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Sample records for residents family caregivers

  1. Mixed Methods Research of Adult Family Care Home Residents and Informal Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeanty, Guy C.; Hibel, James

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a mixed methods approach used to explore the experiences of adult family care home (AFCH) residents and informal caregivers (IC). A rationale is presented for using a mixed methods approach employing the sequential exploratory design with this poorly researched population. The unique challenges attendant to the sampling…

  2. La CLAve to Increase Psychosis Literacy of Spanish-Speaking Community Residents and Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    López, Steven R.; Kopelowicz, Alex; Solano, Susana; del Carmen Lara, Ma.; Foncerrada, Hector; Aguilera, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed and tested a 35-min psychoeducational program with the goal of increasing Spanish-speaking persons’ literacy of psychosis. The program uses popular cultural icons derived from music, art, and videos, as well as a mnemonic device—La CLAve (The Clue)—to increase (a) knowledge of psychosis, (b) efficacy beliefs that one can identify psychosis in others, (c) attributions to mental illness, and (d) professional help-seeking. Assessments were conducted before and after administering the program to both community residents (n = 57) and family caregivers of persons with schizophrenia (n = 38). For community residents, the authors observed increases across the 4 domains of symptom knowledge, efficacy beliefs, illness attributions, and recommended help-seeking. For caregivers, increases were observed in symptom knowledge and efficacy beliefs. La CLAve is a conceptually informed psychoeducational tool with a developing empirical base aimed at helping Spanish-speaking Latinos with serious mental illness obtain care in a timely manner. PMID:19634968

  3. Family Caregiver Alliance

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Family Caregiver Alliance. Blog What's New HOT Weather Tips We all suffer in hot weather. However, for elderly and disabled people and those ... conditions such as vascular disease or diabetes, the weather does not have to hit 100 degrees to ...

  4. Supporting Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    (1) About 8,000 baby boomers reach age 65 every day. (2) Nearly 70 percent of people over age 65 will need some form of long-term services and supports in their lives. (3) AARP estimates the value of uncompensated care provided by family caregivers to be more than $450 billion annually. PMID:26173298

  5. Roles for the Family Caregiver

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communicator The family caregiver has many roles besides giving the patient hands-on care. Most people think ... caregiver becomes an advocate for the patient by giving this information to the health care team. Although ...

  6. Family Caregivers in Cancer (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Communicator The family caregiver has many roles besides giving the patient hands-on care. Most people think ... caregiver becomes an advocate for the patient by giving this information to the health care team. Although ...

  7. Perceptions of long-term care, autonomy, and dignity, by residents, family and care-givers: the Houston experience.

    PubMed

    Boisaubin, Eugene V; Chu, Adeline; Catalano, Janine M

    2007-01-01

    Houston, Texas, is a major U.S. city with, like many, a growing aging population. The purpose of this study and ultimate book chapter is to explore the views and perceptions of long-term care (LTC) residents, family members and health care providers. Individuals primarily in independent living and group residential settings were interviewed and studied. Questions emphasized the concepts of personal autonomy, dignity, quality and location of care and decision making. Although a small sample of participants were involved, consistency was noted. Keeping the elderly in caring and loving home situations (theirs or family) was most preferred. Personal choice and independence were emphasized by residents, but family members needed to act as advocates. We also noted that the legal system emphasizes family control over individual decision making as competency declines with aging. Optimal personal decision making in the residents' best interest also became more difficult with loss of individual mental capacity. PMID:17924271

  8. Family Caregiving or Caregiving Alone: Who Helps the Helper?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims-Gould, Joanie; Martin-Matthews, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This study advances the understanding of family caregiving by examining the relationship between adult children caregivers and their helpers. Specifically, it focuses on examining "who helps whom" and extends analyses beyond the dyadic focus of caregiving in later life. The focus on helping and caregiving addresses the variety of contributions and…

  9. Long-Distance Caregiving -- A Family Affair

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the aging family member. Talk about caregiving responsibilities First, try to define the caregiving responsibilities. You ... suited to your skills or interests. Splitting caregiving responsibilities—consider your strengths When thinking about who should ...

  10. Measuring the Caregiver Burden of Caring for Community-Residing People with Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hongmei; Wang, Xiaocheng; He, Runlian; Liang, Ruifeng; Zhou, Liye

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess the direct and indirect effects of patient or caregiver factors on caregiver burden of caring for community-residing people with mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with AD from two hospitals and three communities in Taiyuan, China and their caregivers. For this survey, 200 patients with mild AD and their caregivers were selected. Caregivers were asked to provide sociodemographic information including age, gender, relationship with the patient, level of education, and number of contact hours per week with the patient. Caregiver burden was assessed using the Caregivers Burden Inventory. The caregivers also completed other measures including the Positive Aspects of Caregiving, the Family Adaptation, Partnership, Growth, Affection, and Resolve, and the Social Support Rating Scale. The patients with AD completed the Montreal Cognitive Assessment; their caregivers completed the Activities of Daily Living Scale and a questionnaire about the patients’ Behavioral and Psychological symptoms of Dementia. The main outcome in this study was caregiver burden. The care receivers’ level of cognitive function, physical function, and behavioral problems were treated as original stress; the primary appraisal variable was measured as the number of hours of caregiving in the previous week reported by the caregiver. Mediator variables included perceived social support, family function, and caregiving experience. Path analysis was used to build the interrelationship among caregiver burden and patient or caregiver factors. Results A lower level of cognitive function in patients (r = −0.28, p<0.001) and longer hours of caregiving (r = 0.17, p = 0.019) were related to increased caregiver burden. Greater social support (r = −0.23, p<0.001), family function (r = −0.17, p = 0.015) and caregiving experience (r = −0.16, p = 0.012) were related to decreased caregiver burden. Social support (r = 0

  11. Credentialing Caregivers. Families Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dean, Christiana

    The Families Matter series of papers from the Harvard Family Research Project advances the concept of family-centered child care, advocating an approach to early childhood education that addresses the development of the child and family together. Grounded in family support principles, which build on family strengths and work from a community's…

  12. R. I. Caregivers. Caring: A Training Program for Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhode Island State Dept. of Elderly Affairs, Providence.

    This document presents a training manual to help caregivers who provide care to older family members and friends at home. The program, which offers a practical approach to caregiving and a realistic view of the aging process, is intended to clarify the problems confronting caregivers of older people, serve as a basic source manual for training…

  13. Widening the Generational Circle: Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Bert Kruger

    This document addresses the dilemma faced by families with an aging or disabled member and the stress associated with the role of family caregiver. Emotions experienced by family caregivers, especially when the caregiver is an adult child caring for an elderly or frail parent, are discussed and feelings of desertion, dependence, and sibling…

  14. Family Caregivers: Psychosocial Impacts and Clinical Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daire, Andrew P.; Torres, Jennifer; Edwards, Nivischi N.

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe how 3 groups of family caregivers (spouses, daughters, and sons) are affected by the caregiving role. In addition, clinical considerations and interventions for mental health professionals working with these different groups of family caregivers are discussed. A clinical case example is also presented. (Contains 2 tables.)

  15. How Do Family Caregivers of Older People Give Up Caregiving?

    PubMed Central

    Mortazavi, Hamed; Peyrovi, Hamid; Joolaee, Soodabeh

    2015-01-01

    Background Population aging has social, economic and political consequences. Most family caregivers prefer to care for their family member older person with chronic disease at home. Despite traditional culture within Iranian families, in some cases, hospitalization of the elderly in nursing home is inevitable, and this affects the old person and his/her family. The aim of this study was to explain how Iranian family cargivers give up caring their older person with chronic condition at home. Methods A grounded theory approach was used to conduct the study. The study setting included four nursing homes under the auspices of Iran Welfare Organization. Fourteen participants were recruited through purposive sampling. Data were collected from December 2010 to March 2011 by Semi-structured interviews lasting about 17 to 95 minutes (average 52 minutes). Constant comparative analysis was used to analyze the data. Results Three main categories appeared at the end of the analysis: “going out of the road of usual life”, “challenge of meeting older person, family and caregivers care needs”, and “the appearance of inconstancy in the family”. They explained exclusively how family caregivers of old people give up caregiving. Conclusion Health care providers are recommended to become familiar with challenges of family caregivers in taking care of older person with chronic disease at home, and then organize their supportive and consulting actions according to family situations in order to improve the life quality of older person and family caregivers. PMID:26171407

  16. Caregiving Styles: A Cognitive and Behavioral Typology Associated With Dementia Family Caregiving

    PubMed Central

    Corcoran, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An increasing number of elderly individuals are diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders (ADRD), many of whom receive daily caregiving from spouse or adult child. Caregiving is a “cultural activity,” and as such it is strongly influenced by sociocultural beliefs about caregiving and how it should be enacted. Understanding this thinking–action process has important implications for future research and service. Reasoned action theory provides empirical evidence that attitudes and beliefs, as they are influenced by the social environment, predict intentions to act. In turn, behavioral intentions can reliably predict behaviors. This grounded theory study describes a typology of caregiving styles relevant to family members of an individual with ADRD, where caregiving style is defined as a culturally based pattern in thinking and action. The goal of this study was to characterize the relationship between caregiver intentions and care strategies. Methods: Study participants included 97 individuals residing in the Washington, DC, area, who provide daily care for a family member with ADRD. Narrative data were collected from each caregiver during three 1-hr interview sessions. A subset of 30 caregiver–care recipient (CR) dyads was videotaped during typical interactions. Results: Four caregiving styles were identified (facilitating, balancing, advocating, and directing), which differ primarily in the intended focus of care and preferred interactions with the CR. Implications: The results provide a foundation for future studies of the relationships between sociocultural context, caregiving styles and strategies, and ensuing outcomes for caregiver–CR dyads. PMID:21335422

  17. Family Caregiver Identity: A Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eifert, Elise K.; Adams, Rebecca; Dudley, William; Perko, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the multitude of available resources, family caregivers of those with chronic disease continually underutilize support services to cope with the demands of caregiving. Several studies have linked self-identification as a caregiver to the increased likelihood of support service use. Purpose: The present study reviewed the…

  18. Needs of family caregivers in chronic schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Winefield, H R; Harvey, E J

    1994-01-01

    The goals of the study were to describe (1) the tasks undertaken by people who care for a relative with chronic schizophrenia, according to their level of contact with the patient; and (2) any needs for further help that these caregivers might experience. Interviews and standardized questionnaires were used to collect information from 121 family caregivers whose relatives had been diagnosed an average of 14 years previously. Burden in the sense of interference in caregivers' daily lives was most marked for caregivers in high contact with the patients. Patients whom the caregivers regarded as enjoyable to live with had greater self-care and communication skills. Caregivers preferred that patients low in these skills or high in disruptive behavior live in supervised settings. Caregivers expressed particular support for earlier professional intervention in episodes of illness, information about how to lobby politicians for resources, and information about schizophrenia. These results can be used to plan interventions to reduce caregiver stress. PMID:7973471

  19. Assessing Impact on Family Caregivers to Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talkington-Boyer, Shannon; Snyder, Douglas K.

    1994-01-01

    Examined impact of caregiving among 110 caregivers to aging family member with Alzheimer's disease. Family caregivers' appraisals along dimensions of subjective burden, negative impact, caregiving satisfaction, and caregiver mastery were correlated with extent of memory and behavior problems of patient and caregivers' coping style, locus of…

  20. Going public as an AIDS family caregiver.

    PubMed

    Powell-Cope, G M; Brown, M A

    1992-03-01

    Images of AIDS invoke fears of contagion, disability and formidable death, and moral overtones directed toward drug use, sexuality and sexual identity and freedom. Responses to these images are both private and public, and have profound consequences for individuals whose lives have been touched by the disease, both the person with AIDS and the family caregiver. The purpose of this paper is to analyze in detail 'going public,' one category of a substantive theory of AIDS family caregiving. This category was developed from a grounded theory study of 53 AIDS family members who were asked to describe their experiences as an AIDS family caregiver during an indepth interview. Data were content analyzed using constant comparative analysis. Going public referred to how AIDS family caregivers let others known that they were caring for a PWA. Specifically, going public entailed selecting appropriate persons and audiences to tell, formulating approaches to communicating information, and considering the risks and benefits of the possible choices. The description of going public as an AIDS family caregiver details the assertiveness involved in political action and social change, contrasted with the isolation and secrecy involved in maintaining relationships with others under the condition of a stigmatizing illness. Data revealed a particular emphasis on the phenomenon of 'guilt by association'. Because of their close relationship to a person with AIDS, caregivers were obligated to share the stigma of AIDS and were likewise discredited. Findings from our study emphasize the tremendous personal suffering experienced by caregivers which was associated with AIDS stigma in the form of rejection, loss of friends and harassment. Data also revealed the strong commitment of many caregivers to social activism which ranged from participating in educational efforts to marching in demonstrations. The rationale for the apparent increased activism among AIDS family caregivers compared to

  1. Family caregivers of people with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Brodaty, Henry; Donkin, Marika

    2009-01-01

    Family caregivers of people with dementia, often called the invisible second patients, are critical to the quality of life of the care recipients. The effects of being a family caregiver, though sometimes positive, are generally negative, with high rates of burden and psychological morbidity as well as social isolation, physical ill-health, and financial hardship. Caregivers vulnerable to adverse effects can be identified, as can factors which ameliorate or exacerbate burden and strain. Psychosocial interventions have been demonstrated to reduce caregiver burden and depression and delay nursing home admission. Comprehensive management of the patient with dementia includes building a partnership between health professionals and family caregivers, referral to Alzheimer's Associations, and psychosocial interventions where indicated. PMID:19585957

  2. Family Caregivers and Consumer Health Information Technology.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Jennifer L; Darer, Jonathan D; Larsen, Kevin L

    2016-01-01

    Health information technology has been embraced as a strategy to facilitate patients' access to their health information and engagement in care. However, not all patients are able to access, or are capable of using, a computer or mobile device. Although family caregivers assist individuals with some of the most challenging and costly health needs, their role in health information technology is largely undefined and poorly understood. This perspective discusses challenges and opportunities of engaging family caregivers through the use of consumer-oriented health information technology. We compile existing evidence to make the case that involving family caregivers in health information technology as desired by patients is technically feasible and consistent with the principles of patient-centered and family-centered care. We discuss how more explicit and purposeful engagement of family caregivers in health information technology could advance clinical quality and patient safety by increasing the transparency, accuracy, and comprehensiveness of patient health information across settings of care. Finally, we describe how clarifying and executing patients' desires to involve family members or friends through health information technology would provide family caregivers greater legitimacy, convenience, and timeliness in health system interactions, and facilitate stronger partnerships between patients, family caregivers, and health care professionals. PMID:26311198

  3. Family Caregivers in Cancer (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the challenges faced by family caregivers of cancer patients. This summary focuses on typical caregiver roles and concerns, and helpful interventions for caregivers.

  4. Family Caregivers Define and Manage the Nursing Home Placement Process.

    PubMed

    Koplow, Sarah M; Gallo, Agatha M; Knafl, Kathleen A; Vincent, Catherine; Paun, Olimpia; Gruss, Valerie

    2015-08-01

    The nursing home placement process is complex and difficult for family caregivers. This qualitative descriptive study examines the experiences of caregivers involved in the management of care and placement of an older family member using the Family Management Style Framework. Ten caregivers were recruited from four nursing homes in the Midwest. The caregivers were interviewed shortly after placement and again 3 months post-placement. Results provide a unique understanding of care management and the nursing home placement process from the perspective of the primary family caregiver. Overall, there were similarities across the same types of caregiving dyads, for example, spousal and adult-children caregivers. Caregivers expressed the need to maintain the identity of their older family member, a familial responsibility for caregiving, and change in their family relationship over time. Appreciating caregivers' challenges and needs gives health care professionals a better understanding for how to provide assistance for a smoother nursing home transition. PMID:25691220

  5. Identifying Changeable Barriers to Family Involvement in the Nursing Home for Cognitively Impaired Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Port, Cynthia Lindman

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Barriers to family involvement in the nursing home with the potential for change through intervention are examined, including transportation, caregiver health, relationships with staff, and resident characteristics. Design and Methods: Data were collected for 93 family caregiver-resident pairs by means of telephone interviews and chart…

  6. Experiences and Learning Needs of African American Family Dementia Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Samson, Zoe Blake; Parker, Monica; Dye, Clinton; Hepburn, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Dementia family caregivers display significant rates of psychological and physical symptoms. African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected by dementia. African American caregivers display unique patterns of symptomology and responses to interventions designed to promote caregiver well-being. This study analyzed qualitative focus group data from 32 AA caregivers to explore how issues of race and culture may be incorporated into a culturally sensitive intervention for AA dementia family caregivers. Caregivers were asked scripted questions about their caregiving experiences and to suggest alterations to an existing psychoeducation program. Analysis revealed 4 key themes: the tradition of family care, caregiving and caregiving issues, culturally appropriate care, and navigating without a map. Suggestions for an educational program included a focus on developing caregiver skills and knowledge for caregiving, promotion of self-care, and reflection on the AA family and community as resources for care. PMID:26953236

  7. Toward the Conceptualization and Measurement of Caregiver Burden among Pueblo Indian Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Robert; Hennessy, Catherine Hagan; Dyeson, Timothy B.; Garrett, Mario D.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluates burden as experienced by a group of American Indian primary family caregivers. Analysis of items composing the Caregiver Burden scale indicate that caregiver burden is multidimensional and consists of several types of burden. Finds that caregiver burden is composed of four dimensions: role conflict, negative feelings, lack of caregiver…

  8. Family Caregiving for the Elderly: An Overview of Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blieszner, Rosemary; Alley, Janet M.

    1990-01-01

    Provides overview of impact of caregiving on families, discusses health policies that have led to limitations in formal support services, and identifies resources available to assist professional and caregiving families. (Author)

  9. Family Caregiver Research and the HIPAA Factor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albert, Steven M.; Levine, Carol

    2005-01-01

    Research in family caregiving recently has become more challenging because of the strict protection of privacy mandated in the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) of 1996. We ask when should Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) follow HIPAA rules to the letter and when might they use the waiver option? What is the appropriate…

  10. Typical and Atypical Dementia Family Caregivers: Systematic and Objective Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Zuber, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This systematic, objective comparison of typical (spouse, children) and atypical (in-law, sibling, nephew/niece, grandchild) dementia family caregivers examined demographic, caregiving and clinical variables. Analysis was of 1,476 caregivers, of whom 125 were atypical, from the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH I and II)…

  11. A Pilot Evaluation of the Family Caregiver Support Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Ya-Mei; Hedrick, Susan C.; Young, Heather M.

    2010-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate a federal and state-funded Family Caregiver Support Program (FCSP) and explore what types of caregiver support service are associated with what caregiver outcomes. Information was obtained on a sample of 164 caregivers' use of eleven different types of support service. Descriptive and comparative…

  12. Understanding social support burden among family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Washington, Karla; Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra Parker; Shaunfield, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of research on social support, both as a variable in larger studies and as a central focus of examination, there is little consensus about the relationship between social support and health outcomes. Current social support measures typically account only for frequency and size of network, and a paucity of research exists that has explained social support burden, defined as the burden associated with accessing and receiving support from others. We analyzed audio-recorded discussions by hospice family caregivers about their caregiving problems and potential solutions to examine social relationships within networks and identify the processes that influence social support seeking and receiving. Using qualitative thematic analysis, we found that caregivers providing hospice care experience social support burden resulting from perceived relational barriers between friends and family, the inclination to remain in control, recognition of the loss of the patient as a source of social support and guidance in decision making, family dynamics, and decreased availability of emotional support. Social support researchers should consider how the quality of communication and relationships within social networks impacts the provision and subsequent outcomes of social support in varying contexts. Findings from this study suggest that hospice social support resources should be tailored to the caregiver's support needs and include assessment on the type of support to be offered. PMID:24345081

  13. Stress in Family Practice Residents

    PubMed Central

    Rudner, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    Sources and levels of stress, as well as coping mechanisms, perceived by residents in both years of a two-year family practice residency program in Toronto are described. In addition, differences between first- and second-year residents, and between women and men residents, regardless of year, are examined. Results of the survey indicate that the levels of stress are relatively high throughout the two years of residency training. The three most stressful aspects of being a resident are time pressures, fatigue, and lack of self-confidence. Female residents appear to report a higher level of stress than males, especially in trying to combine a personal and a professional life. Specific coping mechanisms include talking to others, adjusting attitudes and feelings, or strategic use of time. Recommendations aimed at helping family medicine residency programs deal with the problem of stress in residents are suggested. A current major province-wide research study including all interns and residents in Ontario is described. PMID:21267263

  14. [Impact of childhood cancer for family caregivers: integrative review].

    PubMed

    Amador, Daniela Doulavince; Gomes, Isabelle Pimentel; Reichert, Altamira Pereira da Silva; Collet, Neusa

    2013-01-01

    This is an integrative review that aimed to identify the repercussions of childhood cancer for the family caregiver. The research was done in the databases LILACS, PubMed, SciELO, Adolec and Cochrane, searching articles in English, Portuguese and Spanish; published between 2005 and 2010; using the descriptors: caregivers, children, cancer and nursing. Eighteen articles was found. Through the analysis four themes were identified: feelings experienced by family caregivers; physical repercussions and psychological distress of family caregivers; financial impact of childhood cancer in the caregiver's life, and need for social support to family caregivers. It was concluded that the damage to the caregiver's life can weaken the relationship between child/caregiver, determining the need of effective performance of the health team to offer support, guidance and monitoring. PMID:23743848

  15. Classification of caregiving families according to the Family Caregivers' Appraisal Checklist.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kazuko; Iwata, Noboru; Matsuda, Nobuko

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to classify caregiving families according to the Family Caregivers' Appraisal Checklist (FACL; Horiguchi et al., 2012), which was originally developed to evaluate the probability of continuing caregiving. After nationwide targeting in Japan, the selected survey candidates included 1279 families utilizing domiciliary nursing services chosen by stratified two-stage sampling, and available data were obtained from 945 out of 1020 returned responses (return ratio: 79.8%). Scores for the seven components of FACL were cluster analyzed, and the following six clusters were extracted: Cluster A (12.8%) yielded high scores for all components; Cluster B (34.0%) yielded average scores; Cluster C (20.7%) scored mostly average but low for "quality of care service"; Cluster D (15.8%) showed relatively low scores for all components; Cluster E (11.4%) yielded low scores for all components except for "quality of care service" and "preparedness for emergencies"; and Cluster F (5.3%) scored significantly poorly for all components except for "preparedness for emergencies". Significant intercluster differences were observed for care recipient's age, the number of medical care, employment status, principal caregiver's subjective health, and the advice from family and friends. Caregiving duration was significantly associated with "positive appraisal of family caregiving", the number of medical care and the number of care types, and marginally with the level of care stipulated by the public long-term care insurance program (p < 0.07). Implications of classification of family type according to the FACL and the importance of positive appraisal of caregiving are discussed along with the future direction of use of the FACL. PMID:23666400

  16. Understanding Social Support Burden Among Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla; Demiris, George; Parker Oliver, Debra; Shaunfield, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Despite the abundance of research on social support, both as a variable in larger studies and as a central focus of examination, there is little consensus about the relationship between social support and health outcomes. Current social support measures typically account only for frequency and size of network and a paucity of research exists that has explained social support burden, defined as the burden associated with accessing and receiving support from others. We analyzed audio-recorded discussions by hospice family caregivers about their caregiving problems and potential solutions to examine social relationships within networks and identify the processes that influence social support seeking and receiving. Using qualitative thematic analysis, we found that caregivers providing hospice care experience social support burden resulting from perceived relational barriers between friends and family, the inclination to remain in control, recognition of the loss of the patient as a source of social support and guidance in decision-making, family dynamics and decreased availability of emotional support. Social support researchers should consider how the quality of communication and relationships within social networks impacts the provision and subsequent outcomes of social support in varying contexts. Findings from this study suggest that hospice social support resources should be tailored to the caregiver’s support needs and include assessment on the type of support to be offered. PMID:24345081

