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Sample records for residential care education

  1. A Culture of Education: Enhancing School Performance of Youth Living in Residential Group Care in Ontario

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a synthesis of what is known about the educational experiences of youth living in residential group care based on a literature review that highlights both the experiences of the youth themselves and the operational context of residential group care in Ontario as it pertains to educational performance. The author argues that…

  2. Residential Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... dementia care Programs and Services Appropriate services and programming based on specific health and behavioral care needs ... of Alzheimer's Treatments Contact us 24/7 Helpline: 1-800-272-3900 Find Your Local Chapter Get ...

  3. Education Secured? The School Performance of Adolescents in Secure Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Annemiek T.; Huyghen, Anne-Marie N.; Knot-Dickscheit, Jana; Kalverboer, Margrite E.; Köngeter, Stefan; Zeller, Maren; Knorth, Erik J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite poor school performance by adolescents in secure residential care and the potential importance of education during care, little is known about how to achieve academic success with these adolescents. Objective: Therefore, the aim of the present study is to assess adolescents' academic achievement during secure residential…

  4. A Social Pedagogy Approach to Residential Care: Balancing Education and Placement in the Development of an Innovative Child Welfare Residential Program in Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras; Groskleg, Ron

    2010-01-01

    This paper chronicles the exploration and development of a residential program of the child welfare authority of Renfrew County in Ontario, Canada. Recognizing that virtually its entire population of youth in care was failing to achieve positive outcomes in education, Renfrew County Family and Children Services embarked on a program development…

  5. Indiana Residential Child Care Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Ann L.; Johnson, Marilee

    To compose a comprehensive description of the residential child care needs in Indiana, county agencies, county welfare departments, and probation departments were surveyed. Respondents were asked to identify the characteristics of children placed in Indiana residential facilities, in out-of-state residential care, and of those whom the agency was…

  6. The Impact of Child Sexual Abuse on the Education of Boys in Residential Care between 1950 and 1975

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bode, Andrew; Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2012-01-01

    Children's education may be adversely impacted by external factors during their childhood. For example, learning to learn, critical reflection, experiential learning and self-direction may be permanently impaired. Many children in out-of-home residential care during the last century suffered ongoing child abuse and neglect, including sexual abuse,…

  7. Examination of Negative Peer Contagion in a Residential Care Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huefner, Jonathan C.; Ringle, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    There has been ongoing concern about the negative impact of residential treatment on youth in care. Research examining the impact of negative peer influence in juvenile justice, education, and residential care settings is reviewed. A study was conducted to examine the impact of negative peer contagion on the level of problem behavior in a…

  8. Characteristics of Owners of Residential Care Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horgan, Dianne D.; And Others

    Although researchers have investigated quality and cost of residential care, little is known about the people who own and manage residential care facilities. In an attempt to find out more about these managers, members of the National Association of Residential Care Facilities (NARCF) were surveyed. Members (N=175) responded to questionnaires…

  9. Staff supervision in residential care.

    PubMed

    Myers, Peter G; Bibbs, Tonya; Orozco, Candy

    2004-04-01

    Residential care workers must be offered opportunities for formalized and systematic supervision in individual and group formats to provide the highest possible level of care to children and adolescents whom they serve. Effective supervision with residential care staff should be open to exploring issues at all levels of their experience and in relation to each component of the broader organizational structure within which they work. Systems theory offers a useful lens through which to view supervising staff in residential treatment. Systems theory proposes that human behavior is shaped by interactional processes and internal factors. Although the development of the individual occurs within intrinsic cognitive and emotional spheres, it also is believed to be related to several other elements. These additional variables include the point at which the family and system function in their own life cycle, the historical and current emotional context, the current and changing structure of the system, narratives, and the cultural context. This article discussed how methods of training and supervision would be most effective if they were designed specifically for the developmental level of the participants. Some literature reviews have concluded that youth care workers, like all professionals, pass through developmental stages and progress through them in their work. To assist youth care workers in their jobs, supervisors must understand these stages and the ways in which they may be enacted in the workplace. PMID:15062348

  10. A Cluster-Randomised Trial of Staff Education to Improve the Quality of Life of People with Dementia Living in Residential Care: The DIRECT Study

    PubMed Central

    Beer, Christopher; Horner, Barbara; Flicker, Leon; Scherer, Samuel; Lautenschlager, Nicola T.; Bretland, Nick; Flett, Penelope; Schaper, Frank; Almeida, Osvaldo P.

    2011-01-01

    Background The Dementia In Residential care: EduCation intervention Trial (DIRECT) was conducted to determine if delivery of education designed to meet the perceived need of GPs and care staff improves the quality of life of participants with dementia living in residential care. Methodology/Principal Findings This cluster-randomised controlled trial was conducted in 39 residential aged care facilities in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. 351 care facility residents aged 65 years and older with Mini-Mental State Examination ≤24, their GPs and facility staff participated. Flexible education designed to meet the perceived needs of learners was delivered to GPs and care facility staff in intervention groups. The primary outcome of the study was self-rated quality of life of participants with dementia, measured using the QOL-Alzheimer's Disease Scale (QOL-AD) at 4 weeks and 6 months after the conclusion of the intervention. Analysis accounted for the effect of clustering by using multi-level regression analysis. Education of GPs or care facility staff did not affect the primary outcome at either 4 weeks or 6 months. In a post hoc analysis excluding facilities in which fewer than 50% of staff attended an education session, self-rated QOL-AD scores were 6.14 points (adjusted 95%CI 1.14, 11.15) higher at four-week follow-up among residents in facilities randomly assigned to the education intervention. Conclusion The education intervention directed at care facilities or GPs did not improve the quality of life ratings of participants with dementia as a group. This may be explained by the poor adherence to the intervention programme, as participants with dementia living in facilities where staff participated at least minimally seemed to benefit. Trial Registration ANZCTR.org.au ACTRN12607000417482 PMID:22140531

  11. 78 FR 32124 - Community Residential Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... approval is revoked. On May 13, 1996, 61 FR 21965, VA redesignated Sec. 17.51n as Sec. 17.67. We are... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 17 RIN 2900-AO62 Community Residential Care AGENCY: Department of Veterans Affairs... concerning approval of non-VA community residential care facilities to allow VA to waive such...

  12. Children with ADHD in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kathryn J.; Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Reid, Robert; Chmelka, Beth; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about the characteristics or functioning of children with ADHD in residential care as compared to their non-ADHD peers. This study evaluated data on 538 children with (n = 125) and without (n = 413) ADHD in residential care to determine demographic, mental health, behavioral, and treatment (i.e., medication use) characteristics.…

  13. Measuring Group Care Worker Interventions in Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanssen, Inge L. W.; Kroes, Gert; Nijhof, Karin S.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Veerman, Jan Willem

    2012-01-01

    Background: By interacting with children, group care workers shape daily living environments to influence treatment. Current literature provides little knowledge about the content of youth residential care. Objective: In this study, a questionnaire called the Group care worker Intervention Checklist was developed. Method: Group care workers…

  14. Small Child Care Facilities in Residential Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giegerich & Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD.

    One part of a three-part investigation prepared for the Montgomery County Planning Board in Silver Spring, Maryland, this study addresses planning and site planning issues arising from the location of child care facilities in residential settings. The study, which emphasizes homes and centers which care for 7 to 20 children, provides a detailed…

  15. End-of-Life Care Policies in Flemish Residential Care Facilities Accommodating Persons with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Haene, I.; Pasman, H. R. W.; Deliens, L.; Bilsen, J.; Mortier, F.; Stichele, R. Vander

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article aims to describe the presence, content and implementation strategies of written policies on end-of-life decisions in Flemish residential care facilities (RCFs) accommodating persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), and to describe training, education and quality assessments of end-of-life care. Methods: A…

  16. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 6, Number 2, Fall 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "CWLA's Position on Residential Care"; (2) "The View of Adolescent Life: Perceptions and Realities" ( Lisa Moore Willis); (3) "Assessing Youth Preferences for Adult Behavior in Residential Care: A Replication" (Jack T. Bowers, III, Robert J. Jones, Gary D.…

  17. An examination of the health profile, service use and care needs of older adults in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Aminzadeh, F; Dalziel, W B; Molnar, F J; Alie, J

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile, patterns of service use, and medical/care needs of a representative sample of 178 older adults in residential care facilities in the City of Ottawa. The results indicate great diversity in resident and facility profiles in this setting and confirm earlier impressions that special care units in the residential care sector have become increasingly close to being unlicensed pseudo-nursing homes. Despite the heavy burden of care, the evidence suggests that the care needs of the majority of residents are adequately met in the residential care environment. The results can inform future research, case finding, educational, and policy planning initiatives in this setting. PMID:15660301

  18. Documentation for Students in Residential Care: Network of Relations of Human and Non-Human Actants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Severinsson, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Swedish and international research points to serious problems for the education of students with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties (SEBD) in the care of social welfare, for example, in residential care. The aim of this article is to elucidate how documentation, care plans (CPs) and individual educational plans (IEPs) outline the…

  19. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 3, Winter 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "Promising Practices for Adequately Funding and Reimbursing Residential Services" (Lloyd Bullard); (2) "Closing the Gender Gap" (Erin Andersen); (3) "Residential Child Care: Guidelines for Physical Techniques, Crisis Prevention, and Management" (Kurk Lalemand);…

  20. Youth Departing from Residential Care: A Gender Comparison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Annette K.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Epstein, Michael H.; Reid, Robert; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Orduna, Debbie

    2009-01-01

    Although females represent almost half of all youth involved in residential care in the US, very little is known about this population. In order to examine differences in characteristics of male (n = 308) and female (n = 180) youth departing from residential care, data were collected on 488 youth from a large residential treatment facility in the…

  1. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 6, Number 4, Spring 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) Strengthening the Culture of Care in Child Care Agencies (Vonda I. Wallace and Jean Carpenter-Williams); (2) Improving Restraint Monitoring with Pulse…

  2. Compassion Fatigue and Compassion Satisfaction among Residential Child Care Workers: The Role of Personality Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zerach, Gadi

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed compassion fatigue (CF) and compassion satisfaction (CS) among Israeli residential child-care workers (RCWs) working in residential treatment facilities for children and youth at risk (N = 147) as compared to educational boarding schools workers (BSWs; N = 74). Furthermore, we assessed the relationship of potential…

  3. Predictors of Success in a Residential Education Placement for Foster Youths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Loring P.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines factors that contributed to successful outcomes (graduated high school, remained in school, went to a lower level of care, or reunified with parents) for the first 246 residents of a residential education placement. Residential education placements' primary purpose is to provide an educational program rather than mental health…

  4. Bullying in Adolescent Residential Care: The Influence of the Physical and Social Residential Care Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sekol, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Background: To date, no study examined possible contributions of environmental factors to bullying and victimization in adolescent residential care facilities. Objective: By testing one part of the Multifactor Model of Bullying in Secure Setting (MMBSS; Ireland in "Int J Adolesc Med Health" 24(1):63-68, 2012), this research examined the…

  5. Experiential Education, Outdoor Adventure As a Modality in Youth Care and Residential Treatment. A Survey of Programs, Principles, Research and Practice on the European Continent, Especially the Netherlands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton

    Orthopedagogisch Centrum Michiel is a multifunctional institution in the eastern Netherlands for youth with emotional problems. The staff of the institution's residential treatment center has gradually become involved with outdoor experiential education through training programs, conferences, special projects, and supervised programs. Activities…

  6. Positive behavioral interventions and supports: using strength-based approaches to enhance the culture of care in residential and day treatment education environments.

    PubMed

    Kalke, Thomas; Glanton, Ann; Cristalli, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports model, first introduced into public schools, has been extended to alternative settings. This article highlights applying PBIS to day treatment and residential treatment education programs increasingly challenged to serve seriously emotionally disturbed youth whose risk factors have become more complex. The results demonstrate a more positive environment enhancing children's treatment and education along with decreasing numbers of safety holds and need for out-of-classroom supports. PMID:18422053

  7. Substance Use among Young People Living in Residential State Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrystal, Patrick; Percy, Andrew; Higgins, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Existing empirical evidence on substance use among young people living in residential state care during adolescence is comparatively limited. This paper reports on substance use trends of young people living in residential state care during three annual data-sweeps when aged 14, 15 and 16 years. A repeated cross-sectional research design was…

  8. The Future of Family Engagement in Residential Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affronti, Melissa L.; Levison-Johnson, Jody

    2009-01-01

    Residential programs for children and youth are increasingly implementing engagement strategies to promote family-centered and family-driven models of care (Leichtman, 2008). The practice of engagement is a fairly new area of research, especially in residential care. Driven by their goal to increase the use of state-of-the-art family engagement…

  9. Residential Care in Illinois: Trends and Alternatives. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budde, Stephen; Mayer, Susan; Zinn, Andrew; Lippold, Melissa; Avrushin, Adam; Bromberg, Ava; Goerge, Robert; Courtney, Mark

    2004-01-01

    In this multi-faceted exploratory study, administrative data were used to examine trends in residential care utilization by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS) and youth outcomes from 1993 to 2003. Multivariate analyses were conducted to determine the factors associated with entry to residential care and…

  10. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 1, Summer 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) Building Bridges between Service Delivery Providers, Families, and Youth (Lloyd Bullard); (2) The Promise of Professionalism Arrives in Practice:…

  11. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 2, Fall 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, Kathy, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) Whatever Happened to Sound Clinical Reasoning? (Elizabeth Kohlstaedt); (2) Minorities as Majority Disproportionality in Child Welfare and Juvenile…

  12. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 6, Number 1, Summer 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" includes the following articles: (1) "Residential Treatment: Finding the Appropriate Level of Care" (Shay Bilchik); (2) "Family-Centered Practices" (Rodger McDaniel and Brenden McKinney); and (3) "Can the Community Serve Sex Offenders?" (Point/Counterpoint--Daniel Wallach and Wayne D. Parks).…

  13. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 1, Summer 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Scott, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "National Definitions and Data Collection for Residential Care Facilities' Use of Restraint and Seclusion" (Lloyd Bullard); (2) "CWLA Publishes Best Practices in Behavior Support and Intervention Assessment Instrument" (Nupur Gupta); (3) "Initial Findings of an…

  14. Validating a Marking Rubric for Evaluating Staff Knowledge of Dementia for Competency in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberdeen, Suzanne M.; Leggat, Sandra G.; Barraclough, Simon

    2009-01-01

    The shift to Vocational Education and Training (VET) for the training of the Australian residential aged care workforce has resulted in significant variance in the competencies at graduation of those caring for people with dementia. Competence may be also be enhanced, or conversely, decline over time as a result of implicit learning gained from…

  15. Medical Service Utilization among Youth with School-Identified Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Matthew C.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Epstein, Michael H.; W. Thompson, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Background: Behavioral, social, emotional, and educational risks among children and youth with school identified disabilities served in residential care have been well documented. However, the health care needs and medical service utilization of this high-risk population are less well known. Given the risks associated with children with…

  16. Oral health care in residential aged care services: barriers to engaging health-care providers.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Lydia; Slack-Smith, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The oral health of older people living in residential aged care facilities has been widely recognised as inadequate. The aim of this paper is to identify barriers to effective engagement of health-care providers in oral care in residential aged care facilities. A literature review was conducted using MEDline, CINAHL, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete and PsychInfo between 2000 and 2013, with a grey literature search of government and non-government organisation policy papers, conference proceedings and theses. Keywords included: dental/oral care, residential aged care, health-care providers, barriers, constraints, and limitations. A thematic framework was used to synthesise the literature according to a series of oral health-care provision barriers, health-care provider barriers, and cross-sector collaborative barriers. A range of system, service and practitioner level barriers were identified that could impede effective communication/collaboration between different health-care providers, residents and carers regarding oral care, and these were further impeded by internal barriers at each level. Findings indicated several areas for investigation and consideration regarding policy and practice improvements. While further research is required, some key areas should be addressed if oral health care in residential aged care services is to be improved. PMID:25155109

  17. A Curriculum for the Residential Educable Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Wisconsin Colony and Training School, Union Grove.

    Organized so that each teacher may use some latitude in planning teaching approaches, the guide describes the sequential curriculum used with educable mentally retarded children in a residential setting. Arithmetic, language arts, science, and social studies are outlined separately for preprimary, primary, and intermediate levels. Vocational units…

  18. Resident Satisfaction and Its Components in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the direction and magnitude of the effects among the components of resident satisfaction in residential aged care and to examine if the relationships among satisfaction components vary according to facility type (i.e., nursing home and hostel). Briefly, a hostel is a low-care facility in which…

  19. Psychotropic Medication Management in a Residential Group Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spellman, Douglas F.; Griffith, Annette K.; Huefner, Jonathan C.; Wise, Neil, III; McElderry, Ellen; Leslie, Laurel K.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a psychotropic medication management approach that is used within a residential care program. The approach is used to assess medications at youths' times of entry and to facilitate decision making during care. Data from a typical case study have indicated that by making medication management decisions slowly, systematically,…

  20. The Child Welfare Profession's Perception of Residential Care for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Larry W.

    2008-01-01

    This research study explored the Child Welfare League of America's (CWLA) perception of residential care for children, as a reflection of the child welfare profession as a whole. A content analysis of CWLA's national conference programs and the journal "Child Welfare" from 1997 to 2006 found that the profession emphasizes family foster care and…

  1. Victim or Troublemaker? Young People in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Young people who live in residential care are caught between discourses of being a victim of abuse and inadequate care or being a troublemaker by their own conduct. Both discourses are rooted in the reasons for placement, and they will offer subject positions that are experienced as troubled. Repeated interviews with young people living in…

  2. Factors Associated with Abuse in Residential Child Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colton, Matthew

    2002-01-01

    Examines factors associated with abuse of children in residential child care institutions including: failings in staff recruitment, training, and supervision; ineffective management and accountability; development of inappropriate institutional cultures; public ambivalence toward children in care; slow response to threats posed to children in…

  3. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 4, Spring 2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Jennifer, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "Instrument for Assessing Behavioral Change" (David Colton); (2) "Comfort Rooms: Reducing the Need for Seclusion and Restraint" (Gayle Bluebird); (3) "Child Care Workers First in North Carolina to be Certified" (BCH Communications); and (4) "Should residential…

  4. Songs for Residential Outdoor Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Diane, Comp.

    A collection of songs for residential outdoor education programs gives the lyrics to 42 recent and traditonal songs. Recent songs include "Leaving on a Jet Plane,""Blowin' in the Wind,""Country Roads,""Last Thing on My Mind,""City of New Orleans,""Me and Bobby McGee,""Moon River," and "I Shall be Released." Modern folk songs included are "Jamaica…

  5. Children and Residential Experiences: A Comprehensive Strategy for Implementing a Research-Informed Program Model for Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Martha J.; Izzo, Charles; Nunno, Michael; Smith, Elliott G.; Endres, Thomas; Holden, Jack C.; Kuhn, Frank

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an effort to bridge research and practice in residential care through implementing a program model titled Children and Residential Experiences (CARE). The strategy involves consulting at all levels of the organization to guide personnel to incorporate CARE evidence-based principles into daily practice, and fostering an…

  6. Education in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Blust, Linda

    2005-02-01

    Palliative care education includes the domains of pain and nonpain symptom management, communications skills, ethics and law, psychosocial care, and health systems. Defining key attitudes, knowledge, and skill objectives, and matching these to appropriate learning formats, is essential in educational planning. Abundant educational resource material is available to support classroom and experiential palliative care training. PMID:15639043

  7. Factors Influencing Residents' Satisfaction in Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Shu-Chiung; Boldy, Duncan P.; Lee, Andy H.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to identify the important factors influencing residents' satisfaction in residential aged care and to provide a better understanding of their interrelationships. Design and Methods: A cross-sectional survey design was used to collect the required information, including resident satisfaction, resident dependency…

  8. A National Study of Residential Care for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mor, Vincent; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A national survey of Residential Care Home programs revealed that most facilities were family owned and operated. A provider survey revealed that homes regulated by departments of health were more institutional than were homes regulated by integrated, social service departments. Elderly residents had high satisfaction. (Author/ABB)

  9. Risk Profiles of Children Entering Residential Care: A Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald W.; Reid, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Children in residential care are a heterogeneous population, presenting various combinations of risks. Existing studies on these children suggest high variability across multiple domains (e.g., academics, behavior). Given this heterogeneity, it is important to begin to identify the combinations and patterns of multiple risks, or risk profiles,…

  10. Fresh Thinking about Families: A View from Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garfat, Thom

    2011-01-01

    Historically there has been a huge gulf between families and residential programs serving their children. This contradicted classic studies showing that family involvement is the cornerstone for successful outcomes with children in out-of-home care. But in spite of frequent early calls for such inclusion, the family was historically considered to…

  11. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 4, Spring 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Emily, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). The Child Welfare League of America is the nation's oldest and largest membership-based child welfare organization. It is committed to engaging people everywhere in promoting the wellbeing of children, youth, and their families, and…

  12. Communication Supports in Congregate Residential Care Settings in Ohio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Pamela R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Communication skills are important to the pursuit of increased self-determination in individuals with disabilities. The aim of this investigation was to gather information about communication supports in state-run residential care facilities in Ohio, and to compare findings with a previous investigation on this topic examining such…

  13. Compassionate Accountability in Residential Care: A Trauma Informed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimmarusti, Rocco A.; Gamero, Soe L.

    2009-01-01

    This article examines techniques for holding youth in residential care accountable for their behavior. Based on the use of trauma treatment theory, the authors believe that holding one accountable can actually be conceptualized and put into practice as a nurturing operation. For traumatized individuals, more traditional approaches to…

  14. Shifting Gears: From Coercion to Respect in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Leslie T.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Hall Youth Services (CHYS), a residential foster-care provider in Bismarck, North Dakota, desired to move from an adult-centered, punitive program model to a strength-based model with an emphasis on teaching critical life skills and behaviors to young clients. Through a partnership with the Teel Institute of Kansas City, Missouri, the…

  15. Residential Child Care Institutions (RCCI) Food Services Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho State Dept. of Education, Boise.

    This food manual for small Idaho residential child care institutions with 10-15 students and no full-time cook, is designed to help directors serve meals that promote healthy eating behavior in their residents, serve meals that meet the USDA's Healthy School Meals Initiative, and manage the food service to assure the fiscal integrity of the…

  16. Predicting the Academic Functioning of Youth Involved in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Annette K.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Epstein, Michael H.; Garbin, Calvin P.; Pick, Robert; Wright, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    Youth involved in residential care programs present with significant difficulties across behavioral and mental health domains. Although this is a group that is also at considerable risk for academic failure, very little research has been done to understand the academic functioning of this population. The current study sought to expand what is…

  17. The Family Characteristics of Youth Entering a Residential Care Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Annette K.; Ingram, Stephanie D.; Barth, Richard P.; Trout, Alexandra L.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Thompson, Ronald W.; Epstein, Michael H.

    2009-01-01

    Although much is known about the mental health and behavioral functioning of youth who enter residential care programs, very little research has focused on examining the family characteristics of this population. Knowledge about family characteristics is important, however, as it can aid in tailoring programs to meet the needs of families who are…

  18. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 5, Number 2, Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkwood, Scott, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "Residential Group Care Quarterly" contains the following articles: (1) "Achieving Better Outcomes for Children and Families: Reducing the Use of Restraint and Seclusion" (Katherine Johnson); (2) "STAR Project Outcomes" (Nancy Campbell); (3) "The Devereux Glenholme School" (Mary Guilfoile); (4) "Lessons Learned in the Reduction of…

  19. Residential Group Care Quarterly. Volume 7, Number 3, Winter 2007

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shenk, Emily, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    "Residential Group Care Quarterly" is published four times a year by the Child Welfare League of America (CWLA). This issue contains the following articles: (1) Building a Lasting Agency: The Leadership Institute (Letitia Howland); (2) For Our Safety: Examining High-Risk Interventions for Children and Youth (Michael A. Nunno, Lloyd Bullard, and…

  20. Treatment Foster Care in a System of Care: Sequences and Correlates of Residential Placements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Wagner, H. Ryan; Burns, Barbara J.; Richards, Jesse T.

    2003-01-01

    We examined Treatment Foster Care (TFC) in residential trajectories for youth with psychiatric disorders and aggressive behavior. We analyzed residential placements of a statewide sample of youth during the 12 months preceding and following admission to TFC. Prior to TFC, the majority of youth were residing in more restrictive settings (group…

  1. 38 CFR 17.65 - Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... approvals of community residential care facilities. 17.65 Section 17.65 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Community Residential Care § 17.65 Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities. (a) An approval of a facility meeting all...

  2. 38 CFR 17.65 - Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... or more of the standards in 38 CFR 17.63 for the approval of a particular community residential care... approvals of community residential care facilities. 17.65 Section 17.65 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Community Residential Care § 17.65 Approvals...

  3. 38 CFR 17.65 - Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... approvals of community residential care facilities. 17.65 Section 17.65 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL Community Residential Care § 17.65 Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities. (a) An approval of a facility meeting all...

  4. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  5. 29 CFR 778.601 - Special overtime provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... residential care establishments under section 7(j). 778.601 Section 778.601 Labor Regulations Relating to... provisions available for hospital and residential care establishments under section 7(j). (a) The statutory provision. Section 7(j) of the Act provides, for hospital and residential care establishment...

  6. The Transition Status of Youth Departing Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, Kathryn J.; Reid, Robert; Trout, Alexandra L.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the characteristics related to a successful reintegration among youth from a residential facility. Specifically, this study describes the transition skills of youth at departure in five areas: (a) education and employment goals, (b) self-determination skills, (c) social support, (d) life skills, and (e) hopefulness. Further,…

  7. The Education of Youth in DFY Residential Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Div. for Youth, Albany.

    This report describes educational programs at New York State Division for Youth (DFY) residential facilities. It provides an overview of the services offered to prepare adjudicated youth for successful return to the community. The Division's residential education services encourage student growth in cognitive, affective, and vocational skill…

  8. Impediments to applying the 'dignity of risk' principle in residential aged care services.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph E; Davis, Marie-Claire

    2013-09-01

    This discussion paper identifies four core factors currently impeding the application of the dignity of risk principle in residential aged care settings in Victoria, Australia: the fluctuating decision-making ability of residents; multiple participants in decision-making; discordance between espoused values and actions; and confusion and fear around legal responsibilities of care providers. Potential solutions identified include a conceptual shift in approach and consensus between key stakeholders, as well as more tangible solutions such as education and point-of-care decision support tools. PMID:24028460

  9. The role of social pedagogy in the training of residential child care workers.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robin

    2006-03-01

    A requirement for most people working in residential child care in Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands is a qualification in social pedagogy. Social pedagogy is not narrowly concerned with a child's schooling but relates to the whole child - body, mind and spirit. This article describes the first social pedagogy course to be introduced and professionally recognized in the UK: the BA in Curative Education Programme. This 4-year programme blurs the line between 'classroom learning' and 'learning in practice'. A unique feature of the programme is that most students 'live the course' in residential care communities for children or adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The life-sharing aspect of the programme ensures that the principles of dignity, value and mutual respect can be meaningfully translated into practice. The social pedagogic model presents a timely challenge to current care philosophy and practice. PMID:16495325

  10. Residential Education as an Option for At-Risk Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beker, Jerome, Ed.; Magnuson, Douglas, Ed.

    Residential treatment centers have always steered a course between bureaucracy and anarchy. The conventional professional wisdom in the United States holds that residential group care programs for children and youth are intrinsically flawed. This volume seeks to remedy this perception by making a case for the adoption of Israeli and European…

  11. Reporting and Charting Residents' Behaviors and Care in an Adult Residential Care Home. Adult Residential Care Home 12, Lesson Plan No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basuel, Terry

    Designed as part of a 40-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCH's), this lesson plan was developed to explain the importance of and correct procedures for charting (i.e., keeping a written record of observations and care of ARCH residents). The objectives of the 50-minute lesson are to enable students to: (1) list reasons why the…

  12. Middle Class Education Strategies and Residential Segregation in Athens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloutas, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This paper uses census data to investigate educational inequality in different types of residential areas in Athens, focusing on drop-out rates from secondary education, access to higher education and to particular degrees within it. The unequal socio-spatial distribution of educational attainment is linked to antagonistic middle class education…

  13. 25 CFR 20.508 - What must the social services agency do when a child is placed in foster care, residential care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... placed in foster care, residential care or guardianship home? 20.508 Section 20.508 Indians BUREAU OF... placed in foster care, residential care or guardianship home? The social services agency must make efforts to secure child support for the child in foster care or residential care through a court...

  14. Comparative Costs of Home Care and Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chappell, Neena L.; Havens, Betty; Honorary, Dlitt; Hollander, Marcus J.; Miller, Jo Ann; McWilliam, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on Canadian research that examined the cost effectiveness of home care for seniors as a substitute for long-term institutional services. Design and Methods: Two Canadian cities were included in the research: Victoria, British Columbia, and Winnipeg, Manitoba. The research computes the costs of formal care and informal…

  15. Educating for integrated care

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samia

    2012-01-01

    In September 2012 the North West London Integrated Care Plot held a conference for clinical educators. The aim was to reach a consensus about what learning clinical staff needed in order to contribute to an integrated care system. The conference was attended by 81 clinical educators from a range of backgrounds. The participants decided that competence in the following three domains was essential: 1. Patient and user engagement and empowerment. 2. Collaboration with other health and social care professionals. 3. Leading improvement in the system of care. Educational interventions to facilitate learning should wherever possible be interprofessional, team based and experiential. The views of patients, carers and users should inform the education. Assessment should take into account real-life performance through multi-source feedback and observed practice. Evaluation of the educational intervention should take into account any impact on the patient and user experience as well as clinical outcome measures. PMID:25949668

  16. Looking beyond the Residential Education and Distance Education Debate, What Matters in Education Is . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bediako Asare, Kwame

    2014-01-01

    The value of education is widely acknowledged. Evidence from literature indicates that some perceptions or rather misconceptions are expressed about distance education visà- vis traditional, residential education particularly in higher education institutions (HEIs). In this article, the author offers some reflections on traditional education and…

  17. Building Bridges between the School and the Home: Understanding the Literacy Practices of Children Living in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jennifer Poh Sim

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that children in residential care fall behind at school. This proves a great challenge for educators who have to cater to the students' needs to ensure no one is left behind. Studies investigating family literacy practices of different social classes show a positive implication if the home literacy practices are…

  18. Cooperative Programs in Residential Outdoor Environmental Education: Teacher's Materials Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin County Superintendent of Schools, Corte Madera, CA.

    Serving as teacher orientation materials for the cooperative programs in residential outdoor education located in Marin County, California, this guide includes the following: (1) "This I Believe" (a philosophical statement on outdoor environmental education); (2) "Outdoor Science and Conservation Education Report" (a brief history of outdoor…

  19. Citizenship Education as an Educational Outcome for Young People in Care: A Phenomenological Account

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiteri, Damian

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study presents a retrospective analysis of how a cohort of young men, who as boys were assigned to residential care in Malta, perceive the citizenship education that they received while "in care" as having empowered them--as boys, adolescents, and eventually as young adults. Rather than focusing on citizenship education that is…

  20. Moral Education and Caring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    2010-01-01

    Michael Slote's very interesting work on moral sentimentalism and moral education raises some important questions on the meaning of empathy, the limitations of "inductions", and the development of moral education from the perspective of care ethics. These questions are addressed in this commentary. (Contains 5 notes.)

  1. Securing the Downside Up: Client and Care Factors Associated with Outcomes of Secure Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harder, Annemiek T.; Knorth, Erik J.; Kalverboer, Margrite E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although secure residential care has the potential of reducing young people's behavioral problems, it is often difficult to achieve positive outcomes. Research suggests that there are several common success factors of treatment, of which the client's motivation for treatment and the quality of the therapeutic relationship between…

  2. Essential Skills for the Care Team. A Program for New Employees in Residential and Home Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany. Rockefeller Coll.

    This document contains modules for two types of training. It provides 20 hours of training to newly hired Nursing Assistant Trainees (NATs) in residential care settings preparing to become state Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs), using eight stand-alone modules supported by training process guides. It also includes 7 hours of training for newly…

  3. Neighbourhood Based Residential Child Care: A Local Residential Child Care Unit as a Resource for Integrated and Flexible Child and Family Care in Dublin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilligan, Robbie

    A pioneering residential child care project in inner city Dublin began operations in July 1981. The project was designed to function as a resource for seriously deprived or at-risk children and their families. The community served is one characterized by exceptionally high unemployment, a 10 percent rate of heroin addiction among local 15- to…

  4. Integrated working between residential care homes and primary care: a survey of care homes in England

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Older people living in care homes in England have complex health needs due to a range of medical conditions, mental health needs and frailty. Despite an increasing policy expectation that professionals should operate in an integrated way across organisational boundaries, there is a lack of understanding between care homes and the National Health Service (NHS) about how the two sectors should work together, meaning that residents can experience a poor "fit" between their needs, and services they can access. This paper describes a survey to establish the current extent of integrated working that exists between care homes and primary and community health and social services. Methods A self-completion, online questionnaire was designed by the research team. Items on the different dimensions of integration (funding, administrative, organisational, service delivery, clinical care) were included. The survey was sent to a random sample of residential care homes with more than 25 beds (n = 621) in England in 2009. Responses were analysed using quantitative and qualitative methods. Results The survey achieved an overall response rate of 15.8%. Most care homes (78.7%) worked with more than one general practice. Respondents indicated that a mean of 14.1 professionals/ services (other than GPs) had visited the care homes in the last six months (SD 5.11, median 14); a mean of .39 (SD.163) professionals/services per bed. The most frequent services visiting were district nursing, chiropody and community psychiatric nurses. Many (60%) managers considered that they worked with the NHS in an integrated way, including sharing documents, engaging in integrated care planning and joint learning and training. However, some care home managers cited working practices dictated by NHS methods of service delivery and priorities for care, rather than those of the care home or residents, a lack of willingness by NHS professionals to share information, and low levels of respect for

  5. Young People's Satisfaction with Residential Care: Identifying Strengths and Weaknesses in Service Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwell, Jenni; Fraser, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a landmark Australian study investigating the experiences and perspectives of young people in residential care. Data from a representative sample are analyzed to identify young people's satisfaction with various aspects of their residential care experience: their sense of safety, normality, support, comfort in…

  6. Residential Care for Youth in the Child Welfare System: Stop-Gap Option or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Sigrid S.; Zhang, Jin Jin; Landsverk, John

    2012-01-01

    This study provides national estimates for length of stay in residential care and examines within-group variability along salient predictors. Using data from the National Study on Child and Adolescent Well-Being, the sample included 254 youth with episodes in residential care. Descriptive analyses provided estimates for length of stay over the…

  7. Attachment Style, Home-Leaving Age and Behavioral Problems among Residential Care Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shechory, Mally; Sommerfeld, Eliane

    2007-01-01

    In a prospective study, the attachment style, home-leaving age, length of time in residential care, and behavioral problems among Israeli residential care children (N=68), were studied. Data analyses showed that children removed from their homes at a later age suffered from higher levels of anxiety, depression and social problems compared to…

  8. A Challenging Job: Physical and Sexual Violence towards Group Workers in Youth Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alink, Lenneke R. A.; Euser, Saskia; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Residential or group care social workers appear to be at increased risk for experiencing physical violence at work. However, little is known about "sexual harassment" in addition to physical victimization of social workers in "youth" residential or group care. Objective We investigated the prevalence of physical and…

  9. Children in Residential Care: Development and Validation of a Group Climate Instrument

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strijbosch, E. L. L.; van der Helm, G. H. P.; van Brandenburg, M. E. T.; Mecking, M.; Wissink, I. B.; Stams, G. J. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This study describes the development and validation of the Group Climate Instrument for Children aged 8 to 15 years (GCIC 8-15), which purports to measure the quality of group climate in residential care. Methods: A confirmatory factor analysis was performed on data of 117 children in Dutch residential youth care. Reliability analysis was…

  10. The Experience of Living with Dementia in Residential Care: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clare, Linda; Rowlands, Julia; Bruce, Errollyn; Surr, Claire; Downs, Murna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The subjective psychological experience of people with moderate to severe dementia living in residential care is insufficiently understood. In the present study we aimed to explore the subjective experience of life with dementia in residential care from the perspective of the person with dementia, and to understand the psychological…

  11. Observations of Group Care Worker-Child Interaction in Residential Youth Care: Pedagogical Interventions and Child Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastiaanssen, Inge L. W.; Delsing, Marc J. M. H.; Geijsen, Luuk; Kroes, Gert; Veerman, Jan W.; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The work of group care workers in residential youth care is often described as professional parenting. Pedagogical interventions of group care workers influence the quality of care for looked-after children. Objective: The aim of the current study was to observe the pedagogical interventions of group care workers within residential…

  12. [The Relationship Between Burnout Symptoms and Work Satisfaction Among Child Welfare Workers in Residential Care].

