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1

Lipoprotein(a): A Promising Marker for Residual Cardiovascular Risk Assessment  

PubMed Central

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, although optimal medical therapy has been prescribed for primary and secondary preventions. Residual cardiovascular risk for some population groups is still considerably high although target low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) level has been achieved. During the past few decades, compelling pieces of evidence from clinical trials and meta-analyses consistently illustrate that lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is a significant risk factor for atherosclerosis and CVD due to its proatherogenic and prothrombotic features. However, the lack of effective medication for Lp(a) reduction significantly hampers randomized, prospective, and controlled trials conducting. Based on previous findings, for patients with LDL-C in normal range, Lp(a) may be a useful marker for identifying and evaluating the residual cardiovascular risk, and aggressively lowering LDL-C level than current guidelines' recommendation may be reasonable for patients with particularly high Lp(a) level.

Cai, Anping; Li, Liwen; Zhang, Ying; Mo, Yujin; Mai, Weiyi; Zhou, Yingling

2013-01-01

2

Cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making.

Payne, Rupert A

2012-01-01

3

Molecular sources of residual cardiovascular risk, clinical signals, and innovative solutions: relationship with subclinical disease, undertreatment, and poor adherence: implications of new evidence upon optimizing cardiovascular patient outcomes  

PubMed Central

Residual risk, the ongoing appreciable risk of major cardiovascular events (MCVE) in statin-treated patients who have achieved evidence-based lipid goals, remains a concern among cardiologists. Factors that contribute to this continuing risk are atherogenic non-low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particles and atherogenic processes unrelated to LDL cholesterol, including other risk factors, the inherent properties of statin drugs, and patient characteristics, ie, genetics and behaviors. In addition, providers, health care systems, the community, public policies, and the environment play a role. Major statin studies suggest an average 28% reduction in LDL cholesterol and a 31% reduction in relative risk, leaving a residual risk of about 69%. Incomplete reductions in risk, and failure to improve conditions that create risk, may result in ongoing progression of atherosclerosis, with new and recurring lesions in original and distant culprit sites, remodeling, arrhythmias, rehospitalizations, invasive procedures, and terminal disability. As a result, identification of additional agents to reduce residual risk, particularly administered together with statin drugs, has been an ongoing quest. The current model of atherosclerosis involves many steps during which disease may progress independently of guideline-defined elevations in LDL cholesterol. Differences in genetic responsiveness to statin therapy, differences in ability of the endothelium to regenerate and repair, and differences in susceptibility to nonlipid risk factors, such as tobacco smoking, hypertension, and molecular changes associated with obesity and diabetes, may all create residual risk. A large number of inflammatory and metabolic processes may also provide eventual therapeutic targets to lower residual risk. Classically, epidemiologic and other evidence suggested that raising high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol would be cardioprotective. When LDL cholesterol is aggressively lowered to targets, low HDL cholesterol levels are still inversely related to MCVE. The efflux capacity, or ability to relocate cholesterol out of macrophages, is believed to be a major antiatherogenic mechanism responsible for reduction in MCVE mediated in part by healthy HDL. HDL cholesterol is a complex molecule with antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-thrombotic, antiplatelet, and vasodilatory properties, among which is protection of LDL from oxidation. HDL-associated paraoxonase-1 has a major effect on endothelial function. Further, HDL promotes endothelial repair and progenitor cell health, and supports production of nitric oxide. HDL from patients with cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and autoimmune disease may fail to protect or even become proinflammatory or pro-oxidant. Mendelian randomization and other clinical studies in which raising HDL cholesterol has not been beneficial suggest that high plasma levels do not necessarily reduce cardiovascular risk. These data, coupled with extensive preclinical information about the functional heterogeneity of HDL, challenge the “HDL hypothesis”, ie, raising HDL cholesterol per se will reduce MCVE. After the equivocal AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides: Impact on Global Health Outcomes) study and withdrawal of two major cholesteryl ester transfer protein compounds, one for off-target adverse effects and the other for lack of efficacy, development continues for two other agents, ie, anacetrapib and evacetrapib, both of which lower LDL cholesterol substantially. The negative but controversial HPS2-THRIVE (the Heart Protection Study 2-Treatment of HDL to Reduce the Incidence of Vascular Events) trial casts further doubt on the HDL cholesterol hypothesis. The growing impression that HDL functionality, rather than abundance, is clinically important is supported by experimental evidence highlighting the conditional pleiotropic actions of HDL. Non-HDL cholesterol reflects the cholesterol in all atherogenic particles containing apolipoprotein B, and has outperformed LDL cho

Kones, Richard

2013-01-01

4

Residual Cardiovascular Risk Despite Optimal LDL-Cholesterol Reduction with Statins: The Evidence, Etiology, and Therapeutic Challenges  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review This review captures the existence, cause, and treatment challenges of residual cardiovascular risk (CVR) after aggressive low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction. Recent findings Scientific evidence implicates low high-density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-C) and high triglycerides (TG) in the CVR observed after LDL-C lowering. However, the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) lipid trial with fenofibrate, the Investigation of Lipid Level Management to Understand its Impact in Atherosclerotic Events (ILLUMINATE) study with torcetrapib, and the recently terminated Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL Cholesterol/High Triglyceride and Impact on Global Health Outcomes (AIM-HIGH) study with niacin, do not clearly attribute risk reduction value to HDL-C/TG modulation. Summary The optimum approach to long-term lipid-modifying therapies for CVR reduction remains uncertain. Consequently, absolute risk modulation via lifestyle changes remains the centerpiece of a strategy addressing the physiological drivers of CVR associated with HDL-C/TG, especially in the context of diabetes/metabolic syndrome.

Sampson, Uchechukwu K.; Fazio, Sergio; Linton, MacRae F.

2013-01-01

5

Comparison of atorvastatin, pitavastatin and rosuvastatin for residual cardiovascular risk using non-fasting blood sampling.  

PubMed

Abstract Background: Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major cardiovascular risk. However, some patients show symptoms of coronary heart disease (CHD) even though their LDL-C is strictly controlled. Therefore, it is important to treat other risk factors. Methods: Some 129 outpatients with dyslipidemia who were treated with either atorvastatin 10 mg/day (ATO), pitavastatin 2 mg/day (PIT), or rosuvastatin 2.5 mg/day (ROS) were enrolled. After informed consent was obtained, these patients were switched to another statin. Lipid profiles and lipoprotein fraction by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were compared between before and after 3 months of treatment with non-fasting blood sample. Results: LDL-C did not show any significant changes after switching and was maintained around 2.59 mmol/L in all groups. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly increased in group ATO?PIT (1.43?1.54 mmol/L, p = 0.0010) and ROS?PIT (1.46?1.57 mmol/L, p = 0.0004), and was significantly decreased in group PIT?ATO (1.44?1.36 mmol/L, p = 0.0290). Apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I) and preheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mass showed similar changes in HDL-C. Changes in HDL-C showed a significant positive correlation with those in Apo A-I and preheparin LPL mass, and a little but significant negative correlation with changes in Lp(a) and intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) fraction. Conclusions: ATO, PIT, and ROS have comparable effect on LDL-C lowering. Changes in HDL-C were similar to those in Apo A-I and preheparin LPL mass, and PIT was the most effective treatment in increasing HDL-C, Apo A-I, and preheparin LPL mass. PMID:24564634

Kakuda, Hirokazu; Matoba, Munetoshi; Nakatoh, Hideaki; Nagao, Shin; Takekoshi, Noboru

2014-06-01

6

Firefighters' cardiovascular risk behaviors.  

PubMed

Cardiac events are strongly associated with line-of-duty deaths among firefighters. The frequency with which firefighters succumb to cardiovascular events while on duty is well documented. Many firefighters have undiagnosed or undertreated hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity, as well as poor dietary habits and marginal physical fitness. Extremely high heart rates while engaged in fire suppression increase the risk for cardiovascular risk within the fire service. Cultural factors such as shift work and crew cohesion create multiple levels of influence on firefighters' decisions about engaging in positive health behaviors. This review highlights the significance of primordial and primary prevention of cardiovascular diseases that is culturally congruent with the fire service. PMID:24571052

Banes, Catherine J

2014-01-01

7

Microalbuminuria and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Microalbuminuria is a marker for generalized vascular dysfunction. Its prevalence in United States and European general population surveys ranges from 6% to 10%. Increased risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality begins with albumin excretion rates that are well within normal limits. Although microalbuminuria interacts with the traditional cardiovascular risk factors, it has an independent relationship to renal and cardiovascular outcomes. For example, microalbuminuria doubles the risk for a cardiovascular event in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus even after adjusting for the usual risk factors. Elevated rates of urinary albumin excretion predict target organ damage, notably renal disease, but are also related to left ventricular dysfunction, stroke, and myocardial infarction. Screening for microalbuminuria, which is recommended by several expert committees and associations, has become a readily accessible procedure. Screening can give clinicians prognostic information concerning cardiovascular risk and assist in guiding therapy. The goal of treatment is to prevent progression of, and even to reverse, microalbuminuria. Abundant evidence demonstrates that antihypertensive therapy is an important key to the control of urinary albumin excretion, and blockade of the renin-angiotensin system (with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers) is the treatment of choice. These drugs have successfully halted or delayed the progression to nephropathy and have reversed elevated rates of albumin excretion to normal values, even when blood pressure reduction has been minimal. PMID:15485765

Karalliedde, Janaka; Viberti, Giancarlo

2004-10-01

8

Testosterone and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular (CV) disease is one of the most common causes of death in the western populations and, nowadays, its incidence is increasing even in the developing countries; although CV disease affects both sexes, it is more frequent in males in whom it shortens the average life expectancy. In this regard, this difference has been wrongly attributed for many years to the negative effects of testosterone (T); however, nowadays, a large amount of evidence suggests that this hormone may have protective effects on the CV system and that, indeed, the low levels of T could be associated with an increased CV risk and with an augmentation of morbidity and mortality in males. Such an aspect gains great relevance in light of the consideration that T decrease, besides occurring as a consequence of rare pathological conditions, can often take place with natural aging, causing a state of "male menopause", also called late-onset hypogonadism. In this review, we aimed to summarize the present state of the art concerning the association between T deficit and CV disease by analyzing the protective role of T on CV system and the relationship of this hormonal lack with metabolic syndrome, CV morbidity and mortality, and with the CV complications, such as ischemic heart disease, heart failure and stroke, that frequently occur in T deficiency. PMID:23475207

Tirabassi, Giacomo; Gioia, Angelo; Giovannini, Lara; Boscaro, Marco; Corona, Giovanni; Carpi, Angelo; Maggi, Mario; Balercia, Giancarlo

2013-04-01

9

Managing the residual cardiovascular disease risk associated with HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides in statin-treated patients: a clinical update.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a significant cause of death in Europe. In addition to patients with proven CVD, those with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at a particularly high-risk of CVD and associated mortality. Treatment for dyslipidaemia, a principal risk factor for CVD, remains a healthcare priority; evidence supports the reduction of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) as the primary objective of dyslipidaemia management. While statins are the treatment of choice for lowering LDL-C in the majority of patients, including those with T2D, many patients retain a high CVD risk despite achieving the recommended LDL-C targets with statins. This 'residual risk' is mainly due to elevated triglyceride (TG) and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels. Following statin therapy optimisation additional pharmacotherapy should be considered as part of a multifaceted approach to risk reduction. Fibrates (especially fenofibrate) are the principal agents recommended for add-on therapy to treat elevated TG or low HDL-C levels. Currently, the strongest evidence of benefit is for the addition of fenofibrate to statin treatment in high-risk patients with T2D and dyslipidaemia. An alternative approach is the addition of agents to reduce LDL-C beyond the levels attainable with statin monotherapy. Here, addition of fibrates and niacin to statin therapy is discussed, and novel approaches being developed for HDL-C and TG management, including cholesteryl ester transfer protein inhibitors, Apo A-1 analogues, mipomersen, lomitapide and monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9, are reviewed. PMID:23932901

Reiner, Z

2013-09-01

10

HIV and General Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is increasing in HIV-infected people. Risk factors such as hyperlipidemia, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance have become common. CVD in HIV may also be related to non-traditional risk factors including accumulation of visceral fat, inflammation secondary to HIV, and effects of some antiretroviral drugs. This cross-sectional study described the CVD risk factors of 123 adults living with HIV and calculated the 10-year estimate for general cardiovascular risk score. Results showed that approximately 25% of the participants were considered to be at high risk for developing CVD in the next 10 years. Increased waist circumference and longer duration of smoking habit were associated with elevated general cardiovascular risk scores. Similar to the general population, most of the identified risks could be modified through lifestyle management.

Capili, Bernadette; Anastasi, Joyce K.; Ogedegbe, Olugbenga

2011-01-01

11

Cardiovascular risk factors and dementia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia, are disorders of aging populations and represent a significant economic burden. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors may be instrumental in the development of dementia.Objective: The goal of this review was to discuss the relationship between specific CVD risk factors and dementia and how current

Howard Fillit; David T. Nash; Tatjana Rundek; Andrea Zuckerman

2008-01-01

12

Carotenoids and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Fruits and vegetables (typically associated with the Mediterranean diet) are very rich in carotenoids, i.e. fat-soluble pigments really important in human life. Structurally, carotenoids consists of eleven (beta-carotene, zeaxanthin, lycopene) or ten (alpha-carotene, lutein) conjugated double bonds, responsible for their antioxidant capability in agreement with their substituents. Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) particles oxidation process is the one of the most important first steps of atherosclerotic disease and, consequentially, the first pathogenetical step of cerebro- and cardiovascular events like myocardial infarction and stroke, which are the first cause of death in industrialized countries. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) also seem to be the target of Carotenoids main action, by scavenging singlet oxygen (1O2) and free radicals. Literature data showed that ROS increase atherosclerotic individual burden. The carotenoids scavenging action could reduce atherosclerosis progression partly due to such a decrease in ROS concentrations. Many studied demonstrated such a reduction by analyzing the relationship between carotenoids and Intima-Media Thickness of common carotid artery wall (CCA-IMT), [a well established marker of atherosclerosis evolution] reduction. Aim of this review is to evaluate actual knowledge about the importance of carotenoids molecules in slowing down the starting and the progression of atherosclerotic plaque, and to consider their implementation in everyone's diet as a tool to obtain a sharp decrease of LDL oxidation and their possible effect on endothelial function. PMID:22747421

Giordano, Paola; Scicchitano, Pietro; Locorotondo, Manuela; Mandurino, Cosimo; Ricci, Gabriella; Carbonara, Santa; Gesualdo, Michele; Zito, Annapaola; Dachille, Annamaria; Caputo, Paola; Riccardi, Roberta; Frasso, Giulia; Lassandro, Giuseppe; Di Mauro, Antonio; Ciccone, Marco Matteo

2012-01-01

13

Anabolic steroids and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Recent reports from needle exchange programmes and other public health initiatives have suggested growing use of anabolic steroids (AS) in the UK and other countries. Data indicate that AS use is not confined to body-builders or high-level sportsmen. Use has spread to professionals working in emergency services, casual fitness enthusiasts and subelite sportsmen and women. Although the precise health consequences of AS use is largely undefined, AS use represents a growing public health concern. Data regarding the consequences of AS use on cardiovascular health are limited to case studies and a modest number of small cohort studies. Numerous case studies have linked AS use with a variety of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events or endpoints, including myocardial infarction, stroke and death. Large-scale epidemiological studies to support these links are absent. Consequently, the impact of AS use upon known CVD risk factors has been studied in relatively small, case-series studies. Data relating AS use to elevated blood pressure, altered lipid profiles and ECG abnormalities have been reported, but are often limited in scope, and other studies have often produced equivocal outcomes. The use of AS has been linked to the appearance of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy as well as endothelial dysfunction but the data again remains controversial. The mechanisms responsible for the negative effect of AS on cardiovascular health are poorly understood, especially in humans. Possibilities include direct effects on myocytes and endothelial cells, reduced intracellular Ca2+ levels, increased release of apoptogenic factors, as well as increased collagen crosslinks between myocytes. New data relating AS use to cardiovascular health risks are emerging, as novel technologies are developed (especially in non-invasive imaging) that can assess physiological structure and function. Continued efforts to fully document the cardiovascular health consequences of AS use is important to provide a clear, accurate, public health message to the many groups now using AS for performance and image enhancement. PMID:22229259

Angell, Peter; Chester, Neil; Green, Danny; Somauroo, John; Whyte, Greg; George, Keith

2012-02-01

14

Water Chemistry and Cardiovascular Disease Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic stu...

A. P. Watson E. A. Zeighami

1985-01-01

15

C-reactive protein: associations with haematological variables, cardiovascular risk factors and prevalent cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

C-reactive protein (CRP) has been proposed as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease; however, this association is confounded by mutual relationships with both classical and haematological cardiovascular risk factors. We, therefore, measured CRP with a high-sensitivity assay in stored plasma samples from 414 men and 515 women in the north Glasgow MONICA (MONItoring trends in CArdiovascular diseases) survey, to study its correlation with haematological variables, classical risk factors and prevalent cardiovascular disease. CRP correlated with age, oral contraceptive use, menopause and most classical cardiovascular risk factors (except blood pressure). CRP also correlated with plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 6, and haematocrit, viscosity, red cell aggregation, white cell count, and coagulation factors [fibrinogen, factor (F) VII in women, FVIII, FIX] and inhibitors (antithrombin and protein C in women; protein S) but not coagulation activation markers. CRP was significantly associated with prevalent cardiovascular disease in both men (P = 0.03) and women (P = 0.009), however, the association became non-significant after adjustment for firstly classical risk factors, then fibrinogen. We conclude that correlations with classical and haematological risk factors account for a substantial component of the association of CRP with prevalent cardiovascular disease, but there is evidence of a residual, independent effect among women. PMID:12823355

Woodward, Mark; Rumley, Ann; Lowe, Gordon D O; Tunstall-Pedoe, Hugh

2003-07-01

16

Cardiovascular risk and atherosclerosis prevention.  

PubMed

Until recently, coronary artery disease (CAD) was the leading cause of death in the developed countries. Its remarkable decline can be attributed to our knowledge of the major risk factors identified by several studies resulting in better prevention and treatment. Of the major risk factors, the ratio of apolipoprotein (apo) B/apo A1 followed by smoking, diabetes, and hypertension are the most important. A number of risk scores for men and women are now available to estimate the likelihood of development of CAD. However, because of the risk of CAD differs in various populations, some of the algorithms are more appropriate for some countries but not suitable for others. These risk assessment algorithms differ in the parameters they use. All the risk scores have some limitations such as different study populations; the age of the study is also different, and number of points awarded for age categories also differs among the various algorithms. In an effort to further improve the risk prediction, a number of biomarkers have been studied. In addition to plasma lipids, a lot of interest has focused on apo measurements; particularly of apo B. Another valuable biomarker is lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)]. Lp(a) is not only atherogenic as low-density lipoprotein (LDL) but also prothrombotic, and several studies indicate that Lp(a) is an independent risk factor for CAD. The lipid profile provides a framework for appropriate management. This includes therapeutic lifestyle changes and medications. Lifestyle interventions are the cornerstone of CAD prevention strategies and are the first step in risk factor management. Of particular importance are smoking cessation, achievement and maintenance of ideal body weight, regular exercise, reduction in the intake of saturated fat and sugars, and decreasing level of stress. Of medications, lipid-lowering, anti-hypertensive, and anti-coagulant can be effectively used. The current strategies for risk assessment and prevention have been very successful contributing to the more than 50% decrease in CAD mortality over the last 20 years. Thus, in Canada, cardiovascular disease is no longer the leading cause of death. PMID:22502868

Frohlich, Jiri; Al-Sarraf, Ahmad

2013-01-01

17

Cardiovascular risk and subclinical cardiovascular disease in polycystic ovary syndrome.  