  17. Preparing family caregivers for death and bereavement. Insights from caregivers of terminally ill patients.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Randy S; Schulz, Richard; Copeland, Valire C; Arnold, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Many family caregivers are unprepared for the death of their loved one and may suffer from worse mental health as a result. We therefore sought to determine the factors that family caregivers believe are important to preparing for death and bereavement. Focus groups and ethnographic interviews were conducted with 33 family caregivers (bereaved or current) of terminally ill patients. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Life experiences such as the duration of caregiving/illness, advance care planning, previous experiences with caregiving or death, and medical sophistication all impacted preparedness, or the degree to which a caregiver is ready for the death and bereavement. Regardless of life experiences, however, all caregivers reported medical, practical, psychosocial, and religious/spiritual uncertainty. Because uncertainty was multidimensional, caregivers often needed more than prognostic information in order to prepare. Communication was the primary mechanism used to manage uncertainty. Good communication included clear, reliable information, combined with relationship-centered care from health care providers. Finally, preparedness had cognitive, affective, and behavioral dimensions. To prepare, some caregivers needed information tailored to their uncertainty (cognitive), others needed to "mentally" or "emotionally" prepare (affective), and still others had important tasks to complete (behavioral). In order to better prepare family caregivers for the death of a loved one, health care providers must develop a trusting relationship with caregivers, provide them with reliable information tailored to their uncertainty, and allow time for caregivers to process the information and complete important tasks. PMID:18538977

  18. Diabetes mellitus patients' family caregivers' subjective quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Abdel W.; Ohaeri, Jude U.; Al-Awadi, Shafika A.; Tawfiq, Adel M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the subjective quality of life (QOL) of family caregivers of Sudanese type-1 and type-2 diabetic outpatients, using the WHO 26-item QOL instrument, compared with a general population sample; and to examine the factors associated with caregiver QOL. METHOD: Responses of caregivers of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 135 with type-2 diabetes were compared with 139 general population subjects. RESULTS: Caregivers were satisfied with the content of items related to general social supports. Type-1 caregivers had significantly lower QOL scores than type-2 caregivers and the general population. Parents and siblings had lowest scores compared with other family groups. Caregivers scored higher than patients. Patients' age and duration of illness, and caregivers' education, marital status and state of health were positively associated with caregiver QOL. Caregivers' QOL was predicted by their appraisal of patients' QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers who were sick, younger, single, less educated and caring for patients with more recent illness appeared relatively vulnerable. Clinicians should be interested in the dynamics of the family caregiving situation--as it impacts QOL--and in promoting caregiver awareness of diabetes in order to enhance the caregiving role, quality of care and QOL. PMID:16749648

  19. The Impact of Family Functioning on Caregiver Burden among Caregivers of Veterans with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Crystal Dea

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 76 family caregivers of older veterans with congestive heart failure utilized the McMaster model of family functioning to examine the impact of family functioning variables (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, and affective involvement) on caregiver burden dimensions (relationship burden,…

  20. Assessing family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; Fogg, Louis G.; McCann, Judith J.; Etkin, Caryn; Dong, Xinqi; Barnes, Lisa L.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This measurement study operationalized family caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by testing a Caregiver Assessment of Behavioral Skill-Self Report measure (CAB-SR). Method A cross-sectional design was used. Caregivers had a family member with possible/probable AD, resided at home with the care recipient and provided the majority of care (N=82). The mail-administered assessment included the CAB-SR and other care recipient and caregiver measures. Results Preliminary CAB-SR reliability and validity were determined, using reliability, factor analytic and correlational procedures. Conclusion This measure provides a preliminary assessment of caregiver skill in managing behavioral symptoms of AD and shows promise for use in research and clinical intervention settings. PMID:21500018

  1. Transnational caregiving: Part 1, caring for family relations across nations.

    PubMed

    Dhar, V Erica

    2011-01-01

    This article concerns how globalization and the aging of the world's population are affecting the already complex issue of intergenerational transnational caregiving. Globalization has caused an increase in workforce mobility with large numbers of individuals seeking employment overseas. This, coupled with increased longevity globally, has resulted in many workers leaving their elderly parents in need of care in their home countries. This has spawned caregiving across national borders, or caring for family relations across nations. Currently in the United States, not enough emphasis is given to family caregiving. Data compiled by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving estimate the economic value for this group of family caregivers in 2007 to be $375 billion, accounting for 34-52 million family caregivers per given year. This does not include those families who are transnational caregivers. The seminal work in this emerging field has been done by social anthropologists Loretta Baldassar, Cora Velekoop Baldock, and Raelene Wilding, who have defined the components of transnational caregiving based on an ethnographic study using qualitative data to study nine immigrant communities in Western Australia. Although their research focused on caregiving from a distance, additional work has been added to the discussion by introducing the element of "care drain" and further cultural perspectives. Therefore, this research is an exploratory study on intergenerational transnational caregiving within the context of the changing world and its demographics. Within the context of globalization and global aging, the following questions are addressed: What is the significance of family caregiving? What is a transnational? How has technology changed "transnationalism" today? What are the elements that comprise transnational caregiving? How does culture play a role in transnational caregiving? What are some of the national initiatives undertaken by governments to aid in workforce

  2. Uncovering a family caregiving model: insights from research to benefit HIV-infected patients, their caregivers, and health professionals.

    PubMed

    Wacharasin, Chintana; Homchampa, Pissamai

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand family caregiving practices for HIV-infected patients, including problems and needs based on experiences of primary family caregivers and persons living with HIV (PLWH) in Rayong province, Thailand. The participants were 48 PLWH and 48 primary family caregivers. Data collection consisted of individual in-depth interviews of PLWH and family caregivers, plus focus groups with the primary family caregivers and observations. Content analysis was performed to analyze the qualitative data. Results indicated that there was a transformation in family caregivers from the time of initial diagnosis to their offering of loving, caregiving practices. The most unexpected result was that primary family caregivers evolved their own model for caregiving practices; the most concerning result was their fear of stigmatization. Caregiving practices included seeking treatment and help, providing support and care, keeping the closure of diagnosis, coping with stress, requesting the truth about diagnosis, and maintaining family values and dignity. PMID:18762146

  3. Discussion and Recommendations: Nurses and Social Workers Supporting Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Laurie

    2008-01-01

    Family members--whether people related by birth and marriage or friends and neighbors (sometimes called a "family of choice")--are the main caregivers for millions of older Americans. These family caregivers assist those they care for with activities of daily living such as bathing and dressing, with instrumental activities of daily living such as…

  4. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Participant and family....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided...

  5. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Participant and family....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided...

  6. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Participant and family....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided...

  7. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Participant and family....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided...

  8. 38 CFR 52.71 - Participant and family caregiver responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participant and family....71 Participant and family caregiver responsibilities. The program management has a written statement of participant and family caregiver responsibilities that are posted in the facility and provided...

  9. Development of the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Shirley S.; Bernard, Marie A.; McAuley, William J.; Thornton, Megan; Kole, Tristen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: "Medication administration hassles" are the minor daily irritants that family caregivers experience when they assist a dependent family member with medication regimens. This study was designed to develop and test a multidimensional measure of the hassles in family caregiver medication administration. Design and Method: The authors…

  10. Psychometric Properties of the Family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Bull, Margaret J; Avery, Jennifer Sjostedt; Boaz, Lesley; Oswald, Debra

    2015-01-01

    A valid, reliable measure of family caregivers' knowledge about delirium was not located in the literature; such an instrument is essential to assess learning needs and outcomes of education provided. The purpose of the current study was to (a) develop a family Caregiver Delirium Knowledge Questionnaire (CDKQ) based on the Symptom Interpretation Model; and (b) establish validity and reliability of the measure. The 19-item CDKQ was developed and administered to 164 family caregivers for community-dwelling older adults. Descriptive statistics were examined for all variables. Psychometric testing included confirmatory factor analysis, item-to-total correlations, and internal consistency reliability. A three-factor model provided the best fit for the data. The findings support initial validity and reliability of the CDKQ with family caregivers. Although the CDKQ was developed for use with family caregivers, it has potential for use with other caregivers, such as home health aides. PMID:25893726

  11. Assessing and Managing Caregiver Stress: Development of a Teaching Tool for Medical Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Famakinwa, Abisola; Fabiny, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Forty medical residents from major teaching hospitals in Boston, Massachusetts, participated in small group teaching sessions about caregiver stress. A teaching tool was developed that included a teaching handout, interactive cases, standard instruments for assessing caregiver stress, peer-reviewed articles about caregiving, and a list of…

  12. Depression symptoms among caregivers of children in HIV-affected families in rural China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yunfei; Zhao, Qun; Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Fang, Xiaoyi; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Guoxiang; Zhao, Junfeng

    2010-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine symptoms of depression among caregivers of rural AIDS orphans (i.e., children who had lost one or both of their parents to HIV/AIDS) and vulnerable children (i.e., children who were living with HIV-infected alive parents), and to explore factors associated with the presence of symptoms of depression among caregivers. Cross-sectional data were collected from 160 adult caregivers (parents, relatives, or other adults) from a rural area in China where many residents were infected with HIV through unhygienic blood collection. The sample included 120 caregivers from households caring for AIDS orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) and 40 from households without OVC. The Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) was used to assess the symptoms of depression among the caregivers. Multiple regression analysis was performed to assess the associations of depressive symptoms with various individual and family factors among caregivers. The mean score of CES-D for the entire sample was 19.18 (17.84 for men and 20.44 for women). The univariate analysis indicated that the score of CES-D was significantly higher among caregivers with lower education, fewer household items/assets, from families with adult or pediatric HIV infection. Controlling for age, gender, and caregivers' education, multiple regression analysis revealed significant associations between symptoms of depression and reduced family socioeconomic status (SES), adult or pediatric HIV infection in family. Our results indicated an elevated level of depression symptoms among caregivers of OVC and underscored the needs for psychological support and intervention for their caregivers, especially for those with lower family SES, from families with an adult or pediatric HIV infection. PMID:20461573

  13. Family Caregiver's Perception of Alzheimer's disease and caregiving in Chinese culture.

    PubMed

    Dai, Baozhen; Mao, Zongfu; Wu, Bei; Mei, Y John; Levkoff, Sue; Wang, Huali

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the perception of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and caregiving among family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD in China. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with 46 family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment in 2009 in Wuhan and Beijing, China. Participants included 38 spouses, 7 adult children, and 1 sibling, aged between 41 and 85 years old. The findings showed that all family caregivers thought the Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai, brought discrimination to individuals with cognitive impairment. Caregivers of individuals with AD experienced burden and desired an increase of formal services. Traditional beliefs of respecting elders and caring for extended family members were held among family caregivers of individuals with cognitive impairment, and there was nearly no difference found between caregivers of AD and those of MCI. It implied that traditional culture provided positive influences on caring for elders with cognitive impairment. An alternative term for MCI may contribute to further reducing the discrimination brought by the old Chinese terminology of AD laonian chidai. Development of formal services for elders with cognitive impairment may contribute to reducing caregivers' worries about future caregiving. PMID:25602761

  14. Caregiver burden among Iranian heart failure family caregivers: A descriptive, exploratory, qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud; Etemadifar, Shahram; Shahriari, Mohsen; Farsani, Alireza Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Living with patients of chronic diseases such as heart failure (HF) is a difficult situation for the caregivers. This study explored the Iranian family caregivers’ burden of caregiving for patients with HF. Materials and Methods: Eighteen family caregivers of the HF patients from two governmental medical training centers in Isfahan, Iran were recruited using purposive sampling. Data were collected through face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Each interview was transcribed verbatim and was thematically analyzed concurrently. Results: Four major themes emerged from the analysis of the transcripts: Lack of care-related knowledge, physical exhaustion, psychosocial exhaustion, and lack of support. Family caregivers believed that they have little knowledge about the patients’ disease, drugs, and how to perform caregiving roles. They experienced negative physical and psychosocial consequences of full-time and highly extended caregiving roles, such as musculoskeletal disorder, fatigue, and sleep disturbance, and a high level of anxiety, stress, and social isolation. Caregivers believed that they receive little familial and organizational support on the emotional and financial dimensions of caregiving. Conclusions: The findings of this study can be used by healthcare providers, especially nurses, to provide more effective social, informational, and professional support for family caregivers. PMID:24554961

  15. Family Dynamics and Personal Strengths among Dementia Caregivers in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Elnasseh, Aaliah G.; Trujillo, Michael A.; Peralta, Silvina Victoria; Stolfi, Miriam E.; Morelli, Eliana; Perrin, Paul B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether healthier family dynamics were associated with higher personal strengths of resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism among dementia caregivers in Argentina. Caregivers are usually required to assist individuals with dementia, and family members have typically fulfilled that role. Personal strengths such as resilience, sense of coherence, and optimism have been shown to protect caregivers from some of the negative experiences of providing care, though the family-related variables associated with these personal strengths are largely unknown. Hierarchical multiple regressions investigated the extent to which family dynamics variables are associated with each of the caregiver personal strengths after controlling for demographic and caregiver characteristics. A sample of 105 caregivers from Argentina completed a set of questionnaires during a neurologist visit. Family dynamics explained 32% of the variance in resilience and 39% of the variance in sense of coherence. Greater family empathy and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher resilience. Greater communication and decreased family problems were uniquely associated with higher sense of coherence. Optimism was not found to be significantly associated with family dynamics. These results suggest that caregiver intervention research focused on the family may help improve caregiver personal strengths in Argentina and other Latin American countries. PMID:27413574

  16. The Caregiving Experience in a Racially Diverse Sample of Cancer Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Siefert, Mary Lou; Williams, Anna-leila; Dowd, Michael F.; Chappel-Aiken, Lolita; McCorkle, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The literature supports a variety of predictor variables to account for the psychological and stress burden experienced by cancer family caregivers. Missing among the predictor variables are the differences by or influence of race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to describe the sample, explore differences in outcomes by patient and family caregiver characteristics, and determine if any of the patient and family characteristics, including race/ethnicity, predicted outcomes. Cross-sectional surveys were used to determine sociodemographics, psychological and physical health, and burdens of caregiving among 54 caregivers. The analysis consisted of descriptive methods, including frequencies and t tests, and regression modeling. The sample was 35% African American or Hispanic. African American and Hispanic caregivers were younger than white caregivers and more often women, were rarely the spouse of the patient, and frequently had other dependents, including children and older parents. African American and Hispanic caregivers reported lower incomes and more burden related to finances and employment than did white caregivers. When controlling for sociodemographic factors, there was no difference by race/ethnicity on the outcome measures. The experience of caregiving may supersede race/ethnicity and may be its own cultural entity. Areas of concern include the interrelationship between socioeconomic status and race/ethnicity, the absence of cultural frameworks to direct caregiver research, and the question of cultural relevance of measurement tools. PMID:18772665

  17. 75 FR 67903 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2010-28078 Filed 11-3-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8593 of October 29, 2010 National Family Caregivers Month, 2010 By the... their daily lives. During National Family Caregivers Month, we honor the millions of Americans who...

  18. 78 FR 66617 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2013

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... thirty- eighth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2013-26675 Filed 11-4-13; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F4 ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 9053 of October 31, 2013 National Family Caregivers Month, 2013 By the... Family Caregivers Month, we thank these tireless heroes for the long, challenging work they...

  19. 77 FR 66525 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8900 of November 1, 2012 National Family Caregivers Month, 2012 By the... loved ones. During National Family Caregivers Month, we recognize and thank the humble heroes who do...

  20. 76 FR 68621 - National Family Caregivers Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    .... (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc. 2011-28843 Filed 11-3-11; 11:15 am] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8748 of November 1, 2011 National Family Caregivers Month, 2011 By the... National Family Caregivers Month, we pay tribute to the individuals throughout America who ensure...

  1. Trends Impacting Public Policy Support for Caregiving Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, George H. S.; Biegel, David E.; Ethridge, Brandy L.

    2010-01-01

    Public policy aimed at supporting the caregiving capacity of families has risen to prominence on the public agenda in the United States. Initiatives at the state and federal levels have created some initial services. Three trends that are pushing the issue of family caregiving to the surface are discussed, including large-scale social,…

  2. Sleep in Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Hubbard, Erin; Mastick, Judy; Miller, Bruce L.; Dowling, Glenna A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Dementia is associated with disruptions in sleep and sleep quality for patients and their family caregivers. Little is known about the impact of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) on sleep. Objective The purpose of this study was to characterize sleep in patients with frontotemporal dementia and their family caregivers. Methods Twenty-two patient-caregiver dyads were enrolled: Thirteen behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) and nine semantic dementia (SD). Sleep and sleep quality data were collected for two weeks using diaries and Actiwatches. Results Patients with bvFTD and SD spent more time in bed at night compared to their caregivers. Nighttime behaviors were reported more frequently by caregivers for the bvFTD patients and strongly correlated with caregiver distress. Actigraphy data demonstrated normal sleep efficiency and timing of the nighttime sleep period for both patients and their caregivers. Caregivers of patients with bvFTD reported poorer sleep quality compared to the SD caregivers. A greater number of bvFTD caregivers compared to SD reported negative aspects of sleep quality for themselves and used sleep medications more frequently. Conclusion The clinical manifestations of bvFTD appear to be associated with different and more distressing impacts on the caregiver sleep quality than SD. PMID:24589648

  3. Family resources study: part 1: family resources, family function and caregiver strain in childhood cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Severe illness can disrupt family life, cause family dysfunction, strain resources, and cause caregiver burden. The family's ability to cope with crises depends on their resources. This study sought to assess families of children with cancer in terms of family function-dysfunction, family caregiver strain and the adequacy of family resources using a new family resources assessment instrument. Methods This is a cross-sectional study involving 90 Filipino family caregivers of children undergoing cancer treatment. This used a self-administered questionnaire composed of a new 12-item family resources questionnaire (SCREEM-RES) based on the SCREEM method of analysis, Family APGAR to assess family function-dysfunction; and Modified Caregiver Strain Index to assess strain in caring for the patient. Results More than half of families were either moderately or severely dysfunctional. Close to half of caregivers were either predisposed to strain or experienced severe strain, majority disclosed that their families have inadequate economic resources; many also report inaccessibility to medical help in the community and insufficient educational resources to understand and care for their patients. Resources most often reported as adequate were: family's faith and religion; help from within the family and from health providers. SCREEM-RES showed to be reliable with Cronbach's alpha of 0.80. There is good inter-item correlation between items in each domain: 0.24-0.70. Internal consistency reliability for each domain was also good: 0.40-0.92. Using 2-point scoring system, Cronbach's alpha were slightly lower: full scale (0.70) and for each domain 0.26-.82. Results showed evidence of association between family resources and family function based on the family APGAR but none between family resources and caregiver strain and between family function and caregiver strain. Conclusion Many Filipino families of children with cancer have inadequate resources, especially economic

  4. The Effects of Caregiving on the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Eric J.; Young, Rosalie F.

    The topic of caregiving was investigated with respect to the burden experienced by primary caregivers of older persons who had recently suffered a myocardial infarction. Structured interviews were completed with 104 primary care providers who were part of a larger National Institute on Aging funded survey. The caregivers were of both sexes and…

  5. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults. PMID:26810575

  6. Family Stigma and Caregiver Burden in Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Perla; Mittelman, Mary S.; Goldstein, Dovrat; Heinik, Jeremia

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The stigma experienced by the family members of an individual with a stigmatized illness is defined by 3 dimensions: caregiver stigma, lay public stigma, and structural stigma. Research in the area of mental illness suggests that caregivers' perception of stigma is associated with increased burden. However, the effect of stigma on…

  7. Clinical Efficacy of Psychoeducational Interventions with Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Limiñana-Gras, Rosa M.; Colodro-Conde, Lucía; Cuéllar-Flores, Isabel; Sánchez-López, M. Pilar

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate the efficacy of psychoeducational interventions geared to reducing psychological distress for caregivers in a sample of 90 family caregivers of elderly dependent (78 women and 12 men). We conducted an analysis of the statistical and clinical significance of the changes observed in psychological health…

  8. Physical and Mental Health Effects of Family Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Richard; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2008-01-01

    The associations between physical and psychological health and being an informal caregiver are well established. In this article, "caregiving" denotes care that is provided by a family member or friend rather than by a professional who is reimbursed for services. Clinical observation and early empirical research showed that assuming a caregiving…

  9. Equity Matters: Doing Fairness in the Context of Family Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lashewicz, Bonnie; Manning, Gerald; Hall, Margaret; Keating, Norah

    2007-01-01

    Although family scholars conceptualize caregiving in terms of networks of carers, little attention has been given to equity within these groups. Siblings comprise a prevalent caregiving network of members who feel responsible for parent care, expect to share these responsibilities with each other, and look to each other to evaluate the fairness of…

  10. The Impact of Family Caregivers on Potentially Inappropriate Medication Use in Non-institutionalized Older Adults with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Thorpe, Joshua M.; Thorpe, Carolyn T.; Kennelty, Korey A.; Gellad, Walid F.; Schulz, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Background The risk of potentially inappropriate prescription and over-the-counter medication (PIM) use in dementia patients is high. Informal caregivers often facilitate patients’ use of medications, but the effect of caregiver factors on PIM use has not been a focus of prior research. Objective To examine PIM use in dementia patients and caregivers, and identify caregiver risk factors for PIM use in dementia patients. Methods We conducted a secondary data analysis of the baseline wave of the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregiver's Health study. The sample was comprised of 566 persons with dementia aged 65 and older and their co-residing family caregiver. PIM was defined using the 2003 Beers criteria and was examined in both dementia patients and their caregivers. Caregiver and patient risk factors included a range of socio-demographic and health variables. Results In dementia patients, 33% were taking at least 1 PIM, and 39% of their caregivers were also taking a PIM. In fully adjusted models, the following caregiver factors were associated with an increased risk of dementia patient PIM use: caregiver's own PIM use; spouse caregivers; Hispanic caregivers; and greater number of years the caregiver has lived in the United States. Increased caregiver age was associated with a decreased risk of PIM use in patients. Conclusions PIM use may be higher in dementia patients and their informal caregivers compared to the general older adult population. Further, patterns of medication use in one member of the dyad may influence PIM risk in the other dyad member. These results suggest that interventions to increase appropriate medication use in dementia patients and their caregivers should target both members of the dyad and target over-the-counter agents along with prescription medications. PMID:22683399

  11. Caring for the Family Caregiver: Lessons Learned in Child Health.

    PubMed

    Keilty, Krista; Cohen, Eyal

    2015-01-01

    Policy to support informal caregivers is a critical health policy issue in Canada. Lessons may be learned from the perspectives and experience in the child health field with applicability for all cared-for persons and their informal caregivers. Familycentred care addresses the centrality of the family caregiver in the design and delivery of health services. A life course approach focuses on key periods of transition and downstream effects facing caregivers over their lifetime. The medical home model where care delivery is more coordinated offers potential direct cost savings for both family caregivers and the healthcare system. Models of pediatric home care that focus on promoting caregiver capacity and integration of unregulated providers show the promise of being acceptable and sustainable solutions to increasing demands for caregiver respite. Finally, a number of assumptions that are somewhat unique to the pediatric caregiver experience are explored and/or challenged. These lessons and assumptions may provide insight for policymakers in the development of systems and supports for all cared-for persons and their caregivers in Canada. PMID:26626116

  12. Promoting and measuring family caregiver self-efficacy in caregiver-physician interactions.

    PubMed

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Cook, Kevin M

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development of a 5-item scale that assesses family caregivers' self-efficacy in communicating with physicians about ill family members (Perceived Efficacy in Caregiver-Physician Interactions-PECPI) in the context of an evaluation study of an online training in health care communication skills for caregivers. A national sample of 197 self-identified family caregivers participated in an online webinar and completed a brief evaluation instrument before and immediately after the training. Results indicated that the webinar was effective in increasing perceived self-efficacy and self-reported knowledge about and level of preparation for medical visits. Principal component analysis indicates that the PECPI is unidimensional with a Cronbach's alpha of .91. PMID:22136346

  13. [Care and chronic illness: family caregiver's viewpoint in northeast Brazil].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Juliana Maria de Sousa; Nations, Marilyn Kay

    2012-02-01

    The provision of care causes stress in everyday family dynamics leading to physical, mental and emotional complications in caregivers and spouses' loss of liberty and/or overwork. Between March and November 2006, this anthropological research examined family caregiving in the context of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). By means of ethnographic interviews, illness narratives and participant observation, the scope was to describe family reorganization and coexistence with the disease and its evolution, caregiver perceptions about patient difficulties and limitations experienced and strategies employed to tackle their illness. Six low-income family caregivers, living in poor, urban areas in the outskirts of the capital city, Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil, participated in the study. From the Content Analysis, two categories arose: "sharing suffering" and "attitudes and behavior perceived and experienced by caregivers." In-depth narratives revealed marked affection between patients and their family caregivers. Despite poverty, structural violence, unemployment, social prejudice and low salaries endemic in the Northeast of Brazil, the caregivers find effective ways to cope with chronic illness besides creating strategies to diminish suffering caused by the illness. PMID:22267046

