Hall of the History of Science. The exhibit contains original…

  2. NIRS external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents after the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, Keiichi; Yonai, Shunsuke; Fukuda, Shigekazu; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Iwaoka, Kazuki; Matsumoto, Masaki; Fukumura, Akifumi; Akashi, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    The great east Japan earthquake and subsequent tsunamis caused Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) accident. National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) developed the external dose estimation system for Fukushima residents. The system is being used in the Fukushima health management survey. The doses can be obtained by superimposing the behavior data of the residents on the dose rate maps. For grasping the doses, 18 evacuation patterns of the residents were assumed by considering the actual evacuation information before using the survey data. The doses of the residents from the deliberate evacuation area were relatively higher than those from the area within 20 km radius. The estimated doses varied from around 1 to 6 mSv for the residents evacuated from the representative places in the deliberate evacuation area. The maximum dose in 18 evacuation patterns was estimated to be 19 mSv. PMID:23591638

  3. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  4. Public Health Education for Emergency Medicine Residents

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Marian E.; Bernstein, Steven L.; Gutman, Deborah; Tibbles, Carrie D.; Joyce, Nina; Lipton, Robert; Schweigler, Lisa; Fisher, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) has an important role in public health, but the ideal approach for teaching public health to EM residents is unclear. As part of the national regional public health–medicine education centers-graduate medical education (RPHMEC-GM) initiative from the CDC and the American Association of Medical Colleges, three EM programs received funding to create public health curricula for EM residents. Curricula approaches varied by residency. One program used a modular, integrative approach to combine public health and EM clinical topics during usual residency didactics, one partnered with local public health organizations to provide real-world experiences for residents, and one drew on existing national as well as departmental resources to seamlessly integrate more public health–oriented educational activities within the existing residency curriculum. The modular and integrative approaches appeared to have a positive impact on resident attitudes toward public health, and a majority of EM residents at that program believed public health training is important. Reliance on pre-existing community partnerships facilitated development of public health rotations for residents. External funding for these efforts was critical to their success, given the time and financial restraints on residency programs. The optimal approach for public health education for EM residents has not been defined. PMID:21961671

  5. Public health education for emergency medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Betz, Marian E; Bernstein, Steven L; Gutman, Deborah C; Tibbles, Carrie D; Joyce, Nina R; Lipton, Robert I; Schweigler, Lisa M; Fisher, Jonathan

    2011-10-01

    Emergency medicine (EM) has an important role in public health, but the ideal approach for teaching public health to EM residents is unclear. As part of the national Regional Public Health-Medicine Education Centers-Graduate Medical Education initiative from the CDC and the American Association of Medical Colleges, three EM programs received funding to create public health curricula for EM residents. Curricula approaches varied by residency. One program used a modular, integrative approach to combine public health and EM clinical topics during usual residency didactics, one partnered with local public health organizations to provide real-world experiences for residents, and one drew on existing national as well as departmental resources to seamlessly integrate more public health-oriented educational activities within the existing residency curriculum. The modular and integrative approaches appeared to have a positive impact on resident attitudes toward public health, and a majority of EM residents at that program believed public health training is important. Reliance on pre-existing community partnerships facilitated development of public health rotations for residents. External funding for these efforts was critical to their success, given the time and financial restraints on residency programs. The optimal approach for public health education for EM residents has not been defined. PMID:21961671

  6. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don . E-mail: donyee@cancerboard.ab.ca; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-06-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada.

  7. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior window detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  8. Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. Adam ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Marguerite Arnet Residence, exterior door detail, looking north. - Adam & Bessie Arnet Homestead, Marguerite Arnet Residence, 560 feet northeast of Adam & Bessie Arnet Residence, Model, Las Animas County, CO

  9. Science and Engineering in the Petascale Era

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Thom H.; Schulten, Klaus; Tromp, Jeroen; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Droegemeier, Kelvin; Xue, Ming; Fussell, Paul

    2011-01-01

    What breakthrough advances will petascale computing bring to various science and engineering fields? Experts in everything from astronomy to seismology envision the opportunities ahead and the impact they’ll have on advancing our understanding of the world. PMID:21998556

  10. Science and Engineering in the Petascale Era.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Thom H; Schulten, Klaus; Tromp, Jeroen; Ostriker, Jeremiah P; Droegemeier, Kelvin; Xue, Ming; Fussell, Paul

    2009-09-01

    What breakthrough advances will petascale computing bring to various science and engineering fields? Experts in everything from astronomy to seismology envision the opportunities ahead and the impact they'll have on advancing our understanding of the world. PMID:21998556

  11. Senior Resident Training on Educational Principles (STEP): A Proposed Innovative Step from a Developing Nation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satendra

    2010-01-01

    Resident-as-teacher courses are pretty common in Western medical schools however they are a rarity in Asian and developing countries. The current report is a scholarly analysis of a three day orientation program for senior residents in order to improve their functioning by providing new template either for supplementing basic workshops for faculty or to advocate a change in system. The experience gained by Medical Education Unit of University College of Medical Sciences can be used to conduct training breeding grounds at national or regional levels. Resident as teachers educational interventions need to be designed taking into account their impact on education system. PMID:21179229

  12. Senior Resident Training on Educational Principles (STEP): A Proposed Innovative Step from a Developing Nation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Resident-as-teacher courses are pretty common in Western medical schools however they are a rarity in Asian and developing countries. The current report is a scholarly analysis of a three day orientation program for senior residents in order to improve their functioning by providing new template either for supplementing basic workshops for faculty or to advocate a change in system. The experience gained by Medical Education Unit of University College of Medical Sciences can be used to conduct training breeding grounds at national or regional levels. Resident as teachers educational interventions need to be designed taking into account their impact on education system. PMID:21179229

  13. MarsQuest: Bringing the Excitement of Mars Exploration to the Public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Morrow, C. A.; Harold, J. B.

    2005-08-01

    We are in the midst of an extraordinary era of Mars exploration with missions like NASA's Odyssey and Mars Global Surveyor and ESA's Mars Express spacecraft along with NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers returning results that expand our knowledge and understanding of the Red Planet. To bring the excitement of Mars exploration to the public, the Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, CO, has developed a comprehensive Mars Education Program that includes: 1) large and small traveling exhibits, 2) workshops for educators and docents, and 3) an interactive Web site called MarsQuest Online (in partnership with TERC and JPL). This program will be presented and offered as a good model for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to improve science education. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is on a six-year tour that began in 1998. The exhibit is currently at the Life Science Centre, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. The Institute has also developed Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest that is designed for smaller venues. Workshops for educators and docents are conducted at host sites. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions to students and museum visitors. MarsQuest Online is a Web site that uses the MarsQuest exhibit as a framework for online interactives that delve deeper into Mars science. The Mars Education Program also provides a context for educational research on effective educational programming and web-based versus exhibit delivery of interactives. The results of this research inform subsequent exhibit projects, (e.g. Giant Planets) and are disseminated to the broader informal science community.

  14. Bring out your codes! Bring out your codes! (Increasing Software Visibility and Re-use)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; Berriman, B.; Brunner, R.; Burger, D.; DuPrie, K.; Hanisch, R. J.; Mann, R.; Mink, J.; Sandin, C.; Shortridge, K.; Teuben, P.

    2013-10-01

    Progress is being made in code discoverability and preservation, but as discussed at ADASS XXI, many codes still remain hidden from public view. With the Astrophysics Source Code Library (ASCL) now indexed by the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS), the introduction of a new journal, Astronomy & Computing, focused on astrophysics software, and the increasing success of education efforts such as Software Carpentry and SciCoder, the community has the opportunity to set a higher standard for its science by encouraging the release of software for examination and possible reuse. We assembled representatives of the community to present issues inhibiting code release and sought suggestions for tackling these factors. The session began with brief statements by panelists; the floor was then opened for discussion and ideas. Comments covered a diverse range of related topics and points of view, with apparent support for the propositions that algorithms should be readily available, code used to produce published scientific results should be made available, and there should be discovery mechanisms to allow these to be found easily. With increased use of resources such as GitHub (for code availability), ASCL (for code discovery), and a stated strong preference from the new journal Astronomy & Computing for code release, we expect to see additional progress over the next few years.

  15. Revamped NPS Brings More Focus to CTE Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Techniques: Connecting Education and Careers (J3), 2008

    2008-01-01

    In March, attendees at the annual ACTE National Policy Seminar (NPS) got more than they bargained for. With a new hotel and a completely reorganized agenda, career and technical educators were more than energized to bring the career and technical education (CTE) message to Capitol Hill. This year marked the first time ACTE held a special briefing…

  16. Bringing up Harry Penrith: Injustice and Becoming Burnum Burnum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsland, John

    2004-01-01

    "The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations" recognizes Harry Penrith's ironic public declaration as Burnum Burnum on 26 January 1988, the official Bicentenary celebration day of the white invasion, settlement and occupation of Australia: "We wish no harm to England's native people, We are here to bring you good manners, refinement and an…

  17. Bringing the Outside In: Insects and Their Galls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farenga, Stephen J.; Joyce, Beverly A.; Ness, Daniel; Wilkens, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Introduces gall-making insects and explains gall development. Explains how to bring galls into the classroom and conduct experiments. Suggests using gall systems to introduce students to the concepts of genetic control, biodiversity, plant and animal development, species interactions, biodiversity, and the flow of energy through the food web. (YDS)

  18. Professing in the Contact Zone: Bringing Theory and Practice Together.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Janice M., Ed.