    PubMed

    Steinlin, Célia; Dölitzsch, Claudia; Fischer, Sophia; Schmeck, Klaus; Fegert, Jörg M; Schmid, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Working in residential care is associated with high demands and high stress. As a result, employees may develop symptoms of burnout. These symptoms lead to absence from work and have a negative effect on the continuity and quality of the residential care. Until now, little is known about burnout risks in child welfare workers, although children and adolescents are especially dependent on continuous relationships and healthy caregivers. A better understanding of the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction may help to identify starting points for prevention and intervention. The present study assessed symptoms of burnout in a sample of 319 social education workers in residential care in Switzerland using the burnout-screening-scales (BOSS). Work satisfaction was assessed with a newly developed questionnaire based on concepts of trauma-sensitive care. The questionnaire was tested for reliability and factorial validity in the present study. In order to estimate the relationship between burnout symptoms and work satisfaction, correlations and relative risks were calculated. Almost one fifth (18 %) of the sample showed a risk of burnout. The principal component analysis of the questionnaire on work satisfaction revealed four factors: support by superiors, participation and transparency; communication and support within the team; gratification in the work; and institutional structures and resources. All four factors as well as the total score showed significant correlations with burnout symptoms. Among employees with a comparably lower work satisfaction, the risk of burnout was 5.4 times higher than among employees with a comparably higher work satisfaction. It is discussed how work satisfaction could be promoted and how, as a result, the quality and continuity of care for the children and adolescents could be improved. PMID:26947529

  13. Memories as Useful Outcomes of Residential Outdoor Environmental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liddicoat, Kendra R.; Krasny, Marianne E.

    2014-01-01

    Residential outdoor environmental education (ROEE) programs for youth have been shown to yield lasting autobiographical episodic memories. This article explores how past program participants have used such memories, and draws on the memory psychology literature to offer a new perspective on the long-term impacts of environmental education.…

  14. Optimising nutrition in residential aged care: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ekta; Marshall, Skye; Miller, Michelle; Isenring, Elisabeth

    2016-10-01

    In developed countries the prevalence of protein-energy malnutrition increases with age and multi-morbidities increase nutritional risk in aged care residents in particular. This paper presents a narrative review of the current literature on the identification, prevalence, associated risk factors, consequences, and management of malnutrition in the residential aged care (RAC) setting. We performed searches of English-language publications on Medline, PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane Library from January 1, 1990 to November 25, 2015. We found that, on average, half of all residents in aged care are malnourished as a result of factors affecting appetite, dietary intake and nutrient absorption. Malnutrition is associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes, including increased risk of infections, falls, pressure ulcers and hospital admissions, all of which can lead to increased health care costs and poorer quality of life. A number of food and nutrition strategies have demonstrated positive nutritional and clinical outcomes in the RAC setting. These strategies extend beyond simply enhancing the nutritional value of foods and hence necessitate the involvement of a range of committed stakeholders. Implementing a nutritional protocol in RAC facilities that comprises routine nutrition screening, assessment, appropriate nutrition intervention, including attention to food service systems, and monitoring by a multidisciplinary team can help prevent decline in residents' nutritional status. Food and nutritional issues should be identified early and managed on admission and regularly in the RAC setting. PMID:27621242

  15. Grey spaces: The wheeled fields of residential care

    PubMed Central

    Mortenson, W. Ben; Oliffe, John L.; Miller, William C.; Backman, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals living in residential care use a wheelchair as their primary means of mobility. Although studies have documented challenges encountered by residents in these facilities, few have addressed the role that wheelchairs, as potential enablers and barriers to mobility and participation, play in their lives. To better understand residents’ experiences, an ethnographic study was conducted drawing on Bourdieu’s theoretical constructs of capital, field, and habitus. Participant observations were conducted at two facilities and residents, family members and staff took part in in-depth individual interviews. Our analysis revealed three themes. Ready to roll detailed how residents used wheelchairs as a source of comfort and means for expanding their social space, while staff could use them as a means to move and control some residents. Squeaky wheels described how residents solicited assistance from staff and family amid having to wait to perform activities of daily living. In, out and about revealed diversity in the places residents went, spaces they shared and the social activities in which they engaged inside and outside their residential facilities. The study findings emphasize how wheelchairs constitute capital that govern many fields of practice for residents and staff and suggest how practice and policy might be adjusted. PMID:21707660

  16. Job Satisfaction among Care Aides in Residential Long-Term Care: A Systematic Review of Contributing Factors, Both Individual and Organizational

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Janet E.; Hoben, Matthias; Linklater, Stefanie; Carleton, Heather L.; Graham, Nicole; Estabrooks, Carole A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature on professional nurses' job satisfaction, job satisfaction by nonprofessional nursing care providers and, in particular, in residential long-term care facilities, is sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence on which factors (individual and organizational) are associated with job satisfaction among care aides, nurse aides, and nursing assistants, who provide the majority of direct resident care, in residential long-term care facilities. Nine online databases were searched. Two authors independently screened, and extracted data and assessed the included publications for methodological quality. Decision rules were developed a priori to draw conclusions on which factors are important to care aide job satisfaction. Forty-two publications were included. Individual factors found to be important were empowerment and autonomy. Six additional individual factors were found to be not important: age, ethnicity, gender, education level, attending specialized training, and years of experience. Organizational factors found to be important were facility resources and workload. Two additional factors were found to be not important: satisfaction with salary/benefits and job performance. Factors important to care aide job satisfaction differ from those reported among hospital nurses, supporting the need for different strategies to improve care aide job satisfaction in residential long-term care. PMID:26345545

  17. Job Satisfaction among Care Aides in Residential Long-Term Care: A Systematic Review of Contributing Factors, Both Individual and Organizational.

    PubMed

    Squires, Janet E; Hoben, Matthias; Linklater, Stefanie; Carleton, Heather L; Graham, Nicole; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2015-01-01

    Despite an increasing literature on professional nurses' job satisfaction, job satisfaction by nonprofessional nursing care providers and, in particular, in residential long-term care facilities, is sparsely described. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the evidence on which factors (individual and organizational) are associated with job satisfaction among care aides, nurse aides, and nursing assistants, who provide the majority of direct resident care, in residential long-term care facilities. Nine online databases were searched. Two authors independently screened, and extracted data and assessed the included publications for methodological quality. Decision rules were developed a priori to draw conclusions on which factors are important to care aide job satisfaction. Forty-two publications were included. Individual factors found to be important were empowerment and autonomy. Six additional individual factors were found to be not important: age, ethnicity, gender, education level, attending specialized training, and years of experience. Organizational factors found to be important were facility resources and workload. Two additional factors were found to be not important: satisfaction with salary/benefits and job performance. Factors important to care aide job satisfaction differ from those reported among hospital nurses, supporting the need for different strategies to improve care aide job satisfaction in residential long-term care. PMID:26345545

  18. The need for a social revolution in residential care.

    PubMed

    Theurer, Kristine; Mortenson, W Ben; Stone, Robyn; Suto, Melinda; Timonen, Virpi; Rozanova, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Loneliness and depression are serious mental health concerns across the spectrum of residential care, from nursing homes to assisted and retirement living. Psychosocial care provided to residents to address these concerns is typically based on a long-standing tradition of 'light' social events, such as games, trips, and social gatherings, planned and implemented by staff. Although these activities provide enjoyment for some, loneliness and depression persist and the lack of resident input perpetuates the stereotype of residents as passive recipients of care. Residents continue to report lack of meaning in their lives, limited opportunities for contribution and frustration with paternalistic communication with staff. Those living with dementia face additional discrimination resulting in a range of unmet needs including lack of autonomy and belonging-both of which are linked with interpersonal violence. Research suggests, however, that programs fostering engagement and peer support provide opportunities for residents to be socially productive and to develop a valued social identity. The purpose of this paper is to offer a re-conceptualization of current practices. We argue that residents represent a largely untapped resource in our attempts to advance the quality of psychosocial care. We propose overturning practices that focus on entertainment and distraction by introducing a new approach that centers on resident contributions and peer support. We offer a model-Resident Engagement and Peer Support (REAP)-for designing interventions that advance residents' social identity, enhance reciprocal relationships and increase social productivity. This model has the potential to revolutionize current psychosocial practice by moving from resident care to resident engagement. PMID:26568229

  19. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to purchase or contract for room and board in licensed residential care facilities. (a) You can use...

  20. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT... in residential care facilities? You, the social service program, can use Child Assistance funds to purchase or contract for room and board in licensed residential care facilities. (a) You can use...

  1. Use of information technology for medication management in residential care facilities: correlates of facility characteristics.

    PubMed

    Bhuyan, Soumitra S; Chandak, Aastha; Powell, M Paige; Kim, Jungyoon; Shiyanbola, Olayinka; Zhu, He; Shiyanbola, Oyewale

    2015-06-01

    The effectiveness of information technology in resolving medication problems has been well documented. Long-term care settings such as residential care facilities (RCFs) may see the benefits of using such technologies in addressing the problem of medication errors among their resident population, who are usually older and have numerous chronic conditions. The aim of this study was two-fold: to examine the extent of use of Electronic Medication Management (EMM) in RCFs and to analyze the organizational factors associated with the use of EMM functionalities in RCFs. Data on RCFs were obtained from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The association between facility, director and staff, and resident characteristics of RCFs and adoption of four EMM functionalities was assessed through multivariate logistic regression. The four EMM functionalities included were maintaining lists of medications, ordering for prescriptions, maintaining active medication allergy lists, and warning of drug interactions or contraindications. About 12% of the RCFs adopted all four EMM functionalities. Additionally, maintaining lists of medications had the highest adoption rate (34.5%), followed by maintaining active medication allergy lists (31.6%), ordering for prescriptions (19.7%), and warning of drug interactions or contraindications (17.9%). Facility size and ownership status were significantly associated with adoption of all four EMM functionalities. Medicaid certification status, facility director's age, education and license status, and the use of personal care aides in the RCF were significantly associated with the adoption of some of the EMM functionalities. EMM is expected to improve the quality of care and patient safety in long-term care facilities including RCFs. The extent of adoption of the four EMM functionalities is relatively low in RCFs. Some RCFs may strategize to use these functionalities to cater to the increasing demands from the market and also to

  2. Residential Education in Israel. Report of the Israeli-American Seminar on "Out of School Education".

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapira, R., Ed.; And Others

    Issues and developments concerning the education of Israeli youth in residential schools are summarized in this report of a seminar which brought together educators from the United States and Israel. The first part of the report describes the residential school and gives its history as both part of a long tradition, and as it particularly evolved…

  3. Residential Segregation and the Availability of Primary Care Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, Darrell J; Dinwiddie, Gniesha Y; Chan, Kitty S; McCleary, Rachael R

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between residential segregation and geographic access to primary care physicians (PCPs) in metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs). Data Sources We combined zip code level data on primary care physicians from the 2006 American Medical Association master file with demographic, socioeconomic, and segregation measures from the 2000 U.S. Census. Our sample consisted of 15,465 zip codes located completely or partially in an MSA. Methods We defined PCP shortage areas as those zip codes with no PCP or a population to PCP ratio of >3,500. Using logistic regressions, we estimated the association between a zip code's odds of being a PCP shortage area and its minority composition and degree of segregation in its MSA. Principal Findings We found that odds of being a PCP shortage area were 67 percent higher for majority African American zip codes but 27 percent lower for majority Hispanic zip codes. The association varied with the degree of segregation. As the degree of segregation increased, the odds of being a PCP shortage area increased for majority African American zip codes; however, the converse was true for majority Hispanic and Asian zip codes. Conclusions Efforts to address PCP shortages should target African American communities especially in segregated MSAs. PMID:22524264

  4. Indian Residential Schools. A Research Study of the Child Care Programs of Nine Residential Schools in Saskatchewan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Doris

    The Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development Commissioned this study by the Canadian Welfare Council to examine child care programs in residential schools relative to their effect on the adaptation (present and projected) and adjustment of Indian students. Specific research variables were: (1) the institution, which was subdivided…

  5. Residential Environmental Education Center Program Evaluation: An Ongoing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourke, Nicholas; Buskist, Connie; Herron, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Residential environmental education centers (REECs) have been criticized for their lack of quality program evaluation. However, the last national study done on the practices of REECs was Chenery and Hammerman's (1985) research. This article presents the results of a national survey of directors of REECs (n = 114) that gives insight into the…

  6. RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTRES IN CANADA, A DIRECTORY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Association for Adult Education, Toronto (Ontario).

    CANADIAN RESIDENTIAL ADULT EDUCATION CENTERS ARE LISTED BY PROVINCE, WITH INFORMATION GIVEN ON THE CENTER NAME, ADDRESS, CONTACT OFFICE, SPONSORING ORGANIZATION, NUMBER ACCOMMODATED, USER DAYS IN 1965, TYPES OF PROGRAMS OFFERED, AND GENERAL COMMENTS. PROGRAMS TAILORED TO NEEDS CHARACTERIZE CANADIAN CENTERS. IT IS EXPECTED THAT AS PROVINCIAL…

  7. Does residential mobility improve educational outcomes? Evidence from the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Haelermans, Carla; De Witte, Kristof

    2015-07-01

    This paper explores the impact of residential mobility on educational outcomes. By considering a large Dutch city with substantial internal residential mobility, we examine how residential mobility influences the decision of students to drop out of school. The paper exploits a rich administrative dataset with extensive information on educational, individual, family, housing and moving characteristics of students. It combines a matching design with a multivariate regression analysis, such that the evaluation draws on a well-comparable control group for the treated students. Accounting for individual, family, educational, neighborhood and housing characteristics, as well as for school and year fixed effects, we observe that residential mobility increases the probability of school dropout in the first few years after moving. The estimated effect changes, however, to a lower risk of early school leaving after an initial period, and then changes again to a higher risk after 6years. This effect remains, regardless the level of education the students attended, or whether the student moves to a better or a worse neighborhood. PMID:26004467

  8. Compassion Fatigue Risk and Self-Care Practices among Residential Treatment Center Childcare Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastwood, Callum D.; Ecklund, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    Exploration of the presence of risk for compassion fatigue among residential childcare workers (RCW) at residential treatment facilities and the relationship between self-care practices and compassion fatigue were explored. Using the Professional Quality of Life Survey (ProQOL-R III) to assess compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion…

  9. What Do They Do at Home? The Literacies of Children Living in Residential Care in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an ethnographic study of the out of school literacy practices of children living in residential care in Malaysia. Although residential homes generate much publicity, especially during the festive seasons, not much is known about the children living within the confines of these homes. Even more lacking is research on their…

  10. The Academic, Behavioral, and Mental Health Status of Children and Youth at Entry to Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Hagaman, Jessica L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Gehringer, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.; Reid, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Often considered a "last resort placement," residential settings serve a broad range of children who present significant risks. While much is known about emotional and behavioral functioning, less is known about academic strengths and limitations. This study evaluated 127 children at intake into a residential care program to determine demographic,…

  11. Redefining Residential: Family-Driven Care in Residential Treatment--Family Members Speak

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Residential Treatment for Children & Youth, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This is the sixth in a series of papers issued by the American Association of Children's Residential Centers (AACRC) regarding emerging and best practices in the field of residential treatment for children, youth, and families. AACRC is a long standing national association focused exclusively on practice and policy issues related to the provision…

  12. 25 CFR 20.508 - What must the social services agency do when a child is placed in foster care, residential care...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... placed in foster care, residential care or guardianship home? 20.508 Section 20.508 Indians BUREAU OF... PROGRAMS Child Assistance Foster Care § 20.508 What must the social services agency do when a child is placed in foster care, residential care or guardianship home? The social services agency must...

  13. Validation of the symptoms and functioning severity scale in residential group care.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Matthew C; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Gross, Thomas J; Epstein, Michael H; Stevens, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    Tests that measure the emotional and behavioral problems of children and youth are typically not normed and standardized on youth diagnosed with disruptive behavior, particularly those youth in residential care. Yet professional standards mandate that before instruments are used with a specific population the psychometric properties need to be studied and re-established: specifically, psychometric properties, including validity, need to be evaluated (AERA, APA, and NCME, The standards for educational and psychological testing. AERA, Washington, DC, 1999). The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity characteristics of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman et al., Manual of the Peabody Treatment Progress Battery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 2010), a widely used test developed for use in outpatient clinics, with youth in a residential care program. The convergent validity of the SFSS was established with the large correlations (0.78-0.86) with the CBCL. Several binary classification analyses including specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and the Youden Index supported the validity of the SFSS. However, the sensitivity index was somewhat low indicating the test may produce a high level of false negatives. Limitations, future research and implications are discussed. PMID:25037614

  14. Supporting residents’ expression of sexuality: the initial construction of a sexuality assessment tool for residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sexuality is a key component of quality of life and well-being and a need to express one’s sexuality continues into old age. Staff and families in residential aged care facilities often find expressions of sexuality by residents, particularly those living with dementia, challenging and facilities often struggle to address individuals’ needs in this area. This paper describes the development of an assessment tool which enables residential aged care facilities to identify how supportive their organisation is of all residents’ expression of their sexuality, and thereby improve where required. Methods Multi-phase design using qualitative methods and a Delphi technique. Tool items were derived from the literature and verified by qualitative interviews with aged care facility staff, residents and families. The final item pool was confirmed via a reactive Delphi process. Results A final item pool of sixty-nine items grouped into seven key areas allows facilities to score their compliance with the areas identified as being supportive of older people’s expression of their sexuality in a residential aged care environment. Conclusions The sexuality assessment tool (SexAT) guides practice to support the normalization of sexuality in aged care homes and assists facilities to identify where enhancements to the environment, policies, procedures and practices, information and education/training are required. The tool also enables facilities to monitor initiatives in these areas over time. PMID:24980463

  15. Residential and Health Care Transition Patterns among Older Medicare Beneficiaries over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Masayo; Shaffer, Thomas; Arbaje, Alicia I.; Zuckerman, Ilene H.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To describe annual care transition patterns across residential and health care settings and assess consistency in care transition patterns across years. Design and Methods: This retrospective cohort study used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (2000-2005). The sample comprised beneficiaries aged 65 years and older (N = 57,684…

  16. Learning opportunities in a residential aged care facility: the role of supported placements for first-year nursing students.

    PubMed

    Lea, Emma; Marlow, Annette; Bramble, Marguerite; Andrews, Sharon; Crisp, Elaine; Eccleston, Claire; Mason, Ron; Robinson, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    The residential aged care sector is reportedly a less attractive career choice for nursing students than other sectors. Research shows that students are often fearful of working with residents with dementia when they are inadequately supported on clinical placements by aged care staff. Thirty first-year nursing students attended a 2-week placement in one of two Tasmanian aged care facilities as part of the Wicking Dementia Research and Education Centre Teaching Aged Care Facilities Program, which aims to provide students with a quality aged care placement focusing on dementia palliation. Placement experience and dementia knowledge were evaluated through preplacement and postplacement questionnaires and weekly feedback meetings with mentors and students. Students had more positive attitudes related to aged care and higher dementia knowledge at the end of placement. Students described their interactions with residents with dementia and thought that the placement had increased their capacity to provide quality care to these residents. The findings indicate that residential aged care placements can be productive learning environments for novice nursing students. PMID:24972402

  17. Quality of advance care planning policy and practice in residential aged care facilities in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Silvester, William; Fullam, Rachael S; Parslow, Ruth A; Lewis, Virginia J; Sjanta, Rebekah; Jackson, Lynne; White, Vanessa; Gilchrist, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To assess existing advance care planning (ACP) practices in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) in Victoria, Australia before a systematic intervention; to assess RACF staff experience, understanding of and attitudes towards ACP. Design Surveys of participating organisations concerning ACP-related policies and procedures, review of existing ACP-related documentation, and pre-intervention survey of RACF staff covering their role, experiences and attitudes towards ACP-related procedures. Setting 19 selected RACFs in Victoria. Participants 12 aged care organisations (representing 19 RACFs) who provided existing ACP-related documentation for review, 12 RACFs who completed an organisational survey and 45 staff (from 19 RACFs) who completed a pre-intervention survey of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. Results Findings suggested that some ACP-related practices were already occurring in RACFs; however, these activities were inconsistent and variable in quality. Six of the 12 responding RACFs had written policies and procedures for ACP; however, none of the ACP-related documents submitted covered all information required to meet ACP best practice. Surveyed staff had limited experience of ACP, and discrepancies between self reported comfort, and levels of knowledge and confidence to undertake ACP-related activities, indicated a need for training and ongoing organisational support. Conclusions Surveyed organisations â policies and procedures related to ACP were limited and the quality of existing documentation was poor. RACF staff had relatively limited experience in developing advance care plans with facility residents, although attitudes were positive. A systematic approach to the implementation of ACP in residential aged care settings is required to ensure best practice is implemented and sustained. PMID:24644755

  18. Integrated Payment And Delivery Models Offer Opportunities And Challenges For Residential Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Grabowski, David C; Caudry, Daryl J; Dean, Katie M; Stevenson, David G

    2015-10-01

    Under health care reform, new financing and delivery models are being piloted to integrate health and long-term care services for older adults. Programs using these models generally have not included residential care facilities. Instead, most of them have focused on long-term care recipients in the community or the nursing home. Our analyses indicate that individuals living in residential care facilities have similarly high rates of chronic illness and Medicare utilization when compared with matched individuals in the community and nursing home, and rates of functional dependency that fall between those of their counterparts in the other two settings. These results suggest that the residential care facility population could benefit greatly from models that coordinated health and long-term care services. However, few providers have invested in the infrastructure needed to support integrated delivery models. Challenges to greater care integration include the private-pay basis for residential care facility services, which precludes shared savings from reduced Medicare costs, and residents' preference for living in a home-like, noninstitutional environment. PMID:26438740

  19. An Examination of Health Profile, Service Use and Care Needs of Older Adults in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aminzadeh, F.; Salziel, William B.; Molnar, F. J.; Alie, J.

    2004-01-01

    Private, unregulated residential care facilities have become an increasingly important component of the continuum of housing and care for frail older adults in Canada. To date, this growing segment of the older population has received very little research attention. This study involved an in-depth examination of the functional/health profile,…

  20. 29 CFR 516.23 - Employees of hospitals and residential care facilities compensated for overtime work on the basis...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employees of hospitals and residential care facilities... Exemptions Under the Act; Other Special Requirements § 516.23 Employees of hospitals and residential care... Act. With respect to each employee of hospitals and institutions primarily engaged in the care of...

  1. What Does It Mean to Be an Adult? Perceptions of Young Men in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raymond, Ivan; Heseltine, Karen

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that young people residing in residential care transition to independence and adult responsibilities earlier than peers living within their family of origin. There has been a lack of literature examining the way young people in care construct this transition. In response, in-depth qualitative interviews, guided by grounded…

  2. Residential Treatment of Substance Abusing Adolescents: Trends in the Post-Managed Care Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacMaster, Samuel A.; Ellis, Rodney A.; Cooper, Lyle

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores historical and recent trends in the delivery of residential adolescent substance abuse treatment, looking specifically at the impact of managed care on the service delivery system. Three historical eras are conceptualized by the authors: (1) an era prior to managed care in which services were provided on a fee for service basis…

  3. Increasing the Efficiency of Program Status Reporting by Residential Direct Care Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastien, James S.; Burns, William J.; Kelly, Francis D.; Schumm, Patricia A.; Allen, Theresa P.

    2005-01-01

    In large residential treatment centers for adolescent youth, program administrators and clinical staff rely on the information imparted to them by direct care staff to make appropriate decisions regarding administrative and clinical support functions so that the residents in care can receive the best treatment possible. This study was designed to…

  4. Implementation of a Program of Outcomes Research in Residential Care Settings: Outcomes for Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portwood, Sharon G.; Boyd, A. Suzanne; Murdock, Tamera B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a need to examine behavioral and mental health outcomes for children in out-of-home care across settings. Objective: Using a participatory research approach, researchers and agency personnel aimed to implement a program of scientific outcomes research in residential care settings. Data were used to examine children's…

  5. Choosing Home or Residential Care: A Guide for Families of Children with Severe Physical Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Marilyn; Kahn, Paul

    This guide is designed to help families identify and explore common questions, concerns, and dilemmas as they consider the advantages and drawbacks of raising a child with severe physical disabilities at home or arranging for care in a residential program. Chapters address: (1) options for the care of children with severe physical disabilities in…

  6. Measuring Therapeutic Alliance with Children in Residential Treatment and Therapeutic Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roest, Jesse; van der Helm, Peer; Strijbosch, Eefje; van Brandenburg, Mariëtte; Stams, Geert Jan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined the construct validity and reliability of a therapeutic alliance measure (Children's Alliance Questionnaire [CAQ]) for children with psychosocial and/or behavioral problems, receiving therapeutic residential care or day care in the Netherlands. Methods: Confirmatory factor analysis of a one-factor model ''therapeutic…

  7. Prevalence of Weight Problems among Youth with High-Incidence Disabilities in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Lambert, Matthew C.; Nelson, Timothy D.; Thompson, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of weight problems among youth in general and youth in out-of-home care has been well documented; however, the prevalence of obesity/overweight among youth with high-incidence disabilities in more restrictive settings, such as residential care, has not been assessed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of…

  8. An Empirical Typology of Residential Care/Assisted Living Based on a Four-State Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Nan Sook; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Sloane, Philip D.; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Eckert, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living describes diverse facilities providing non-nursing home care to a heterogeneous group of primarily elderly residents. This article derives typologies of assisted living based on theoretically and practically grounded evidence. Design and Methods: We obtained data from the Collaborative Studies of Long-Term…

  9. Children in Residential Group Care with No Family Ties: Facing Existential Aloneness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dvir, Orly; Weiner, Anita; Kupermintz, Hagai

    2012-01-01

    The issue of children living in residential group care in Israel completely without family ties is studied in order to explore the feelings of staff and uncover possible characteristics of these children. Data were collected through focus groups, questionnaires, and life stories of children who left group care at 18 years of age. Results reveal…

  10. School Functioning of Children in Residential Care: The Contributions of Multilevel Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study, using an ecological approach, examines the relationships between problems in school functioning (including academic and behavior problems) of children in residential care with a number of variables describing the child and the care setting. Methods: The study reports on 4,061 children and youth (ages 6-20) in 54 Israeli…

  11. Interprofessional Education in Neonatal Care.

    PubMed

    Kenner, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education is not a new concept. Yet, the operationalization of interprofessional education with related competencies for collaborative team-based practice in neonatal units is often difficult. Changes in healthcare with an emphasis on patient-focused care and the concern for patient safety and quality care are accelerating the need for more interprofessional education. This article briefly outlines the evolution of interprofessional education to support collaborative team-based practice and how that facilitates safety and quality care in neonatal units. PMID:27465448

  12. An innovative educational program for residential energy efficiency. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Laquatra, J.; Chi, P.S.K.

    1996-09-01

    Recognizing the importance of energy conservation, under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy, Cornell University conducted a research and demonstration project entitled An Innovative Educational Program for Residential Energy Efficiency. The research project examined the amount of residential energy that can be saved through changes in behavior and practices of household members. To encourage these changes, a workshop was offered to randomly-selected households in New York State. Two surveys were administered to household participants (Survey 1 and Survey 2, Appendix A) and a control group; and a manual was developed to convey many easy but effective ways to make a house more energy efficient (see Residential Manual, Appendix B). Implementing methods of energy efficiency will help reduce this country`s dependence on foreign energy sources and will also reduce the amount of money that is lost on inefficient energy use. Because Cornell Cooperative Extension operates as a component of the land-grant university system throughout the US, the results of this research project have been used to develop a program that can be implemented by the Cooperative Extension Service nationwide. The specific goals and objectives for this project will be outlined, the population and sample for the research will be described, and the instruments utilized for the survey will be explained. A description of the workshop and manual will also be discussed. This report will end with a summary of the results from this project and any observed changes and/or recommendations for future surveys pertaining to energy efficiency.

  13. What's the diagnosis? Organisational culture and palliative care delivery in residential aged care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Frey, Rosemary; Boyd, Michal; Foster, Sue; Robinson, Jackie; Gott, Merryn

    2016-07-01

    Organisational culture has been shown to impact on resident outcomes in residential aged care (RAC). This is particularly important given the growing number of residents with high palliative care needs. The study described herein (conducted from January 2013 to March 2014) examined survey results from a convenience sample of 46 managers, alongside interviews with a purposively selected sample of 23 bereaved family members in order to explore the perceptions of organisational culture within New Zealand RAC facilities in one large urban District Health Board. Results of the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) completed by managers indicated a preference for a 'Clan' and the structured 'Hierarchy' culture. Bereaved family interviews emphasised both positive and negative aspects of communication, leadership and teamwork, and relationship with residents. Study results from both managers' OCAI survey scores and next of kin interviews indicate that while the RAC facilities are culturally oriented towards providing quality care for residents, they may face barriers to adopting organisational processes supportive of this goal. PMID:25808936

  14. Collaborative Implementation of a Sequenced Trauma-Focused Intervention for Youth in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Kliethermes, Matthew D.; Juedemann, David; Dunn, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Few evidence-based interventions have been developed or tested with youth in residential care. Moreover, models for transferring implementation knowledge from clinical trials to service settings are sparse. This paper addresses the lessons learned about addressing this technology transfer gap by presenting a case study of a collaborative effort to implement a trauma-informed pilot program with youth in residential care. Key considerations are the collaborative nature of implementation efforts, the requirement of organizational support, the need for interventions to be sensitive to the child and the milieu, and the lack of fit between Medicaid reimbursement and evidence-based intervention. PMID:20824117

  15. Residential treatment centers and other organized mental health care for children and youth: United States, 1988.

    PubMed

    Sunshine, J H; Witkin, M J; Atay, J E; Manderscheid, R W

    1991-07-01

    Residential treatment centers (RTCs) for emotionally disturbed children are an important component of the mental health services delivery system in the United States. The 440 RTCs operating in 1988 represented 9 percent of all mental health organizations in the U.S. in that year. They served approximately 10 percent of the patients who received inpatient and residential treatment care and approximately 2 percent of outpatient psychiatric visits in organized settings. Their 39,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) staff and $1.3 billion expenditures were, respectively, 7 percent and 6 percent of the total for all mental health organizations. Between 1986 and 1988, the number of RTCs increased slightly, while the volume of residential treatment care changed little. However, partial care and outpatient care expanded in RTCs, with the number of visits in these categories increasing by 75 percent and 42 percent, respectively. FTE staff grew by 13 percent, and expenditures increased by 33 percent between 1986 and 1988. In 1988, RTCs were located in all States except North Dakota. The largest number were found in California (48), Massachusetts (38), and New York (28). By definition, all RTCs provided residential treatment care. About one-third of them also provided partial care and one-third provided outpatient care. The highest rates of additions to residential treatment care in RTCs per 100,000 civilian population were found in Minnesota and Colorado. Reflecting the role of RTCs as providers of care to children and youth, 94 percent of residential treatment patients in RTCs were under age 18. Seventy percent of residential treatment patients were male; 28 percent, black; and 10 percent, Hispanic. Approximately 94 percent had mental illness as their principal disability. In December 1988, 43,000 staff worked in RTCs; 14 percent were employed part-time, and 3 percent were trainees. Among others, the staff included approximately 900 psychiatrists, 300 other physicians, 1

  16. Residential Care Provision in Medicaid Home- and Community-Based Waivers: A National Study of Program Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitchner, Martin; Hernandez, Mauro; Ng, Terence; Harrington, Charlene

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: While state policy and market factors are known to have contributed to the increased supply of residential care, little is known about efforts to accommodate demand from lower-income consumers. This study describes participation and expenditure trends for residential care services funded by Medicaid waivers and examines variation across…

  17. The Academic and Functional Academic Skills of Youth Who Are at Risk for Language Impairment in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagaman, Jessica L.; Trout, Alexandra L.; DeSalvo, Cathy; Gehringer, Robert; Epstein, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Undiagnosed language impairment (LI) for youth in residential care is a concern as similar populations have shown elevated levels of language delays. Therefore, the purposes of this study were to identify the percentage of youth in residential care who are at risk for LI and to compare the demographic, academic achievement, and functional…

  18. Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese elders on adjustment to residential care.

    PubMed

    Lee, D T

    2001-08-01

    While there is an increasing number of elders moving into residential care homes in Hong Kong, very little is known about how they adjust to the changes associated with living in such homes. A grounded theory study was therefore conducted to explore the processes through which Chinese elders adjust following a move to residential care. Audiotaped in-depth interviews were conducted with 18 elders one week after residential home admission and then every month until no new information about their adjustment experiences could be discovered. Constant comparative analysis of data revealed that newly admitted elders adjust through the four stages of orienting, normalizing, rationalizing and stabilizing as they struggle to regain normality in a life that is as close to that lived before admission as possible. The purpose of this paper is to report on Chinese elders' normalizing experiences in the second stage of adjustment. It found that a number of experiences suggested in the literature, as barriers to residential living, such as living with rules and regulations, lack of privacy and autonomy, are not regarded as important by Chinese elders. However, establishing relations with other residents and staff appears to be a particular challenge. It concludes that the life experience and socio-cultural values of Chinese elders have to be addressed when trying to effectively help Chinese elders adjust to life in residential care. The findings also highlight the need for better collaboration between nursing and social work staff in their efforts to promote elders' adjustment. PMID:11705232

  19. Operating characteristics of residential care communities, by community bed size: United States, 2012.

    PubMed

    Caffrey, Christine; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren; Rome, Vincent; Sengupta, Manisha

    2014-11-01

    In 2012, the majority of residential care communities had 4–25 beds, yet 71% of residents lived in communities with more than 50 beds. A lower percentage of communities with 4–25 beds were chain-affiliated, nonprofit, and in operation 10 years or more, compared with communities with 26–50 and more than 50 beds. Dementia-exclusive care or dementia care units were more common as community size increased. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for cognitive impairment and offered dementia-specific programming compared with communities with 4–25 and 26–50 beds. A higher percentage of communities with more than 50 beds screened for depression compared with communities with 4–25 beds. Compared with communities with 4–25 beds, a higher percentage of communities with 26–50 beds and more than 50 beds provided therapeutic, hospice, mental health, and dental services; but a lower percentage of communities with more than 50 beds provided skilled nursing services than did smaller communities. This report presents national estimates of residential care communities, using data from the first wave of NSLTCP. This brief profile of residential care communities provides useful information to policymakers, providers, researchers, and consumer advocates as they plan to meet the needs of an aging population. The findings also highlight the diversity of residential care communities across different sizes. Corresponding state estimates and their standard errors for the national figures in this data brief can be found on the NSLTCP website at http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsltcp/ nsltcp_products.htm. These national and state estimates establish a baseline for monitoring trends among residents living in residential care. PMID:25411834

  20. Attachment and Aspiration: What Influences Rural Youths' Educational and Residential Plans? White Paper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howley, Caitlin; Hambrick, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    Building on recent research, ICF sought to explore how socioeconomic status and attachment to place influence rural youths' educational and residential preferences across a wider geographic region. Our research questions included: What are rural high school students' educational and residential plans? And what factors influence rural youths' plans…

  1. Educating Students in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffernan, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Students who are in foster care need principals who are informed about policy, aware of their needs, and willing to be advocates for them. Multiple school placements often result in significant gaps in the education of students in foster care. If they also have disabilities, they may lose special programs and services when they change placements.…

  2. 38 CFR 17.65 - Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the standards in 38 CFR 17.63 based on the report of a VA inspection and any findings of necessary... one or more of the standards in 38 CFR 17.63, provided that the deficiencies do not jeopardize the... approvals of community residential care facilities. 17.65 Section 17.65 Pensions, Bonuses, and...

  3. Technology-Based Training of Administrators in Residential Care Facilities for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macias, Ron J.

    2011-01-01

    The Problem: The problem in this study was to determine whether there is a difference between technology-based and instructor-led RCFE administrator training. Method: A quasi-experimental research design study was conducted, and 70 students enrolled in the Residential Care Facility for the Elderly (RCFE) Administration Licensing renewal course…

  4. An Ethnographic Study of Stigma and Ageism in Residential Care or Assisted Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, Debra; Eckert, J. Kevin; Rubinstein, Bob; Keimig, Lynn; Clark, Leanne; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored aspects of stigmatization for older adults who live in residential care or assisted living (RC-AL) communities and what these settings have done to address stigma. Design and Methods: We used ethnography and other qualitative data-gathering and analytic techniques to gather data from 309 participants (residents, family…

  5. 38 CFR 17.65 - Approvals and provisional approvals of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... or more of the standards in 38 CFR 17.63 for the approval of a particular community residential care... the standards in 38 CFR 17.63 based on the report of a VA inspection and any findings of necessary... one or more of the standards in 38 CFR 17.63, provided that the deficiencies do not jeopardize...