PubMed

In addition to its effects on reproductive health, it is now well recognized that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a metabolic disorder, characterized by decreased insulin sensitivity which leads to an excess lifetime risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PCOS patients are often obese, hypertensive, dyslipidemic and insulin resistant; they have obstructive sleep apnea and have been reported to have higher aldosterone levels in comparison to normal healthy controls. These are all components of an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. Many studies exploring subclinical atherosclerosis using different methods (flow-mediated dilatation, intima media thickness, arterial stiffness, coronary artery calcification) as well as assessing circulating cardiovascular risk markers, point toward an increased cardiovascular risk and early atherogenesis in PCOS. The risk and early features of subclinical atherosclerosis can be reversed by non-medical (normalization of weight, healthy lifestyle) and medical (metformin, thiazolidinediones, spironolactone, and statins) interventions. However, the long-term risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as well as the clinical significance of different interventions still need to be properly addressed in a large prospective study. PMID:24002406

Bajuk Studen, Katica; Jensterle Sever, Mojca; Pfeifer, Marija

2013-01-01

18

Cardiovascular risk factors among Chamorros  

PubMed Central

Background Little is known regarding the cardiovascular disease risk factors among Chamorros residing in the United States. Methods The Chamorro Directory International and the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Questionnaire (BRFSS) were used to assess the health related practices and needs of a random sample of 228 Chamorros. Results Inactivity, hypertension, elevated cholesterol and diabetes mellitus were more prevalent in this Chamorro sample compared to the US average. Participants who were 50-and-older or unemployed were more likely to report hypertension, diabetes and inactivity, but they were also more likely to consume more fruits and vegetables than their younger and employed counterparts. Women were more likely to report hypertension and diabetes, whereas men were more likely to have elevated BMI and to have never had their blood cholesterol checked. Conclusion The study provides data that will help healthcare providers, public health workers and community leaders identify where to focus their health improvement efforts for Chamorros and create culturally competent programs to promote health in this community.

Chiem, Binh; Nguyen, Victoria; Wu, Phillis L; Ko, Celine M; Cruz, Lee Ann; Sadler, Georgia Robins

2006-01-01

19

Emergent Biomarkers of Residual Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Low HDL-c and/or High Triglycerides and Average LDL-c Concentrations: Focus on HDL Subpopulations, Oxidized LDL, Adiponectin, and Uric Acid  

PubMed Central

This study intended to determine the impact of HDL-c and/or TGs levels on patients with average LDL-c concentration, focusing on lipidic, oxidative, inflammatory, and angiogenic profiles. Patients with cardiovascular risk factors (n = 169) were divided into 4 subgroups, combining normal and low HDL-c with normal and high TGs patients. The following data was analyzed: BP, BMI, waist circumference and serum glucose, Total-c, TGs, LDL-c, oxidized-LDL, total HDL-c and HDL subpopulations, paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, hsCRP, uric acid, TNF-?, adiponectin, VEGF, and iCAM1. The two populations with increased TGs levels, regardless of the normal or low HDL-c, presented obesity and higher waist circumference, Total-c, LDL-c, Ox-LDL, and uric acid. Adiponectin concentration was significantly lower and VEGF was higher in the population with cumulative low values of HDL-c and high values of TGs, while HDL quality was reduced in the populations with impaired values of HDL-c and/or TGs, viewed by reduced large and increased small HDL subfractions. In conclusion, in a population with cardiovascular risk factors, low HDL-c and/or high TGs concentrations seem to be associated with a poor cardiometabolic profile, despite average LDL-c levels. This condition, often called residual risk, is better evidenced by using both traditional and nontraditional CV biomarkers, including large and small HDL subfractions, Ox-LDL, adiponectin, VEGF, and uric acid.

Mascarenhas-Melo, Filipa; Sereno, Jose; Freitas, Isabel; Isabel-Mendonca, Maria; Pinto, Rui; Teixeira, Frederico

2013-01-01

20

Addressing cardiovascular disease risk in diabetes: insights from mechanistic studies  

PubMed Central

Subjects with diabetes have increased cardiovascular disease risk compared to those without diabetes. Addressing residual cardiovascular disease risk in this disease, beyond blood pressure and LDL cholesterol control, remains important as the prevalence of diabetes increases worldwide. The accelerated atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease in diabetes is likely multifactorial and there are numerous therapeutic approaches that can be considered. Results of mechanistic studies conducted in isolated cells, animals, or humans can provide important insights with potential to influence clinical management decisions and improve outcomes. In this review, we focus on three areas in which pathophysiologic considerations could be particularly informative in this regard; the roles of hyperglycemia, diabetic dyslipidemia (beyond LDL cholesterol level), and inflammation (including that in adipose tissue) for accelerating vascular injury and the rates of cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetes are outlined and evaluated.

Mazzone, Theodore; Chait, Alan; Plutzky, Jorge

2009-01-01

21

Obesity, obstructive sleep apnea, and cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, the number one killer of Americans. It is also a major risk factor\\u000a for obstructive sleep apnea, which is rising in the US population as the obesity epidemic continues. Obstructive sleep apnea,\\u000a in turn, has been implicated as a risk factor for hypertension, glucose dysregulation, and cardiovascular disease. Understanding\\u000a the pathophysiologic

Muhammad Iqbal; Syed Shah; Sonalis Fernandez; Jocelyne Karam; Girardin Jean-Louis; Samy I. McFarlane

2008-01-01

22

Cardiovascular risk factor investigation: a pediatric issue  

PubMed Central

Objectives To correlate cardiovascular risk factors (e.g., hypertension, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycemia, sedentariness) in childhood and adolescence with the occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Sources A systematic review of books and selected articles from PubMed, SciELO and Cochrane from 1992 to 2012. Summary of findings Risk factors for atherosclerosis are present in childhood, although cardiovascular disease arises during adulthood. This article presents the main studies that describe the importance of investigating the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases in childhood and their associations. Significant rates of hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and sedentariness occur in children and adolescents. Blood pressure needs to be measured in childhood. An increase in arterial blood pressure in young people predicts hypertension in adulthood. The death rate from cardiovascular disease is lowest in children with lower cholesterol levels and in individuals who exercise regularly. In addition, there is a high prevalence of sedentariness in children and adolescents. Conclusions Studies involving the analysis of cardiovascular risk factors should always report the prevalence of these factors and their correlations during childhood because these factors are indispensable for identifying an at-risk population. The identification of risk factors in asymptomatic children could contribute to a decrease in cardiovascular disease, preventing such diseases as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia from becoming the epidemics of this century.

Rodrigues, Anabel N; Abreu, Glaucia R; Resende, Rogerio S; Goncalves, Washington LS; Gouvea, Sonia Alves

2013-01-01

23

Precaution, cyclooxygenase inhibition, and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular risk led to the withdrawal of Vioxx (rofecoxib) in 2004. Some related drugs also increase cardiovascular risk and cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors that remain on the market, including unselective non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), have not been exonerated. This article reviews if new evidence should change clinical and regulatory practice. Substantial COX-2 inhibition increases the incidence of cardiovascular disease unless concomitant platelet thromboxane production is inhibited by >95%. This can be investigated using whole blood assays, an approach used recently to show that acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a COX-2-selective inhibitor. The epidemiology available suggests acetaminophen, though readily available over-the-counter, does increase cardiovascular risk. Current evidence is inadequate to recommend many potential alternatives to Vioxx as safe. We argue that the precautionary principle, 'first do no harm', should underpin the regulation and prescribing of NSAIDs. Labelling which identifies these risks for prescribers and consumers should be mandatory. PMID:19762092

Ritter, James M; Harding, Idris; Warren, John B

2009-10-01

24

Myeloperoxidase, a Risk Indicator for Cardiovascular Disease.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Diagnostic tests for characterizing an individual's risk of developing or having a cardiovascular disease. In one embodiment the present diagnostic test comprises determining the level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in a bodily sample obtained from the...

R. Zhang S. Hazen

2005-01-01

25

Novel serologic markers of cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

New serologic markers of cardiovascular risk continue to be amassed. Among the new markers, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen,\\u000a and homocysteine have enjoyed the most acceptance, but newer concepts such as inflammatory cytokines, aspirin resistance,\\u000a and antioxidant deficiency continue to emerge. Traditional cardiac risk factors are able to predict less than half of cardiovascular\\u000a events, and the new array of markers have

Guilherme H. M. Oliveira

2005-01-01

26

Reductions in Cardiovascular Risk After Bariatric Surgery  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Obesity is commonly associated with multiple conditions imparting adverse cardiovascular risk including, hypertension, dyslipidemia and insulin resistance or diabetes. In addition, sleep disordered breathing, inflammation, left ventricular hypertrophy, left atrial enlargement and subclinical left ventricular systolic and diastolic dysfunction may collectively contribute to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This review will describe improvements in cardiovascular risk factors after bariatric surgery. Recent findings All of the cardiovascular risk factors listed above are improved or even resolved after bariatric surgery. Cardiac structure and function also have shown consistent improvement after surgically-induced weight loss. The amount of improvement in cardiac risk factors is generally proportional to the amount of weight lost. The degree of weight loss varies with different bariatric procedures. Based on the improvement in risk profiles, it has been predicted that progression of atherosclerosis could be slowed and the 10 year risk of cardiac events would decline by ~ 50% in patients undergoing weight loss surgery. In keeping with these predictions, 2 studies have demonstrated reductions in 10-year total and cardiovascular mortality of approximately 50% in patients who had bariatric surgery. Summary These encouraging data support the continued, and perhaps expanded use of surgical procedures to induce weight loss in severely obese patients.

Benraoune, Fethi; Litwin, Sheldon E.

2012-01-01

27

Risk factors and cardiovascular disease in Turkey  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular risk factors as well as morbidity and mortality from coronary heart disease among Turkish adults are herein reviewed. Lipids and lipoproteins are in focus, but other relevant risk factors are also discussed. Turks have distinctively low levels of total and high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, associated with high levels of hepatic lipase and fasting triglycerides. In addition, physical inactivity is common

Altan Onat

2001-01-01

28

Cardiovascular disease risk in women with migraine  

PubMed Central

Background Studies suggest a higher prevalence of unfavourable cardiovascular risk factors amongst migraineurs, but results have been conflicting. The aim of this study was to investigate traditional and newly recognized risk factors as well as other surrogate markers of cardiovascular risk in obese and normal weight women with migraine. Methods Fifty-nine adult female probands participated in this case–control study. The sample was divided into normal weight and obese migraineurs and age- and body mass index-matched control groups. The following cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed: serum levels of lipids, fasting glucose, and insulin; insulin resistance; blood pressure; smoking (categorized as current, past or never); Framingham 10-year risk of general cardiovascular disease score; C-reactive protein; family history of cardiovascular disease; physical activity; sleep disturbances; depression; and bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The means of continuous variables were compared using Student’s t-test for independent samples or the Mann–Whitney U-test (for 2 groups) and ANOVA or the Kruskal-Wallis test (for 4 groups) depending on the distribution of data. Results All migraineurs were sedentary irrespective of nutritional status. Migraineurs had higher depression scores and shorter sleep duration, and obese migraineurs, in particular, had worse sleep quality scores. Insulin resistance and insulinaemia were associated with obesity, and obese migraineurs had lower HDL-c than normal weight controls and migraineurs. Also, the Framingham risk score was higher in obese migraineurs. Conclusion These findings suggest that female migraineurs experience marked inactivity, depression, and some sleep disturbance, that higher insulin resistance and insulinaemia are related to obesity, and that obesity and migraine probably exert overlapping effects on HDL-c levels and Framingham 10-year cardiovascular risk.

2013-01-01

29

Sleep disturbance and cardiovascular risk in adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background: Evidence suggests that inadequate or disturbed sleep is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in adults. There are limited data on sleep quality and associated cardiovascular risk in children. Methods: We obtained data on adolescents from the 2009/10 cycle of the Healthy Heart Schools’ Program, a population-based cross-sectional study in the Niagara region of Ontario. Participants underwent measurements of cardiometabolic risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), lipid profile and blood pressure, and they completed questionnaires measuring sleeping habits and nutritional status. We assessed sleep disturbance using the sleep disturbance score derived from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. We explored associations between sleeping habits and cardiovascular risk factors. Results: Among 4104 adolescents (51% male), the mean hours of sleep per night (± standard deviation) were 7.9 ± 1.1 on weeknights and 9.4 ± 1.6 on weekends. In total, 19% of participants reported their sleep quality as fairly bad or very bad on weeknights and 10% reported it as fairly bad or very bad on weekends. In the multivariable regression models, a higher sleep disturbance score was associated with increased odds of being at high cardiovascular risk (highest v. lowest tertile odds ratio [OR] 1.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.16–1.77], p < 0.001), increased odds of hypertension (highest v. lowest tertile OR 1.44 [95% CI 1.02–2.05], p = 0.05) and increased odds of elevated non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol (highest v. lowest tertile OR 1.28 [95% CI 1.00–1.64], p = 0.05). The mean duration of sleep was not associated with these outcomes. Interpretation: In healthy adolescents, sleep disturbance is associated with cardiovascular risk factor abnormalities. Intervention strategies to optimize sleep hygiene early in life may be important for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

Narang, Indra; Manlhiot, Cedric; Davies-Shaw, Jolie; Gibson, Don; Chahal, Nita; Stearne, Karen; Fisher, Amanda; Dobbin, Stafford; McCrindle, Brian W.

2012-01-01

30

[Cardiovascular risk and cardiometabolic risk: an epidemiological evaluation].  

PubMed

On the basis of a critical literature review, this article deals with the concepts of global cardiovascular risk and cardiometabolic risk, pointing out their links but also their unresolved issues and discussing their usefulness in clinical practice. The global cardiovascular risk is the probability of suffering from a coronary event or stroke in a given period of time and in this sense it is an absolute risk, generally reported as percentage at 10 years. Usually risk functions are used, derived from longitudinal studies of healthy people at baseline. They consider some factors that are coherently linked with events in population analyses: among these there are some metabolic factors (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, fasting blood glucose), some biological factors (blood pressure) and some lifestyle factors (tobacco smoking), all modifiable beyond those non-modifiable like age and gender. The chosen factors must be independent at multivariate analysis, simple and standardized to measure, and contribute to significantly increase the risk-function predictivity. To be reliable, these risk functions must be derived from the same population where they will be later administered. For this reason the Italian Progetto CUORE, in the longitudinal study section, built a database of risk factors from longitudinal comparable studies started between the mid '80s and '90s and followed up the participants for cardiovascular mortality and morbidity to estimate the Italian global cardiovascular risk (first coronary or cerebrovascular event) for men and women. Two tools have been produced, the risk charts and a score software (see www.cuore.iss.it). The ongoing epidemics of obesity and diabetes and the fact that diabetes is associated with classical risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidemia induced the American Diabetes Association and the American Heart Association to launch a "call to action" to prevent both cardiovascular disease and diabetes. In this paper, as cardiometabolic risk factors were considered those "closely related to diabetes and cardiovascular disease: fasting/postprandial hyperglycemia, overweight/obesity, elevated systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and dyslipidemia". The association among the cardiometabolic risk factors has been known for a long time, and much of their etiology has been ascribed to insulin resistance. Also, the fact that these "metabolic" abnormalities can cluster in many individuals gave rise to the term "metabolic syndrome", a construct embraced by many organizations but questioned by other authors. From an epidemiological point of view the metabolic syndrome seems to increase modestly the cardiovascular risk, whereas in non-diabetic individuals it predicts diabetes much more efficiently. Many studies have compared the performance of the classical cardiovascular evaluation tools (the Framingham risk score, the SCORE charts, the Progetto CUORE score) and metabolic syndrome in cardiovascular disease prediction. Usually in people at high risk the presence of the metabolic syndrome does not improve the risk, whereas in people at lower risk its presence increases significantly the chances of cardiovascular disease. Many studies have shown that positive lifestyle interventions markedly reduce the rate of progression of type 2 diabetes. Also some drugs were tested for diabetes prevention, usually in people with impaired glucose tolerance. Oral diabetes drugs considered together (acarbose, metformin, flumamine, glipizide, phenformin) were less effective than lifestyle interventions, with different results among the drugs; the antiobesity drug orlistat gave similar results to lifestyle interventions. In Italy an appropriate approach to cardiovascular disease and diabetes prevention may be that of first evaluating the global cardiovascular risk using the charts or the score software of the Progetto CUORE, because high-risk subjects (> or =20%) must be treated aggressively independently of the presence of the metabolic syndrome; as a second step the metabo

Vanuzzo, Diego; Pilotto, Lorenza; Mirolo, Renata; Pirelli, Salvatore

2008-04-01

31

Cardiovascular Risk in Women With PCOS  

PubMed Central

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), or Stein-Leventhal syndrome, is a common endocrine disorder defined by two of the three following features: i) oligoovulation or anovulation, ii) clinical and/or biochemical signs of hyperandrogenism, or iii) polycystic ovaries, once the related endocrinological and gynaecological disorders have been excluded. PCOS does not exclusively involve the reproductive apparatus , it has a complex number of systemic relevancy symptoms. It leads to Metabolic Syndrome, with severe consequences on the cardiovascular apparatus. Many clinical studies have underlined the connection between PCOS and the cardiovascular risk profile of such female patients, due to a lipid/glucose altered metabolism, hypertension, systemic inflammatory condition (assessable by markers such as VES, TNF-alfa, citokines and C-reactive protein (hsPCR) levels), and vascular injuries. Considering the early onset of the disease, PCOS could be considered as a real cardiovascular risk factor which affects the quality of life seriously. The current review aimed to point out the main connections between PCOS and cardiovascular risk factors according to the latest findings coming from literature data analysis, and try to depict the great influences that such a common disease can have on the patients’ health integrity.

Scicchitano, Pietro; Dentamaro, Ilaria; Carbonara, Rosa; Bulzis, Gabriella; Dachille, Annamaria; Caputo, Paola; Riccardi, Roberta; Locorotondo, Manuela; Mandurino, Cosimo; Matteo Ciccone, Marco

2012-01-01

32

Water chemistry and cardiovascular disease risk  

SciTech Connect

The evidence linking cardiovascular disease risk and water quality parameters was weighed and analyzed to identify major gaps in understanding reasons for the regional differences in cardiovascular disease mortality in the United States. Epidemiologic studies evaluating occupational and public health exposure to nitrates, carbon monoxide, carbon disulfide, fibrogenic dusts, heavy metals and trace elements, chlorides, and hydro- and fluorocarbons were analyzed. Intake of cholesterol, calcium, and magnesium from food items, cooking water enhancement, and drinking water were also appraised. Based on the current state of knowledge, it is our judgment that the drinking water characteristics of highest priority from the standpoint of cardiovascular disease risks are calcium/magnesium content and chlorine treatment. The potential importance of cadmium, lead, nitrate(s), and chloride/sodium concentrations also needs to be considered. We present working hypotheses to evaluate the role(s) of these parameters and a discussion of variables that should be considered in any study design addressing the association between cardiovascular disease risk and water quality. Important variables are sample size, biological endpoint events (mortality, incidence, clinical determination), population characteristics, drinking water parameters, and dietary intake estimates. 207 references, 6 figures, 17 tables.

Watson, A.P.; Zeighami, E.A.