    This collection of essays brings together Mary Louise Pratt's original essay, the 10-year-old "Professing in the Contact Zone," with 14 responses that interpret, extend, and challenge Pratt's work. The essays examine how contact zone dynamics play out in various pedagogical spaces. Following an introduction by the editor, essays in Section I,…

  19. Bring Your Own Digital Device in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newhouse, C. Paul; Cooper, Martin; Pagram, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation to advise a teacher education institution on the feasibility of having a "Bring Your Own Digital Device" policy for students. The investigation built on components of two research projects while adding the comprehensive testing of representative potential hardware and software platforms. The…

  20. Bringing the Outside World into an Intensive English Programme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillyard, Lindsey; Reppen, Randi; Vasquez, Camilla

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of an intensive English programme to design a class that addressed the challenges of bringing authentic English into the curriculum. This class exposed students to a variety of authentic English language input, while providing support. Through this class, students volunteered with various community organizations.…

  1. Driven: Bringing German Auto Concepts to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adney, Cara

    2012-01-01

    A world away from the red dirt of Oklahoma, David Shields and Shelly Smith felt right at home. A national grant took the Meridian Technology Center automotive teachers on a trip to Germany that car lovers only dream about. The tour to the major automakers last summer has them geared up and bringing fresh ideas to the classroom. They spent four…

  2. Bring Your Own Device: Parental Guidance (PG) Suggested

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiger, Derick; Herro, Dani

    2015-01-01

    Educators are incorporating students' mobile devices into the schooling experience via Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) initiatives. This is advantageous for many reasons, most notably, improving access to Internet resources and digital tools in support of teaching and learning. Obtaining parental support is key to BYOD success. Therefore, this study…

  3. Pastoral del Nino: Bringing the Abundant Life to Paraguayan Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann Berghout; Aquino, Cyle; Burro, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Pastoral del Nino is transforming children's lives in rural Paraguay. Part of Pastoral Social (Catholic Social Services), Pastoral del Nino's primary focus is to bring "vida en abundancia" (the abundant life) to families by ensuring that mothers survive childbirth and children reach their first birthdays. In addition, the organization promotes…

  4. Self-Development: What Older Adults Bring to Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Mary Alice

    Although educators know that older persons bring experience, curiosity, and motivation into the educational setting, they often do not consider the aged to be engaged in development, especially in the development of trust. Education can provide for older persons a means for focusing on society and self. The classroom can serve as a stimulus to…

  5. Social Studies: Bringing the World Closer to Home.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Helen W., Ed.

    This yearbook provides teaching strategy topics of general interest to social studies teachers of all grade levels. This first annual yearbook focuses on using social studies to bring the world closer to home. There are 17 papers, including: (1) "Getting Ready for the World" (Angene H. Wilson); (2) "Making Cultural Connections: A Cultural Resource…

  6. Bringing Curriculum Theory and Didactics Together: A Deweyan Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deng, Zongyi

    2016-01-01

    Using Dewey's method of resolution for resolving a dualism exemplified in "The Child and the Curriculum," this article reconciles and brings together two rival schools of thought--curriculum theory and didactics--in China. The central thesis is that the rapprochement requires a reconceptualisation of curriculum theory and didactics in…

  7. Bringing in a New Era in Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hymowitz, Kay S.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the book, "Bringing in a New Era in Character Education," a collection of essays by prominent social critics and social scientists. Suggests that the book shows that the character education movement is a reaction to the moral vacuum created by the transformations of the middle and late 20th century. Notes that most of the essays appear…

  8. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  9. Costs Associated With Residency Training.

    PubMed

    Bready, Lois L; Luber, M Philip

    2016-02-01

    Texas needs more physicians to care for a rapidly growing population, and new physicians who complete medical training in Texas are likely to remain in the state to practice. The expansion of existing Texas medical schools, along with the development of new schools, has created a need for a corresponding increase in residency and fellowship (graduate medical education, or GME) positions in Texas, and the 2013 and 2015 legislative sessions have funded expanded GME support. While the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services pays for the majority of GME positions nationally, those numbers were capped in 1997. Growing populations, particularly in the southern states, have led many institutions--when funds are available--to increase GME positions "over the cap." Texas physicians need to be aware of costs associated with development of accredited GME positions, as well as other measures being taken to support the growth of the physician workforce in the state. PMID:26859373

  10. Residency Work-Hours Reform

    PubMed Central

    Nuckols, Teryl K; Escarce, José J

    2005-01-01

    Background In response to proposed federal legislation, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education limited resident work-hours in July 2003. The cost may be substantial but, if successful, the reform might lower preventable adverse event costs in hospital and after discharge. Objectives This study sought to estimate the reform's net cost in 2001 dollars, and to determine the reduction in preventable adverse events needed to make reform cost neutral from teaching hospital and societal perspectives. Design Cost analysis using published literature and data. Net costs were determined for 4 reform strategies and over a range of potential effects on preventable adverse events. Results Nationwide, transferring excess work to task-tailored substitutes (the lowest-level providers appropriate for noneducational tasks) would cost $673 million; mid-level providers would cost $1.1 billion. Reform strategies promoting adverse events would increase net teaching hospital and societal costs as well as mortality. If task-tailored substitutes decrease events by 5.1% or mid-level providers decrease them by 8.5%, reform would be cost neutral for society. Events must fall by 18.5% and 30.9%, respectively, to be cost neutral for teaching hospitals. Conclusions Because most preventable adverse event costs occur after discharge, a modest decline (5.1% to 8.5%) in them might make residency work-hours reform cost neutral for society but only a much larger drop (18.5% to 30.9%) would make it cost neutral for teaching hospitals, unless additional funds are allocated. Future research should evaluate which reform approaches prevent adverse events and at what cost. PMID:16191130

  11. Conference Brings Together Scientists, Policy Makers, and Stakeholders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Erik

    2013-08-01

    Incorporating Earth and space science research into policy is integral to supporting any nation's public safety, security, and economy. To help bridge the science and policy fields, AGU convened its second annual Science Policy Conference as a means to engage stakeholders. The meeting, held 24-26 June in Washington, D. C., featured experts from government, industry, academia, media, and nonprofits.

  12. Competitive Robotics Brings out the Best in Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caron, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    This article features Advanced Competitive Science (ACS), a two-year course introduced by a science teacher, Joe Pouliot, in 2004 at Trinity High School in Manchester, New Hampshire. More than a traditional STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) course, ACS harnesses the excitement of robotics competitions to promote student…

  13. Prevalence of Burnout in residents of obstetrics and gynecology: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Yousef; Baradaran, Hamid Reza; Yazdandoost, Maryam; Atrak, Shahla; Kashanian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Burnout is currently a major concern among physicians due to their high level of stress at work. There are several reports on various levels of burnout in residency programs due to several predisposing factors. The aim of this systematic review was to estimate a more precise prevalence of burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. Methods: PubMed, Science Direct and Scopus were searched to identify peer-reviewed Englishlanguage studies published from January 1974 to 2005 reporting burnout among residents of obstetrics and gynecology. The key words used in the search were as follows: Residents, gynecology and obstetrics, professional burnout, depersonalization, distress, anxiety, or emotional exhaustion. Relevant additional articles were identified from the lists of the retrieved articles. Results: We identified 12 studies which met our criteria. A total of 2509 participants were included in this meta-analysis. The overall prevalence rate of burnout on all the three subscales was 44% (95% CI: 30 - 57) in this group of residents. Conclusion: This meta-analysis revealed a high prevalence of burnout syndrome in residents during obstetrics and gynecology residency program. Therefore, it is recommended to consider and address this important issue to develop solutions and interventions which could improve the work condition of the medical residents. PMID:26793673

  14. Ocular Filariasis in US Residents, Returning Travelers, and Expatriates.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2015-01-01

    Several factors acting in concert now place US residents, returning travelers, and expatriates at risks of contracting ocular filariasis including increasing seroprevalence rates of zoonotic filariasis, international travel bringing tourists to and expatriates from filariasis-endemic regions, and warming temperatures extending distribution ranges of arthropod vectors. To describe the epidemiology and outcomes of ocular filariasis and to recommend strategies for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of ocular filariasis, internet search engines were queried with the key words in order to examine case reports and series of ocular filariasis in the US and elsewhere. Descriptive epidemiological, morphological, and molecular evidence now support increasing cases of ocular filariasis in domestic and wild animals and humans, with most cases caused by filarial worms including Dirofilaria repens and other zoonotic Dirofilaria species and Onchocerca lupi and other zoonotic Onchocerca species. Clinicians should maintain early suspicion of ocular filariasis in US residents, returning travelers, and expatriates who complain of combinations of red eye, eye pain, foreign body sensation, reduced visual acuity, and migrating ocular worms, even without significant peripheral eosinophilia or microfilaremia. Microfilariae of Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and O. volvulus may traverse the eye, but can usually be treated medically. Mobile adult worms trapped in the subconjunctiva or anterior chamber should be removed by ophthalmologists to permit species identification, prevent posterior uveitis and iritis, and stop worm migration into the posterior chamber which could require lens removal and vitrectomy for worm extraction causing further eye damage. PMID:27159510

  15. The obstetrics and gynaecology resident as teacher.

    PubMed

    Cullimore, Amie J; Dalrymple, John L; Dugoff, Lorraine; Hueppchen, Nancy A; Casey, Petra M; Chuang, Alice W; Espey, Eve L; Hammoud, Maya M; Kaczmarczyk, Joseph M; Katz, Nadine T; Nuthalapaty, Francis S; Peskin, Edward G

    2010-12-01

    In this article we discuss the role residents play in the clinical training and evaluation of medical students. A literature search was performed to identify articles dealing with research, curriculum, and the evaluation of residents as teachers. We summarize the importance of resident educators and the need to provide appropriate resources for house staff in this role, and we review evidence-based literature in the area of residents as teachers. Specific attention is given to the unique circumstances of the obstetrics and gynaecology resident, who is often faced with teaching in an emotionally charged and stress-filled environment. We present examples of curricula for residents as teachers and describe barriers to their implementation and evaluation. PMID:21176331

  16. Science Sublime: The Philosophy of the Sublime, Dewey's Aesthetics, and Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanaugh, Shane

    2014-01-01

    Feelings of awe, wonder, and appreciation have been largely ignored in the working lives of scientists and, in turn, science education has not accurately portrayed science to students. In an effort to bring the affective qualities of science into the classroom, this work draws on the writings of the sublime by Burke, Kant, Emerson, and Wordsworth…

  17. Developing a Sustained Interest in Science among Urban Minority Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basu, Sreyashi Jhumki; Barton, Angela Calabrese

    2007-01-01

    This study draws upon qualitative case study to investigate the connections between the "funds of knowledge" that urban, high-poverty students bring to science learning and the development of a sustained interest in science. We found that youth developed a sustained interest in science when: (1) their science experiences connected with how they…

  18. Development and Evaluation of an Undergraduate Science Communication Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeoman, Kay H.; James, Helen A.; Bowater, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the design and evaluation of an undergraduate final year science communication module for the Science Faculty at the University of East Anglia. The module focuses specifically on science communication and aims to bring an understanding of how science is disseminated to the public. Students on the module are made aware of the…

  19. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of which the foreign corporation is a resident or a citizen or resident of the United States; (B) The... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... foreign country of which the foreign corporation is a resident and who are not citizens or residents...