  6. Maintaining Basic Skills through Summer Thematic Tutoring with Exceptional Students in Residential Foster Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colombey, Hanna

    A thematic teaching program and portfolio assessment were used to maintain basic academic language arts and mathematics skills during the summer for 21 elementary students placed in residential foster care settings as victims of physical and/or sexual abuse. All activities were designed around the selected theme of a safari. Students listened to…

  7. Trauma Experiences, Maltreatment-Related Impairments, and Resilience among Child Welfare Youth in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collin-Vezina, Delphine; Coleman, Kim; Milne, Lise; Sell, Jody; Daigneault, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to provide a description of the trauma experiences, trauma-related sequels, and resilience features of a sample of Canadian youth in residential care facilities, as well as to explore the impact of gender and of the number of different traumas experienced on trauma-related sequels and resilience features. A convenience…

  8. Characteristics and Psychosocial Predictors of Adolescent Nonsuicidal Self-Injury in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Jason; Snyder, Gregory S.; von der Embse, Nathaniel P.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined characteristics and biopsychosocial predictors of nonsuicidal self-injury in a sample (N = 753) of youth in residential care admitted between 2005 and 2010. To model the data, the authors used t-tests, chi-square tests, and multiple logistic regressions stratified by gender. Results suggested that 12% of youth engaged in…

  9. The Integration of Psychotherapy and Intensive Short-Term Residential Care: The Termination Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leichtman, Martin; Leichtman, Maria Luisa

    2004-01-01

    This paper examines the variety of ways in which psychotherapy and residential care are integrated in the concluding phase of an intensive short-term treatment program for severely disturbed adolescents. It considers the manner in which decisions are made about termination, approaches to discharge planning, typical issues encountered in the…

  10. School adjustment of children in residential care: a multi-source analysis.

    PubMed

    Martín, Eduardo; Muñoz de Bustillo, María del Carmen

    2009-11-01

    School adjustment is one the greatest challenges in residential child care programs. This study has two aims: to analyze school adjustment compared to a normative population, and to carry out a multi-source analysis (child, classmates, and teacher) of this adjustment. A total of 50 classrooms containing 60 children from residential care units were studied. The "Método de asignación de atributos perceptivos" (Allocation of perceptive attributes; Díaz-Aguado, 2006), the "Test Autoevaluativo Multifactorial de Adaptación Infantil" (TAMAI [Multifactor Self-assessment Test of Child Adjustment]; Hernández, 1996) and the "Protocolo de valoración para el profesorado (Evaluation Protocol for Teachers; Fernández del Valle, 1998) were applied. The main results indicate that, compared with their classmates, children in residential care are perceived as more controversial and less integrated at school, although no differences were observed in problems of isolation. The multi-source analysis shows that there is agreement among the different sources when the externalized and visible aspects are evaluated. These results are discussed in connection with the practices that are being developed in residential child care programs. PMID:19899648

  11. Initiation of Substance Use by Adolescents after One Year in Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monshouwer, Karin; Kepper, Annelies; van den Eijnden, Regina; Koning, Ina; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that substance use levels among adolescents living in residential youth care are high. However, it is not clear to what extent adolescents initiate (heavy) substance during their stay and to what extent these rates are higher than would be expected based on their risk profile. Objective: The aim of the…

  12. Residential racial composition, spatial access to care, and breast cancer mortality among women in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Russell, Emily; Kramer, Michael R; Cooper, Hannah L F; Thompson, Winifred Wilkins; Arriola, Kimberly R Jacob

    2011-12-01

    We explored the association between neighborhood residential racial composition and breast cancer mortality among Black and White breast cancer patients in Georgia and whether spatial access to cancer care mediates this association. Participants included 15,256 women living in 15 metropolitan statistical areas in Georgia who were diagnosed with breast cancer between 1999 and 2003. Residential racial composition was operationalized as the percent of Black residents in the census tract. We used gravity-based modeling methods to ascertain spatial access to oncology care. Multilevel Cox proportional hazards models and mediation analyses were used to test associations. Black women were 1.5 times more likely to die from breast cancer than White women. Residential racial composition had a small but significant association with breast cancer mortality (hazard ratios [HRs] = 1.04-1.08 per 10% increase in the percent of Black tract residents). Individual race did not moderate this relationship, and spatial access to care did not mediate it. Residential racial composition may be part of the socioenvironmental milieu that produces increased breast cancer mortality among Black women. However, there is a lack of evidence that spatial access to oncology care mediates these processes. PMID:21847712

  13. Private Service, Public Rights: The Private Children's Residential Group Care Sector in Ontario, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gharabaghi, Kiaras

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the core themes and issues of private residential service delivery for children and youth in Ontario, with a specific focus on staffed group care within this sector. Such exploration highlights the juxtaposition of the public rights of children with the private world of service provision. Based on twenty interviews with…

  14. A Study of Behaviour Profiles among Intellectually Disabled People in Residential Care in Hungary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Csorba, Janos; Radvanyi, Katalin; Regenyi, Eniko; Dinya, Elek

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the behavioural dimensions of 269 intellectually disabled (ID) people in residential care in specialized institutions in Tolna county (South-West Hungary) with the aim of screening the frequency and severity of the relevant behavioural symptoms associated with intellectual disability and depending on the level of…

  15. Aggressive Adolescents in Residential Care: A Selective Review of Treatment Requirements and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knorth, Erik J.; Klomp, Martin; Van den Bergh, Peter M.; Noom, Marc J.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents a selective inventory of treatment methods of aggressive behavior. Special attention is paid to types of intervention that, according to research, are frequently used in Dutch residential youth care. These methods are based on (1) principles of (cognitive) behavior management and control, (2) the social competence model, and…

  16. Increasing Emotional Regulation for Youths in Residential Care: Phases of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimmarusti, Rocco A.

    2011-01-01

    Youths in residential care have likely experienced trauma as they have had atypical and disruptive events occur in their lives that has contributed to their out-of-home placement. For people who have been traumatized, the regulation of emotions is an important feature of their recovery. This article presents a model that traces phases from…

  17. Hazards of Immobility: Bedsores. Adult Residential Care Home, Lesson Plan No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kathleen

    Developed as part of a 104-hour course on adult residential care homes (ARCHs), this 50-minute lesson is designed to enable a student to: (1) define a bedsore; (2) list and describe three major causes of bedsores; (3) identify potential bedsore sites in the back-lying, side-lying, and sitting positions; and (4) calculate the risk for developing…

  18. Insomnia, Sleepiness, and Depression in Adolescents Living in Residential Care Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreau, Vincent; Belanger, Lynda; Begin, Gilles; Morin, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to document sleep patterns and disturbances reported by youths temporarily living in residential care facilities. A secondary objective was to examine the relationships between sleep disturbances and mood and daytime sleepiness. A self-reported questionnaire on sleep patterns and habits assessing duration,…

  19. Deliberate Self-Harm among Children in Tertiary Care Residential Treatment: Prevalence and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Shannon L.; Baiden, Philip; Theall-Honey, Laura; den Dunnen, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Few studies have examined deliberate self-harm (DSH) among children in residential treatment in Canada. Most of the existing studies examined adolescent students or children from pediatric emergency departments. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence of DSH among children in tertiary care residential…

  20. Older Adults With Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Centers in Israel: Health Status and Service Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrick, Joav; Davidson, Philip W.; Morad, Mohammed; Janicki, Matthew P.; Wexler, Orren; Henderson, C. Michael

    2004-01-01

    To determine their health status, we studied 2,282 Israeli adults with intellectual disability who were at least 40 years of age and lived in residential care. Results showed that age is a significant factor in health status. The frequency of different disease categories (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer, and sensory impairments) increased…

  1. Forming Identities in Residential Care for Children: Manoeuvring between Social Work and Peer Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokholm, Anja

    2009-01-01

    The general goal of Danish residential care institutions with a therapeutic objective is to change children's behaviour and redirect their identity formation. This goal is pursued through an individualized focus on development. Dynamics of the resident group is rarely targeted directly in the pedagogical work. This article challenges the implicit…

  2. Educating to Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortari, Luigina

    2004-01-01

    The root of the ecological crisis lies in an ethic of nature consumption. In order to reconstruct our cultural framework, it is necessary to cultivate another ethical approach, an ethic of care. It is the responsibility of school to encourage students to learn how to care for not only the human world, but also for the natural world. This paper is…

  3. Family Involvement in Residential Long-Term Care: A Synthesis and Critical Review*

    PubMed Central

    Gaugler, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this review is to critically synthesize the existing literature on family involvement in residential long-term care. Studies that examined family involvement in various long-term care venues were identified through extensive searches of the literature. Future research and practice must consider the complexity of family structure, adopt longitudinal designs, provide direct empirical links between family involvement and resident outcomes, and offer rigorous evaluation of interventions in order to refine the literature. PMID:15804627

  4. Improving pregnancy outcome during imprisonment: a model residential care program.

    PubMed

    Siefert, K; Pimlott, S

    2001-04-01

    The female prison population has increased dramatically in recent years. Most women prisoners are involved with drugs, and as many as 25 percent are pregnant or have delivered within the past year. Reproductive health and drug treatment services for women in prison are inadequate, if they are available at all, and although illicit drugs are readily available in prison, drug-involved pregnant women often are incarcerated to protect fetal health. Studies of pregnancy outcome among women prisoners have demonstrated high rates of perinatal mortality and morbidity. This article examines issues related to pregnancy among women prisoners and describes an innovative residential program designed for pregnant, drug-dependent women in a state adult corrections system. Social workers can play an important role in promoting policy reform and improved services for this underserved population. PMID:11329642

  5. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    MedlinePlus

    ... billing purposes, does this facility use electronic health records? This is a computerized version of the resident's health and personal information used in the management of the resident's health care." All providers were ...

  6. Residents Living in Residential Care Facilities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Health and Human Services, Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Office of Disability, Aging, and Long-Term Care Policy. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute. 2005. Spillman BC, Black KJ. The size ...

  7. Reducing inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in the residential care setting: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ching Jou; Kong, David CM; Stuart, Rhonda L

    2014-01-01

    Residential aged care facilities are increasingly identified as having a high burden of infection, resulting in subsequent antibiotic use, compounded by the complexity of patient demographics and medical care. Of particular concern is the recent emergence of multidrug-resistant organisms among this vulnerable population. Accordingly, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs have started to be introduced into the residential aged care facilities setting to promote judicious antimicrobial use. However, to successfully implement AMS programs, there are unique challenges pertaining to this resource-limited setting that need to be addressed. In this review, we summarize the epidemiology of infections in this population and review studies that explore antibiotic use and prescribing patterns. Specific attention is paid to issues relating to inappropriate or suboptimal antibiotic prescribing to guide future AMS interventions. PMID:24477218

  8. Educating Transient Youth: Influence of Residential Instability on Educational Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald Edward

    2009-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit their ability to complete a high school diploma and transition to postsecondary education. The federal government passed the McKinney-Vento Act over 20 years ago to address issues of access to public education for homeless youth. The most recent reauthorization of the law expanded the definition of…

  9. Designing a Residential Environment for Adventure Education and Personal Development. A Basic Needs Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Mark

    1990-01-01

    Residential, challenging, learning experiences can provide a powerful and essential education in environmental values and interpersonal relationships. Presents a basic-needs planning guide for residential adventure programs that considers the need for water, air, food, clothing, accommodation, waste disposal, health, energy, resources, love of…

  10. Predictors of positive psychosocial functioning of older adults in residential care facilities.

    PubMed

    Schanowitz, Jeff Y; Nicassio, Perry M

    2006-04-01

    This research examined the contributions of active and passive coping for health problems, and meaning-based coping, to positive psychosocial functioning in a sample of 100 individuals in residential care with a mean age of 83.11 years old. Study participants resided in skilled care, intermediate care, or assisted living facilities. Based on interview data collected on site in participants' residential settings, hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that active and passive coping and meaning-based coping had separate influences on measures of positive psychosocial functioning. Active coping was correlated with higher positive affect, whereas passive coping was associated with higher negative affect and self-acceptance. Positive reappraisal, a meaning-based coping strategy, was uniquely associated with higher positive affect, positive social relations, and self-acceptance. Positive religious coping was not independently associated with positive psychosocial functioning indices, whereas negative religious coping was related to higher negative affect. Health functioning did not contribute to positive psychosocial functioning in this sample. The results confirm the separate importance of health-related and meaning-based coping strategies in explaining positive psychosocial functioning in older adults living in residential care settings. PMID:16453068

  11. Self Care for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Traumatic Stress Network, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Trauma takes a toll on children, families, schools, and communities. Trauma can also take a toll on school professionals. Any educator who works directly with traumatized children and adolescents is vulnerable to the effects of trauma--referred to as "compassion fatigue" or "secondary traumatic stress"--being physically, mentally, or emotionally…

  12. Making Sense of Varying Standards of Care: The Experiences of Staff Working in Residential Care Environments for Adults with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchison, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert

    2016-01-01

    Research evidence reveals that adults with learning disabilities who live in residential care facilities are being exposed to considerable variation in the standards of care they receive. High profile cases of substandard care have also raised concerns regarding the appropriateness of existing care provisions and practices. While attempts have…

  13. Addressing the nutritional needs of older people in residential care homes.

    PubMed

    Merrell, Joy; Philpin, Susan; Warring, Joanne; Hobby, Debra; Gregory, Vic

    2012-03-01

    In the UK and Europe, malnutrition in older people is a significant and continuing problem. Malnutrition predisposes to disease, impedes recovery from illness, increases mortality and is costly to society. Despite the high number of older people potentially at risk, malnutrition in care homes has been under explored. There is concern that national guidelines regarding the nutritional care of older people in residential care homes are not always implemented. This qualitative study explored the factors that influence the nutritional care provided to residents in two different types of local authority residential care homes (providing personal care) in Wales. One home had communal dining rooms; the other had eight bedded units with their own kitchen and dining facilities. The sample of 45 participants, comprised 19 staff (managers, care and catering staff), 16 residents and 10 residents' relatives. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews, focus groups, observation and documentary review between August 2009 and January 2010. This paper focuses on how staff assessed and addressed residents' nutritional needs. In both care homes, staff strove to be responsive to residents' dietary preferences, provided person-centred care and worked in partnership with residents and their families to provide nutritious food in a homely environment. Neither home conducted nutritional screening to identify those at risk of malnutrition, contrary to national guidelines, but relied on ad hoc observation and monitoring. The staff's knowledge of special dietary needs was limited. A need for further training for care home staff regarding the importance of nutrition in maintaining health in older people, use of nutritional screening and special dietary needs was identified. Shared nutrition training between health and social care staff needs expansion and policy implications in terms of an enhanced regulatory focus on maintaining nutritional needs in care homes are proposed. PMID

  14. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs) and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors) was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52%) of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p < 0.001) in nursing homes as in residential homes. The level of non-compliance with system alerts was very low in both settings (0.075% of administrations). The pre-study survey revealed that only 12

  15. Autonomy for older people in residential care: a selective literature review.

    PubMed

    Welford, Claire; Murphy, Kathy; Rodgers, Vivien; Frauenlob, Theresia

    2012-03-01

    Autonomy is an important concept because it brings dignity to peoples' lives, regardless of physical circumstances. The United Nations (UN) Madrid International Plan of Action on Ageing emphasises the need to include older adults in autonomous decision-making processes. However, many older people living in residential care find that their autonomy is curtailed. This is largely because autonomy for older people is poorly understood, and hence, nurses working with older people need to become clear about what autonomy is and how it can be facilitated. In this, the first of three papers, the literature is reviewed specifically to establish the meaning of autonomy for older people in residential care as opposed to autonomy in a wider context. This important distinction may help nurses working with older people to begin to facilitate autonomy more effectively. PMID:22348264

  16. Falls, Depression, and Other Hospitalization Risk Factors for Adults in Residential Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Gimm, Gilbert W; Kitsantas, Panagiota

    2016-06-01

    Prior research has shown a relationship between falls, hospitalizations, and depression among older adults in nursing home settings, but few studies have explored these relationships for younger and older adults in residential care facilities. This study examined risk factors for hospitalizations among assisted living residents. Using the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities, the study found that 24% of residents had a hospital stay in the past year. Residents with falls were more than twice as likely to have a hospitalization. For younger residents, depression was a key risk factor (OR = 1.74, p < .01). However, older residents with dementia had a lower risk of hospitalization (OR = 0.71, p < .01). More attention is needed to prevent falls and identify residents with depression and severe mental illness, who are at greater risk of hospitalization. Reducing avoidable hospitalizations can improve well-being for older and younger adults in residential care facilities. PMID:27147680

  17. Health Care Access Among Asian American Subgroups: The Role of Residential Segregation.

    PubMed

    Carreon, Daisy C; Baumeister, Sebastian E

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have examined differences in health care access across Asian American ethnicities and none have considered the effects of residential segregation. The segregation of Asians by neighborhood has been steadily increasing over the past few decades due in part to the settlement patterns of immigrants. Data from the 2009 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (n = 746) were used. We examined differences in yearly medical checkups between Asian subgroups as well as among foreign-born and US-born Asians. Results showed that immigrant Filipinos and Vietnamese were less likely to get a checkup compared with foreign-born Chinese. The effect of Asian subgroup was modified by the percentage of Asians in a census tract (p < 0.01). Koreans and other Asians had a higher probability of getting a checkup when living in a predominately Asian neighborhood. For Chinese and Vietnamese residential concentration of Asians had a stronger inverse association with having a yearly checkup. PMID:25796521

  18. Structural violence in long-term, residential care for older people: Comparing Canada and Scandinavia

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Albert; Daly, Tamara; Armstrong, Pat; Szebehely, Marta; Armstrong, Hugh; LaFrance, Stirling

    2014-01-01

    Canadian frontline careworkers are six times more likely to experience daily physical violence than their Scandinavian counterparts. This paper draws on a comparative survey of residential careworkers serving older people across three Canadian provinces (Manitoba, Nova Scotia, Ontario) and four countries that follow a Scandinavian model of social care (Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden) conducted between 2005 and 2006. Ninety percent of Canadian frontline careworkers experienced physical violence from residents or their relatives and 43 percent reported physical violence on a daily basis. Canadian focus groups conducted in 2007 reveal violence was often normalized as an inevitable part of elder-care. We use the concept of “structural violence” (Galtung, 1969) to raise questions about the role that systemic and organizational factors play in setting the context for violence. Structural violence refers to indirect forms of violence that are built into social structures and that prevent people from meeting their basic needs or fulfilling their potential. We applied the concept to long-term residential care and found that the poor quality of the working conditions and inadequate levels of support experienced by Canadian careworkers constitute a form of structural violence. Working conditions are detrimental to careworker’s physical and mental health, and prevent careworkers from providing the quality of care they are capable of providing and understand to be part of their job. These conditions may also contribute to the violence workers experience, and further investigation is warranted. PMID:22204839

  19. Using existing information from medico-legal death investigations to improve care of older people in residential aged care services.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Joseph Elias; Bugeja, Lyndal; Ranson, David

    2013-12-01

    The care of older people in residential aged care services could be improved by optimising the use of existing information gathered for medico-legal death investigations. The authors address three myths contributing to underuse of this information: deaths are not preventable; public health gains are too small; and it is someone else's charter or responsibility A significant proportion of deaths are preventable, specifically those occurring prematurely from natural causes or due to injury and trauma. By addressing these preventable deaths, significant public health cost savings and better health outcomes for our growing ageing population can be achieved. Despite substantive monitoring of the provision of aged care, no single entity is explicitly responsible for systematically analysing medico-legal death information. The data and skills for using information from medico-legal death investigations currently exist. Dispelling the myths removes one impediment to investing in this area of public health. PMID:24597371

  20. Introducing an Equal Rights Framework for Older Persons in Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Jönson, Håkan; Harnett, Tove

    2016-01-01

    This article reconceptualizes residential care for older persons by introducing a framework developed from a rights-based principle of disability policies: the normalization principle. This principle is part of the social model and states that society should make available for people who have impairments living conditions that are as close as possible to those of “others.” Using the framework on the case of eldercare in Sweden shows that although disability policies have used people without impairments as a comparative (external) reference group for claiming rights, eldercare policies use internal reference groups, basing comparisons on other care users. The article highlights the need for external comparisons in eldercare and suggests that the third age, which so far has been a normative reference group for older people, could be a comparative reference group when older persons in need of care claim rights to equal conditions. PMID:26035884

  1. Educating Moral People: A Caring Alternative to Character Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noddings, Nel

    An alternative to character education is care ethics. The ethics of care can be seen as fundamentally relational, not individual-agent-based in the way of virtue ethics, and the ethics of care is more indirect than character education. After an introductory chapter that outlines the similarities and differences between character education and care…

  2. Exploring the mealtime experience in residential care settings for older people: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Sarah; Wasielewska, Anna; Raiswell, Christine; Drummond, Barbara

    2013-07-01

    Improving the mealtime experience in residential care can be a major facilitator in improving care, well-being and QoL. Evidence suggests that, despite guidance on the subject of food, nutrition and hydration, there are still concerns. Although there is a range of methods to research and assess the quality of food provision, there is a challenge in capturing the experiences of those residents who are unable or unwilling to describe their feelings and experiences because of frailty, impaired communication or other vulnerability. The aim of this exploratory study was to capture and describe individual residents' mealtime experience. In spring 2011, a small-scale, observational study was carried out in seven dining settings in four residential care homes in Manchester. An adapted dementia care mapping tool was used alongside field notes. Observations showed two major differences in the way the mealtimes were organised: 'pre-plated' and 'family-style' (where either bowls of food are placed in the centre of the table or food is served directly from a hotplate by a chef). These two styles of service are discussed in relation to the emerging themes of 'task versus resident-centred mealtimes', 'fostering resident independence' and 'levels of interaction'. Although improving mealtimes alone is not enough to improve quality of life in care homes, findings showed that relatively small changes to mealtime delivery can potentially have an impact on resident well-being in these homes. Observation is a useful method of engaging residents in care settings for older people who may not otherwise be able to take part in research. PMID:23638872

  3. Factors Associated with Toileting Disability in Older Adults without Dementia Living in Residential Care Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Talley, Kristine M.C.; Wyman, Jean F.; Bronas, Ulf G.; Olson-Kellogg, Becky J.; McCarthy, Teresa C.; Zhao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Background Older adults without dementia living in residential care facilities with toileting disability have increased care costs and dependency. Understanding associated factors could guide prevention and management strategies. Objective To identify the prevalence of and factors associated with toileting disability in this population. Methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. A subsample (N = 2,395) of adults aged 65 years or older, without dementia, and with the potential to implement behavioral interventions was examined. Associated factors were classified according to the disablement process as pathologies, impairments, functional limitations, coexisting disabilities, intra- and extra-individual factors. Logistic regression models accounting for the stratified two-stage probability sampling design were used to identify factors associated with toileting disability. Results Residents were mostly White women, aged 85 years and older. Prevalence of toileting disability was 15%. Associated factors included: reporting fair or poor health, living in a facility with four or less residents, living in a for-profit facility; having bowel incontinence, urinary incontinence, an increased number of physical impairments, visual and hearing impairments; and needing assistance with bathing, dressing, and transferring. Discussion Multicomponent and multidisciplinary prevention and management efforts should be designed for residents without dementia. Future studies testing the efficacy of prevention efforts are needed and should include treatments for incontinence, physical activity programs targeting impairments with walking, standing, sitting, stooping, reaching, and grasping, and therapy to improve dressing, bathing, and transferring skills. PMID:24589646

  4. "Careworkers don't have a voice:" epistemological violence in residential care for older people.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Albert; Armstrong, Pat; Daly, Tamara; Armstrong, Hugh; Braedley, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Drawing on feminist epistemologies, this paper attends to the way the reductionist assumptions have shaped the organization of nursing home carework in manners that are insufficient to the needs of relational care. This paper is informed by a study involving nine focus groups and a survey of Canadian residential care workers (141 RNs, 139 LPNs and 415 frontline careworkers). Four major themes were identified. Reductionist assumptions contributed to routinized, task-based approaches to care, resulting in what careworkers termed "assembly line care." Insufficient time and emphasis on the relational dimensions of care made it difficult to "treat residents as human beings." Accountability, enacted as counting and documenting, led to an "avalanche of paperwork" that took time away from care. Finally, hierarchies of knowledge contributed to systemic exclusions and the perception that "careworkers' don't have a voice." Careworkers reported distress as a result of the tensions between the organization of work and the needs of relational care. We theorize these findings as examples of "epistemological violence," a concept coined by Vandana Shiva (1988) to name the harm that results from the hegemony of reductionist assumptions. While not acting alone, we argue that reductionism has played an important role in shaping the context of care both at a policy and organizational level, and it continues to shape the solutions to problems in nursing home care in ways that pose challenges for careworkers. We conclude by suggesting that improving the quality of both work and care will require respecting the specificities of care and its unique epistemological and ontological nature. PMID:25841727

  5. Assisted Living and Residential Care in Oregon: Two Decades of State Policy, Supply, and Medicaid Participation Trends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hernandez, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The study describes Oregon state policy and supply developments for licensed long-term-care settings, particularly apartment-style assisted living facilities and more traditional residential care facilities. Design and Methods: Data came from a variety of sources, including state agency administrative records, other secondary data…

  6. Identifying mental health symptoms in children and youth in residential and in-patient care settings.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Shannon L; Hirdes, John P

    2015-07-01

    This study demonstrates the use of the interRAI assessment instruments to examine mental health symptoms in children and adults within residential and in-patient care settings. Regardless of service setting, children exhibited more harm to self and others than adults. Children in adult in-patient beds were more likely to exhibit suicide and self-harm and less likely to exhibit harm to others compared to children in child-specific service settings. Implications related to service system improvements are discussed. PMID:26015486

  7. A Report of Selected Residential Continuing Education Centers in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, W. Rex

    General information is presented concerning residential continuing education centers affiliated with public institutions of higher education. Attention was directed to those universities considered self-contained with full-service facilities, including conference facilities, housing accommodations, and food services. Based on the latest documents…

  8. Living Doubled-Up: Influence of Residential Environment on Educational Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallett, Ronald E.

    2012-01-01

    Homeless youth face many barriers that limit success in the educational process. Subgroups of homeless youth frequently experience the educational process differently depending upon their residential context. Recent years witness the federal government's expanding the definition of homelessness to include youth living doubled-up. This residential…

  9. Dementia Special Care Units in Residential Care Communities: United States, 2010

    MedlinePlus

    ... special care units offered dementia-specific activities and programming (91%) and had doors with alarms (90%) ( Figure ... special care units had dementia-specific activities and programming, while only 19% had closed circuit TV monitoring. ...

  10. What Works in Group Care? – A Structured Review of Treatment Models for Group Homes and Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a structured review of treatment models that are relevant to group care and residential treatment settings for children involved with the child welfare system. Initiated and guided by The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare, five treatment models – Positive Peer Culture, Teaching Family Model, Sanctuary Model, Stop-Gap Model, and Re-ED – were reviewed for effectiveness. In this paper, each model s treatment features are described and relevant outcome studies reviewed in terms of their effectiveness as well as relevance for child welfare practice. Findings indicate that four of the models are either supported or promising in terms of evidence for effectiveness. Implications for group care practice and research are discussed. PMID:22468014

  11. An evidence-based program to improve analgesic practice and pain outcomes in residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Savvas, Steven M; Toye, Chris M; Beattie, Elizabeth R A; Gibson, Stephen J

    2014-08-01

    Pain is common in individuals living in residential aged care facilities (RACFs), and a number of obstacles have been identified as recurring barriers to adequate pain management. To address this, the Australian Pain Society developed 27 recommendations for comprehensive good practice in the identification, assessment, and management of pain. This study reviewed preexisting pain management practice at five Australian RACFs and identified changes needed to implement the recommendations and then implemented an evidence-based program that aimed to facilitate better pain management. The program involved staff training and education and revised in-house pain-management procedures. Reviews occurred before and after the program and included the assessment of 282 residents for analgesic use and pain status. Analgesic use improved after the program (P<.001), with a decrease in residents receiving no analgesics (from 15% to 6%) and an increase in residents receiving around-the-clock plus as-needed analgesics (from 24% to 43%). There were improvements in pain relief for residents with scores indicative of pain, with Abbey pain scale (P=.005), Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia Scale (P=.001), and Non-communicative Patient's Pain Assessment Instrument scale (P<.001) scores all improving. Although physical function declined as expected, Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Survey bodily pain scores also showed improvement (P=.001). Better evidence-based practice and outcomes in RACFs can be achieved with appropriate training and education. Investing resources in the aged care workforce using this program improved analgesic practice and pain relief in participating sites. Further attention to the continued targeted pain management training of aged care staff is likely to improve pain-focused care for residents. PMID:25040607

  12. Early Childhood Care and Education in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mbugua, Tata J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen a global endeavor to prioritize early childhood care and education as a foundation for later learning and development, as evidenced by the Global Guidelines for Early Childhood Education and Care in the 21st Century (Association for Childhood Education International/World Organization for Early Childhood, 1999). Such efforts…

  13. An Ethnographic Study of Stigma and Ageism in Residential Care or Assisted Living

    PubMed Central

    Dobbs, Debra; Eckert, J. Kevin; Rubinstein, Bob; Keimig, Lynn; Clark, Leanne; Frankowski, Ann Christine; Zimmerman, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study explored aspects of stigmatization for older adults who live in residential care or assisted living (RC–AL) communities and what these settings have done to address stigma. Design and recognition of resident preferences and strengths, rather than their limitations. Methods We used ethnography and other qualitative data-gathering and analytic techniques to gather data from 309 participants (residents, family and staff) from six RC–AL settings in Maryland. We entered the transcript data into Atlas.ti 5.0. We analyzed the data by using grounded theory techniques for emergent themes. Results Four themes emerged that relate to stigma in RC–AL: (a) ageism in long-term care; (b) stigma as related to disease and illness; (c) sociocultural aspects of stigma; and (d) RC–AL as a stigmatizing setting. Some strategies used in RC–AL settings to combat stigma include family member advocacy on behalf of stigmatized residents, assertion of resident autonomy, and administrator awareness of potential stigmatization. Implications: Findings suggest that changes could be made to the structure as well as the process of care delivery to minimize the occurrence of stigma in RC–AL settings. Structural changes include an examination of how best, given the resident case mix, to accommodate care for persons with dementia (e.g., separate units or integrated care); processes of care include staff PMID:18728301

  14. Health-promoting residential aged care: a pilot project in Austria.

    PubMed

    Krajic, Karl; Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria

    2015-09-01

    Long-term care for the aged is an area that has not been in the focus of health promotion so far. The paper describes context, concept and project plan of a 2-year pilot project of comprehensive health-promoting setting development in residential aged care in Austria, and provides an overview over main experiences and results. Austria's most relevant health promotion agencies, a specialized scientific institute and Austria's largest provider of aged care acted as partners. The project aimed at developing elements of a comprehensive approach, but also providing evidence for the effectiveness of health promotion. Therefore, the project combined an organizational development approach with a scientific, randomized controlled study on mobility enhancement for residents. A comprehensive settings approach turned out acceptable for the main stakeholders of aged care (owners and management, staff, residents and residents' relatives). Strategy development, based on a systematic needs assessment, found staff health to be of special interest for the organization (ergonomics, workability over life course), and residents' relatives, got more attention. The mobility study was able to achieve positive results on occupational performance, concerning quality-of-life indicators and reached also formerly inactive groups. After the end of the project, health promotion is still on the agenda of the organization; further developments will be monitored. Good support from the policy level and well-established networking between the aged care provider, health promotion agencies and a network for health promotion in health care seems to have been an important resource for success. PMID:24682545

  15. A social work practice reflection on issues arising for LGBTI older people interfacing with health and residential care: rights, decision making and end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Francis; Healy, John Paul

    2014-01-01

    This article is a social work practice reflection on issues arising for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) older people interfacing with health and residential care in Australia; focusing on clients, families, and carers in relation to rights, decision making, and end-of-life care. The article explores relevant case examples from social work practice in a health and residential care setting that highlight some specific complexities of working with this client group. This article brings greater attention to issues arising for older LBGTI when interfacing with health and residential care and has the potential to improve practice for social workers and other health professionals and improve outcomes for LGBTI older people. PMID:25050661

  16. The Impact of Brief Play Therapy Training on the Emotional Awareness of Care Workers in a Young Children's Residential Care Setting in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Kathryn Frances

    2010-01-01

    This paper is an account of, and reflection on, the author's six-month ethnographic study of a residential care home for severely traumatised and abused children in Australia. During the stay she designed and offered a short six-day course for the care staff and foster carers in the use of play for emotional and therapeutic support. Prior to this,…

  17. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    PubMed

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:27137741

  18. Validation of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale in Residential Group Care

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Matthew C.; Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Gross, Thomas J.; Epstein, Michael H.; Stevens, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Tests that measure the emotional and behavioral problems of children and youth are typically not normed and standardized on youth diagnosed with disruptive behavior, particularly those youth in residential care. Yet professional standards mandate that before instruments are used with a specific population the psychometric properties need to be studied and re-established: specifically, psychometric properties, including validity, need to be evaluated (AERA, APA, & NCME, 1999). The purpose of the present study was to assess the validity characteristics of the Symptoms and Functioning Severity Scale (SFSS; Bickman, et al., 2010), a widely used test developed for use in outpatient clinics, with youth in a residential care program. The convergent validity of the SFSS was established with the large correlations (.78-.86) with the CBCL. Several binary classification analyses including specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and the Youden Index supported the validity of the SFSS. However, the sensitivity index was somewhat low indicating the test may produce a high level of false negatives. Limitations, future research and implications are discussed. PMID:25037614

  19. Substitute Decision-Making for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Residential Care: Learning Through Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Michael C.; Clare, Isabel C. H.; Holland, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    In the UK, current policies and services for people with mental disorders, including those with intellectual disabilities (ID), presume that these men and women can, do, and should, make decisions for themselves. The new Mental Capacity Act (England and Wales) 2005 (MCA) sets this presumption into statute, and codifies how decisions relating to health and welfare should be made for those adults judged unable to make one or more such decisions autonomously. The MCA uses a procedural checklist to guide this process of substitute decision-making. The personal experiences of providing direct support to seven men and women with ID living in residential care, however, showed that substitute decision-making took two forms, depending on the type of decision to be made. The first process, ‘strategic substitute decision-making’, paralleled the MCA’s legal and ethical framework, whilst the second process, ‘relational substitute decision-making’, was markedly different from these statutory procedures. In this setting, ‘relational substitute decision-making’ underpinned everyday personal and social interventions connected with residents’ daily living, and was situated within a framework of interpersonal and interdependent care relationships. The implications of these findings for residential services and the implementation of the MCA are discussed. PMID:18240026

  20. Advance care planning for older people in Australia presenting to the emergency department from the community or residential aged care facilities.

    PubMed

    Street, Maryann; Ottmann, Goetz; Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Considine, Julie; Livingston, Patricia M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to determine the prevalence of advance care planning (ACP) among older people presenting to an Emergency Department (ED) from the community or a residential aged care facility. The study sample comprised 300 older people (aged 65+ years) presenting to three Victorian EDs in 2011. A total of 150 patients transferred from residential aged care to ED were randomly selected and then matched to 150 people who lived in the community and attended the ED by age, gender, reason for ED attendance and triage category on arrival. Overall prevalence of ACP was 13.3% (n = 40/300); over one-quarter (26.6%, n = 40/150) of those presenting to the ED from residential aged care had a documented Advance Care Plan, compared to none (0%, n = 0/150) of the people from the community. There were no significant differences in the median ED length of stay, number of investigations and interventions undertaken in ED, time seen by a doctor or rate of hospital admission for those with an Advance Care Plan compared to those without. Those with a comorbidity of cerebrovascular disease or dementia and those assessed with impaired brain function were more likely to have a documented Advance Care Plan on arrival at ED. Length of hospital stay was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan [median (IQR) = 3 days (2-6) vs. 6 days (2-10), P = 0.027] and readmission lower (0% vs. 13.7%). In conclusion, older people from the community transferred to ED were unlikely to have a documented Advance Care Plan. Those from residential aged care who were cognitively impaired more frequently had an Advance Care Plan. In the ED, decisions of care did not appear to be influenced by the presence or absence of Advance Care Plans, but length of hospital admission was shorter for those with an Advance Care Plan. PMID:25443161

  1. Variables Associated with the Educational Development of Residential Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard, Gerald; Oakland, Thomas

    Relationships between 15 family, psychological and demographic variables and reading and math achievement are reported for more than 500 hearing impaired children (8 to 15 years old) in a residential state school. The data are also examined for subgroups of children (i.e., hereditary and nonhereditary deafness, rubella, nonrubella, and those with…

  2. Residential Construction. Technology Learning Activity. Teacher Edition. Technology Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This packet of technology learning activity (TLA) materials for residential construction for students in grades 6-10 consists of an instructor's section and student materials. The instructor's section contains background information, suggested activities, and a list of suggested resources. A lesson plan for the 10-day module includes assignments;…

  3. Prediction of Residential Independence of Special Education High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heal, Laird W.; Rusch, Frank

    1994-01-01

    The residential independence of students with disabilities who had exited high school was assessed, using data from 2,686 interviewees in the National Longitudinal Transition Study. Individual characteristics, such as intelligence, living skills, and bad conduct records, were better predictors of postschool living arrangement status than were…

  4. The Changing Mental Health Needs of Youth Admitted to Residential Group Home Care: Comparing Mental Health Status at Admission in 1995 and 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Kristin Duppong; Trout, Alexandra; Chmelka, M. Beth; Burns, Barbara J.; Epstein, Michael H.; Thompson, Ronald W.; Daly, Daniel L.