1985-01-01

33

Gaps in primary care documentation of cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background New Zealand guidelines recommend that cardiovascular risk management should be informed by the absolute risk of a cardiovascular event. This requires knowledge of a person's age, sex, ethnicity, medical and family history, blood pressure, total and HDL cholesterol, diabetes, and smoking status. Aim To establish the extent of primary care documentation of cardiovascular risk factors. Methods An audit of

Natasha Rafter; Susan Wells; Alistair Stewart; Vanessa Selak; Robyn Whittaker; Dale Bramley; Paul Roseman; Sue Furness; Rod Jackson

34

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risks in chronic hemodialysis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risks in chronic hemodialysis patients.BackgroundCardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of death among chronic hemodialysis patients, yet the risk factors for these events have not been well established.MethodsIn this cross-sectional study, we examined the relationship between several traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors and the presence or history of cardiovascular events in 936 hemodialysis patients enrolled in

Alfred K. Cheung; Mark J. Sarnak; Guofen Yan; Johanna T. Dwyer; Robert J. Heyka; Michael V. Rocco; Brendan P. Teehan; Andrew S. Levey

2000-01-01

35

Association of Fibrinogen With Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Disease in the Framingham Offspring Population  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Fibrinogen has been identified as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Also, the role of elevated fibrinogen in thrombosis suggests that it may be on the causal pathway for certain risk factors to exert their effect. These associations remain incompletely characterized. Moreover, the optimal fibrinogen assay for risk stratification is uncertain. Methods

James J. Stec; Halit Silbershatz; Geoffrey H. Tofler; Travis H. Matheney; Patrice Sutherland; Izabela Lipinska; Joseph M. Massaro; Peter F. W. Wilson; James E. Muller; Ralph B. D'Agostino Sr

2010-01-01

36

New risk markers for cardiovascular prevention.  

PubMed

The importance of total cardiovascular (CV) risk estimation before management decisions are taken is well established. Models have been developed that allow physicians to stratify the asymptomatic population in subgroups at low, moderate, high, and very high total CV risk. Most models are based on classical CV risk factors: age, gender, smoking, blood pressure, and lipid levels. The impact of additional risk factors is discussed here, looking separately at the predictive increments of novel biomarkers and of indicators of subclinical atherosclerotic disease. The contribution of biomarkers to the total CV risk estimation is generally modest, and their usage should be limited to subjects at intermediate total CV risk. Detection of subclinical vascular damage may improve total CV risk estimation in asymptomatic subjects who are close to a threshold that could affect management decisions and in whom the chances of re-classification in a different risk category are great. There is, however, an urgent need for trials in which the value of using total CV risk estimation models is tested. PMID:24881768

De Backer, Guy G

2014-08-01

37

Does treatment of psoriasis reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease?  

PubMed

Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease associated with multiple comorbidities and cardiovascular risk factors. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular death. It has been proposed that overlapping mechanisms of systemic inflammation contribute to the link between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease. Some psoriasis treatments decrease systemic inflammation, but the effect of psoriasis treatments on heart disease is unknown. In this review of 23 original research publications, we present preliminary evidence that some psoriasis therapies improve cardiovascular biomarkers and the incidence of cardiovascular risk. Phototherapy may reduce some inflammatory cytokines, but there is little evidence for a decreased risk of CVD outcomes. Both methotrexate and tumour necrosis factor-? inhibitors improve cardiovascular inflammatory biomarkers and improve CVD outcomes. Short-term data on interleukin-12/23 inhibitors are varied, but most data suggest there is not an increase in cardiovascular events. PMID:24420963

Churton, Sarah; Brown, Liza; Shin, Thuzar M; Korman, Neil J

2014-02-01

38

[Burnout syndrome: a "true" cardiovascular risk factor].  

PubMed

The burnout syndrome is characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment in individuals professionally involved with others. The burnout syndrome is poorly recognized, particularly in France, as a distinct nosology from adaptation troubles, stress, depression, or anxiety. Several tools quantifying burnout and emotional exhaustion exist, the most spread is the questionnaire called Maslach Burnout Inventory. The burnout syndrome alters cardiovascular function and its neuroregulation by autonomic nervous system and is associated with: increased sympathetic tone to heart and vessels after mental stress, lowered physiological post-stress vagal rebound to heart, and lowered arterial baroreflex sensitivity. Job strain as burnout syndrome seems to be a real independent cardiovascular risk factor. Oppositely, training to manage emotions could increase vagal tone to heart and should be cardio-protective. PMID:22425226

Cursoux, Pauline; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale; Marchetti, Hélène; Chaumet, Guillaume; Delliaux, Stéphane

2012-11-01

39

Cardiovascular disease risk factors: a childhood perspective.  

PubMed

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide including in developing countries like India. Indians are known to be predisposed to CVD, which occur almost a decade earlier in them. Though these diseases manifest in the middle age and beyond, it is now clear that the roots of CVD lie in childhood and adolescence. Many of the conventional risk factors of CVD such as high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, tobacco use, unhealthy diet and obesity have their beginnings in childhood and then track overtime. It is thus important to screen and identify these risk factors early and treat them to prevent onset of CVD. Similarly community based strategies to prevent onset of these risk factors is imperative to tackle this burgeoning public health crisis especially in countries like ours with limited resources. PMID:22638996

Praveen, Pradeep A; Roy, Ambuj; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj

2013-03-01

40

Sortilin and the risk of cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels are a key determinant of the risk of cardiovascular disease, which is why many studies have attempted to elucidate the pathways that regulate its metabolism. Novel latest-generation sequencing techniques have identified a strong association between the 1p13 locus and the risk of cardiovascular disease caused by changes in plasma LDL-C levels. As expected for a complex phenotype, the effects of variation in this locus are only moderate. Even so, knowledge of the association is of major importance, since it has unveiled a new metabolic pathway regulating plasma cholesterol levels. Crucial to this discovery was the work of three independent teams seeking to clarify the biological basis of this association, who succeeded in proving that SORT1, encoding sortilin, was the gene in the 1p13 locus involved in LDL metabolism. SORT1 was the first gene identified as determining plasma LDL levels to be mechanistically evaluated and, although the three teams used different, though appropriate, experimental methods, their results were in some ways contradictory. Here we review all the experiments that led to the identification of the new pathway connecting sortilin with plasma LDL levels and risk of myocardial infarction. The regulatory mechanism underlying this association remains unclear, but its discovery has paved the way for considering previously unsuspected therapeutic targets and approaches. PMID:23910371

Coutinho, Maria Francisca; Bourbon, Mafalda; Prata, Maria João; Alves, Sandra

2013-10-01

41

The Residual Risk Reduction Initiative: a call to action to reduce residual vascular risk in dyslipidaemic patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite current standards of care aimed at achieving targets for low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, blood pressure and glycaemia, dyslipidaemic patients remain at high residual risk of vascular events. Atherogenic dyslipidaemia, specifically elevated triglycerides and low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, often with elevated apolipoprotein B and non-HDL cholesterol, is common in patients with established cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes,

Jean-Charles Fruchart; Frank M Sacks; Michel P Hermans; Gerd Assmann; W Virgil Brown; Richard Ceska; M John Chapman; Paul M Dodson; Paola Fioretto; Henry N Ginsberg; Takashi Kadowaki; Jean-Marc Lablanche; Nikolaus Marx; Jorge Plutzky; Zeljko Reiner; Robert S Rosenson; Bart Staels; Jane K Stock; Rody Sy; Christoph Wanner; Alberto Zambon; Paul Zimmet

2008-01-01

42

Road traffic noise and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Studies on the association between community noise and cardiovascular risk were subjected to a meta-analysis for deriving a common dose-effect curve. Peer-reviewed articles, objective assessment of exposure and outcome as well as control for confounding and multiple exposure categories were all necessary inclusion criteria. A distinction was made between descriptive (cross-sectional) and analytical (case-control, cohort) studies. Meta-analyses were carried out for two descriptive and five analytical studies for calculating a pooled dose-effect curve for the association between road traffic noise levels and the risk of myocardial infarction. No increase in risk was found below 60 dB(A) for the average A-weighted sound pressure levels during the day. An increase in risk was found with increasing noise levels above 60 dB(A) thus showing a dose-response relationship. A risk curve was estimated for the association using a polynomial fit of the data that can be used for risk assessment and the environmental burden of disease calculations. PMID:18270405

Babisch, Wolfgang

2008-01-01

43

Cardiovascular risk in women: focus on hypertension.  

PubMed

Hypertension is a major concern in women, contributing to the risk for morbidity and mortality and the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart attack, and stroke. A woman's risk for the development of hypertension increases with age. Although it also affects younger women, hypertension is prevalent in approximately 60% of women >65 years of age. In addition to age, there are specific risk factors and lifestyle contributors for the development of hypertension in women, including obesity, ethnicity, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Risk reduction strategies need to be used to help reduce hypertension; maintaining a healthy body weight through diet and exercise, reduced sodium intake, and lower alcohol intake are a few of the approaches for hypertension risk reduction in women. There are several proposed mechanisms for the development of hypertension that are unique to women and pertain to the aging-related elevated risk for hypertension resulting from falling estrogen levels during menopause. Oral contraceptives, pre-eclampsia and polycystic ovary syndrome are special considerations concerning the development and progression of hypertension in women. There are significant awareness issues and care gaps in the treatment of hypertension in women. Therefore, these problems must be faced and efforts need to be taken to resolve the issues surrounding the treatment and control of hypertension in women. PMID:24786446

Abramson, Beth L; Melvin, Rochelle G

2014-05-01

44

Hypertension in pregnancy: an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Increasing evidence indicates that hypertension in pregnancy is an under-recognized risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Compared with women who have had normotensive pregnancies, those who are hypertensive during pregnancy are at greater risk of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events and have a less favorable overall risk profile for CVD years after the affected pregnancies. One factor that might underlie this

Suzanne R Hayman; Vesna D Garovic

2007-01-01

45

Migraine and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context Migraine with aura has been associated with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile and prothrombotic factors that, along with migraine-specific physiology, may increase the risk of vascular events. Although migraine with aura has been associated with increased risk of ischemic stroke, an association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and, specifically, coronary events remains unclear. Objective To evaluate the association between migraine

Tobias Kurth; J. Michael Gaziano; Nancy R. Cook; Giancarlo Logroscino; Hans-Christoph Diener; Julie E. Buring

2010-01-01

46

The putative mechanisms underlying testosterone and cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

The use of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) is increasing primarily in men with symptomatic hypogonadism. While TST has been shown to have numerous benefits, as its use increases, the role on cardiovascular health must be explored. Previous evidence showed no adverse cardiovascular risks associated with TST use; however, more recent studies suggest that there may be an associated risk. The exact mechanism by which TST may contribute to cardiovascular risk has not been elucidated. Numerous mechanisms have been proposed which include testosterone’s effect on thromboxane A2 receptors, vascular adhesion molecule 1 receptors, erythropoiesis, and obstructive sleep apnea, all of which can ultimately lead to atherogenesis and increased cardiovascular risk.

Ramasamy, Ranjith

2014-01-01

47

Health Insurance and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Background Compared to those with health insurance, the uninsured receive less care for chronic conditions such as hypertension and diabetes and they experience higher mortality. Methods We investigated the relations of health insurance status to prevalence, treatment, and control of major cardiovascular disease risk factors, hypertension and elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, among Framingham Heart Study (FHS) participants in sex-specific age-adjusted analyses. Participants who attended either the seventh Offspring cohort examination cycle (1998–2001) or the first Third Generation cohort examination cycle (2002–2005) were studied. Results Among 6098 participants, 3.8% were uninsured at the time of the FHS clinic examination and participants’ ages ranged from 19 to 64 years. The prevalence of hypertension and elevated LDL cholesterol was similar for the insured and uninsured, however the proportion of those who obtained treatment and achieved control of these risk factors was lower among the uninsured. Uninsured men and women were less likely to be treated for hypertension with odds ratios for treatment of 0.19 (95% CI 0.07–0.56) for men and 0.31 (95% CI 0.12–0.79) for women. Among men, the uninsured were less likely to receive treatment or achieve control of elevated LDL cholesterol than the insured, with odds ratios of 0.12 (95% CI 0.04–0.38) for treatment and 0.17 (95% CI 0.05–0.56) for control. Conclusions The treatment and control of hypertension and hypercholesterolemia are lower among uninsured adults. Increasing the proportion of insured individuals may be a means to improve the treatment and control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and reduce health disparities.

Brooks, Erica L.; Preis, Sarah Rosner; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Murabito, Joanne M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Kelly-Hayes, Margaret; Sorlie, Paul; Levy, Daniel

2010-01-01

48

Assessment of cardiovascular risk in primary health care  

PubMed Central

Objective This study aimed at investigating whether cardiovascular risk factors and their impact on total risk estimation differ between men and women. Design Cross-sectional cohort study. Subjects Finnish cardiovascular risk subjects (n =?904) without established cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or known diabetes. Main outcome measures Ankle-brachial index (ABI), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), oral glucose tolerance test, and total cardiovascular risk using SCORE risk charts. Results According to the SCORE risk charts, 27.0% (95% CI 23.1–31.2) of the women and 63.1% (95% CI 58.3–67.7) of the men (p risk subjects. Of the women classified as low-risk subjects according to SCORE, 25% had either subclinical peripheral arterial disease or renal insufficiency. Conclusions The SCORE system does not take into account cardiovascular risk factors typical in women, and thus underestimates their total cardiovascular risk. Measurement of ABI and eGFR in primary care might improve cardiovascular risk assessment. especially in women.

Korhonen, Paivi; Vesalainen, Risto; Aarnio, Pertti; Kautiainen, Hannu; Jarvenpaa, Salme; Kantola, Ilkka

2012-01-01

49

Insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are major drivers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The link between environmental factors, obesity, and dysglycemia indicates that progression to diabetes with time occurs along a "continuum", not necessarily linear, which involves different cellular mechanisms including alterations of insulin signaling, changes in glucose transport, pancreatic beta cell dysfunction, as well as the deregulation of key genes involved in oxidative stress and inflammation. The present review critically addresses key pathophysiological aspects including (i) hyperglycemia and insulin resistance as predictors of CV outcome, (ii) molecular mechanisms underpinning the progression of diabetic vascular complications despite intensive glycemic control, and (iii) stratification of CV risk, with particular emphasis on emerging biomarkers. Taken together, these important aspects may contribute to the development of promising diagnostic approaches as well as mechanism-based therapeutic strategies to reduce CVD burden in obese and diabetic subjects. PMID:24781596

Paneni, Francesco; Costantino, Sarah; Cosentino, Francesco

2014-07-01

50

Statin use in rheumatoid arthritis in relation to actual cardiovascular risk: evidence for substantial undertreatment of lipid-associated cardiovascular risk?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCardiovascular disease (CVD) is partially attributed to traditional cardiovascular risk factors, which can be identified and managed based on risk stratification algorithms (Framingham Risk Score, National Cholesterol Education Program, Systematic Cardiovascular Risk Evaluation and Reynolds Risk Score). We aimed to (a) identify the proportion of at risk patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) requiring statin therapy identified by conventional risk calculators,

Tracey E Toms; Vasileios F Panoulas; Karen M J Douglas; Helen Griffiths; Naveed Sattar; Jaqueline P Smith; Deborah P M Symmons; Peter Nightingale; George S Metsios; George D Kitas

2010-01-01

51

Simple anthropometric indexes and cardiovascular risk factors in Chinese  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major public health problem due to its associations with multiple cardiovascular risk factors. Although there are sophisticated methods, such as imaging, to document total body fat and its distributions, anthropometric measurements remain important in clinical practice. We examined the relationships between cardiovascular risk factors and the three commonest anthropometric measurements for obesity, body mass index (BMI),

GTC Ko; JCN Chan; J Woo; E Lau; VTF Yeung; C-C Chow; HPS Wai; JKY Li; W-Y So; CS Cockram; Gary TC Ko

1997-01-01

52

Psychosocial Indexes and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Community Sample  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Psychosocial characteristics might contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of cardiovascular disease as it is increasingly recognised that biomedical risk factors do not fully explain its dynamics. This study aimed to describe psychometric indexes in a Portuguese community sample relating them to known cardiovascular disease risk factors. Methods: Anthropometric, blood pressure, serum measurements and information on demographic, social, medical

Rui Coelho; Elisabete Ramos; Joana Prata; Henrique Barros

2000-01-01

53

Vitamin D metabolism and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The purpose of this review is to focus on the association of vitamin D and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women. Methods: Review of the relevant literature and results from recent clinical studies as well as critical analysis of published results concerning the association of vitamin D and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women obtained from both a PubMed

Faustino R. Pérez-López

2009-01-01

54

Cardiovascular Risk Factor Levels in Adults with Mental Retardation.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors (blood lipids, obesity, and smoking) in 329 adults with mental retardation residing in various settings with subjects in the Framingham Offspring Study found that adults with mental retardation had cardiovascular risk profiles similar to those of individuals without mental retardation. (Author/DB)

Rimmer, James H.; And Others

1994-01-01

55

Cardiac risk factors: environmental, sociodemographic, and behavioral cardiovascular risk factors.  

PubMed

Several environmental exposures are associated with increased risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Exposure to secondhand smoke may increase the risk by as much as 25% to 30%. Exposure to thirdhand smoke, residual components of tobacco smoke that remain in the environment after a cigarette is extinguished, also appears to increase risk. These residual components can remain in rooms and automobiles for up to 30 years and enter the body through the skin or via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure to particulate matter air pollution from automobile emissions, power plants, and other sources is yet another environmental risk factor for CHD, resulting in tens of thousands of deaths annually in the United States. Exposure to other environmental toxins, particularly bisphenol A and phthalates, also has been linked to CHD. There are sociodemographic risks for CHD, with numerous studies showing that lower socioeconomic status is associated with higher risk. Behavioral risk factors include poor diet, such as frequent consumption of fast food and processed meals; sleep disturbance; and psychological stress, particularly related to marital or work issues. Finally, although high alcohol consumption is associated with increased CHD risk, moderate alcohol consumption (ie, less than 1 to 2 drinks/day), particularly of wine and possibly beer, appears to reduce the risk. PMID:24936715

Anthony, David; George, Paul; Eaton, Charles B

2014-06-01

56

Emerging risk factors for cardiovascular diseases: Indian context.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is globally considered as the leading cause of death with 80% of CVD related deaths being reported from low and middle income countries like India. The relatively early onset age of CVD in India in comparison to Western countries also implies that most productive ages of the patient's life are lost fighting the disease. Conventional cardiovascular risk is attributed to lifestyle changes and altered metabolic activity. This forms the basis of a 10-year risk prediction score inspired by the Framingham study. Since South Asians display considerable heterogeneity in risk factors as compared to developed countries, there is a need to identify risk factors which would not only help in primary prevention but also prevent their recurrence. We reviewed published data on novel risk factors and their potential to identify cardiovascular risk at an early stage, with special emphasis on the Indian population. Emerging risk factors were reviewed to identify their potential to prevent CVD progression independently as well as in association with other cardiovascular risk factors. The most commonly studied emerging cardiovascular risk factors included coronary artery calcium score, lipoprotein (a), apolipoproteins, homocysteine, thrombosis markers like fibrinogen, and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, carotid intima-media thickness, genotypic variations, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, C-reactive protein, platelets, and birth weight levels. Nonetheless, more studies on large sample size can ascertain the utility of these risk factors in estimation and analysis of cardiovascular risk especially in the Indian context. PMID:24083161

Gupta, Sushil; Gudapati, Ramesh; Gaurav, Kumar; Bhise, Manoj

2013-09-01

57

RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENTS - RESIDUAL RISK ASSESSMENT FOR COKE OVENS  

EPA Science Inventory

This source category previously subjected to a technology-based standard will be examined to determine if health or ecological risks are significant enough to warrant further regulation for Coke Ovens. These assesments utilize existing models and data bases to examine the multi-m...

58

Cardiovascular risk factors in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with chronic kidney disease have a higher burden of cardiovascular disease, which increases in a dose-dependent fashion with worsening kidney function. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including advanced age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and dyslipidemia, have an important role in the progression of cardiovascular disease in patients who have a reduced glomerular filtration rate, especially in those with mild-to-moderate kidney disease.

Sarina van der Zee; Usman Baber; Sammy Elmariah; Jonathan Winston; Valentin Fuster

2009-01-01

59

Cardiovascular risk during hormonal treatment in patients with prostate cancer.  