  20. Selecting Residents in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shofler, David

    2015-01-01

    Limited information exists to guide students of podiatric medicine and residency directors through the resident selection process. The present study aimed to evaluate the podiatric medicine and surgery resident selection process using an online survey. Residency directors of podiatric medicine and surgery programs across the United States and fourth-year students across all 9 colleges of podiatric medicine were contacted for participation. Two separate surveys were created, one for the directors and one for the students. The directors and students were asked the relative importance of 21 items considered in resident selection on a 7-point importance scale. Subsequent questions covered an array of related topics. The directors, compared with the students, identified the following items as more important (p < .05): previous disciplinary actions against the student, number of classes failed during school, undergraduate experiences and activities, number of Part I board attempts, class rank, involvement in research, and grade point average during podiatric medical school. The manual dexterity portion of the residency interview was considered significantly more important by the students than the directors. The directors more satisfied with their residents placed greater importance on the following items (p < .05): opinions of current residents, opinions of other attending physicians, and letters of recommendation. Additional trends and differences were also discovered. The results of the present study provide baseline data on the selection of podiatric medicine and surgery residents. PMID:25459090

  1. Reducing dehydration in residents of care homes.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Lee; Whitelock, Suzan; Bunn, Diane

    Dehydration can have serious consequences for older people and is a particular problem for residents of nursing and care homes. This article, the second in a two-part series, describes how a specialist care home for people with dementia in Great Yarmouth introduced high-quality hydration care to frail residents. By involving all staff and ensuring residents take a litre of fluid by the end of a relaxed and extended breakfast, staff have reduced anxiety and aggression and created a calmer and more sociable atmosphere. This has benefitted residents, visitors and staff, and is reflected in low levels of unplanned hospital admissions and paramedic call-outs. PMID:26492664

  2. White Space Odyssey: Bringing Big Bandwidth to College Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Bob

    2013-01-01

    Many rural areas of the country lack an on-ramp to the information superhighway for people who are looking for educational and professional advancement, which leaves these rural communities frustrated by a situation that puts their residents at a significant disadvantage. This article describes Quick Start and Advanced Internet Regions (AIR.U) as…

  3. Putting Residents First: Strategies Developed by CNAs to Prevent and Manage Resident-to-Resident Violence in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Snellgrove, Susan; Beck, Cornelia; Green, Angela; McSweeney, Jean C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Resident-to-resident violence (RRV) in nursing homes (NHs) is common and threatens the safety and quality of life of both residents and caregivers. The purpose of this portion of a larger qualitative study was to explore strategies developed by certified nurses’ assistants (CNAs) to prevent and manage RRV in NHs. Design and Methods: Semistructured interviews were used to collect data. Data were analyzed utilizing content analysis and constant comparison. Results: Analysis revealed one overriding theme, “Putting Residents First” which the CNAs described as a conscious effort to put themselves or a beloved family member in the place of the resident while administering care. Within this theme, there were three related subthemes: (a) Knowing the Residents, (b) Keeping Residents Safe, and (c) Spending Quality Time. Implications: Together, these themes suggest that the formulation of strategies for decreasing and managing RRV was influenced significantly by the ability of the CNAs to empathize with the residents for whom they were caring. The results indicate that in the absence of evidence-based interventions, CNAs have developed their own strategies for the management and prevention of RRV. These strategies may provide a foundation for the development and testing of interventions aimed at preventing and managing RRV in NHs. PMID:26055786

  4. Resident mesenchymal cells and fibrosis✩

    PubMed Central

    Hutchison, Nicol; Fligny, Cécile; Duffield, Jeremy S.

    2013-01-01

    Fibrosis is a major clinical problem associated with as many as 45% of all natural deaths in developed nations. It can affect all organs and accumulating evidence indicates that fibrogenesis is not merely a bystander product of injury, but is a central pathological problem directly contributing to loss of organ function. In the majority of clinical cases, fibrogenesis is strongly associated with the recruitment of leukocytes, even in the absence of infection. Although chronic infections are a significant cause of fibrogenesis, in most cases fibrotic disease occurs in the context of sterile injury, such as microvascular disease, toxic epithelial injury or diabetes mellitus. Fibrogenesis is a direct consequence of the activation of extensive, and previously poorly appreciated, populations of mesenchymal cells in our organs which are either wrapped around capillaries and known as ‘pericytes’, or embedded in interstitial spaces between cell structures and known as resident ‘fibroblasts’. Recent fate-mapping and complementary studies in several organs indicate that these cells are the precursors of the scar-forming myofibroblasts that appear in our organs in response to injury. Here we will review the literature supporting a central role for these cells in fibrogenesis, and highlight some of the critical cell to cell interactions that are necessary for the initiation and continuation of the fibrogenic process. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fibrosis: Translation of basic research to human disease. PMID:23220259

  5. Towards Bringing EEG Research and Diagnostics out of the Lab.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, Jó Ágila; Ramos, Roann; Severijns, Cassandra; Wehrle, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bringing brain research tools like EEG devices out of the lab into the pockets of practitioners and researchers may fundamentally change the way we perform diagnostics and research. While most of the current techniques are limited to research clinics and require excessive set-up, new consumer EEG devices connected to standard, off-the-shelf mobile devices allow us to lift these limitations. This allows neuropsychological assessment and research in mobile settings, possibly even in remote areas with limited accessibility and infrastructure, thus bringing the equipment to the patient, instead of bringing the patient to the equipment. We are developing an Android based mobile framework to perform EEG studies. By connecting a mobile consumer EEG headset directly to an unmodified mobile device, presenting auditory and visual stimuli, as well as user interaction, we create a self-contained experimental platform. We complement this platform by a toolkit for immediate evaluation of the recorded data directly on the device, even without Internet connectivity. Initial results from the replication of two Event Related Potentials studies indicate the feasibility of the approach. PMID:25980867

  6. Teaching clinical decision-making to pediatric residents in an era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Chessare, J B

    1998-04-01

    The growth of managed care has brought a new focus on physician competency in the appropriate use of resources to help patients. The community of pediatric educators must improve residency curricula and teaching methodologies to ensure that graduates of their programs can effectively and efficiently meet the needs of children and their families. The educational approach in many pediatric residency programs is an implicit apprenticeship model, with which the residents follow the actions of attending physicians with little attention to scrutiny of the clinical evidence for and against diagnostic and treatment strategies. Evidence-based medicine stresses to the trainee the importance of the evaluation of evidence from clinical research and cautions against the use of intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and untested pathophysiologic reasoning as sufficient for medical decision-making. Managed care also has helped to create a heightened awareness of the need to educate residents to incorporate the preferences of patients and families into diagnostic and treatment decisions. Trainees must know how to balance their duty to maximize the health of populations at the lowest resource use with their duty to each individual patient and family. Changes in the residency curriculum will bring change in educational settings and the structure of rotations. Potential barriers to implementation will include the need for faculty development and financial resources for information technology. PMID:9544180

  7. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was less expensive…

  8. Current Practices in Resident Assistant Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koch, Virginia Albaneso

    2016-01-01

    Developing resident assistant (RA) training is a challenge for most housing and residence life staff. Grounded in the author's doctoral research on the curricular design of RA training programs, this study summarizes current practices in three types of RA training programs--preservice training, in-service training, and academic courses--and…

  9. Suicide Intervention Skills among Japanese Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yuriko; Kato, Takahiro A.; Hashimoto, Naoki; Sato, Ryoko; Aoyama-Uehara, Kumi; Fukasawa, Maiko; Tomita, Masayuki; Watanabe, Koichiro; Kashima, Haruo; Otsuka, Kotaro

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Patient suicide is a tragic occurrence, and it can be a demoralizing experience for medical residents. Few studies, however, have assessed suicide management skills among these front-line healthcare professionals. This study evaluated the self-assessed competence and confidence of medical residents with regard to the management of…

  10. Putting "Rural" into Psychiatry Residency Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, William A.; Pomerantz, Andrew; Schwartz, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Evidence indicates disparities in the number of psychiatrists practicing in rural America compared to urban areas suggesting the need for a greater emphasis on rural psychiatry in residency training programs. The authors offer suggestions for integrating a rural focus in psychiatry residency training to foster greater competency and…

  11. Assessment of Residents' Attitudes toward Patient Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falvo, Donna; Wright, W. Russel

    1981-01-01

    A questionnaire was developed at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine to elicit information from residents regarding their perceptions of and expectations of patient education. Responding residents generally felt patient education was an asset to total medical care, and that the physician should determine what information should be…

  12. 19th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agron, Joe

    2008-01-01

    The construction of residence hall facilities at colleges and universities continues to be strong, as institutions scramble to meet the housing needs and varied demands of a growing student population. This article presents data collected from 39 new residence hall projects completed in 2007. According to American School & University's 19th annual…

  13. Teaching Psychiatry to Family Practice Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzij, Teodor J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Lacy, Timothy; Rachal, James

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article outlines a psychiatry curriculum developed for family practice residents by family practice-psychiatry residents. Methods: A literature review, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and initial assessment were conducted. Conclusion: Early results demonstrated improved general psychiatric knowledge and a high level of…

  14. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Roisin; Parshuram, Christopher S

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from--and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of--duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  15. Residents as Educators: A Modern Model.