  14. Cancer Family Caregivers: A New Direction for Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Bakitas, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Descriptive studies of cancer family caregivers demonstrate role-related psychosocial and physical burden; however, little is known about which factors contribute to or obviate burden. Systematic reviews of caregiver intervention studies demonstrate mixed results, perhaps because some caregiver needs are still unknown and not adequately addressed. The purpose of our study was to explore the lived experience of being a caregiver for an adult with lung or colon cancer, so as to guide the development of future intervention studies. Method Using phenomenologic methods, open-ended interviews were conducted at a chemotherapy clinic, New Haven, CT with 135 caregivers to adults with lung or colon cancer. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Thematic analysis was conducted with transcripts coded, reviewed, and recoded multiple times. The final 69 codes were reduced to 13 code clusters (thematic categories) distributed among 4 themes. Results Four inter-related themes emerged: 1) becoming a caregiver; 2) new and altered relationships; 3) personal responses to caregiving and 4) antecedents and social context. Caregivers describe hearing the cancer diagnosis as “life-changing”. The cancer creates the context for the caregiver's relationships (with the patient, self, others, and the healthcare system), and cognitive, behavioral, affective, and spiritual responses. The caregiver's antecedent experiences and social support network form the foundation for their perceptions of the diagnosis, relationships, and personal responses. Conclusion This study implicates several intervention components to be developed and tested as favorably supporting caregivers, namely, reinforcing positive aspects of caregiving, cultivating open communication, and acknowledging the prior experiences and social foundation of the caregiver's life that can be supportive or burdensome. PMID:22612407

  15. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL) impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain). Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q) and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q) perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p < 0.05). Using the CCA, we found that the physical and mental well-being dimensions are the ones which present a closer relationship with family functionality, while social support is the quality dimension that is least influenced by the Family APGAR-Q. Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions. PMID:21496270

  16. Behavioral and Psychosocial Interventions for Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarit, Steven; Femia, Elia

    2008-01-01

    Gerontologic research in the past 40 years has shown that caring for an older, disabled person affects the health and well-being of the caregiver. This important contribution led to a wide range of programs and services designed to buffer caregivers from the effects of stressors. Many of these programs have been quite innovative. Although…

  17. Gender differences in caregiving among family - caregivers of people with mental illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nidhi; Chakrabarti, Subho; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    All over the world women are the predominant providers of informal care for family members with chronic medical conditions or disabilities, including the elderly and adults with mental illnesses. It has been suggested that there are several societal and cultural demands on women to adopt the role of a family-caregiver. Stress-coping theories propose that women are more likely to be exposed to caregiving stressors, and are likely to perceive, report and cope with these stressors differently from men. Many studies, which have examined gender differences among family-caregivers of people with mental illnesses, have concluded that women spend more time in providing care and carry out personal-care tasks more often than men. These studies have also found that women experience greater mental and physical strain, greater caregiver-burden, and higher levels of psychological distress while providing care. However, almost an equal number of studies have not found any differences between men and women on these aspects. This has led to the view that though there may be certain differences between male and female caregivers, most of these are small in magnitude and of doubtful clinical significance. Accordingly, caregiver-gender is thought to explain only a minor proportion of the variance in negative caregiving outcomes. A similar inconsistency characterizes the explanations provided for gender differences in caregiving such as role expectations, differences in stress, coping and social support, and response biases in reporting distress. Apart from the equivocal and inconsistent evidence, there are other problems in the literature on gender differences in caregiving. Most of the evidence has been derived from studies on caregivers of elderly people who either suffer from dementia or other physical conditions. Similar research on other mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or mood disorders is relatively scarce. With changing demographics and social norms men are increasingly

  18. Gender differences in caregiving among family - caregivers of people with mental illnesses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Chakrabarti, Subho; Grover, Sandeep

    2016-03-22

    All over the world women are the predominant providers of informal care for family members with chronic medical conditions or disabilities, including the elderly and adults with mental illnesses. It has been suggested that there are several societal and cultural demands on women to adopt the role of a family-caregiver. Stress-coping theories propose that women are more likely to be exposed to caregiving stressors, and are likely to perceive, report and cope with these stressors differently from men. Many studies, which have examined gender differences among family-caregivers of people with mental illnesses, have concluded that women spend more time in providing care and carry out personal-care tasks more often than men. These studies have also found that women experience greater mental and physical strain, greater caregiver-burden, and higher levels of psychological distress while providing care. However, almost an equal number of studies have not found any differences between men and women on these aspects. This has led to the view that though there may be certain differences between male and female caregivers, most of these are small in magnitude and of doubtful clinical significance. Accordingly, caregiver-gender is thought to explain only a minor proportion of the variance in negative caregiving outcomes. A similar inconsistency characterizes the explanations provided for gender differences in caregiving such as role expectations, differences in stress, coping and social support, and response biases in reporting distress. Apart from the equivocal and inconsistent evidence, there are other problems in the literature on gender differences in caregiving. Most of the evidence has been derived from studies on caregivers of elderly people who either suffer from dementia or other physical conditions. Similar research on other mental illnesses such as schizophrenia or mood disorders is relatively scarce. With changing demographics and social norms men are increasingly

  19. Teaching Family Systems Theory to Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Steve; Herndon, Anne

    1981-01-01

    The family practice resident is taught that the patient's family is the most medically relevant context for viewing the patient's present symptoms and illnesses. With the removal of the necessity for family interviews, an effective training program in family dynamics was designed for family medicine residents. (Author/MLW)

  20. Innovative Program Aims to Improve Support for Cancer Family Caregivers

    Cancer.gov

    An article about an educational program at the City of Hope Cancer Center intended to provide health professionals with the tools and information needed to help family caregivers care for themselves and their loved ones with cancer.

  1. Family caregivers' support needs after brain injury: a synthesis of perspectives from caregivers, programs, and researchers.

    PubMed

    Gan, Caron; Gargaro, Judith; Brandys, Clare; Gerber, Gary; Boschen, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    There is a dearth of support for family members who assume caregiving responsibilities following acquired brain injury (ABI). This qualitative study broadens the understanding of ABI caregiver support needs through data triangulation from multiple interview sources across different settings. Thirty-nine caregivers across urban and rural settings in Ontario participated in focus groups. Interviews focused on ABI support services received, their utility, access barriers, needed supports, and suggestions for service delivery. Key informant interviews were also held with four US researchers funded through the TBI Model Systems, one Canadian provincial government health official, and representatives from 11 Ontario ABI programs including two brain injury associations. Interviews focused on existing or proposed caregiver programs and gaps in services. A coding framework was developed through content analysis, centring on five themes: coping, supports that worked, supports needed, barriers, and ideal world recommendations. Perspectives from those involved in receiving, providing and researching caregiver interventions following ABI were synthesized to provide a thorough, detailed depiction of the ongoing support needs of caregivers. This convergence of evidence underscores that caregiver support needs transcend geographical boundaries and must be comprehensive, accessible, long-term, and encompass education, emotional, and instrumental support. Recommendations for ABI caregiver support services are offered. PMID:20634597

  2. American Indian family caregivers' experiences with helping elders.

    PubMed

    Jervis, Lori L; Boland, Mathew E; Fickenscher, Alexandra

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, a vast literature has accumulated on the negative effects on family caregivers of providing care to elders, while relatively little research has explored caregiving as a positive experience. Only a handful of studies have examined any aspect of informal caregiving among American Indians. This mixed methods study explores the negative and positive aspects of providing elder care among 19 northern plains American Indian family members. These caregivers described low levels of burden and high levels of reward, attributable to cultural attitudes toward elders and caregiving, collective care provision, strong reciprocal relationships with elders, enjoyment of elders, and relatively low levels of care provision. Caregiving manifested as part of a complex exchange of assistance rather than a unidirectional provision of assistance from the family member to the elder. That caregiving emerged as such an overwhelmingly positive experience in a community faced with poverty, alcohol disorders, trauma, and cultural traumatization is testimony to the important roles that elders often continue to play in these communities. PMID:21063902

  3. Informal caregiving to persons with AIDS in the United States: caregiver burden among central cities residents eighteen to forty-nine years old.

    PubMed

    Turner, H A; Catania, J A

    1997-02-01

    Characteristics and caregiving experiences of friends and family members caring for people with AIDS (PWAs) were examined. Based on a probability sample of informal AIDS caregivers ages 18-49 living in central cities of the United States (n = 260), analyses were conducted to (a) identify the sociodemographic characteristics of young central city caregivers; and (b) examine the effects of caregiver characteristics (relationship to PWA, gender, race/ethnicity, income, sexual orientation, HIV status, perceived susceptibility), and level of objective caregiving demands, on subjective caregiver burden. Results indicate that the largest group of caregivers in this age category are male friends of the PWA--a group not typically found among caregivers to persons with other types of illnesses. In general, gay or bisexual caregivers, caregivers who have traditional family ties to the PWA, men relative to women, and lower income caregivers, report the greatest burden. While level of caregiving demands represents the most influential predictor of caregiver burden, white and male caregivers experience greater burden, independent of level of involvement and other caregiver characteristics. Receiving instrumental support with caregiving buffers the impact of high objective demands on subjective burden. PMID:9231995

  4. Relationships between Caregiver Violence Exposure, Caregiver Depression, and Youth Behavioral Health among Homeless Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire-Schwartz, Mandy; Small, Latoya A.; Parker, Gary; Kim, Patricia; McKay, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Homelessness affects a large and increasing number of families in the United States, and exposure to violence and other potentially traumatic events is common among homeless families. It is important to understand more about this population and, more specifically, about the relationship between youth mental health and caregiver mental health and…

  5. Partners in Caregiving in a Special Care Environment: Cooperative Communication between Staff and Families on Dementia Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Julie; Curry, Leslie; Gruman, Cynthia; Porter, Martha; Henderson, Charles R., Jr.; Pillemer, Karl

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This article reports the results of a randomized, controlled evaluation of Partners in Caregiving in a Special Care Environment, an intervention designed to improve communication and cooperation between staff and families of residents in nursing home dementia programs. Design and Methods: Participants included 388 family members and 384…

  6. The Role of Family Functioning in the Stress Process of Dementia Caregivers: A Structural Family Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; Lewis, John E.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Czaja, Sara J.; Eisdorfer, Carl; Schulz, Richard; Szapocznik, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the role of family functioning in the stress process in a sample of caregivers of dementia patients by using a structural family framework. The stress-process model of caregiver distress included family functioning as an intervening variable in the relationship between objective burden and…

  7. Emotions, Ideas and Experiences of Caregivers of Patients With Schizophrenia About "Family to Family Support Program".

    PubMed

    Bademli, Kerime; Duman, Zekiye Çetinkaya

    2016-06-01

    "Family to Family Support Program" is a significant intervention program to assist families by informing them about treatment procedures and coping strategies, increasing their functionality, helping them to overcome the challenges of the disease. This study was particularly designed to investigate the emotions, thoughts, and experiences of caregivers of schizophrenia patients who participated in "Family to Family Support Program." The study was conducted with one of the qualitative research methods, phenomenological method. The study sample included caregivers who care for schizophrenia patients and participated in the "Family to Family Support Program". Twenty caregivers were included in the sample. The study was carried out in İzmir Schizophrenia Support Association. The study data were collected with four open ended questions. The average age of the participants was 56,77 ± 72,89, 10 male caregivers and 10 female caregivers, 9 caregivers were fathers, 6 caregivers were mothers, and 5 of them were siblings. The thematic analysis indicated that the emotions, thoughts and experiences of caregivers can be categorized in four groups: "I learned to deal with my problems", "I am conscious in my interaction with the patient and I know and I am not alone", "I feel much better", and "Schizophrenia is not the end of the road, knowledge sorts things out." Caregivers who participated in "Family to Family Support Program" expressed their satisfaction that they were benefited from the program, their coping skills were improved, they experienced less challenges when providing care, they understood the disease better, and it felt comfortable. PMID:27256937

  8. Fatigue in Family Caregivers of Adult Intensive Care Unit Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Tate, Judith A.; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara A.; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Context Family caregivers are a vital resource in the recovery of intensive care unit (ICU) survivors. Of concern, the stress associated with this role can negatively affect caregiver health. Fatigue, an important health indicator, has been identified as a predictor of various illnesses, greater use of health services, and early mortality. Examining the impact of fatigue on caregivers’ physical health can assist in identifying critical time points and potential targets for intervention. Objectives To describe self-reported fatigue in caregivers of ICU survivors from patients’ ICU admission to ≤ two weeks, two- and four-months post-ICU discharge. Methods Patient-caregiver pairs were enrolled from a medical ICU. Caregiver fatigue was measured using the Short-Form-36 Health Survey Vitality subscale (SF-36 Vitality). Caregiver psychobehavioral stress responses included depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors, and sleep quality. Patient data included self-reported physical symptoms and disposition (home vs. institution). Results Forty seven patient-caregiver pairs were initially enrolled. Clinically significant fatigue (SF-36 Vitality ≤ 45) was reported by 43% to 53% of caregivers across the time points and these caregivers reported worse scores in measures of depressive symptoms, burden, health risk behaviors and sleep quality, and patients’ symptom burden. In 26 caregivers with data for all time points (55% of the total sample), SF-36 Vitality scores showed trends of improvement when the patient returned home and greater impairment when institutionalization continued. Conclusion In caregivers of ICU survivors, fatigue is common and potentially linked with poor psychobehavioral responses. Worsening fatigue was associated with greater symptom distress and long-term patient institutionalization. PMID:24439845

  9. Family Caregivers in Cancer: Roles and Challenges (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the challenges faced by family caregivers of cancer patients. This summary focuses on typical caregiver roles and concerns, and helpful interventions for caregivers.

  10. Ranked motives of long-term care providing family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Beneken Genaamd Kolmer, Deirdre; Tellings, Agnes; Gelissen, John; Garretsen, Henk; Bongers, Inge

    2008-03-01

    Family caregivers provide long-term care to their chronically ill loved ones and as a consequence they experience physical, relational and financial problems. This study investigates how long-term family caregivers rank 12 motives for caregiving. Motives are derived from the views of four philosophical anthropologists and are related to self-reported stress and joy and to several different background characteristics of respondents. Motives that focus on feelings concerning the relationship between caregiver and care recipient are more popular as a first choice than motives stemming from feelings of obligation or a general feeling of happiness and are also more popular than more self-directed motives. An analysis of full ranking data shows that two groups can be distinguished, one group of family caregivers with mixed motives and one group of family caregivers with motives that focus on reciprocal mutually equal relationships. The latter are mainly women taking care for a partner or a child, the former report high levels of stress. Implications for intervention programmes and health policy are being discussed. PMID:18269420

  11. Teaching Psychiatry to Family Practice Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huzij, Teodor J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Lacy, Timothy; Rachal, James

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This article outlines a psychiatry curriculum developed for family practice residents by family practice-psychiatry residents. Methods: A literature review, needs assessment, planning, implementation, and initial assessment were conducted. Conclusion: Early results demonstrated improved general psychiatric knowledge and a high level of…

  12. Assisting Cognitively Impaired Nursing Home Residents with Bathing: Effects of Two Bathing Interventions on Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeffer, Beverly; Talerico, Karen Amann; Rasin, Joyce; Mitchell, C. Madeline; Stewart, Babara J.; McKenzie, Darlene; Barrick, Ann Louise; Rader, Joanne; Sloane, Philip D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: When cognitively impaired nursing home residents exhibit agitated and aggressive behaviors during bathing, nursing home caregivers are in a unique position to improve residents' experience. This report addresses whether certified nursing assistants (CNAs) who received training in a person-centered approach with showering and with the…

  13. Sleep complaints in older women who are family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, S; King, A C

    1999-05-01

    Providing care to a family member with dementia has significant psychological and physical consequences. Sleep quality is likely affected by caregiving, yet this domain has received surprisingly little empirical study. In this study, sleep complaints were examined in 90 older women who were family caregivers of adults with dementia. Caregivers reported more sleep complaints than similarly aged healthy adults on all seven components of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and a similar level of sleep complaints to those of sleep-impaired women and depressives on 6 and 4 components, respectively. Sleep medication was used by 38% of caregivers in the past month. The most common sleep complaints that occurred at least weekly were waking up in the night or early morning (84%), bathroom needs (83%), and sleep onset difficulties (41%). Sixty percent of the sample reporting nighttime care recipient disruptions stated that these disruptions occurred 3 or more times per week. Caregiver relationship and care recipient diagnosis were unrelated to sleep complaints. Lower levels of education, less internalized anger, care recipient disruptions, and psychological distress were related to poorer overall sleep quality. Sleep complaints are a common yet understudied problem in family caregivers. PMID:10363041

  14. Health of Elderly Mexican American Adults and Family Caregiver Distress

    PubMed Central

    Rote, Sunshine; Angel, Jacqueline L.; Markides, Kyriakos

    2016-01-01

    Using newly available data on family caregivers from a large epidemiological study of elderly Mexican-origin adults (Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly [HEPESE], 2010/2011), we identify which types of impairment (functional, psychological, and cognitive) in the elderly individual are associated with family caregiver depressive symptoms. Results from ordinary least squares regressions using 626 caregiver–care recipient dyads demonstrate that more severe mobility limitations (Performance-Oriented Mobility Assessment), social disability (instrumental activities of daily living), neuropsychiatric disturbances related to cognitive decline (Neuropsychiatric Inventory), and depressive symptoms in the elderly subject are positively associated with caregiver psychological distress. Perceived social stress partially accounts for these associations. We also identify certain segments of this caregiver population that are especially vulnerable to burden when caring for a family member with high levels of impairment, namely female and low-income caregivers. These vulnerabilities should be the focus of intervention efforts to reduce stress and improve the emotional and psychological well-being of Mexican-origin caregivers. PMID:25651573

  15. Family Caregiving Programs: A Look at the Premises on Which They Are Based [and] Families and Caregiving in an Aging Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winbush, Greta Berry; Cantor, Marjorie H.

    1992-01-01

    Winbush suggests that family caregiving today occurs in a context of changed family composition and devalued attitudes toward families. Cantor highlights trends in family structure that may affect the ability of families to care for impaired members. (SK)

  16. Family Caregiver Role and Burden Related to Gender and Family Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Friedemann, Marie-Luise; Buckwalter, Kathleen C.

    2015-01-01

    This study described and contrasted family caregivers and explored the effect of gender and family relationship on the caregiver’s role perception, workload, burden, and family help. Home care agencies and community organizations assisted with the recruitment of 533 multicultural, predominantly Latino caregivers who were interviewed at home. The Caregiver Identity Theory guided the study. Survey instruments were standardized tools or were constructed and pretested for this study. Descriptive statistics and t-test analyses assisted in describing the sample and multivariate analyses were used to contrast the caregiver groups. Findings suggested a gendered approach to self-appraisal and coping. Men in this predominantly Latino and Caribbean sample felt less burden and depression than women who believed caregiving is a female duty. Family nurses should pay attention to the most vulnerable groups: older spouses resistant to using family and community resources and hard-working female adult children, and assess each family situation individually. PMID:24777069

  17. Effects of Guided Care on Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolff, Jennifer L.; Giovannetti, Erin R.; Boyd, Cynthia M.; Reider, Lisa; Palmer, Sara; Scharfstein, Daniel; Marsteller, Jill; Wegener, Stephen T.; Frey, Katherine; Leff, Bruce; Frick, Kevin D.; Boult, Chad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Guided Care (GC) is a model of health care for multimorbid older adults that is provided by a registered nurse who works with the patients' primary care physician (PCP). The purpose of this study was to determine whether GC improves patients' primary caregivers' depressive symptoms, strain, productivity, and perceptions of the quality of…

  18. Effects of Guided Care on Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Jennifer L.; Giovannetti, Erin R.; Boyd, Cynthia M.; Reider, Lisa; Palmer, Sara; Scharfstein, Daniel; Marsteller, Jill; Wegener, Stephen T.; Frey, Katherine; Leff, Bruce; Frick, Kevin D.; Boult, Chad

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Guided Care (GC) is a model of health care for multimorbid older adults that is provided by a registered nurse who works with the patients’ primary care physician (PCP). The purpose of this study was to determine whether GC improves patients’ primary caregivers’ depressive symptoms, strain, productivity, and perceptions of the quality of care recipients’ chronic illness care. Design and Methods: A cluster-randomized controlled trial of GC was conducted within 14 PCP teams. The study sample included 196 primary caregivers who completed baseline and 18-month surveys and whose care recipients remained alive and enrolled in the GC study for 18 months. Caregiver outcomes included the following: depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale), strain (Modified Caregiver Strain Index), the quality of care recipients’ chronic illness care [Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC)], and personal productivity (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment questionnaire, adapted for caregiving). Results: In multivariate regression models, between-group differences in depression, strain, work productivity, and regular activity productivity were not statistically significant after 18 months, but GC caregivers reported the overall quality of their recipients’ chronic illness care to be significantly higher (adjusted beta = 0.40, 95% confidence interval : 0.14–0.67). Quality was significantly higher in 4 of 5 PACIC subscales, reflecting the dimensions of goal setting, coordination of care, decision support, and patient activation. Implications: GC improved the quality of chronic illness care received by multimorbid care recipients but did not improve caregivers’ depressive symptoms, affect, or productivity. PMID:19710354

  19. Information disclosure to family caregivers: applying Thiroux's framework.

    PubMed

    Rowe, John

    2010-07-01

    In the UK, community care has led to more complex relationships for mental health nurses. They need to respect the rights of service users to confidentiality while also respecting the rights of family caregivers to information that directly affects them. An unsatisfactory situation has arisen in which utilitarian and legally driven motives have seen family caregivers' interests become subsidiary to those of service users and providers. An ethical case is made for sharing information with family caregivers, even against the wishes of service users. Through the use of a conceptual framework based on elements proposed by Thiroux - value of life, goodness or rightness, justice or fairness, truth-telling or honesty, and individual freedom - the article concludes that there is an ethical argument for sharing some information with family caregivers and that nurses should respect caregivers' rights through their actions. Nurses' actions are a commitment to seeking what is 'good' by making judgements based on what matters. It is argued that people and their relationships matter more than strict adherence to laws and codes. PMID:20610577

  20. [Migration specific transitions and family care-giving].