PubMed

The objective of this review is to provide information on cardiovascular risk following androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer patients and to suggest potential prevention and management strategies. Androgen deprivation therapy can cause peripheral insulin resistance, increase fat mass and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and induce type 2 diabetes. While recent studies have reported an association in patients with prostate cancer between ADT and increased risk of cardiovascular events, other studies have not detected the association. However, at this time, it is plausible that ADT could increase cardiovascular risk because of the adverse effect of ADT on risk factors for cardiovascular disease. It is advisable that prostate cancer patients in whom ADT is initiated be referred to their physician, who will carefully monitor them for potential metabolic effects. Therefore, physicians should be informed about these potential side effects. This especially applies to men aged >65 years and those with pre-existing cardiovascular comorbidities. Adopting a healthy lifestyle including a balanced diet and regular physical activity is recommended. Patients with cardiovascular disease should receive appropriate preventive therapies, including lipid-lowering, antihypertensive, glucose-lowering, and antiplatelet therapy. ADT should preferably not be unnecessarily administered to prostate cancer patients with pre-existing cardiovascular disease, certainly not to those in whom the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality is low. The physician should carefully weigh the potential benefits of ADT against the possible risks in individual patients with prostate cancer. PMID:21448299

Van Poppel, Hein; Tombal, Bertrand

2011-01-01

60

Alcohol Intake and Cardiovascular Disease Risk: Cheers, Tears, or Both?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are among the leading causes of shorter life expectancy and loss of quality of life worldwide. Thus, any influence of diet or life habits on the cardiovascular system may have important implications for public health. Epidemiological studies have shown that moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Moreover, high alcohol

Dimitris Grigorakis; Vassiliki Bountziouka; Nick Kalogeropoulos

2011-01-01

61

Beyond statins: new lipid lowering strategies to reduce cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Statins are the first-line therapy in LDL-Cholesterol (LDL-C) reduction and its clinical use has contributed to significant prevention and treatment of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Yet, a significant proportion of patients remain at high risk. Recently, a number of new therapies have been developed to further lower LDL-C. These agents may provide clinical benefit on top of statin therapy in patients with high residual risk, severe hypercholesterolemia or as an alternative for patients who are intolerant to statins. We review four novel approaches based on the inhibition of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), apolipoprotein-B100 (apoB), Cholesteryl ester transport protein (CETP) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). ApoB and MTP inhibitors (Mipomersen and Lomitapide) are indicated only for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia patients. The results of ongoing trials with CETP and PCSK9 inhibitors may warrant a wider employment in different categories of patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease. PMID:24777633

Noto, Davide; Cefalù, Angelo B; Averna, Maurizio R

2014-06-01

62

Pesticide Residues and Bees - A Risk Assessment  

PubMed Central

Bees are essential pollinators of many plants in natural ecosystems and agricultural crops alike. In recent years the decline and disappearance of bee species in the wild and the collapse of honey bee colonies have concerned ecologists and apiculturalists, who search for causes and solutions to this problem. Whilst biological factors such as viral diseases, mite and parasite infections are undoubtedly involved, it is also evident that pesticides applied to agricultural crops have a negative impact on bees. Most risk assessments have focused on direct acute exposure of bees to agrochemicals from spray drift. However, the large number of pesticide residues found in pollen and honey demand a thorough evaluation of all residual compounds so as to identify those of highest risk to bees. Using data from recent residue surveys and toxicity of pesticides to honey and bumble bees, a comprehensive evaluation of risks under current exposure conditions is presented here. Standard risk assessments are complemented with new approaches that take into account time-cumulative effects over time, especially with dietary exposures. Whilst overall risks appear to be low, our analysis indicates that residues of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides pose the highest risk by contact exposure of bees with contaminated pollen. However, the synergism of ergosterol inhibiting fungicides with those two classes of insecticides results in much higher risks in spite of the low prevalence of their combined residues. Risks by ingestion of contaminated pollen and honey are of some concern for systemic insecticides, particularly imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, chlorpyrifos and the mixtures of cyhalothrin and ergosterol inhibiting fungicides. More attention should be paid to specific residue mixtures that may result in synergistic toxicity to bees.

Sanchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Koichi

2014-01-01

63

Association between simple anthropometric indices and cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To identify which of the three simple anthropometric indices, body mass index (BMI), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) and waist circumference (WC), best predicts cardiovascular risk factors, and to determine if the association between the anthropometric indices and cardiovascular risk factors varies with gender.DESIGN AND METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional population-based survey was carried out during 1995–1996. One thousand and ten Chinese people

SC Ho; YM Chen; JLF Woo; SSF Leung; TH Lam; ED Janus

2001-01-01

64

Effects of exercise on emerging and traditional cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. Common cardiovascular disease risk factors (e.g., insulin and aerobic fitness) are improved with exercise; however, few studies have addressed the potential for training to modify emerging cardiovascular disease risk factors such as homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein.Methods. Sedentary adults (n = 324, 48.9 ± 8.4 years) were randomized to four groups differing in training intensity (moderate = 45–55% or

Glen E. Duncan; Michael G. Perri; Stephen D. Anton; Marian C. Limacher; A. Daniel Martin; David T. Lowenthal; Erland Arning; Teodoro Bottiglieri; Peter W. Stacpoole

2004-01-01

65

Renal participation in cardiovascular risk in essential hypertension.  

PubMed

Renal damage as a consequence of uncontrolled hypertension is well recognized. Antihypertensive therapy has been proved to significantly decrease the vascular damage in the kidneys of hypertensive patients. However, prevalence of mild renal insufficiency remains present in a significant proportion of the hypertensive population. This is accompanied by a marked increase in cardiovascular risk, as a consequence of the clustering of other cardiovascular risk factors and of insufficiently controlled blood pressure. Prevention and protection of renal and cardiovascular damage in these patients will be one of the most relevant healt care tasks in the future. PMID:11822536

Ruilope, L M; Rodicio, J L

2001-01-01

66

Cardiovascular Risk and Hippocampal Thickness in Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer's disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer's disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

Werner, Annett; Sauer, Cathrin; Nees, Josef A.; Meyer, Shirin; Donix, Katharina L.; Von Kummer, Rudiger; Holthoff, Vjera A.

2013-01-01

67

Cardiovascular risk and hippocampal thickness in Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer's disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer's disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24228185

Donix, Markus; Scharf, Maria; Marschner, Kira; Werner, Annett; Sauer, Cathrin; Gerner, Antje; Nees, Josef A; Meyer, Shirin; Donix, Katharina L; Von Kummer, Rüdiger; Holthoff, Vjera A

2013-01-01

68

Psoriasis and Cardiovascular Risk: Assessment by CUORE Project Risk Score in Italian Patients  

PubMed Central

Background. Psoriasis is a common inflammatory and immune-mediated skin disease. There is growing controversy as to whether cardiovascular risk is elevated in psoriasis. A number of studies suggest a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors as well as cardiovascular diseases in psoriasis patients. Objective. The objective of this study was to estimate cardiovascular risk score in psoriasis patients and the relation between cardiovascular risk and psoriasis features. Cardiovascular risk was assessed by CUORE project risk score built within the longitudinal study of the Italian CUORE project and suited to populations with a low rate of coronary heart disease. Results. A case-control study in 210 psoriasis outpatients and 111 controls with skin diseases other than psoriasis was performed. CUORE project risk score was higher in patients than controls (6.80 ± 6.34 versus 4.48 ± 4.38, P < 0.001). Compared to controls, psoriasis patients have higher risk of developing major cardiovascular events. Cardiovascular risk was not related to psoriasis characteristics. Conclusion. Increased focus on identifying cardiovascular risk factors and initiation of preventive lifestyle changes or therapeutic interventions in patients with psoriasis is warranted.

Caputo, Valentina; Bongiorno, Maria Rita

2013-01-01

69

Incidence of cardiovascular events after kidney transplantation and cardiovascular risk scores: study protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of death after renal transplantation. Not only conventional CVD risk factors, but also transplant-specific risk factors can influence the development of CVD in kidney transplant recipients. The main objective of this study will be to determine the incidence of post-transplant CVD after renal transplantation and related factors. A secondary objective will be

Salvador Pita-Fernández; Sonia Pértega-Díaz; Francisco Valdés-Cañedo; Rocío Seijo-Bestilleiro; Teresa Seoane-Pillado; Constantino Fernández-Rivera; Angel Alonso-Hernández; Dolores Lorenzo-Aguiar; Beatriz López-Calviño; Andres López-Muñiz

2011-01-01

70

Novel cardiovascular risk markers in women with ischaemic heart disease.  

PubMed

The incidence of coronary heart disease in premenopausal women is lower than in men because of their hormonal protection. Angina pectoris occurs in women about 10 years later than in men. However, mortality from ischaemic heart disease remains higher in women than in men. Current studies are focusing on novel cardiovascular risk biomarkers because it seems that traditional cardiovascular risk factors and their assessment scores underestimate the risk in females. Increased plasma levels of these newly established biomarkers of risk have been found to worsen endothelial dysfunction and inflammation, both of which play a key role in the pathogenesis of microvascular angina, which is very common in women. These novel cardiovascular risk markers can be classified into three categories: inflammatory markers, markers of haemostasis, and other biomarkers. PMID:25000444

Pop, D; D?dârlat, A; Zdrenghea, D

2014-01-01

71

Risk of cardiovascular events in survivors of severe sepsis.  

PubMed

Rationale: The risk of cardiovascular events after severe sepsis is not known, and these events may explain increased long-term mortality in survivors of severe sepsis. Objectives: To determine whether survivors of severe sepsis hospitalization have high long-term risk of cardiovascular events. We examined whether higher risk is due to severe sepsis hospitalization or poor prehospitalization health status, and if the higher risk is also observed in patients hospitalized for infectious and noninfectious reasons, and in other critically ill patients. Methods: Unmatched and matched-cohort analyses of Medicare beneficiaries. For unmatched analysis, we compared patients with severe sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) and survived hospitalization (n = 4,179) to unmatched population control subjects (n = 819,283). For matched analysis, we propensity-score-matched each patient with severe sepsis to four control subjects (population, hospitalized, non-severe sepsis ICU control subjects, and infection hospitalization). Primary outcome was 1-year incidence rate of hospitalization for cardiovascular events. Measurements and Main Results: Cardiovascular events were common among patients discharged alive after severe sepsis hospitalization (29.5%; 498.2 events/1,000 person-years). Survivors of severe sepsis had a 13-fold higher risk of cardiovascular events compared with unmatched control subjects (498.2 vs. 36 events/1,000 person-years; P < 0.0001), and a 1.9-fold higher risk compared with matched-population control subjects (P < 0.0001). Survivors of severe sepsis had 1.1-fold higher risk compared with matched hospitalized patients and infection hospitalizations (P = 0.002 and 0.001) and similar risk compared with matched-ICU control subjects. Conclusions: Survivors of severe sepsis have high risk of cardiovascular events. The higher risk is mainly due to poor prehospitalization health status, and is also seen in a broader population of acutely ill patients. PMID:24456535

Yende, Sachin; Linde-Zwirble, Walter; Mayr, Florian; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Reis, Steven; Angus, Derek C

2014-05-01

72

Can nocturnal hypertension predict cardiovascular risk?  

PubMed Central

Nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping of blood pressure during sleep are distinct entities that often occur together and are regarded as important harbingers of poor cardiovascular prognosis. This review addresses several aspects related to these blood pressure abnormalities including definitions, diagnostic limitations, pathogenesis and associated patient profiles, prognostic significance, and therapeutic strategies. Taken together, persistent nocturnal hypertension and non-dipping blood pressure pattern, perhaps secondary to abnormal renal sodium handling and/or altered nocturnal sympathovagal balance, are strongly associated with deaths, cardiovascular events, and progressive loss of renal function, independent of daytime and 24-hour blood pressure. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological approaches may restore nocturnal blood pressure and circadian blood pressure rhythm to normal; however, whether this translates to a clinically meaningful reduction in unfavorable cardiovascular and renal consequences remains to be seen.

Friedman, Oded; Logan, Alexander G

2009-01-01

73

Integrative Treatments to Reduce Risk for Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Recognizing the contribution and interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors is critical to prioritizing treatment strategies for cardiovascular risk reduction. Lipoprotein factors still dominate risk for developing cardiovascular disease, including myocardial infarction. Some emerging risk factors such as C-reactive protein are gaining acceptance due to recent prospective clinical trials demonstrating clinical benefit in reducing these markers. Other emerging risk factors, including lipoprotein particle size, remain to be validated. In this second article of a 2-part series, we will begin with a review of formal risk assessment, discussing the contribution of multiple “risky” and “healthy” components that play a part in overall cardiovascular health. Following risk assessment, we will discuss evidence-based integrative therapies that can be used to modify any risky lipoprotein and inflammatory patient profiles, including medications, functional foods, supplements, and lifestyle approaches. The focus is on low-density lipoproteins, high-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, and C-reactive protein. Understanding the interrelatedness of lipoprotein risk factors, and finding efficient methods of treating multiple risk factors simultaneously, will not only improve the long-term health of patients but will also save on the expenditure of healthcare dollars for unnecessary testing and ineffective treatments. Integrative practitioners who understand the contribution of lifestyle factors, and who have numerous effective treatment options at their disposal, are well positioned to counsel patients on cardiovascular disease prevention.

Bradley, Ryan; Oberg, Erica

2010-01-01

74

Congenital Cerebral Palsy, Child Sex and Parent Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

Objective Genes associated with cardiovascular disease may also be risk factors for congenital cerebral palsy (CP) and these associations may be modified by sex, since there is an increased risk of CP in male children. We investigated the association between CP of the child with cardiovascular disease in parents, taking sex of the child into consideration. Methods All parents of non-adopted singletons born in Denmark between 1973 and 2003 were included. Parents of a child with CP, confirmed by the Danish National CP registry, were considered exposed. Cox proportional hazards regressions were used to model risk of cardiovascular outcomes for exposed parents compared to all other parents beginning at the child’s 10th birthday. Results We identified 733,730 mothers and 666,652 fathers among whom 1,592 and 1,484, respectively, had a child with CP. The mean age for mothers at end of follow up was 50±8 years. After adjustment for maternal age, parental education, child’s sex, child’s residence, child being small for gestational age and maternal hypertensive disorder during pregnancy, mothers of CP male children had an excess risk of cardiovascular disease (HR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.16-2.00), attributable mostly to an increased incidence of hypertension and cerebrovascular disease. After additional adjustment for preterm birth, the association was markedly attenuated for cardiovascular disease (1.34, 95%CI: 1.02 - 1.76), became nonsignificant for hypertension, but remained significant for cerebrovascular disease (HR: 2.73, 95% CI: 1.45- 5.12). There was no increased risk of cardiovascular events in mothers of female CP children, or fathers of CP children of any sex. Conclusions Women that have a male child with CP are at increased risk for premature cardiovascular disease. Part of this association may be related to risk factors for preterm births.

Streja, Elani; Wu, Chunsen; Uldall, Peter; Grove, Jakob; Arah, Onyebuchi; Olsen, J?rn

2013-01-01

75

Radiation as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Abstract Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from terrestrial sources. The two major contributors to radiation exposure of the U.S. population are ubiquitous background radiation and medical exposure of patients. From the early 1980s to 2006, the average dose per individual in the United States for all sources of radiation increased by a factor of 1.7–6.2?mSv, with this increase due to the growth of medical imaging procedures. Radiation can place individuals at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs a long time after exposure to lower doses of radiation as demonstrated in Japanese atomic bomb survivors. This review examines sources of radiation (atomic bombs, radiation accidents, radiological terrorism, cancer treatment, space exploration, radiosurgery for cardiac arrhythmia, and computed tomography) and the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The evidence presented suggests an association between cardiovascular disease and exposure to low-to-moderate levels of radiation, as well as the well-known association at high doses. Studies are needed to define the extent that diagnostic and therapeutic radiation results in increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to understand the mechanisms involved, and to develop strategies to mitigate or treat radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1945–1956.

Moulder, John E.; Hopewell, John W.

2011-01-01

76

Radiation as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Abstract population are ubiquitous background radiation and medical exposure of patients. From the early 1980s to 2006, the average dose per individual in the United States for all sources of radiation increased by a factor of 1.7-6.2?mSv, with this increase due to the growth of medical imaging procedures. Radiation can place individuals at an increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Excess risk of cardiovascular disease occurs a long time after exposure to lower doses of radiation as demonstrated in Japanese atomic bomb survivors. This review examines sources of radiation (atomic bombs, radiation accidents, radiological terrorism, cancer treatment, space exploration, radiosurgery for cardiac arrhythmia, and computed tomography) and the risk for developing cardiovascular disease. The evidence presented suggests an association between cardiovascular disease and exposure to low-to-moderate levels of radiation, as well as the well-known association at high doses. Studies are needed to define the extent that diagnostic and therapeutic radiation results in increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease, to understand the mechanisms involved, and to develop strategies to mitigate or treat radiation-induced cardiovascular disease. PMID:21091078

Baker, John E; Moulder, John E; Hopewell, John W

2011-10-01

77

Assessment of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients: a comparison of commonly used risk scoring programs  

PubMed Central

Several calculation modalities are used today for cardiovascular risk assessment. Cardiovascular risk assessment should be performed in all hypertensive patients. Risk assessment methods being based on the population in which the patient lives and the inclusion of factors such as ethnicity variations, socioeconomic status, and medication use will contribute to improvements in risk assessments. The results should be shared with the patient, and modifiable risk factors must be effectively treated.

Ulusoy, Sukru

2013-01-01

78

Decreasing cardiovascular risk in HIV infection between 2005 and 2011.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular risk profile was compared in 765 Italian HIV-infected outpatients enrolled in 2005 and in 765 individually age-matched and sex-matched patients enrolled in 2011. Median Framingham risk score was 8.6% in 2005 vs. 7.9% in 2011 (P = 0.04); metabolic syndrome was present in 40.3% vs. 33.4% (P = 0.006). Blood glucose, triglycerides, prevalence of smokers, and lipodystrophy were all significantly lower in 2011 (all P < 0.0001). Cardiovascular risk improved over a 6-year period in Italian HIV-infected patients. PMID:24378754

De Socio, Giuseppe V; Parruti, Giustino; Ricci, Elena; Maggi, Paolo; Celesia, Benedetto M; Penco, Giovanni; Martinelli, Canio; Franzetti, Marco; Di Biagio, Antonio; Bonfanti, Paolo; Pucci, Giacomo; Schillaci, Giuseppe

2014-02-20

79

Type 2 diabetes: postprandial hyperglycemia and increased cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Hyperglycemia is a major risk factor for both the microvascular and macrovascular complications in patients with type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the cardiovascular results of large outcomes trials in diabetes and presents new evidence on the role of hyperglycemia, with particular emphasis on postprandial hyperglycemia, in adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes. Treatment options, including the new dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide-1 mimetics that primarily target postprandial hyperglycemia, are also discussed. Hyperglycemia increases cardiovascular mortality, and reducing hyperglycemia lowers cardiovascular risk parameters. Control of both fasting and postprandial hyperglycemia is necessary to achieve optimal glycated hemoglobin control. Therefore, anti-hyperglycemic agents that preferentially target postprandial hyperglycemia, along with those that preferentially target fasting hyperglycemia, are strongly suggested to optimize individual diabetes treatment strategies and reduce complications.