    PubMed

    Kensinger, Clark D; McMaster, William G; Vella, Michael A; Sexton, Kevin W; Snyder, Rebecca A; Terhune, Kyla P

    2015-01-01

    Education during surgical residency has changed significantly. As part of the shifting landscape, the importance of an organized and structured curriculum has increased. However, establishing this is often difficult secondary to clinical demands and pressure both on faculty and residents. We present a peer-assisted learning model for academic institutions without professional non-clinical educations. The "resident as educator" (RAE) model empowers residents to be the organizers of the education curriculum. RAE is built on a culture of commitment to education, skill development and team building, allowing the upper level residents to develop and execute the curriculum. Several modules designed to address junior level residents and medical students' educational needs have been implemented, including (1) intern boot camp, (2) summer school, (3) technical skill sessions, (4) trauma orientation, (5) weekly teaching conferences, and (4) a fourth year medical student surgical preparation course. Promoting residents as educators leads to an overall benefit for the program by being cost-effective and time-efficient, while simultaneously promoting professional development of residents and a culture of education. PMID:26143515

  16. Teaching Forensic Psychiatry to General Psychiatry Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Catherine F.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) requires that general psychiatry residency training programs provide trainees with exposure to forensic psychiatry. Limited information is available on how to develop a core curriculum in forensic psychiatry for general psychiatry residents and few articles have been…

  17. A Clinical Evaluation System for Anesthesiology Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viets, J. L.; Foster, Scot D.

    1988-01-01

    Baylor College of Medicine's system for evaluating the clinical progress of anesthesiology residents, developed in response to problems of standards, staff cooperation, and student dissatisfaction with evaluation, assesses resident progress in terms of performance levels based on case complexity and degree of staff intervention. (Author/MSE)

  18. Teaching Psychiatric Administration to Senior Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbott, John A.; Sacks, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Describes a course in psychiatric administration which is part of a "standard" psychiatric residency training program. The course combined both didactic and experiential learning for senior residents performing administrative duties for the first time. Includes details of each week's seminar. Discusses course evaluation by both teachers and…

  19. Delinking resident duty hours from patient safety

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Patient safety is a powerful motivating force for change in modern medicine, and is often cited as a rationale for reducing resident duty hours. However, current data suggest that resident duty hours are not significantly linked to important patient outcomes. We performed a narrative review and identified four potential explanations for these findings. First, we question the relevance of resident fatigue in the creation of harmful errors. Second, we discuss factors, including workload, experience, and individual characteristics, that may be more important determinants of resident fatigue than are duty hours. Third, we describe potential adverse effects that may arise from – and, therefore, counterbalance any potential benefits of – duty hour reductions. Fourth, we explore factors that may mitigate any risks to patient safety associated with using the services of resident trainees. In summary, it may be inappropriate to justify a reduction in working hours on the grounds of a presumed linkage between patient safety and resident duty hours. Better understanding of resident-related factors associated with patient safety will be essential if improvements in important patient safety outcomes are to be realized through resident-focused strategies. PMID:25561349

  20. Current Perspectives on Chief Residents in Psychiatry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warner, Christopher H.; Rachal, James; Breitbach, Jill; Higgins, Michael; Warner, Carolynn; Bobo, William

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors examine qualitative data from outgoing chief residents in psychiatry from the 2004-2005 academic year to 1) determine common characteristics between programs, 2) examine the residents' perspectives on their experiences, and 3) determine their common leadership qualities. Method: The authors sent out self-report surveys via…

  1. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Residency requirements. 59.4 Section 59.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND PROGRAM OF ASSISTANCE TO STATES; POST-COMPLETION COMPLIANCE RESPONSIBILITIES § 59.4 Residency requirements....

  2. [MENTORING PROGRAM - ANOTHER FACET OF RESIDENT EDUCATION].

    PubMed

    Fishman, Ami; Kenet, Ron; Biron-Shental, Tal

    2015-08-01

    Medical residents are exposed to physical and emotional pressure and are required to cope with numerous demands during long working hours. Often, the intense workload leads to neglect of possible difficulties and professional and personal growth and empowerment. The Mentoring Program provides each resident with an attending physician mentor to help him or her adjust to the residency and to cope with its demands. The mentor guides the resident in career development and provides support in the event of difficulties. Attending physicians received professional guidance in the objectives and meaning of mentorship and were teamed with residents. The residents completed questionnaires regarding satisfaction and self-confidence before and a year after the mentoring program was established. The program significantly increased their feelings of support, confidence and satisfaction. As the program continued, the mentors' role in guiding the residents was expanded. The Mentoring Program has become an integral part of departmental teaching and team communication. It seems that the mentors, the residents and the department, all benefit from the program. PMID:26480614

  3. Residence Hall Furnishings Top 20 List.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tampke, Dale

    1999-01-01

    Provides advice on how to best meet the furniture needs of student residents now and in the future to ensure their privacy and value from the residence hall experience. Twenty tips are highlighted that include considering fire safety, upholstering, lifecycle costs, input from stakeholders, the Americans with Disabilities Act, comfort, lighting,…

  4. Selected Health Practices Among Ohio's Rural Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, G. Howard; Pugh, Albert

    Using a stratified random sample of 12 of Ohio's 88 counties, this 1967 study had as its objectives (1) to measure the level of participation in selected health practices by Ohio's rural residents, (2) to compare the level of participation in selected health practices of farm and rural nonfarm residents, and (3) to examine levels of participation…

  5. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  6. Accommodating to Restrictions on Residents' Working Hours.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Henry W., Jr.; Seltzer, Vicki L.

    1991-01-01

    In response to New York State legislation limiting house staff working hours, a survey of obstetrics and gynecology resident programs (n=26) was conducted. Results were used to construct a prototype call schedule and a hypothetical monthly schedule indicating how a single resident would function without violating any state regulations. (MSE)

  7. Study of Teaching Residents How to Teach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Janine C.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teaching skills program for residents at Louisiana State University Medical Center was evaluated among 22 residents in obstetrics and gynecology, medicine, and family medicine who were randomly assigned to control and experimental groups. There was greater increase in the scores of the experimental than the control groups.…

  8. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  9. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  10. 42 CFR 483.10 - Resident rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Resident rights. 483.10 Section 483.10 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE FACILITIES Requirements for Long Term Care Facilities § 483.10 Resident rights....

  11. 42 CFR 436.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State of residence is the State in which the individual is living. (3) For any other non... “foster care homes”, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and providing food, shelter and supportive... of indicating intent, the State of residence is the State where the individual is living with...

  12. Resident Performance and Sleep Deprivation: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asken, Michael J.; Raham, David C.

    1983-01-01

    A review of the literature on resident performance and sleep deprivation suggests that current research is sparse and inconclusive, and existing research suggests potentially severe negative effects. It is proposed that justifications for sleep-depriving night call schedules remain untested, and their use as part of residency training should be…

  13. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  14. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  15. 28 CFR 115.333 - Resident education.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident education. 115.333 Section 115.333 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL... provide comprehensive age-appropriate education to residents either in person or through video...

  16. A Rural Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kairys, Steven; Newell, Priscilla

    1985-01-01

    The primary care pediatric residency program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. (Author/MLW)

  17. 42 CFR 435.403 - State residence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... State placement, the term also includes foster care homes, licensed as set forth in 45 CFR 1355.20, and... accordance with 45 CFR 233.40, the rules governing residence under the AFDC program. (4) For any..., AND AMERICAN SAMOA General Eligibility Requirements § 435.403 State residence. (a) Requirement....

  18. The Social Ecology of University Student Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerst, Marvin S.; Moos, Rudolf H.

    The development, initial standardization and substantive data of the University Residence Environment Scale (URES) is presented. The URES is a true-false perceived environment scale composed of 10 subscales (e.g., affiliation, innovation) which discriminates among the 74 student residences in the current norm group. The URES has high internal…

  19. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  20. 19 CFR 141.38 - Resident corporations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Resident corporations. 141.38 Section 141.38 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ENTRY OF MERCHANDISE Powers of Attorney § 141.38 Resident corporations. A power...

  1. 36 CFR 59.4 - Residency requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... a project sponsor, are covered in 43 CFR part 17 which implements the provisions of Title VI of the... discrimination on the basis of residence, including preferential reservation or membership systems, except to the... assisted programs and services on the basis of residence, except in reasonable fee differentials....

  2. Psychiatry Residency Training around the World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zisook, Sidney; Balon, Richard; Bjorksten, Karin S.; Everall, Ian; Dunn, Laura; Ganadjian, Krauz; Jin, Hua; Parikh, Sagar; Sciolla, Andres; Sidhartha, Tanuj; Yoo, Tai

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The authors compare and contrast psychiatry residency training in the United States to that in Canada and selected countries in South America, Europe, and Asia. Method: Nine individuals who are intimately familiar with psychiatry residency training in the United States (primarily chairs, training directors, associate training directors,…

  3. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  4. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  5. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  6. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  7. 28 CFR 115.251 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.251 Section 115.251 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Community Confinement Facilities Reporting § 115.251 Resident reporting. (a)...

  8. 28 CFR 115.351 - Resident reporting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Resident reporting. 115.351 Section 115.351 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Reporting § 115.351 Resident reporting. (a) The agency...

  9. Survey of Residence Hall Life at NCSU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolin, Nancy C.

    A 1977 North Carolina State University survey of a sample of on-campus students determined their attitudes toward residence hall activities, facilities, and staff. Information is shown by sex, class, and residence hall, and totals are weighted to reflect actual proportions in each dorm. Among the findings are the following: cookouts, movies, beer…

  10. Community Residences for Mentally Retarded People: A Study of Seven Community Residences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehbring, Kurt; Ogren, Ciele

    The report describes the distinctive characteristics and styles of seven community residences for retarded children or adults and provides a comparative analysis with emphasis on common themes of successful group homes. The homes are compared in terms of original initiation of the residence; the development of the residence; operations (such as…

  11. Feedback from Chief Residents about Proposed Revisions of the Special Requirements for Internal Medicine Residencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, P. Preston; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A survey of 272 medical school chief residents concerning proposed revisions of internal medicine residency requirements found the most strongly supported changes were: enhanced training in interviewing, interpersonal, and physical examination skills; increased emphasis on residency as an educational experience and on general internal medicine in…

  12. Resident Assistants and Students on Leadership, Residence Hall Climate and Student Brinkmanship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn Hagan; Licata, Joseph W.