    2009-01-01

    Youth entering residential care possess significant emotional and behavioral needs; yet, it is uncertain whether these needs have remained constant or are changing over time. This study examined mental health variables from the admission files of 1,047 youth entering residential group home care in 1995 and 2004. Sequential logistical regression…

  5. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jody C; MacDonell, Sue O; Gray, Andrew R; Reid, Malcolm R; Barr, David J; Thomson, Christine D; Houghton, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (-15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  6. Iodine Status of New Zealand Elderly Residents in Long-Term Residential Care

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jody C.; MacDonell, Sue O.; Gray, Andrew R.; Reid, Malcolm R.; Barr, David J.; Thomson, Christine D.; Houghton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to the re-emergence of iodine deficiency in New Zealand, in 2009 the government mandated that all commercially made breads be fortified with iodized salt. There has been no evaluation of the impact of the program on iodine status of the elderly, despite this population group being vulnerable to iodine deficiency or excess. The aim of this study was to describe the iodine status of elderly New Zealanders in residential aged-care homes following the implementation of the bread fortification program. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, involving 309 residents (median age 85 years) from 16 aged-care homes throughout NZ. Information on socio-demographic, anthropometric, dietary and health characteristics were collected. Casual spot urine samples were analysed for urinary iodine concentration (UIC). Blood samples were analysed for serum thyroglobulin, thyroglobulin antibodies, and other biochemical indices. The median UIC (MUIC) of the residents was 72 μg/L, indicating mild iodine deficiency, and 29% had a UIC < 50 μg/L. Median thyroglobulin concentration was 18 ng/mL and 26% had elevated thyroglobulin concentration (>40 ng/mL), suggesting iodine insufficiency. Diuretic use was associated with lower MUIC (p = 0.043). Synthetic thyroxine use was associated with lower odds of having a UIC < 50 μg/L (OR 0.32, p = 0.030)) and lower median thyroglobulin (−15.2 ng/mL, p = 0.001), compared with untreated participants. Frailty was associated with elevated thyroglobulin (p = 0.029), whereas anemia was associated with lower thyroglobulin (p = 0.016). Iodine insufficiency persists in New Zealanders residing in residential aged-care homes despite increasing iodine intake from fortified bread. Research is required to establish optimal iodine intake and status in the elderly. PMID:27455319

  7. Education for primary health care.

    PubMed

    Smith, M; Drickey, R

    1985-07-01

    Postrevolutionary Nicaragua has developed a new health system in which primary health care is a central component. Great progress has been made in correcting the poor health conditions that existed prior to the revolution. As part of an interdisciplinary health team that emphasizes prevention and community service, physicians in the new system play a different role than they did previously. Training for health workers of all types has been expanded. However, scarce teaching and curricular resources have restrained progress in this area. The U.S. based Committee for Health Rights in Central America (CHRICA) has collaborated with the Nicaraguan Ministry of Health to organize two Colloquia on Health in Nicaragua in the past two years. These Colloquia brought together North American participants who provided current medical training and Nicaraguan participants who provided information about the new health system. The Colloquia, whose participants were eligible to receive CME credit from the UCSF School of Medicine, have led to continuing educational exchanges between health care personnel in the two countries. PMID:10272498

  8. Leadership Choices in Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goffin, Stacie G.; Washington, Valora

    2008-01-01

    After more than a century of evolution, early care and education is in transition. No longer is it a narrow endeavor of relative obscurity and of limited interest to leaders from outside the field. Early care and education has become of interest to K-12 leaders seeking to bolster school reform efforts; to corporate entrepreneurs and stockholders…

  9. We CARE About In-Service Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupuis, Mary M.

    Presented in this paper is a description of the Computer Assisted Renewal Education (CARE) program, which uses computer-assisted instruction to reach teachers for inservice education. The CARE program utilizes a mobile van to transport the computer and equipment from one location to another. The system includes a television tube, a set of…

  10. Early Care and Education (ECE) Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Richard

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents several facts about the early care and education in Minnesota. These facts are organized according to the following topics: (1) Children age 5 and younger in Minnesota; (2) Number of early care and education programs and providers; (3) Children ages 0-2 and 3-5 enrolled in quality early childhood programs; (4) Number of…

  11. The Educational Day Care Consultation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Melinda; Valenstein, Thelma

    A research and training program for family day care mothers at the University of Michigan involves both group meetings and individual home consultations by educational consultants, trained community para-professionals. The program is directed toward low income and working class licensed day care mothers and is conducted by the School of Education.…

  12. The "no man's" land of home weekends for children in residential care.

    PubMed

    Laufer, Z

    1994-11-01

    Home Weekends are the main channel of contact between children in placement and their parents. This practice is of special interest because of both the hopes it raises and the risk it entails. The present research examines public welfare agency practice in this domain. Interviews were held with 45 social workers (from 32 agencies) who were responsible for case-managing 74 families with children in residential care (n = 105). Findings clearly indicate that the practice of home weekends is characterized by the following: an absence of professional access to the children and their parent(s) and neglect in assuring the well-being of children; a lack of differential patterns of children's visits or intensity of social worker-parent contact in relation to parents' dysfunctioning; and a lack of implementation of family-oriented intervention. It was also found that, for 50% of the children, the well-being score while at home does not manifest serious distress. This raises the question of whether the conditions obligate placement in a residential setting. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:7850600

  13. Girls in residential care: from child maltreatment to trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood.

    PubMed

    van Vugt, Eveline; Lanctôt, Nadine; Paquette, Geneviève; Collin-Vézina, Delphine; Lemieux, Annie

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined the association between child maltreatment and trauma-related symptoms in emerging adulthood--over and above the incidence of such symptoms and conduct problems during adolescence--among a sample of female adolescents in residential care. This study used data from a longitudinal study. The sample was composed of 89 adolescent females who were first interviewed at time of admission in a residential center (M(age)=15.33 years, SD=1.31) and later in young adulthood (M(age)=19.27, SD=1.55). At time 1, trauma-related symptoms were assessed with the Trauma Symptom Checklist for Children and conduct problems with a composite measure. At time 2, child maltreatment was assessed retrospectively with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, and trauma-related symptoms were reassessed with the Trauma Symptom Inventory-2. Results indicated that child maltreatment, especially emotional abuse and neglect, was related to anxious arousal, depression, and anger in emerging adulthood. This study showed that females from our sample often reported different types of maltreatment during childhood and that these traumatic experiences were significantly associated with poor adult psychological functioning. PMID:24262310

  14. Intervening at the Setting Level to Prevent Behavioral Incidents in Residential Child Care: Efficacy of the CARE Program Model.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Charles V; Smith, Elliott G; Holden, Martha J; Norton, Catherine I; Nunno, Michael A; Sellers, Deborah E

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined the impact of a setting-level intervention on the prevention of aggressive or dangerous behavioral incidents involving youth living in group care environments. Eleven group care agencies implemented Children and Residential Experiences (CARE), a principle-based program that helps agencies use a set of evidence-informed principles to guide programming and enrich the relational dynamics throughout the agency. All agencies served mostly youth referred from child welfare. The 3-year implementation of CARE involved intensive agency-wide training and on-site consultation to agency leaders and managers around supporting and facilitating day-to-day application of the principles in both childcare and staff management arenas. Agencies provided data over 48 months on the monthly frequency of behavioral incidents most related to program objectives. Using multiple baseline interrupted time series analysis to assess program effects, we tested whether trends during the program implementation period declined significantly compared to the 12 months before implementation. Results showed significant program effects on incidents involving youth aggression toward adult staff, property destruction, and running away. Effects on aggression toward peers and self-harm were also found but were less consistent. Staff ratings of positive organizational social context (OSC) predicted fewer incidents, but there was no clear relationship between OSC and observed program effects. Findings support the potential efficacy of the CARE model and illustrate that intervening "upstream" at the setting level may help to prevent coercive caregiving patterns and increase opportunities for healthy social interactions. PMID:27138932

  15. Evaluation in Residential Environmental Education: An Applied Literature Review of Intermediary Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ardoin, Nicole M.; Biedenweg, Kelly; O'Connor, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Residential environmental education aims to enhance proenvironmental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, as well as attain outcomes related to personal and interpersonal skills. Although these outcomes may not be evident for months or even years afterward, few program evaluations investigate how the experience and context affect intended outcomes…

  16. Adaptation to Early Adulthood by a Sample of Youth Discharged from a Residential Education Placement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Loring

    2008-01-01

    Three years of outcome data for foster youth (n = 106) discharged from a one-of-kind residential education service are presented. Findings were that 50% of respondents attended college at some point. Youth reported having 2 or 3 jobs a year with at least one bout of unemployment. Most of the non-college bound youth reported working in low-wage…

  17. What Difference Does It Make? Assessing Outcomes from Participation in a Residential Environmental Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Marc J.; Powell, Robert B.; Ardoin, Nicole M.

    2008-01-01

    The authors explored the influences of 3- and 5-day residential environmental education programs at the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont (TN) on participants' connections with nature, environmental stewardship, interest in learning and discovery, and awareness of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and biodiversity. The authors found…

  18. Treatment and Posttreatment Effects of Residential Treatment Using a Re-education Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Elaine; Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Apperson, Joy; Mustillo, Sarah; Simmers, Deborah

    2006-01-01

    This study examined preliminary effectiveness of one of the first Project Re-ED (Re-education of Emotionally Disturbed children) residential treatment centers for children. Data were collected at admission, at discharge, and up to 6 months postdischarge. Findings show substantial decreases in problem behaviors and improvements in personal…

  19. Physical and psychosocial function in residential aged-care elders: effect of Nintendo Wii Sports games.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Justin W L; Power, Nicola; Wooller, Leslie; Lucas, Patricia; Whatman, Chris

    2014-04-01

    This mixed-methods, quasi-experimental pilot study examined whether the Nintendo Wii Sports (NWS) active video game (exergame) system could significantly improve the functional ability, physical activity levels, and quality of life of 34 older adults (4 men and 30 women, 83 ± 8 yr) living in 2 residential aged-care (RAC) centers. Change score analyses indicated the intervention group had significantly greater increases in bicep curl muscular endurance, physical activity levels, and psychological quality of life than the control group (p < .05). Analysis of the quotes underlying the 3 themes (feeling silly, feeling good; having fun; and something to look forward to) suggested that intervention group participants developed a sense of empowerment and achievement after some initial reluctance and anxiousness. They felt that the games were fun and provided an avenue for greater socialization. These results add some further support to the utilization of NWS exergames in the RAC context. PMID:23752164

  20. Residents' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and participation in leisure activities in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jessica E; O'Connell, Beverly; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J

    2013-10-01

    Social interaction and participation in leisure activities are positively related to the health and well-being of elderly people. The main focus of this exploratory study was to investigate elderly peoples' perceptions and experiences of social interaction and leisure activities living in a residential aged care (RAC) facility. Six residents were interviewed. Themes emerging from discussions about their social interactions included: importance of family, fostering friendships with fellow residents, placement at dining room tables, multiple communication methods, and minimal social isolation and boredom. Excursions away from the RAC facility were favourite activities. Participants commonly were involved in leisure activities to be socially connected. Poor health, family, the RAC facility, staffing, transportation, and geography influenced their social interaction and participation in leisure activities. The use of new technologies and creative problem solving with staff are ways in which residents could enhance their social lives and remain engaged in leisure activities. PMID:24299253

  1. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How Child Assistance Funds Can Be Used §...

  2. Inside a Hall of Mirrors: Residential Care and the Shifting Constructions of Childhood in Mid-Twentieth-Century Britain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fink, Janet

    2008-01-01

    Drawing on imagery from promotional literature produced between 1930 and 1960 by the National Children's Home, a British child welfare charity, this article focuses upon constructions of childhood and child development in the context of residential care for children. It suggests that photographs and their related captions are rich sources through…

  3. Determinants and Effects of Nurse Staffing Intensity and Skill Mix in Residential Care/Assisted Living Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stearns, Sally C.; Park, Jeongyoung; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Konrad, Thomas R.; Sloane, Philip D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Residential care/assisted living facilities have become an alternative to nursing homes for many individuals, yet little information exists about staffing in these settings and the effect of staffing. This study analyzed the intensity and skill mix of nursing staff using data from a four-state study, and their relationship to outcomes.…

  4. Health Status and ADL Functioning of Older Persons with Intellectual Disability: Community Residence versus Residential Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lifshitz, Hefziba; Merrick, Joav; Morad, Mohammed

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to study differences in aging phenomena among adults with intellectual disability (ID), who live in community residence versus their peers in residential care centers and to determine the contribution of health status, age, gender, etiology and level of ID to the decline in ADL function with age. Our study was based…

  5. 25 CFR 20.502 - Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Can Child Assistance funds be used to place Indian children in residential care facilities? 20.502 Section 20.502 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AND SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAMS Child Assistance How Child Assistance Funds Can Be Used § 20.502...

  6. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas (intentionality,…

  7. A Long-Term Leisure Program for Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Residential Care Settings: Research to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert A.; Burke, Amie M.; Fung, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    We studied the effectiveness of an individually-tailored leisure program implemented by direct care staff in a residential program for 28 adults with severe to profound intellectual disability using a multiple baseline design across two homes over a 1.5 year baseline and treatment period followed by another nearly 1.5 year maintenance phase. The…

  8. Children with and without Disabilities in Residential Care: Risk at Program Entry, Departure and Six-Month Follow-Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chmelka, M. B.; Trout, A. L.; Mason, W. A.; Wright, T.

    2011-01-01

    Although youth with disabilities represent nearly a third of the population served in residential care, little is known about the functioning of these children as compared to their peers without disabilities at program entry, departure and six-month follow-up. This study sought to extend previous research by evaluating the behavioral, mental…

  9. "The Extreme End of a Spectrum of Violence": Physical Abuse, Hegemony and Resistance in British Residential Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coldrey, Barry

    2001-01-01

    Explores reasons for the abuse phenomenon throughout traditional residential care provided for boys and young men in the United Kingdom. Addresses specifically the severe discipline which often became abusive, the presence of sexual abuse, severe staff reaction to resistance, and the similarities of regimen across the spectrum of traditional care…

  10. Improving compassionate care skills with education.

    PubMed

    Walker, Mhairi; Quinn, Isabel; Corder, Karen

    The ability to show compassion in practice is a crucial nursing skill. This article discusses how education can change the culture around the delivery of compassionate care. It focuses on using education as a tool and integrating other strategies such as communication, recruitment and leadership, which not only underpin the use of education, but are inextricably linked to bringing about change in the delivery of compassionate care. PMID:27337790

  11. Attachment relationships of adolescents who spent their infancy in residential group care: The Greek Metera study.

    PubMed

    Vorria, Panayiota; Ntouma, Maria; Vairami, Maria; Rutter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A prospective longitudinal study beginning whilst the infants were living in the Metera Babies Centre showed that the great majority showed a disorganized attachment during the period of residential care, even though neither abuse/neglect nor subnutrition were involved. There was an initial follow-up post-adoption age at four years. This paper concerns a further follow-up of the 52 adopted adolescents aged 13 years who had spent their first two years of life in Metera Babies Centre. They were compared to 36 adolescents reared in their biological families who, during their infancy, attended full-time public day care. The key aim was to examine continuities and discontinuities between early and contemporary relationships. The Child Attachment Interview was employed in adolescence. The main findings were a significant decrease in the rate of disorganization and a lack of a significant difference between the previously institutionalized group and the family care comparison group on attachment qualities in adolescence. There was not sufficient statistical power, however, to detect a small difference. PMID:25862310

  12. Family Foster Care, Kinship Networks, and Residential Care of Abandoned Infants in Egypt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megahead, Hamido A.; Cesario, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    While infant abandonment has occurred in all segments of society, on all continents, and across all generations, the motivations for this practice are varied and depend upon the social norms of a specific geographic region at a given point in time. Western approaches addressing the care of abandoned infants focus on terminating parental rights and…

  13. The contribution of Australian residential early parenting centres to comprehensive mental health care for mothers of infants: evidence from a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Australia's public access residential early parenting services provide programs to assist parents who self-refer, to care for their infants and young children. Treatment programs target infant feeding and sleeping difficulties and maternal mental health. There is limited systematic evidence of maternal and infant mental health, psychosocial circumstances or presenting problems, or the effectiveness of the programs. The aim of this study was to contribute to the evidence base about residential early parenting services. Methods A prospective cohort design was used. A consecutive sample of mothers with infants under one year old recruited during admission to a public access residential early parenting service for a 4 or 5 night stay in Melbourne, Australia was recruited. They completed structured self-report questionnaires, incorporating standardised measures of infant behaviour and maternal mood, during admission and at one and six months after discharge. Changes in infant behaviour and maternal psychological functioning after discharge were observed. Results 79 women completed the first questionnaire during admission, and 58 provided complete data. Women admitted to the residential program have poor physical and mental health, limited family support, and infants with substantial behaviour difficulties. One month after discharge significant improvements in infant behaviour and maternal psychological functioning were observed (mean (SD) daily crying and fussing during admission = 101.02 (100.8) minutes reduced to 37.7 (55.2) at one month post discharge, p < 0.001; mean (SD) Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale at admission = 11.3 (5.7) reduced to 6.78 (4.44), at one month, p < 0.001) which were sustained at six months. Participant satisfaction with the program was high; 58 (88%) found the support of the nurses and 50 (75%) the social support of other mothers very helpful. Conclusions This psycho-educational approach is an effective and acceptable early

  14. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Patients Nursed at Home or in Long-Term Care Residential Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Arpaia, Guido; Ambrogi, Federico; Penza, Maristella; Ianes, Aladar Bruno; Serras, Alessandra; Boracchi, Patrizia; Cimminiello, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Background. This study investigated the prevalence of and impact of risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in patients with chronic diseases, bedridden or with greatly limited mobility, cared for at home or in long-term residential facilities. Methods. We enrolled 221 chronically ill patients, all over 18 years old, markedly or totally immobile, at home or in long-term care facilities. They were screened at the bedside by simplified compression ultrasound. Results. The prevalence of asymptomatic proximal DVT was 18% (95% CI 13–24%); there were no cases of symptomatic DVT or pulmonary embolism. The best model with at most four risk factors included: previous VTE, time of onset of reduced mobility, long-term residential care as opposed to home care and causes of reduced mobility. The risk of DVT for patients with reduced mobility due to cognitive impairment was about half that of patients with cognitive impairment/dementia. Conclusions. This is a first estimate of the prevalence of DVT among bedridden or low-mobility patients. Some of the risk factors that came to light, such as home care as opposed to long-term residential care and cognitive deficit as causes of reduced mobility, are not among those usually observed in acutely ill patients. PMID:21748017

  15. Staff and youth views on autonomy and emancipation from residential care: a participatory research study.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Maria Manuela; Patrício, Joana Nunes; Graça, João

    2013-08-01

    The use of participatory approaches in designing services is still relatively uncommon. In this study, we helped design a service to support the transition of youth from residential care to independent living by exploring the perspectives of staff and of youth regarding: (a) the concept and development of autonomy; and (b) key factors in developing this type of service. We gathered the data through 10 interviews with staff (n=10) and 4 focus groups with youth (n=21), and subjected the data to a thematic content analysis. Staff defined autonomy as self-regulation and self-care, and identified three paths to foster autonomy--a sense of normality, meaningful relationships, and planning for emancipation. The staff and youth identified the following important aspects in designing the service: achieving normality (e.g. limited number of residents), promoting youth capacity (e.g. skill-building activities), providing social support (e.g. trust and respect between residents), and assuring guidance and boundaries (e.g. supervision of youth). PMID:23681252

  16. Poly-victimization and psychopathology among Spanish adolescents in residential care.

    PubMed

    Segura, Anna; Pereda, Noemí; Guilera, Georgina; Abad, Judit

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of poly-victimization on symptom severity among adolescents being cared for by the child welfare system in a southwestern European country. The sample consisted of 127 youths (62 males and 65 females) aged 12-17 years (M=14.60, SD=1.61) who were recruited from short- and long-term residential centers. The Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire (Finkelhor, Hamby, Ormrod, & Turner, 2005) and the Youth Self-Report (Achenbach & Rescorla, 2001) were used to assess interpersonal victimization experiences and psychopathology, respectively. Victim (n=68), low poly-victim (n=48), and high poly-victim (n=18) groups had comparable rates of psychopathology severity, with the exception of rule-breaking behavior, which was more severe among those with more victimization experiences (Cramer's V=.342). Poly-victimization was shown to be a significant predictor of clinically severe rule-breaking behavior, thought problems, and anxiety/depression symptoms. Among victimization types, sexual and electronic victimization significantly predicted withdrawn/depressed and aggressive behavior, and attention problems, respectively. The results of this study highlight the importance of assessing a wide range of victimization experiences among adolescents in care, since poly-victimization seems to underlie the serious psychological problems these youth present. PMID:27082753

  17. Effectiveness and Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in Residential Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    James, Sigrid; Alemi, Qais; Zepeda, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Prompted by calls to implement evidence-based practices (EBPs) into residential care settings (RCS), this review addresses three questions: (1) Which EBPs have been tested with children and youth within the context of RCS? (2) What is the evidence for their effectiveness within such settings? (3) What implementation issues arise when transporting EBPs into RCS? Methods Evidence-based psychosocial interventions and respective outcome studies, published from 1990–2012, were identified through a multi-phase search process, involving the review of four major clearinghouse websites and relevant electronic databases. To be included, effectiveness had to have been previously established through a comparison group design regardless of the setting, and interventions tested subsequently with youth in RCS. All outcome studies were evaluated for quality and bias using a structured appraisal tool. Results Ten interventions matching a priori criteria were identified: Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach, Aggression Replacement Training, Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, Ecologically-Based Family Therapy, Eye Movement and Desensitization Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multimodal Substance Abuse Prevention, Residential Student Assistance Program, Solution-Focused Brief Therapy, and Trauma Intervention Program for Adjudicated and At-Risk Youth. Interventions were tested in 13 studies, which were conducted in different types of RCS, using a variety of study methods. Outcomes were generally positive, establishing the relative effectiveness of the interventions with youth in RCS across a range of psychosocial outcomes. However, concerns about methodological bias and confounding factors remain. Most studies addressed implementation issues, reporting on treatment adaptations, training and supervision, treatment fidelity and implementation barriers. Conclusion The review unearthed a small but important body of knowledge that demonstrates that EBPs can be implemented

  18. The prevention and management of constipation in older adults in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Grieve, Jennifer

    2006-03-01

    The need to implement programs for developing leadership and practice improvement skills using an evidence-based practice approach to practice change is becoming more apparent in the health and aged care services. This is no more apparent than in high care residential health and aged care services, where health professionals are increasingly required to provide care for older people with multifocal and complex healthcare needs. This paper describes one of the projects undertaken as part of the Joanna Briggs Institute Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing Clinical Aged Care Fellowship program from February 2005 to June 2005. This purpose of this particular project was twofold. First it sought to improve the local practice in the prevention and management of constipation and that this practice was performed according to the best available evidence. Second to use the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Guidance (PACES) program to implement a process of audit and feedback as a strategy to improve practice. The project was designed to link in with the facility's existing quality improvement program and better practice continence management project. The project was conducted over 6 months and was divided into six stages involving the identification of evidence-based standards of care, an initial audit to determine appropriate sample size, a clinical audit across the facility, planning of the implementation process, implementation of the action plan and re-audit to assess practice change. Overall, the results were extremely positive and demonstrated a real improvement in practice relating to constipation in the project facility. This success, however, needs to be seen in the context of the benefits of having the support of senior management, an existing quality improvement and continence management better practice project, and a culture of clinical review. Although there will always be more work to be done, the success of this project can be

  19. Early Childhood Care and Education in Curacao.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedder, Paul; Kook, Hetty

    1993-01-01

    Examines the quality of care and education for Curacao's children under the age of four. Notes that, whereas the children's health situation is generally good and stable, child abuse and negligence are on the rise, and there is a growing need for good quality child-care centers. (TJQ)

  20. Evidence for the Treatment of Osteoporosis with Vitamin D in Residential Care and in the Community Dwelling Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, John A. A.; Inderjeeth, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Vitamin D is common treatment for osteoporosis. Both age >70 years and living in residential care are associated with increased fracture risk. Community dwelling elderly are a heterogeneous group who may have more similatiry with residential care groups than younger community dwelling counterparts. Aims. To review the evidence for cholecalciferol or ergocalciferol tretment of osteoporosis in either community dwelling patients aged ≥70 years of age, or redidential care patients. Secondly endpoints were changes in bone mineral denisty, and in bone turnover markers. Methods. We performed a literature search using search terms for osteoporosis and vitamin D. Treatment for at least one year was required. Results. Only one residential care study using cholecalciferol, showed non-vertebral and hip fracture reduction in vitamin D deficient subjects. In the community setting one quasi randomised study using ergocalciferol showed reduction in total but not hip or non-vertebral fracture, and a second randomised study showed increased hip fracture risk. Three studies reported increases in hip bone mineral denisty. Discussion. A minority of studies demonstrated a fracture benefit form vitamin D and one suggested possible harm in a community setting. Current practice should be to only offer this treatment to subjects identified as deficient. PMID:24058907

  1. Interprofessional education in practice: Evaluation of a work integrated aged care program.

    PubMed

    Lawlis, Tanya; Wicks, Alison; Jamieson, Maggie; Haughey, Amy; Grealish, Laurie

    2016-03-01

    Health professional clinical education is commonly conducted in single discipline modes, thus limiting student collaboration skills. Aged care residential facilities, due to the chronic and complex health care needs of residents, provide an ideal placement to provide a collaborative experience. Interprofessional education is widely acknowledged as the pedagogical framework through which to facilitate collaboration. The aim of the evaluation was to assess student attitudes towards collaboration after active involvement in an interprofessional education program. Students studying nursing, occupational therapy, and aged care were invited to complete a version of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale before and after participating in a three-week pilot interprofessional program. A positive change in student attitudes towards other health professionals and the importance of working in interprofessional teams was reported with significant differences between two statements indicated: Learning with health-care students before qualifications would improve relationships after qualifications; and I learned a lot from the students from the other disciplines. The innovative pilot project was found to enhance student learning in interprofessional teams and the aged care environment. Further development of this and similar interprofessional programs is required to develop sustainable student projects that have health benefits for residents in aged care residential facilities. PMID:26733460

  2. Evaluation of a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system at a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rohan A; Lee, Cik Yin; Hussainy, Safeera Y

    2016-06-01

    Objectives The aims of the study were to investigate discrepancies between general practitioners' paper medication orders and pharmacy-prepared electronic medication administration charts, back-up paper charts and dose-administration aids, as well as delays between prescribing, charting and administration, at a 90-bed residential aged care facility that used a hybrid paper-electronic medication management system. Methods A cross-sectional audit of medication orders, medication charts and dose-administration aids was performed to identify discrepancies. In addition, a retrospective audit was performed of delays between prescribing and availability of an updated electronic medication administration chart. Medication administration records were reviewed retrospectively to determine whether discrepancies and delays led to medication administration errors. Results Medication records for 88 residents (mean age 86 years) were audited. Residents were prescribed a median of eight regular medicines (interquartile range 5-12). One hundred and twenty-five discrepancies were identified. Forty-seven discrepancies, affecting 21 (24%) residents, led to a medication administration error. The most common discrepancies were medicine omission (44.0%) and extra medicine (19.2%). Delays from when medicines were prescribed to when they appeared on the electronic medication administration chart ranged from 18min to 98h. On nine occasions (for 10% of residents) the delay contributed to missed doses, usually antibiotics. Conclusion Medication discrepancies and delays were common. Improved systems for managing medication orders and charts are needed. What is known about the topic? Hybrid paper-electronic medication management systems, in which prescribers' orders are transcribed into an electronic system by pharmacy technicians and pharmacists to create medication administration charts, are increasingly replacing paper-based medication management systems in Australian residential aged care

  3. Development and dissemination of collaborative family-oriented services: the case of community/day residential care in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elizur, Yoel

    2012-03-01

    The initiation, development, and dissemination of family-oriented programs are a unifying thread that highlights family therapy's contribution to the fields of mental/physical health and social services. These demanding tasks require an ecosystemic vision, a supportive larger context, and a range of skills. This article delineates the evolution of community and day residential care in Israel by examining processes at different ecological levels: the formulation and implementation of national social policy, the follow-up of two family-oriented facilities, one of which thrived while the other eventually closed, and the residential care provided to 1 family with 3 children. The analysis of this multilevel data highlights 4 facilitating/obstructing factors that have had major impact on family-oriented programs: support by both national and local sociopolitical-professional administration, program's management autonomy, staff training, support and development, and effective facility leadership that establishes and nurtures family-oriented organizational structure and culture. PMID:22428716

  4. Patient stoma care: educational theory in practice.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jenny

    Patients undergoing stoma formation encounter many challenges including psychosocial issues, relationship concerns and fear of leakage. Leakage, inappropriate product usage and poor patient adaptation post stoma formation has cost implications for the NHS. Developing good, practical stoma care skills has been identified as improving patient outcomes, promoting the provision of quality care and improving efficiency within the NHS. However, a thorough literature search indicated that there is little research available on patient stoma care education. This is considered surprising by Metcalf (1999), O'Connor (2005) and the author of this article. This article considers and adapts generic educational theory to make it pertinent to patient stoma care education in order to bridge the gap between theory and practice. PMID:22874778

  5. The Language Functioning of Youth at Entry to Residential Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Huscroft-D'Angelo, Jacqueline; DeSalvo, Catherine; Gehringer, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Although much is known about the behavioral and educational characteristics of youth at entry to residential care, little is known about youth language performance. Given the impact of language deficits on outcomes, this study assessed the specific language skills of 70 adolescents at entry to a residential treatment setting. Results revealed…

  6. Promoting psychosocial adaptation of youths in residential care through animal-assisted psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balluerka, Nekane; Muela, Alexander; Amiano, Nora; Caldentey, Miguel A

    2015-12-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the influence of animal-assisted psychotherapy (AAP) on the psychosocial adaptation of a group of adolescents in residential care who had suffered traumatic childhood experiences and who presented with mental health problems. This study recruited 63 youths (mean age=15.27, SD=1.63) who were divided into two groups: a treatment group of 39 youths (19 female and 20 male; mean age=15.03, SD=0.51) and a control group of 24 (five female and 19 male; mean age=15.67, SD=1.63). The youths who underwent the AAP program had higher school adjustment in comparison to their peers who did not receive treatment. Their hyperactive behavior decreased, and they showed better social skills, more leadership, and fewer attention problems. They also showed a more positive attitude toward their teachers in comparison to controls. No differences were observed in other variables associated with clinical symptoms or personal adjustment. These results suggest that AAP can be effective with teenagers who have suffered childhood traumas and who present with problems of psychosocial adaptation. PMID:26443670

  7. A study of behaviour profiles among intellectually disabled people in residential care in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Janos; Radvanyi, Katalin; Regenyi, Eniko; Dinya, Elek

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the behavioural dimensions of 269 intellectually disabled (ID) people in residential care in specialized institutions in Tolna county (South-West Hungary) with the aim of screening the frequency and severity of the relevant behavioural symptoms associated with intellectual disability and depending on the level of intellectual impairment. Only 120 residents had an International Classification of Disease (ICD) diagnosis of "mental retardation (MR)" and a valid IQ grading either by means of the Hungarian standard version of the HAWIK or by the coloured Raven test. 4 IQ groups were created: borderline (B), mild (MID), moderate (MOD) and profound (PID) intellectual disability subgroups. The Hungarian pilot version of the Behaviour Problem Inventory (BPI) was used. seventy-two percent of the residents displayed behavioural problems. All scale score means exhibited an enhancing tendency with IQ loss, as both frequency and Seventy increased linearly towards the more severe groups, but significantly only in the category of stereotyped behaviour. The authors focussed on problems of patient recruitment and discussed the measurement of behavioural and other psychiatric symptoms when researchers reported on the increased occurrence of behaviour and psychiatric symptoms in ID populations. PMID:21530162

  8. Indirect and verbal victimization by peers among at-risk youth in residential care.

    PubMed

    Attar-Schwartz, Shalhevet; Khoury-Kassabri, Mona

    2015-04-01

    Verbal and indirect violence among peers in residential care settings (RCSs) are understudied social problems. This study, based on a sample of 1,324 Jewish and Arab adolescents aged 11-19 in 32 RCSs, examines the prevalence and multilevel correlates of verbal (such as cursing) and indirect (such as social exclusion) forms of victimization by peers in RCSs. Adolescents completed a self-report anonymous questionnaire in their facility. Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) is used to examine the links between adolescents' victimization, individual-level characteristics (gender, age, adjustment difficulties, self-efficacy, staff maltreatment experiences and perceived institutional social climate), and RCS-level characteristics (setting type of care, size, structure, and ethnic affiliation). Most adolescents reported having been verbally (73%) and indirectly (62%) victimized by their peers at least once in the month prior to filling out the questionnaire. Vulnerability to indirect violence is higher among girls and those with low perception of their social self-efficacy. Younger adolescents, adolescents with higher levels of overall adjustment difficulties, those experiencing high levels of physical maltreatment by RCS staff and those perceiving levels of child friendliness in their RCS as poor, were all more vulnerable to verbal and indirect victimization by peers. Verbal victimization is positively associated with residence in Jewish RCSs and indirect victimization is positively associated with residence in therapeutic settings which contain higher concentrations of vulnerable youth compared with rehabilitative settings. The findings can assist in designing anti-bullying intervention and prevention programs tailored for the at-risk children and institutions identified in the study. PMID:25626336

  9. Assessing the homogenization of urban land management with an application to US residential lawn care.

    PubMed

    Polsky, Colin; Grove, J Morgan; Knudson, Chris; Groffman, Peter M; Bettez, Neil; Cavender-Bares, Jeannine; Hall, Sharon J; Heffernan, James B; Hobbie, Sarah E; Larson, Kelli L; Morse, Jennifer L; Neill, Christopher; Nelson, Kristen C; Ogden, Laura A; O'Neil-Dunne, Jarlath; Pataki, Diane E; Chowdhury, Rinku Roy; Steele, Meredith K

    2014-03-25

    Changes in land use, land cover, and land management present some of the greatest potential global environmental challenges of the 21st century. Urbanization, one of the principal drivers of these transformations, is commonly thought to be generating land changes that are increasingly similar. An implication of this multiscale homogenization hypothesis is that the ecosystem structure and function and human behaviors associated with urbanization should be more similar in certain kinds of urbanized locations across biogeophysical gradients than across urbanization gradients in places with similar biogeophysical characteristics. This paper introduces an analytical framework for testing this hypothesis, and applies the framework to the case of residential lawn care. This set of land management behaviors are often assumed--not demonstrated--to exhibit homogeneity. Multivariate analyses are conducted on telephone survey responses from a geographically stratified random sample of homeowners (n = 9,480), equally distributed across six US metropolitan areas. Two behaviors are examined: lawn fertilizing and irrigating. Limited support for strong homogenization is found at two scales (i.e., multi- and single-city; 2 of 36 cases), but significant support is found for homogenization at only one scale (22 cases) or at neither scale (12 cases). These results suggest that US lawn care behaviors are more differentiated in practice than in theory. Thus, even if the biophysical outcomes of urbanization are homogenizing, managing the associated sustainability implications may require a multiscale, differentiated approach because the underlying social practices appear relatively varied. The analytical approach introduced here should also be productive for other facets of urban-ecological homogenization. PMID:24616515

  10. Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility.