Aryangat, Ajikumar V; Gerich, John E

2010-01-01

80

Unfavorable cardiovascular risk profiles in untreated and treated psoriasis patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease that is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk profile. The systemic inflammation present in psoriasis, various systemic treatments for psoriasis and an increased prevalence of unhealthy life style factors may all contribute to this unfavorable risk profile. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of what is known about these

M. Wakkee; H. B. Thio; E. P. Prens; E. J. G. Sijbrands; H. A. M. Neumann

2007-01-01

81

Gender Differences in Genetic Risk Profiles for Cardiovascular Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence, complications and burden differ markedly between women and men. Although there is variation in the distribution of lifestyle factors between the genders, they do not fully explain the differences in CVD incidence and suggest the existence of gender-specific genetic risk factors. We aimed to estimate whether the genetic risk profiles of coronary heart disease (CHD), ischemic

Kaisa Silander; Mervi Alanne; Kati Kristiansson; Olli Saarela; Samuli Ripatti; Kirsi Auro; Juha Karvanen; Sangita Kulathinal; Matti Niemelä; Pekka Ellonen; Erkki Vartiainen; Pekka Jousilahti; Janna Saarela; Kari Kuulasmaa; Alun Evans; Markus Perola; Veikko Salomaa; Leena Peltonen; A. Cecile J. W. Janssens

2008-01-01

82

Midlife cardiovascular risk factors and late cognitive impairment.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular risk factors increase the risk of dementia in later life. The aims of the current study were to assess the effect of multiple midlife cardiovascular risk factors on the risk of cognitive impairment in later life, and to assess the validity of the previously suggested CAIDE Study risk score predicting dementia risk 20 years later. A total of 2,165 Finnish twins were followed and at the end of the follow-up their cognitive status was assessed with a validated telephone interview. The assessment of the risk factors at baseline was based on a self-report questionnaire. Relative risk ratios (RR) were calculated and receiver operating characteristic analyses performed. Midlife obesity (RR 2.42, 95 % CI 1.47-3.98), hypertension (RR 1.38, 95 % CI 1.01-1.88) and low leisure time physical activity (RR 2.52, 95 % CI 1.10-5.76) increased the risk of cognitive impairment after a mean follow-up of 22.6 ± 2.3 years. Hypercholesterolemia did not significantly increase the risk (RR 1.52, 95 % CI 0.92-2.51). Overweight individuals who gained more than 10 % weight between 1981 and 1990 had an increased risk of cognitive impairment (RR 4.27, 95 % CI 1.62-11.2). The CAIDE Study risk score combining various individual risk factors had an area-under-curve of 0.74 (95 % CI 0.69-0.79, n = 591), and there was a strong association between an increasing risk score and the risk of cognitive impairment. The results indicate that multiple midlife cardiovascular risk factors increase the risk of cognitive impairment in later life. Also, a risk score including easily measurable midlife factors predicts an individual's cognitive impairment risk well. PMID:23532744

Virta, Jyri J; Heikkilä, Kauko; Perola, Markus; Koskenvuo, Markku; Räihä, Ismo; Rinne, Juha O; Kaprio, Jaakko

2013-05-01

83

Glycated Hemoglobin, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk in Nondiabetic Adults  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods We compared the prognostic value of glycated hemoglobin and fasting glucose for identifying adults at risk for diabetes or cardiovascular disease. We measured glycated hemoglobin in whole-blood samples from 11,092 black or white adults who did not have a history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease and who attended the second visit (occurring in the 1990-1992 period) of the Atherosclerosis

Elizabeth Selvin; Michael W. Steffes; Hong Zhu; Kunihiro Matsushita; Lynne Wagenknecht; James Pankow; Josef Coresh; Frederick L. Brancati

2010-01-01

84

Adducin Polymorphism, Atherosclerosis, and Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose—Carriers of the 460Trp allele of the -adducin gene (ADD1) show higher rates of sodium reabsorption compared with homozygous carriers of the Gly460 allele and were found to have an increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. We studied the association between the Gly460Trp polymorphism and atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease. Methods—Intima-media thickness of the common carotid

Marie Josee; E. van Rijn; Michiel J. Bos; Mojgan Yazdanpanah; Aaron Isaacs; Alejandro Arias-Vasquez; Peter J. Koudstaal; Albert Hofman; Jacqueline C. Witteman; Cornelia M. van Duijn; Monique M. B. Breteler

85

Cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees visiting primary care clinics  

PubMed Central

Objective: The aim of this study was to highlight cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees attending a primary care clinic, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods:A cross sectional study was conducted from Januaryto February 2013 at Primary Care Clinics of King Khalid University Hospital and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All retired attendees were interviewed by family physician, and their duration of retirement was determined. Their cardiovascular risk factors were confirmed from their medical records. The cardiovascular risk factors included history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and smoking. Their weight and height were recorded during the consultation and Body Mass Index was calculated to decide about those classified as obesity ? 30 All data were entered and analyzed using statistical package of social science SPSS version 17 software. Results: The present study showed that 19.5% of retired attendees presenting at primary care clinic were early retired before the age of 60 years, while 80.5% were normally retired. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors showed: Hypertension among 73% attendees, Diabetes Mellitus in 67%, dyslipidemia in 71%, Obesity 29%, and Smoking 13% of the patients. Conclusion:This study concluded that cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees of a primary care clinic are common, and need to be taken in to priority consideration while improving the health care of retired people.

Al Turki, Yousef Abdullah

2014-01-01

86

Cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees visiting primary care clinics.  

PubMed

Objective: The aim of this study was to highlight cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees attending a primary care clinic, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted from Januaryto February 2013 at Primary Care Clinics of King Khalid University Hospital and College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All retired attendees were interviewed by family physician, and their duration of retirement was determined. Their cardiovascular risk factors were confirmed from their medical records. The cardiovascular risk factors included history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and smoking. Their weight and height were recorded during the consultation and Body Mass Index was calculated to decide about those classified as obesity ? 30 All data were entered and analyzed using statistical package of social science SPSS version 17 software. Results: The present study showed that 19.5% of retired attendees presenting at primary care clinic were early retired before the age of 60 years, while 80.5% were normally retired. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors showed: Hypertension among 73% attendees, Diabetes Mellitus in 67%, dyslipidemia in 71%, Obesity 29%, and Smoking 13% of the patients. Conclusion: This study concluded that cardiovascular risk factors among retired attendees of a primary care clinic are common, and need to be taken in to priority consideration while improving the health care of retired people. PMID:24948970

Al Turki, Yousef Abdullah

2014-05-01

87

A literature review of the cardiovascular risk-assessment tools: applicability among Asian population  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundCardiovascular diseases, the main causes of hospitalisations and death globally, have put an enormous economic burden on the healthcare system. Several risk factors are associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events. At the heart of efficient prevention of cardiovascular disease is the concept of risk assessment. This paper aims to review the available cardiovascular risk-assessment tools and its applicability in

Siow Yen Liau; M. I. Mohamed Izham; M. A. Hassali; A. A. Shafie

2010-01-01

88

Cardiovascular risk in pediatric-onset rheumatological diseases  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are becoming major health concerns for adults with inflammatory rheumatic diseases. The enhanced atherogenesis in this patient population is promoted by the exposure to traditional risk factors as well as nontraditional cardiovascular insults, such as corticosteroid therapy, chronic inflammation and autoantibodies. Despite definite differences between many adult-onset and pediatric-onset rheumatologic diseases, it is extremely likely that atherosclerosis will become the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this pediatric patient population. Because cardiovascular events are rare at this young age, surrogate measures of atherosclerosis must be used. The three major noninvasive vascular measures of early atherosclerosis - namely, flow-mediated dilatation, carotid intima-media thickness and pulse wave velocity - can be performed easily on children. Few studies have explored the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and even fewer have used the surrogate vascular measures to document signs of early atherosclerosis in children with pediatric-onset rheumatic diseases. The objective of this review is to provide an overview on cardiovascular risk and early atherosclerosis in pediatric-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and juvenile dermatomyositis patients, and to review cardiovascular preventive strategies that should be considered in this population.

2013-01-01

89

Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Incident Acute Renal Failure in Older Adults: The Cardiovascular Health Study  

PubMed Central

Background and objectives: Although the elderly are at increased risk for acute renal failure, few prospective studies have identified risk factors for acute renal failure in the elderly. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: The associations of cardiovascular disease risk factors, subclinical cardiovascular disease, and clinical coronary heart disease with the risk for development of acute renal failure were examined in older adults in the Cardiovascular Health Study, a prospective cohort study of community-dwelling older adults. Incident hospitalized cases of acute renal failure were identified through hospital discharge International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes and confirmed through physician diagnoses of acute renal failure in discharge summaries. Results: Acute renal failure developed in 225 (3.9%) of the 5731 patients during a median follow-up period of 10.2 yr. In multivariate analyses, diabetes, current smoking, hypertension, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were associated with acute renal failure. Prevalent coronary heart disease was associated with incident acute renal failure, and among patients without prevalent coronary heart disease, subclinical vascular disease measures were also associated with acute renal failure: Low ankle-arm index (?0.9), common carotid intima-media thickness, and internal carotid intima-media thickness. Conclusions: In this large, population-based, prospective cohort study, cardiovascular risk factors and both subclinical and clinical vascular disease were associated with incident acute renal failure in the elderly.

Mittalhenkle, Anuja; Stehman-Breen, Catherine O.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Fried, Linda F.; Katz, Ronit; Young, Bessie A.; Seliger, Stephen; Gillen, Daniel; Newman, Anne B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Siscovick, David

2008-01-01

90

Cardiac testing to manage cardiovascular risk in cancer patients.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular toxicity is one of the most feared complications of cancer treatment. Recent advances in oncologic therapies have resulted in improved cancer outcomes but also a new set of cardiovascular adverse effects. Common toxicities include left ventricular dysfunction/heart failure, hypertension, and myocardial ischemia. Accurate risk stratification allows avoidance of potentially harmful treatments in those patients at greatest risk while maintaining the ability to deliver high doses of effective therapies to the lower-risk population. Cardiac investigations, including echocardiography, nuclear imaging, magnetic resonance imaging, biomarker measurement, blood pressure monitoring, electrocardiography, stress testing, and invasive angiography, can help to risk-stratify selected patients. In this review, common complications are discussed in terms of the factors used to identify patients with elevated risk, the monitoring strategies available, and selected interventions that have been used to modify outcomes in patients identified as being at high risk for cardiac complications of cancer treatment. PMID:23540740

Davis, Margot; Witteles, Ronald M

2013-04-01

91

Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in South Asian Populations  

PubMed Central

Although South Asian populations have high cardiovascular disease (CVD) burden in the world, their patterns of individual CVD risk factors have not been fully studied. None of the available algorithms/scores to assess CVD risk have originated from these populations. To explore the relevance of CVD risk scores for these populations, literature search and qualitative synthesis of available evidence were performed. South Asians usually have higher levels of both “classical” and nontraditional CVD risk factors and experience these at a younger age. There are marked variations in risk profiles between South Asian populations. More than 100 risk algorithms are currently available, with varying risk factors. However, no available algorithm has included all important risk factors that underlie CVD in these populations. The future challenge is either to appropriately calibrate current risk algorithms or ideally to develop new risk algorithms that include variables that provide an accurate estimate of CVD risk.

Hussain, S. Monira; Oldenburg, Brian; Zoungas, Sophia; Tonkin, Andrew M.

2013-01-01

92

Childhood cardiovascular risk factors in South Asians: A cause of concern for adult cardiovascular disease epidemic  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular risk factors in children are increasing at an alarming rate in the western world. However, there is limited information regarding these in the South Asian children. This review attempts at summarizing such evidence. South Asians are remarkable for the earlier onset of adult cardiovascular disease (CVD) by almost a decade compared to the Caucasians. We identified published literature, mainly on PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library using specific search terms such as lipid abnormalities, high blood pressure, hyperglycemia, tobacco use, obesity, physical inactivity, and unhealthy dietary practices. Atherosclerotic CVD processes begin early in childhood and are influenced over the life course by genetic and potentially modifiable risk factors and environmental exposure. 80% of adult CVD burden will fall on the developing nations by 2020. The concept of primordial prevention is fast emerging as a necessary prevention tool to curb adult CVD epidemic. Established guidelines and proven preventive strategies on cardiovascular health exist; however, are always implemented half-heartedly. Composite screening and prediction tools for adults can be adapted and validated in children tailored to South Asian population. South Asian children could be at a greater risk of developing cardiovascular risk factors at an earlier stage, thus, timely interventions are imperative.

Prasad, Duggirala Sivaram; Kabir, Zubair; Dash, Ashok Kumar; Das, Bhagabati Charan

2011-01-01

93

A Review of Calcium Supplements and Cardiovascular Disease Risk12  

PubMed Central

A group of academic and industry experts in the fields of nutrition, cardiology, epidemiology, food science, bone health, and integrative medicine examined the data on the relationship between calcium supplement use and risk of cardiovascular events, with an emphasis on 4 of the Bradford Hill criteria for causal inference: strength, consistency, dose-response, and biological plausibility. Results from 2 epidemiological studies and a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials, including a subgroup analysis from the Women’s Health Initiative, have prompted concern about a potential association between calcium supplement use and a small increase in the risk of adverse cardiovascular events. However, a number of issues with the studies, such as inadequate compliance with the intervention, use of nontrial calcium supplements, potential bias in event ascertainment, and lack of information on and adjustment for known cardiovascular risk determinants, suggest that bias and confounding cannot be excluded as explanations for the reported associations. Findings from other cohort studies also suggest no detrimental effect of calcium from diet or supplements, with or without vitamin D, on cardiovascular disease risk. In addition, little evidence exists for plausible biological mechanisms to link calcium supplement use with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. The authors do not believe that the evidence presented to date regarding the hypothesized relationship between calcium supplement use and increased cardiovascular disease risk is sufficient to warrant a change in the Institute of Medicine recommendations, which advocate use of supplements to promote optimal bone health in individuals who do not obtain recommended intakes of calcium through dietary sources.

Heaney, Robert P.; Kopecky, Stephen; Maki, Kevin C.; Hathcock, John; MacKay, Douglas; Wallace, Taylor C.

2012-01-01

94

Central autonomic network mediates cardiovascular responses to acute inflammation: Relevance to increased cardiovascular risk in depression?  

PubMed Central

Inflammation is a risk factor for both depression and cardiovascular disease. Depressed mood is also a cardiovascular risk factor. To date, research into mechanisms through which inflammation impacts cardiovascular health rarely takes into account central effects on autonomic cardiovascular control, instead emphasizing direct effects of peripheral inflammatory responses on endothelial reactivity and myocardial function. However, brain responses to inflammation engage neural systems for motivational and homeostatic control and are expressed through depressed mood state and changes in autonomic cardiovascular regulation. Here we combined an inflammatory challenge, known to evoke an acute reduction in mood, with neuroimaging to identify the functional brain substrates underlying potentially detrimental changes in autonomic cardiovascular control. We first demonstrated that alterations in the balance of low to high frequency (LF/HF) changes in heart rate variability (a measure of baroreflex sensitivity) could account for some of the inflammation-evoked changes in diastolic blood pressure, indicating a central (rather than solely local endothelial) origin. Accompanying alterations in regional brain metabolism (measured using 18FDG-PET) were analysed to localise central mechanisms of inflammation-induced changes in cardiovascular state: three discrete regions previously implicated in stressor-evoked blood pressure reactivity, the dorsal anterior and posterior cingulate and pons, strongly mediated the relationship between inflammation and blood pressure. Moreover, activity changes within each region predicted the inflammation-induced shift in LF/HF balance. These data are consistent with a centrally-driven component originating within brain areas supporting stressor evoked blood pressure reactivity. Together our findings highlight mechanisms binding psychological and physiological well-being and their perturbation by peripheral inflammation.

Harrison, Neil A.; Cooper, Ella; Voon, Valerie; Miles, Ken; Critchley, Hugo D.

2013-01-01

95

Cardiovascular Health Informatics: Risk Screening and Intervention  

PubMed Central

Despite enormous efforts to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the past, it remains the leading cause of death in most countries worldwide. Around two-thirds of these deaths are due to acute events, which frequently occur suddenly and are often fatal before medical care can be given. New strategies for screening and early intervening CVD, in addition to the conventional methods, are therefore needed in order to provide personalized and pervasive healthcare. In this special issue, selected emerging technologies in health informatics for screening and intervening CVDs are reported. These papers include reviews or original contributions on 1) new potential genetic biomarkers for screening CVD outcomes and high-throughput techniques for mining genomic data; 2) new imaging techniques for obtaining faster and higher resolution images of cardiovascular imaging biomarkers such as the cardiac chambers and atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries, as well as possible automatic segmentation, identification, or fusion algorithms; 3) new physiological biomarkers and novel wearable and home healthcare technologies for monitoring them in daily lives; 4) new personalized prediction models of plaque formation and progression or CVD outcomes; and 5) quantifiable indices and wearable systems to measure them for early intervention of CVD through lifestyle changes. It is hoped that the proposed technologies and systems covered in this special issue can result in improved CVD management and treatment at the point of need, offering a better quality of life to the patient.

Hartley, Craig J.; Naghavi, Morteza; Parodi, Oberdan; Pattichis, Constantinos S.; Poon, Carmen C. Y.; Zhang, Yuan-Ting

2014-01-01

96

Postprandial hyperlipidemia, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk: focus on incretins  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is only partially reduced by intensive glycemic control. Diabetic dyslipidemia is suggested to be an additional important contributor to CVD risk in T2DM. Multiple lipid lowering medications effectively reduce fasting LDL cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations and several of them routinely reduce CVD risk. However, in contemporary Western societies the vasculature is commonly exposed to prolonged postprandial hyperlipidemia. Metabolism of these postprandial carbohydrates and lipids yields multiple proatherogenic products. Even a transient increase in these factors may worsen vascular function and induces impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation, a predictor of atherosclerosis and future cardiovascular events. There is a recent increased appreciation for the role of gut-derived incretin hormones in controlling the postprandial metabolic milieu. Incretin-based medications have been developed and are now used to control postprandial hyperglycemia in T2DM. Recent data indicate that these medications may also have profound effects on postprandial lipid metabolism and may favorably influence several cardiovascular functions. This review discusses (1) the postprandial state with special emphasis on postprandial lipid metabolism and its role in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk, (2) the ability of incretins to modulate postprandial hyperlipidemia and (3) the potential of incretin-based therapeutic strategies to improve vascular function and reduce CVD risk.

2011-01-01

97

Postprandial hyperlipidemia, endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk: focus on incretins.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is only partially reduced by intensive glycemic control. Diabetic dyslipidemia is suggested to be an additional important contributor to CVD risk in T2DM. Multiple lipid lowering medications effectively reduce fasting LDL cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations and several of them routinely reduce CVD risk. However, in contemporary Western societies the vasculature is commonly exposed to prolonged postprandial hyperlipidemia. Metabolism of these postprandial carbohydrates and lipids yields multiple proatherogenic products. Even a transient increase in these factors may worsen vascular function and induces impaired endothelial dependent vasodilatation, a predictor of atherosclerosis and future cardiovascular events. There is a recent increased appreciation for the role of gut-derived incretin hormones in controlling the postprandial metabolic milieu. Incretin-based medications have been developed and are now used to control postprandial hyperglycemia in T2DM. Recent data indicate that these medications may also have profound effects on postprandial lipid metabolism and may favorably influence several cardiovascular functions. This review discusses (1) the postprandial state with special emphasis on postprandial lipid metabolism and its role in endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk, (2) the ability of incretins to modulate postprandial hyperlipidemia and (3) the potential of incretin-based therapeutic strategies to improve vascular function and reduce CVD risk. PMID:21736746

Ansar, Sameer; Koska, Juraj; Reaven, Peter D

2011-01-01

98

Validity of Cardiovascular Risk Prediction Models in Kidney Transplant Recipients  

PubMed Central

Background. Predicting cardiovascular risk is of great interest in renal transplant recipients since cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality. Objective. To conduct a systematic review to assess the validity of cardiovascular risk prediction models in this population. Methods. Five databases were searched (MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, and Web of Science) and cohort studies with at least one year of follow-up were included. Variables that described population characteristics, study design, and prognostic performance were extracted. The Quality in Prognostic Studies (QUIPS) tool was used to evaluate bias. Results. Seven studies met the criteria for inclusion, of which, five investigated the Framingham risk score and three used a transplant-specific model. Sample sizes ranged from 344 to 23,575, and three studies lacked sufficient event rates to confidently reach conclusion. Four studies reported discrimination (as measured by c-statistic), which ranged from 0.701 to 0.75, while only one risk model was both internally and externally validated. Conclusion. The Framingham has underestimated cardiovascular events in renal transplant recipients, but these studies have not been robust. A risk prediction model has been externally validated at least on one occasion, but comprehensive validation in multiple cohorts and impact analysis are recommended before widespread clinical application is advocated.