    Student brinkmanship in residence halls, resident assistant (RA) leadership, and residence social climate are discussed. In "brinking" the system, students challenge authority in ways that provide scant grounds for the institution to apply punishment. The study looks at relationships between: the RA's leadership behavior and student perceptions of…

  13. Bringing Society to a Changing Polar Ocean: Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schofield, O.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental changes in the Arctic and Antarctic appear to be accelerating and scientists are trying to understand both the patterns and the impacts of change. These changes will have profound impact on humanity and create a need for public education about these critical habitats. We have focused on a two-pronged strategy to increase public awareness as well as enable educators to discuss comfortably the implications of climate change. Our first focus is on entraining public support through the development of science documentaries about the science and people who conduct it. Antarctic Edge is a feature length award-winning documentary about climate change that has been released in May 2015 and has garnered interest in movie theatres and on social media stores (NetFlix, ITunes). This broad outreach is coupled with our group's interest assisting educators formally. The majority of current polar education is focused on direct educator engagement through personal research experiences that have impact on the participating educators' classrooms. Polar Interdisciplinary Coordinated Education (ICE) proposes to improve educator and student engagement in polar sciences through exposure to scientists and polar data. Through professional development and the creation of data tools, Polar ICE will reduce the logistical costs of bringing polar science to students in grades 6-16. We will provide opportunities to: 1) build capacity of polar scientists in communicating and engaging with diverse audiences; 2) create scalable, in-person and virtual opportunities for educators and students to engage with polar scientists and their research through data visualizations, data activities, educator workshops, webinars, and student research symposia; and 3) evaluate the outcomes of Polar ICE and contribute to our understanding of science education practices. We will use a blended learning approach to promote partnerships and cross-disciplinary sharing. This combined multi-pronged approach

  14. Planet Press: an EGU initiative to bring geoscientific research to children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Bárbara

    2016-04-01

    Planet Press (http://www.egu.eu/education/planet-press/) is an EGU educational project that aims to get children (mainly 7-13 year olds), as well as their parents and educators, interested in and engaged with up-to-date scientific research and news. Planet Press articles are short versions of EGU press releases written in child-friendly language. Because EGU press releases cover research published in the various EGU scientific journals, Planet Press focuses on topics as varied as air pollution, glaciers, climate change, earthquakes, ocean sciences, droughts and floods, or space sciences. The texts are reviewed by both scientists and educators to make sure they are accurate and clear to their target audience. By sharing new and exciting geoscientific research with young kids, we hope to inspire them to develop an interest in the Earth, planetary and space sciences. In this presentation, we describe how the Planet Press idea came about, how the project is run, and the challenges and lessons learnt since the launch of this educational initiative in 2014. Planet Press, which has the support of the EGU Committee on Education, is made possible by the work of volunteer scientists and educators who review and translate the texts. We are grateful for the help of Jane Robb, former EGU Educational Fellow, with launching the project. Planet Press is inspired by Space Scoop (http://www.spacescoop.org/), an initiative by UNAWE, the EU-Universe Awareness organisation, that brings astronomy news to children every week.

  15. Medical error and related factors during internship and residency.

    PubMed

    Ahmadipour, Habibeh; Nahid, Mortazavi

    2015-01-01

    It is difficult to determine the real incidence of medical errors due to the lack of a precise definition of errors, as well as the failure to report them under certain circumstances. We carried out a cross- sectional study in Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Iran in 2013. The participants were selected through the census method. The data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire, which consisted of questions on the participants' demographic data and questions on the medical errors committed. The data were analysed by SPSS 19. It was found that 270 participants had committed medical errors. There was no significant difference in the frequency of errors committed by interns and residents. In the case of residents, the most common error was misdiagnosis and in that of interns, errors related to history-taking and physical examination. Considering that medical errors are common in the clinical setting, the education system should train interns and residents to prevent the occurrence of errors. In addition, the system should develop a positive attitude among them so that they can deal better with medical errors. PMID:26592783

  16. Sexual Abuse of Older Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Malmedal, Wenche; Iversen, Maria Helen; Kilvik, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature related to elder abuse, sexual abuse of older persons in general and of vulnerable adults living in nursing homes in particular is still sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to assess the state of knowledge on the subject of sexual abuse against older nursing home residents through a literature review. Systematic searches in reference databases including Cinahl, Medline, OVID Nursing Database, ISI Web of Science, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, and SveMed + were conducted. Through several phases of selection of the articles, using strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were chosen for a deeper examination. Findings from the review show that sexual abuse occurs in nursing homes and that both older women and men are victims of sexual abuse. Perpetrators appear mainly to be staff and other residents and mainly to be men, but also women abuse both older men and older women. Findings from the literature review show that there is a need for knowledge and further research on the topic of sexual abuse against older residents in nursing homes. Furthermore, there is a need for good policies and reporting systems, as an important step in seriously addressing sexual abuse against older persons. PMID:25642347

  17. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Parker E.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. Methods: We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education. PMID:25745588

  18. New oil era prompts unique resid refinery

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.E.; Sliger, A.G.; Kain, G.E.

    1982-03-22

    Flowsheets and a process description are given for a refinery that will employ resid desulfurization and the Heavy Oil Cracking (HOC) process to upgrade the bottom of the crude barrel. The key processing concept in the new Saber facility is the combination of HOC, a proven process, that has been employed since the early 1960's, with resid hydrodesulfurization (HDS) a newer process but one that is well proven and that has found widespread application. Design feedstock for the complex is heavy Arabian 650+/degree/ F. atmospheric resid, but flexibility to run light Arabian atmospheric resid or any intermediate resid also has been incorporated into the design. Rated Capacity is 46,100 b/sd. 9 refs.

  19. Earth Data Multimedia Instrument - EDMI: A NASA-funded Showcase That Brings Research Technology to Secondary Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caron, B.; Gautier, C.; Landsfeld, M.; Engle, D.

    2001-12-01

    Through its NASA-funded work in partnership with scientists, schools and curriculum developers, Planet Earth Science Inc. (PES) develops multimedia education software to support Earth science education at the secondary level. One of the main ingredients of PES software is the use of geographical data sets from satellite or climate models to illustrate and explain complex and interacting Earth processes. The exploration of science learning and actual Earth-system data sets occurs in parallel, the science and the data continuously interacting with each other. Data exploration is made possible through a novel interactive courseware product (the EDMIT or Earth Data Multimedia Instrument) PES is developing that melds the data visualization and analysis capabilities of Kodak's IDLT with the interactive, multimedia authoring capabilities of Macromedia's DirectorT. The Earth Data Multimedia Instrument (EDMIT) is "mini-IDL" capability within an interactive Director-based GUI. In this session we will demonstrate the EDMI technology through a couple of applications that showcase its powerful capability to grow a community of developers that can create cost-efficient tools to bring real (and real-time) data into secondary schools and better integrate research and education. We will also highlight the role scientists play in finding ways to successfully partner with different constituencies, from educators to the private sector, to bring the best technology to the students' desktop.

  20. The ASTRA (Ancient instruments Sound/Timbre Reconstruction Application) Project brings history to life!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avanzo, Salvatore; Barbera, Roberto; de Mattia, Francesco; Rocca, Giuseppe La; Sorrentino, Mariapaola; Vicinanza, Domenico

    ASTRA (Ancient instruments Sound/Timbre Reconstruction Application) is a project coordinated at Conservatory of Music of Parma which aims to bring history to life. Ancient musical instruments can now be heard for the first time in hundreds of years, thanks to the successful synergy between art/humanities and science. The Epigonion, an instrument of the past, has been digitally recreated using gLite, an advanced middleware developed in the context of the EGEE project and research networks such as GÉANT2 in Europe and EUMEDCONNECT2 in the Mediterranean region. GÉANT2 and EUMEDCONNECT2, by connecting enormous and heterogeneous computing resources, provided the needed infrastructures to speed up the overall computation time and enable the computer-intensive modeling of musical sounds. This paper summarizes the most recent outcomes of the project underlining how the Grid aspect of the computation can support the Cultural Heritage community.

  1. Resident Research and Scholarly Activity in Internal Medicine Residency Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Rachel B; Hebert, Randy S; Wright, Scott M

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES 1) To describe how internal medicine residency programs fulfill the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) scholarly activity training requirement including the current context of resident scholarly work, and 2) to compare findings between university and nonuniversity programs. DESIGN Cross-sectional mailed survey. SETTING ACGME-accredited internal medicine residency programs. PARTICIPANTS Internal medicine residency program directors. MEASUREMENTS Data were collected on 1) interpretation of the scholarly activity requirement, 2) support for resident scholarship, 3) scholarly activities of residents, 4) attitudes toward resident research, and 5) program characteristics. University and nonuniversity programs were compared. MAIN RESULTS The response rate was 78%. Most residents completed a topic review with presentation (median, 100%) to fulfill the requirement. Residents at nonuniversity programs were more likely to complete case reports (median, 40% vs 25%; P =.04) and present at local or regional meetings (median, 25% vs 20%; P =.01), and were just as likely to conduct hypothesis-driven research (median, 20% vs 20%; P =.75) and present nationally (median, 10% vs 5%; P =.10) as residents at university programs. Nonuniversity programs were more likely to report lack of faculty mentors (61% vs 31%; P <.001) and resident interest (55% vs 40%; P =.01) as major barriers to resident scholarship. Programs support resident scholarship through research curricula (47%), funding (46%), and protected time (32%). CONCLUSIONS Internal medicine residents complete a variety of projects to fulfill the scholarly activity requirement. Nonuniversity programs are doing as much as university programs in meeting the requirement and supporting resident scholarship despite reporting significant barriers. PMID:15836549

  2. Two Simple Activities to Bring Rainbows into the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isik, Hakan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    A rainbow reveals the colors of sunlight in a breathtaking way, but the formation of this natural event cannot be controlled by human beings. Transforming this out-of-class experience into a teaching activity is a challenge for science educators. This paper outlines two activities for rainbow formation in the science classroom in cases of good…

  3. Two Simple Activities to Bring Rainbows into the Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isik, Hakan; Yurumezoglu, Kemal

    2012-01-01

    A rainbow reveals the colors of sunlight in a breathtaking way, but the formation of this natural event cannot be controlled by human beings. Transforming this out-of-class experience into a teaching activity is a challenge for science educators. This paper outlines two activities for rainbow formation in the science classroom in cases of good sunlight availability and artificial light.