    PubMed

    Son, Sungmin; Jeon, Byoungjin; Kim, Heejung

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the critical importance of active obesity management through a fitness program, and to provide foundational data required for effective obesity management of disabled persons residing in residential carse facilities. [Subjects and Methods] The study period lasted 16 weeks, from August 1 to November 30, 2014. The study participants comprised 9 individuals and they participated in a walking exercise program. An occupational therapist assessed each participant's body weight, body composition (body mass index [BMI], body fat, and abdominal fat), basic fitness (muscle strength and flexibility), and waist circumference. Collected data were encoded by items and analyzed with SPSS ver.18.0. [Results] It was found that the body weight, body composition (BMI, body fat, and abdominal fat), and waist circumference decreased significantly, while baseline fitness (muscle strength and flexibility) improved significantly. [Conclusion] Obesity management is critically important for intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. Active care through continuous program implementation is needed. Accordingly, walking exercise programs should be offered to obese intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. PMID:27134359

  11. Effects of a walking exercise program for obese individuals with intellectual disability staying in a residential care facility

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sungmin; Jeon, Byoungjin; Kim, Heejung

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to confirm the critical importance of active obesity management through a fitness program, and to provide foundational data required for effective obesity management of disabled persons residing in residential carse facilities. [Subjects and Methods] The study period lasted 16 weeks, from August 1 to November 30, 2014. The study participants comprised 9 individuals and they participated in a walking exercise program. An occupational therapist assessed each participant’s body weight, body composition (body mass index [BMI], body fat, and abdominal fat), basic fitness (muscle strength and flexibility), and waist circumference. Collected data were encoded by items and analyzed with SPSS ver.18.0. [Results] It was found that the body weight, body composition (BMI, body fat, and abdominal fat), and waist circumference decreased significantly, while baseline fitness (muscle strength and flexibility) improved significantly. [Conclusion] Obesity management is critically important for intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. Active care through continuous program implementation is needed. Accordingly, walking exercise programs should be offered to obese intellectually disabled persons residing in residential care facilities. PMID:27134359

  12. Literature review to identify factors that support implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Masso, Malcolm; McCarthy, Grace

    2009-06-01

    The aim was to undertake a review of the literature on change management, quality improvement, evidence-based practice and diffusion of innovations to identify key factors that might influence the uptake and continued use of evidence in residential aged care. The key factors will be used to shape and inform the evaluation of the Encouraging Best Practice in Residential Aged Care Program which commenced in Australia in 2007. MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched using combinations of search terms. Searching focused on existing literature reviews, discussions of relevant conceptual and theoretical frameworks and primary studies that have examined the implementation of evidence-based practice in residential aged care. Keyword searching was supplemented with snowball searching (following up on the references cited in the papers identified by the search), searching by key authors in the field and hand searching of a small number of journals. In general, the period covered by the searches was from 2002 to 2008. The findings from the literature are often equivocal. Analysis and consolidation of factors derived from the literature that might influence the implementation of evidence-based practice resulted in the identification of eight factors: (i) a receptive context for change; (ii) having a model of change to guide implementation; (iii) adequate resources; (iv) staff with the necessary skills; (v) stakeholder engagement, participation and commitment; (vi) the nature of the change in practice; (vii) systems in place to support the use of evidence; and (viii) demonstrable benefits of the change. Most of the literature included in the review is from studies in healthcare and hence the generalisability to residential aged care is largely unknown. However, the focus of this research is on clinical care, within the context of residential aged care, hence the healthcare literature is relevant. The factors are relatively broad and cover

  13. An Outcomes Perspective of the Role of Residential Treatment in the System of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, John S.; Woltman, Heather; Martinovich, Zoran; Hancock, Brian

    2009-01-01

    A variety of factors are putting great pressure on residential treatment centers to justify their role in the child serving system through evidence of impact on the lives of children, youth, and families. The present study describes the role of residential treatment from an outcomes perspective in a midsized state over the course of a 5 year…

  14. The Associations between Structural Treatment Characteristics and Post-Treatment Functioning in Compulsory Residential Youth Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nijhof, Karin S.; Vermulst, Ad A.; Veerman, Jan W.; van Dam, Coleta; Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Scholte, Ron H. J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In 2005 a new compulsory residential treatment program was developed for adolescents in need for protection against themselves or their environment. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the association of structural treatment characteristics of this new residential treatment program (i.e., duration of treatment,…

  15. Poverty, Hunger, Education, and Residential Status Impact Survival in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Wanke, Christine; Terrin, Norma; Skinner, Sally; Knox, Tamsin

    2010-01-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), HIV infected people have higher mortality than non-infected. Lower socioeconomic status (SES) predicts higher mortality in many chronic illnesses but data in people with HIV is limited. We evaluated 878 HIV infected individuals followed from 1995 to 2005. Cox proportional hazards for all-cause mortality were estimated for SES measures and other factors. Mixed effects analyses examined how SES impacts factors predicting death. The 200 who died were older, had lower CD4 counts, and higher viral loads (VL). Age, transmission category, education, albumin, CD4 counts, VL, hunger, and poverty predicted death in univariate analyses; age, CD4 counts, albumin, VL, and poverty in the multivariable model. Mixed models showed associations between (1) CD4 counts with education and hunger; (2) albumin with education, homelessness, and poverty; and (3) VL with education and hunger. SES contributes to mortality in HIV infected persons directly and indirectly, and should be a target of health policy in this population. PMID:20632079

  16. Early Education and Care, and Reconceptualizing Play. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Brown, Mac H., Ed.

    Providing a forum for current thought about the field of early education and care, this book reviews efforts worldwide to educate young children. The book examines child care quality, presents a cultural feminist perspective on caregiving, discusses curricular issues, and considers the role of play in early childhood practice. The chapters are:…

  17. Caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD.

    PubMed

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Larsson, Lise-Lotte Franklin; Norberg, Astrid

    2014-06-01

    Caring for people with dementia and working in dementia care is described as having both rewarding and unpleasant aspects and has been studied to a minor extent. This study aims to explore care providers' narrated experiences of caring for people with dementia disease (DD) and working in a private not-for-profit residential care facility for people with DD. Nine care providers were interviewed about their experiences, the interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis. The analysis revealed that participants were struggling to perform person-centred care, which meant trying to see the person behind the disease, dealing with troublesome situations in the daily care, a two-edged interaction with relatives, feelings of shortcomings and troubled conscience, and the need for improvements in dementia care. The analysis also revealed an ambiguous work situation, which meant a challenging value base, the differently judged work environment, feelings of job satisfaction and the need for a functional leadership and management. The results illuminate participants' positive as well as negative experiences and have identified areas requiring improvements. It seems of great importance to strive for a supportive and attendant leadership, a leadership which aims to empower care providers in their difficult work. Using conscience as a driving force together in the work group may benefit care providers' health. PMID:23834127

  18. Integrating self-care into nursing education.

    PubMed

    Meadows, L C

    1998-05-01

    The didactic and clinical components of the mental health curriculum content within a school of nursing in the southeastern United States were revised to integrate a self-care focus. The major learning modalities used were group process dynamics and a structured psychoeducation approach. A six-hour per quarter credit course was divided into three parts: theory, laboratory, and clinical. Students averaged 3 hours in class, 2 hours in a simulated college laboratory, and 7 hours at a clinical site per week for one quarter. Theoretical concepts were taught during class time; self-care activities and concepts were taught in the college laboratory; and clinical time was devoted to practicing self-care through patient-nurse interactions and group work. Nurse educators may use this study to guide curriculum development in fostering caring models of nursing education. PMID:9605199

  19. Why are some care homes better than others? An empirical study of the factors associated with quality of care for older people in residential homes in Surrey, England.

    PubMed

    Gage, Heather; Knibb, Wendy; Evans, Joanne; Williams, Peter; Rickman, Neil; Bryan, Karen

    2009-11-01

    This paper reports an empirical study that investigated associations between the quality of care received by older people in residential settings and features of the care homes in which they live. Data were gathered from the first announced inspection reports (2002-2003) of all 258 care homes for older people in one county of England (Surrey). The number of inspected standards failed in each home was used as the main indicator of quality of care. Independent variables (for each home) were: size, type, specialist registration, on-site nursing, ownership, year registered, location, maximum fee, vacancies, resident dependency, whether the home took publicly funded residents, care staff qualifications and managerial quality. Quality of care was modelled using a Poisson count maximum likelihood method based on 245 (91%) of the inspected homes for which relevant data were available. The results showed that quality of care (as defined by failures on national standards) was statistically associated with features of care homes and their residents. A higher probability of failing a standard was significantly associated with being a home that: was a for-profit small business (adjusted risk ratio (RR) = 1.17); was registered before 2000 (adj. RR = 1.22), accommodated publicly funded residents (adj. RR = 1.12); was registered to provide nursing care (adj. RR = 1.12). Fewer failures were associated with homes that were corporate for-profit (adj. RR = 0.82); held a specialist registration (adj. RR = 0.91); charged higher maximum fees (adj. RR = 0.98 per 100 pound sterling unit). A secondary analysis revealed a stronger model: higher scores on managerial standards correlated with fewer failures on other standards (r = 0.65, P < 0.001). The results of this study may help inform future policy. They are discussed in the context of alternative approaches to measuring quality of residential care, and in terms of their generalisability. PMID:19601991

  20. Early Education and Care in Jamaica: A Grassroots Effort.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, J. W.; Milner, V.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the history of early childhood education in Jamaica and current trends. Considers the sponsorship of early childhood education and care programs; child care philosophy and policy; the variety of child care and education programs available, including Basic Schools, Infant Schools, and day care centers; teacher qualifications;…

  1. Teachers' Care in Higher Education: Contesting Gendered Constructions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mariskind, Clare

    2014-01-01

    There is little research on care in higher education, and yet for many of those who teach in higher education institutions, care is an important part of their work. Care in the compulsory education sector has traditionally been linked to the feminine, and this paper considers whether this is also the case in higher education. It investigates how…

  2. Exploring Parental Preferences: Care or Education: What Do Greek Parents Aspire from Day Care Centres?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care is a multifaceted institution. Based on children's age, a number of different settings operate, which have usually two distinct aims. Kindergartens provide mainly education whereas day care centres provide care. Yet, in recent years, the need to establish programmes which provide both education and care to…

  3. "I stand alone." An ethnodrama about the (dis)connections between a client and professionals in a residential care home.

    PubMed

    Baur, Vivianne; Abma, Tineke; Baart, Ingrid

    2014-09-01

    Client participation in elderly care organizations requires shifting traditional power relations and establishing communicative action that involves the lifeworlds of clients and professionals alike. This article describes a particular form of client participation in which one client was part of a team of professionals in a residential care home. Their joint remit was to plan the implementation of a new personal care file for residents. We describe the interactions within this team through an ethnodrama, based on participant observations and the embodied presence of the researcher (first author). The narratives and voices of all team members are dramatized in this ethnodrama. Throughout the project the team members experienced confusion relating to the confrontation between lifeworld and system, as experienced by the client and professionals in the team. We analyze these tensions by making use of a Habermasian theoretical framework. We conclude that forms for collective client participation in residential care homes should be developed based on communicative action between clients and professionals, with room for emotional engagement. PMID:22361817

  4. Electronic Information Systems Use in Residential Care Facilities: The Differential Effect of Ownership Status and Chain Affiliation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jullet A; Zakoscielna, Karolina; Jacobs, Lindsey

    2016-03-01

    The use of electronic information systems (EISs) including electronic health records continues to increase in all sectors of the health care industry. Research shows that EISs may be useful for improving care delivery and decreasing medical errors. The purpose of this project is twofold: First, we describe the prevalence of EIS use among residential care facilities (RCFs), and second, we explore utilization differences by ownership status and chain affiliation. We anticipate that RCFs that are non-profit and non-chain will use more EIS than other categories of RCFs. Data for this project come from the 2010 National Survey of Residential Care Facilities. The sample consists of 2,300 facilities. Overall use of EIS was greatest among RCFs that are non-profit and chain-affiliated. Conversely, the use was lowest among for-profit RCFs that were also non-chain affiliated. This may suggest that these facilities lack the necessary resources or motivation to invest in information systems. PMID:25537650

  5. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes. PMID:25499658

  6. Incorporating Educational Theory into Critical Care Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rashotte, Judy; Thomas, Margot

    2002-01-01

    Describes a critical care nursing program based on Benner's novice-to-expert model, Schon's theory of reflective practice, and Cranton's transformative learning theory. Core components are orientation and continuing education that facilitate acquisition of knowledge, practice skills, attitudes, and critical thinking. (Contains 22 references.) (SK)

  7. Faculty Development for Ambulatory Care Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, William A.; Carline, Jan D.; Ambrozy, Donna M.; Irby, David M.

    1997-01-01

    A study documented the practices of 14 peer-nominated medical educators who conduct faculty development programs in ambulatory care settings. Results indicate the programs were delivered almost exclusively in workshop format, with great similarities in topics and strategies. Evaluation was generally limited to satisfaction ratings. Makes…

  8. Physician Migration, Education, and Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norcini, John J.; Mazmanian, Paul E.

    2005-01-01

    Physician migration is a complex and multifaceted phenomenon that is intimately intertwined with medical education. Imbalances in the production of physicians lead to workforce shortages and surpluses that compromise the ability to deliver adequate and equitable health care to large parts of the world's population. In this overview, we address a…

  9. Online Collaborative Learning in Health Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    At our University, the Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education has delivered a variety of undergraduate and postgraduate courses via flexible distance learning for many years. Distance learning can be a lonely experience for students who may feel isolated and unsupported. However e-learning provides an opportunity to use technology to…

  10. Leadership in Early Care and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, Sharon L., Ed.; Bowman, Barbara T., Ed.

    Despite recent attention to leadership in early care and education, the field does not have a commonly accepted definition of leadership, nor has it engaged in a systematic and collaborative discussion of the properties of leadership. This volume is intended to address these and other shortcomings. In addition to defining leadership and presenting…

  11. Evaluating Multidisciplinary Education in Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirrie, Anne; Wilson, Valerie; Elsegood, John; Hall, John; Hamilton, Sheila; Harden, Ronald; Lee, Diana; Stead, Joan

    A 2-year study evaluated students' and course organizers' perceptions of the effectiveness of multidisciplinary education (ME) in health care and factors that facilitate or inhibit its development. The study had three phases: a survey of ME provision in the United Kingdom; 42 qualitative interviews and focus groups in 14 sites; and data feedback.…

  12. The Predicaments of Non-Residential Students in Ghanaian Institutions of Higher Education: A Micro-Level Empirical Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Addai, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    This paper in the field of capacity building and students' affairs used the external survey assessment techniques of the probit model to examine the predicaments of non-resident students of the College of Technology Education, University of Education, Winneba. Considering the very limited residential facilities and the growing demand for tertiary…

  13. Funding child care and public education.

    PubMed

    Zigler, E F; Finn-Stevenson, M

    1996-01-01

    Ensuring the availability of high-quality, affordable child care to all families who need it is a goal of national importance. The authors suggest that a comprehensive financing and service delivery system for child care is needed to achieve this goal, and the system should ideally be grounded in an existing institution, already present in every community--the public school. The linkage of child care with the public education system would eliminate the false distinction between child care and education, and would create a universally accessible system of child care services for children. The School of the 21st Century is an example of such a system. Initially conceptualized by Zigler, it has now been implemented in 400 schools across 13 states, with the leadership and direction of Finn-Stevenson. This article describes how school districts that have implemented the program employ a mixture of parent fees and local, state, federal, and private dollars to fund it, and then proposes an ideal financing model for the program. In the ideal model, the same mix of funding sources would be retained, but a per-pupil expenditure of about $9,000 per year is advocated to deliver child care and other social services to three- and four-year-olds. Funds for initial start-up could be derived from reallocation of existing dollars, especially state prekindergarten programs, but eventually new funds would be needed to support ongoing operations. PMID:8972130

  14. Scabies outbreaks in residential care homes: factors associated with late recognition, burden and impact. A mixed methods study in England.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, K A; Nalabanda, A; Cassell, J A

    2015-05-01

    Scabies is an important public health problem in residential care homes. Delayed diagnosis contributes to outbreaks, which may be prolonged and difficult to control. We investigated factors influencing outbreak recognition, diagnosis and treatment, and staff experiences of outbreak control, identifying areas for intervention. We carried out a semi-structured survey of managers, affected residents and staff of seven care homes reporting suspected scabies outbreaks in southern England over a 6-month period. Attack rates ranged from 2% to 50%, and most cases had dementia (37/39, 95%). Cases were diagnosed clinically by GPs (59%) or home staff (41%), none by dermatologists. Most outbreaks were attributable to avoidably late diagnosis of the index case. Participants reported considerable challenges in managing scabies outbreaks, including late diagnosis and recognition of outbreaks; logistically difficult mass treatment; distressing treatment processes and high costs. This study demonstrates the need for improved support for care homes in detecting and managing these outbreaks. PMID:25195595

  15. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement II to Volume 7. Preparing the Student: The Education Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutterer, Richard H.

    One of three supplements which accompany chapter 7 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the early childhood education, building trades and services, and office education components of the educational…

  16. The decision of out-of-home placement in residential care after parental neglect: Empirically testing a psychosocial model.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Leonor; Calheiros, Manuela; Pereira, Cícero

    2015-11-01

    Out-of-home placement decisions in residential care are complex, ambiguous and full of uncertainty, especially in cases of parental neglect. Literature on this topic is so far unable to understand and demonstrate the source of errors involved in those decisions and still fails to focus on professional's decision making process. Therefore, this work intends to test a socio-psychological model of decision-making that is a more integrated, dualistic and ecological version of the Theory of Planned Behavior's model. It describes the process through which the decision maker takes into account personal, contextual and social factors of the Decision-Making Ecology in the definition of his/her decision threshold. One hundred and ninety-five professionals from different Children and Youth Protection Units, throughout the Portuguese territory, participated in this online study. After reading a vignette of a (psychological and physical) neglect case toward a one-year-old child, participants were presented with a group of questions that measured worker's assessment of risk, intention, attitude, subjective norm, behavior control and beliefs toward residential care placement decision, as well as worker's behavior experience, emotions and family/child-related-values involved in that decision. A set of structural equation modeling analyses have proven the good fit of the proposed model. The intention to propose a residential care placement decision was determined by cognitive, social, affective, value-laden and experience variables and the perceived risk. Altogether our model explained 61% of professional's decision toward a parental neglect case. The theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed, namely the importance of raising awareness about the existence of these biased psychosocial determinants. PMID:25882668

  17. Exploratory Investigation of Communication Management in Residential-Aged Care: A Comparison of Staff Knowledge, Documentation and Observed Resident-Staff Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Michelle K.; Ward, Elizabeth C.; Scarinci, Nerina A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is a high prevalence of communication difficulty among older people living in residential-aged care. Such functional deficits can have a negative impact on resident quality of life, staff workplace satisfaction and the provision of quality care. Systematic research investigating the nature of communication management in…

  18. Health Education in Child Care: Opportunities and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalle, Maureen A.

    1996-01-01

    This article addresses the health and safety risks associated with child care facilities, including injuries and infectious diseases. Related health education needs for child care providers, parents, and children are examined, and recommendations for health educators are provided. (SM)

  19. Advancing the argument for validity of the Alberta Context Tool with healthcare aides in residential long-term care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Organizational context has the potential to influence the use of new knowledge. However, despite advances in understanding the theoretical base of organizational context, its measurement has not been adequately addressed, limiting our ability to quantify and assess context in healthcare settings and thus, advance development of contextual interventions to improve patient care. We developed the Alberta Context Tool (the ACT) to address this concern. It consists of 58 items representing 10 modifiable contextual concepts. We reported the initial validation of the ACT in 2009. This paper presents the second stage of the psychometric validation of the ACT. Methods We used the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing to frame our validity assessment. Data from 645 English speaking healthcare aides from 25 urban residential long-term care facilities (nursing homes) in the three Canadian Prairie Provinces were used for this stage of validation. In this stage we focused on: (1) advanced aspects of internal structure (e.g., confirmatory factor analysis) and (2) relations with other variables validity evidence. To assess reliability and validity of scores obtained using the ACT we conducted: Cronbach's alpha, confirmatory factor analysis, analysis of variance, and tests of association. We also assessed the performance of the ACT when individual responses were aggregated to the care unit level, because the instrument was developed to obtain unit-level scores of context. Results Item-total correlations exceeded acceptable standards (> 0.3) for the majority of items (51 of 58). We ran three confirmatory factor models. Model 1 (all ACT items) displayed unacceptable fit overall and for five specific items (1 item on adequate space for resident care in the Organizational Slack-Space ACT concept and 4 items on use of electronic resources in the Structural and Electronic Resources ACT concept). This prompted specification of two additional models. Model 2 used

  20. Workforce Development in Early Childhood Education and Care. Research Overview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherton, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    The early childhood education and care industry in Australia is undergoing a shift in philosophy. Changes in policy are driving the industry towards a combined early childhood education and care focus, away from one on child care only. This move has implications for the skilling of the child care workforce. This research overview describes the…

  1. Care and Education of Orphaned Children in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowak-Fabrykowski, Krystyna

    2004-01-01

    Poland is going through tremendous changes in its educational and health-care systems. These changes may bring reforms in the care of orphaned children, because the new politics and economy are forcing educators to look for new solutions and forms of care. There are many problems with the care of orphan children in Poland in both Children's Homes…

  2. Electrical Occupations and Residential Electricity. Vocational Education Curriculum Guide. Industrial and Technical Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Vocational Curriculum Lab., Cedar Lakes.

    This curriculum guide contains eight units that provide the basic curriculum components required to develop lesson plans for the electrical occupations/residential electricity curriculum. The guide is not intended to be a complete, self-contained curriculum, but instead provides the teacher with a number of informational items related to the…

  3. Special Education in the Residential Setting. Proceedings of the Special Study Institute (Columbia University, New York, New York, June 30-July 18, 1969).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younie, William J., Ed.; Goldberg, I. Ignacy, Ed.

    Reported are the proceedings of a three-week conference for special education administrators working with educational programs for the institutionalized mentally handicapped. Conference papers included are: The Role of a Residential Facility in Modern Society, by Robert Dentler; The Present Nature of Residential Populations, by Harvey Dingman;…

  4. Mental Ill-Health and Care Pathways in Adults with Intellectual Disability across Different Residential Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, Eddie; Paschos, Dimitrios; O'Hara, Jean; McCarthy, Jane; Holt, Geraldine; Bouras, Nick; Tsakanikos, Elias

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate co-morbid psychopathology and clinical characteristics of adults with ID living across different types of residential settings. All participants were first time referrals to specialist services in South-East London who lived either with their family (N = 375) or in supported residence (N = 280) or…

  5. Regulating Life in Residential Care: The Unassuming Authority of the Timetable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This paper highlights the various roles and influences of a particular text form: the timetable pasted unassumingly on the wall of a residential home for children. It provides examples of literacy events that take place around the ubiquitous timetable and how through these events, the social dynamics of its residents and those around them are…

  6. Brainwashing and Psychotherapy: The Care of Children in Residential Treatment Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pines, Ayala; Solomon, Trudy

    The purpose of this paper is to present the reader with an indepth study of the special plight of children currently confined in our nation's residential treatment centers. Several of the fundamental legal issues involved in the coercive commitment of minors to such institutions will be discussed, especially those concerning due process and…

  7. Innovative strategies in critical care education.

    PubMed

    Tainter, Christopher R; Wong, Nelson L; Bittner, Edward A

    2015-06-01

    The cadre of information pertinent to critical care medicine continues to expand at a tremendous pace, and we must adapt our strategies of medical education to keep up with the expansion. Differences in learners' characteristics can contribute to a mismatch with historical teaching strategies. Simulation is increasingly popular, but still far from universal. Emerging technology has the potential to improve our knowledge translation, but there is currently sparse literature describing these resources or their benefits and limitations. Directed strategies of assessment and feedback are often suboptimal. Even strategies of accreditation are evolving. This review attempts to summarize salient concepts, suggest resources, and highlight novel strategies to enhance practice and education in the challenging critical care environment. PMID:25702843

  8. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-01-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  9. An Enhanced Variable Two-Step Floating Catchment Area Method for Measuring Spatial Accessibility to Residential Care Facilities in Nanjing.

    PubMed

    Ni, Jianhua; Wang, Jinyin; Rui, Yikang; Qian, Tianlu; Wang, Jiechen

    2015-11-01

    Civil administration departments require reliable measures of accessibility so that residential care facility shortage areas can be accurately identified. Building on previous research, this paper proposes an enhanced variable two-step floating catchment area (EV2SFCA) method that determines facility catchment sizes by dynamically summing the population around the facility until the facility-to-population ratio (FPR) is less than the FPR threshold (FPRT). To minimize the errors from the supply and demand catchments being mismatched, this paper proposes that the facility and population catchment areas must both contain the other location in calculating accessibility. A case study evaluating spatial accessibility to residential care facilities in Nanjing demonstrates that the proposed method is effective in accurately determining catchment sizes and identifying details in the variation of spatial accessibility. The proposed method can be easily applied to assess other public healthcare facilities, and can provide guidance to government departments on issues of spatial planning and identification of shortage and excess areas. PMID:26580637

  10. Effectiveness of a low-threshold physical activity intervention in residential aged care – results of a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cichocki, Martin; Quehenberger, Viktoria; Zeiler, Michael; Adamcik, Tanja; Manousek, Matthias; Stamm, Tanja; Krajic, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Research on effectiveness of low-threshold mobility interventions that are viable for users of residential aged care is scarce. Low-threshold is defined as keeping demands on organizations (staff skills, costs) and participants (health status, discipline) rather low. The study explored the effectiveness of a multi-faceted, low-threshold physical activity program in three residential aged-care facilities in Austria. Main goals were enhancement of mobility by conducting a multi-faceted training program to foster occupational performance and thus improve different aspects of health-related quality of life (QoL). Participants and methods The program consisted of a weekly session of 60 minutes over a period of 20 weeks. A standardized assessment of mobility status and health-related QoL was applied before and after the intervention. A total of 222 of 276 participants completed the randomized controlled trial study (intervention group n=104, control group n=118; average age 84 years, 88% female). Results Subjective health status (EuroQoL-5 dimensions: P=0.001, d=0.36) improved significantly in the intervention group, and there were also positive trends in occupational performance (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure). No clear effects were found concerning the functional and cognitive measures applied. Conclusion Thus, the low-threshold approach turned out to be effective primarily on subjective health-related QoL. This outcome could be a useful asset for organizations offering low-threshold physical activity interventions. PMID:26056438

  11. Policy options to improve leadership of middle managers in the Australian residential aged care setting: a narrative synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The prevalence of both chronic diseases and multi-morbidity increases with longer life spans. As Australia's population ages, the aged care sector is under increasing pressure to ensure that quality aged care is available. Key to responding to this pressure is leadership and management capability within the aged care workforce. A systematic literature review was conducted to inform the policy development necessary for the enhancement of clinical and managerial leadership skills of middle managers within residential aged care. Methods Using scientific journal databases, hand searching of specialist journals, Google, snowballing and suggestions from experts, 4,484 papers were found. After a seven-tiered culling process, we conducted a detailed review (narrative synthesis) of 153 papers relevant to leadership and management development in aged care, incorporating expert and key stakeholder consultations. Results • Positive staff experiences of a manager's leadership are critical to ensure job satisfaction and workforce retention, the provision of quality care and the well-being of care recipients, and potentially a reduction of associated costs. • The essential attributes of good leadership for aged care middle management are a hands-on accessibility and professional expertise in nurturing respect, recognition and team building, along with effective communication and flexibility. However, successful leadership and management outcomes depend on coherent and good organisational leadership (structural and psychological empowerment). • There is inadequate preparation for middle management leadership roles in the aged care sector and a lack of clear guidelines and key performance indicators to assess leadership and management skills. • Theory development in aged care leadership and management research is limited. A few effective generic clinical leadership programs targeting both clinical and managerial leaders exist. However, little is known regarding

  12. Residential Plumbing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Leney

    This twenty-nine-unit residential plumbing curriculum contains teacher and student materlals based on the Vocational-Technical Education Consortium of States (V-TECS) Plumbing Catalog of Performance Objectives, Performance Guides, and Tool and Equipment Lists. An introduction contains a V-TECS task listing showing the relationship between the…

  13. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement III to Volume 7. Preparing the Student: The Education Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutterer, Richard H.

    One of three supplements which accompany chapter 7 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the mobility and transportation component and marketing and tourism component of the educational services division.…

  14. QuickStats: Percentages* of Residential Care Communities and Adult Day Services Centers That Provided(†) Selected Services - United States, 2014.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    In 2014, a greater percentage of residential care communities than adult day service centers provided five of seven selected services. The majority of residential care communities provided pharmacy services (82%); followed by transportation for social activities (79%); physical, occupational, or speech therapy (69%); hospice (62%); skilled nursing (59%); and mental health services (52%). Fewer than half provided social work services (48%). The majority of adult day services centers provided transportation for social activities (69%); skilled nursing (66%); and social work (52%). %). Fewer than half provided physical, occupational, or speech therapy (49%). One third or less provided mental health (33%), pharmacy (27%), and hospice services (12%). PMID:27607333

  15. Compliance with best practice: implementing the best available evidence in the use of physical restraint in residential aged care.

    PubMed

    Timmins, Janet

    2008-09-01

    The Aged Care Clinical Fellowship, funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing and conducted through the Joanna Briggs Institute is an initiative designed to improve the care of older Australians through clinical leadership and promotion of best practice. This paper outlines one of the projects undertaken at Carinya of Bicton, a residential aged high care facility, using an audit and feedback process to implement best practice standards in the use of physical restraint. Aims  Between 12% and 47% of residents in residential care facilities are restrained; however, initial observation of residents restrained in the project facility showed that restraint devices were utilised in up to 40% of residents. Within the aged care sector there has been a shift in attitude to reducing or eliminating restraint in aged care facilities. Restraint is seen as a negative experience for the resident, being associated with physical discomfort, embarrassment and restriction of freedom and of movement. The purpose of the project was to improve practice in the area of physical restraint through the process of auditing current practice against evidence-based, best practice criteria and ultimately to reduce the level of restraint in the facility. Methods  This practice improvement project utilised an audit and implementation cycle. The Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and best practice criteria developed from a systematic review were used to determine compliance with best practice. The Getting Research into Practice module was then employed to develop strategies to improve practice. Results  The follow-up audit indicated there has been a reduction in the number of residents restrained, increased use of alternatives to restraint and an awareness on the part of all care staff of the policies and procedures, which govern the use of restraint in the facility. Conclusions  It is recognised that the success of this project is in

  16. Intertwining caring science, caring practice and caring education from a lifeworld perspective—two contextual examples

    PubMed Central

    Ozolins, Lise-lotte; Ekebergh, Margaretha

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how caring science can be a helpful foundation for caring practice and what kind of learning support that can enable the transformation of caring science into practice. The lifeworld approach is fundamental for both caring and learning. This will be illustrated in two examples from research that show the potential for promoting health and well-being as well as the learning process. One example is from a caring context and the other is from a learning context. In this article, learning and caring are understood as parallel processes. We emphasize that learning cannot be separated from life and thus caring and education is intertwined with caring science and life. The examples illustrate how an understanding of the intertwining can be fruitful in different contexts. The challenge is to implant a lifeworld-based approach on caring and learning that can lead to strategies that in a more profound way have the potential to strengthen the person's health and learning processes. PMID:22171223

  17. A Study of the Growth Patterns in Language, Communication, and Educational Achievement in Six Residential Schools for Deaf Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babbini, Barbara E.; Quigley, Stephen P.

    Communication skills, language abilities, and educational achievement of 163 subjects from six residential schools for deaf students were studied. Subjects were tested yearly from 1963 to 1967 on speechreading, fingerspelling, speech intelligibility, reading achievement, arithmetic achievement, and written language. Both males and females and the…

  18. Development of a Residential Education Program for Emotionally Deprived Pseudo-Retarded Blind Children, Volume I. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Mary E.; Woodcock, Charles C.

    To design a residential school program for multiply handicapped blind children and to develop identifying procedures for prospects for this type of program, 15 children (ages 5 to 13, legally blind, educationally retarded, multiply handicapped) of both sexes were enrolled in a 12 month program. The curriculum was based on a systematic presentation…

  19. Residential Instability and the McKinney-Vento Homeless Children and Education Program: What We Know, Plus Gaps in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Mary; Harwood, Robin; Hall, Sam

    2010-01-01

    As homelessness increased among families and children during the 1980s and 1990s, policymakers created, and strengthened, the McKinney-Vento Education for Homeless Children and Youth (EHCY) program. The McKinney-Vento EHCY program aims to mitigate the effects of residential instability through the identification of homeless children in schools and…

  20. Access to care: leveraging dental education.

    PubMed

    Bertolami, Charles N; Berne, Robert

    2014-11-01

    If it is not a naïve expectation for dentists who have been beneficiaries of public generosity to share their good fortune with the public that made it possible, there may be a rational basis for enhancing the role of dental education in improving access to oral health care by promoting-but not requiring-a voluntary service commitment after graduation commensurate with the magnitude of the subsidy received. Such an approach would be in accordance with the Institute of Medicine's report Improving Access to Oral Health Care for Vulnerable and Underserved Populations, but without the governmental coercion explicit in the report. A sustainable alternative proposal is made here, offering both greater options to students in the financing of their dental education and greater obligations for those students who accept state subsidies: providing tuition discounts for students of state-supported dental schools based not on past residency status but rather on a future commitment to public service. This arrangement could be good public policy that might also help to create a culture in which dental students are given authentic options as part of a profession-wide ideology of public service. The result could well contribute to improved oral health care for the underserved. PMID:25362688

  1. The Impact of Electronic Health Records on Risk Management of Information Systems in Australian Residential Aged Care Homes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tao; Yu, Ping; Hailey, David; Ma, Jun; Yang, Jie

    2016-09-01

    To obtain indications of the influence of electronic health records (EHR) in managing risks and meeting information system accreditation standard in Australian residential aged care (RAC) homes. The hypothesis to be tested is that the RAC homes using EHR have better performance in meeting information system standards in aged care accreditation than their counterparts only using paper records for information management. Content analysis of aged care accreditation reports from the Aged Care Standards and Accreditation Agency produced between April 2011 and December 2013. Items identified included types of information systems, compliance with accreditation standards, and indicators of failure to meet an expected outcome for information systems. The Chi-square test was used to identify difference between the RAC homes that used EHR systems and those that used paper records in not meeting aged care accreditation standards. 1,031 (37.4%) of 2,754 RAC homes had adopted EHR systems. Although the proportion of homes that met all accreditation standards was significantly higher for those with EHR than for homes with paper records, only 13 RAC homes did not meet one or more expected outcomes. 12 used paper records and nine of these failed the expected outcome for information systems. The overall contribution of EHR to meeting aged care accreditation standard in Australia was very small. Risk indicators for not meeting information system standard were no access to accurate and appropriate information, failure in monitoring mechanisms, not reporting clinical incidents, insufficient recording of residents' clinical changes, not providing accurate care plans, and communication processes failure. The study has provided indications that use of EHR provides small, yet significant advantages for RAC homes in Australia in managing risks for information management and in meeting accreditation requirements. The implication of the study for introducing technology innovation in RAC in

  2. The lived experiences of resilience in Iranian adolescents living in residential care facilities: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    PubMed Central

    Nourian, Manijeh; Nourozi Tabrizi, Kian; Rassouli, Maryam; Biglarrian, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Background Resilience is one of the main factors affecting human health, and perceiving its meaning for high-risk adolescents is of particular importance in initiating preventive measures and providing resilience care. Objectives This qualitative study was conducted to explain the meaning of resilience in the lived experiences of Iranian adolescents living in governmental residential care facilities. Materials and methods This study was conducted using the hermeneutic phenomenological method. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight adolescents aged 13–17 living in governmental residential care facilities of Tehran province affiliated to the Welfare Organization of Iran who articulated their experiences of resilience. Sampling lasted from May 2014 to July 2015 and continued until new themes were no longer emerging. The researchers analyzed the verbatim transcripts using Van Manen's six-step method of phenomenology. Results The themes obtained in this study included “going through life's hardships,” “aspiring for achievement,” “self-protection,” “self-reliance,” and “spirituality.” Conclusion Our study indicates that the meaning of resilience coexists with self-reliance in adolescents’ lived experiences. Adolescents look forward to a better future. They always trust God in the face of difficulties and experience resilience by keeping themselves physically and mentally away from difficulties. Adverse and bitter experiences of the past positively affected their positive view on life and its difficulties and also their resilience. The five themes that emerged from the findings describe the results in detail. The findings of this study enable nurses, health administrators, and healthcare providers working with adolescents to help this vulnerable group cope better with their stressful life conditions and improve their health through increasing their capacity for resilience. PMID:26942909

  3. [Systemic concepts in residential placement: considerations for pedagogics, counseling and organization].