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Wilfried; Duijnstee, Mia; Grypdonck, Mieke

    2005-10-01

    This qualitative study focuses on care-giving among Russo-German re-settlers. Since the early '90s, Russo-Germans have been increasingly allowed to return to Germany. Up to now, the phenomenon of care-giving in this group was little known. The meaning of family care-giving within this particular group of immigrants can only be understood by investigating the foundations of care, the kind of care given, and the ways of providing care. Using the Grounded Theory method, four data sets of 81 interviews have been conducted and analysed in Russia and Germany. Care-giving among Russo-German re-settlers is part of a system of comprehensive family care and support stemming from a collectivistically oriented family concept. Family care is taken for granted and experienced as a must. On account of their biographic experiences and the experiences of immigration, the caring behaviour of Russo-German re-settlers is not necessarily congruent with the caring behaviour practised in Germany, let alone the caring behaviour of professional carers. This has an impact on the utilization of professional support. In order to provide helpful and meaningful support professional carers have to take into account the whole system of family carers and to avoid the separation of the family. PMID:16281895

  1. The living-dying interval in nursing home-based end-of-life care: family caregivers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Waldrop, Deborah P; Kusmaul, Nancy

    2011-11-01

    Guided by concepts from the living-dying interval ( Pattison, 1977 ) this study sought to explore family members' experiences with a dying nursing home resident. In-depth interviews were conducted with 31 caregivers of residents who had died. Interviews were audiotaped and transcribed. Themes that illuminated families' experiences on the living-dying interval were: an acute medical crisis (trigger events, accumulation of stressors, level of care crisis); the living-dying phase (advance care planning, hospitalization, end-stage decisions); and the terminal phase (beginning of the end, awareness of dying). The results illustrate critical periods for social work intervention with families of dying nursing home residents. PMID:22060004

  2. Distance caregiving a family member with cancer: A review of the literature on distance caregiving and recommendations for future research

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Sara L; Mazanec, Polly; Lipson, Amy; Leuchtag, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Distance caregivers (DCGs) are a growing phenomenon in the United States Family members are struggling to provide care to loved ones with chronic illnesses such as cancer, from a distance. Unlike local caregiving research, distance caregiving research is limited and inconsistent definitions of distance make it difficult to compare studies. To date, DCGs have not been afforded the opportunities for educational and emotional support that local caregivers have received from the health care teams. Because they are not usually present at medical appointments, DCGs do not receive first-hand information from the health care team about the patient’s condition, disease progression, and/or treatment options. These caregivers report feeling left out of important family discussions. They experience anxiety related to the uncertainty of the family members’ well-being and guilt related to not being available to help local caregivers more. The challenges of distance caregiving are especially evident when the distance caregiver has a parent with advanced cancer. Family-centered care, attending to the needs of the whole family regardless of their geographic location is critical for quality cancer care. In this manuscript, the sparse literature on distance caregiving is reviewed. Recommendations for future research and for the development of creative technologically advanced interventions for this underserved caregiving population are suggested. PMID:27081643

  3. Young caregivers: effect of family health situations on school performance.

    PubMed

    Siskowski, Connie

    2006-06-01

    Recognition, assessment, education, support, and research of young caregivers is yet to be well established throughout the United States. Studies show that as a result of family caregiving, employees miss work, arrive late, have telephone interruptions, and pass up promotions. Education is essentially the work-life of a student. Research among 12,681 public school students in Palm Beach County, Florida, shows that more than 1 in 2 middle and high school youth (6,210) have the dual role of young caregiver and student; one third of all students (67.1% of young caregivers) miss school/after school activities, do not complete homework, and/or are interrupted in their studying-their work-life. As demonstrated in the United Kingdom, assessment, education, and support of young caregivers in school and in the community can improve education outcomes. Proactive school nurses have the opportunity to identify, assess, and promote the well-being and academic success of U.S. student-caregivers. PMID:16704286

  4. Inpatient falls: the impact of family and personal caregivers.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2009-08-01

    The impact of family and personal caregivers on inpatients with fall-related injuries in a Taiwanese medical center is investigated in this study. Taiwan has a prevalent custom for families to accompany their hospitalized loved ones during hospital stays. During the 95-day data collection period, 228 falls occurred. Results showed that if no family members were present when a patient fell, the fall-related injury was less serious. Nurses in Taiwan tend to depend on family members to help provide patient care. Regardless of whether an inpatient has a family member present, frequent bedside nursing visits are important to prevent falls. PMID:19616163

  5. Group Intervention for Dementia Family Caregivers: A Longitudinal Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, William E.

    1989-01-01

    Conducted longitudinal follow-up to previously published experimental study of effectiveness of group intervention for dementia family caregivers. Found methodological and clinical issues relevant to future studies included issues of differential attrition from treatment, selection of participants,and need for measures appropriate to long-term…

  6. Implications of the Schiavo Case for Understanding Family Caregiving Issues at the End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Lori A.; Osman, Hana; Haley, William E.

    2006-01-01

    The case of Mrs. Terri Schiavo illustrates common themes in family caregiving at the end of life but is distinctive from most family caregiving situations in other ways. As occurred in Mrs. Schiavo's case, family members do act as both caregivers and decisionmakers for their loved ones at the end of life, often without the benefit of written…

  7. Accessible Support for Family Caregivers of Seniors with Chronic Conditions: From Isolation to Inclusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Miriam; Barnfather, Alison; Neufeld, Anne; Warren, Sharon; Letourneau, Nicole; Liu, Lili

    2006-01-01

    Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family…

  8. The Impact of Dementia on Family Caregivers: What Is Research Teaching Us?

    PubMed

    Merrilees, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Dementia family caregiving has been the focus of research for decades. Much has been learned about the negative impact of caregiving as well as characteristics that may be protective. This paper explores themes in caregiving pertinent to clinicians and researchers working with dementia family caregivers: the psychological, subjective, and physical outcomes of caregiving, ways in which dementia alters relationships between the patient and caregiver, and strategies for improving outcomes for caregivers. Suggestions for next steps in research and clinical care are made. PMID:27541750

  9. Adapting the Structural Family Systems Rating to Assess the Patterns of Interaction in Families of Dementia Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrani, Victoria B.; Feaster, Daniel J.; McCabe, Brian E.; Czaja, Sara J.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study adapted the Structural Family Systems Ratings (SFSR), an observational measure of family interactions, for dementia caregivers. This article presents the development of the SFSR-Dementia Caregiver adaptation (SFSR-DC) and examines relationships between specific family-interaction patterns and caregiver distress. Design and…

  10. Does Race Influence Conflict Between Nursing Home Staff and Family Members of Residents?

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Karl; Sechrist, Jori; Suitor, Jill

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. This study examines the influence of race on perceived similarity and conflict between nursing home staff and family members of residents. Despite evidence that the caregiving experience varies by race for both family and professional caregivers, little is known about how race plays a role in staff conflict with residents’ family members. Methods. We used a representative sample of Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to test relationships between race, treatment from family members, similarity to family members in expectations for care by CNAs, and conflicts with family members concerning aspects of resident care. Results. Results of structural equation modeling indicated that race was not a predictor of staff perception of conflict with family members or of poor treatment from residents’ families. However, Black nursing assistants were more likely to perceive that their own expectations of nursing care are dissimilar from those of residents’ family members. Dissimilarity predicted reports of poor treatment from family members, and poor treatment was a positive predictor of perception of conflict. Discussion. The personal long-term nature of nursing home care necessitates a high level of connectedness between family caregivers and nursing home staff. Results highlight the importance of establishing organizational pathways for communication of expectations between nursing staff and residents’ families. PMID:21885531

  11. Differences in COPD Patient Care by Primary Family Caregivers: An Age-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Peng-Ching; Chu, Chi-Ming; Sung, Pei-Yi; Perng, Wann-Cherng; Wang, Kwua-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background Because Taiwan has the fastest aging rate among developed countries, care for the elderly is becoming more prominent in the country. Primary family caregivers play an important role in patient health and health promotion behavior. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), an age-related disease, is a major public health problem with high morbidity and mortality and can be a long-term burden for family members; however, little attention has been given to the differences in COPD care between elder caregivers and other caregivers. This study aimed to investigate the differences between elder family caregivers and non-elder family caregivers caring for COPD patients in Taiwan, including caring behavior, caregiver response, and caring knowledge. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted between March 2007 and January 2008; 406 primary family caregivers of COPD patients from the thoracic outpatient departments of 6 hospitals in north-central Taiwan were recruited to answer questionnaires measuring COPD characteristics, care behavior, caregiver response, and COPD knowledge. All questionnaires, which addressed caregiver knowledge, care behaviors, and care reactions, were shown to have acceptable validity and reliability, and the data were analyzed using univariate and generalized linear model techniques. Results The elder caregivers group had 79 participants, and the non-elder caregivers comprised 327 participants. The COPD-related knowledge scale results were positively correlated with the family caregiver caring behavior scale, suggesting that better COPD-related knowledge among family caregivers may result in improved caring behavior. After adjusting for all possible confounding factors, the elder caregivers had significantly lower COPD-related knowledge than the non-elder caregivers (P<0.001). However, there were no significant differences in the family caregiver caring behavior scale or the caregiver reaction assessment scale between the two

  12. Wearable Technology to Garner the Perspective of Dementia Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Judith T.; Campbell, Grace B.; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Klinger, Julie; Mecca, Laurel Person; Hu, Lu; Hostein, Sally; Lingler, Jennifer H.

    2015-01-01

    Family caregivers of persons with dementia typically have limited opportunity during brief clinical encounters to describe the dementia-related behaviors and interactions that they find difficult to handle. Lack of objective data depicting the nature, intensity, and impact of these manifestations of the underlying disease further constrains the extent to which strategies recommended by nurses or other health care providers can be tailored to the situation. We describe a prototype wearable camera system used to gather image and voice data from the caregiver’s perspective in a pilot feasibility intervention study conducted with 18 caregiving dyads. Several scenarios are presented that incorporate salient events (i.e., behaviors or interactions deemed difficult by the caregiver or identified as concerning by our team during screening) identified in the resulting video. We anticipate that future wearable camera systems and software will automate screening for salient events, providing new tools for assessment and intervention by nurses. PMID:26468655

  13. Burden on Family Caregivers Caring for Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Farshid; Cheraghi, Fatemeh; Bashirian, Saied

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study ‎was to determine the prevalence ‎of the burden reported by familycaregivers of Patients with ‎schizophrenia.‎ Methods: This cross sectional ‎study involved face-to-face ‎interviews with family caregivers ‎of patients with schizophrenia. ‎Using convenience sampling, ‎‎225 caregivers were selected ‎from Farshchian psychiatry ‎Hospital in Hamadan, Iran from ‎July to September 2012. ‎Measures included patients and ‎caregivers’ demographic ‎variables and caregivers’ burden ‎using the Zarit Burden Interview ‎‎(ZBI). Data were analyzed by ‎SPSS-18 with Pearson ‎correlation and t-test.‎ Results: Using the ZBI, we found ‎that 7.6% of the caregivers ‎experienced “no to low” burden, ‎‎23.5% “mild to moderate”, 41.8% ‎‎“moderate to severe” and 27.1% ‎‎“severe” burden. The mean ‎average score of the responses ‎to ZBI was 51.73 (SD: ± 18.23). ‎The level of burden experienced ‎was significantly associated with ‎age, gender, and educational ‎level, relation to care recipient, ‎caregiving duration and duration ‎of schizophrenia illness.‎ Conclusion: ‎ ‏ ‏Mental health ‎professionals need to develop ‎more innovative programs for ‎families of schizophrenic ‎patients. Furthermore, as a ‎replacement for supporting the ‎families and easing their ‎burdens, it may be more ‎effective to include them in the ‎health care team by assigning ‎specific tasks and providing the ‎required resources to them to ‎perform such tasks. ‎ PMID:27006669

  14. Universality of aging: family caregivers for elderly cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Baider, Lea; Surbone, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The world population is aging, with the proportion of older people (65+ years) expected to reach 21% in 2050 and to exceed the number of younger people (aged 15 or less) for the first time in history. Because cancer is particularly a chronic disease of older people, a large increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer is anticipated. The estimated number of new cancer cases worldwide among people over 65 is expected to grow from about 6 million in 2008 to more than 11 million during the coming decade. By 2030, individuals over 65 are expected to account for 70% of all cancer patients in the Western world. Along with the increase in oncology patients, the number of older people caring for their ill spouses or other relatives is also growing, with the ensuing toll on these caregivers causing major concern, especially in western countries. In different societies the characteristics of family caregiver stressors, cultural norms concerning caregiving, and the availability of support have a huge impact on those providing care. Any study of older caregivers of older cancer patients requires an integrative evaluation of aging that takes into account cultural, social, psychological, and behavioral variables. This review proposes a critical discussion of the multidimensionality of the caregiving and of the impact that age, culture, and gender have on it. PMID:25076927

  15. Living With Dementia: An Exploratory Study of Caregiving in a Chinese Family Context.

    PubMed

    Wong, Oi Ling; Kwong, Ping Sum; Ho, Candis Ka Yan; Chow, Susanna Miu Yee; Kwok, Timothy; Wong, Bel; Ho, Vennus; Lau, Andrew; Ho, Florence

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored themes that described families taking care of elderly relatives with dementia in Chinese society. Ten families were invited for two in-depth family interviews involving spousal caregivers, child caregivers, and care recipients. Five themes resulted: positive affection as coping strategies, power and control in the caregiving relationship, adult children's involvement in caregiving, sibling rivalry, and intergenerational conflicts. The ways these themes functioned and helped in dementia care, the research implications, and limitations are discussed. PMID:26399493

  16. Evaluating the Impact of the Life of a Caregiver Simulation on Student Attitudes, Understanding, and Knowledge of Frail Older Adults and Their Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sawin, Erika Metzler; Mast, Merle E; Sessoms, John C; Fulcher, Keston H

    2016-01-01

    Many older adults age at home, cared for by family caregivers. Nurse educators need effective educational strategies to teach students family caregiving issues. This article examines how the Life of a Caregiver (LOC) simulation influences students' understanding and knowledge of aging, family caregiving issues, and related community services. A descriptive mixed-methods study was used with a student sample (n = 46). Participants reported significantly higher knowledge of caregiving terminology and significantly greater understanding of caregiving challenges and community services. The LOC simulation was found to be an effective strategy to teach students to care for older adults and their caregivers. PMID:27164776

  17. Developing a Measurement Strategy for Assessing Family Caregiver Skills: Conceptual Issues

    PubMed Central

    Farran, Carol J.; McCann, Judith J.; Fogg, Louis G.; Etkin, Caryn D.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a conceptual approach to assessing skills of family caregivers for persons with Alzheimer’s disease and recommends next steps for development of this science. Researchers used multiple methods to develop a conceptual strategy for assessing family caregiver skills. Study participants included clinical/outreach staff from an Alzheimer’s Disease Center, nursing faculty with expertise in dementia care, and family caregivers. Mixed methods contributed to the conceptual clarification of caregiving skill and to the development of three approaches to assessing caregiver skill: caregiver self report, clinician assessment, and direct observational assessment. Caregiver effectiveness has the potential to affect the process of caregiving and outcomes for the person with dementia and caregiver. PMID:20179779

  18. The Impact of Family Relations on Caregivers' Positive and Negative Appraisal of Their Caretaking Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baronet, Anne-Marie

    2003-01-01

    Examines the impact of family support and relationship difficulties between the caregiver and the care recipient on caregivers' satisfaction and subjective burden. Findings showed that relationship difficulties were associated with both satisfaction received from caregiving activities and subjective burden. Family support was not associated with…

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Family Caregivers of Stroke Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yangkun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three stroke patients consecutively admitted to a stroke clinic and their 123 family caregivers were recruited. The caregivers' HRQOLs were assessed…

  20. Family Caregiver Uplift and Burden: Associations with Aggressive Behavior in Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unwin, Gemma; Deb, Shoumitro

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of family caregivers caring for adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display aggressive behavior in terms of associations with caregiver burden and uplift. The family caregivers of 44 people with ID and aggressive behavior were interviewed using a suite of questionnaires and…

  1. Equity matters: doing fairness in the context of family caregiving.

    PubMed

    Lashewicz, Bonnie; Manning, Gerald; Hall, Margaret; Keating, Norah

    2007-01-01

    Although family scholars conceptualize caregiving in terms of networks of carers, little attention has been given to equity within these groups. Siblings comprise a prevalent caregiving network of members who feel responsible for parent care, expect to share these responsibilities with each other, and look to each other to evaluate the fairness of their sharing. In this paper, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine sibling views of equity in relation to disputes over giving parent care and receiving parent assets. A literary perspective is offered through analysis of stepsibling tensions depicted in the novel Family Matters. Real life disputes among biological siblings that have been pursued through the courts are also examined. Issues arising from these examples are then analysed through the lens of legal doctrines of equity. Siblings evaluating fairness undertake careful comparisons of their respective relationships with parents in terms of biological links to parents and type and extent of influence in interactions with parents. PMID:18089528

  2. Executive Summary: Professional Partners Supporting Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Kathleen; Reinhard, Susan C.; Brooks-Danso, Ashley

    2008-01-01

    Today, more than three-quarters of adults who live in the community and need long-term care depend on family and friends as their only source of assistance with activities of daily living (such as bathing, dressing, and eating) or instrumental activities of daily living (such as transportation and managing finances). Research suggests that the…

  3. 3 CFR 8900 - Proclamation 8900 of November 1, 2012. National Family Caregivers Month, 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... caregivers to the ones they love even as they navigate their own health challenges. Mothers and fathers... stability to those they love. Family caregivers have an immeasurable impact on the lives of those...

  4. Educational contracts in family medicine residency training.

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, S.; Rojas, R.; Andres, D.; Zagozeski, C.; White, G.; Bradel, T.

    1994-01-01

    An educational contract for family medicine residency training and evaluation addresses many of the difficulties and challenges of current postgraduate medical education. This article identifies important principles for developing a contractual approach; describes the contract used in one program and its implementation; and discusses its theory, advantages, and limitations. Images p550-a PMID:8199512

  5. Otolaryngology Training for Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Rood, Stewart R.

    1980-01-01

    The faculty of the Department of Otolaryngology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, has designed a rotation in the otolaryngology service, that is a basic clinical orientation to ear, nose and throat medicine, to fit the one-month block committed by the local family practice residency training program. The program is described and its…

  6. Do Family Medicine Residents and Their Teachers Have Common Goals?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Richard L.; Green, Larry A.

    1977-01-01

    Opinions were obtained from residents, family medicine faculty, and attending physicians familiar with an established family medicine residency program regarding the tasks that family doctors should and should not perform. (LBH)

  7. Caregiver Person-Centeredness and Behavioral Symptoms in Nursing Home Residents With Dementia: A Timed-Event Sequential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore-Bykovskyi, Andrea L.; Roberts, Tonya J.; Bowers, Barbara J.; Brown, Roger L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Evidence suggests that person-centered caregiving approaches may reduce dementia-related behavioral symptoms; however, little is known about the sequential and temporal associations between specific caregiver actions and behavioral symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify sequential associations between caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and the temporal variation within these associations. Design and Methods: Videorecorded observations of naturally occurring interactions (N = 33; 724min) between 12 nursing home (NH) residents with dementia and eight certified nursing assistants were coded for caregiver person-centered actions, task-centered actions, and resident behavioral symptoms and analyzed using timed-event sequential analysis. Results: Although caregiver actions were predominantly person-centered, we found that resident behavioral symptoms were significantly more likely to occur following task-centered caregiver actions than person-centered actions. Implications: Findings suggest that the person-centeredness of caregivers is sequentially and temporally related to behavioral symptoms in individuals with dementia. Additional research examining the temporal structure of these relationships may offer valuable insights into the utility of caregiver person-centeredness as a low-cost strategy for improving behavioral symptom management in the NH setting. PMID:26055782

  8. Attachment and caregiving relationships in families affected by parental incarceration.

    PubMed

    Shlafer, Rebecca J; Poehlmann, Julie

    2010-07-01

    This longitudinal, mixed method study focused on 57 families of children who participated in a mentoring program for children of incarcerated parents. Children ranged in age from 4 to 15 years. Monthly interviews were conducted with children, caregivers, and mentors during the first six months of program participation, and questionnaires were administered at intake and six months to assess caregiver-child and incarcerated parent-child relationships, contact with incarcerated parents, and children's behavior problems. Although some children viewed their incarcerated parents as positive attachment figures, other children reported negative feelings toward or no relationship with incarcerated parents. In addition, our assessments of children nine years old and older revealed that having no contact with the incarcerated parent was associated with children reporting more feelings of alienation toward that parent compared to children who had contact. Children's behavior problems were a primary concern, often occurring in a relational context or in reaction to social stigma associated with parental imprisonment. PMID:20582847

  9. Families With Special-Needs Children. Starting a Healthy Family Series/Family and Community Health Through Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    This student manual, part of the Family and Community Health Through Caregiving program, focuses on the impact of children with birth defects on families, and the ways families cope with the needs of these children. Topics include: (1) genetic causes of birth defects; (2) how the community and individuals can help families with special-needs…

  10. Caregiving families within the long-term services and support system for older adults.

    PubMed

    Qualls, Sara Honn

    2016-01-01

    Long-term care services and supports are primarily a family industry that warrants psychologists' involvement through practice, research, and policy advocacy. Families are poorly integrated into service systems despite the dominance of family caregiving work within health care and long-term care. This article positions family caregiving work within the context of family life across the life span, noting overlaps and distinctions between normal family life and caregiving work for older adults whose physical or cognitive challenges require assistance. The prevalence, work, and consequences of family caregiving for older adults are described. Families are identified as key partners in long-term care, despite substantial policy and practice barriers to integrating them into care structures and systems. Policy options for reducing or eliminating barriers are suggested, as are professional practice opportunities for psychologists to support caregiving families. Approaches to assessment and interventions for caregivers across a variety of settings are described. Gaps in research are highlighted, with a focus on how to understand caregiving as embedded within context of family, long-term care services and supports, and health care. Caregiving work presents an imperative for expanding psychologists' engagement in integrating and supporting the families whose caregiving is so critical to a rapidly aging society. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27159435

  11. Accessible support for family caregivers of seniors with chronic conditions: from isolation to inclusion.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Miriam; Barnfather, Alison; Neufeld, Anne; Warren, Sharon; Letourneau, Nicole; Liu, Lili

    2006-01-01

    Accessible support programs can improve health outcomes for family caregivers of older relatives with a chronic condition. Over the course of 6 months, 27 experienced family caregivers provided weekly support via the telephone to 66 individuals, either new family caregivers of seniors recently diagnosed with stroke or newly vulnerable family caregivers (i.e., facing increasing demands from the deterioration of their senior relative's condition) of seniors with Alzheimer's disease. Qualitative data documented the perceived impact of the intervention, including increased satisfaction with support, coping skills, caregiving competence and confidence, and decreased caregiver burden and loneliness. Caregivers identified varied support processes that overcame support deficits in their social networks. These processes can facilitate replication in future research and inform practice, programs, and policies. PMID:16821200

  12. Medication management concerns of ethnic minority family caregivers of people living with dementia.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Robyn J; Harrison, Lindsey; Mullan, Judy

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the medication management experiences of Australian ethnic minority family caregivers of people living with dementia. From the perspective of this group of caregivers, medication management was a source of stress resulting from the progressive loss of ability of care recipients to manage their own medications; the complexity of the medication regime and the caregiver's lack of trust of the care recipient to safely and effectively manage medications. Caregivers used various strategies to manage medications and avoid conflict with care recipients including being watchful and involving other family members in medication management tasks. Family caregivers indicated that a lack of information and access to support to inform their medication management role added to their stress, which was exacerbated in some cases by limited English proficiency. Supportive factors noted by caregivers included a well-established relationship with a community pharmacist, involvement of a geriatrician, family support and caregiver support group participation. PMID:24339089

  13. Effects of Social Support and Coping of Family Caregivers of Older Adults with Dementia in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiung-Yu; Musil, Carol M.; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A.; Wykle, May L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship of demographic characteristics, contextual factors, social support, and coping on health outcomes of family caregivers of older adults with dementia in Taiwan. This study also examined caregiving stress and whether support moderated the effects of caregiver stress on health. Lazarus and…

  14. Older and Younger Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disability: Factors Associated with Future Plans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lee, Yue-Chune; Lin, Li-Chan; Kroger, Teppo; Chang, Ai-Ning

    2009-01-01

    A structured interview survey was conducted in a major city in Taiwan to explore and compare older and younger family primary caregivers' well being and their future caregiving plans for these adults with intellectual disability. The sample size was 315 caregivers who were 55 years or older and who cared for adults with intellectual disability and…

  15. The Effect of a Family Therapy and Technology-Based Intervention on Caregiver Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisdorfer, Carl; Czaja, Sara J.; Loewenstein, David A.; Rubert, Mark P.; Arguelles, Soledad; Mitrani, Victoria B.; Szapocznik, Jose

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The majority of persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are cared for at home by a family member such as a spouse or daughter. Caregiving places enormous demands on these caregivers, and the negative consequences associated with caregiving are well documented. This paper reports results from the Miami site of the REACH (Resources for…

  16. The Nature of Elder Impairment and Its Impact on Family Caregivers' Health and Psychosocial Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cattanach, Lynn; Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    1991-01-01

    Assessed nature of elder impairment and its impact on health and psychosocial functioning of 102 family caregivers. Found no differences among caregivers of cognitively impaired, functionally impaired, and nonimpaired elderly relatives in terms of self-reported health or psychosocial functioning. Suggests that other aspects of caregiving context…

  17. Employed Mothers and Family Day-Care Substitute Caregivers: A Comparative Analysis of Infant Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stith, Sandra M.; Davis, Albert J.

    1984-01-01

    Provides a comparative assessment of maternal and nonmaternal infant caregiving practices in own-home and unregulated family day-care homes, respectively. A total of 30 caregivers (10 employed mothers, 10 substitute caregivers, and 10 nonemployed mothers) were observed in interaction with five- to six-month-old infants. (Author/RH)

  18. Socialization of Coping with Community Violence: Influences of Caregiver Coaching, Modeling, and Family Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliewer, Wendy; Parrish, Katie Adams; Taylor, Kelli W.; Jackson, Kate; Walker, Jean M.; Shivy, Victoria A.