  4. Resident physician interactions with surrogate decision-makers: the resident experience.

    PubMed

    Reckrey, Jennifer M; McKee, M Diane; Sanders, Justin J; Lipman, Hannah I

    2011-12-01

    This study explored interactions between medical residents and patient surrogates in order to clarify resident understanding of roles and relationships, resident emotional experience, and resident learning processes. Qualitative analysis of in-depth interviews were used involving three family medicine residency programs serving culturally diverse, urban, underserved patient populations. Eighteen second- and third-year trainees described a memorable interaction with a surrogate and then were prompted to discuss their learning experience and their role in the interaction. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed through an iterative process. Residents experienced significant emotional burden during interactions yet continued to value their relationships with surrogates. Despite their reservations about giving recommendations, residents adopted a variety of roles with surrogates as they gave support, information, and advice. Although residents reported little formal education about surrogate decision-making, they relied on passive role modeling and their own previous experiences to help surrogates make decisions. Residents have complex and emotionally significant interactions with surrogates despite minimal formal education about surrogate decision-making. Educational efforts should seek to help residents understand their own emotions and the ethical beliefs that underlie the roles they adopt with surrogates. This will help residents to facilitate value-based conversations with surrogates and better support surrogates in the decision-making process. PMID:22092192

  5. Bringing Science to Bear: An Empirical Assessment of the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, Paul B.; McBride, Sharon; Bliese, Paul D.; Adler, Amy B.

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines the U.S. Army's effort to empirically validate and assess the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness (CSF) program. The empirical assessment includes four major components. First, the CSF scientific staff is currently conducting a longitudinal study to determine if the Master Resilience Training program and the Comprehensive…

  6. Food science challenge: Translating the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to Bring About Real Behavior Change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food scientists and nutrition scientists (dietitians and nutrition communicators) are tasked with creating strategies to more closely align the American food supply and the public's diet with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). This paper is the result of 2 expert dialogues to address this m...

  7. Understanding How Young Children Learn: Bringing the Science of Child Development to the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostroff, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Because little kids can't tell you how their minds work and what makes them learn, you need this book about new scientific discoveries that explain how young children learn and what teachers can do to use those findings to enhance classroom teaching. Discover where the desire to learn comes from and what occurs during children's development to…

  8. SCIENCE RESULTS INTEGRATION. BRINGING MOLECULAR BIOLOGY TECHNIQUES TO REGIONAL WATER MONITORING PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) develops innovative methods for use in environmental monitoring and assessment by scientists in Regions, states, and Tribes. Molecular-biology-based methods are not yet established in the environmental monitoring "tool box". SRI (Sci...

  9. Bringing Engineering Design into High School Science Classrooms: The Heating/Cooling Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apedoe, Xornam S.; Reynolds, Birdy; Ellefson, Michelle R.; Schunn, Christian D.

    2008-01-01

    Infusing engineering design projects in K-12 settings can promote interest and attract a wide range of students to engineering careers. However, the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability to standards leaves little room to incorporate engineering design into K-12 classrooms. We argue that design-based learning, the combination…

  10. Bringing together science and policy to protect and enhance wetland ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wetland ecosystems operate at the cusp of hydrological and ecological functioning of agricultural landscapes, and provide a range important functions that benefit human societies worldwide. However, agricultural development has led to the drainage, degradation, and loss of vast areas of wetland that...

  11. Food Science Challenge: Translating the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to Bring About Real Behavior Change

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Almeida, Nelson; Black, Richard; Burns, Robbie; Bush, Laina; Crawford, Patricia; Keim, Nancy; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Weaver, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Food scientists and nutrition scientists (dietitians and nutrition communicators) are tasked with creating strategies to more closely align the American food supply and the public's diet with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). This paper is the result of 2 expert dialogues to address this mandate, which were held in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C., in early October 2010 between these 2 key scientific audiences. It is an objective that has largely eluded public health experts over the past several decades. This document takes the perspective of food scientists who are tasked with making positive modifications to the food supply, both in innovating and reformulating food products, to respond to both the DGA recommendations, and to consumer desires, needs, and choices. The paper is one of two to emerge from those October 2010 discussions; the other article focuses on the work of dietitians and nutrition communicators in effecting positive dietary change. PMID:21535704

  12. Live TV Broadcasts from Ocean Floor bring New Depth to Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyre, Terian

    1989-01-01

    Described is the network and activities that accompanied the JASON Project in 1988. Discussed are the curriculum, broadcasts, and projections of future projects. Project sponsors and network members are listed. (CW)

  13. Despite the Shutdown, Rescheduled NIH Research Festival Brings Science to the Forefront | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Andrea Frydl, Contributing Writer Although it was delayed by almost a month because of the federal shutdown, the NIH Research Festival still took place at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md., and attendance was high.

  14. The Right Chemistry. Lawn Care Project Brings Science down to Earth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollar, David

    1992-01-01

    At Southwest High School in Fort Worth, Texas, an applied learning project enables chemistry students to determine the most effective, economical, and environmentally safe fertilizer for the lawns of schools in the district. (SK)

  15. Sharing Knowledge, Power, and Respect: Keys in Bringing Communities Together to Improve Science, Practice, and Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Flaxen D. L.

    2006-01-01

    Are communities better off because of the efforts of higher education? Extension educators have extended university-based research and technologies that have helped create strong, natural resource-based communities. However, the political and socioeconomic environments in which these communities function are changing even faster than the natural…

  16. Food science challenge: translating the dietary guidelines for Americans to bring about real behavior change.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Almeida, Nelson; Black, Richard; Burns, Robbie; Bush, Laina; Crawford, Patricia; Keim, Nancy; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Weaver, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Food scientists and nutrition scientists (dietitians and nutrition communicators) are tasked with creating strategies to more closely align the American food supply and the public's diet with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA). This paper is the result of 2 expert dialogues to address this mandate, which were held in Chicago, Illinois, and Washington, D.C., in early October 2010 between these 2 key scientific audiences. It is an objective that has largely eluded public health experts over the past several decades. This document takes the perspective of food scientists who are tasked with making positive modifications to the food supply, both in innovating and reformulating food products, to respond to both the DGA recommendations, and to consumer desires, needs, and choices. The paper is one of two to emerge from those October 2010 discussions; the other article focuses on the work of dietitians and nutrition communicators in effecting positive dietary change. PMID:21535704

  17. Bringing Lunar and Planetary Science and Exploration to Underrepresented and Underutilized Student Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, A. S.

    2007-03-01

    In order to reach the nation's best talent and brainpower, NASA must inform and inspire all populations including those that have been underutilized and underserved in the past, such as females, African-Americans and Native Americans.

  18. Bringing Mars Science and Exploration to Underrepresented and Underutilized Student Populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, A. S.

    2007-07-01

    NASA's New Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) requires the best talent and brainpower that the country has to offer, including females, African-Americans and Native Americans, all of whom have been largely underutilized and underrepresented in space activities in the past.

  19. Metagenomics: A Call for Bringing a New Science into the Classroom (While It's Still New)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurkowski, Anne; Reid, Ann H.; Labov, Jay B.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the emerging field of metagenomics, a potent new tool that vastly expands the ability of scientists to study the myriad capabilities of microbial communities and the as yet unrecognized relationships and interactions of microbes with other forms of life and the environment. The birth of this exciting new field provides the…

  20. Using the Web to Bring Space Science and Technology Down To Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. F.

    1997-01-01

    At JPL, the World-Wide Web has become an invaluable educational outreach mechanism. In the area of space flight mission operations, for example, we have been able to make publicly accessible two workbooks found to be of much wider interest than their original internal training purposes would have suggested.

  1. The Moraine Valley Resident: His Attitude Toward the Community College and His Socio-Economic Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moraine Valley Community Coll., Oak Lawn, IL. Office of Research and Curriculum Planning.

    A study was conducted to give the college current community data for educational planning and to give social science students the experience of helping to conduct a survey. The parts of the report were highlights of the survey results, purpose and background of the study, its methods and limitations, attitudes of residents to the college, and…

  2. Does an Urban Teacher Residency Increase Student Achievement? Early Evidence from Boston

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papay, John P.; West, Martin R.; Fullerton, Jon B.; Kane, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    Boston Teacher Residency (BTR) is an innovative practice-based preparation program in which candidates work alongside a mentor teacher for a year before becoming a teacher of record in the Boston Public Schools (BPS). The authors found that BTR graduates are more racially diverse than other BPS novices, more likely to teach math and science, and…

  3. An Investigation of Candidates' Experience of Attrition in a Limited-Residency Doctoral Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Donna Hosie

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 50% of doctoral students in social science, humanities, and educational doctoral programs fail to earn the Ph.D. This number is 10% to 15% higher for students enrolled in online or limited-residency programs. Using in-depth interviewing and qualitative data analysis techniques, this study examined participants' recollections of…

  4. Legislative Agenda Setting for In-State Resident Tuition Policies: Immigration, Representation, and Educational Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLendon, Michael K.; Mokher, Christine G.; Flores, Stella M.

    2011-01-01

    Few recent issues in higher education have been as contentious as that of legislation extending in-state college tuition benefits to undocumented students, initiatives now known as in-state resident tuition (ISRT) policies. Building on several strands of literature in political science and higher education studies, we analyze the effects of…

  5. Neurosurgery resident leadership development: an innovative approach.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Jeffrey E; Dahdaleh, Nader S; Albert, Gregory W; Greenlee, Jeremy D

    2011-02-01

    A great deal of time and resources go into the development and training of neurosurgeons. One area that has minimal literature and assessment is leadership development. Under the core competency of interpersonal and communication skills, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has indicated that residents are expected to work effectively as a member or leader of a healthcare team. This article reveals how a structured leadership program was developed so that residents are better prepared for the role of chief resident and future leadership roles. Beginning in October 2006, residents attended a series of 1-hour workshops conducted monthly. Topics included leadership style, conflict management, effective feedback, team building, team leadership, motivation, and moving from peer to leader. A retrospective pretest was conducted at the end of the program. Residents reported a significant knowledge gain for the majority of topics. Resident comments indicated a greater awareness of the impact of leading and ways to improve their personal leadership. Quantitatively and qualitatively, residents and faculty reported that the leadership program made a significant impact on the development of future neurosurgical leaders. PMID:21135732

  6. The Social Sciences in China.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng-Fang, Yang

    1980-01-01

    Characterizes social science research and teaching in China today as being closely linked to the solution of practical social, economic, and political problems. The emphasis is also on encouraging many different schools of thought among scientists and social scientists as a means of bringing about a flourishing socialist culture. (DB)

  7. New ways to bring solar energy to communities

    SciTech Connect

    Mastaitis, V.; Thomas, S.M.