Stewart, Samuel Alan; Shoker, Ahmed

2014-01-01

99

Subclinical hyperthyroidism and cardiovascular risk: recommendations for treatment.  

PubMed

Subclinical hyperthyroidism (SHy), the mildest form of hyperthyroidism, is diagnosed in patients having a persistently low or undetectable serum concentration of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) with normal free T4 and T3 concentrations. Although overt hyperthyroidism is associated with an increased risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, the cardiovascular risk of SHy is controversial. Multiple studies have demonstrated an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, especially in older individuals with TSH levels <0.1 mU/L. The effects of SHy on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality are not clear, but recent meta-analyses suggest a modest increase in mortality, with the risk increasing with age and associated with the lowest TSH levels. The long-term consequences of SHy in young- and middle-aged adults, and in those with TSH levels are mildly low, are uncertain. For these reasons, guidelines for treatment are based on patient age, the degree of TSH suppression, symptoms consistent with hyperthyroidism, and overall cardiovascular and osteoporotic fracture risks. PMID:23563523

Palmeiro, Christopher; Davila, Maria I; Bhat, Mallika; Frishman, William H; Weiss, Irene A

2013-01-01

100

Prognostic Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Renal Disease  

PubMed Central

Although the annual mortality rate for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is decreasing, likely due to an increase in kidney transplantation rate, the survival probability for ESRD patients from day one of dialysis has not changed, and is still poor with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 34%. This is contributed to by a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of death in ESRD patients. In order to improve survival outcomes, patients at high risk of cardiovascular related mortality need to be identified. Heart rate variability (HRV), baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index can be used to assess heart rate control and may predict cardiovascular mortality. This paper will discuss how HRV, baroreceptor sensitivity, and baroreceptor reflex effectiveness index are altered in renal disease and the utility of these indices as markers of cardiac risk in this patient population.

Hildreth, Cara M.

2011-01-01

101

Clustering of Unconventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors among Taiwanese Hemodialysis Patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CAVD) is the most common cause of mortality for chronic hemodialysis (HD) patients, yet the risk factors for the events have not been well established. Methods: We conducted a multicenter cross-sectional survey in 995 chronic HD patients recruited from 12 HD centers in Taiwan to investigate the prevalence of CAVD, including coronary heart disease (CHD), cerebrovascular disease

Shih-Yuan Hung; Hung-Hsiang Liou; Luo-Ping Ger; Liang-Ken Chen; Mei-Chyn Liu; Hsiao-Min Chung; Kang-Ju Chou; Tso-Hsiao Chen; Chih-Kuang Lin; Yu Yang

2009-01-01

102

Developing and Evaluating a Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Project.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the development and baseline evaluation data from the Ozark Heart Health Project, a community-based cardiovascular disease risk reduction program in rural Missouri that targeted smoking, physical inactivity, and poor diet. Several Ozark counties participated in either intervention or control groups, and researchers conducted surveillance…

Brownson, Ross C.; Mayer, Jeffrey P.; Dusseault, Patricia; Dabney, Sue; Wright, Kathleen; Jackson-Thompson, Jeannette; Malone, Bernard; Goodman, Robert

1997-01-01

103

Cardiovascular risk assessment before and after kidney transplantation.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in dialysis patients and the most common cause of death and allograft loss among kidney transplant recipients. End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is associated with an increased incidence and prevalence of a wide range of CVDs including coronary artery disease, stroke, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, sudden cardiac death, pulmonary hypertension, and valvular heart disease. CVD risk factors are very common in patients with ESRD, and most patients have multiple risk factors. Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with ESRD, as a successful transplant improves longevity and quality of life, primarily by decreasing the incidence and severity of CVD. Correction of the uremic state and improved glomerular filtration rate seem to be the major mechanism of this benefit. Transplant candidates should undergo cardiovascular assessment, usually echocardiography and exercise stress testing, and may require formal cardiology consultation. Higher risk candidates, including those aged >50 years, hypertension, diabetes, established coronary artery disease or peripheral vascular disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, and dialysis duration >1 year, should have repeat cardiovascular assessment every 1-2 years. Transplant candidates and recipients should have individualized treatment for CVD and risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. Special consideration should be given for statin therapy, as its use is associated with decreased cardiovascular death in dialysis and transplant patients. Prospective randomized, controlled trials are needed to determine the optimal approach to diagnosis and treat CVD in the transplant candidate and recipient population. PMID:24896248

Glicklich, Daniel; Vohra, Parag

2014-01-01

104

Correlations of cardiovascular disease risk factors between African American siblings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: This study examines intrasibling correlations at 2 points during childhood for African American siblings with the same father, different fathers, a father present in the home, and no father present in the home.Study design: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors were assessed in 267 pairs of African American siblings (visit 1) and in 79 of these siblings approximately 28 months

Ronald J Iannotti; Alan E Zuckerman; Nader Rifai

2000-01-01

105

Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Black College Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examined cardiovascular risk factors in Black first-year college students (N=238). Students completed surveys about blood pressure, cholesterol level, smoking, and physical activity. Results found low rates of high blood pressure, low awareness of cholesterol levels, and low numbers of students who smoked. Females had lower physical…

Kelley, George A.; Lowing, Larry

1997-01-01

106

Microalbuminuria, an integrated marker of cardiovascular risk in essential hypertension  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the existing epidemiological and clinical evidence about the relationships of non-diabetic microalbuminuria with cardiovascular risk factors such as elevated blood pressure (BP), systolic particularly, cardiac hypertrophy, adverse metabolic status, smoking habits, elevated angiotensin II levels, endothelial dysfunction, acute and perhaps subclinical inflammation. Because of that unique property of reflecting the influence of so many clinically relevant parameters,

R Pedrinelli; G Dell’Omo; V Di Bello; R Pontremoli; M Mariani

2002-01-01

107

Dietary Magnesium Intake and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Women  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study assessed the hypothesis that greater magnesium intake is associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke, in a large prospective cohort of women. In 1993, a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to assess magnesium intake in 39,876 female health professionals aged 39 to 89 years who had no history of CVD

Yiqing Song; JoAnn E. Manson; Nancy R. Cook; Christine M. Albert; Julie E. Buring; Simin Liu

2005-01-01

108

Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Healthy Elderly.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cardiovascular risk factors in 57 healthy older individuals were measured (blood pressure, lipids and lipoproteins, and lifestyle behaviors) via a personal health questionnaire. Results indicated that, though the subjects were generally healthy, their lifestyle behaviors, particularly diet and physical activity, could be improved. (SM)

Waller, Kathy V.; And Others

1992-01-01

109

Exercise and Acute Cardiovascular Events: Placing the Risks into Perspective  

Microsoft Academic Search

Habitual physical activity reduces coronary heart disease events, but vig- orous activity can also acutely and transiently increase the risk of sudden cardiac death and acute myocardial infarction in susceptible persons. This scientific statement discusses the potential cardiovascular complications of exercise, their pathological substrate, and their incidence and suggests strategies to reduce these complications. Exercise-associated acute cardiac events generally occur

Paul D. Thompson; Barry A. Franklin; Gary J. Balady; Steven N. Blair; Domenico Corrado; N. A. Mark Estes III; Janet E. Fulton; Neil F. Gordon; William L. Haskell; Mark S. Link; Barry J. Maron; Murray A. Mittleman; Antonio Pelliccia; Nanette K. Wenger; Stefan N. Willich; Fernando Costa

110

The portfolio diet for cardiovascular risk reduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prompted by current dietary recommendations for the control of serum cholesterol to new targets to reduce the risk of coronary\\u000a heart disease (CHD), and by the CHD risk reduction claims made for certain foods or food components, studies are now being\\u000a undertaken using combinations of cholesterol-lowering foods in one diet (eg, a dietary portfolio) rather than single foods\\u000a to achieve

David J. A. Jenkins; Andrea R. Josse; Julia M. W. Wong; Tri H. Nguyen; Cyril W. C. Kendall

2007-01-01

111

Cardiovascular risk stratification and management in pre-diabetes.  

PubMed

Prediabetes, covering individuals with impaired fasting glycemia, impaired glucose tolerance, or high-risk HbA1c levels, is associated with a ?20 % increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with normoglycemic individuals. It is well-known that lifestyle or pharmacologic interventions can prevent diabetes in prediabetic people; however, the evidence is less clear regarding prevention of CVD. Most diabetes prevention trials have failed to show beneficial effects on CVD morbidity and mortality despite significant improvements of CVD risk factors in individuals with prediabetes. Another challenge is how to estimate CVD risk in prediabetic people. In general, prediction models for CVD do not take glucose levels or prediabetes status into account, thereby underestimating CVD risk in these high-risk individuals. More evidence within risk stratification and management of CVD risk in prediabetes is needed in order to recommend useful and effective strategies for early prevention of CVD. PMID:24743942

Færch, Kristine; Vistisen, Dorte; Johansen, Nanna Borup; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

2014-06-01

112

Cardiovascular risk factors in hematopoietic cell transplantation survivors: role in development of subsequent cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients may be at an increased risk of developing hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia (referred to as cardiovascular risk factors [CVRFs]); and these factors can potentially increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We examined the incidence and predictors of CVRFs and subsequent CVD in 1885 consecutive 1+year survivors of HCT performed at City of Hope between 1995 and 2004. Ten-year cumulative incidence of hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and multiple (? 2) CVRFs was 37.7%, 18.1%, 46.7%, and 31.4%, respectively. The prevalence of CVRFs was significantly higher among HCT recipients compared with the general population; contributed to largely by allogeneic HCT recipients. Older age and obesity at HCT were associated with increased risk of CVRFs. History of grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease was associated with an increased risk for hypertension (relative risk [RR] = 9.1, P < .01), diabetes (RR = 5.8, P < .01), and dyslipidemia (RR = 3.2, P < .01); conditioning with total body irradiation was associated with an increased risk of diabetes (RR = 1.5, P = .01) and dyslipidemia (RR = 1.4, P < .01). There was an incremental increase in 10-year incidence of CVD by number of CVRFs (4.7% [none], 7.0% [1 CVRF], 11.2% [? 2 CVRFs], P < .01); the risk was especially high (15.0%) in patients with multiple CVRFs and pre-HCT exposure to anthracyclines or chest radiation. PMID:23034279

Armenian, Saro H; Sun, Can-Lan; Vase, Tabitha; Ness, Kirsten K; Blum, Emily; Francisco, Liton; Venkataraman, Kalyanasundaram; Samoa, Raynald; Wong, F Lennie; Forman, Stephen J; Bhatia, Smita

2012-11-29

113

Intestinal Microbial Metabolism of Phosphatidylcholine and Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Recent studies in animals have shown a mechanistic link between intestinal microbial metabolism of the choline moiety in dietary phosphatidylcholine (lecithin) and coronary artery disease through the production of a proatherosclerotic metabolite, trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). We investigated the relationship among intestinal microbiota-dependent metabolism of dietary phosphatidylcholine, TMAO levels, and adverse cardiovascular events in humans. METHODS We quantified plasma and urinary levels of TMAO and plasma choline and betaine levels by means of liquid chromatography and online tandem mass spectrometry after a phosphatidylcholine challenge (ingestion of two hard-boiled eggs and deuterium [d9]-labeled phosphatidylcholine) in healthy participants before and after the suppression of intestinal microbiota with oral broad-spectrum antibiotics. We further examined the relationship between fasting plasma levels of TMAO and incident major adverse cardiovascular events (death, myocardial infarction, or stroke) during 3 years of follow-up in 4007 patients undergoing elective coronary angiography. RESULTS Time-dependent increases in levels of both TMAO and its d9 isotopologue, as well as other choline metabolites, were detected after the phosphatidylcholine challenge. Plasma levels of TMAO were markedly suppressed after the administration of antibiotics and then reappeared after withdrawal of antibiotics. Increased plasma levels of TMAO were associated with an increased risk of a major adverse cardiovascular event (hazard ratio for highest vs. lowest TMAO quartile, 2.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.96 to 3.28; P<0.001). An elevated TMAO level predicted an increased risk of major adverse cardiovascular events after adjustment for traditional risk factors (P<0.001), as well as in lower-risk subgroups. CONCLUSIONS The production of TMAO from dietary phosphatidylcholine is dependent on metabolism by the intestinal microbiota. Increased TMAO levels are associated with an increased risk of incident major adverse cardiovascular events. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others.)

Tang, W.H. Wilson; Wang, Zeneng; Levison, Bruce S.; Koeth, Robert A.; Britt, Earl B.; Fu, Xiaoming; Wu, Yuping; Hazen, Stanley L.

2013-01-01

114

Method and apparatus for assessing cardiovascular risk  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The method for assessing risk of an adverse clinical event includes detecting a physiologic signal in the subject and determining from the physiologic signal a sequence of intervals corresponding to time intervals between heart beats. The long-time structure of fluctuations in the intervals over a time period of more than fifteen minutes is analyzed to assess risk of an adverse clinical event. In a preferred embodiment, the physiologic signal is an electrocardiogram and the time period is at least fifteen minutes. A preferred method for analyzing the long-time structure variability in the intervals includes computing the power spectrum and fitting the power spectrum to a power law dependence on frequency over a selected frequency range such as 10.sup.-4 to 10.sup.-2 Hz. Characteristics of the long-time structure fluctuations in the intervals is used to assess risk of an adverse clinical event.

Albrecht, Paul (Inventor); Bigger, J. Thomas (Inventor); Cohen, Richard J. (Inventor)

1998-01-01

115

Marine Carotenoids and Cardiovascular Risk Markers  

PubMed Central

Marine carotenoids are important bioactive compounds with physiological activities related to prevention of degenerative diseases found principally in plants, with potential antioxidant biological properties deriving from their chemical structure and interaction with biological membranes. They are substances with very special and remarkable properties that no other groups of substances possess and that form the basis of their many, varied functions and actions in all kinds of living organisms. The potential beneficial effects of marine carotenoids have been studied particularly in astaxanthin and fucoxanthin as they are the major marine carotenoids. Both these two carotenoids show strong antioxidant activity attributed to quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. The potential role of these carotenoids as dietary anti-oxidants has been suggested to be one of the main mechanisms for their preventive effects against cancer and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this short review is to examine the published studies concerning the use of the two marine carotenoids, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

Riccioni, Graziano; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio; Franceschelli, Sara; Speranza, Lorenza

2011-01-01

116

[Prevention of cardiovascular comorbidities in uremic patients on chronic dialysis: metabolic derangements and cardiovascular risk].  

PubMed

Cardiovascular events are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in uremic patients on renal replacement therapy. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors such as dyslipidemia and hypertension as well as risk factors specific to uremia such as calcium and phosphate metabolism derangements are involved in the development and progression of the cardiovascular alterations. In this review the results of prospective randomized trials that evaluated the effects on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality of lowering serum cholesterol and phosphate levels and controlling secondary hyperparathyroidism are critically reexamined. A recent trial of 9270 patients with chronic kidney disease documented a significant reduction of major atherosclerotic events by lowering LDL cholesterol by 39 mg/dL on average with sinvastatin plus ezetimibe over nearly 5 years. No significant reduction in mortality rate was documented by lowering serum phosphate levels with sevelamer rather than calcium-containing phosphate binders. Treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism with cinacalcet plus lowdose vitamin D seems to attenuate the progression of vascular calcification. PMID:23229605

Malberti, Fabio

2012-11-01

117

Medical management and cardiovascular risk reduction in peripheral arterial disease  

PubMed Central

Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common manifestation of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Its incidence increases with age and in the presence of known cardiovascular risk factors (eg, smoking and diabetes). PAD frequently coexists with coronary and/or cerebrovascular disease, probably because of common risk factors. Asymptomatic PAD of the lower limbs (defined as an ankle-brachial index of less than 0.9) is believed to be approximately three to four times more common than symptomatic PAD. Both symptomatic and asymptomatic diseases are associated with high risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Therefore, patients with PAD are candidates for preventive strategies for cardiovascular events. Platelet activation and aggregation is believed to significantly contribute to atherothrombotic events. Thus, patients with PAD can benefit from antiplatelet therapy. Both acetylsalicylic acid and clopidogrel decrease serious cardiovascular events in patients with PAD. However, acetylsalicylic acid is the preferred agent because of its low cost and wide availability. Cilostazol is recommended for use in patients with severe and disabling symptoms but not for asymptomatic or less disabling disease. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend routine use of newer agents such as picotamide in patients with PAD.

Sethi, Ankur; Arora, Rohit R

2008-01-01

118

Familial predisposition to cardiovascular risk and disease contributes to cardiovascular risk and disease interacting with other cardiovascular risk factors in diabetes: implication for common soil (JDDM 14).  

PubMed

In diabetic population cardiovascular morbidity is high and the effects of genetic predisposition remain elucidated. In a large-scale multicenter-based diabetic population, clinical parameters including conventional cardiovascular risk factors and first-degree family history (FH) of diabetes, hypertension, coronary heart disease (CHD) and stroke were investigated in association with presence of CHD and stroke. Among 3611 diabetic patients, 181 (5.0%) had CHD and 118 (3.3%) had stroke. After adjustment for conventional risk factors, FH of CHD (OR 2.32, p<0.0001) and of diabetes (OR 1.44, p<0.05) were associated with CHD, and FH of stroke (OR 1.86, p<0.01) was associated with stroke. FH of hypertension was significantly associated with presence of hypertension and obesity. Synergistic effect of FH of CHD in combination with hypertension or aging on increasing CHD, and that of FH of stroke in combination with microalbuminuria on increasing stroke were found. FH of diabetes, of hypertension, of CHD and of stroke were significantly associated with FH of each disease, indicating clustering of FH. In diabetic population, FH of CHD and FH of stroke doubled the risk of CHD and stroke, respectively, and had synergistic effect in combination with other risk factors. Clustering of FH may indicate interrelation of genetic predisposition. PMID:18423471

Yokoyama, Hiroki; Kawai, Koichi; Ohishi, Mariko; Sone, Hirohito

2008-12-01

119

Cardiovascular disease risk factors in homeless people  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are associated with significant morbidity and mortality, which is highest in Eastern Europe including Estonia. Accumulating evidence suggests that life-style is associated with the development of CVD. The aim of this study was to evaluate the informative power of common CVD-related markers under unhealthy conditions. Subjects Subjects (n = 51; mean age 45 years; 90% men) were recruited from a shelter for homeless people in Tallinn, Estonia, and consisted of persons who constantly used alcohol or surrogates, smoked, and were in a bad physical condition (amputated toes, necrotic ulcers, etc.). Methods Blood pressure, pulse rate, and waist circumference were measured, and body mass index (BMI) was calculated. The following markers were measured in blood serum: total cholesterol (TChol), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-Chol), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-Chol), plasma triglycerides (TG), apolipoproteins A-l (ApoA1) and B (ApoB), lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), glucose (Gluc), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), serum carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (CDT), gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST). Except smoking, the anamnestic information considering eating habits, declared alcohol consumption and medication intake were not included in the analysis due to the low credibility of self-reported data. Results More than half of the investigated patients had values of measured markers (hsCRP, TChol, LDL-Chol, TG, HbA1c, ApoA1, ApoB, Lp(a), Gluc) within normal range. Surprisingly, 100% of subjects had HDL-Chol within endemic norm. Conclusion This study demonstrates that traditional markers, commonly used for prediction and diagnosis and treatment of CVD, are not always applicable to homeless people, apparently due to their aberrant life-style.