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, J; Reuter, D

    1991-01-01

    The paper starts from an analysis of typical problems in residential child care, which can be identified on different system levels (family, family and residential child care unit, family and larger systems, child care as a profession). More recent systems concepts (such as autopoiesis, role of the observer, "fitting", limits of planning in human systems) are used to develop suggestions for everyday practice of residential child care--from intake to dismissal, from crisis intervention to family education, from job satisfaction to management issues. PMID:1871061

  4. The Learning Organisation and Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abri, Rashid K; Al-Hashmi, Intisar S

    2007-01-01

    The ‘Learning Organisation’ is a concept first described by Peter Senge as an organisation where people continuously learn and enhance their capabilities to create. It consists of five main disciplines: team learning, shared vision, mental models, personal mastery and systems thinking. These disciplines are dynamic and interact with each other. System thinking is the cornerstone of a true learning organisation and is described as the discipline used to implement the disciplines. In a learning organisation, health care education aims to educate its members with up to date knowledge to produce competent and safe personnel, who can promote quality in health care services. In addition, there are some educational concepts and theoretical models, which are of relevance to the learning organisation, and can provide a framework for managerial decisions. The stages required to achieve the principles of a learning organisation will be described in detail. Moreover, in a proper culture which supports the learning organisation, members continuously learn to improve the environment and never remain passive recipients. PMID:21748105

  5. Managing the wandering behaviour of people living in a residential aged care facility.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Brent; Koch, Susan; Nay, Rhonda; Lewis, Matthew

    2007-12-01

    containing count data where possible. All other data were presented in a narrative summary. Results  Searches identified one care protocol, two systematic reviews and 24 other studies that satisfied the inclusion criteria. The following recommendations are divided into four categories of interventions (environmental, technology and safety, physical/psychosocial, and caregiving support and education) with only Level 1, 2 or 3 evidence presented. Environmental modifications  Gridlines placed in front of doors or covering exit door doorknobs or panic bars may be effective at reducing exit-seeking behaviour (Level 3b). Technology and safety  Mobile locator devices may be effective at enabling quick location of wandering residents (Level 3c). Physical/psychosocial interventions  Implementation of a walking group or an exercise program may reduce the incidence of disruptive wandering behaviour (Level 3b). Use of air mat therapy may reduce wandering behaviour for at least 15 min post therapy (Level 2). Providing music sessions (and reading sessions) may keep residents from wandering during the period of the session (Level 3b). Caregiving support and education  There is no evidence to support any interventions. Conclusions  The majority of the available research for which the guidelines are based upon was derived from observational studies or expert opinion (Level of evidence 3 or 4). More rigorous research is required to demonstrate the efficacy of these recommendations. PMID:21631803

  6. Impact of Physician Asthma Care Education on Patient Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cabana, Michael D.; Slish, Kathryn K.; Evans, David; Mellins, Robert B.; Brown, Randall W.; Lin, Xihong; Kaciroti, Niko; Clark, Noreen M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We evaluated the effectiveness of a continuing medical education program, Physician Asthma Care Education, in improving pediatricians' asthma therapeutic and communication skills and patients' health care utilization for asthma. Methods: We conducted a randomized trial in 10 regions in the United States. Primary care providers…

  7. Asthma Information Handbook for Early Care and Education Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2004

    2004-01-01

    With proper care, most children with asthma can lead normal, active lives and can enter school with the same abilities as other children. For this purpose, the Asthma Information Packet for Early Care and Education Providers was designed to cover the following topics: (1) Basic information; (2) How to improve early care and education environments…

  8. Mothers' Emotional Care Work in Education and Its Moral Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maeve

    2007-01-01

    This paper seeks to build on feminist and egalitarian critiques of the traditional allocation of care work to mothers, particularly in relation to understandings of educational care work. It seeks to locate the emotional support work carried out by mothers in the educational field within their daily routines of care, and to make visible the…

  9. Career Progression in Early Care and Education: A Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen

    Several reports on the link between the economy and the quality of child care indicate that: (1) early care and education benefits two generations of workers; (2) quality is essential to, but is rarely found in, early care and education programs; and (3) the key to quality is the professional development of practitioners. A vision of dynamic…

  10. Higher Education and Health Care at a Crossroads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirch, Darrell G.

    2011-01-01

    As major providers and consumers of health care, higher-education institutions have an important role to play in improving health and the nation's health-care system. Health care is a complex issue for colleges and universities. Not only do institutions of higher education provide health insurance to faculty members, staff members, and students,…

  11. A System for Planning and Achieving Comprehensive Health Care in Residential Institutions for the Mentally Retarded.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Harold A.

    Based on a view of health care intertwining medicine intimately with other components of institutional care, the monograph presents a system of concepts and operating techniques for providing comprehensive health care to institutionalized retardates. Background of the system is explained in terms of its research basis (two studies by the author of…

  12. California Early Care and Education Workforce Study: Licensed Child Care Centers and Family Child Care Providers. Statewide Highlights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Child Care Employment, University of California at Berkeley, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing the critical role that early childhood educators play in the lives of California's children and families, First 5 California commissioned in 2004 a statewide and regional study of the early care and education (ECE) workforce in licensed child care centers and licensed family child care homes. The overall goal of the study was to…

  13. Client incentives versus contracting and staff incentives: how care continuity interventions in substance abuse treatment can improve residential to outpatient transition.

    PubMed

    Acquavita, Shauna P; Stershic, Sandra; Sharma, Rajni; Stitzer, Maxine

    2013-07-01

    Interventions for improving transition from short-term residential to outpatient treatment were examined. Usual care (UC; n=114) was referral to a preferred outpatient program with advance appointment optional. Client incentive (CI; n=97) offered up to $100 in gift cards for intake and attendance during the first 30days of treatment. Contracting with staff incentives (CSI; n=49) consisted of meeting with an outpatient counselor prior to residential discharge, signing an attendance contract, receiving an appointment and payment to staff if clients attended. CSI significantly improved rates of successful transition (84%) and admission (74%) compared to UC (64% contact; 49% admitted). CI did not result in significantly improved outcomes (74%; 60%). CSI was likely mediated by the reliability (92 versus 52% in UC) and immediacy (1.0 versus 3.9days) of appointment scheduling. This study supports use of CSI for improving rates of transition between residential and outpatient continuing care treatment. PMID:23375361

  14. A quasi-experimental study on a new service option for short-term residential care of older stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Chau, Pui-hing; Yeung, Fannie; Chan, Tsz-wai; Woo, Jean

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a quasi-experimental study to compare the effectiveness of a new short-term residential care option for stroke rehabilitation with that of usual day hospital care. Primary data were collected from stroke patients and their caregivers from June 2009 to May 2012. New service option users and their caregivers were recruited for the intervention group, while users of usual public geriatric day hospital care and their caregivers were recruited for the control group. The primary outcome measures were Modified Barthel Index (MBI) and Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE) scores. Trained research assistants assessed the outcome measures at the beginning of the rehabilitation program (baseline) and at a 4-month follow-up. Sixty and 128 stroke patients were recruited for the intervention and control groups, respectively; 50 and 105 participants, respectively, completed the 4-month follow-up. At 4-month follow-up, the intervention group had an increased MBI score of 15.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.8–19.8) and an MMSE score of 1.3 (95% CI 0.4–2.1). In comparison, the control group had an increased MBI score of 13.3 (95% CI 9.7–16.8) and an MMSE score of 1.1 (95% CI 0.4–1.9). Both groups showed a significant improvement in MBI and MMSE scores after 4 months, and there was no significant between-group difference. To conclude, the new service option and the usual care option showed similar improvement in rehabilitation outcomes at 4 months after baseline. Initiatives to provide alternative care options on a user-pay model should be encouraged to ensure a sustainable health care system. PMID:24039413

  15. When Care Trumps Justice: The Operationalization of Black Feminist Caring in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    In this study, I discuss the benefits of Black feminist caring (BFC) in educational leadership. I suggest that the ethic of care in educational leadership is a manifestation of strength when serving disadvantaged student populations. This article is based on a qualitative, exploratory, multicase study that examines the ethic of care in the…

  16. The Ecology of Day Care: Building a Model for an Integrated System of Care and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Lenira

    In the past few years, the care and education dimensions of day care have occupied a prominent place in scientific and political debate in Brazil and internationally. This study used an ecological perspective to examine the interconnections surrounding the dimensions of early care and childhood education and the forces that promote or restrain…

  17. Health Care Marketing: Role Evolution of the Community Health Educator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syre, Thomas R.; Wilson, Richard W.

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses role delineation in the health education profession, defines and presents principles of health care marketing, describes marketing plan development, and examines major ethical issues associated with health care marketing when utilized by community health educators. A marketing plan format for community health education is…

  18. Outcomes for youth receiving intensive in-home therapy or residential care: a comparison using propensity scores.

    PubMed

    Barth, Richard P; Greeson, Johanna K P; Guo, Shenyang; Green, Rebecca L; Hurley, Sarah; Sisson, Jocelyn

    2007-10-01

    This study compares outcomes for behaviorally troubled children receiving intensive in-home therapy (IIHT) and those receiving residential care (RC). Propensity score matching is used to identify matched pairs of youth (n = 786) with equivalent propensity for IIHT. The majority of pretreatment differences between the IIHT and RC groups are eliminated following matching. Logistic regression is then conducted on outcome differences at 1 year postdischarge. Results show that IIHT recipients had a greater tendency (.615) toward living with family, making progress in school, not experiencing trouble with the law, and placement stability compared with RC youth (.558; p < .10). This suggests that IIHT is at least as effective for achieving positive outcomes. Given IIHT's reduced restrictiveness and cost, intensive in-home services should be the preferred treatment over RC in most cases. PMID:18194029

  19. Taking Control: An Exploratory Study of the Use of Tilt-in-Space Wheelchairs in Residential Care.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Sneha; Mortenson, W Ben; Wallace, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Tilt-in-space (TIS) wheelchairs are common in residential care, but little empirical evidence exists regarding how they are used by residents and staff in these settings. As part of a larger study exploring the use of wheeled mobility in these facilities, we conducted a substudy to examine how TIS wheelchairs are used in practice and to explore the experiences of the residents who use them. We conducted a series of three participant observations and interviews with 6 residents or their family members and interviewed 10 staff. Our analysis identified taking control as the main overarching theme, subsuming two subthemes: promoting comfort and mobilizing to participate. Findings suggest that power TIS wheelchairs enable user control, whereas manual TIS wheelchairs promote staff control. These findings illustrate how TIS wheelchairs may enable or inhibit occupational engagement and suggest that vigilance is necessary to prevent their use as a restraint. PMID:26122688

  20. Adults with Intellectual Disabilities Living in Hong Kong's Residential Care Facilities: A Descriptive Analysis of Health and Disease Patterns by Sex, Age, and Presence of Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Chi Wai

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the health status profile and identify the healthcare needs of adults with intellectual disability (ID) residing in 18 of Hong Kong's residential care facilities. The author employed a cross-sectional study using a structured questionnaire survey to collect data on 811 persons with ID (432 males, 53.3%, and…

  1. Examining Needs and Referrals to Mental Health Services for Children in Residential Care in Spain: An Empirical Study in an Autonomous Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sainero, Ana; Bravo, Amaia; del Valle, Jorge F.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of mental health disorders in children living in residential care and their use of therapeutic services, including the relationship between these factors and social-family and intervention process variables, as well as the relationship among the disorders identified by professionals and the…

  2. Meeting the Needs of GLB Youth in Residential Care Settings: A Framework for Assessing the Unique Needs of a Vulnerable Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Rebecca G.; Matthews, John D.

    2006-01-01

    This article explores uses for strengths-based assessment of gay, lesbian and bisexual youth in residential care. Gay, lesbian and bisexual (GLB) youth face unique challenges such as stigma management and disclosure. In addition, GLB youth are also at increased risk for drug use, suicide and unprotected sex. Consequently, the needs of GLB youth…

  3. Mental Health and Behavioral Problems of Youth in the Child Welfare System: Residential Treatment Centers Compared to Therapeutic Foster Care in the Odyssey Project Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Amy J. L.; Kurland, David; Curtis, Patrick; Alexander, Gina; Papa-Lentini, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    This is the first multisite, prospective study of behavioral and mental health disorders of youth in residential treatment centers (RTC) and therapeutic foster care (TFC), and the first study to compare the two. This study addressed two questions in a sample of 22 agencies in 13 states: (1) how prevalent were emotional and behavioral disorders in…

  4. Re-Imagining the Care Home: A Spatially Responsive Approach to Arts Practice with Older People in Residential Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers some of the spatial challenges of doing arts projects with older people in care homes, including those living with dementia. It reflects on the author's own experience of running a performance project with residents with at a care home in North London. Drawing on Lefebvre's concept of socially produced space, it argues that…

  5. The role of context and the interpersonal experience of loneliness among older people in a residential care facility

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Vera; Malan, Lelanie

    2012-01-01

    Older people are more prone to experience loneliness when living in residential care facilities. The purpose of this study was to explore older people's experiences of loneliness in the context of institutionalized care. A voluntary and convenience-based sample of 10 white South African older people (age range 62 to 82 years; three men and seven women) was drawn. Data on the subjective experience of loneliness were then gathered through the Mmogo-method®, whereby drawings were employed to explore matters and issues of importance in the lives of older people that could be used to deal with loneliness. Data were analyzed thematically and visually as well as through the use of keywords in context. The results showed that older people experienced loneliness in terms of having unavailable interactions due to loss, and an absence of meaningful interpersonal interactions. Meaningful interpersonal interactions were described as when the older people had regular contact and a variety of interactions. Ineffective interpersonal styles (e.g. taking a controlling position in relationships and being rigid) elicited rejection and isolation, and were associated with a lack of confirmatory interpersonal relationships. It is recommended that greater emphasis should be placed on creating awareness of unhealthy group dynamics as well as on psychosocial interventions to develop group support. Interpersonal styles, either effective or ineffective, take place in a social context, which, in this research, was observed to be unsafe, lacking in care, and a non-stimulating environment. PMID:23078747

  6. Witnessing presence: Swedish care professionals' experiences of supporting resident's well-being processes within the frame of residential care homes (RCH).

    PubMed

    Lundin, Anette; Berg, Lars-Erik; Hellström Muhli, Ulla

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyse the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being. The phenomenon is seen from the eldercarers' meaning-making through their lifeworld perspective at a residential care home. Based on primary empirical interview material with twelve professionals in the context of Swedish eldercare, a phenomenological analysis was undertaken. The result shows that the phenomenon of supportive care for older persons' well-being creates certain ambiguities in the professionals' meaning-making. In practice, it balances between the older persons' (from hereon called residents) needs and the conditions of the eldercare organization. The ambiguities (the what) is made up by three constituents: (i) freedom of choice for the older persons vs. institutional constraints, (ii) the residents' need for activation vs. wanting not to be activated, and (iii) the residents' need for routine vs. the eldercarers' not being able to know what the residents need. The conclusions drawn are that this ambiguity has consequences for the eldercarers' choice of handling supportive care for older persons' well-being (the how). They have to navigate between the support for authenticity, dwelling and mobility, and their own presence and time. In performing supportive care for older persons' well-being, the eldercarers have to consider aspects concerning the resident's lifeworld, the social setting of the eldercare ward, and the institutional demands of the organization. The practical implications for supporting well-being in the care of older residents are manifested in the importance of 'the little things', and the eldercarer's ability to give receptive attention, which requires presence. PMID:27131273

  7. Impact of an education program on perinatal care practices.

    PubMed

    Harlan, W R; Hess, G E; Borer, R C; Hiss, R G

    1980-12-01

    Education of health professionals has an important role in improving health care. A media-based, self-instructional, perinatal education program was developed and field tested in rural and urban regions of Michigan. Cognitive tests, chart audits, and consultation/referral times were used to measure the impact on education and patient care. The program effectively increased knowledge and improved patient care practices by physicians and nurses. This study presents evidence that a targeted educational program in a media-based format can significantly improve perinatal care. PMID:6161337

  8. Medical and Health Care in State Residential Institutions for Children and Youths

    PubMed Central

    Fremont, Albert C.; Wallace, Helen M.; Crain, Lucy; Biakanja, Krist A.; Roizen, Nancy

    1981-01-01

    A survey of five Northern California state residential institutions showed considerable variation in the type and amount of medical services provided for children and youths. There was no standard policy for relationships with regional centers, use of community hospitals, vision and hearing assessments, speech and rehabilitation therapy, or genetic and maternal health services. Some hospitals had no staff members certified to carry out cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Not all staff physicians and other health professionals working in state hospitals had specific training in the areas of genetics, seizure control and physical rehabilitation medicine. While all five state hospitals are involved in training personnel, there is a need to develop a statewide plan for the better sharing of knowledge and expertise of the state hospital personnel in the training of pediatricians and others. PMID:6451985

  9. Implementing nutrition guidelines for older people in residential care homes: a qualitative study using Normalization Process Theory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Optimizing the dietary intake of older people can prevent nutritional deficiencies and diet-related diseases, thereby improving quality of life. However, there is evidence that the nutritional intake of older people living in care homes is suboptimal, with high levels of saturated fat, salt, and added sugars. The UK Food Standards Agency therefore developed nutrient- and food-based guidance for residential care homes. The acceptability of these guidelines and their feasibility in practice is unknown. This study used the Normalization Process Theory (NPT) to understand the barriers and facilitators to implementing the guidelines and inform future implementation. Methods We conducted a process evaluation in five care homes in the north of England using qualitative methods (observation and interviews) to explore the views of managers, care staff, catering staff, and domestic staff. Data were analyzed thematically and discussed in data workshops; emerging themes were then mapped to the constructs of NPT. Results Many staff perceived the guidelines as unnecessarily restrictive and irrelevant to older people. In terms of NPT, the guidelines simply did not make sense (coherence), and as a result, relatively few staff invested in the guidelines (cognitive participation). Even where staff supported the guidelines, implementation was hampered by a lack of nutritional knowledge and institutional support (collective action). Finally, the absence of observable benefits to clients confirmed the negative preconceptions of many staff, with limited evidence of reappraisal following implementation (reflexive monitoring). Conclusions The successful implementation of the nutrition guidelines requires that the fundamental issues relating to their perceived value and fit with other priorities and goals be addressed. Specialist support is needed to equip staff with the technical knowledge and skills required for menu analysis and development and to devise ways of evaluating

  10. Managed care and medical education: hard cases and hard choices.

    PubMed

    Friedman, E

    1997-05-01

    As managed care becomes more and more dominant in U.S. health care, it is coming into conflict with medical education. There are historical reasons for this: medical education traditionally excluded physicians who chose to work in health plans, and for profit managed care has tended to avoid subsidizing medical education. In order to improve the climate, three changes are necessary: medical education must understand the tense history of discord between the two; distinctions must be made between responsible and irresponsible managed care plans; and medical educators should not assume they own the moral high ground. Arrogance, a gross oversupply of physicians and especially specialists, scandals and fraud, an often callous attitude toward the poor, and other sins can be laid at medical education's door. The worse threat for both sides is that the public and payers could simply abandon both, leading to underfunding for health professions education, a society that does not trust its health care system, and the loss of superb teaching organizations. To prevent this, managed care and medical education should work together to solve several difficult problems: how to shrink the medical education infrastructure; how to report honestly the uses to which medical education funds are put; and how to identify and end irresponsible behavior on the part of health plans and medical education entities alike. If the two sides can exercise leadership in these areas, they will be able to protect and enhance the singular place of honor that medical education holds in this society. PMID:9159575

  11. 38 CFR 17.63 - Approval of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... facilities or other extended care facilities have one), hot and cold water, electricity, plumbing, sewage... interaction in the community of which the resident is capable; (iii) Leave and return freely to the...

  12. Up Close and Personal: Theorising Care Work in Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Vaughn M.

    2016-01-01

    How do we account for the close personal bonds and deeply caring relationships forged by educators with learners in many adult educational encounters? The literature is relatively silent on the emotional and relational basis to adult educator work. This is a serious silence, given the stressful nature of adult education in developing contexts such…

  13. Residential Stability Reduces Unmet Health Care Needs and Emergency Department Utilization among a Cohort of Homeless and Vulnerably Housed Persons in Canada.

    PubMed

    Jaworsky, Denise; Gadermann, Anne; Duhoux, Arnaud; Naismith, Trudy E; Norena, Monica; To, Matthew J; Hwang, Stephen W; Palepu, Anita

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the association of housing status over time with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed persons in Canada. Homeless and vulnerably housed individuals completed interviewer-administered surveys on housing, unmet physical health care needs, health care utilization, sociodemographic characteristics, substance use, and health conditions at baseline and annually for 4 years. Generalized logistic mixed effects regression models examined the association of residential stability with unmet physical health care needs and emergency department utilization, adjusting for potential confounders. Participants were from Vancouver (n = 387), Toronto (n = 390), and Ottawa (n = 396). Residential stability was associated with lower odds of having unmet physical health needs (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 0.82; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.67, 0.98) and emergency department utilization (AOR, 0.74; 95 % CI, 0.62, 0.88) over the 4-year follow-up period, after adjusting for potential confounders. Residential stability is associated with fewer unmet physical health care needs and lower emergency department utilization among homeless and vulnerably housed individuals. These findings highlight the need to address access to stable housing as a significant determinant of health disparities. PMID:27457795

  14. Nature connection, outdoor play, and environmental stewardship in residential environmental education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrejewski, Robert G.

    A lack of exposure to the natural world has led to a generation of children disconnected from nature. This phenomenon has profound negative implications for the physical and psychological well being of today's youth. Residential environmental education provides one avenue to connect children to nature. One purpose of this study was to investigate the role of Outdoor School, a residential environmental education program, on ecological knowledge, children's connection to nature, school belonging, outdoor play attitude, environmental stewardship attitude, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior, as reported by participants. A quasi-experimental research design was utilized in the study. A total of 228 fifth grade students (156 treatment, 72 control) from central Pennsylvania participated. The results of the program evaluation indicated that Outdoor School was successful in achieving significant, positive gains in the areas of ecological knowledge, connection to nature, outdoor play behavior, and environmental stewardship behavior. No change was found from pretest to post-test in outdoor play attitudes, environmental stewardship attitudes, and school belonging. Additionally, the study addressed gaps in the literature regarding the relationship between connection to nature, environmental stewardship, and outdoor play using two different approaches. An adaptation of the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) was used to predict outdoor play behavior in children. In this model, favorable attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control lead to intentions to perform a given behavior. Intention to perform the behavior is the best predictor for behavior performance. For this study, participants' feeling of connection to nature was added as an affective independent variable. This model explained 45% of the variance in outdoor play. The hypothesis that a connection to nature would be a significant predictor of both attitudes toward outdoor play was

  15. Planning and Decision Making about the Future Care of Older Group Home Residents and Transition to Residential Aged Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bigby, C.; Bowers, B.; Webber, R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Planning for future care after the death of parental caregivers and adapting disability support systems to achieve the best possible quality of life for people with intellectual disability as they age have been important issues for more than two decades. This study examined perceptions held by family members, group home staff and…

  16. Residential Workers' Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rimmer, Alan, Ed.

    The packet of information is intended to help residential workers with disturbed children in the United Kingdom. The first section on theory contains two papers: "Which Children Come Into Residential Care?" (Robin Benians); and "Models of Treatment: Behavioral, Psychodynamic, Cognitive" (Daphne Lennox). The next section contains practical guidance…

  17. Theme with Variations: Social Policy, Community Care and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Changes in British social policy regarding community health care has implications for local education agency (LEA) providers of adult continuing education. LEAs will either have a role in providing staff training and other learning opportunities, will be forced to provide cheaper forms of community care, or will be ignored altogether. (SK)

  18. In Defence of Care: Gilligan's Relevance for Primary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the main, writing about care seems to contrast the ethics of justice with the ethics of care. Whilst the former deploys objectivity, the latter holds that individuals are connected. Problematically, contemporary primary education seemingly holds a-personal, justice conceptions as its basis and rationale. In turn, primary education, in parts,…

  19. Key Concepts in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nutbrown, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    This book aims to provide a series of starting points which will help readers to understand more about many key topics in early childhood education and care. In the rapidly changing field of early childhood education and care, it is becoming increasingly important for students and practitioners to have an awareness of the many topics that relate…

  20. Obstacles to Continuing Education in Health Care for Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gercke, Timothy

    A quasi-experimental research study identified obstacles to continuing education for women in the health care fields to determine if these obstacles were characteristic to continuing education for women in general. Questionnaires were distributed to 50 women health care providers within one hospital in a small community in Arizona and to 50…

  1. Toward an Early Care and Education Agenda for Hispanic Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ray; Ribeiro, Rose

    2004-01-01

    The age distribution and growth of the Latino population have critical implications for the present and future of social and economic policy, with particular emphasis on early care and education. Following a discussion of the demographic trends involving Latino children and families, this paper discusses the child care and early education needs of…

  2. Collaboration and Subsidized Early Care and Education Programs in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spielberger, Julie; Zanoni, Wladimir; Barisik, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    As a result of policy changes following welfare reform in 1996 and the costs associated with providing high-quality early care and education for children of low-income working families, agency collaboration in the state of Illinois has become an increasingly salient feature of subsidized early care and education programs (SECE). The authors…

  3. Analysis of Health, Education and Welfare Day Care Requirements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Black Child Development Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    This document analyzes Department of Health, Education and Welfare (DHEW) regulations for day care centers and homes. New DHEW day care proposals are paraphrased and the content and history of related regulations are summarized. Topics discussed include definitions, applicability, Office of Education waivers, program activities for children,…

  4. Caring as an Imperative for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Patricia R.; Cullen, Janice A.

    2003-01-01

    An associate nursing degree program threads caring across the curriculum using Watson's framework of interpersonal/transpersonal processes for caring and a taxonomy of affective competencies. Ways of caring are integrated into classroom and clinical experiences. (Contains 20 references.) (SK)

  5. An interprofessional education project to address the health care needs of women transitioning from prison to community reentry.

    PubMed

    Busen, Nancy H

    2014-01-01

    With the implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, the need for health care providers to work collaboratively in teams to provide cost-effective, quality health care has become even more apparent because an estimated additional 22 million Americans gain health care coverage by 2014. The need for evidenced-based care that combines the expertise of various disciplines has been acknowledged by policy makers and health educators. With support from national Association for Prevention, Teaching and Research, an interprofessional education course was designed and implemented by health professionals in nursing, nutrition, and dentistry, in collaboration with a local community agency, to address the health care needs of women transitioning from prison to the community. Health care needs of women in prison are often overlooked, and access to care is limited. When released from prison, utilization of even basic health services is rare. Four interactive teaching-learning sessions were offered at a residential facility for women in transition over a 12-week period. Topics were selected based on feedback from the participants and included stress reduction, self-beast examination, hypertension, and common dental conditions. Teaching methods and materials were interactive and designed for sustainability. The model for this interprofessional education project, which employed a service-learning approach, can be adapted for other communities. Working with our communities requires innovative thinking to be effective but provides an enriching life experience to those involved. A community-based reciprocal learning environment benefits all partners in the real-world environment. PMID:25150422

  6. Sustainable effects of a low-threshold physical activity intervention on health-related quality of life in residential aged care

    PubMed Central

    Quehenberger, Viktoria; Cichocki, Martin; Krajic, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Background Mobility is a main issue for health-related quality of life in old age. There is evidence for effects of physical activity (PA) interventions on several dimensions of health for the aged and also, some specific evidence for vulnerable populations, like residents of residential aged care. Research on low-threshold PA interventions for users of residential aged care and documentation of their sustainability are scarce. “Low threshold” implies moderate demands on the qualification of trainers and low frequency of conduct, implying low demands on the health status and discipline of users. Yet the investigation of low-threshold interventions in residential aged care seems important as they might foster participation of users and implementation in everyday routines of provider organizations. An initial study (October 2011 to June 2012) had found intervention effects on health-related quality of life. The objective of this study was to examine sustainability of the effects of a low-threshold PA intervention on health-related quality of life in residential aged care. Methods Data collection took place in three residential aged care homes in Vienna, Austria. At 1-year follow-up (June 2013), participants from the intervention group were interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Using general mixed linear models and Friedman tests followed by paired t- and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests, we compared outcome measures at follow-up with measures obtained at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Results At the 1-year follow-up assessment, participants’ (mean age 84.7 years; 89.7% female) subjective health status was still significantly increased, equaling a small sustainable intervention effect (Cohen’s d=0.38, P=0.02). In comparison with baseline, a significant decline of reported pain/discomfort (P=0.047) was found. Regarding the subdimensions of health-related quality of life, favorable trends could be observed. Conclusion The study indicates that

  7. Public Policy Report. Who Cares? State Commitment to Child Care and Early Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

    1997-01-01

    Examines state financial commitment to child care and early education. Indicates that levels of commitment vary widely, are inadequate to serve many children and families in need, and depend more on state "will" than on state resources. Points out that states give child care and early education a low priority. Suggests that increased commitment is…

  8. Integrating Prevention in Residential and Community Care Settings: A Multidimensional Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Christopher G.; Perloff, Judy; McVicker, Jason; Ebbert, Shelly; Petersen, Laird; Oltean, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    As people with HIV live longer and healthier lives, ongoing prevention with positive individuals has become a new focus of care. Effective prevention with positives interventions are emerging and new interventions continue to be developed. This article discusses the development and evaluation of the prevention for positives intervention developed…

  9. 38 CFR 17.63 - Approval of community residential care facilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... extended care facilities have one), hot and cold water, electricity, plumbing, sewage, cooking, laundry... approved by the Director of the Federal Register, in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51..., autonomy, and interaction in the community of which the resident is capable; (iii) Leave and return...

  10. The Departure Status of Youth from Residential Group Care: Implications for Aftercare

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra L.; Chmelka, M. Beth; Thompson, Ronald W.; Epstein, Michael H.; Tyler, Patrick; Pick, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Youth departing from out-of-home care settings face numerous challenges as they adapt to new settings or return to placements that have been unsuccessful in the past. Although several thousand youth face this transition annually, little is known about their specific needs and risks at departure. To better identify needs and risks, we evaluated the…

  11. Who Cares about Caring in Early Childhood Teacher Education Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamee, Abigail; Mercurio, Mia; Peloso, Jeanne M.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to care for oneself, near and distant others, animals, plants, human-made objects, and even ideas is an antidote for violence in its many forms as experienced in childhood as well as adulthood. This article makes a case for facilitating the development of the ability to care as children develop. The authors emphasize the importance of…

  12. Working for Quality Child Care: An Early Childhood Education Text from the Child Care Employee Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitebook, Marcy, Comp.; And Others

    This early childhood education text was designed to help students and child care staff become effective advocates for the improvement of quality, salaries, and working conditions in child care programs. Unit I provides literature on the issues affecting the child care field and focuses on strategies to improve salaries and working conditions.…

  13. Measuring the performance of electronic health records: a case study in residential aged care in Australia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ping; Qian, Siyu; Yu, Hui; Lei, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    Measuring the performance of electronic health records (EHR) is an important, yet un-resolved challenge. Various measurements have addressed different aspects of EHR success, yet a holistic, comprehensive measurement tool needs to be developed to capture the potential EHR success variables completely. A self-administered questionnaire survey instrument was developed based on the theoretical framework of the DeLone and McLean Information Systems Success Model. It measures nigh variables of EHR success: system quality, information quality, service quality, training, self efficacy, intention to use, use, user satisfaction and net benefits. The instrument was used to measure the performance of aged care EHR systems in three aged care organizations. The results suggest that the instrument was reliable. PMID:23920809

  14. Educating Health Care Professionals on Human Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Aimee M.; Lippert, Suzanne; Collins, Kristin; Pineda, Noelle; Tolani, Alisha; Walker, Rebecca; Jeong, Monica; Trounce, Milana Boukhman; Graham-Lamberts, Caroline; Bersamin, Melina; Martinez, Det. Jeremy; Dotzler, Det. Jennifer; Vanek, Lt John; Storfer-Isser, Amy; Chamberlain, Lisa J.; Horwitz, Sarah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The US Department of State estimates that there are between 4 and 27 million individuals worldwide in some form of modern slavery. Recent studies have demonstrated that 28% to 50% of trafficking victims in the United States encountered health care professionals while in captivity, but were not identified and recognized. This study aimed to determine whether an educational presentation increased emergency department (ED) providers' recognition of human trafficking (HT) victims and knowledge of resources to manage cases of HT. Methods The 20 largest San Francisco Bay Area EDs were randomized into intervention (10 EDs) or delayed intervention comparison groups (10 EDs) to receive a standardized educational presentation containing the following: background about HT, relevance of HT to health care, clinical signs in potential victims, and referral options for potential victims. Participants in the delayed intervention group completed a pretest in the period the immediate intervention group received the educational presentation, and all participants were assessed immediately before (pretest) and after (posttest) the intervention. The intervention effect was tested by comparing the pre–post change in the intervention group to the change in 2 pretests in the delayed intervention group adjusted for the effect of clustering within EDs. The 4 primary outcomes were importance of knowledge of HT to the participant's profession (5-point Likert scale), self-rated knowledge of HT (5-point Likert scale), knowledge of who to call for potential HT victims (yes/no), and suspecting that a patient was a victim of HT (yes/no). Findings There were 258 study participants from 14 EDs; 141 from 8 EDs in the intervention group and 117 from 7 EDs in the delayed intervention comparison group, of which 20 served as the delayed intervention comparison group. Participants in the intervention group reported greater increases in their level of knowledge about HT versus those in the

  15. To Be Cared for and to Care: Understanding Theoretical Conceptions of Care as a Framework for Effective Inclusion in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that incorporating theoretical conceptions of care into Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) programmes creates a foundation for achieving the effective inclusion of children with disabilities. Critical examinations of the origins of care theory and current conceptions of care are used to consider the differing valuation…

  16. Collaborative Care Management Reduces Disparities in Dementia Care Quality for Caregivers with Less Education

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Arleen F.; Vassar, Stefanie D.; Connor, Karen I.; Vickrey, Barbara G.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lower educational attainment among informal caregivers’ may be associated with poorer outcomes for patients with dementia. OBJECTIVE To examine educational gradients in dementia care and whether the effect of a dementia collaborative care management intervention varied by the educational attainment of the informal caregiver. DESIGN Analysis of data from a cluster-randomized controlled trial. SETTING Eighteen clinics across 3 healthcare organizations in Southern California. PARTICIPANTS Dyads of Medicare recipients, ages 65 years and older with a diagnosis of dementia, and an eligible caregiver. INTERVENTION Collaborative care management for dementia. MEASUREMENTS 1) Caregiver educational attainment, 2) adherence to four dimensions of guideline-recommended processes of dementia care: Assessment, Treatment, Education/Support, and Safety pre- and post-intervention, and 3) the adjusted intervention effect (IE) for each dimension stratified by caregiver education. Each IE was estimated by subtracting the difference between pre- and post-intervention scores for the usual care participants from the difference in the intervention participants. RESULTS At baseline, caregivers with lower educational attainment had lower guideline-recommended processes of dementia care for the Treatment and Education dimensions than those with more education. However, less educated caregivers had significantly more improvement after the intervention on the Assessment, Treatment, and Safety dimensions. The IEs for those who had not graduated from high school compared to college graduates were 44.4 vs. 29.5 for the Assessment dimension (P<0.001), 36.9 vs. 15.7 for the Treatment dimension (P<0.001), and 52.7 vs. 40.9 for the Safety Dimension (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Collaborative care management was associated with reductions in disparities in dementia care quality among caregivers with lower educational attainment relative to more educated caregivers. PMID:23320655

  17. Obtrusiveness of information-based assistive technologies as perceived by older adults in residential care facilities: a secondary analysis.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Karen L; Demiris, George; Hensel, Brian K

    2007-09-01

    With the anticipated growth in the older adult population in the next few years, information designers are examining new ways for assistive technologies to support independent living and quality of life for adults as they age. Central to the role of assistive technology to support and enhance quality of life is the development of non-obtrusive technologies. Despite the importance of non-obtrusiveness to the design of assistive technologies, there remains no standard definition of obtrusiveness or measurement instrument. A conceptual framework for obtrusiveness in home telehealth technologies has recently been proposed but has not yet been tested empirically. This project performed a secondary analysis of focus group and interview data to explore the presence of the dimensions of the obtrusiveness framework in older adults' responses to information-based assistive technologies in residential care facilities. We found the existing data contained examples of each dimension (physical, usability, privacy, function, human interaction, self-concept, routine, and sustainability) and 16 of the 22 subcategories proposed by the obtrusiveness framework. These results provide general support for the framework, although further prospective validation research is needed. Potential enhancements to the framework are proposed. PMID:17701829

  18. The social treatment: the benefits of group interventions in residential care settings.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Catherine; Haslam, S Alexander; Jetten, Jolanda; Bevins, Adam; Ravenscroft, Sophie; Tonks, James

    2010-03-01

    We report findings from an intervention study that investigates the impact of group reminiscence (GR) and individual reminiscence (IR) activities on older adults living in care settings. This research aimed to provide a theory-driven evaluation of reminiscence based on a social identity framework. This framework predicts better health outcomes for group-based interventions as a result of their capacity to create a sense of shared social identification among participants. A total of 73 residents, living in either standard or specialized (i.e., dementia) care units, were randomly assigned to one of three interventions: GR (n = 29), IR (n = 24), and a group control activity (n = 20). The intervention took place over 6 weeks, and cognitive screening and well-being measures were administered both pre- and post-intervention. Results indicated that only the group interventions produced effective outcomes and that these differed as a modality-specific function of condition: Collective recollection of past memories enhanced memory performance, and engaging in a shared social activity enhanced well-being. Theoretically, these findings point to the important role that group membership plays in maintaining and promoting health and well-being. PMID:20230136

  19. Improving Educational Preparation for Transcultural Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Var, Rita M. H.