    1999-07-01

    Efforts to educate decision-makers, planners and the public about the availability and benefits of solar energy use often have appeared disjointed and piecemeal. Recognizing that a more holistic approach was needed to bring solar energy into communities, the Interstate Renewable Energy Council devised an approach that assists government and community officials in bringing renewables into every aspect of community building--housing, recreation facilities, open spaces and businesses. This effort utilizes the Workshop in a Box (WIAB), a collection of informational tools packaged to make it easy to approach a community about using these technologies: climate-responsive buildings, solar electricity, solar water and pool heating and community energy systems (including wind and biomass systems). More important than the tools, however is the training, education, creation of a network of trainers and on-going communications among the group of trainers. The objectives of the WIAB program are: to continue efforts to provide a comprehensive approach in educating builders, planners, community officials and the public in order to bring renewable energy to communities; to continue outreach and building of a network of trainers in cities and communities who are then a resource for renewable energy information; to provide the most up-to-date information on renewables to cites and communities; and, to support the network of renewable energy educators in the states and communities. The intended audience is city, community and neighborhood officials willing to become trainers and educators for renewable energy. However, the Neighborhood Power Workshop in a Box has value and applicability for a wide range of people interested in fostering renewable energy use such as public and civic organizations, environmental groups, chapters of national renewable energy organizations, state energy officials and many others.

  8. Reverse Your Science Fair with Educational Partnerships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Jordan; Zardetto-Smith, Andrea; Mu, Keli; Demetrikopoulos, Melissa K.

    2004-01-01

    This article suggests several ways teachers can get their students really excited about science by bringing scientists to the science fair in a different role than the traditional "judge." With a bit more effort, scientists can become actively involved as presenters of hands-on activities. This article discusses: what happens when the tables are…

  9. Great Explorations: Discovering Science in the Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Maria, Ed.; And Others

    The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Library Institute was a project that brought together 28 school and public librarians from the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to discuss science, mathematics, and technology. education reform and what can be done to bring it about. This book discusses the project in 12 chapters:…

  10. Russian Science and Education: Problems and Prospects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebedev, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education in Russia is not able to provide the science personnel and research that the country needs for its future economic well-being. Urgent changes are needed to improve the situation, not least among them being significant increases in the salaries of scientists, bringing Russian science into line with world standards of scientific…

  11. Reforming Science Education. Social Perspectives & Personal Reflections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    Science education reform is an ongoing process. In recent years many have begun to look not only to teachers for change, but they are also insisting on the involvement of administrators, parents, community members, and some business organizations to bring about this change. This book presents facts and insights regarding science education reform…

  12. Activities for Science: Cooperative Learning Lessons (Challenging).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jasmine, Grace; Jasmine, Julia

    This book is designed to help advanced elementary students learn science skills while actively engaged in cooperative activities based on the earth sciences and natural disasters. The first section explains how to make cooperative learning a part of the curriculum and includes an overview, instructions and activities to bring cooperative learning…

  13. Doing Science: The Process of Scientific Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, 2005

    2005-01-01

    This curriculum supplement, from The NIH Curriculum Supplement Series, brings cutting-edge medical science and basic research discoveries from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) into classrooms. It was designed to complement existing life science curricula at both the state and local levels and to be consistent with the National Science…

  14. Informed Decisions: Bringing Assessments into the Policy Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannegan, B.

    2008-12-01

    Human activities are causing rapid and widespread changes in the biogeochemical cycles that support and sustain human societies. In the U.S., policy makers in both the Legislative and Executive Branches are faced with the challenge of using the results from assessment models to develop policy instruments to mitigate the problems that can result. Drawing on the author's experience with both the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the White House Council on Environmental Quality, as well as his present work with energy systems at EPRI, the talk will explore the challenges and opportunities for effectively bringing these assessments into the policy process.

  15. Teaching pediatric residents about child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Dubowitz, H; Black, M

    1991-10-01

    Child maltreatment is a growing problem faced by pediatricians; however, there are many deficiencies in pediatricians' relevant knowledge and skills. Residency programs typically have included limited teaching in the area of child maltreatment. Fifty pediatric residents participated in an evaluation of a model educational course in child maltreatment developed by an interdisciplinary faculty. The course resulted in significant short-term improvements in knowledge and skills as well as a greater sense of competence in managing cases of child maltreatment. The importance of teaching pediatric residents about the "new morbidity" is discussed. PMID:1939686

  16. Tuition fees for residents: one physician's perspective

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, B

    1999-01-01

    Although the education, expertise and guidance of Canada's academic physicians cannot be overlooked, individual universities appear to see tuition fees for residents as an easy source of much needed revenue. If tuition should "rise to market levels," perhaps residents' wages should similarly rise to reflect the amount of training received, skills required, responsibilities discharged and time expended. Unfortunately, tuition fees will be an area of contention for some time. Support of provincial resident associations and medical societies may lend both moral and, possibly, financial support to future members of the profession. PMID:10530300

  17. Teaching practice management skills to pediatric residents.

    PubMed

    Babitch, Leland A

    2006-11-01

    To satisfy the core competencies required by the Pediatric Residency Review Committee, the author describes an educational program for the residents in a large pediatric training program. The course provides a year-long overview of multiple medical management topics. The sessions cover nonclinical subjects usually missed in other educational settings, with particular focus on areas of finance, compliance, personnel management, career advancement, and leadership. The series is currently in its third year, with a positive response from the participants, and demonstrated improvement in resident knowledge of the covered areas. PMID:17041173

  18. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  19. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  20. 26 CFR 1.884-5 - Qualified resident.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... an individual who is not a U.S. citizen or resident, also obtains a certificate of residency... a certificate of residency shall not be required in the case of an individual who is a shareholder...) Certificate of residency. A certificate of residency must be signed by the relevant authorities (as...

  1. The Chief Resident in Psychiatry: Roles and Responsibilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Russell F.; Schwartz, Eric; Servis, Mark; Cox, Paul D.; Lai, Alan; Hales, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Psychiatric residency programs have had chief residents for many years, and several articles previously published describe the chief residents' unique role as both faculty and resident. This article describes chief resident roles and responsibilities and explores trends in academic psychiatry departments from 1995 to 2006. Methods: The…

  2. The Upper San Pedro Partnership: A Case Study of Successful Strategies to Connect Science to Societal Needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, D. C.; Richter, H.; Varady, R.; Browning-Aiken, A.; Shuttleworth, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Upper San Pedro Partnership (USPP) (http://www.usppartnership.com/) has been in existence since 1998. Its purpose is to coordinate and cooperate in the implementation of comprehensive policies and projects to meet the long-term water needs of residents within the U.S. side of the basin and of the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area. The Partnership consists of 21 local, state, and Federal agencies, NGO's and a private water company. In 2004 it was recognized by Congress in Section 321 of Public Law 108-136 and required to make annual reports to Congress on its progress in bringing the basin water budget into balance by 2011. The Partnership is dedicated to science-based decision making. This presentation will provide an overview of the evolution of natural resources research in the binational (U.S.-Mexico) San Pedro Basin into a mature example of integrated science and decision making embodied in the USPP. It will discuss the transition through science and research for understanding; to science for addressing a need; to integrated policy development and science. At each stage the research conducted becomes more interdisciplinary, first across abiotic disciplines (hydrology, remote sensing, atmospheric science), then a merging of abiotic and biotic disciplines (adding ecology and plant physiology), and finally a further merging with the social sciences and policy and decision making for resource management. Federal, university, and NSF SAHRA Science and Technology Center research has been planned and conducted directly with the USPP. Because of the success the San Pedro has been designated as an operational HELP (Hydrology for the Environment, Life, and Policy) demonstration basin—the most advanced category. Lessons learned from this experience will be reviewed with the intent providing guidance to ensure that hydrologic and watershed research is socially and scientifically relevant and will directly address the needs of policy makers and resource

  3. Red tape and cuts bring researchers to Moscow streets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Simon

    2011-12-01

    More than 500 researchers in Russia have come out in protest over the country's lack of research funding and its excessive bureaucracy that they say are destroying science in the country and forcing the nation's researchers to go abroad.

  4. Bringing Technology into college and High School Physics Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zettili, Nouredine

    2007-04-01

    We want to present ideas on ways of bringing technology to college and high school physics classrooms. We focus in particular on our outreach initiative in supporting a number of school districts with ways to improve high school physics education. This initiative is part of Project IMPACTSEED (IMproving Physics And Chemistry Teaching in SEcondary Education), a No-Child Left Behind grant funded by the Alabama Commission on Higher Education. This project is motivated by a major local need: A large number of high school physics teachers teach out of field. IMPACTSEED aims at helping high school teachers learn and master the various physics topics required by the Alabama course of study. Teachers are offered year-round support through a rich variety of programs: a two-week long summer institute, a series of five technology workshops, and onsite year-round support. Through our hands-on approach, we have identified a number of ways of bringing technology into physics classrooms. A number of technology projects were assigned to the teachers so as to show their students how physics connects to the technological devices around us. IMPACTSEED aims at providing our students with a physics education that enjoys continuity and consistency from high school to college.