2011-01-01

120

Exercise protects the cardiovascular system: effects beyond traditional risk factors  

PubMed Central

In humans, exercise training and moderate to high levels of physical activity are protective against cardiovascular disease. In fact they are ?40% more protective than predicted based on the changes in traditional risk factors (blood lipids, hypertension, diabetes etc.) that they cause. In this review, we highlight the positive effects of exercise on endothelial function and the autonomic nervous system. We also ask if these effects alone, or in combination, might explain the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease that appear to be independent of traditional risk factor modification. Our goal is to use selected data from our own work and that of others to stimulate debate on the nature and cause of the ‘risk factor gap’ associated with exercise and physical activity.

Joyner, Michael J; Green, Daniel J

2009-01-01

121

Total cardiovascular risk profile of Taiwanese vegetarians  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Although the health benefits of vegetarian diets have been well documented among Western population, there are geographic differences of vegetarian diets and the health benefits of the Taiwanese vegetarian diet have not been studied extensively. In addition to conventional risk factors, homocysteine and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels have been found to predict first atherothrombotic events. We undertook this study

C-W Chen; Y-L Lin; T-K Lin; C-T Lin; B-C Chen; C-L Lin

2008-01-01

122

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

The term "Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease" (NAFLD) covers a series of liver lesions similar to those induced by alcohol, but not caused by alcohol use. The importance of NAFLD lies in the high prevalence in Western societies and, from the point of view of the liver, in its progression from steatosis to cirrhosis and liver cancer. More recently, NAFLD has been found to be associated with lipid metabolism disorders, the deposition of fat outside of the adipocytes, insulin resistance and Metabolic Syndrome. Also attributed to NAFLD is a heightened systemic pro-inflammatory state, which accelerates arteriosclerosis, thereby increasing cardiovascular risk and associated cardiovascular events. Here we provide an update to the etiopathogenesis of NAFLD, its influence on cardiovascular disease, and the treatment options. PMID:23141876

Brea, Angel; Puzo, José

2013-08-20

123

Prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors among Nigerians with stroke  

PubMed Central

Summary Stroke is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The case fatality rates from stroke are two- to three-fold higher in sub-Saharan Africa, including Nigeria, than in the developed world, mainly because of limited healthcare facilities and untreated risk factors. The aim was to determine the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors among Nigerians with stroke and compare the prevalence of risk factors between young and older adults with stroke. Methods The study was cross-sectional in design, and was carried out on stroke patients who were 15 years of age or older, in the medical wards and neurology clinic of Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Data was collated consecutively over six months. Results A total of 81 patients were studied. Sixteen of them (19.8%) were under 45 years old (group 1) while the remaining 65 patients (80.2%) were 45 years or older (group 2). All patients had at least one risk factor. One-third of group 1 patients (37.5%) and 81.5% of group 2 patients had three or more cardiovascular risk factors (p = 0.0004). The most widespread risk factor in all patients, particularly in group 2 patients was systemic hypertension, while dyslipidaemia was most common among group 1 patients. Recurrent stroke was significantly more common among group 2 than group 1 patients (30.8 and 6.3% respectively) (p = 0.045). Conclusion Cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension and dyslipidaemia were prevalent in the studied patients with stroke. The older patients in group 2 had more multiple-risk factors than the younger ones in group 1. Secondary prevention strategies including detection and treatment of risk factors may curtail the burden of the disease.

Karaye, KM; Nashabaru, I; Fika, GM; Ibrahim, DA; Maiyaki, BM; Ishaq, NA; Abubakar, LY; Nalado, AM; Hassan, M; Bello, AK; Yusuf, SM

2007-01-01

124

Younger age of escalation of cardiovascular risk factors in Asian Indian subjects  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular risk factors start early, track through the young age and manifest in middle age in most societies. We conducted epidemiological studies to determine prevalence and age-specific trends in cardiovascular risk factors among adolescent and young urban Asian Indians. METHODS: Population based epidemiological studies to identify cardiovascular risk factors were performed in North India in 1999–2002. We evaluated major

Rajeev Gupta; Anoop Misra; Naval K Vikram; Dimple Kondal; Shaon Sen Gupta; Aachu Agrawal; RM Pandey

2009-01-01

125

Appropriate use of antiplatelets: is prescription in daily practice influenced by the global cardiovascular risk?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the appropriate pre- scription of antiplatelets according to patients' global cardiovascular risk level in everyday practice. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, general practitioners (GPs) identified a random sample of 10% of patients at car- diovascular risk among all subjects coming to the sur- gery and collected data on cardiovascular risk factors and history of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

Lara Monesi; Fausto Avanzini; Simona Barlera; Vittorio Caimi; Davide Lauri; Paolo Longoni; Daria Roccatagliata; Massimo Tombesi; Gianni Tognoni; Maria Carla Roncaglioni

2005-01-01

126

Cardiovascular risk with and without antihypertensive drug treatment in the Japanese general population: participant-level meta-analysis.  

PubMed

To evaluate the cardiovascular mortality risk in association with blood pressure level among people with and without antihypertensive treatment, we performed the participant-level meta-analysis that included 39 705 Japanese from 6 cohorts (58.4% women; mean age, 60.1 years; 20.4% treated). Multivariable-adjusted Cox models were used to analyze the risk of cardiovascular mortality and its subtypes among 6 blood pressure levels according to recent guidelines, optimal to Grade 3 hypertension, and the usage of antihypertensive medication at baseline. During median 10.0 years of follow-up, there were 2032 cardiovascular deaths (5.1 per 1000 person-years), of which 410 deaths were coronary heart disease, 371 were heart failure, and 903 deaths were stroke. Treated participants had significantly higher risk for cardiovascular mortality (hazard ratios, 1.50; 95% confidence intervals, 1.36-1.66), coronary heart disease (hazard ratios, 1.53; confidence intervals, 1.23-1.90), heart failure (hazard ratios, 1.39; confidence intervals, 1.09-1.76), and stroke (hazard ratios, 1.48; confidence intervals, 1.28-1.72) compared with untreated people. Among untreated participants, the risks increased linearly with an increment of blood pressure category (P?0.011). The risk increments per blood pressure category were higher in young participants (<60 years; 22% to 79%) than those in old people (?60 years; 7% to 15%) with significant interaction for total cardiovascular, heart failure, and stroke mortality (P?0.026). Among treated participants, the significant linear association was also observed for cardiovascular mortality (P=0.0003), whereas no stepwise increase in stroke death was observed (P=0.19). The risks of cardiovascular mortality were ?1.5-fold high in participants under antihypertensive medication. More attention should be paid to the residual cardiovascular risks in treated patients. PMID:24637661

Asayama, Kei; Satoh, Michihiro; Murakami, Yoshitaka; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Nagasawa, Sin-Ya; Tsuji, Ichiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Imai, Yutaka; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Okamura, Tomonori

2014-06-01

127

The cardiometabolic syndrome as a cardiovascular risk factor.  

PubMed

The cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and includes a constellation of risk factors such as central obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, microalbuminuria, and hypercoagulability. Collectively, these risk factors increase CVD endpoints such as stroke, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and overall mortality. The CMS is associated with endothelial dysfunction, inflammation, abnormal thrombolysis, and increased oxidative stress that accentuate progression of CVD. We will review how the varying components of the CMS relate to an increased CVD and renal disease risk. PMID:16355016

Govindarajan, Gurushankar; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Mugo, Maryann; Stump, Craig; Sowers, James R

2005-12-01

128

Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Schizophrenia Patients: A Case Control Study  

PubMed Central

Background: The Schizophrenia patients are at higher risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The aim of this case-control study is to measure Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) risk parameters in patient group and compare it with normal population. Methodology: We recruited 45 cases of Schizophrenia diagnosed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-IV) criteria and 41 healthy controls from general population. The body mass index, metabolic syndrome parameters, lipid parameters and high sensitive C-reactive protein were measured in both groups. Metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia prevalence were assessed based on National Cholesterol Education Programme (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guidelines. Results: The Schizophrenia subjects showed statistically significant high waist circumference, increased triglycerides and decreased HDL cholesterol values. The subjects also showed statistically significant increased hs-CRP values. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and laboratory dyslipidemia were 28.8% and 51.1% respectively, which were higher compared to control group. Conclusion: The Schizophrenia subjects are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease events due to high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and dyslipidemia. These patients should be regularly monitored for CVD risk factors and timely referred to physician for further management.

Joshi, Kedar B.; Nillawar, Anup; Thorat, A.P.

2013-01-01

129

Biomarkers and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment for Primary Prevention: an Update  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Interest in cardiovascular biomarkers in primary prevention has increased dramatically in the past decade. This has been fueled by an improved understanding of cardiovascular pathophysiology, as well as novel technologies for biomarker identification. CONTENT The article provides a brief overview of recent concepts in the evaluation of screening biomarkers, because biomarkers may behave differently when used for screening as opposed to diagnosis or disease staging. The following specific biomarker examples are then discussed, with a focus on data from primary prevention studies: high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, B-type natriuretic peptide, lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2, and high-sensitivity troponin T. The article concludes by addressing novel platforms for biomarker discovery, reviewing recent examples from the field of metabolomics. SUMMARY An ongoing challenge is to develop screening strategies that can identify individuals at risk for cardiovascular events well before symptoms appear. For this purpose, the measurement of soluble biomarkers could be an important adjunct to traditional risk cardiovascular assessment. Recent studies highlight both the strengths and limitations of “novel” circulating biomarkers, and suggest that substantial work is still needed to identify biomarkers that are sufficiently accurate and cost-effective for routine use in primary prevention.

Gilstrap, Lauren G.; Wang, Thomas J.

2014-01-01

130

Association of Sympathovagal Imbalance with Cardiovascular Risks in Overt Hypothyroidism  

PubMed Central

Background: Cardiovascular morbidities have been reported in hypothyroidism. Aims: The objective of this study is to investigate the link of sympathovagal imbalance (SVI) to cardiovascular risks (CVRs) and the plausible mechanisms of CVR in hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods: Age-matched 104 females (50 controls, 54 hypothyroids) were recruited and their body mass index (BMI), cardiovascular parameters, autonomic function tests by spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV), heart rate response to standing, deep breathing and blood pressure response to isometric handgrip were studied. Thyroid profile, lipid profile, immunological and inflammatory markers were estimated and their association with low-frequency to the high-frequency ratio (LF-HF) of HRV, the marker of SVI was assessed by multivariate regression. Results: Increased diastolic pressure, decreased HRV, increased LF-HF, dyslipidemia and increased high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were observed in hypothyroid patients and all these parameters had significant correlation with LF-HF. BMI had no significant association with LF-HF. Atherogenic index (? 1.144, P = 0.001) and hsCRP (b 0.578, P = 0.009) had independent contribution to LF-HF. LF-HF could significantly predict hypertension status (odds ratio 2.05, confidence interval 1.110-5.352, P = 0.008) in hypothyroid subjects. Conclusions: SVI due to sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal occurs in hypothyroidism. Dyslipidemia and low-grade inflammation, but not obesity contribute to SVI and SVI contributes to cardiovascular risks.

Syamsunder, Avupati Naga; Pal, Gopal Krushna; Pal, Pravati; Kamalanathan, Chandrakasan Sadishkumar; Parija, Subhash Chandra; Nanda, Nivedita

2013-01-01

131

Chronic hyperuricemia, uric acid deposit and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel "cardiometabolic" treatments will be also discussed. PMID:23173592

Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Di Giosia, Paolo; Cheli, Paola; Del Pinto, Rita; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

2013-01-01

132

Chronic Hyperuricemia, Uric Acid Deposit and Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

Hyperuricemia is commonly associated with traditional risk factors such as dysglicemia, dyslipidemia, central obesity and abnormal blood pressure, i.e. the metabolic syndrome. Concordantly, recent studies have revived the controversy over the role of circulating uric acid, hyperuricemia, and gout as an independent prognostic factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In this regard, different studies also evaluated the possible role of xanthine inhibitors in inducing blood pressure reduction, increment in flow-mediated dilation, and improved cardiovascular prognosis in various patient settings. The vast majority of these studies have been conducted with either allopurinol or its active metabolite oxypurinol, i.e. two purine-like non-selective inhibitors of xanthine oxidase. More recently, the role of uric acid as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the possible protective role exerted by reduction of hyperuricemia to normal level have been evaluated by the use of febuxostat, a selective, non purine-like xanthine oxidase inhibitor. In this review, we will report current evidence on hyperuricemia in cardiovascular disease. The value of uric acid as a biomarker and as a potential therapeutic target for tailored old and novel “cardiometabolic” treatments will be also discussed.

Grassi, Davide; Ferri, Livia; Desideri, Giovambattista; Giosia, Paolo Di; Cheli, Paola; Pinto, Rita Del; Properzi, Giuliana; Ferri, Claudio

2013-01-01

133

Does Pomegranate intake attenuate cardiovascular risk factors in hemodialysis patients?  

PubMed Central

Background Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality among hemodialysis (HD) patients. It has been attributed, among other causes, to hypertension and dyslipidemia. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of a year-long consumption of Pomegranate juice (PJ), on two traditional cardiovascular (CV) risk factors: hypertension and lipid profile, as well as on cardiovascular events. Methods 101 HD patients were randomized to receive 100 cc of PJ (0.7 mM polyphenols) or matching placebo juice, three times a week for one year. The primary endpoints were traditional CV risk factors; blood pressure and lipid profile. Systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure, plasma levels of triglycerides (TG), high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol were monitored quarterly during the study year. Secondary endpoint was incidence of cardiovascular events. Results PJ consumption yielded a significant time response improvement in systolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, triglycerides and HDL level; an improvement that was not observed in the placebo intake group. These beneficial outcomes were more pronounced among patients with hypertension, high level of triglycerides and low levels of HDL. Conclusion Regular PJ consumption by HD patients reduced systolic blood pressure and improved lipid profile. These favorable changes may reduce the accelerated atherosclerosis and high incidence of CVD among HD patients. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Identifier number: NCT00727519

2014-01-01

134

Prevalence of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Evaluation of Cardiovascular Risk Using Three Risk Equations in Nigerians Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus  

PubMed Central

Background: Reports from middle- and high-income countries suggest that the improved health outcome from highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLWHIV) is being mitigated by increase in deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Aims: This study was to determine the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (CVRFs) and the 10-year cardiovascular risk using three risk equations in PLWHIV with no overt vascular disease. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 265 PLWHIV. We classified the subjects as having low, moderate or high cardiovascular risk using the Framingham, World Health Organization/International Society of Hypertension (WHO/ISH) and Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) equations. Results: The mean age of the cohort was 38.7 ± 8.7 years; 179 (67.5%) were females and 214 (80.8%) were on HAART. The prevalent traditional CVRFs in our cohort were low physical activity (66%), low HDL-C (49.1%), hypercholesterolaemia (33.6%), BMI ? 25 kg/m2 (32.8%) and elevated LDL-C (28.3%). The prevalence of smoking was very low (1.9%). The prevalence of moderate to high 10-year coronary risk was 11.7, 12.8, and 12.8% according to the Framingham, WHO/ISH and SCORE risk equations, respectively. Conclusion: Most of our patients had low overall cardiovascular risk according to the three risk equations.

Edward, Ayodele Olugbenga; Oladayo, Akinboro Adeolu; Omolola, Akinyemi Suliat; Adetiloye, Adepeju Akinlawon; Adedayo, Popoola Adetoun

2013-01-01

135

Environmental endocrine disruption of energy metabolism and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Rates of metabolic diseases have increased at an astounding rate in recent decades. Even though poor diet and physical inactivity are central drivers, these lifestyle changes alone fail to fully account for the magnitude and rapidity of the epidemic. Thus, attention has turned to identifying novel risk factors, including the contribution of environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals. Epidemiologic and preclinical data support a role for various contaminants in the pathogenesis of diabetes. In addition to the vascular risk associated with dysglycemia, emerging evidence implicates multiple pollutants in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Reviewed herein are studies linking endocrine disruptors to these key diseases that drive significant individual and societal morbidity and mortality. Identifying chemicals associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disease as well as their mechanisms of action is critical for developing novel treatment strategies and public policy to mitigate the impact of these diseases on human health. PMID:24756343

Kirkley, Andrew G; Sargis, Robert M

2014-06-01

136

Cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive function in African Americans.  

PubMed

The present study examined the cross-sectional association of medically determined cardiovascular risk factors with cognitive function in 43 African Americans (aged 43-82 yr; 83% women). Measures of attention, memory, and executive functions were evaluated in relation to blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fitness level (peak O(2)). Multiple regression analyses with age, education, number of antihypertensive medications, HbA1c, diastolic BP, and peak O(2) as predictors revealed significant (and marginally significant) associations between lower levels of fitness (peak O(2)) and poorer executive functions and delayed verbal memory. Antihypertensive medications were associated with poorer attention, but better delayed verbal memory. In addition, greater levels of HbA1c were positively related to attention. These results suggest that cardiovascular risk factors are important predictors of cognitive function among middle-aged and older African Americans. PMID:12084788

Izquierdo-Porrera, Anna Maria; Waldstein, Shari R

2002-07-01

137

Cardiovascular Prevention in a High Risk Sport, Ice Hockey: Applications in Wider Sports Physical Therapy Practice  

PubMed Central

Although acute myocardial infarction and sudden cardiac death are relatively rare occurrences in athletics, cardiovascular accidents do occur. This manuscript presents information on the cardiovascular risks in athletics. In addition, information is provided on screening for cardiovascular risk – including history taking, chart review, physical examination – and the appropriate guidelines on the treatment of athletes found to be at risk. For the purpose of this article, the sport of ice hockey is used to illustrate the subject matter and highlight the behaviors in sport that carry cardiovascular risk. Physical therapists have ethical and legal responsibility to undertake the necessary screening procedures to recognize and respond to any signs of cardiovascular risk in their clients.

2006-01-01

138

Four anthropometric indices and cardiovascular risk factors in Taiwan  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships between four anthropometric measurements and cardiovascular risk factors in Taiwan.DESIGN: The data was collected from four nationwide health screen centers in Taiwan from 1998 to 1999.SUBJECTS: A total of 38 556 subjects: 18 280 men and 20 276 women, mean age=37.0±11.1 y. None had any known major systemic diseases or were currently on medication.MEASUREMENTS: Individual

K-C Huang; W-Y Lin; L-T Lee; C-Y Chen; H Lo; H-H Hsia; I-L Liu; W-Y Shau; R-S Lin; Kuo-Chin Huang

2002-01-01

139

Effects of cocoa flavanols on risk factors for cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epidemiologic investigations support the hypothesis that regular consumption of flavonoid-containing foods can reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). While flavonoids are ubiquitous in plants, cocoa can be particularly rich in a sub-class of flavonoids known as flavanols. A number of human dietary intervention trials with flavanol-containing cocoa products have demonstrated improvements in endothelial and platelet function, as well as

John W Erdman Jr; LeaAnn Carson; Catherine Kwik-Uribe; Ellen M

140

Diet, physical activity, childhood obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eating and physical activity (PA) patterns and obesity in childhood have many long-term effects on the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Two-thirds of premature deaths in the US are due to poor nutrition, lack of PA and tobacco use. Obesity, a result of excess energy intake and inadequate PA, is an indicator of unhealthy lifestyles. Currently, over one-third of American

Youfa Wang

2004-01-01

141

Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Menstrual Cycle Phase in Premenopausal Women  

PubMed Central

Background Exogenous estrogens have been shown to affect markers of cardiovascular risk in women. Aim The objective of this study was to determine the effect of menstrual cycle phase on markers of cardiovascular risk in young, healthy women with regular menstrual cycles. Subjects and Methods This prospective cohort study examined 20 healthy premenopausal women at two time points in the menstrual cycle, in early follicular phase and early luteal phase. Results In the early luteal phase, levels of estrogen, progesterone, luteinizing hormone, total cholesterol and HDL were significantly higher, compared with the early follicular phase. In contrast, there were no significant differences in LDL or triglyceride levels between the two phases. Furthermore, there were no significant effects of menstrual cycle phase on glycemic indices (fasting blood glucose, HbA1c or HOMAIR), markers of inflammation (CRP, sCD40L, ICAM, VCAM, or adiponectin), or vascular function, as measured by brachial artery reactivity. Conclusions Although menstrual cycle phase affects total cholesterol and HDL levels, it does not affect other markers of cardiovascular risk in young women with regular menstrual cycles.