    1998-01-01

    Nurses and health care professionals must be prepared for transcultural health care because society is becoming increasingly multicultural and current health services are not meeting the needs of minority ethnic groups in Britain. (SK)

  20. Comparison of Four Probabilistic Models (CARES, Calendex, ConsEspo, SHEDS) to Estimate Aggregate Residential Exposures to Pesticides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two deterministic models (US EPA’s Office of Pesticide Programs Residential Standard Operating Procedures (OPP Residential SOPs) and Draft Protocol for Measuring Children’s Non-Occupational Exposure to Pesticides by all Relevant Pathways (Draft Protocol)) and four probabilistic mo...

  1. Special Education Administrators' Response to the Educational Needs of Foster Care Youth: Collaborative or Disjointed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, John; Haar, Jean

    2011-01-01

    Although the literature discusses the deleterious educational outcomes that foster care students endure, little attention has focused on school personnel's responses to the phenomenon. Despite the documented relationship between foster care and special education, a missing contribution is the voice of special education administrators. In turn, the…

  2. Reflecting Caring and Power in Early Childhood Education: Recalling Memories of Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ylitapio-Mantyla, Outi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine how early childhood education teachers recall educational situations concerning caring and power in their childhoods and in their work. The purpose is to study how caring and power are constructed and intertwined in educational practices. The intention is to examine how teachers reflect their work concerning…

  3. Developments in spiritual care education in German - speaking countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article examines spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The paper reveals the current extent of available training while defining the target group(s) and teaching aims. In addition to those, we will provide an analysis of delivered competencies, applied teaching and performance assessment methods. Methods In 2013, an anonymous online survey was conducted among the members of the International Society for Health and Spiritual Care. The survey consisted of 10 questions and an open field for best practice advice. SPSS21 was used for statistical data analysis and the MAXQDA2007 for thematic content analysis. Results 33 participants participated in the survey. The main providers of spiritual care training are hospitals (36%, n = 18). 57% (n = 17) of spiritual care training forms part of palliative care education. 43% (n = 13) of spiritual care education is primarily bound to the Christian tradition. 36% (n = 11) of provided trainings have no direct association with any religious conviction. 64% (n = 19) of respondents admitted that they do not use any specific definition for spiritual care. 22% (n = 14) of available spiritual care education leads to some academic degree. 30% (n = 19) of training form part of an education programme leading to a formal qualification. Content analysis revealed that spiritual training for medical students, physicians in paediatrics, and chaplains take place only in the context of palliative care education. Courses provided for multidisciplinary team education may be part of palliative care training. Other themes, such as deep listening, compassionate presence, bedside spirituality or biographical work on the basis of logo-therapy, are discussed within the framework of spiritual care. Conclusions Spiritual care is often approached as an integral part of grief management, communication/interaction training, palliative care, (medical) ethics

  4. Principle-based concept analysis: Caring in nursing education

    PubMed Central

    Salehian, Maryam; Heydari, Abbas; Aghebati, Nahid; Moonaghi, Hossein Karimi; Mazloom, Seyed Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this principle-based concept analysis was to analyze caring in nursing education and to explain the current state of the science based on epistemologic, pragmatic, linguistic, and logical philosophical principles. Methods A principle-based concept analysis method was used to analyze the nursing literature. The dataset included 46 English language studies, published from 2005 to 2014, and they were retrieved through PROQUEST, MEDLINE, CINAHL, ERIC, SCOPUS, and SID scientific databases. The key dimensions of the data were collected using a validated data-extraction sheet. The four principles of assessing pragmatic utility were used to analyze the data. The data were managed by using MAXQDA 10 software. Results The scientific literature that deals with caring in nursing education relies on implied meaning. Caring in nursing education refers to student-teacher interactions that are formed on the basis of human values and focused on the unique needs of the students (epistemological principle). The result of student-teacher interactions is the development of both the students and the teachers. Numerous applications of the concept of caring in nursing education are available in the literature (pragmatic principle). There is consistency in the meaning of the concept, as a central value of the faculty-student interaction (linguistic principle). Compared with other related concepts, such as “caring pedagogy,” “value-based education,” and “teaching excellence,” caring in nursing education does not have exact and clear conceptual boundaries (logic principle). Conclusion Caring in nursing education was identified as an approach to teaching and learning, and it is formed based on teacher-student interactions and sustainable human values. A greater understanding of the conceptual basis of caring in nursing education will improve the caring behaviors of teachers, create teaching-learning environments, and help experts in curriculum development

  5. Improving Medical Education: Improving Patient Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugsley, Lesley; McCrorie, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Is medical education unique among all other educational disciplines? Why does it not seem to conform to the rules laid down by universities for every other faculty? We explore the ways in which particular elements pertaining to medical education have been perceived historically and consider the ways in which medical educators and students have…

  6. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education.

    PubMed

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  7. Promoting Access Through Integrated Mental Health Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Kverno, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Mental disorders are the leading cause of non-communicable disability worldwide. Insufficient numbers of psychiatrically trained providers and geographic inequities impair access. To close this treatment gap, the World Health Organization (WHO) has called for the integration of mental health services with primary care. A new innovative online program is presented that increases access to mental health education for primary care nurse practitioners in designated mental health professional shortage areas. To create successful and sustainable change, an overlapping three-phase strategy is being implemented. Phase I is recruiting and educating primary care nurse practitioners to become competent and certified psychiatric mental health nurse practitioners. Phase II is developing partnerships with state and local agencies to identify and support the psychiatric mental health nurse practitioner education and clinical training. Phase III is sustaining integrated mental health care services through the development of nurse leaders who will participate in interdisciplinary coalitions and educate future students. PMID:27347257

  8. Externalization of the Health Care System's Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seisser, Mary A.; Epstein, Alice L.

    1999-01-01

    Health care organizations with successful internal education programs can expand their offerings through a formal externalization process. The process involves needs assessment, environmental scanning, identification of internal successes, and selection of appropriate topics. (SK)

  9. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  10. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  11. EDUCATION OF "GOOD CARE": LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE DIGNITY IN CARE PROJECT.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Olaf; De; Klerk-; Jolink, Nicolette; Boitte, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This paper defends a pragmatist ethical approach in education. Such an approach has fuelled a pedagogical experimentation approach within the scope the "Dignity in care" (www.dignity-in-care.eu) European project, focusing on ethical practice in health and social care. Its key objective was to enhance 'good care', by reinforcing health care workers'ability to conduct an ethical reflection on the way they would deliver care. Nevertheless, 'good care'is a concept that may seem hard to define and to implement. To clarify and validate the characteristics and conditions of such a good care, and to explore the way to educate the concept of what "good care" is in a more concrete way, this paper presents a summary of findings across which we have come during the final conference of this three-year project and through a focus-group organized by the Lille Dignity-in-Care partners. The results show that a self-assessment work regarding pedagogical practices reveals necessary for an adaptation to the evolution of the socio-professional context. It is not just a matter of developing new pedagogical skills, but also of becoming able to understand the care context and situations. Future work on "what is good care" and the need for empowerment will have to leave from daily practices in order to suggest how to prepare/train caregivers to become responsive professionals. Both the matter of finding a way to enhance good care in existing care-settings, and the matter of finding and testing appropriate educational methods to help caregivers handle communication and deliver good care. PMID:27305796

  12. Development of an educational module on provider self-care.

    PubMed

    Meadors, Patrick; Lamson, Angela; Sira, Natalia

    2010-01-01

    Intensive care providers who care for traumatized populations often face multiple traumas for extended periods and are vulnerable to developing lasting symptoms of compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization. Symptoms are often not recognizable until compassion fatigue or secondary traumatization negatively affects the providers' ability to care for their patients. More attention needs to be given to the care of the provider to ensure high-quality patient care, decrease turnover in the profession, and increase productivity. This article provides a framework for the development of an educational module for healthcare providers' self-care. This educational module created the opportunity to share with providers (a) how to explore their own professional experience; (b) how to recognize the different symptoms of compassion fatigue, primary traumatization, and secondary traumatization; (c) factors related to grief reactions; and (d) personal and professional strategies to decrease compassion fatigue and secondary traumatization. PMID:20683299

  13. A quantitative and qualitative inquiry of the impact of a residential environmental education program on student learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberst, Mary Claire

    Quantitative and qualitative research methods were utilized in a two-phase design approach to describe the impact of a residential environmental education program on student learning and provide a profile of program participants. In phase one, within a nonequivalent pre-posttest control group design, fourth and fifth-grade students (N = 490) were administered learner-outcome-based instruments in terms of ecological knowledge and environmental attitude. The treatment group consisted of students who participated in the 4-6th grade level curriculum of the residential environmental education program at Cuyahoga Valley Environmental Education Center. A teacher survey was implemented to provide a profile of the teachers participating in the residential program with their students. Major findings indicate a statistically significant impact on student ecological knowledge (p ≤.05); no statistically significant impact on environmental attitude was found. Data collected from the teacher survey provided a profile of the contact teachers who participated in the study. Eighty-eight percent of these primarily fourth and fifth grade teachers teach science. The majority have a Master's Degree and all have had some coursework related to environmental education. Ninety-two percent have attended at least one workshop related to environmental education and seventy-five percent have attended up to five environmental education related workshops within the last five years. All of these teachers use environmental education techniques and content in the classroom and all report a high level of environmental concern. In the second phase of the study, a purposeful sample of students, teachers, and parents was interviewed; data were collected through program observation, interviews, and program document collection. Content analysis yielded the following patterns in regard to student, teacher, and parent perceptions of what students learned: (1) natural history; (2) environmental awareness

  14. Whither Education for Health Care Delivery. A Florida Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Margaret K., Ed.; Filson, Dolores, Ed.

    The conference summarized in this monograph grew out of two expressed concerns of health care personnel educators: their desire for more information about future trends in health care delivery, and their desire for better articulation of the various levels of programs preparing health related personnel. Papers presented include these: Future…

  15. Child Care Choices, Consumer Education, and Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Anne; And Others

    In 1991, the National Center for Children in Poverty undertook a study of low-income parents as child care consumers. The study involved a review of current research findings, interviews with staff of child resource and referral agencies, and an examination of child care consumer education provided in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS)…

  16. New Directions in Education for Changing Health Care Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The summary report focuses on postsecondary education for the health professions in the context of evolving health care systems within Organizations for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) member countries. An assessment of health care practices in these countries led to the conclusions and recommendations presented in part one of the…

  17. Epistemological Beliefs in Child Care: Implications for Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brownlee, J.; Boulton-Lewis, G.; Berthelsen, D.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The quality of child care is of social and economic significance worldwide. The beliefs that child care workers hold about knowing and knowledge (epistemological beliefs) influence the quality of their professional work. However, attention to epistemological beliefs is rarely a focus in vocational education programmes. Aim: The aim of…

  18. Strategies for Creating a Caring Learning Climate in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Teacher-student interactions are at the core of the teaching-learning process. There is research evidence showing that a teacher's caring behavior is strongly related to students' attitudes and engagement in physical education (PE). This article discusses practical strategies that PE teachers can employ to create a caring learning environment,…

  19. Early Childhood Education and Care in Canada, 2001. Fifth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Martha; Beach, Jane; Turiano, Michelle

    Noting that in Canada, regulated child care and most other early childhood services are under provincial jurisdiction, this report is the fifth to provide statistical and other information on early childhood care and education services for each province and territory in Canada. Data were assembled from a variety of sources, including…

  20. Maternal Education, Early Child Care and the Reproduction of Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustine, Jennifer March; Cavanagh, Shannon E.; Crosnoe, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The social and human capital that educational attainment provides women enables them to better navigate their children's passages through school. In this study, we examine a key mechanism in this intergenerational process: mothers' selection of early child care. Analyses of the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development revealed that…

  1. Primary Health Care in Africa: Implications for Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambo, Leke I.

    1991-01-01

    Delivery of primary health care (PHC) programs is critical to rural African health care. The paper explores the school's role in PHC delivery and indicates ways that professional health personnel and teacher educators can cooperate in preparing teachers with necessary knowledge and skills to participate meaningfully in PHC delivery. (SM)

  2. Views on Pre-School Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rambusch, Nancy McCormick

    There is a clear need in our country today for early education programs aimed at accelerating the cognitive development of disadvantaged children. Another need is for centers to care for the children of working mothers. Our traditional nursery schools have deemphasized early cognitive development while day care programs have been focused on…

  3. State Investments in Child Care and Early Childhood Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina; Sandfort, Jodi R.

    This study examined state expenditures during fiscal year 1990 for programs that helped low-income families purchase child care, provided preschool education services to children, or provided child care assistance to special groups of families such as families with teen parents, migrant or refugee families, and families whose children are at risk…

  4. Health Care Reform and Medical Education: Forces toward Generalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Edward H.; Seifer, Sarena D.

    1995-01-01

    Health care reforms will dramatically change the culture of medical schools in areas of patient care, research, and education programs. Academic medical centers must construct mutually beneficial partnerships that will position them to take advantage of the opportunities rather than leave them without the diversity of resources needed to make…

  5. Caring, Competence and Professional Identities in Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLeod, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the multiple discourses that influence medical education with a focus on the discourses of competence and caring. Discourses of competence are largely constituted through, and related to, biomedical and clinical issues whereas discourses of caring generally focus on social concerns. These discourses are not necessarily equal…

  6. Pre-Employment Laboratory Education. Child Care Guidebook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Instructional Materials Center.

    This guidebook is designed for use in teaching students enrolled in secondary pre-employment laboratory education (PELE) child care programs. The first of two major sections includes an overview for teachers in planning, conducting, and evaluating a child care program. Specific topics discussed in section 1 include (1) the school-operated center,…

  7. Gendered Capital: Emotional Capital and Mothers' Care Work in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Maeve

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the inequalities experienced by mothers in the performance of educational care work for their children. It is argued that the caring work carried out by mothers at transfer to second-level schooling is shaped by their ability to activate the significant resource of emotional capital; a gendered resource involving…

  8. Status of simulation in health care education: an international survey

    PubMed Central

    Qayumi, Karim; Pachev, George; Zheng, Bin; Ziv, Amitai; Koval, Valentyna; Badiei, Sadia; Cheng, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is rapidly penetrating the terrain of health care education and has gained growing acceptance as an educational method and patient safety tool. Despite this, the state of simulation in health care education has not yet been evaluated on a global scale. In this project, we studied the global status of simulation in health care education by determining the degree of financial support, infrastructure, manpower, information technology capabilities, engagement of groups of learners, and research and scholarly activities, as well as the barriers, strengths, opportunities for growth, and other aspects of simulation in health care education. We utilized a two-stage process, including an online survey and a site visit that included interviews and debriefings. Forty-two simulation centers worldwide participated in this study, the results of which show that despite enormous interest and enthusiasm in the health care community, use of simulation in health care education is limited to specific areas and is not a budgeted item in many institutions. Absence of a sustainable business model, as well as sufficient financial support in terms of budget, infrastructure, manpower, research, and scholarly activities, slows down the movement of simulation. Specific recommendations are made based on current findings to support simulation in the next developmental stages. PMID:25489254

  9. 34 CFR 300.104 - Residential placement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Residential placement 300.104 Section 300.104 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.104 Residential placement If placement in a public or private residential program is necessary to provide special education and related services to...

  10. 34 CFR 300.104 - Residential placement

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Residential placement 300.104 Section 300.104 Education... DISABILITIES State Eligibility Other Fape Requirements § 300.104 Residential placement If placement in a public or private residential program is necessary to provide special education and related services to...

  11. Higher Education as Child Care Provider.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everts, Joanne; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses employer-sponsored child care, specifically on college and university campuses and briefly reviews history and status of campus children's centers. Describes campus child care provided at University of Nevada, Reno. Shows how important it is for institutions to develop a corporate culture that is truly family friendly. Proposes agenda…

  12. Media-Educational Habitus of Future Educators in the Context of Education in Day-Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedrichs-Liesenkötter, Henrike

    2015-01-01

    This research explores these questions: (1) How are the forms of media-educational habitus of future educators shaped? (2) What conditions influence whether or not media education is done in day-care centers? The qualitative study consists of six semi-structured interviews with media education teachers in educator training, four focus group…

  13. Foster Care Experiences and Educational Outcomes of Young Adults Formerly Placed in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havalchak, Anne; White, Catherine Roller; O'Brien, Kirk; Pecora, Peter J.; Sepulveda, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the body of research on the educational outcomes of young adults who were formerly placed in foster care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 359 young adults (a 54.6% response rate). Participants must have been served for at least one year by one private foster care agency in one of its twenty-two offices. Results…

  14. Foster Care and College: The Educational Aspirations and Expectations of Youth in the Foster Care System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Chris M.; Lewis, Rhonda K.; Nilsen, Corinne; Colvin, Deltha Q.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an overall increase in college attendance, low-income youth and particularly those in the foster care system are less likely to attend college (Wolanin, 2005). Although youth in foster care report high educational aspirations, as little as 4% obtain a 4-year college degree (Nixon & Jones, 2007). The purpose of this study is to explore…

  15. A Profile of Child Care Settings: Early Education and Care in 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisker, Ellen Eliason; And Others

    This volume combines an executive summary, a report, and appendixes, all of which comprise the findings of the Profile of Child Care Settings Study. The study collected information on the supply of formal early education and care programs by means of telephone interviews with a national sample of center directors and home-based providers of early…

  16. Improving Educational Prospects for Youth in Foster Care: The Education Liaison Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetlin, Andrea G.; Weinberg, Lois A.; Shea, Nancy M.

    2006-01-01

    Foster children are an educationally vulnerable population that is over represented in special education. This article describes a collaborative effort among a child welfare agency, a local education agency, and a nonprofit law office to improve the educational outcomes of children in foster care. Program procedures and the role of the education…

  17. Breaking Silence: Educating Citizens for Love, Care and Solidarity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Kathleen; Lyons, Maureen; Cantillon, Sara

    2007-01-01

    An indifference to the affective domain and an allegiance to the education of the rational autonomous subject and public citizen are at the heart of formal education. The impact of Cartesian rationalism is intensifying with the glorification of performativity measured by league tables and rankings. The citizen carer and the care recipient citizen…

  18. Early Care and Education Issues Rising to the Top.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Sherry Freeland, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    Noting that growing consensus about the importance of the first 5 years of life has prompted in-depth considerations about the systemic quality of early care and education in the United States, this issue of "State Education Leader" examines various aspects of early learning. Topics considered in this issue are: (1) key issues in financing early…

  19. Educational Psychologists and Children in Care: Practices and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwich, Brahm; Richards, Andrew; Nash, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    The aims of this study were to examine the extent and nature of educational psychologist (EP) work related to children in care in five local authority educational psychology services in the south-west region. The study involved an initial internet-based questionnaire for the 107 EPs in these services (86% response rate), followed up by in-depth…

  20. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  1. An Investigation of Japanese and American Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagayama, Mariko; Gilliard, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Staff interviews and classroom observations based on predetermined observation criteria and open-ended questions were conducted at early care and education programs in Kakunodate, Akita, Japan; Tazawako, Akita, Japan; Butte, Montana; and Missoula, Montana. Differences in curriculum, classroom structure and educational strategies were found. For…

  2. A Nordic Perspective on Early Childhood Education and Care Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karila, Kirsti

    2012-01-01

    The national policies and historical roots of early childhood education (ECE) vary from society to society. In the Nordic countries, early childhood education and care (ECEC) policies have been built in the context of the welfare state. As such, they are closely connected to other welfare policy areas such as social policy, family policy and…

  3. A Guide to Health Education in Ambulatory Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Health Services Administration (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. Bureau of Community Health Services.

    This report outlines ways in which health education strategies can be developed within an ambulatory care center and how they can be implemented to optimize their effectiveness and efficiency. Section 1 describes a program planning model for use in the development of health education programs. Sections 2 through 5 trace the consumer through four…

  4. Computer-assisted education for critical care nurses.

    PubMed

    Bove, L A

    2001-03-01

    Technology is changing rapidly and health care is just beinnng to see the wave of technological advances. Computer-assisted educational software is available for many topics and in many media. Educators and learners need to explore these media and determine how they can best fit into a total learning experience. Computers should be used to enhance education and training, rather than replace the human instructor. The latest software and hardware are interesting to learners, but technology needs to be weighed along with outcomes of education. Over the next 10 years, many of the materials we use today for critical care education will be replaced with more advanced technologies. Subject matter experts should work with computer experts to design and improve computer-assisted technology. In addition, all educators should assess the return on investment of these newer technologies before embracing them. PMID:11863142

  5. 'Troubled conscience related to deficiencies in providing individualised meal schedule in residential care for older people--a participatory action research study'.

    PubMed

    Ericson-Lidman, Eva; Strandberg, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    Food and mealtimes should be adapted to the older person's individual needs and desires, a fact that is often ignored in favour of a functional mealtime organisation. This study was grounded in participatory action research (PAR), and the aim of the study was to illuminate a PAR process to assist care providers in constructively dealing with their troubled conscience generated from perceived shortcomings in providing an individualised meal schedule in residential care for older people. Care providers and their manager participated in twelve PAR sessions. The participants' troubled conscience was eased by reflecting on and sharing their thoughts about their perception of a lack of individualised meal schedule and a lack of opportunities for meaningful interventions. The researchers in PAR became the bridge between the care providers and the management that was needed to improve individualised mealtime schedule. This study pinpoints how difficult it can be to make small changes in a rigid organisation that is run by a management that does not have the hands-on knowledge about the daily care provided by the organisation. This study points to the need of creating communication arenas wherein all personnel involved in care for older people, at all organisational levels, together meet to create a good care for older people. However, the care providers have been provided with tools, uncomplicated to use, to continue to let their voices being heard. PMID:25622910

  6. Care-Sickness: Black Women Educators, Care Theory, and a Hermeneutic of Suspicion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseboro, Donyell L.; Ross, Sabrina N.

    2009-01-01

    This article builds upon earlier work exploring the implications of care theory for Black women educators by exploring the issue of colorblindness more broadly, as it relates to libratory education. Using the work of Freire (1970, 1998a, 1998b) and Noddings (1992a, 1995, 2001, 2005b), the authors revisit the relationship between libratory…

  7. Motivation for Attending Higher Education from the Perspective of Early Care and Education Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huss-Keeler, Rebecca; Peters, Michelle; Moss, Joy Marie

    2013-01-01

    The field of early care and education has been challenged to raise the level of quality for young children by increasing the number of practitioners with college degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of early care and education professionals working in the field and enrolled in community college early childhood classes,…

  8. Educating and Caring for Very Young Children: The Infant/Toddler Curriculum. Early Childhood Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, Doris; Reid, Rebecca; Torelli, Louis

    Noting an increasing consensus that meeting care and education goals for infants and toddlers is a societal as well as a family responsibility, this book provides an "educare" curriculum for infants and toddlers, emphasizing both education and care perspectives. Part 1 of the book provides basic principles of good infant and toddler curriculum in…

  9. Outdoor Experiential Education in Residential Treatment Centres: Methodological Approach and the Czech Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duindam, Ton; Keus, Bart

    Outdoor activities in residential programs aim to promote personal growth and to develop a healthy personality in troubled youth for whom other interventions have been unsuccessful. In the Netherlands, experiential outdoor programs consist of activities such as mountain climbing and rapelling, flat and white water canoeing, biking, sailing,…

  10. Trouble in the Dorms: A Guide to Residential Life Programs for Higher Education Trustees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Trustees and Alumni, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This guide briefly retraces the rise of ideologically charged residential life programming on campuses and shows how such programs, despite their seemingly innocuous goals, in fact undercut the principles of rational inquiry that are foundational to the academic enterprise. In the fall of 2007, one university conducted a program for all 7,000…

  11. Cooperation, Integration, and Caring in Public Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cogar, Paul N.; Raebeck, Barry S.

    1989-01-01

    For our students to become truly free, we must share with them our perceptions concerning freedom. Educators must stop "motivating" and begin inspiring students to use education as a means toward self-realization. Teachers and administrators should stop isolating themselves and experience the benefits of cooperation and collegiality. Includes two…

  12. Patient Education and Involvement in Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andiric, Linda Reynolds

    2010-01-01

    A study conducted on patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty indicated that participants who were offered preadmission education for their procedure had statistically better outcomes than patients who had not attended an educational class. The study further focused on patients' confidence in their ability to take control of their health…

  13. Early Childhood Education and Care in England.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lubeck, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Describes early childhood education reform policies in England based on recent report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Explores implications of these government reform initiatives for early childhood education in the United States. (Contains 39 references.) (PKP)

  14. Should we provide oral health training for staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities in community based residential care? A cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Mac Giolla Phadraig, Caoimhin; Nunn, June; Guerin, Suzanne; Normand, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Oral health training is often introduced into community-based residential settings to improve the oral health of people with intellectual disabilities (ID). There is a lack of appropriate evaluation of such programs, leading to difficulty in deciding how best to allocate scarce resources to achieve maximum effect. This article reports an economic analysis of one such oral health program, undertaken as part of a cluster randomized controlled trial. Firstly, we report a cost-effectiveness analysis of training care-staff compared to no training, using incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Effectiveness was measured as change in knowledge, reported behaviors, attitude and self-efficacy, using validated scales (K&BAS). Secondly, we costed training as it was scaled up to include all staff within the service provider in question. Data were collected in Dublin, Ireland in 2009. It cost between €7000 and €10,000 more to achieve modest improvement in K&BAS scores among a subsample of 162 care-staff, in comparison to doing nothing. Considering scaled up first round training, it cost between €58,000 and €64,000 to train the whole population of staff, from a combined dental and disability service perspective. Less than €15,000-€20,000 of this was additional to the cost of doing nothing (incremental cost). From a dental perspective, a further, second training cycle including all staff would cost between €561 and €3484 (capital costs) and €5815 (operating costs) on a two yearly basis. This study indicates that the program was a cost-effective means of improving self-reported measures and possibly oral health, relative to doing nothing. This was mainly due to low cost, rather than the large effect. In this instance, the use of cost effectiveness analysis has produced evidence, which may be more useful to decision makers than that arising from traditional methods of evaluation. There is a need for CEAs of effective interventions to allow comparison

  15. [Shared Care Plan: convergence between the educational problematizing perspective and the theory of nursing cultural care].

    PubMed

    Martins, Paula Alvarenga de Figueiredo; Alvim, Neide Aparecida Titonelli

    2012-01-01

    This report is a reflection that marks a change of perspective in the care relation between nurse and client, in the implementation context of the educative process. It emerged a Shared Care Plan as an educational-caring proposal, in the convergence among theorists Paulo Freire and Leininger, regarding the dialogical pedagogy and nursing cultural care. With regard to the elements considered essential to the care, learning together allows the unveiling of a peculiar reality of possibilities for integration and transformation of the reality revealed, by choice of the person. Autonomy planned becomes real, so that customers no longer carry fragmented practices, stemming from traditional pedagogy. The stand-alone client reaches, then, the fullness of the action. PMID:22911423

  16. Evolution of Self-Care Education

    PubMed Central

    Ambizas, Emily M.; Bastianelli, Karen M.S.; Ferreri, Stefanie P.; Haines, Seena L.; Stutz, Misty M.; VanAmburgh, Jenny A.; Wilhelm, Miranda

    2014-01-01

    During the past 15 years, the curriculum content for nonprescription medication and self-care therapeutics has expanded significantly. Self-care courses ranging from stand-alone, required courses to therapeutic content and skills laboratories, have evolved in colleges and schools of pharmacy to accommodate rapid changes related to nonprescription medications and to meet the needs of students. The design of and content delivery methods used in self-care courses vary among institutions. Teaching innovations such as team-based learning, role playing/vignettes, videos, and social media, as well as interdisciplinary learning have enhanced delivery of this content. Given that faculty members train future pharmacists, they should be familiar with the new paradigms of Nonprescription Safe Use Regulatory Expansion (NSURE) Initiative, nonprescription medications for chronic diseases, and the growing trends of health and wellness in advancing patient-care initiatives. This paper reviews the significant changes that may be impacting self-care curriculums in the United States. PMID:24672061

  17. Silent and suffering: a pilot study exploring gaps between theory and practice in pain management for people with severe dementia in residential aged care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Peisah, Carmelle; Weaver, Judith; Wong, Lisa; Strukovski, Julie-Anne

    2014-01-01

    Background Pain is common in older people, particularly those in residential aged care facilities (RACF) and those with dementia. However, despite 20 years of discourse on pain and dementia, pain is still undetected or misinterpreted in people with dementia in residential aged care facilities, particularly those with communication difficulties. Methods A topical survey typology with semistructured interviews was used to gather attitudes and experiences of staff from 15 RACF across Northern Sydney Local Health District. Results While pain is proactively assessed and pain charts are used in RACF, this is more often regulatory-driven than patient-driven (eg, prior to accreditation). Identification of pain and need for pain relief was ill defined and poorly understood. Both pharmacological and non-pharmacological regimes were used, but in an ad hoc, variable and unsystematic manner, with patient, staff, and attitudinal obstacles between the experience of pain and its relief. Conclusion A laborious “pain communication chain” exists between the experience of pain and its relief for people with severe dementia within RACF. Given the salience of pain for older people with dementia, we recommend early, proactive consideration and management of pain in the approach to behaviors of concern. Individualized pain measures for such residents; empowerment of nursing staff as “needs interpreters”; collaborative partnerships with common care goals between patients where possible; RACF staff, doctors, and family carers; and more meaningful use of pain charts to map response to stepped pain protocols may be useful strategies to explore in clinical settings. PMID:25342895

  18. Findings from a pilot investigation of the effectiveness of a snoezelen room in residential care: should we be engaging with our residents more?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Katrina; Bird, Michael; Macpherson, Sarah; McDonough, Vikki; Davis, Terri

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing literature on multisensory therapy or Snoezelen, with some evidence suggesting it promotes positive mood and reduces maladaptive behavior in people with dementia. We undertook a pilot evaluation of a Snoezelen room in residential care and compared effects with a condition in which staff took residents out to a garden. This study was therefore a comparison between a Snoezelen room containing prescriptive, expensive equipment and a more everyday existing location that, inevitably, also contained several sensory stimuli. The study was difficult to implement, with low numbers because some staff failed to attend sessions, and the frequent although rarely reported difficulty of introducing psychosocial interventions and doing research in residential care is one of the main stories of this study. No staff member used the room outside of the study, and we found no significant difference between Snoezelen and garden conditions. Results, although highly equivocal because of low numbers, raised the issue of the implementation of standard therapies in dementia care outpacing the evidence, possibly at the expense of less elaborate practices. PMID:21306798

  19. Global Health Education in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine Fellowships.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Trishul; North, Crystal M; Attia, Engi F; Christiani, David C; Checkley, William; West, T Eoin

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship programs in the United States offer global health training opportunities. Formal, integrated global health programs within pulmonary and critical care fellowships are relatively new but are built on principles and ideals of global health that focus on the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and social justice. Although core competencies consistent with these overarching themes in global health education have not been formalized for pulmonary and critical care trainees, relevant competency areas include clinical knowledge, international research training, cultural competency, and clinical and research capacity building. Existing global health education in U.S. pulmonary and critical care medicine training programs can generally be classified as one of three different models: integrated global health tracks, global health electives, and additional research years. Successful global health education programs foster partnerships and collaborations with international sites that emphasize bidirectional exchange. This bidirectional exchange includes ongoing, equitable commitments to mutual opportunities for training and professional development, including a focus on the particular knowledge and skill sets critical for addressing the unique priorities of individual countries. However, barriers related to the availability of mentorship, funding, and dedicated time exist to expanding global health education in pulmonary and critical care medicine. The implementation of global health training within pulmonary and critical care medicine programs requires continued optimization, but this training is essential to prepare the next generation of physicians to address the global aspects of respiratory disease and critical illness. PMID:26974557

  20. Restructuring VA ambulatory care and medical education: the PACE model of primary care.

    PubMed

    Cope, D W; Sherman, S; Robbins, A S

    1996-07-01

    The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Western Region and associated medical schools formulated a set of recommendations for an improved ambulatory health care delivery system during a 1988 strategic planning conference. As a result, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in Sepulveda, California, initiated the Pilot (now Primary) Ambulatory Care and Education (PACE) program in 1990 to implement and evaluate a model program. The PACE program represents a significant departure from traditional VA and non-VA academic medical center care, shifting the focus of care from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. From its inception, the PACE program has used an interdisciplinary team approach with three independent global care firms. Each firm is interdisciplinary in composition, with a matrix management structure that expands role function and empowers team members. Emphasis is on managed primary care, stressing a biopsychosocial approach and cost-effective comprehensive care emphasizing prevention and health maintenance. Information management is provided through a network of personal computers that serve as a front end to the VHA Decentralized Hospital Computer Program (DHCP) mainframe. In addition to providing comprehensive and cost-effective care, the PACE program educates trainees in all health care disciplines, conducts research, and disseminates information about important procedures and outcomes. Undergraduate and graduate trainees from 11 health care disciplines rotate through the PACE program to learn an integrated approach to managed ambulatory care delivery. All trainees are involved in a problem-based approach to learning that emphasizes shared training experiences among health care disciplines. This paper describes the transitional phases of the PACE program (strategic planning, reorganization, and quality improvement) that are relevant for other institutions that are shifting to training programs emphasizing primary and ambulatory care

  1. Educational Impacts of New Care Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, J. Robert

    1987-01-01

    Forces acting on medical education and compelling a reexamination of current approaches include cost containment, competition and price sensitivity, new technologies, the physician surplus, and a rapidly expanding, politically assertive aging population. (MSE)

  2. Promoting Diversity in Early Child Care Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perlman, Michal; Kankesan, Tharsni; Zhang, Jing

    2010-01-01

    Preschool-aged children are aware of differences in the race and abilities of the people around them. Given this awareness it is important to promote children's acceptance of diversity in the preschool period. The goals of this study were to assess the extent to which child care centres provide diversity instruction through classroom activities,…

  3. On Marcuse and Caring in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shel, Tammy

    2006-01-01

    Can caring and standardized testing coincide? Marcuse criticized the misuse of science because it also legitimizes social and economic hierarchy. By the same token, scholars develop standardized testing, claiming these tests are scientific and can measure objectively individuals' learning and intelligence capabilities. However, if inclusive caring…

  4. Staff and relatives' perspectives on the aggressive behaviour of older people with dementia in residential care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Duxbury, J; Pulsford, D; Hadi, M; Sykes, S

    2013-11-01

    multidimensional studies can then provide a sounder basis for health and social care education, and person centred informed practice to reduce the incidence of aggression through preventative strategies. PMID:23163804

  5. [From anthropocentrism to ecocentrism: educating for ecological care in health].

    PubMed

    Backes, Marli Terezinha Stein; Backes, Dirce Stein; Drago, Lívia Crespo; Koerich, Magda Santos; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2011-06-01

    The focus of the paper is the meaning of ecological care as understood by students and educators and how this issue is addressed in programs in the fields of health sciences and health care in a federal public institution in southern Brazil. Our goal is to discuss the central category. The methodology adopted was Grounded Theory. Ten interviews were carried out among two sample groups between September, 2008, and April, 2009. The results led to the design of the theory: considering ecological care as broad and complex phenomenon, and the core category: the ecological care that results from relations, interactions and associations within the global environment. We concluded that rejecting anthropocentrism is not enough for the survival of all forms of life in the planet. This survival demands educating for ecocentrism and for systemic-functional interactivity and adaptability. We must go beyond speeches and world conferences and redo the web of interdependence of all beings and elements of nature. PMID:21987986

  6. Finnish Media Literacy Education Policies and Best Practices in Early Childhood Education and Care since 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantala, Leena

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to describe Finnish media literacy policies and good media education practices in early childhood education and care. This article will focus on describing two central action lines related to the Children and Media Program, initiated by the Division for Cultural Policy of the Ministry of Education and Culture in 2004.…

  7. Early Childhood Care and Education in Zambia: An Integral Part of Educational Provision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Carolyn M.; Thomas, Matthew A. M.