  5. Resident and attending physician perception of maladaptive response to stress in residents

    PubMed Central

    Riesenberg, Lee Ann; Berg, Katherine; Berg, Dale; Morgan, Charity J.; Davis, Joshua; Davis, Robyn; Schaeffer, Arielle; Hargraves, Robert; Little, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Residency stress has been shown to interfere with resident well-being and patient safety. We developed a survey research study designed to explore factors that may affect perception of a maladaptive response to stress. Methods A 16-item survey with 12 Likert-type perception items was designed to determine how often respondents agreed or disagreed with statements regarding the resident on the trigger tape. A total of 438 respondents from multiple institutions completed surveys. Results Attending physicians were more likely than residents to agree that the resident on the trigger tape was impaired, p<0.0001; needed to seek professional counseling, p=0.0003; should be removed from the service, p=0.002; was not receiving adequate support from the attending physician, p=0.007; and was a risk to patient safety, p=0.02. Attending physicians were also less likely to agree that the resident was a good role model, p=0.001, and that the resident should be able to resolve these issues herself/himself, p<0.0001. Conclusion Our data suggest that resident physicians may not be able to adequately detect maladaptive responses to stress and that attending physicians may be more adept at recognizing this problem. More innovative faculty and resident development workshops should be created to teach and encourage physicians to better observe and detect residents who are displaying maladaptive responses to stress. PMID:25407054

  6. Residency and Beyond: Subspecialization Trends Among Graduating Physiatry Residents and the Musculoskeletal Curriculum.

    PubMed

    Yang, Aaron Jay; Brakke, Rachel A; Boimbo, Sandra; Sauerwein, Kelly; Coronado, Rogelio A; Schumacher, Alexandra

    2016-02-01

    Previous studies and informal surveys have demonstrated a trend among graduating physiatry residents who desired to practice in an outpatient musculoskeletal (MSK)- or spine-type setting. However, there has been no updated information on the current trend among graduating residents as well as sparse information on gauging if current trainees feel prepared on graduation to treat patients with such disorders. This article describes a prospective survey of graduating chief residents during the 2013-2014 academic year in which 72% of chief residents planned to pursue a fellowship. A total of 54% of those chief residents planned to pursue a pain, sports, or spine fellowship. Seventy-five percent of the responding chief residents reported that most of the residents in their program felt that the current amount of required rotations in MSK, sports, spine, or pain medicine was adequate and 85% felt comfortable practicing in a noninterventional spine or MSK position after graduation without a fellowship. The results of this survey provide an updated perspective on the current trends among graduating residents as well as how residents perceive their MSK curriculum. These results may prove useful when evaluating MSK curriculums and shaping resident education to maximize career goals. PMID:26259054

  7. Surgical residency training and international volunteerism: a national survey of residents from 2 surgical specialties

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Wadih Y.; Trottier, Daniel C.; Balaa, Fady; Fairful-Smith, Robin; Moroz, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Background Many low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) lack basic surgical resources, resulting in avoidable disability and mortality. Recently, residents in surgical training programs have shown increasing interest in overseas elective experiences to assist surgical programs in LMICs. The purpose of this study was to survey Canadian surgical residents about their interest in international volunteerism. Methods We sent a web-based survey to all general and orthopedic surgery residents enrolled in surgical training programs in Canada. The survey assessed residents’ interests, attitudes and motivations, and perceived barriers and aids with respect to international volunteerism. Results In all, 361 residents completed the survey for a response rate of 38.0%. Half of the respondents indicated that the availability of an international surgery elective would have positively influenced their selection of a residency program. Excluding the 18 residents who had volunteered during residency, 63.8% of the remaining residents confirmed an interest in international volunteering with “contributing to an important cause,” “teaching” and “tourism/cultural enhancement” as the leading reasons for their interest. Perceived barriers included “lack of financial support” and “lack of available organized opportunities.” All (100%) respondents who had done an international elective during residency confirmed that they would pursue such work in the future. Conclusion Administrators of Canadian surgical programs should be aware of strong resident interest in global health care and accordingly develop opportunities by encouraging faculty mentorships and resources for global health teaching. PMID:22854155

  8. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox: an educational and clinical tool for radiology residents.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Emerson E; Kendrick, Michael; Strickland, Colin; Dodd, Gerald D

    2013-07-01

    Tablet computing and mobile resources are the hot topics in technology today, with that interest spilling into the medical field. To improve resident education, a fully configured iPad, referred to as the "Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox," was created and implemented at the University of Colorado. The goal was to create a portable device with comprehensive educational, clinical, and communication tools that would contain all necessary resources for an entire 4-year radiology residency. The device was distributed to a total of 34 radiology residents (8 first-year residents, 8 second-year residents, 9 third-year residents, and 9 fourth-year residents). This article describes the process used to develop and deploy the device, provides a distillation of useful applications and resources decided upon after extensive evaluation, and assesses the impact this device had on resident education. The Radiology Resident iPad Toolbox is a cost-effective, portable, educational instrument that has increased studying efficiency; improved access to study materials such as books, radiology cases, lectures, and web-based resources; and increased interactivity in educational conferences and lectures through the use of audience-response software, with questions geared toward the new ABR board format. This preconfigured tablet fully embraces the technology shift into mobile computing and represents a paradigm shift in educational strategy. PMID:23647869

  9. Science in Science Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allday, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Offers some suggestions as to how science fiction, especially television science fiction programs such as "Star Trek" and "Star Wars", can be drawn into physics lessons to illuminate some interesting issues. (Author/KHR)

  10. The Baylor pediatric nutrition handbook for residents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Baylor Pediatric Nutrition Handbook for Residents provides basic resource information about the assessment of growth, the nutritional status assessment and feeding guidelines, biochemical evaluation of nutritional status, infant nutrition, enteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition, nutritional man...

  11. Personal health care of internal medicine residents

    PubMed Central

    Palabindala, Venkataraman; Foster, Paul; Kanduri, Swetha; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Pamarthy, Amaleswari; Kovvuru, Karthik

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Medical residents, as part of their job to balance the demands of their work with caring for themselves so as to be mentally, emotionally, and physically sound to stay clinically competent. While regulatory and legislative attempts at limiting medical resident work hours have materialized but have yet to attain passage, there are fairly little data looking into how residents cope up with their demands and yet attend to their own personal health. Design Anonymous mailed survey. Subjects Three hundred and thirty-seven residents from all internal medicine residency programs within United States. Methods We conducted a survey in the form of a questionnaire that was sent by e-mail to the program directors of various internal medicine residency programs within the United States, and responses were collected between May 19 and June 21, 2009. Response was well appreciated with total number of participants of 337 with even demographical distribution in gender, residency year, AMG/IMG, age group. Seventy-one percent of the residents felt that they would prefer getting admitted to their own hospital for any acute medical or surgical condition. Of the 216 residents who have had received health care in the past, almost half of them chose their own hospital because of the proximity, while 45% did not choose their own hospital despite proximity. Two out of three residents missed their doctors appointments or cancelled them due to demands of medical training. Only half of the residents have a primary care physician and almost 80% of them did not have their yearly health checkup. Close to 30% held back information regarding their social and sexual history from their provider because of privacy and confidentiality concerns. Eighty percent of residents never received information about barriers that physicians may face in obtaining care for their socially embarrassing conditions. Seventy percent felt that their performance then was suboptimal because of that health

  12. Residence Hall Furniture: What's on the Horizon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiens, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Describes what leading manufacturers are saying about the future of residence hall furniture design, explaining that fabrics, frames, colors, materials, and other factors are combining to give college officials numerous choices. (EV)

  13. 42 CFR 483.20 - Resident assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... condition as described in 42 CFR 435.1010 of this chapter. ... comprehensive, accurate, standardized, reproducible assessment of each resident's functional capacity. (a... Medicaid in part 483, subpart C to the maximum extent practicable to avoid duplicative testing and...

  14. Independence Training in Nursing-Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltes, Margret M.; Zerbe, Melissa B.

    1976-01-01

    Single-subject reversal designs were used in teaching elderly nursing-home residents to change dependency behavior and to reacquire and maintain self-feeding skills. Fast control of self-feeding was obtained. Results are discussed. (Author)

  15. A rural primary care pediatric residency program.

    PubMed

    Kairys, S; Newell, P

    1985-10-01

    Rural primary care is often reported in the medical literature as frustrating, lonely, and nonrewarding. Many graduating residents who choose small town practice become quickly disenchanted with the life-style and leave for a more populous territory or subspecialty training. Opportunities to learn how to take advantage of rural settings and establish rewarding community practices are few. The Primary Care Pediatric Residency Program at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center has developed a training program in rural primary care. Residents experience over a three-year period the many facets of rural practice and are introduced to community-oriented approaches to child health care. Selected rural pediatric practices within a 45-mile radius of the medical center serve as teaching laboratories in which residents develop the skills necessary to manage children's problems related to school, behavioral disorders, and chronic diseases. PMID:4045973

  16. The Residency Application Abyss: Insights and Advice

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Douglas P.; Oatts, Julius T.; Fields, Barry G.; Huot, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Most medical students apply for residency training upon completion of medical school. The choice of specialty is one of a student’s first major career decisions, and the application process often results in considerable anxiety, as it is competitive, unpredictable, and requires a significant investment of time and money. This article, which addresses several important facets of the residency application using both experiential and evidence-based data, is organized chronologically into sections that describe a logical approach to applying for residency: choice of a specialty, the personal statement, the interview day, and developing a rank list. A list of relevant websites is also included. This paper is a resource that provides timely and tangible guidance to medical students applying for residency training. PMID:21966036

  17. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Calculating income. (1) Income of participants must be calculated in accordance with 24 CFR 5.609 and 24 CFR 5... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.310 Resident rent. (a) Amount...

  18. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Calculating income. (1) Income of participants must be calculated in accordance with 24 CFR 5.609 and 24 CFR 5... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.310 Resident rent. (a) Amount...

  19. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Calculating income. (1) Income of participants must be calculated in accordance with 24 CFR 5.609 and 24 CFR 5... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.310 Resident rent. (a) Amount...

  20. 24 CFR 582.310 - Resident rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Calculating income. (1) Income of participants must be calculated in accordance with 24 CFR 5.609 and 24 CFR 5... DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES SHELTER PLUS CARE Program Requirements § 582.310 Resident rent. (a) Amount...