    2006-01-01

    A socialization model of coping with community violence was tested in 101 African American adolescents (55% male, ages 9-13) and their maternal caregivers living in high-violence areas of a mid-sized, southeastern city. Participants completed interviews assessing caregiver coping, family context, and child adjustment. Caregiver-child dyads also…

  19. Family Caregivers' Experiences of Caring for a Relative With Younger Onset Dementia: A Qualitative Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Cabote, Christy Joy; Bramble, Marguerite; McCann, Damhnat

    2015-08-01

    Family caregiving for people with younger onset dementia affects everyone in the family unit. This article presents findings of a qualitative systematic review exploring the experiences of family caregivers of persons with younger onset dementia. A systematic search resulted in the inclusion of five relevant articles, and two groups within the family unit were identified-child caregivers and adult and spousal caregivers. Using the thematic synthesis approach, five themes emerged: dementia damage, grief for loss of relationship, changes in family roles, positive and negative impacts of family caregiving, and transition to formal care. The review findings support increasing evidence that despite the stress of caring for a person with dementia damage, family members have the capacity to cope, adapt, and grow through their experiences. Nurses can assist families to identify their unique strengths and enhance family resiliency so they can navigate the "lonely road" of younger onset dementia. PMID:25724671

  20. Usability of a Wearable Camera System for Dementia Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Judith T.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Campbell, Grace B.; Hunsaker, Amanda E.; Hu, Lu; Pires, Bernardo R.; Hebert, Martial; Schulz, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Health care providers typically rely on family caregivers (CG) of persons with dementia (PWD) to describe difficult behaviors manifested by their underlying disease. Although invaluable, such reports may be selective or biased during brief medical encounters. Our team explored the usability of a wearable camera system with 9 caregiving dyads (CGs: 3 males, 6 females, 67.00 ± 14.95 years; PWDs: 2 males, 7 females, 80.00 ± 3.81 years, MMSE 17.33 ± 8.86) who recorded 79 salient events over a combined total of 140 hours of data capture, from 3 to 7 days of wear per CG. Prior to using the system, CGs assessed its benefits to be worth the invasion of privacy; post-wear privacy concerns did not differ significantly. CGs rated the system easy to learn to use, although cumbersome and obtrusive. Few negative reactions by PWDs were reported or evident in resulting video. Our findings suggest that CGs can and will wear a camera system to reveal their daily caregiving challenges to health care providers. PMID:26288888

  1. You Are Not Alone: PARISH NURSES BRIDGE CHALLENGES FOR FAMILY CAREGIVERS.

    PubMed

    Grebeldinger, Teresa A; Buckley, Kathleen M

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, there were 43.5 million informal, unpaid caregivers in the United States. Caregivers reported a moderate to high level of burden of care, including performing medical and nursing tasks they were not trained to do. A study of family caregiver experiences with parish/faith community nurses reveals four key ways parish nurses support caregivers and offers important implications for parish nurse preparation and practice. PMID:26817372

  2. As Families Grow Older: Information for Family Caregivers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halls, Dolores M.; And Others

    This document presents the final report of the "As Families Grow Older" project, a continuing education program for aging network service providers and family members in 23 counties throughout New Mexico which was designed to promote family well-being. It describes how the project, which was in operation from April 1986 through January 1987,…

  3. Role of the Lebanese family caregivers in cardiac self-care: a collective approach

    PubMed Central

    Dumit, Nuhad Y; Abboud, Sarah; Massouh, Angela; Magilvy, Joan K

    2015-01-01

    Aims and objectives The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions of cardiac self-care among Lebanese family caregivers of cardiac patients. The specific aims were to describe the cultural context of cardiac care-giving in Lebanon and to explore the roles of family caregivers in enhancing self-care practices in patients with cardiac diseases. Background The role of family caregivers in Lebanon, a country in the Middle East, is assumed to extend beyond care-giving to making decisions on behalf of the patient and assuming responsibility for patient care. To date, there has been no study done to empirically validate this impression. Design The design of the study is qualitative descriptive that used semi-structured individual interviews with family caregivers of Lebanese cardiac patients. Method Thirteen family caregivers of cardiac patients were recruited from a referral medical centre in Lebanon. The participants were designated by their patients and interviewed in a place of their choice. Results One overarching and three themes emerged from data analysis describing roles of family care givers in cardiac self-care. The overarching theme was: Family caregivers of Lebanese cardiac patients were unfamiliar with the term, concept and meaning of Self-Care. The moral and emotional duty to care for the family member stemmed from obligation and responsibility towards patients (theme I). Interdependent care (theme II) between cardiac patients and their families emerged as a significant cultural role. Family members play multiple supportive roles in care-giving namely emotional, informational and instrumental role (theme III). Conclusion In this study, family caregiver role is shown to be based in the sense of obligation and duty towards the sick family member who collectively provide different types of supportive care. Relevance to clinical practice Nurses have to give significant importance to the family caregiver role as an integral part of any culturally sensitive

  4. Remediation plans in family medicine residency

    PubMed Central

    Audétat, Marie-Claude; Voirol, Christian; Béland, Normand; Fernandez, Nicolas; Sanche, Gilbert

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess use of the remediation instrument that has been implemented in training sites at the University of Montreal in Quebec to support faculty in diagnosing and remediating resident academic difficulties, to examine whether and how this particular remediation instrument improves the remediation process, and to determine its effects on the residents’ subsequent rotation assessments. Design A multimethods approach in which data were collected from different sources: remediation plans developed by faculty, program statistics for the corresponding academic years, and students’ academic records and rotation assessment results. Setting Family medicine residency program at the University of Montreal. Participants Family medicine residents in academic difficulty. Main outcome measures Assessment of the content, process, and quality of remediation plans, and students’ academic and rotation assessment results (successful, below expectations, or failure) both before and after the remediation period. Results The framework that was developed for assessing remediation plans was used to analyze 23 plans produced by 10 teaching sites for 21 residents. All plans documented cognitive problems and implemented numerous remediation measures. Although only 48% of the plans were of good quality, implementation of a remediation plan was positively associated with the resident’s success in rotations following the remediation period. Conclusion The use of remediation plans is well embedded in training sites at the University of Montreal. The residents’ difficulties were mainly cognitive in nature, but this generally related to deficits in clinical reasoning rather than knowledge gaps. The reflection and analysis required to produce a remediation plan helps to correct many academic difficulties and normalize the academic career of most residents in difficulty. Further effort is still needed to improve the quality of plans and to support teachers.

  5. 1. VIEW OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE FAMILY RESIDENCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE FAMILY RESIDENCE (FEATURE B-10), FACING NORTH. - Nevada Lucky Tiger Mill & Mine, Family Residence, East slope of Buckskin Mountain, Paradise Valley, Humboldt County, NV

  6. The Cancer Family Caregiving Experience: An Updated and Expanded Conceptual Model

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Barbara Swore; Miaskowski, Christine; Given, Barbara; Schumacher, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Objective The decade from 2000–2010 was an era of tremendous growth in family caregiving research specific to the cancer population. This research has implications for how cancer family caregiving is conceptualized, yet the most recent comprehensive model of cancer family caregiving was published ten years ago. Our objective was to develop an updated and expanded comprehensive model of the cancer family caregiving experience, derived from concepts and variables used in research during past ten years. Methods A conceptual model was developed based on cancer family caregiving research published from 2000–2010. Results Our updated and expanded model has three main elements: 1) the stress process, 2) contextual factors, and 3) the cancer trajectory. Emerging ways of conceptualizing the relationships between and within model elements are addressed, as well as an emerging focus on caregiver-patient dyads as the unit of analysis. Conclusions Cancer family caregiving research has grown dramatically since 2000 resulting in a greatly expanded conceptual landscape. This updated and expanded model of the cancer family caregiving experience synthesizes the conceptual implications of an international body of work and demonstrates tremendous progress in how cancer family caregiving research is conceptualized. PMID:22000812

  7. Family-Oriented Patient Care through the Residency Training Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Ellen M.; Heru, Alison; Grunebaum, Henry; Rolland, John; Sargent, John; Wamboldt, Marianne; McDaniel, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Because family oriented patient care improves patient outcome and reduces family burden, clinical family skills of communication, assessment, alliance, and support are part of core competencies required of all residents. Teaching residents to "think family" as part of core competencies and to reach out to families requires change in the…

  8. Family caregivers' burden, quality of life, and health following patients' renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wicks, M N; Milstead, E J; Hathaway, D K; Cetingok, M

    1998-09-01

    Improved quality of life and physical functioning among renal transplant recipients have been documented; however, little of the literature has addressed the effects of transplantation on family caregivers. The purpose of this exploratory descriptive study was to characterize the level of subjective burden, quality of life, and self-rated health of caregivers who assist family members prior to transplantation as well as at 6 months following. The study sample included 19 caregivers of 19 renal transplant recipients. In general, caregiver burden, quality of life, and self-rated health did not improve following patients' transplants. In addition, 9 of 19 family caregivers reported increased burden. Because much of healthcare is family-based and greater reliance on family support seems inevitable, further studies are needed to examine the impact of transplantation on the family as well as the impact of the family on patients' posttransplant outcomes. PMID:9866547

  9. Family, Friend, and Neighbor Child Caregivers: Results of a Statewide Study to Determine Needs and Desires for Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Pamela Marie; Greenspoon, Bayla; Unti, Lisa; Fawcett, Linda K.; Neville-Morgan, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Family, friend and neighbor (FFN) child caregivers represent a significant proportion of caregivers for young children. Yet, these caregivers receive little support for their services. In 2003, the First 5 California Children and Families Commission (First 5 California) began a study to determine the work-related needs of FFN caregivers in…

  10. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  11. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  12. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  13. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  14. 12 CFR 1010.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Single-family residence exemption. 1010.10...) General Requirements § 1010.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  15. 24 CFR 1710.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single-family residence exemption... Requirements § 1710.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which meets the... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  16. 12 CFR 1010.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Single-family residence exemption. 1010.10...) General Requirements § 1010.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  17. 12 CFR 1010.10 - Single-family residence exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Single-family residence exemption. 1010.10...) General Requirements § 1010.10 Single-family residence exemption. (a) General. The sale of a lot which... zoned for single-family residences or, in the absence of a zoning ordinance, limited exclusively...

  18. A DVD program on fall prevention skills training for cancer family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Potter, Patricia; Olsen, Sarah; Kuhrik, Marilee; Kuhrik, Nancy; Huntley, Lance R

    2012-03-01

    This feasibility study tested an instructional DVD program for improving cancer family caregivers' knowledge and preparedness in fall prevention and reducing fall occurrence among the patients they care for at home. DVD program features included training caregivers on safe mobility skills. Family caregivers of cancer patients were surveyed before and after viewing the DVD program on "Moving Safely" in the home. Cancer patients were followed 4 months postintervention to determine if fall occurrence was reduced. There was a decrease in the number of patients who fell postintervention compared with those who fell preintervention. Caregivers' perceptions of knowledge about fall prevention improved significantly after viewing the DVD. An instructional DVD program is an effective educational tool for preparing family caregivers with the knowledge and skills needed to reduce the incidence of falls in the home setting. Educators must develop programs for preparing family caregivers to perform nursing skills within the home. PMID:22057986

  19. Functional and Existential Tasks of Family Caregiving for End-of-Life, Hospitalized Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Chaim Charles; Auslander, Gail; Dror, Yossi Freier; Breuer, Gabriel S

    2016-07-01

    The current study examined how functional and existential coping factors are related to the sense of self-benefit among end-of-life (EOL) family caregivers caring for hospitalized older adults. A convenience sample of 92 family caregivers was interviewed in two Israeli hospitals using a structured questionnaire based on Pearlin's stress process model. Findings show that engagement in EOL existential tasks and motivations, such as life review, spirituality, multigenerational family relationships, and preparation for death, acted as a coping resource and was positively related with caregivers' sense of self-benefit. However, functional caregiving did not act as a significant stressor, as it was weakly related to care-givers' sense of self-benefit. Findings discuss the importance of training health professionals to recognize and discuss existential concerns with EOL family caregivers. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(7), 55-64.]. PMID:27064609

  20. Participation of immigrant women family caregivers in qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Neufeld, A; Harrison, M J; Hughes, K D; Spitzer, D; Stewart, M J

    2001-10-01

    The recruitment of articulate, expressive participants is an essential part of methodology in qualitative research. This article presents the authors' experience in the recruitment of immigrant women of Chinese and South Asian origin in an ethnographic study. The study included women caring for an adult or child family member who had a chronic health problem. Knowledge of women family caregivers' health is restricted by the failure to include diverse groups of women in research. In this article, the authors discuss issues related to recruitment and participation of immigrant women in research, including establishing access to diverse groups of women, benefits for immigrant women, and placing the researcher and research process on the same level. Practical research strategies to address these issues and engage the women in research that portrays their perspectives are presented. The authors' discussion concludes with reflection on their experience and that of other researchers. PMID:11569331

  1. Caregiving Styles: A Cognitive and Behavioral Typology Associated with Dementia Family Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Mary A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: An increasing number of elderly individuals are diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease and related disorders (ADRD), many of whom receive daily caregiving from spouse or adult child. Caregiving is a "cultural activity," and as such it is strongly influenced by sociocultural beliefs about caregiving and how it should be enacted. Understanding…

  2. Anticipatory Grief in New Family Caregivers of Persons with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Garand, Linda; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Deardorf, Kaitlyn E.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Schulz, Richard; Reynolds, Charles F.; Dew, Mary Amanda

    2011-01-01

    Anticipatory grief is the process of experiencing normal phases of bereavement in advance of the loss of a significant person. To date, anticipatory grief has been examined in family caregivers to individuals who have had Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) an average of 3 to 6 years. Whether such grief is manifested early in the disease trajectory (at diagnosis) is unknown. Using a cross-sectional design, we examined differences in the nature and extent of anticipatory grief between family caregivers of persons with a new diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=43) or AD (n=30). We also determined whether anticipatory grief levels were associated with caregiver demographics, caregiving burden, depressive symptoms and marital quality. Mean anticipatory grief levels were high in the total sample, with AD caregivers endorsing significantly more anticipatory grief than MCI caregivers. In general, AD caregivers endorsed difficulty functioning whereas MCI caregivers focused on themes of “missing the person” they once knew. Being a female caregiver, reporting higher levels of objective caregiving burden and higher depression levels each bore independent, statistically significant relationships with anticipatory grief. Given these findings, family caregivers of individuals with mild cognitive deficits or a new AD diagnosis may benefit from interventions specifically addressing anticipatory grief. PMID:21946013

  3. Magnitude and Causes of Bias among Family Caregivers rating Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Richard; Cook, Thomas B.; Beach, Scott R.; Lingler, Jennifer H.; Martire, Lynn M.; Monin, Joan K.; Czaja, Sara J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Family caregivers generally underestimate the health and well-being of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients when compared to patient self-assessments. The goals of this study were to identify caregiver, patient, and contextual factors associated with caregiver rating bias. Methods 105 patients with AD and their family caregivers were assessed twice by trained interviewers one year apart. In separate interviews, caregivers were asked to rate the quality of life and suffering of their patient relative, and patients provided self-ratings using the same structured instruments. Multivariate cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses were used to identify predictors of caregiver-patient discrepancies. Results Caregivers consistently reported significantly higher levels of suffering and lower levels of quality of life than patients. Caregiver psychological well-being and health status accounted for a substantial portion of the difference in caregiver and patient ratings in both cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. Caregiver depression and burden were consistently positively associated with the magnitude of caregiver-patient discrepancy, and caregiver health status was negatively associated with the size of the discrepancy. Conclusions Caregiver assessments of dementia patients may determine the type and frequency of treatment received by the patient, and caregivers’ ability to reliably detect change in patient status can play a critical role in evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic interventions and pharmacologic agents. Clinicians and researchers working with dementia patients who rely on caregiver reports of patient status should be sensitive to the health and well-being of the caregiver and recognize that caregiver assessments may be negatively biased when the caregiver’s own well-being is compromised. PMID:23290199

  4. Statewide implementation of "reducing disability in Alzheimer's disease": impact on family caregiver outcomes.

    PubMed

    Menne, Heather L; Bass, David M; Johnson, Justin D; Primetica, Branka; Kearney, Keith R; Bollin, Salli; Molea, Marcus J; Teri, Linda

    2014-01-01

    There have been few replications of efficacious evidence-based programs for dementia caregivers offered in community settings. This study highlights the replication of the evidence-based Reducing Disability in Alzheimer's Disease program and explores the changes in outcomes for participating caregivers and whether those changes are related to level of program utilization. With data from 219 caregivers, regression results indicate that more exercise sessions are associated with a decrease in caregiver strain and more behavior management sessions are associated with a decrease in unmet needs after 3 months. Findings demonstrate how a multicomponent program can have positive benefits for family caregivers. PMID:24329593

  5. Support Service Use and Interest in Support Services among Distressed Family Caregivers of Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mosher, Catherine E.; Champion, Victoria L.; Hanna, Nasser; Jalal, Shadia I.; Fakiris, Achilles J.; Birdas, Thomas J.; Okereke, Ikenna C.; Kesler, Kenneth A.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.; Given, Barbara A.; Monahan, Patrick O.; Ostroff, Jamie S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study examined support service use and interest in support services among distressed family caregivers of patients recently entering a comprehensive cancer care facility. Methods Primary family caregivers of lung cancer patients (N = 83) were recruited from three medical centers within 12 weeks of the patient’s new visit to the oncology clinic. All family caregivers were screened for psychological distress and those reporting significant anxiety or depressive symptoms were eligible for this study. Caregivers completed a baseline assessment of support service use (i.e., use of mental health services and complementary and alternative medicine [CAM]) and interest in support services. Support service use was also assessed three months later. Results Although all caregivers reported clinically meaningful distress, only 26% used mental health and 39% used CAM services during the 3-month study period. Patients’ receipt of chemotherapy was positively associated with caregivers’ mental health service use, whereas greater education and receiving assistance with caregiving tasks were associated with CAM use. Forty percent of caregivers who did not use CAM at baseline were interested in CAM. In addition, 29% of caregivers who did not receive mental health services at baseline were interested in professional psychosocial support, and 29% of caregivers who did not receive staff assistance with practical needs at baseline were interested in this service. Conclusions Findings suggest that distressed family caregivers of lung cancer patients underuse mental health services and that a sizable minority are interested in professional help with psychosocial and practical needs. PMID:22941782

  6. 3 CFR 8748 - Proclamation 8748 of November 1, 2011. National Family Caregivers Month, 2011

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Proclamation 8748 of November 1, 2011. National Family Caregivers Month, 2011 8748 Proclamation 8748 Presidential Documents Proclamations Proclamation 8748 of November 1, 2011 Proc. 8748 National Family Caregivers Month, 2011By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation Across...

  7. Respite Utilization and Responses to Loss among Family Caregivers: Relationship Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCaporale, Lauren; Mensie, Lauren; Steffen, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Family caregivers of physically and cognitively impaired older adults face multiple challenges when providing care, including responses to tangible and anticipated losses. However, little is known about the grief experiences of family caregivers and how these might differentially influence the care-related behaviors of spouses and adult children.…

  8. 38 CFR 71.25 - Approval and designation of Primary and Secondary Family Caregivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval and designation of Primary and Secondary Family Caregivers. 71.25 Section 71.25 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) CAREGIVERS BENEFITS AND CERTAIN MEDICAL BENEFITS OFFERED TO FAMILY MEMBERS OF VETERANS § 71.25...

  9. Understanding Discrepancy in Perceptions of Values: Individuals with Mild to Moderate Dementia and Their Family Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamy, Allison M.; Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: We explore discrepancies in perceptions of values and care preferences between individuals with dementia (IWDs) and their family caregivers. Design and Methods: We interviewed 266 dyads consisting of an individual with mild to moderate dementia and his or her family caregiver to determine IWDs' beliefs for 5 values related to…

  10. Family Economic Strengthening and Parenting Stress Among Caregivers of AIDS-Orphaned Children: Results from a Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Nabunya, Proscovia; Ssewamala, Fred M; Ilic, Vilma

    2014-09-01

    This study examines the impact of a family economic strengthening intervention on parenting stress among caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children in Uganda. The study uses data from a 4-year (2008-2012) NIMH randomized clinical trial for AIDS-orphaned children known as Suubi-Maka (N=346 dyads). Child-caregiver dyads from 10 comparable primary schools were randomly assigned to either the control group (n=167 dyads) receiving usual care for school-going orphaned children (such as food aid and scholastic materials) or the treatment group (n=179 dyads) receiving a family economic strengthening intervention (focused on a matched savings account), financial planning and management workshops over and above the usual care. Interviews were conducted at baseline, 12 months and 24 months follow-up. This study uses data from baseline and 24 months post-intervention. We use multivariate regression methods, controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. At 24 months, caregivers in the treatment group reported significantly lower levels of parenting stress compared to caregivers in the control group. Findings from this study point to the potential of a family economic strengthening intervention to improve caregiver's psychosocial wellbeing and that of their families. We conclude that programs and policies aimed at improving the psychosocial wellbeing of families caring for AIDS-orphaned children may consider incorporating economic strengthening components in their programming to help support these kinds of families, caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children especially those residing in developing countries. PMID:25136142

  11. Strengthening Incarcerated Families: Evaluating a Pilot Program for Children of Incarcerated Parents and Their Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Miller, Alison L; Perryman, Jamie; Markovitz, Lara; Franzen, Susan; Cochran, Shirley; Brown, Shavonnea

    2013-10-01

    Parental incarceration can be devastating for families. Children may experience difficulties, and the stress on caregivers who take on unexpected childrearing is high. We implemented and evaluated a family-level intervention with caregivers and children experiencing parental (typically maternal) incarceration, in a community setting. We partnered with a community-based organization serving families with an incarcerated parent to conduct a pilot trial of the Strengthening Families Program (SFP). Process evaluation indicated high implementation fidelity, satisfaction, engagement, and attendance. Outcome evaluation results indicated positive changes in family-level functioning, caregivers' positive parenting, and caregiver depression symptoms from pre- to post-intervention, with some changes retained at follow-up 4 months later. Implications for preventive interventions with children of incarcerated parents, and their caregivers, are discussed. PMID:24353363

  12. Effects of a Psychosocial Intervention on Caregivers of Recently Placed Nursing Home Residents: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    SCHULZ, RICHARD; ROSEN, JULES; KLINGER, JULIE; MUSA, DONALD; CASTLE, NICHOLAS G.; KANE, APRIL; LUSTIG, AMY

    2014-01-01

    Many caregivers continue to provide care and support to their care recipients after institutional placement. A two-group randomized controlled trial was carried out to test the efficacy of a psychosocial intervention for informal caregivers whose care recipients resided in a long-term care facility. The intervention was delivered during the 6 month period following baseline assessment. Follow-up assessments were carried out at 6, 12, and 18 months. Primary outcomes were caregiver depression, anxiety, burden, and complicated grief. Significant time effects were found for all three primary outcomes showing that caregiver depression, anxiety, and burden improved over time. No treatment effects were found for these outcomes. However, complicated grief was significantly lower for caregivers in the treatment condition. PMID:25071302

  13. Burden and associated pathologies in family caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Cotelo, Natalia Vérez; Rodríguez, N. Floro Andrés; PÉREZ, José A. Fornos; Iglesias, J. Carlos Andrés; Lago, Marcos Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the profile of family caregivers of Alzheimer’s disease patients, identify any signs of psychopathology, quantify the level of perceived burden on the caregiver, and determine the caregiver’s relationship with their pharmacist. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted at a community pharmacy in Pontevedra, Spain. Demographic variables were collected, and the following questionnaires were administered: the Beck Depression Inventory-II, STAI-Anxiety Questionnaire, Zarit Burden Scale, family APGAR scale, and the Duke-UNC questionnaire. Results: The typical caregiver profile consists of a 55-year old first degree relative (mostly daughters) with a primary education who belongs to a functional or mildly dysfunctional family. Nearly one quarter (24%) of caregivers had a high perception of burden, with anxiety in 20% of caregivers and symptoms of depression in 20%. Family caregivers usually went to the same pharmacy as the patients (96%), were treated with psychotropic drugs (68%), and interacted with the pharmacist (92%). Conclusion: This study confirmed that psychological distress and burden is present among family caregivers. Care for caregivers should be integrated into patient care as part of a national plan, including grants and subsidies, which will result in better care of Alzheimer’s patients. Pharmacists are the most accessible health care professionals and can provide information about Alzheimer’s disease management to caregivers to ease the burden of care. PMID:26131040