    2009-01-01

    The field of international development has recently been consumed by a shift in contemporary educational discourse, one that moves Early Childhood Care and Education (ECCE) closer to the forefront of what is considered progressive policy formation. In Zambia, the current educational environment seems to indicate that the creation and continued…

  8. Characteristics of Swedish Preschools That Provide Education and Care to Children with Special Educational Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundqvist, Johanna; Westling, Mara Allodi; Siljehag, Eva

    2016-01-01

    In Sweden, preschool inclusion is embraced and preschools are open for children both with and without special educational needs. The purpose of this study was to examine the characteristics of a number of preschool units in Sweden that provide education and care to children with special educational needs with regard to organisation, resources and…

  9. Continuing Education about Physically Abusive Relationships: Does Education Change the Perceptions of Health Care Practitioners?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Karen M.; Boyett, Timothy P.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of Florida health care professionals before (n=72) and after (n=53) mandated continuing education on domestic violence found no significant changes in awareness and identification of women involved in physically abusive relationships. Availability of patient education materials increased. Respondents desired more professional education on…

  10. Efficacy of purposeful educational workshop on nursing care

    PubMed Central

    Aminoroaia, Mahin; Mashhadi, Mortaza; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Attari, Abbas

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to define the efficacy of a nursing care educational workshop on nurses’ knowledge and attitude until 3 months after holding the workshop in psychiatric wards of educational hospitals in Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This is a quasi-experimental study. The study population comprised all nurses working in psychiatric wards of Nour and Farabi hospitals in Isfahan in 2012. An educational workshop was held through educational sessions in the form of lectures and group discussion in the two above-mentioned hospitals. Nurses’ level of knowledge and attitude were investigated by a researcher-made questionnaire before, immediately after, and 3 months after intervention. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical tests of repeated measures ANOVA and Bonferroni. Results: A significant increase was observed in mean scores of nurses’ knowledge immediately after and 3 months after education compared to before education. Nurses’ knowledge mean scores increased from 59.2 ± 14.8 before education to 88.6 ± 8.4 immediately after and to 71 ± 9.8 3 months after (P ≤ 0.016). There was no significant difference in mean scores of nurses’ attitude in the three above-mentioned time points. Conclusion: Educational sessions notably affected the promotion of nurses’ knowledge. With regard to nurses’ satisfaction with the workshop that was held, designing and organizing educational workshops based on constant needs assessment is suggested for promotion of nursing cares. PMID:25250348

  11. Generational considerations in providing critical care education.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Tricia

    2010-01-01

    With the current and predicted nursing shortage, much emphasis is placed on recruitment and retention. With an aging workforce, we must recruit, educate, and retain nurses from many different generations. As leaders and educators, we must be aware of generational differences and work with staff to appreciate potential preferences in communication, approach to learning and motivational factors. We are aware that over the next 15 years, many experienced nurses will retire. We must do all we can to recruit and retain nurses from all generations in order to provide a workforce able to meet the needs of our patients and families. Generational preferences should be considered when developing nursing education and in welcoming and accepting new staff into the culture of the nursing unit. PMID:20019512

  12. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries. PMID:12492943

  13. Mastering health care executive education: creating transformational competence.

    PubMed

    Clement, D G; Wan, T T

    1997-01-01

    The effective health services executive needs to continue to develop analytical, technical and behavioral skills to anticipate and meet the changing requirements of the health care industry. Those leading the field of health administration will need to be competent in achieving transformations. Lifelong learning is a necessity. As the structure and knowledge of the field change, so must the ways of exchanging information about health and medical care. Distance learning is a strategy for lifelong learning that can be used to continue one's education. In order to be successful in positioning a health care organization in the competitive world, investment in continued education to update strategic thinking and the analytical competency of executives and managers is imperative. Academic programs able to respond to the educational needs of the health care industry have a dedicated faculty who understand corporate culture and competitiveness in the health care marketplace and are able to offer effective adult education using cutting-edge computer technology for distance learning. PMID:10178099

  14. Integrated Pest Management: A Curriculum for Early Care and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Childcare Health Program, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This "Integrated Pest Management Toolkit for Early Care and Education Programs" presents practical information about using integrated pest management (IPM) to prevent and manage pest problems in early care and education programs. This curriculum will help people in early care and education programs learn how to keep pests out of early care and…

  15. The Cost of Public and Community Residential Care for Mentally Retarded People in the United States. Project Report No. 9.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieck, Colleen A.; Bruininks, Robert H.

    The direction and scope of deinstitutionalization in 75 public and 161 community residential programs for mentally retarded people in the Unites States were examined by analysis of current levels of expenditures, projected costs, efficacy of existing funding mechanisms, and identification of critical factors affecting cost variation. Results of a…

  16. CARE: Creating Augmented Reality in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latif, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores how Augmented Reality using mobile phones can enhance teaching and learning in education. It specifically examines its application in two cases, where it is identified that the agility of mobile devices and the ability to overlay context specific resources offers opportunities to enhance learning that would not otherwise exist.…

  17. Care and Education in the Danish Creche

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Stig; Hansen, Ole Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This article seeks to identify the relation between policy and lived life, for the small child in the Danish creche. To accomplish this, the article integrates demography, traditions, national curriculum and psychological, educational, and recent developments in research. It is an attempt to reveal knowledge and consequences, by conducting the…

  18. An Analysis of Associations between Residential and School Mobility and Educational Outcomes in South African Urban Children: The Birth to Twenty Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ginsburg, Carren; Richter, Linda M.; Fleisch, Brahm; Norris, Shane A.

    2011-01-01

    Using data from Birth to Twenty, a cohort of South African urban children, the current paper investigates the relationships between residential and school mobility and a set of educational outcomes. The findings provide some evidence of a positive association between changes in residence and numeracy and literacy scores, and school mobility was…

  19. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement I to Volume 5. Operational Support: Administrative Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Newell B.; And Others

    One of two supplements which accompany chapter 5 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the reprographic and personnel components of the administrative services division. Several job descriptions and sample…

  20. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement I To Volume 3. Measurement and Evaluation: The Research Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, David A.; And Others

    One of five supplements which accompany chapter 3 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains specific information concerning the data monitoring procedures and forms utilized by the research services division. Included are the following…

  1. A Residential School's Outdoor Education Program for Emotionally Handicapped Adolescents. Final Project Report of the Rhinecliff Union Free School District, Holy Cross Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigothi, Anthony, Ed.

    Concept definition and activity description constituted the major focus of implementation proceedings of this outdoor education program designed for a residential school serving secondary students with emotional and drug related problems. Major program objectives were the development of greater academic growth and more positive self-concept for…

  2. Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential Family Based Education Program. Appendix. Supplement Four to Volume Three. Measurement and Evaluation: The Research Services Division.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, David A.; And Others

    One of five supplements which accompany chapter 3 of "Mountain-Plains Handbook: The Design and Operation of a Residential, Family Oriented Career Education Model" (CE 014 630), this document contains a master listing of all Mountain-Plains curriculum, compiled by job title, course, unit, and Learning activity package (LAPS) and arranged in…

  3. The relationship between the quality of the built environment and the quality of life of people with dementia in residential care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Richard; Goodenough, Belinda; Low, Lee-Fay; Chenoweth, Lynn; Brodaty, Henry

    2016-07-01

    While there is considerable evidence on the impact of specific design features on problems associated with dementia, the link between the quality of the built environment and quality of life of people with dementia is largely unexplored. This study explored the environmental and personal characteristics that are associated with quality of life in people with dementia living in residential aged care. Data were obtained from 275 residents of 35 aged care homes and analysed using linear regression. The quality of the built environment was significantly associated with the quality of life of the resident measured by global self-report. Environmental ratings were not associated with proxy or detailed self-report ratings. Higher quality of life is associated with buildings that facilitate engagement with a variety of activities both inside and outside, are familiar, provide a variety of private and community spaces and the amenities and opportunities to take part in domestic activities. PMID:24803645

  4. Spica cast care: a collaborative staff-led education initiative for improved patient care.

    PubMed

    Reed, Cynthia; Carroll, Lee; Baccari, Susan; Shermont, Herminia

    2011-01-01

    One of the most challenging aspects for nurses caring for incontinent children in spica casts is maintaining healthy skin integrity. Noting an increase in the number of phone calls from parents of discharged children in spica casts concerning diaper rash and skin breakdown, inpatient orthopedics staff nurses lead an interdisciplinary quality improvement and educational initiative. They standardized pediatric spica cast care and education by creating an intranet narrated PowerPoint presentation for staff and parents of children with spica casts. A take-home DVD of this education module is now produced and given to parents, reinforcing nursing discharge teaching and giving parents the opportunity to review these new skills at home as needed. The purpose of this article is to share this experience of improving patient outcomes and empowering other orthopedics nurses to develop creative educational solutions. PMID:22124183

  5. Patient education preferences in ophthalmic care

    PubMed Central

    Rosdahl, Jullia A; Swamy, Lakshmi; Stinnett, Sandra; Muir, Kelly W

    2014-01-01

    Background The learning preferences of ophthalmology patients were examined. Methods Results from a voluntary survey of ophthalmology patients were analyzed for education preferences and for correlation with race, age, and ophthalmic topic. Results To learn about eye disease, patients preferred one-on-one sessions with providers as well as printed materials and websites recommended by providers. Patients currently learning from the provider were older (average age 59 years), and patients learning from the Internet (average age 49 years) and family and friends (average age 51 years) were younger. Patients interested in cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration, and dry eye were older; patients interested in double vision and glasses were younger. There were racial differences regarding topic preferences, with Black patients most interested in glaucoma (46%), diabetic retinopathy (31%), and cataracts (28%) and White patients most interested in cataracts (22%), glaucoma (22%), and macular degeneration (19%). Conclusion Most ophthalmology patients preferred personalized education: one-on-one with their provider or a health educator and materials (printed and electronic) recommended by their provider. Age-related topics were more popular with older patients, and diseases with racial risk factors were more popular with high risk racial groups. PMID:24812493

  6. Training and Continuing Education; A Handbook for Health Care Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hospital Research and Educational Trust, Chicago, IL.

    This basic handbook for personnel development through training and continuing education within health care institutions describes the techniques involved in developing programs, from needs determination to evaluation. It covers how to make a skill inventory and a survey of learning needs; how to state learning objectives; how to design a specific…

  7. Internet Continuing Education for Health Care Professionals: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Susan Copley

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to review key articles and research studies on practices, preferences, and evaluation of on-line continuing education used by health care professionals. Methods: Data sources included searches of the "MEDLINE," "CINAHL," and "ERIC" databases (January 1990 to June 2004) and manual searches of the "Journal of…

  8. Disciplinary Regimes of "Care" and Complementary Alternative Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Pat; Pennacchia, Jodie

    2016-01-01

    In schools, the notion of "care" is often synonymous with welfare and disciplinary regimes. Drawing on Foucault, and a study of alternative education (AE) across the UK, and looking in depth at two cases of complementary AE, we identify three types of disciplinary regimes at work in schools: (1) dominant performative reward and…

  9. Preschool Education and Day Care for Swedish Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Jeanne

    A comprehensive study of the types of care provided for Swedish children is presented. The point is made that the three major frameworks which support the Swedish philosophy of early childhood education are those of Arnold Gesell, Jean Piaget, and Erik H. Erikson. From all three sources, preschool teachers learn the concept of epigenesis, the…

  10. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Norway 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) can bring a wide range of benefits--for children, parents and society at large. However, these benefits are conditional on "quality". Expanding access to services without attention to quality will not deliver good outcomes for children or long-term productivity benefits for society. This series of country…

  11. Foster Care Children Need Better Educational Opportunities. Backgrounder No. 2039

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lips; Dan

    2007-01-01

    The estimated 518,000 children in foster care in the United States are among the most at-risk children in American society. Research shows that foster children are more likely to be at risk of poor life outcomes. The quality of a foster child's primary and secondary education is a major factor in future life success. Early warning signs of these…

  12. Rethinking Research in Early Care and Education: Joining Sally's Quest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, Rebecca S.

    2008-01-01

    The article considers three domains of Sally Lubeck's scholarship as illustrations of her orientation to research on early care and education: her critique of positivism in general and the field of developmental psychology (and the sub-discipline of child development) specifically as the primary source of a "knowledge base" for the field of early…

  13. The Role of Education in Systems of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberton, Cindy J., Ed.; And Others

    Eight papers presented at a March 1993 conference address the role of education in systems of care for children's mental health. Papers have the following titles and authors: (1) "Interagency Collaboration through a School-Based Wraparound Approach: A Systems Analysis Summary of Project WRAP" (Lucille Eber and Carol Stieper); (2) "Baseline…

  14. Changing Health Care Education: The Challenge to Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, Eugene P.

    1993-01-01

    This keynote address offers suggestions for structural change in dental education to meet changing societal needs including programs tailored to specific local community needs, interdisciplinary efforts, public-private cooperative projects building on local health care community strengths, and international collaboration supporting both health…

  15. Evaluation of Health Educator Consults in Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Stacia; Lopez, Patricia; McKee, M. Diane; Deen, Darwin; Fornari, Alice; Fletcher, Jason; Blank, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to evaluate a primary care obesity prevention intervention, targeting low-income minority parents in the USA. The first objective is to describe the barriers to behavior change experienced by families. The second objective is to understand the types of strategies that were used by the health educator to empower families to…

  16. Adult Basic Education. Child Care, Transportation, Support Services Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Deborah; Morris, Jamie, Ed.

    This workbook focuses on two primary needs of adult basic education (ABE) students--child care and transportation--and provides ideas to assist program administrators (especially in Texas) to develop appropriate, workable, community-based strategies to meet these needs. The book contains five chapters. Each chapter addresses a particular aspect of…

  17. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) has become a policy priority in many countries. A growing body of research recognises that it provides a wide range of benefits, including social and economic benefits, better child well-being and learning outcomes as a foundation for lifelong learning, more equitable outcomes and reduction of poverty, and…

  18. Inclusive Education for Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janz, Janice; And Others

    This paper discusses issues concerning inclusion of children with special health care needs in the regular classroom. Six categories of health conditions are discussed in terms of their implications for the educational setting. These are: (1) "hidden" conditions (e.g., juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, sickle cell anemia, asthma, and cystic…

  19. Constructions of Early Childhood Education and Care Provision: Negotiating Discourses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Barr, Verity

    2014-01-01

    Drives to increase the number of early childhood education and care places in England have relied on a mixed economy of providers. Yet this is not a free market as policy makers have sought to create a discursive truth of an entrepreneurial provider in order to secure their initial pump priming investment. However, there remain sustainability…

  20. Improving Educational Outcomes for Children in Foster Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Christina; Kabler, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Recent statistics estimate that there are 783,000 children living in foster care in the United States. This vulnerable population is at risk for academic failure as well as internalizing and externalizing behavioral problems. Compared to their peers, foster youth face significant educational difficulties, including lower levels of academic…

  1. Caring and Agency: Noddings on Happiness in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Hanan

    2013-01-01

    In this short essay I express my own deep sympathy with Nel Noddings's ethic of care and applaud her stubborn resistance in "Happiness and Education" to what John Dewey would have called false dualisms, such as those between intelligence and emotion, theory and practice, or vocation and academic studies.However, I question whether…

  2. Parent Choice of Early Childhood Education and Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, Karen

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on a study designed to enhance knowledge and understanding of parent choice in relation to early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. It investigates the ways parents make their choices of early childhood services and examines and interprets the meanings they ascribe to those choices. An orthodox grounded theory…

  3. Early Childhood Education and Care: An Issue for All Canadians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Martha

    Arguing that quality early childhood education and care (ECEC) contributes to meeting goals that strengthen Canadians and Canadian society, this paper discusses the support found for ECEC within the nation; maintains that ECEC is a broad issue that bridges socioeconomic, ethnic, and regional divisions; and addresses the main problems and issues in…

  4. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Slovak Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a topic of increased policy interest in the Slovak Republic where improving quality in the ECEC sector is a subject of growing importance. The OECD has identified five effective policy levers to encourage quality in the sector: 1) quality goals and regulations; 2) curriculum and guidelines; 3)…

  5. Starting Strong II: Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2006

    2006-01-01

    This review of early childhood education and care (ECEC) in twenty OECD countries describes the social, economic, conceptual and research factors that influence early childhood policy. These include increasing women's labour market participation; reconciling work and family responsibilities on a more equitable basis for women; confronting the…

  6. Hide and Seek: Values in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Sacha

    2010-01-01

    Early childhood education and care settings in England and the people who work in them constitute an important sphere of influence, shaping young children's characters and values. But the values and dispositions expected of the early years workforce are missing from statutory policy documentation despite its clear requirement that practitioners…

  7. Competence Requirements in Early Childhood Education and Care. Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Mathias; Vandenbroeck, Michel; Lazzari, Arianna; Van Laere, Katrien; Peeters, Jan

    2012-01-01

    This report presents the findings of a European research project jointly conducted by the University of East London (UEL) and the University of Ghent (UGent). The "study on competence requirements in early childhood education and care" (CoRe) explored conceptualisations of "competence" and professionalism in early childhood practice, and…

  8. Bolstering medical education to enhance critical care capacity in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Albert, Tyler J; Fassier, Thomas; Chhuoy, Meng; Bounchan, Youttiroung; Tan, Sokhak; Ku, No; Chhor, Nareth; LoGerfo, James P; West, T Eoin

    2015-04-01

    The capacity to care for the critically ill has long been viewed as a fundamental element of established and comprehensive health care systems. Extending this capacity to health care systems in low- and middle-income countries is important given the burden of disease in these regions and the significance of critical care in overall health system strengthening. However, many practicalities of improving access and delivery of critical care in resource-limited settings have yet to be elucidated. We have initiated a program to build capacity for the care of critically ill patients in one low-income Southeast Asian country, Cambodia. We are leveraging existing international academic partnerships to enhance postgraduate critical care education in Cambodia. After conducting a needs assessment and literature review, we developed a three-step initiative targeting training in mechanical ventilation. First, we assessed and revised the current resident curriculum pertaining to mechanical ventilation. We addressed gaps in training, incorporated specific goals and learning objectives, and decreased the hours of lectures in favor of additional bedside training. Second, we are incorporating e-learning, e-teaching, and e-assessment into the curriculum, with both live, interactive and independent, self-paced online instruction. Third, we are developing a train-the-trainer program defined by bidirectional international faculty exchanges to provide hands-on, case-based, and bedside training to achieve competency-based outcomes. In targeting specific educational needs and a key population-the next generation of Cambodian intensivists-this carefully designed approach should address some existing gaps in the health care system and hopefully yield a lasting impact. PMID:25751194

  9. Educating primary care providers about HIV disease: multidisciplinary interactive mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Macher, A; Goosby, E; Barker, L; Volberding, P; Goldschmidt, R; Balano, K B; Williams, A; Hoenig, L; Gould, B; Daniels, E

    1994-01-01

    As HIV-related prophylactic and therapeutic research findings continue to evolve, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) of the Public Health Service has created multidisciplinary mechanisms to disseminate new treatment options and educate primary care providers at rural and urban sites throughout our nation's health care system. HRSA has implemented (a) the International State-of-the-Art HIV Clinical Conference Call Series, (b) the national network of AIDS Education and Training Centers, (c) the nationwide HIV Telephone Consultation Service, and (d) the Clinical Issues Subcommittee of the HRSA AIDS Advisory Committee. These collaborative and comprehensive efforts at HIV information dissemination target physicians, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, clinical pharmacists, mental health care providers, case managers, and allied health professionals. The sites where they provide care include public health clinics; county, State and Federal correctional facilities; private practice offices; community and academic hospitals; military and Veterans Administration facilities; hemophilia centers; schools of medicine, nursing, and dentistry; departments of health; chronic care facilities; visiting nurse and home care agencies; health maintenance organizations; and Indian Health Service clinics and hospitals. PMID:8190853

  10. Family Policy and Practice in Early Child Care. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.; Dunst, Carl J., Ed.; Wolery, Mark, Ed.

    Family issues are an abiding concern for members of the profession of early education, and debate regarding government policies about families and child care continues to be timely. This volume provides a foundation for understanding programs, families, and the current social context, as well as particular areas of concern for families and child…

  11. Improving Education Outcomes for Children in Foster Care: Intervention by an Education Liaison

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zetlin, Andrea; Weinberg, Lois; Kimm, Christina

    2004-01-01

    Children in foster care represent one of the most vulnerable, academically at risk populations in the United States. Aside from lower standardized achievement test scores, higher grade retention numbers, and a greater dropout rate than non-foster youth, between 30% to 50% of children in foster care are placed in special education programs,…

  12. Clinical interdisciplinary health team care: an educational experiment.

    PubMed

    Mazur, H; Beeston, J J; Yerxa, E J

    1979-09-01

    With increasing concern for teamwork in clinical practice in health care settings, the need to identify the concepts, methods, and learning processes for improving interdisciplinary team skills is apparent. This paper describes patient-centered, clinical-research-demonstration programs for teams of students, preceptors, and faculty members from six disciplines who provided patient care in a long-term rehabilitation setting. The teams were involved in the theory and practice of team-building, including weekly sessions on leadership styles, communication, group decision-making, and team effectiveness assessment. Objective and subjective measurements were administered throughout the program. The results indicate that task-oriented patient care favors the learning of team skills, especially when all levels of administration support and participate in the processes. Question are raised concerning the effect of clinical teams on the quality of patient care, their cost-effectiveness, and the low priority given to teaching interdisciplinary team skills in professional education. PMID:158089

  13. California Alliance For Radiotracer Education, CARE

    SciTech Connect

    Sutcliffe, Julie

    2015-02-19

    The report contains a summary of the accomplishments made during the CARE proposal. The overall goal of this proposal was to train graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the field of radiochemistry. The goal was to expose trainees to the fundamentals of radioisotope production, radiochemistry synthesis, synthetic organic chemistry as well as applications and hands on experience in small animal imaging. In summary approximately 30 trainees were involved including trainees both at the graduate and postdoctoral levels. This funding has to date resulted in publications in high impact journals such as Med Chem Comm, Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging and Biology. Trainees have gone on to further their careers in both academia, industry and the private sector. The funding will result in seven Master’s and six Ph.D dissertations. Without the DOE funding it simply would not have been possible to continue to train the next generation of radiochemists needed to assure a future US-based Nuclear and Radiochemistry Expertise.

  14. Restructuring the Teaching Profession. Proceedings of the Residential Teacher Education Workshop (44th, Muncie, Indiana, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Donald W., Ed.

    This volume contains 17 papers and reports from the 1991-92 Teacher Education Project sponsored by the North Central Accrediting Association and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Chapters include: (1) "Introduction to the NCA/AACTE Teacher Education Project" (D. Jones); (2) "The 44th Annual Workshop, Summer 1991" (D.…

  15. Teleconferenced Educational Detailing: Diabetes Education for Primary Care Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Stewart B.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Webster-Bogaert, Susan; Van, Daphne M.; O'Neill, Colleen

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Formal didactic continuing medical education (CME) is relatively ineffective for changing physician behavior. Diabetes mellitus is an increasingly prevalent disease, and interventions to improve adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are needed. Methods: A stratified, cluster-randomized, controlled trial design was used to…

  16. The "Key" to Successful Transitions for Young People Leaving Residential Child Care: The Role of the Keyworker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Stephanie; Kirwan, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of mandatory planning and support to assist all young people who leave care in Ireland, after-care provision is a "neglected" area of service provision and has been criticised for being inconsistent and ad hoc. The benefits of keyworker support for young people making the transition out of care is more clearly articulated within the…

  17. Foundations, Adult Dynamics, Teacher Education and Play. Advances in Early Education and Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reifel, Stuart, Ed.

    Providing a forum for current thinking related to early care and education, this book presents a wide range of views regarding research methodology, the nature of experience while teaching, teaching and program improvement, and conceptualizing play in the curriculum. The chapters are: (1) "Postmodern Research in Early Childhood Education" (Gaile…

  18. Enhancing Palliative Care Education in Medical School Curricula: Implementation of the Palliative Education Assessment Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Emily B.; Meekin, Sharon Abele; Fins, Joseph J.; Fleischman, Alan R.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated a project to catalyze New York State medical schools to develop and implement strategic plans for curricular change to enhance palliative care education. Found that the project's process of self-assessment and curriculum mapping with the Palliative Education Assessment Tool, along with strategic planning for change, appears to have…

  19. Assessing the effectiveness and acceptability of interprofessional palliative care education.

    PubMed

    Koffman, Jonathan; Higginson, Irene J

    2005-01-01

    Interprofessional education in health care in general and palliative care has been the focus of increasing attention in recent years. However, there is still controversy about its outcomes and few courses have been evaluated. The aims of this evaluation were to explore (1) the career progression of former students who attended an interprofessional MSc in palliative care; (2) the activities former students were engaged in as a result of attending the course; and (3) the experience of attending an interprofessional postgraduate course in palliative care. Former students who attended the course between January 1998 and January 2004 were surveyed using a postal questionnaire. Of the 56 students who completed the course, 44 (79%) responded; 23 (52%) were doctors, 20 (45%) nurses, and one an occupational therapist. Career progression was significant for doctors (Z=-2.08, p=0.04) and for nurses (Z=-2.4, p=0.017). Thirty-nine (89%) former students believed this was due to attending the course. Former students described a wide range of clinical, research, and service development activities they were involved in as a result of attending the course. Qualitative data highlighted the benefits of attending an interprofessional course where the following themes became evident: lateral thinking, challenging misconceptions, enhancing teamwork opportunities, and professional networks and confidence. Funding should be made available to extend interprofessional education to a wide range of professionals who care for patients with advanced disease and their families. PMID:16483095

  20. Leadership, Education and Awareness: A Compassionate Care Nursing Initiative.

    PubMed

    Simmonds, Anne H

    2015-03-01

    The Canadian Nurses' Association Code of Ethics (2008) and the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia (CRNNS) Standards of Practice for Registered Nurses (CRNNS 2011) identify the provision of safe, compassionate, competent and ethical care as one of nursing's primary values and ethical responsibilities. While compassion has historically been viewed as the essence of nursing, there is concern that this has become an abstract ideal, rather than a true reflection of nursing practice. This paper describes a compassionate care initiative undertaken by the CRNNS and the initial outcomes of these educational workshops. This work is informed by an exploration of the multiplicity of factors that have brought this issue to the fore for nursing regulators, educators, administrators, the public as well as front-line staff. The two most significant areas of learning reported by workshop participants included understanding the connection between mindfulness, non-judgmental care and compassion/self-compassion and recognizing possibilities for action related to compassionate care, even in the face of personal and environmental constraints. Implications for nursing regulators and leaders include consideration of their roles and responsibilities in supporting nurses to meet professional practice standards, such as provision of compassionate care. PMID:26154121

  1. Tracing detached and attached care practices in nursing education.

    PubMed

    Soffer, Ann Katrine B

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of skills labs in Danish nursing education can, in itself, be viewed as a complexity. The students are expected to eventually carry out their work in a situated hospital practice, but they learn their professional skills in a different space altogether, detached and removed from the hospitals and practising on plastic dummies. Despite the apparent artificiality of the skills lab, this article will show that it is possible to analyse some of the fundamental aspects of care in nursing by ethnographically following this phenomenon of simulation-based training. These particular aspects of care are not explicated in the curriculum or textbooks; however, they surfaced once this crooked approach to studying care in a simulated practice was applied. The article start from the assertion that detached engagements are not recognized within the field of nursing education as an equal component to attachments. Yet empirical cases from the skills lab and hospitals illustrate how students sometimes felt emotionally attached to plastic dummies and how experienced nurses sometimes practised a degree of detachment in relation to human patients. Detached engagements will therefore be presented as part of care practices of nurses - rendering the ability to detach in engagement with patients a professional skill that students also need to learn. In the analysis to follow, attached and detached engagements are located on an equal plane by integrating both into the same conceptual framework, rather than imposing a priori notions about their dialectic relation. The analysis shows that it is the particular intertwinement of attachment and detachment that gives care its fundamental meaning. In conclusion, the need for a conceptual shift from a strong emphasis on attached engagement to a more balanced analytical approach to care work, as involving both attached and detached engagement within Danish nursing education, is advocated. PMID:24528597

  2. Veteran Affairs Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education: transforming nurse practitioner education.

    PubMed

    Rugen, Kathryn Wirtz; Watts, Sharon A; Janson, Susan L; Angelo, Laura A; Nash, Melanie; Zapatka, Susan A; Brienza, Rebecca; Gilman, Stuart C; Bowen, Judith L; Saxe, JoAnne M

    2014-01-01

    To integrate health care professional learners into patient-centered primary care delivery models, the Department of Veterans Affairs has funded five Centers of Excellence in Primary Care Education (CoEPCEs). The main goal of the CoEPCEs is to develop and test innovative structural and curricular models that foster transformation of health care training from profession-specific "silos" to interprofessional, team-based educational and care delivery models in patient-centered primary care settings. CoEPCE implementation emphasizes four core curricular domains: shared decision making, sustained relationships, interprofessional collaboration, and performance improvement. The structural models allow interprofessional learners to have longitudinal learning experiences and sustained and continuous relationships with patients, faculty mentors, and peer learners. This article presents an overview of the innovative curricular models developed at each site, focusing on nurse practitioner (NP) education. Insights on transforming NP education in the practice setting and its impact on traditional NP educational models are offered. Preliminary outcomes and sustainment examples are also provided. PMID:24630678

  3. Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Spratt, John M., Jr. [D-SC-5

    2010-03-17

    03/30/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-152. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: The bill makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act enacted by H.R.3590 and modifies higher education assistance provisions. Read together, H.R.3590 and the health care-related provisions of this bill are commonly... Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Key Facts about Child Care and Early Education: A Briefing Book, 1997 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Gina C.; Poersch, Nicole Oxendine

    This briefing book from the Children's Defense Fund contains factsheets on child care and early education issues. Areas covered include basic facts about early childhood education and care; their importance to children, families, and communities; some of the challenges facing families who need day care; and key child care and early education…

  5. Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe: Tackling Social and Cultural Inequalities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delhaxhe, Arlette; Motiejunaite, Akvile; Coghlan, Misia; Huart, Thierry; Manni, Gentile; Leseman, Paul P.M.; Crahay, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the available cross-national data and national policies on early childhood education and care (later--ECEC) in Europe. Early childhood education and care in this study refers to publicly subsidised and accredited provision for children under compulsory school age. "Education" and "care" are combined in the phrase to underline…

  6. Staff Reactions Toward Lesbian, Gay, or Bisexual (LGB) People Living in Residential Aged Care Facilities (RACFs) Who Actively Disclose Their Sexual Orientation.

    PubMed

    Villar, Feliciano; Serrat, Rodrigo; Fabà, Josep; Celdrán, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Fifty-three staff members currently working in residential aged care facilities located in Barcelona, Spain, were asked about the way they would react if a resident told them that he or she felt sexually attracted and had maintained sexual relationships with another resident of the same gender. Acceptance of non-heterosexual sexual orientation was a frequent answer, and around one in four professionals stated that they would try helping the resident in question, by offering a private space or giving some emotional support. However, some reactions were not consistent with a respectful approach toward sexual diversity, as, for instance, informing the resident's family or advising the resident to keep his or her sexual orientation hidden. We highlight the importance of developing formal policies and offering formal training to staff in order to address the specific needs of older LGB people living in RACFs. PMID:25710604

  7. Expanding physician education in health care fraud and program integrity.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Shantanu; Tarzy, Bruce; Hunt, Lauren; Taitsman, Julie; Budetti, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Program integrity (PI) spans the entire spectrum of improper payments from fraud to abuse, errors, and waste in the health care system. Few physicians will perpetrate fraud or abuse during their careers, but nearly all will contribute to the remaining spectrum of improper payments, making preventive education in this area vital. Despite the enormous impact that PI issues have on government-sponsored and private insurance programs, physicians receive little formal education in this area. Physicians' lack of awareness of PI issues not only makes them more likely to submit inappropriate claims, generate orders that other providers and suppliers will use to submit inappropriate claims, and document improperly in the medical record but also more likely to become victims of fraud schemes themselves.In this article, the authors provide an overview of the current state of PI issues in general, and fraud in particular, as well as a description of the state of formal education for practicing physicians, residents, and fellows. Building on the lessons from pilot programs conducted by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and partner organizations, the authors then propose a model PI education curriculum to be implemented nationwide for physicians at all levels. They recommend that various stakeholder organizations take part in the development and implementation process to ensure that all perspectives are included. Educating physicians is an essential step in establishing a broader culture of compliance and improved integrity in the health care system, extending beyond Medicare and Medicaid. PMID:23807100

  8. The impact of the Affordable Care Act on health education: perceptions of leading health educators.

    PubMed

    Gastmyer, Christine L; Pruitt, B E Buzz

    2014-05-01

    The health care system in the United States is being overhauled by major legislation, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). This study's goal was to provide insight into the perceived impact and changes that could occur within the health education profession as a result of this health care reform legislation. Seven leaders of the health education profession participated in this qualitative research study. Six semistructured, exploratory interviews were conducted, and one participant provided written responses to the interview questions. A thematic analysis of the content of the interviews yielded five themes: (a) a fragmented sick-care system, (b) ACA becomes law: the participants' reactions, (c) ACA becomes law: the profession's reactions, (d) impact on the profession, and (e) health education in 2020. This article describes the fourth theme, the impact of the ACA on the health education profession. Leaders of the health education profession believed that the ACA creates a more favorable environment for health education practice. The positive elements of this legislation, however, will need to be protected, strengthened, and verified, through the work of health education professionals. As more mandates within the law are enacted over time, the impact on the profession, more than likely, will shift. PMID:24013465

  9. Incorporating educative environments into the holistic care of paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wilks, Susan E; Green, Julie B; Zazryn, Tsharni R

    2012-08-01

    Hospital settings can, and should, create educative spaces and learning opportunities as part of their holistic care for young patients. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evidence for creating high quality, child-centred learning environments within paediatric settings. We explore the impact of physical spaces on learning; the literature on developmental stages of learning for children and young people as it relates to learning environments; and the literature on learning in out-of-school settings, particularly as this applies to children who are separated from their daily communities. As all paediatric settings can create opportunities for the ongoing educational development of their patients, this paper presents a way forward for this approach to holistic care. PMID:22935113

  10. The Residential Career Education Concept: The Mountain-Plains Program. An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The objective of the Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, (MPEEDP), is to develop through action research and experimentation, integrated career education methods and programs which can be implemented on a widespread basis. This experimental demonstration activity involved various individuals, agencies, and other resources…

  11. The Representation of Knowledge in Written Instruction for Non-Residential Students in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennyson, Robert D.

    Educational experiences can now be an important element for people who want to obtain a college degree but were unable to because of the limited structure of traditional schools. This can be achieved through the nonresidential school in higher education that emphasizes student-environment interaction. If the nonresidential school is to be a…

  12. A Guide for Foodservice Education; Health Care; Community Care and School Feeding in California. Dietetic Service Supervision Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schickling, Clarice; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to help California community college educators understand and develop a vocational program in health care, community care, and school food service. It establishes the general need for such a program, and provides guidelines to help educators determine if there is a need for such a program in their geographic…

  13. [The impact of education on chronic wound care improvement].

    PubMed

    Novinscak, Tomislav; Filipović, Marinko; Kristofić, Jelena; Toplek, Goran

    2014-10-01

    Although not fully understood, close relationship between health and education ensures unambiguous health and quality of life advantages to educated individuals. Education ensures different thinking and decision making processes and man is enabled to receive information from the external world. Even though the process of education and learning still relies on banking principles and coping of common knowledge, modern and technological society drives the system as well as education opportunities towards the new learning sources. In the developed world, the impact of chronic wounds on health systems is fairly perceived, as well as chronic wound treatment and education. Our health system still neglects the significant impact of chronic wounds on social and economic, individual and community well-being. Recognizing the importance of chronic wounds and implementation of a developed educational system gives us the potential for improving care for chronic wounds, and thus to substantially improve the quality of life of patients. Furthermore, consequent reduction of unnecessary health costs could reallocate substantial resources to other points of interest. PMID:25326984

  14. Care for the Other's Selfhood: A View on Child Care and Education through Heidegger's Analytic of Dasein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joensuu, Kosti

    2012-01-01

    Philosophical analysis concerning selfhood and care is of fundamental importance for child care and education. Martin Heidegger's analytic of Dasein introduces the concepts of self and care within the ontological domain while structuring the holistic understanding of human existence. Because of the ontological emphasis, Heidegger's concepts of…

  15. A Decade of Data: The Compensation and Credentials of Arizona's Early Care and Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Action Alliance, 2008

    2008-01-01

    As Arizona strives for a first-rate educational system, the foundation of care and education for our youngest children remains far too weak. This new report, "A Decade of Data: The Compensation and Credentials of Arizona's Early Care and Education Workforce," marks ten years of data on trends in the wages, benefits, and education levels of…

  16. School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care. Best Practices in Homeless Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Homeless Education at SERVE, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this brief to provide a framework for local homeless education liaisons, educators, child welfare caseworkers, and other child welfare advocates for assessing best interest when selecting a school for students in out-of-home care. While the brief…

  17. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  18. Primary care--opportunities and threats. Developing professional knowledge: making primary care education and research more relevant.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, P.; Jones, K.

    1997-01-01

    The trio of recent government white papers heralds a new world for primary care. Many changes in the education of future primary health care professionals and in the research ethos of the discipline will be needed to realise this vision. New skills and attitudes, not least in multidisciplinary working; lifelong learning; and greater understanding of and participation in primary care research will have to emerge from educational efforts in the next few years. PMID:9081008

  19. School Desegregation and Residential Segregation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billingsley, Andrew; And Others

    1979-01-01

    This statement on school and residential segregation, signed by 38 educators and social scientists, was prepared for attorneys connected with litigation concerning the Dayton and Columbus school systems. (RLV)

  20. Early Childhood Education and Care in Europe: Tackling Social and Cultural Inequalities. Lithuania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seibokiene, Grazina

    2008-01-01

    In Lithuania early childhood education and care embraces children of the age from one to seven and is an integrated part of the education system. According to Lithuanian education classification, it belongs to the zero level of education. Though defined as pre-school education yet this stage is composed of two parts--pre-school education of…