  14. Subjective caregiver burden: validity of the 10-item short version of the Burden Scale for Family Caregivers BSFC-s

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Subjective burden is a central variable describing the situation encountered by family caregivers. The 10-item short version of the Burden Scale for Family Caregivers (BSFC-short/BSFC-s) was developed to provide an economical measure of this variable. The present study examined the reliability and validity of the BSFC-s. Methods Comprehensive data from “the IDA project” were the basis of the calculations, which included 351 dyads and examined medical data on people with dementia, interview data from their family caregivers, and health insurance data. A factor analysis was performed to explore the structure of the BSFC-s; Cronbach’s alpha was used to evaluate the internal consistency of the scale. The items were analyzed to determine the item difficulty and the discriminatory power. Construct validity was tested with five hypotheses. To establish the predictive validity of the BSFC-s, predictors of institutionalization at a follow-up time of 2.5 years were analyzed (binary logistic regression). Results The BSFC-s score adhered to a one-factor structure. Cronbach's alpha for the complete scale was .92. A significant increase in the BSFC-s score was observed when dementia progressed, disturbing behavior occurred more frequently, care requirements increased, and when caregivers were diagnosed with depression. Caregiver burden was the second strongest predictor of institutionalization out of a total of four significant predictors. Conclusions All hypotheses that referred to the construct validity were supported. The BSFC-short with its ten items is a very economical instrument for assessing the caregiver’s total subjective burden in a short time frame. The BSFC-s score has predictive validity for the institutionalization of people with dementia. Therefore it is an appropriate outcome measure to evaluate caregiver interventions. The scale is available for free in 20 languages (http://www.caregiver-burden.eu). This availability facilitates the

  15. Predictors of the depressive symptomatology of the family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Lau, C G; Tang, W K; Wong, K S; Mok, V; Ungvari, G S

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to determine the socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with depressive symptoms in the family caregivers of Hong Kong Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three patients at a stroke clinic and their family caregivers formed the study sample. The depressive symptoms of both the patients and their family caregivers were rated with the Chinese version of the 15-item Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Participants' socio-demographic data and clinical characteristics served as the independent variables in relation to the caregivers' GDS scores. Patients' and caregivers' somatic and psychological conditions were measured with 10 scales. In univariate analysis, caregivers' GDS scores were significantly correlated with certain of their characteristics [Modified Life Event Scale (MLES), Cumulative Illness Rating Scale (CIRS) and Lubben Social Network Scale (LSNS) scores, sex and being a housewife] and those of the patients (GDS score and being a housewife). Multiple regression analysis showed caregivers' MLES and CIRS scores and patients' GDS scores to be independent correlates of caregivers' GDS scores. Adverse events encountered by caregivers in the past 6 months, their current health problems and patients' depressive symptoms were found to be the principal factors associated with caregivers' depressive symptoms. PMID:22070345

  16. Neuro-oncology family caregivers are at risk for systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sherwood, Paula R; Price, Thomas J; Weimer, Jason; Ren, Dianxu; Donovan, Heidi S; Given, Charles W; Given, Barbara A; Schulz, Richard; Prince, Jennifer; Bender, Catherine; Boele, Florien W; Marsland, Anna L

    2016-05-01

    Prolonged periods of family caregiving can induce stress levels that may negatively influence caregiver health. However, the physiologic effect of psychological distress in oncology family caregivers has received little attention. Therefore we aimed to determine longitudinal profiles of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1ra) in neuro-oncology caregivers and identify associations between psychological distress and cytokine levels. Depressive symptoms, anxiety, caregiver burden and blood were collected from 108 adult caregivers at adult patients' diagnosis, 4-, 8-, and 12-months. Trajectory analyses of log transformed cytokine levels were performed. Multiple logistic regression analyses evaluated the impact of psychological distress on cytokine levels. For both cytokines, two distinct populations were identified, neither of which changed over time. High IL-1ra was associated with male caregivers with anxiety (OR = 1.7; 95 %CI 1.06-2.83) and obese caregivers (BMI = 40) who felt burdened due to disrupted schedules (OR = 1.3; 95 %CI 1.02-1.77). Conversely, caregivers with a healthy weight (BMI = 25) who felt burdened due to disrupted schedules were less likely to have high IL-1ra (OR = 0.71; 95 %CI 0.54-0.92). Caregivers ≤30 years old with lower self-esteem from caregiving were 1.16 times (95 %CI 1.04-1.30) more likely to have high IL-6. Analysis demonstrated groups of family caregivers with high and low levels of systemic inflammation and these levels did not change longitudinally over the care trajectory. Poor physical health in family caregivers may have a negative impact on the burden placed on the healthcare system in general and on the well-being of neuro-oncology patients in particular. PMID:26907491

  17. Experience with a Family-Practice-Resident-Directed Obstetrical Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jerry L.; Snyder, Frank

    1980-01-01

    At Toledo Hospital, family practice residents have assumed responsibility for the normal obstetrics clinic. Specialty consultations are provided by the hospital's obstetrics residency program. A medical audit of the clinic indicates that the family practice residents obtained consultations and made referrals at the appropriate times. (JMD)

  18. Creating Patient and Family Education Websites: Design and Content of the Home Parenteral Nutrition Family Caregivers Website

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Sharon; Yadrich, Donna Macan; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol

    2011-01-01

    When managing chronic illnesses, caregivers repeatedly seek online information about providing complex, long-term care but often neglect to find information about how to care for themselves. Poor health among caregivers is not only detrimental to their own well-being but may also result in harm to those for whom they care. For this reason, caregivers need access to information and activities about caring for themselves in addition to the information about managing home care they were already likely to seek. The HPN Family Caregivers Website was developed to guide caregivers through the process of caring for themselves by establishing a caregiving routine, self-monitoring their mental and physical health, practicing good sleep hygiene, etc., while also managing the complexities of home care. While website information, activities and algorithms for managing chronic illnesses need to be specific to each population, the content guiding caregivers to care for their own health is universal. PMID:21825970

  19. Liminality as a Conceptual Frame for Understanding the Family Caregiving Rite of Passage: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, Susanne W.; Ross, Alyson; Bevans, Margaret

    2014-01-01

    Family caregiving is a significant rite of passage experienced by family caregivers of individuals with protracted illness or injury. In an integrative review of 26 studies, we characterized family caregiving from the sociocultural perspective of liminality and explored associated psychosocial implications. Analysis of published evidence on this dynamic and formative transition produced a range of themes. While role ambiguity resolved for most, for others, uncertainty and suffering continued. The process of becoming a caregiver was transformative and can be viewed as a rebirth that is largely socially and culturally driven. The transition to family caregiving model produced by this review provides a holistic perspective on this phenomenon and draws attention to aspects of the experience previously underappreciated. PMID:25176315

  20. Negotiating care of frail elders: relationships between community nurses and family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Ward-Griffin, C

    2001-09-01

    Recent changes in patterns of care of the elderly in Canada, including the withdrawal of formal home-care services and increasing reliance on family caregivers, call for a critical analysis of the relationship between formal and informal caregivers. The purpose of this study was to describe and analyze the relationship between nurses and female family members caring for frail elders in the home. Using a critical ethnographic method in a socialist-feminist framework, separate in-depth interviews were conducted with 23 nurse-family caregiver dyads. Analysis of interview transcripts and fieldnotes revealed that relationships were characterized by uncertainty and tension. While both nurses and family caregivers functioned within and resisted current home-care arrangements, they engaged in an ongoing process of negotiating cultural assumptions about "private" and "public" caregiving. The findings point to implications for nursing practice, education, and policy. PMID:11928337

  1. Compassion fatigue: an application of the concept to informal caregivers of family members with dementia.

    PubMed

    Day, Jennifer R; Anderson, Ruth A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Compassion fatigue is a concept used with increasing frequency in the nursing literature. The objective of this paper is to identify common themes across the literature and to apply these themes, and an existing model of compassion fatigue, to informal caregivers for family members with dementia. Findings. Caregivers for family members with dementia may be at risk for developing compassion fatigue. The model of compassion fatigue provides an informative framework for understanding compassion fatigue in the informal caregiver population. Limitations of the model when applied to this population were identified as traumatic memories and the emotional relationship between parent and child, suggesting areas for future research. Conclusions. Research is needed to better understand the impact of compassion fatigue on informal caregivers through qualitative interviews, to identify informal caregivers at risk for compassion fatigue, and to provide an empirical basis for developing nursing interventions for caregivers experiencing compassion fatigue. PMID:22229086

  2. Compassion Fatigue: An Application of the Concept to Informal Caregivers of Family Members with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Day, Jennifer R.; Anderson, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Compassion fatigue is a concept used with increasing frequency in the nursing literature. The objective of this paper is to identify common themes across the literature and to apply these themes, and an existing model of compassion fatigue, to informal caregivers for family members with dementia. Findings. Caregivers for family members with dementia may be at risk for developing compassion fatigue. The model of compassion fatigue provides an informative framework for understanding compassion fatigue in the informal caregiver population. Limitations of the model when applied to this population were identified as traumatic memories and the emotional relationship between parent and child, suggesting areas for future research. Conclusions. Research is needed to better understand the impact of compassion fatigue on informal caregivers through qualitative interviews, to identify informal caregivers at risk for compassion fatigue, and to provide an empirical basis for developing nursing interventions for caregivers experiencing compassion fatigue. PMID:22229086

  3. Family Caregiving for Immigrant Seniors Living With Heart Disease and Stroke: Chinese Canadian Perspective.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lichun Willa; McDaniel, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease and stroke are two leading causes of death and disability among older Canadians. Family support and caregiving are crucial to the positive functional recovery and psychological well-being of heart disease and stroke survivors. Based on focus groups and individual interviews with Chinese family caregivers in the Canadian province of Ontario, we explored the caregiver's experience, including the challenges, needs, and service gaps in providing care for immigrant seniors with heart disease and stroke. We found that caregiving practices and the strategies used to cope with caregiving challenges varied by gender, ethnicity, age, and length of migration. We provide recommendations for narrowing the gaps in caregiving at the end of the article. PMID:25985230

  4. Teaching prenatal ultrasound to family medicine residents.

    PubMed

    Dresang, Lee T; Rodney, William MacMillan; Dees, Jason

    2004-02-01

    Prenatal ultrasound is a powerful diagnostic tool, but there has been little research on how to teach ultrasound to family physicians. The available evidence supports teaching through didactics followed by supervised scanning. Didactic topics include physics and machine usage, indications, fetal biometry, anatomic survey, practice management, ethical issues, and resources. Supervised scanning reinforces the didactic components of training. A "hand-on-hand" supervised scanning technique is recommended for the transmission of psychomotor skills in these sessions. Curricula for teaching ultrasound should include information on which residents will be taught prenatal ultrasound, who will teach them, how to create time for learning ultrasound skills, and how to test for competency. The literature suggests that competency can be achieved within 25-50 supervised scans. Measures of competency include examination and qualitative analysis of scanning. Competency-based testing needs further development because no uniform standards have been established. PMID:14872356

  5. Family caregivers' perspectives on dementia-related dressing difficulties at home: The preservation of self model.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Diane F; LaRose, Sharon; Mahoney, Edward L

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's caregiving literature acknowledges dressing as a major daily stressor but research on this topic is negligible. A qualitative grounded theory approach was used to explore Alzheimer's family caregivers' perspectives about issues that arise when their family members lose the ability to dress independently. Three focus groups and seven individual interviews were conducted and audio recorded with 25 information rich caregivers. Constant comparative analyses and coding of the transcripts identified six major themes leading to a 'Preservation of Self Model: Care Recipient to Care Giver' that portrays the caregiving trajectory. Initially, caregivers tried to protect the self dignity of the family member by maintaining usual routines and absorbing blame for difficulties. Dressing 'battles' occurred and caregivers learned management through trial and error. Crossing adult-child-gender role boundaries escalated discomfort. When facing unrelenting demands, concern shifted to preservation of the caregivers' health and self. Results suggest that caregivers would benefit from more pro-active dressing counseling to shorten the trial and error periods, dressing aids more relevant to dementia and more knowledgeable helpers. The preservation model can facilitate understanding of the caregiving trajectory and guide intervention support. PMID:24339112

  6. Caregiver Positive and Negative Appraisals: Effects of the National Alliance on Mental Illness Family-to-Family Intervention.

    PubMed

    Toohey, Michael J; Muralidharan, Anjana; Medoff, Deborah; Lucksted, Alicia; Dixon, Lisa

    2016-02-01

    The 3-month-long Family-to-Family intervention (FTF) has been shown to increase empowerment, knowledge, and coping and to reduce distress among caregivers of people with serious mental illness. We sought to determine the influence of FTF on caregivers' appraisal of their caregiving experience. Family members of individuals with mental illness who sought enrollment in FTF (n = 318) were randomly assigned to FTF or a waitlist condition. Positive and negative appraisals were measured using the Experiences of Caregiving Inventory at baseline and 3 months later; 259 participants completed both assessments. Regression analyses found significant increases in positive appraisal but no significant decreases in negative appraisals for those in the FTF condition. In the context of overall benefits from taking FTF, these relationships reflect the FTF curriculum's emphasis on positive coping (e.g., strength and empowerment) and the potential value of strategies that help caregivers increase positive appraisal. PMID:26825266

  7. Family caregivers in public tertiary care hospitals in Bangladesh: Risks and opportunities for infection control

    PubMed Central

    Islam, M. Saiful; Luby, Stephen P.; Sultana, Rebeca; Rimi, Nadia Ali; Zaman, Rashid Uz; Uddin, Main; Nahar, Nazmun; Rahman, Mahmudur; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Gurley, Emily S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Family caregivers are integral to patient care in Bangladeshi public hospitals. This study explored family caregivers’ activities and their perceptions and practices related to disease transmission and prevention in public hospitals. Methods Trained qualitative researchers conducted a total of 48 hours of observation in 3 public tertiary care hospitals and 12 in-depth interviews with family caregivers. Results Family caregivers provided care 24 hours a day, including bedside nursing, cleaning care, and psychologic support. During observations, family members provided 2,065 episodes of care giving, 75% (1,544) of which involved close contact with patients. We observed family caregivers washing their hands with soap on only 4 occasions. The majority of respondents said diseases are transmitted through physical contact with surfaces and objects that have been contaminated with patient secretions and excretions, and avoiding contact with these contaminated objects would help prevent disease. Conclusion Family caregivers are at risk for hospital-acquired infection from their repeated exposure to infectious agents combined with their inadequate hand hygiene and knowledge about disease transmission. Future research should explore potential strategies to improve family caregivers’ knowledge about disease transmission and reduce family caregiver exposures, which may be accomplished by improving care provided by health care workers. PMID:24406254

  8. Does Expressive Writing Reduce Stress and Improve Health for Family Caregivers of Older Adults?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackenzie, Corey S.; Wiprzycka, Ursula J.; Hasher, Lynn; Goldstein, David

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: We examined whether written emotional disclosure reduces stress and improves health outcomes for family caregivers of physically frail and cognitively impaired older adults, as it has been shown to do for certain student and clinical populations. Design and Methods: Primary caregivers of older adults attending a day program were randomly…

  9. Relationships between Perceptions of Personal and Family Functioning, Defensive Functioning, and Working Models of Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Steven A.; And Others

    Current psychological literature suggests that positive representations of self and others are associated with sensitivity of caregiving. This study was designed to examine the relationship among self-perceptions, perceptions of family functioning, and caregiving schemata in 618 undergraduates (437 females, 181 males) enrolled in Introductory…

  10. 38 CFR 71.25 - Approval and designation of Primary and Secondary Family Caregivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... beneficiary travel under 38 CFR part 70. Respite care will be provided during the period of initial caregiver... as a Family Caregiver. (3) There must be no determination by VA of abuse or neglect of the eligible... training concerning the following core competencies: (1) Medication management; (2) Vital signs and...

  11. 38 CFR 71.25 - Approval and designation of Primary and Secondary Family Caregivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... beneficiary travel under 38 CFR part 70. Respite care will be provided during the period of initial caregiver... as a Family Caregiver. (3) There must be no determination by VA of abuse or neglect of the eligible... training concerning the following core competencies: (1) Medication management; (2) Vital signs and...

  12. 38 CFR 71.25 - Approval and designation of Primary and Secondary Family Caregivers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... beneficiary travel under 38 CFR part 70. Respite care will be provided during the period of initial caregiver... as a Family Caregiver. (3) There must be no determination by VA of abuse or neglect of the eligible... training concerning the following core competencies: (1) Medication management; (2) Vital signs and...

  13. Values and Preferences of Individuals with Dementia: Perceptions of Family Caregivers over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reamy, Allison M.; Kim, Kyungmin; Zarit, Steven H.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Cross-sectional evidence indicates that family caregivers reporting on the importance of daily care values and preferences of individuals with mild-to-moderate dementia consistently report less importance than individuals with dementia (IWDs) self-report. Discrepancy is primarily associated with caregivers' beliefs about…

  14. Family Caregiving: Impact of Patient Functioning and Underlying Causes of Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silliman, Rebecca A.; Sternberg, Josef

    1988-01-01

    Notes that diseases affect health and functional status of patients in different ways and have variable impacts on family caregivers. Using hip fracture, dementia, and stroke as examples, illustrates how physical, social, psychological, and cognitive disabilities place different demands on caregivers. (Author)

  15. Comparative Effects of Cognitive-Behavioral and Brief Psychodynamic Psychotherapies for Depressed Family Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher-Thompson, Dolores; Steffen, Ann M.

    1994-01-01

    Randomly assigned depressed family caregivers (n=66) of frail elderly relatives to 20 sessions of cognitive-behavioral (CB) or brief psychodynamic (PD) individual psychotherapy. At posttreatment, 71% of caregivers were no longer clinically depressed, with no differences found between two treatments. Found interaction between treatment modality and…

  16. HIPAA and talking with family caregivers: what does the law really say?

    PubMed

    Levine, Carol

    2006-08-01

    The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (PL 104-191), known as HIPAA, has confused and unnecessarily alarmed many conscientious health care providers. Nurses in particular are likely to be on the front line of family caregivers' inquiries, because physicians are often difficult to reach and because family caregivers look to nurses as sources of reliable information. A major retraining of health care providers at all levels is needed to dampen the "HIPAA scare" and clarify what HIPAA does and does not say about communication with family caregivers. PMID:16905933

  17. Family Economic Strengthening and Parenting Stress Among Caregivers of AIDS-Orphaned Children: Results from a Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nabunya, Proscovia; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Ilic, Vilma

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the impact of a family economic strengthening intervention on parenting stress among caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children in Uganda. The study uses data from a 4-year (2008-2012) NIMH randomized clinical trial for AIDS-orphaned children known as Suubi-Maka (N=346 dyads). Child-caregiver dyads from 10 comparable primary schools were randomly assigned to either the control group (n=167 dyads) receiving usual care for school-going orphaned children (such as food aid and scholastic materials) or the treatment group (n=179 dyads) receiving a family economic strengthening intervention (focused on a matched savings account), financial planning and management workshops over and above the usual care. Interviews were conducted at baseline, 12 months and 24 months follow-up. This study uses data from baseline and 24 months post-intervention. We use multivariate regression methods, controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. At 24 months, caregivers in the treatment group reported significantly lower levels of parenting stress compared to caregivers in the control group. Findings from this study point to the potential of a family economic strengthening intervention to improve caregiver’s psychosocial wellbeing and that of their families. We conclude that programs and policies aimed at improving the psychosocial wellbeing of families caring for AIDS-orphaned children may consider incorporating economic strengthening components in their programming to help support these kinds of families, caregivers of AIDS-orphaned children especially those residing in developing countries. PMID:25136142

  18. Caregiver Action Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... main content Caregiver Action Network Toggle navigation Toolbox Forum Volunteers Donate About Us Join National Family Caregivers ... for caring for a loved one Family Caregiver Forum Share and talk with other caregivers Rare Disease ...

  19. Barriers to mental health service use among distressed family caregivers of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mosher, C E; Given, B A; Ostroff, J S

    2015-01-01

    Although family caregivers of patients with lung and other cancers show high rates of psychological distress, they underuse mental health services. This qualitative study aimed to identify barriers to mental health service use among 21 distressed family caregivers of lung cancer patients. Caregivers had not received mental health services during the patient's initial months of care at a comprehensive cancer centre in New York City. Thematic analysis of interview data was framed by Andersen's model of health service use and Corrigan's stigma theory. Results of our analysis expand Andersen's model by providing a description of need variables (e.g. psychiatric symptoms), enabling factors (e.g. finances), and psychosocial factors associated with caregivers' non-use of mental health services. Regarding psychosocial factors, caregivers expressed negative perceptions of mental health professionals and a desire for independent management of emotional concerns. Additionally, caregivers perceived a conflict between mental health service use and the caregiving role (e.g. prioritising the patient's needs). Although caregivers denied stigma associated with service use, their anticipated negative self-perceptions if they were to use services suggest that stigma may have influenced their decision to not seek services. Findings suggest that interventions to improve caregivers' uptake of mental health services should address perceived barriers. PMID:24761985

  20. Clinical Evaluation in a Family Medicine Residency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, James M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    A study assessed (1) the validity of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine evaluation instrument regarding the occurrence of halo effects and (2) possible relationships between the faculty's evaluations of the residents and the residents' cognitive knowledge and productivity. (MLW)

  1. Families and Futures: Helping Self and Others. Starting a Healthy Family Series/Family and Community Health Through Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Development Center, Inc., Newton, MA.

    This student manual, part of the Family and Community Health Through Caregiving program, focuses on the special needs of teenagers with birth defects. Topics include: (1) the effect of informal contacts with the community, neighbors, and school age peers on the special needs adolescent; (2) society's attempts to meet these needs; (3) problems of…

  2. A Qualitative Study of Family Caregiver Experiences of Managing Incontinence in Stroke Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Ning; Huang, Guey-Shiun; Yu, Po-Jui; Lou, Meei-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background Incontinence is a common problem faced by family caregivers that is recognized as a major burden and predictor of institutionalization. However, few studies have evaluated the experiences of family caregivers caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. Purpose To describe experiences of caregivers managing incontinence in stroke survivors. Design This qualitative descriptive study employed a grounded-theory approach. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews with ten family caregivers of stroke survivors with incontinence were conducted during 2011. Audiotaped interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Findings Data analysis identified four themes: chaos, hypervigilance, exhaustion, and creating a new life. There were nine related subcategories: fluster, dirtiness, urgency, fear of potential health-hazard, physically demanding and time-consuming, mentally draining, financial burden, learning by doing, and attitude adjustment. Together, these described a process of struggling to cope with the care of stroke survivors with urinary/fecal incontinence. Of the four categories, “creating a new life” developed gradually over time to orient caregivers to their new life, while the other three categories occurred in a chronological order. Conclusion The research highlighted unique caring experiences of family caregivers of stroke patients, which focused solely on the ‘incontinence issue’. Understanding these experiences may help nurses provide better support and resources for family caregivers when caring for stroke survivors with incontinence. PMID:26066345

  3. Health Risk Behaviors in Family Caregivers During Patients’ Stay in Intensive Care Units: A Pilot Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, JiYeon; Hoffman, Leslie A.; Schulz, Richard; Ren, Dianxu; Donahoe, Michael P.; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies of family caregivers of the critically ill have mainly focused on the psychological impact of the patients’ stay in the intensive care unit and related stress. Despite known associations between stress and physical health, limited attention has been paid to the need to promote and maintain physical health in these caregivers. Objective To explore how family caregivers’ health risk behaviors are associated with patients’ preexisting care needs and the caregivers’ depressive symptoms and burden. Methods During the intensive-care-unit stay of critically ill patients (who required mechanical ventilation for ≥4 days), 50 family caregivers were surveyed to determine the caregivers’ depressive symptoms, burden, and health risk behaviors. Data were also collected on patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. Results One or more health risk behaviors were reported by 94% of family caregivers. More than 90% of caregivers reported depressive symptoms above the score indicating risk for clinical depression. A high level of burden was reported by 36% of caregivers. More health risk behaviors were associated with higher scores of depressive symptoms and burden (P<.001 for both). Caregivers’ responses did not differ according to patients’ preexisting care needs. Conclusion Health risk behaviors of family caregivers are associated with greater perceptions of burden and/or depressive symptoms but not with patients’ care needs before admission to the intensive care unit. PMID:23283087

  4. Caring for the brain tumor patient: Family caregiver burden and unmet needs

    PubMed Central

    Schubart, Jane R.; Kinzie, Mable B.; Farace, Elana

    2008-01-01

    The rapid onset and progression of a brain tumor, cognitive and behavioral changes, and uncertainty surrounding prognosis are issues well known to health practitioners in neuro-oncology. We studied the specific challenges that family caregivers face when caring for patients experiencing the significant neurocognitive and neurobehavioral disorders associated with brain tumors. We selected 25 family caregivers of adult brain tumor patients to represent the brain tumor illness trajectory (crisis, chronic, and terminal phases). Interviews documented caregiving tasks and decision-making and information and support needs. Themes were permitted to emerge from the data in qualitative analysis. We found that the family caregivers in this study provided extraordinary uncompensated care involving significant amounts of time and energy for months or years and requiring the performance of tasks that were often physically, emotionally, socially, or financially demanding. They were constantly challenged to solve problems and make decisions as care needs changed, yet they felt untrained and unprepared as they struggled to adjust to new roles and responsibilities. Because the focus was on the patient, their own needs were neglected. Because caregiver information needs are emergent, they are not always known at the time of a clinic visit. Physicians are frequently unable to address caregiver questions, a situation compounded by time constraints and cultural barriers. We provide specific recommendations for (1) improving the delivery of information; (2) enhancing communication among patients, families, and health care providers; and (3) providing psychosocial support for family caregivers. PMID:17993635

  5. Family caregiver quality of life in multiple sclerosis among Kuwaitis: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Alshubaili, Asmahan F; Ohaeri, Jude U; Awadalla, Abdel W; Mabrouk, Asser A

    2008-01-01

    Background Research interest in the quality of life (QOL) of persons with multiple sclerosis (MS) has been spurred by the need to broaden outcome measures. Far less of this interest has been directed at the family caregivers, who bear most of the burden of care. The objectives of the study were: First, to compare the subjective QOL of family caregivers of persons with relapsing remitting and progressive MS, with those of a matched general population sample and caregivers of diabetes and psychiatric patients. Second, to assess the relationship of QOL with caregiver attitudes to MS and patient's variables. Methods Consecutive MS clinic attendees were assessed with the 26 – item WHOQOL Instrument, and for depression and disability. Similarly, caregivers independently rated their own QOL as well as their impression of patients' QOL and attitudes to patients' illness. Results The 170 caregivers, mean age 35.7 years, had no significant diagnostic differences in QOL domain scores and attitudes to MS. Caregivers had significantly lower QOL than the general population control group for five out of six domains and the general facet (P < 0.01), but higher QOL than the patients. When the scores were corrected for patients' depression and disability, caregivers had similar QOL with the general population group for four domains. Using corrected scores, MS caregivers had lower scores than diabetic and psychiatric caregivers in the physical, psychological and social relations domains. Majority expressed negative attitudes to MS. Caregiver QOL was more affected by their fear of having MS than their feelings about the illness and caregiving role. Caregiver attitudes had mostly no significant impact on their proxy ratings of patients' QOL. The significant predictor of caregivers' overall QOL was their impression of patients' QOL. Conclusion Caregivers need specific attention if they are less educated, unemployed, afraid of having MS and caring for patients with longer duration of

  6. Perception Gap in Quality-of-Life Ratings: An Empirical Investigation of Nursing Home Residents and Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mittal, Vikas; Rosen, Jules; Govind, Rahul; Degenholtz, Howard; Shingala, Sunil; Hulland, Shelley; Rhee, YongJoo; Kastango, Kari B.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Castle, Nick; Rubin, Fred H.; Nace, David

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Several studies have previously documented the existence of a perception gap--the extent to which quality-of-life ratings provided by nursing home residents and caregivers diverge. In this study we use Helson's adaptation-level theory to investigate three types of antecedents: (a) focal factors, (b) background factors, and (c) residual…

  7. Stress in Family Practice Residents: An Exploratory Study Using Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julliard, Kell; Intilli, Nancy; Ryan, Jennifer; Vollmann, Sarah; Seshadri, Mahalakshmi

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the themes of 16 family practice residents' art work and their characteristics (age, gender, resident year, undergraduate training location) in relationship to stress. Residents' drawing were linked by common themes of psychological pressure, anxiety, a sense of being overwhelmed, and depression. Evidence of stress was more frequently…

  8. Morning Report in Family Medicine Residency Programs: A Descriptive Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuncharapu, Indumathi; Cass, Alvah R.; Carlson, Carol A.; Scott, Jack R.

    Morning Report (MR) is a frequently held case conference in most Family Medicine (FM) residency programs among medical learners who discuss recent inpatient admissions before the day's care of patients. This study conducted a national survey of FM residency program directors to describe the roles of faculty and residents in facilitating MR.…

  9. Parental psychopathology and treatment outcome for anxious youth: Roles of family functioning and caregiver strain

    PubMed Central

    Schleider, Jessica L.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Keeton, Courtney P.; Weisz, John R.; Birmaher, Boris; Kendall, Phillip C.; Piacentini, John; Sherrill, Joel; Walkup, John T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Research has examined the effects of parental psychopathology, family functioning, and caregiver strain on treatment response in anxious youths. Although these variables have shown individual links to youth treatment response, theoretical models for their combined effects remain unexplored. This study tested the hypothesis that improvements in family functioning and reductions in caregiver strain explained the effects of parental psychopathology on youth treatment outcome in an anxiety treatment trial. Method A multiple mediation technique was used to test the proposed model across independent evaluator (IE), parent, and youth informants in 488 youths, aged 7–17 years (50% female; mean age 10.7) meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for social phobia, separation anxiety, and/or generalized anxiety disorder. Youths were randomized to receive 12 weeks of cognitive-behavioral treatment (Coping Cat), medication (sertraline), their combination, or a pill placebo. At pre- and post-treatment, parents completed self-report measures of global psychopathology symptoms, family functioning, and caregiver strain; parents, youths, and IEs rated youths’ anxiety symptom severity. Results Changes in family functioning and caregiver strain jointly explained relations between parental psychopathology and reductions in youth anxiety. Specifically, across IE and parent informants, families with higher pre-treatment parental psychopathology showed more improvement in family functioning and caregiver strain, which in turn predicted greater youth anxiety reductions. Further, higher pre-treatment parental psychopathology predicted greater caregiver strain reductions, and in turn, greater youth anxiety reductions, based on youths’ reports of their own anxiety. Conclusions Findings suggest that improvements in family functioning and reductions in caregiver strain can influence treatment outcomes for anxious youths, especially among youths with more distressed parents. Public health

  10. Satisfaction and Difficulties of Korean Family Medicine Resident Training Faculty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Ha; Kim, Ju Young; Kwon, Kil Young; Lee, Chul-Min; Hyun, Seung Soo

    2013-01-01

    Background Practitioners of family medicine are essential to primary care practices in Korea. Resident training staffs in Korean family medicine departments have a crucial role in producing well-trained family physicians. This study assesses the aspects of satisfaction and difficulties of Korean family medicine resident training staffs. Methods We surveyed the resident training staffs of various Korean family medicine departments using an online survey tool. The survey used in this study was modified from previously used questionnaires. Respondents rated items using a five-point Likert scale and a 0-10 visual analogue scale. Results The response rate was 43.9% (122/278). The mean satisfaction score with regard to current family medicine residency programs was 7.59 out of 10. Resident training staffs found the administrative aspects of their role to be the most difficult. There were considerable differences in the reported difficulties of resident training according to the differing characteristics of each staff member, including age, sex, type of hospital, number of staff members, role as chief, and duration of staff. Most respondents (91.9%) cited a need for faculty development programs. Conclusion Korean family medicine resident training staffs need faculty development programs for the improvement of resident training. For the strengthening of core competencies among resident training staffs, faculty development programs or courses should be designed and implemented in Korea. PMID:24106588

  11. Caregiving Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... more likely than non-caregivers to live in poverty and five times more likely to receive Supplemental ... caregiving families. In every state and DC the poverty rate is higher among families with members with ...

  12. Normal versus Pathological Aging: Knowledge of Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beall, S. Colleen; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Family physicians may lack discriminatory ability to differentiate normal aging form disease states. To assess such ability, 53 aging-related indicators or symptoms were presented to 65 physicians in 3 family practice residency programs. Respondents classified each symptom as normal aging or disease. On average, residents classified 73.4% of…

  13. Characteristics of Combined Family Practice-Psychiatry Residency Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, James; Lacy, Timothy J.; Warner, Christopher H.; Whelchel, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate how family practice-psychiatry residency programs meet the challenges of rigorous accreditation demands, clinical supervision, and boundaries of practice. Method: A 54-question survey of program directors of family practice-psychiatry residency programs outlining program demographic data, curricula, coordination, resident…

  14. Recruiting and retaining family caregivers to a randomized controlled trial on mindfulness-based stress reduction.

    PubMed

    Whitebird, Robin R; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Lewis, Beth A; Hanson, Leah R; Crain, A Lauren; Enstad, Chris J; Mehta, Adele

    2011-09-01

    Caregivers for a family member with dementia experience chronic long-term stress that may benefit from new complementary therapies such as mindfulness-based stress reduction. Little is known however, about the challenges of recruiting and retaining family caregivers to research on mind-body based complementary therapies. Our pilot study is the first of its kind to successfully recruit caregivers for a family member with dementia to a randomized controlled pilot study of mindfulness-based stress reduction. The study used an array of recruitment strategies and techniques that were tailored to fit the unique features of our recruitment sources and employed retention strategies that placed high value on establishing early and ongoing communication with potential participants. Innovative recruitment methods including conducting outreach to health plan members and generating press coverage were combined with standard methods of community outreach and paid advertising. We were successful in exceeding our recruitment goal and retained 92% of the study participants at post-intervention (2 months) and 90% at 6 months. Recruitment and retention for family caregiver interventions employing mind-body based complementary therapies can be successful despite many challenges. Barriers include cultural perceptions about the use and benefit of complementary therapies, cultural differences with how the role of family caregiver is perceived, the use of group-based designs requiring significant time commitment by participants, and travel and respite care needs for busy family caregivers. PMID:21601010

  15. Associations between advanced cancer patients' survival and family caregiver presence and burden.

    PubMed

    Dionne-Odom, J Nicholas; Hull, Jay G; Martin, Michelle Y; Lyons, Kathleen Doyle; Prescott, Anna T; Tosteson, Tor; Li, Zhongze; Akyar, Imatullah; Raju, Dheeraj; Bakitas, Marie A

    2016-05-01

    We conducted a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of an early palliative care intervention (ENABLE: Educate, Nurture, Advise, Before Life Ends) for persons with advanced cancer and their family caregivers. Not all patient participants had a caregiver coparticipant; hence, we explored whether there were relationships between patient survival, having an enrolled caregiver, and caregiver outcomes prior to death. One hundred and twenty-three patient-caregiver dyads and 84 patients without a caregiver coparticipant participated in the ENABLE early versus delayed (12 weeks later) RCT. We collected caregiver quality-of-life (QOL), depression, and burden (objective, stress, and demand) measures every 6 weeks for 24 weeks and every 3 months thereafter until the patient's death or study completion. We conducted survival analyses using log-rank and Cox proportional hazards models. Patients with a caregiver coparticipant had significantly shorter survival (Wald = 4.31, HR = 1.52, CI: 1.02-2.25, P = 0.04). After including caregiver status, marital status (married/unmarried), their interaction, and relevant covariates, caregiver status (Wald = 6.25, HR = 2.62, CI: 1.23-5.59, P = 0.01), being married (Wald = 8.79, HR = 2.92, CI: 1.44-5.91, P = 0.003), and their interaction (Wald = 5.18, HR = 0.35, CI: 0.14-0.87, P = 0.02) were significant predictors of lower patient survival. Lower survival in patients with a caregiver was significantly related to higher caregiver demand burden (Wald = 4.87, CI: 1.01-1.20, P = 0.03) but not caregiver QOL, depression, and objective and stress burden. Advanced cancer patients with caregivers enrolled in a clinical trial had lower survival than patients without caregivers; however, this mortality risk was mostly attributable to higher survival by unmarried patients without caregivers. Higher caregiver demand burden was also associated with decreased patient survival. PMID:26860217

  16. Family-to-work spillover and appraisals of caregiving by employed women caring for their elderly parents in Japan

    PubMed Central

    SAKKA, Mariko; SATO, Iori; IKEDA, Mari; HASHIZUME, Hirofumi; UEMORI, Masayo; KAMIBEPPU, Kiyoko

    2016-01-01

    We examined the differences in family-to-work spillover between employed women who did and did not have caregiving responsibilities for elderly parents and the relationship between family-to-work spillover and negative and positive appraisals of caregiving using moderation analysis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with middle-aged employed women (age ≥40 years) from four large companies. Negative and positive family-to-work spillover (FWNS and FWPS, respectively) and negative and positive appraisals of caregiving were measured. Data from 386 non-caregivers and 82 caregivers were analyzed using Fisher’s exact tests, Welch’s t-tests, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results showed that FWNS was higher in caregivers than in non-caregivers, while there was no significant difference in FWPS. Caregiver “fulfillment from the caregiving role” (a subscale of positive appraisal) buffered the effects of caregiver “feelings of social restriction” (a subscale of negative appraisal) on FWNS. On the other hand, caregiver “commitment to caregiving tasks” (another positive subscale) intensified the effects of “feelings of social restriction” on FWNS. However, there was no relationship between negative and positive appraisals of caregiving and FWPS. These findings suggest that both negative and positive appraisals of caregiving are important contributors to FWNS among employed women caring for their parents. PMID:26829970

  17. Family-to-work spillover and appraisals of caregiving by employed women caring for their elderly parents in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakka, Mariko; Sato, Iori; Ikeda, Mari; Hashizume, Hirofumi; Uemori, Masayo; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2016-06-10

    We examined the differences in family-to-work spillover between employed women who did and did not have caregiving responsibilities for elderly parents and the relationship between family-to-work spillover and negative and positive appraisals of caregiving using moderation analysis. A cross-sectional survey was conducted with middle-aged employed women (age ≥40 years) from four large companies. Negative and positive family-to-work spillover (FWNS and FWPS, respectively) and negative and positive appraisals of caregiving were measured. Data from 386 non-caregivers and 82 caregivers were analyzed using Fisher's exact tests, Welch's t-tests, and hierarchical multiple regression. Results showed that FWNS was higher in caregivers than in non-caregivers, while there was no significant difference in FWPS. Caregiver "fulfillment from the caregiving role" (a subscale of positive appraisal) buffered the effects of caregiver "feelings of social restriction" (a subscale of negative appraisal) on FWNS. On the other hand, caregiver "commitment to caregiving tasks" (another positive subscale) intensified the effects of "feelings of social restriction" on FWNS. However, there was no relationship between negative and positive appraisals of caregiving and FWPS. These findings suggest that both negative and positive appraisals of caregiving are important contributors to FWNS among employed women caring for their parents. PMID:26829970

  18. Evaluating life in foster homes for persons with serious mental illness: Resident and caregiver perspectives

    PubMed Central

    PIAT, MYRA; RICARD, NICOLE; LESAGE, ALAIN

    2016-01-01

    Background In Montreal Canada, the majority of persons with serious mental illness discharged from psychiatric hospitals were placed into foster homes. Very little updated information exists on life in foster homes, and the level of autonomy allowed in this residential setting. Aims The purpose of the study was to elicit the foster home residents’ opinions about their lives in this setting and their caregiver’s perception of the level of autonomy allowed. Method Two questionnaires were administered to 102 foster home residents and their caregivers: (1) Patient Attitude Questionnaire and (2) Hospital and Hostel Practices Profile Survey. Results Consumers are satisfied living in this type of milieu and do not desire to change their housing. The foster home provides residents with a sense of security and well being. Foster homes rank second in terms of autonomy when compared to hospitals and hostels. Only supported apartments rank higher. Conclusion These findings shed a new light on this type of residential milieu. Over time the structure of foster homes has evolved. This study points to the need to value the opinions of consumers and not force people to move onto other types of housing. PMID:27182124

  19. Putting theory to the test: Examining family context, caregiver motivation, and conflict in the Family Check-Up model

    PubMed Central

    Fosco, Gregory M.; Van Ryzin, Mark; Stormshak, Elizabeth A.; Dishion, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined contextual factors (caregiver depression, family resources, ethnicity, and initial levels of youth problem behavior) related to the effectiveness of the Family Check-Up (FCU) and evaluated family processes as a mediator of FCU intervention response and adolescent antisocial behavior. We followed a sample of 180 ethnically diverse youths of families who engaged in the FCU intervention. Family data were collected as part of the FCU assessment, and youth data were collected over 4 years, from sixth through ninth grade. Findings indicated that caregiver depression and minority status predicted greater caregiver motivation to change. In turn, caregiver motivation was the only direct predictor of FCU intervention response during a 1-year period. Growth in family conflict from sixth through eighth grade mediated the link between FCU response and ninth-grade antisocial behavior. This study explicitly tested core aspects of the FCU intervention model and demonstrated that caregiver motivation is a central factor that underlies family response to the FCU. The study also provided support for continued examination of family process mechanisms that account for enduring effects of the FCU and other family-centered interventions. PMID:24438894

  20. Putting theory to the test: examining family context, caregiver motivation, and conflict in the Family Check-Up model.

    PubMed

    Fosco, Gregory M; Van Ryzin, Mark; Stormshak, Elizabeth A; Dishion, Thomas J

    2014-05-01

    This study examined contextual factors (caregiver depression, family resources, ethnicity, and initial levels of youth problem behavior) related to the effectiveness of the Family Check-Up (FCU) and evaluated family processes as a mediator of FCU intervention response and adolescent antisocial behavior. We followed a sample of 180 ethnically diverse youths of families who engaged in the FCU intervention. Family data were collected as part of the FCU assessment, and youth data were collected over 4 years, from sixth through ninth grade. Findings indicated that caregiver depression and minority status predicted greater caregiver motivation to change. In turn, caregiver motivation was the only direct predictor of FCU intervention response during a 1-year period. Growth in family conflict from sixth through eighth grade mediated the link between FCU response and ninth-grade antisocial behavior. This study explicitly tested core aspects of the FCU intervention model and demonstrated that caregiver motivation is a central factor that underlies family response to the FCU. The study also provided support for continued examination of family process mechanisms that account for enduring effects of the FCU and other family-centered interventions. PMID:24438894

  1. Differences in the Experience of Caregiver Strain between Families Caring for Youth with Substance Use Disorders and Families of Youth with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heflinger, Craig Anne; Brannan, Ana Maria

    2006-01-01

    This study examined caregiver strain (i.e., burden of care, caregiver burden) among families of adolescents in treatment for substance abuse disorders compared to youth with mental health problems. We used descriptive and regression analyses to compare groups and to examine the youth and family variables associated with caregiver strain across the…

  2. Linking family cohesion and flexibility with expressed emotion, family burden and psychological distress in caregivers of patients with psychosis: A path analytic model.

    PubMed

    Koutra, Katerina; Simos, Panagiotis; Triliva, Sofia; Lionis, Christos; Vgontzas, Alexandros N

    2016-06-30

    The present study aimed to evaluate a path analytic model accounting for caregivers' psychological distress that takes into account perceived family cohesion and flexibility, expressed emotion and caregiver's burden associated with the presence of mental illness in the family. 50 first-episode and 50 chronic patients diagnosed with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (most recent episode manic severe with psychotic features) recruited from the Inpatient Psychiatric Unit of the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece, and their family caregivers participated in the study. Family functioning was assessed in terms of cohesion and flexibility (FACES-IV), expressed emotion (FQ), family burden (FBS) and caregivers' psychological distress (GHQ-28). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the direct and indirect effects of family dynamics on caregivers' psychological distress. The results showed that neither family cohesion nor family flexibility exerted significant direct effects on caregivers' psychological distress. Instead, the effect of flexibility was mediated by caregivers' criticism and family burden indicating an indirect effect on caregivers' psychological distress. These results apply equally to caregivers of first episode and chronic patients. Family interventions aiming to improve dysfunctional family interactions by promoting awareness of family dynamics could reduce the burden and improve the emotional well-being of family caregivers. PMID:27085666

  3. [Family caregivers and health promotion. Pilot study to validate a German assessment to survey resources and risks of elderly family caregivers (ARR)].

    PubMed

    Budnick, A; Kummer, K; Blüher, S; Dräger, D

    2012-04-01

    The ARR is a German assessment instrument to survey physical and psychological resources and risks of elderly family caregivers (50+). Factor structure, reliability, and validity were investigated using a sample of 202 caregivers from a national health insurance company. The factorial validity was confirmed for the physical profile (PHP) and the psychological profile (PSP). Reliability is good (PHP: Cronbach's α=0.73; PSP: Cronbach's α=0.71) for the shortness of the profiles. The correlation with self-efficacy constitutes an indicator for construct validity. The psychometric qualities allow the conclusion that the ARR is a reliable and valid instrument which is of interest for family caregivers. Nevertheless, further testing of validity is required. PMID:22311698

  4. Perception of social support among family caregivers of vegetative patients: A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Noohi, Esmat; Peyrovi, Hamid; Imani Goghary, Zahra; Kazemi, Majid

    2016-04-01

    A vegetative state (VS) is the probable result after brain damage. After VS patients are discharged from the hospital, the responsibility of caring of them is transferred to their families, which impacts a caregiver's physical and psychological health. Social support as a valuable resource reduces the negative effects of stressful events. This study aimed to explore the perception of social support among family caregivers of VS patients. This study is a part of a larger qualitative study which used the descriptive and qualitative method. Purposeful and theoretical sampling was done, and data was gathered through face-to-face, in-depth interviews. The four categories of "Family, a supporter in all aspects," "Beautiful emanation of the nurse's role," "Revitalization via empathy and companionship," and "Defects in support," were extracted. The primary concern of participants was receiving social support which can facilitate caregiving and coping with difficulties, but there are many shortcomings in supporting these caregivers. PMID:26942650

  5. Family Responsibility and Caregiving in the Qualitative Analysis of the Alzheimer's Disease Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gubrium, Jaber F.

    1988-01-01

    Presents field data to examine family responsibility in caring for Alzheimer's disease patients. Addresses features of social comparison, issue contingency, family history, and kinship priority. Argues that qualitative analysis offers empirical lessons about family responsibility and caregiver functioning untaught by other methods. (Author)

  6. Multiple Family Groups for Child Behavior Difficulties: Retention Among Child Welfare-Involved Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gopalan, Geetha; Fuss, Ashley; Wisdom, Jennifer P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The Multiple Family Group (MFG) service delivery model to reduce childhood disruptive behavior disorders has shown promise in engaging child welfare-involved families. This qualitative study examines caregivers' perceptions of factors that influence retention in MFGs among child welfare-involved families. Methods: Twenty-five…

  7. Impact of family caregiving by youth on their psychological well-being: a latent trait analysis.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Donna; Greene, Jennifer A; Toyinbo, Peter A; Siskowski, Constance T

    2012-07-01

    Secondary data analyses were conducted on a survey dataset from 1,281 middle school students to analyze the impact of family caregiving on self-reports of psychological well-being using the Multiple Indicators, Multiple Causes (MIMIC) model. Factor analysis resulted in four latent factors underlying psychological functioning, and the MIMIC model revealed significant caregiver effects on three factors: anxiety/depression, engaged coping, and disengaged coping, but not life satisfaction. Youth caregivers, especially those living with the care recipient, reported significantly higher anxiety/depression and a greater use of both coping styles compared to non-caregivers. Caregiving has a negative influence on the emotional well-being of youth with dual student-caregiver roles. The utilization of more coping strategies may reflect needing to try many approaches to school/family stressors because supports and experience are limited. Research to clarify how caregiving mediates the behavioral health and academic success of youth and also impacts care recipients and the family is warranted. PMID:22382804

  8. Perceived Challenges in Dementia Care by Vietnamese Family Caregivers and Care Workers in South Australia.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lily Dongxia; Habel, Lesley; De Bellis, Anita

    2015-09-01

    The majority of Vietnamese Australians migrated to Australia as refugees to escape a war and this unique migration background may affect their ability to access and utilize healthcare services in Australia. Inability to utilize dementia services is associated with higher levels of caregiver burden, higher rates of morbidities and mortality and hospitalization. The aim of the study was to explore the perceived challenges of dementia care from Vietnamese family caregivers and Vietnamese care workers. Gadamer's philosophical hermeneutics was used to interpret and describe the experiences of the participants. Data were collected from in-depth interviews with six Vietnamese family caregivers and a focus group with Vietnamese care workers using purposive sampling. Participants were recruited from a Vietnamese community care organization in South Australia. Five themes were identified from the data analysis namely: (1) a need for culturally and linguistically appropriate dementia education programs; (2) a willingness and unwillingness to seek help; (3) poor knowledge of health care service availability related to dementia; (4) the effect of language barrier in accessing services; and (5) the main sources of services utilized. The study revealed that Vietnamese family caregivers and Vietnamese care workers held different views on the association of stigma with dementia. Findings also revealed factors that impacted accessing and utilizing dementia services. These findings facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of Vietnamese family caregivers' needs and have implications for developing individualized support for family caregivers and for consumer-directed dementia services in Australia. PMID:25935206

  9. Pain Reports by Older Hospice Cancer Patients and Family Caregivers: The Role of Cognitive Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Rebecca S.; Haley, William E.; Small, Brent J.; McMillan, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Prior research in nursing homes has shown that cognitive impairment may reduce self-reported pain, but this relation has not been systematically explored among hospice patients. The assessment and treatment of pain is a primary goal of hospice care, and both disease processes and the use of opioid analgesics may lead to cognitive impairment among hospice patients. However, little is known about how cognitive functioning may impact the self-report of pain or the report of care recipient pain by family caregivers. Design and Methods We explored the associations between pain, cognitive functioning, and gender among cancer patients and their family caregivers (N = 176 dyads) during in-home hospice care. This was a cross-sectional, correlational study. Results Contrary to expectation, care recipients with cognitive impairment reported more intense pain than care recipients with intact cognitive functioning. However, cognitive impairment among care recipients had no impact on the pain report of family caregivers. Care recipient cognitive impairment was related to greater discrepancy in the pain reports of caregivers and care recipients. No gender differences in pain intensity report were found. Implications Measurement issues and implications for assessing self-reported pain among hospice cancer patients with impaired cognitive functioning and the report of care recipient pain by family caregivers are discussed. Specifically, hospice staff must educate family caregivers regarding the potential impact of care recipient cognitive impairment on pain reports in order to facilitate accurate pain assessment and management. PMID:12145378

  10. Informational needs and related problems of family caregivers of heart failure patients: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Masoud; Etemadifar, Shahram; Shahriari, Mohsen; Farsani, Alireza Khosravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is incurable disease and patients often have an ongoing decline once diagnosed. The symptoms of heart failure may impair the ability of patient to perform activities of daily living. As heart failure progresses, patients normally increase their reliance on family caregivers. Aims: This paper explored the informational needs and related problems of family caregivers of heart failure patients as a part of the findings of a study exploring experiences of family caregivers in the caregiving situation. Setting and Design: Using a qualitative design, 19 family caregivers from three educational hospitals in Isfahan, Iran, were recruited. Materials and Methods: Participants were selected by purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed concurrently. Results: Four major themes were emerged from the analysis of the transcripts: “Lack of care-related knowledge”, “Inaccessibility to responsible source of information”, “Lack of guidance from healthcare team” and “caring with ambiguity due to unpredictable nature of the disease”. Caregivers believed that they did not have the basic knowledge related to disease and medication administration. They received little guidance and support from the health care team on the caregiving roles. They experienced high level of ambiguity and stress in caregiving tasks due to lack of care-related knowledge and unpredictable nature of disease. Conclusion: The care, which was performed by the caregivers of HF patients, is beyond of their knowledge, capabilities, and resources. Nurses and other healthcare providers can use the findings of this study to develop effective educational and supportive programs to facilitate these needs. PMID:25540786

  11. Intervention to improve social and family support for caregivers of dependent patients: ICIAS study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the existence of formal professional support services, informal support (mainly family members) continues to be the main source of eldercare, especially for those who are dependent or disabled. Professionals on the primary health care are the ideal choice to educate, provide psychological support, and help to mobilize social resources available to the informal caregiver. Controversy remains concerning the efficiency of multiple interventions, taking a holistic approach to both the patient and caregiver, and optimum utilization of the available community resources. .For this reason our goal is to assess whether an intervention designed to improve the social support for caregivers effectively decreases caregivers burden and improves their quality of life. Methods/design Design: Controlled, multicentre, community intervention trial, with patients and their caregivers randomized to the intervention or control group according to their assigned Primary Health Care Team (PHCT). Study area: Primary Health Care network (9 PHCTs). Study participants: Primary informal caregivers of patients receiving home health care from participating PHCTs. Sample: Required sample size is 282 caregivers (141 from PHCTs randomized to the intervention group and 141 from PHCTs randomized to the control group. Intervention: a) PHCT professionals: standardized training to implement caregivers intervention. b) Caregivers: 1 individualized counselling session, 1 family session, and 4 educational group sessions conducted by participating PHCT professionals; in addition to usual home health care visits, periodic telephone follow-up contact and unlimited telephone support. Control: Caregivers and dependent patients: usual home health care, consisting of bimonthly scheduled visits, follow-up as needed, and additional attention upon request. Data analysis Dependent variables: Caregiver burden (short-form Zarit test), caregivers’ social support (Medical Outcomes Study), and

  12. Responsibility and burden from the perspective of seniors’ family caregivers: a qualitative study in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Li; Zhu, Xiaoping; Meng, Xianmei; Mao, Yafen; Wu, Qian; Shi, Yan; Zhou, Lanshu

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to explore the experience of seniors’ family caregivers with regarding the responsibility, burden and support needs during caregiving in Shanghai, China. Materials and methods: An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative design was used and a semi-structure interview was conducted. A convenience sample of 11 participants in two community service centers in Shanghai was recruited. Data saturation guided the size of the sample. The Colaizzi method of empirical phenomenology was used for interviewing and analyzing data obtained from 11 caregivers. Results: Three major themes were found: It is a hard work; It is my responsibility; Social support is not enough. Conclusion: The findings of the study are practical and helpful for health care providers to develop appropriate caregiver support services, to balance the responsibility and burden of caregivers, and to consider the factors influencing the utility of support services. PMID:25126186

  13. Comparative outcomes of two distance-based interventions for male caregivers of family members with dementia.

    PubMed

    Gant, Judith R; Steffen, Ann M; Lauderdale, Sean A

    2007-01-01

    Data are presented on a preliminary study investigating the efficacy of 2 distance-based psychosocial interventions (N = 32) for male family dementia caregivers. Male caregivers were randomly assigned to either a basic education intervention (ie, educational booklet and biweekly check-in telephone calls) or a video intervention (ie, set of 10 videos, an accompanying workbook, and weekly telephone coaching sessions using behavioral strategies to manage challenging caregiving situations). Results did not support the greater efficacy of the video condition in reducing psychosocial distress (eg, negative affect, upset and annoyance following behavior problems) or increasing positive affect or caregiving self-efficacy. There was, however, a statistically significant effect for postintervention improvement in both the video/coaching and the educational booklet/check-in conditions. Potential reasons for the lack of differential treatment effects are discussed, along with implications for recruitment of male dementia caregivers. PMID:17545139

  14. A Buberian approach to the co-construction of relationships between professional caregivers and residents in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Westerhof, Gerben J; van Vuuren, Mark; Brummans, Boris H J M; Custers, Annette F J

    2014-06-01

    This article demonstrates the value of a Buberian approach to relationships between professional caregivers and residents in nursing homes. Extant research on relationships between professional caregivers and residents typically distinguishes between task-centered and person-centered communication yet tends to privilege either the perspective of professionals or residents. To address this issue, we develop an approach that addresses the co-construction of I-It and I-Thou relationships, based on Martin Buber's social existentialist philosophy. In turn, we show the merit of this approach by using it to analyze interactional data from an observational study on morning care in Dutch nursing homes. As these examples illustrate, our analytical perspective is useful because it highlights how different caregiver-resident relationships are co-created and unfold over time. Thus, by revealing how these relationships are worked out in everyday interactions through subtle shifts between task-centered and person-centered communicative practices, this article offers important insights for improving the quality of care in nursing homes. PMID:23840020

  15. The Impact of Caregiver-Care Recipient Relationship Quality on Family Caregivers of Women with Substance-Use Disorders or Co-Occurring Substance and Mental Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz-Saltzman, Shiri; Biegel, David E.; Townsend, Aloen

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study utilized a stress-process model to examine the impact of caregivers' (N = 82) perceptions of their relationship quality with a female family member (i.e., care-recipient) with substance-use or co-occurring substance and mental disorders on caregivers' perceived burden. Regression findings indicate that relationship…

  16. Value of a regional family practice residency training program site

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Sarah; Mullett, Jennifer; Beerman, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the perceptions of residents, nurses, and physicians about the effect of a regional family practice residency site on the delivery of health services in the community, as well as on the community health care providers. Design Interviews and focus groups were conducted. Setting Nanaimo, BC. Participants A total of 16 residents, 15 nurses, and 20 physicians involved with the family practice residency training program at the Nanaimo site. Methods A series of semistructured interviews and focus groups was conducted. Transcripts of interviews and focus groups were analyzed thematically by the research team. Main findings Overall, participants agreed that having a family practice residency training site in the community contributed to community life and to the delivery of health services in the following ways: increased community capacity and social capital; motivated positive relationships and attitudes in the hospital and community settings; improved communication and teamwork, as well as accessibility and understanding of the health care system; increased the standard of care; and facilitated the recruitment and retention of family physicians. Conclusion This family practice residency training site was beneficial for the community it served. Future planning for distributed medical education sites should take into account the effects of these sites on the health care community and ensure that they continue to be positive influences. Further research in this area could focus on patients’ perceptions of how residency programs affect their care, as well as on the effect of residency programs on wait times and workload for physicians and nurses. PMID:25217693

  17. Characterization of Apathy in Persons with Frontotemporal Dementia and The Impact on Family Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Merrilees, Jennifer; Dowling, Glenna A.; Hubbard, Erin; Mastick, Judy; Ketelle, Robin; Miller, Bruce L

    2012-01-01

    This study characterized daytime activity and apathy in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) and semantic dementia (SD) and their family caregivers. Twenty-two patient-caregiver dyads were enrolled,13 bvFTD and 9 SD.Data were collected on behaviors and movement. Patients and caregivers wore Actiwatches for 2 weeks to record activity. We predicted that bvFTD patients would show greater caregiver report of apathy and less daytime activity than patients diagnosed with SD. Findings: Patients with bvFTD spent 25% of their day immobile while patients with SD spent 16% of their day inactive. BvFTD caregivers spent 11% of their day immobile and SD caregivers 9%. Apathy was described as present in 100% of the patients with bvFTD and in all but one patient with SD, the severity of apathy was greater in bvFTD compared to SD. Apathy correlated with caregiver emotional distress in both groups. In conclusion, apathy has been defined as a condition of diminished motivation that is difficult to operationalize. Among patients with FTD, apathy was associated with lower levels of activity, greater number bouts of immobility and longer immobility bout duration. Apathy and diminished daytime activity appeared to have an impact on the caregiver. Objective measures of behavioral output may help in formulation of a more precise definition of apathy. PMID:22261729

  18. Family medicine residency training and burnout: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Kimberly; Oda, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Background Almost three-quarters of family practice residents in British Columbia (BC) meet criteria for burnout. We sought to understand how burnout is perceived and experienced by family medicine residents, and to identify both contributory and protective factors for resident burnout. Method Two semi-structured focus groups were conducted with ten family practice residents from five distinct University of British Columbia training sites. Participants completed the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The data were analyzed using a thematic analysis approach. Results Seventy percent of the focus group participants met criteria for burnout using the MBI. The experience of burnout was described as physical and emotional exhaustion, loss of motivation, isolation from loved ones, and disillusionment with the medical profession. Contributory factors included high workload, burned-out colleagues, perceived undervaluing of family medicine, lack of autonomy, and inability to achieve work-life balance. Protective factors included strong role models in medicine, feeling that one’s work is valued and rotations in family medicine. Conclusions The high level of burnout in family medicine residents in BC is a multifactorial and complex phenomenon. Training programs and faculty should be aware of burnout risk factors and strive to implement changes to reduce burnout, including allowing residents increased control over scheduling, access to counseling services and training for resident mentors. PMID:26451218

  19. Exploring Spirituality in Family Caregivers of Patients With Primary Malignant Brain Tumors Across the Disease Trajectory

    PubMed Central

    Newberry, Alyssa G.; Jean Choi, Chien-Wen; Donovan, Heidi S.; Schulz, Richard; Bender, Catherine; Given, Barbara; Sherwood, Paula

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To determine whether the perceived level of spirituality in family caregivers of patients with primary malignant brain tumors (PMBTs) changes across the disease trajectory. Design Ongoing descriptive, longitudinal study. Setting Southwestern Pennsylvania. Sample 50 family caregivers of patients with PMBT. Methods Caregivers and care recipients were recruited at time of diagnosis. Participants were interviewed at two subse-quent time points, four and eight months following diagnosis. Main Research Variables Care recipients’ symptoms, neuro-psychologic status, and physical function, as well as caregiver social support. Findings Results showed no significant difference in spirituality scores reported at baseline and eight months (p = 0.8), suggesting that spirituality may be a stable trait across the disease trajectory. Conclusions Spirituality remains relatively stable along the course of the disease trajectory. Reports of caregiver depressive symptoms and anxiety were lower when paired with higher reports of spirituality. Implications for Nursing Clinicians can better identify caregivers at risk for negative outcomes by identifying those who report lower levels of spirituality. Future interventions should focus on the development and implementation of interventions that provide protective buffers such as increased social support. Knowledge Translation Spirituality is a relatively stable trait. High levels of spirituality can serve as a protective buffer from negative mental health outcomes. Caregivers with low levels of spirituality may be at risk for greater levels of burden, anxiety, and stress. PMID:23615145

  20. Impaired autonomic nervous system activity during sleep in family caregivers of ambulatory dementia patients in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Shihomi; Onishi, Joji; Hirai, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    The number of dementia patients requiring care is rapidly increasing in Japan. Consequently, a large percentage of family members, including spouses and children of those with dementia, are assuming the role of primary caregiver. Many caregivers develop health problems including sleep disorders. Some report poor quality of sleep even when sleep duration is normal. In the present study, we used actigraphy and heart rate variability spectral analysis to assess autonomic nervous system activity and quality of sleep in family caregivers of people with ambulatory dementia. The 20 caregivers who participated in our study exhibited significantly higher levels of sympathetic nervous system activity during sleep than noncaregivers. This abnormal activity was most prominent during the first half of the sleep period and was not related to overall sleep duration. We propose that relaxation is inhibited during the first half of the sleep period in this caregiver population. This may be due to increased stress, as caregivers of people with ambulatory dementia may worry about their patients waking and wandering at night, potentially injuring themselves. Our findings indicate a need for increased support for caregivers of people with dementia, including the assessment and treatment of sleep disorders. PMID:25504947

  1. Caring for family members with chronic physical illness: A critical review of caregiver literature

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jung-won; Zebrack, Brad

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews 19 studies (1987–2004) on quality of life for family caregivers helping those with chronic physical illness. Here we explore the concepts of and instruments used to measure caregivers' quality of life. We were particularly interested in understanding stress-related variables and documenting factors influencing quality of life based on family stress theory. Findings show that various positive and negative terms equated with quality of life were used to measure them. Results indicate that stress-related variables as possible predictors influencing caregivers' quality of life include: patient and caregiver characteristics, stressors, stress appraisal, stress coping methods, and social support. Our recommendations touch upon applying theory for intervention, developing measurement, making operable the concepts for measuring, and the need for longitudinal and comprehensive study. PMID:15377384

  2. Family burdens, Chinese health beliefs, and the mental health of Chinese caregivers in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Wong, Daniel Fu Keung; Tsui, Helen Kam Pui; Pearson, Veronica; Chen, Eric Yu Hai; Chiu, Siu Ning

    2004-12-01

    This study explored the types of family burdens, mental health and Chinese health beliefs of Chinese caregivers with relatives suffering from a serious mental illness. It also examined the impacts of these beliefs on caregivers' burdens and mental health. A structured questionnaire was administered to 125 Chinese caregivers in out-patient clinics in Hong Kong. Measures included distress (General Health Questionnaire), family burdens and belief in traditional Chinese medicine. Family burdens exerted a significant impact on the mental health of caregivers. Significant differences were found between believers and non-believers of traditional Chinese medical beliefs in terms of financial burdens, disruptions to family interactions and decline in physical health. No [corrected] moderating effect of Chinese health beliefs on family burdens and mental health was found. The lack of a moderating effect of health belief on family burdens may be related to caregivers' changes in perspectives from a traditional Chinese cultural perspective to a psychosocial and personality perspective. Implications for research and service development are discussed. PMID:15709648

  3. Longitudinal Analysis of Resourcefulness, Family Strain, and Depressive Symptoms in Grandmother Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Musil, Carol; Jeanblanc, Alexandra; Burant, Christopher; Zauszniewski, Jaclene; Warner, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Background Grandmothers living with grandchildren face stressors that may increase depressive symptoms, but cognitive-behavioral strategies, such as resourcefulness, may reduce the effects of stressors on mental health. Purpose This analysis examined the contemporaneous and longitudinal relationships among intra-family strain, resourcefulness and depressive symptoms in 240 grandmothers, classified by caregiving status to grandchildren. Methods Grandmothers raising grandchildren, grandmothers living in multigenerational homes, and non-caregivers to grandchildren reported on intra-family strain, resourcefulness, and depressive symptoms using mailed questionnaires at three time points over five years. Structural equation modeling was used to evaluate the mediating effects of resourcefulness and the relationships between variables. Discussion Grandmother caregiver status had significant effects on depressive symptoms and intra-family strain, but not resourcefulness. At all waves, higher resourcefulness was associated with fewer depressive symptoms, which reduced appraisals of intra-family strain. Conclusions Interventions focused on strengthening resourcefulness could reduce depressive symptoms over time. PMID:23756496

  4. Family caregiver perspectives on caring for ventilator-assisted individuals at home

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rachael; Catapano, Michael; Brooks, Dina; Goldstein, Roger; Avendano, Monica

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The trend of patients who are invasively ventilated to prefer home care is one that benefits both the patient and the health care system. However, this assumes a role for patients’ family members to become informal caregivers. OBJECTIVE: To explore the impact of caring for a ventilator-assisted individual on informal caregivers. METHODS: A descriptive design with semistructured caregiver interviews and the Caregiver Burden Inventory were used. Participants were informal caregivers of a family member with a progressive neuromuscular disease on invasive ventilation for at least six months. Transcript coding was performed and regularly reviewed, and recruitment continued until data saturation. Qualitative analysis was based on ‘thematic analysis’. RESULTS: A total of 21 caregivers were interviewed. Five themes developed: a sense of duty; restriction of day-to-day life; physical and emotional burden; training and education; and the need for more paid support. Caregivers described a sense of duty to take care of loved ones, but suffered a significant restriction of their own time with a negative impact on their physical and mental health. The initial transfer home was highlighted as the most stressful part of the process. The Caregiver Burden Inventory scores supported a high level of burden: median 49 (interquartile range 39.5 to 53.0) of a maximum 96. CONCLUSION: Homecare for ventilator-assisted individuals with progressive neuromuscular disease causes significant burden to informal care-givers. Approaches to lessen this burden, such as increased paid care, improved professional support and respite care, may enable home ventilation to be a more sustainable modality of care. PMID:23248801

  5. Correlates of Burnout Among Family Practice Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemkau, Jeanne P.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A study of burnout among 67 residents in four programs found little relationship between burnout scores and situational and background factors, but numerous relationships were found among personality measures, burnout scores, and measures of regret about career choice, indicating the importance of interpersonal skills and comfort in mitigating…

  6. Family caregivers: a shadow workforce in the geriatric health care system?

    PubMed

    Bookman, Ann; Harrington, Mona

    2007-12-01

    Based on two years of fieldwork, conducted between March 2003 and March 2005 in the health care industry of the northeastern United States, this study shows that the work of family caregivers of elders goes far beyond previously recognized care in the home to acknowledge care inside health care facilities and in conjunction with community services. It reveals that family caregivers--untrained, undersupported, and unseen--constitute a "shadow workforce," acting as geriatric case managers, medical record keepers, paramedics, and patient advocates to fill dangerous gaps in a system that is uncoordinated, fragmented, bureaucratic, and often depersonalized. Detailed examination of what family caregivers actually do in traversing multiple domains reveals the extent of their contribution to and the weaknesses in the present geriatric health care system. It suggests that the experiences of family caregivers must be central to the creation of new policies and a more coordinated system that uses the complex work of family caregivers by providing the training and support that they need. PMID:18000158

  7. [Support for cancer caregivers during the palliative, hospice, and bereavement phases: the role of family physicians].

    PubMed

    Oshiro, Hisako; Oshiro, Tatsuo; Tanimizu, Masahito

    2014-12-01

    The family caregivers of cancer patients are at an increased risk of physical and mental morbidity. The purpose of this study is to capture the needs of the caregivers before and during the years after the loss of the patient. A survey was conducted among 229 consecutive advanced cancer patients in our family clinic. Seventy percent of the patients died in their homes, the median overall survival was 15.1 months, and the median survival time was 3 months from the beginning of the coordination with oncologists. While 28%of the patients received the best possible supportive care alone and 50%of them were admitted after the cessation of chemotherapy, in 22%of the patients, the coordination with oncologists began during the chemotherapy phase. During times of active cancer treatment, the caregivers were provided with various types of support from the family physicians. In the post-death bereavement phase, 124 caregivers were admitted to our family care clinic. The family physician can play an important role in aiding the caregivers during the palliative, hospice, and bereavement phases. PMID:25595070

  8. Schizophrenia in Malaysian families: A study on factors associated with quality of life of primary family caregivers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Schizophrenia is a chronic illness which brings detrimental effects in the caregivers' health. This study was aimed at highlighting the socio-demographic, clinical and psychosocial factors associated with the subjective Quality of Life (QOL) of Malaysian of primary family caregivers of subjects with schizophrenia attending an urban tertiary care outpatient clinic in Malaysia. Methods A cross-sectional study was performed to study patient, caregiver and illness factors associated with the QOL among 117 individuals involved with caregiving for schizophrenia patients. The study used WHOQOL-BREF to assess caregivers' QOL and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) to assess the severity of patients' symptoms. Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS) assessed the stress level due to life events. Results The mean scores of WHOQOL-BREF in physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were 66.62 (14.36), 61.32 (15.52), 62.77 (17.33), 64.02 (14.86) consecutively. From multiple regression analysis, factors found to be significantly associated with higher QOL were higher educational level among caregivers in social and environmental domains; caregivers not having medical problem/s in physical and psychological domains; later onset and longer illness duration of illness in social domains; patients not attending day care program in environmental domain; lower BPRS score in physical and environmental domains. SRRS score of caregivers was also found to have a significant negative correlation with QOL in environmental and psychological domains. Other factors were not significantly associated with QOL. Conclusion Caregivers with more social advantages such as higher educational level and physically healthier and dealing with less severe illness had significantly higher QOL in various aspects. Supporting the caregivers in some of these modifiable factors in clinical practice is important to achieve their higher level QOL. PMID:21651770

  9. Caregivers of Children with Sexual Behavior Problems: Psychological and Familial Functioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pithers, William D.; Gray, Alison; Busconi, Aida; Houchens, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Families of 72 children with sexual behavior problems completed a structured interview and psychometric measures. Caregivers manifested stresses across many variables including income, criminal arrest, family violence, sexual abuse, social support, modulation of emotion, and attachment to the child. Foster parents consistently reported lower…

  10. The Impact of Intellectual Disability, Caregiver Burden, Family Functioning, Marital Quality, and Sense of Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Krenawi, Alean; Graham, John R.; Al Gharaibeh, Fakir

    2011-01-01

    The present article is the first to consider the impact of intellectual disability on Bedouin-Arab families' caregiver burden, family functioning, marital quality, and sense of coherence. A random sample of 300 Bedouin-Arab parents with one or more intellectually disabled children, and a control group (n = 100) completed the McMaster Family…