Saxena, A.R.; Seely, E.W.; Goldfine, A.B.

2012-01-01

142

Association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular risk in individuals with type-2 diabetes without overt cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Background: Erectile dysfunction in type-2 diabetes may be an independent marker for coronary artery disease. Present study was undertaken to investigate whether type-2 diabetic patients with erectile dysfunction without having overt cardiovascular disease had increased cardiovascular risk. Aim: To find out correlation between ED and cardiovascular risk in diabetic patients. Methods: Fifty type-2 diabetic patients were assessed for erectile dysfunction using international index of erectile dysfunction (IIEF-5), which include questionnaire and cardiovascular risk assessment by multiparameter cardiovascular analysis device (periscope). Results: The prevalence of erectile dysfunction in type-2 diabetics was very high (78%), mild, moderate and severe ED was present in 6, 36 and 36%, respectively. The total cardiovascular risk was more in patients with ED in comparison to patients without ED (34.87 ± 18.82 vs 20.91 ± 11.03 p = 0.002). The mean 10-years coronary risk and cardiac risk was 12.00 + 9.60 and 22.23 + 14.14 (p = 0.029) and 13.36 ± 1.22 and 28.85 ± 4.13 (p 0.002) in patients without ED and with ED respectively. The mean vascular and atherosclerosis risk was 28.73 ± 13.94 and 39.38 ± 19.51 (p > 0.05) and 26.18 ± 10.31 and 33.92 ± 13.40 (p > 0.05) in patients without ED and with ED, respectively. Total cardiovascular risk was found to increase with age, duration of diabetes and HbA1c levels. Conclusion: The total cardiovascular risk increases with increasing severity of erectile dysfunction in type-2 diabetic patients without having overt cardiovascular disease.

Meena, Babu Lal; Kochar, Dhanpat Kumar; Agarwal, Tulsi Das; Choudhary, Raghvendra; Kochar, Abhishek

2009-01-01

143

Cardiovascular protection for all individuals at high risk: evidence-based best practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with cardiovascular risk factors are largely undertreated, for many reasons. Vulnerable individuals may not be aware\\u000a of the risks they are facing or an individual’s risk of cardiovascular disease may be underestimated, particularly among those\\u000a at high risk. Furthermore, in individuals identified as being at high total cardiovascular risk, the full spectrum of therapeutic\\u000a options may not be implemented

George Bakris; Michael Böhm; Gilles Dagenais; Hans-Christoph Diener; Toshiro Fujita; Philip Gorelick; Sverre Erik Kjeldsen; Markku Laakso; Giuseppe Mancia; Bertram Pitt; Arya Sharma; Peter Sleight; Koon Teo; Thomas Unger; Michael Weber; Bryan Williams; Faiez Zannad

2008-01-01

144

Risk of cardiovascular disease? A qualitative study of risk interpretation among patients with high cholesterol  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies have shown the importance of paying attention to lay peoples’ interpretations of risk of disease, in order to explain health-related behavior. However, risk interpretations interplay with social context in complex ways. The objective was to explore how asymptomatic patients with high cholesterol interpret risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods Fourteen patients with high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease were interviewed, and patterns across patient accounts were identified and analysed from an ethnographic approach. Results Information from the general practitioner about high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease was reinterpreted in everyday social life. The risk associated with fatty foods was weighed against the pleasures of social and cultural events in which this type of food was common and cherished. A positive mindset was applied as a strategy to lower the risk of having high cholesterol, but knowledge about risk was viewed as a cause of anxiety and self-absorption, and this anxiety made the body susceptible to disease, hampering the chances for healthy life. Conclusion Interpretations of high cholesterol and risk of cardiovascular disease are embedded in social relations and everyday life concerns. This should be addressed in general practice in preference-sensitive cases about risk-reducing medication. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01187056

2013-01-01

145

The combined effect of augmentation index and carotid intima-media thickness on cardiovascular risk in young and middle-aged men without cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) has been used as a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis and is related to cardiovascular risk. Indices of arterial stiffness are also associated with cardiovascular risk and atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to assess the prognostic value of the combination of surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease measured non-invasively in subjects without cardiovascular disease. In

K S Stamatelopoulos; D Kalpakos; A D Protogerou; C M Papamichael; I Ikonomidis; M Tsitsirikos; I Revela; T G Papaioannou; J P Lekakis

2006-01-01

146

Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy and herbal medicines: the risk of drug interaction.  

PubMed

Use of herbal medicines among patients under cardiovascular pharmacotherapy is widespread. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature to determine the possible interactions between herbal medicines and cardiovascular drugs. The Medline database was searched for clinical articles published between January 1996 and February 2003. Forty-three case reports and eight clinical trials were identified. Warfarin was the most common cardiovascular drug involved. It was found to interact with boldo, curbicin, fenugreek, garlic, danshen, devil's claw, don quai, ginkgo, papaya, lycium, mango, PC-SPES (resulting in over-anticoagulation) and with ginseng, green tea, soy and St. John's wort (causing decreased anticoagulant effect). Gum guar, St. John's wort, Siberian ginseng and wheat bran were found to decrease plasma digoxin concentration; aspirin interactions include spontaneous hyphema when associated with ginkgo and increased bioavailability if combined with tamarind. Decreased plasma concentration of simvastatin or lovastatin was observed after co-administration with St. John's wort and wheat bran, respectively. Other adverse events include hypertension after co-administration of ginkgo and a diuretic thiazide, hypokalemia after liquorice and antihypertensives and anticoagulation after phenprocoumon and St. John's wort. Interaction between herbal medicine and cardiovascular drugs is a potentially important safety issue. Patients taking anticoagulants are at the highest risk. PMID:15676159

Izzo, Angelo A; Di Carlo, Giulia; Borrelli, Francesca; Ernst, Edzard

2005-01-01

147

Iron: Protector or Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease? Still Controversial  

PubMed Central

Iron is the second most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust. Despite being present in trace amounts, it is an essential trace element for the human body, although it can also be toxic due to oxidative stress generation by the Fenton reaction, causing organic biomolecule oxidation. This process is the basis of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The relationship between iron and cardiovascular disease was proposed in 1981 by Jerome Sullivan. Since then, numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted to test this hypothesis. The aim of this review is to present the main findings of the chief epidemiological studies published during the last 32 years, since Sullivan formulated his iron hypothesis, suggesting that this element might act as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have analyzed 55 studies, of which 27 supported the iron hypothesis, 20 found no evidence to support it and eight were contrary to the iron hypothesis. Our results suggest that there is not a high level of evidence which supports the hypothesis that the iron may be associated with CVD. Despite the large number of studies published to date, the role of iron in cardiovascular disease still generates a fair amount of debate, due to a marked disparity in results.

Munoz-Bravo, Carlos; Gutierrez-Bedmar, Mario; Gomez-Aracena, Jorge; Garcia-Rodriguez, Antonio; Fernandez-Crehuet Navajas, Joaquin

2013-01-01

148

Altered Blood Rheology in Obstructive Sleep Apnea as a Mediator of Cardiovascular Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Cardiovascular complications are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Blood rheology is a major determent of coagulation and an established risk factor for cardiovascular events. Since nocturnal hypoxemia could influence parameters of blood rheology, we hypothesized that OSA alters blood rheology independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: One hundred and ten consecutive patients admitted to the

Stephan Steiner; Thomas Jax; Stefanie Evers; Marcus Hennersdorf; Andreas Schwalen; Bodo E. Strauer

2005-01-01

149

Hypopituitary Females Have a High Incidence of Cardiovascular Morbidity and an Increased Prevalence of Cardiovascular Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We recently reported that female patients with hypopituitarism receiving controlled thyroid and steroid hormone substitution, but without GH replacement, had a more than 2-fold increase in cardio- vascular mortality compared to the general population. In the present study we investigated the incidence of cardiovascular disease as well as the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in 33 females with hypopituitarism for

BIRGITTA BULOW; LARS HAGMAR; JAN ESKILSSON; EVA MARIE ERFURTH

150

Can haematological tests predict cardiovascular risk? The 2005 Kettle Lecture.  

PubMed

The risk of venous or arterial thrombosis is routinely assessed by clinical variables (risk factors) supplemented by measurement of blood lipids and glucose for arterial thrombotic events. Haematological tests that might play a role in risk prediction include haemostatic variables, haematocrit and inflammatory markers (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, plasma viscosity, white cell count). Recent epidemiological studies of these phenotypes and related genotypes are reviewed. For the risk prediction of first venous thrombosis, screening for thrombophilias in 'high-risk' situations does not appear clinically effective or cost-effective; with the possible exception of women considering oral hormone replacement therapy. General screening after a first venous event to predict recurrence (or risk in asymptomatic relatives) does not appear effective; with the possible exception of d-dimer, which requires further study. For risk prediction of first arterial thrombosis, screening adds little to prediction by current clinical risk scores. Screening of persons after a first arterial event, or with atrial fibrillation (e.g. with D-dimer for stroke prediction), requires further study. In conclusion, haematological tests have very limited roles in the prediction of cardiovascular risk, and should only be used according to evidence-based guidelines. The need for management studies is highlighted. PMID:16643425

Lowe, Gordon D O

2006-05-01

151

Effects of Muscular Strength on Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Prognosis  

PubMed Central

Physical fitness is one of the strongest predictors of individual future health status. Together with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscular strength (MusS) has been increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis and prevention of chronic disease. We review the most recent literature on the effect of MusS in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with special interest in elucidating its specific benefits beyond those from CRF and body composition. MusS has shown an independent protective effect on all-cause and cancer mortality in healthy middle-aged men, as well as in men with hypertension (HTN) and patients with heart failure. It has also been inversely associated with age-related weight and adiposity gains, risk of HTN, and prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome. In children and adolescents, higher levels of muscular fitness have been inversely associated with insulin resistance, clustered cardiometabolic risk and inflammatory proteins. Generally, the influence of muscular fitness was weakened but remained protective after considering CRF. Also interestingly, higher levels of muscular fitness seems to some extent counteract the adverse cardiovascular profile of overweight and obese individuals. As many of the investigations have been conducted with non-Hispanic white men, it is important to examine how race/ethnicity and gender may affect these relationships. To conclude, most important effects of resistance training (RT) are also summarized, to better understand how higher levels of muscular fitness may result in a better cardiovascular prognosis and survival.

Artero, Enrique G.; Lee, Duck-chul; Lavie, Carl J.; Espana-Romero, Vanesa; Sui, Xuemei; Church, Timothy S.; Blair, Steven N.

2012-01-01

152

The Role of Carotid Ultrasound for Cardiovascular Risk Stratification beyond Traditional Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Primary prevention and early detection of cardiovascular disease is important, as it is the leading cause of death throughout world. Risk stratification algorithms, such as Framingham Risk Score and European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation, that utilize a combination of various traditional risk factors have been developed to improve primary prevention. However, the accuracy of these algorithms for screening high risk patients is moderate at best. Accordingly, the use of biomarkers or imaging studies may improve risk stratification. Carotid ultrasound, which measures both carotid intima-media thichkness (cIMT) and carotid plaque, is useful in detecting the degree of subclinical carotid atherosclerosis, and has the advantage of being noninvasive and safe. Several large epidemiologic studies have indicated that cIMT and carotid plaque are closely related with other cardiovascular risk factors and may be useful for risk reclassification in subjects deemed to be at intermediate risk by traditional risk scores. Moreover, recent clinical guidelines for management of hypertension or dyslipidemia highlight the usefulness of cIMT in high risk patients. In this article, we review evidence for the usefulness of measurement of cIMT and carotid plaque for cardiovascular risk stratification.

Lee, Chan Joo

2014-01-01

153

Relation between Body Iron Status and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Background: There is conflicting evidence regarding the relationship between iron stores and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The present study aimed to investigate the association between body iron indices and some cardiovascular risk factors. Methods: In a case–control study conducted in the south of Shiraz, Iran, we determined ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), metabolic risk factors, C-reactive protein (CRP), and anthropometric measurements in 100 men aged 45 years and higher with newly diagnosed CVD and 100 adjusted controls without evidence for CVD. Results: The mean of low density lipoprotein (LDL-c), CRP, and ferritin concentrations were significantly higher in cases than controls, and high density lipoprotein (HDL-c) was significantly lower in cases than controls. Pearson correlation coefficient between CRP and the other risk factors in case group showed that only ferritin, serum iron, waist circumference, and LDL-c significantly correlated with CRP (r = 0.32 with P < 0.001, r = 0.29 with P < 0.05, r = 0.41 with P < 0.01, and r = 0.36 with P < 0.001, respectively). Conclusions: This study indicated an association between a positive balance of body iron and CVD. Hence, caution should be exercised in administration of iron supplements to patients with CVD and in consumption of food rich in iron by them.

Eftekhari, Mohammad Hassan; Mozaffari-Khosravi, Hassan; Shidfar, Farzad; Zamani, Atefeh

2013-01-01

154

Gender-based cardiometabolic risk evaluation in minority and non-minority men grading the evidence of non-traditional determinants of cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Evaluation of cardiometabolic risk has become vital in primary prevention of adverse vascular events (coronary artery disease, heart attack, stroke or congestive heart failure), particularly in younger middle-aged men (40-60 years old). To discern the prevalence of events in these men, clinicians often stratify cardiovascular risk and treat according to traditional Framingham risk criteria. Yet it is evident that the traditional Framingham risk assigned to intermediate- and low-risk men will miss several of these individuals deemed at high 'cardiometabolic risk', also known as residual cardiovascular risk. This review will elaborate the definition of cardiometabolic risk and apply the use of surrogate markers for cardiovascular risk stratification in men in addition to the traditional Framingham-based markers. It will utilise both gender non-specific and gender-specific determinants of cardiometabolic risk. Lastly, it will examine minority men's health and racial differences in these determinants of cardiovascular risk. This analysis includes an electronic literature search utilising PubMed, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases to clarify the level of evidence for the stepwise utility of novel biomarkers for cardiometabolic risk in the male patient. This manuscript generates discussion of the utility of markers of cardiometabolic risk stratification. The following questions are summarised: (i) Are there non-traditional tests that might define this risk better than traditional markers? (ii) Will treatment based on this risk assessment augment present risk stratification and lower cardiovascular risk? (iii) What is known regarding racial differences surrounding cardiometabolic risk assessment? Traditional risk factors including Framingham Risk Score underestimate the overall 10 year and lifetime risk for the intermediate-risk younger middle-aged men<60 years of age. This fact is especially true in the minority population. We have graded the evidence of non-gender specific and gender-specific markers of cardiometabolic risk, thereby, allowing greater clarification of risk in this population. The pragmatic use of these novel markers of cardiometabolic risk may help stratify those individuals at greater lifetime risk than that noted by the Framingham Risk Score. PMID:21199197

Billups, K L; Miner, M M; Wierzbicki, A S; Jackson, G

2011-02-01

155

Improving cardiovascular risk management: a randomized, controlled trial on the effect of a decision support tool for patients and physicians  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: There is nonoptimal adherence of general practitioners (GPs) and patients to cardiovascular risk reducing interventions. GPs find it difficult to assimilate multiple risk factors into an accurate assessment of cardiovascular risk. In addition, communicating cardiovascular risk to patients has proved to be difficult. AIMS: Improving primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in primary care by enhancing patient involvement in

Ben van Steenkiste; Trudy van der Weijden; Henri E. J. H. Stoffers; Arnold D. M. Kester; Richard Grol

2007-01-01

156

Collaborative Cardiovascular Risk Reduction in Primary Care II (CCARP II)  

PubMed Central

Background: Previous pharmacist interventions to reduce cardiovascular (CV) risk have been limited by low patient enrolment. The primary aim of this study was to implement a collaborative pharmacist intervention that used a systematic case-finding procedure to identify and manage patients with uncontrolled CV risk factors. Methods: This was an uncontrolled, program implementation study. We implemented a collaborative pharmacist intervention in a primary care clinic. All adults presenting for an appointment with a participating physician were systematically screened and assessed for CV risk factor control by the pharmacist. Recommendations for risk factor management were communicated on a standardized form, and the level of pharmacist follow-up was determined on a case-by-case basis. We recorded the proportion of adults exhibiting a moderate to high Framingham risk score and at least 1 uncontrolled risk factor. In addition, we assessed before-after changes in CV risk factors. Results: Of the 566 patients who were screened prior to visiting a participating physician, 186 (32.9%) exhibited moderate or high CV risk along with at least 1 uncontrolled risk factor. Physicians requested pharmacist follow-up for 60.8% (113/186) of these patients. Of the patients receiving the pharmacist intervention, 65.5% (74/113) were at least 50% closer to 1 or more of their risk factor targets by the end of the study period. Significant risk factor improvements from baseline were also observed. Discussion: Through implementation of a systematic case-finding approach that was carried out by the pharmacist on behalf of the clinic team, a large number of patients with uncontrolled risk factors were identified, assessed and managed with a collaborative intervention. Conclusion: Systematic case finding appears to be an important part of a successful intervention to identify and manage individuals exhibiting uncontrolled CV risk factors in a primary care setting.

Yakiwchuk, Erin M.; Jorgenson, Derek; Mansell, Kerry; Laubscher, Tessa; LeBras, Marlys

2013-01-01

157

Subfertility and risk of later life maternal cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND Subfertility shares common pathways with cardiovascular disease (CVD), including polycystic ovarian syndrome, obesity and thyroid disorders. Women with prior 0–1 pregnancies are at an increased risk of incident CVD when compared with women with two pregnancies. It is uncertain whether history of subfertility among women eventually giving birth is a risk factor for CVD. METHODS Among Swedish women with self-reported data on subfertility in the Swedish Medical Birth Register (n = 863 324), we used Cox proportional hazards models to relate a history of subfertility to CVD risk after adjustment for age, birth year, highest income, education, birth country, hypertension, diabetes, preterm birth, small for gestational age (SGA), smoking and for BMI in separate models. In additional analyses, we excluded women with: (i) pregnancy-related or non-pregnancy-related hypertension and/or diabetes; and (ii) preterm births and/or SGA babies. RESULTS Among nulliparous women eventually having a childbirth (between 1983 and 2005, the median follow-up time 11.9; 0–23 years and 9 906 621 person-years of follow-up), there was an increased risk of CVD among women reporting ?5 years of subfertility versus 0 years (hazard ratio 1.19, 95% confidence interval 1.02–1.39). There were not significantly elevated CVD risks for women with 1–2 or 3–4 years of subfertility versus 0 years. Accounting for BMI did not change results. Excluding women with hypertension and/or diabetes attenuated associations, whereas exclusion of women with preterm and/or SGA births did not change findings. CONCLUSIONS Subfertility among women eventually having a childbirth is a risk factor for CVD even upon accounting for cardiovascular risk factors and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Future studies should explore the mechanisms underlying this association.

Parikh, Nisha I.; Cnattingius, Sven; Mittleman, Murray A.; Ludvigsson, Jonas F.; Ingelsson, Erik

2012-01-01

158

Migraine and the risk for stroke and cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Numerous data have pointed to an association between migraine and cardiovascular diseases. The majority of the available data have indicated that migraine with aura can be considered a risk factor for ischemic stroke, whereas migraine without aura cannot be reliably considered as such. High frequency of attacks and a recent onset of migraine have been related to an increased ischemic stroke risk. In addition, in young subjects with ischemic stroke migraine with aura represents an independent risk factor of overall recurrent vascular events and of recurrent ischemic stroke. Also the risk of transient ischemic attack seems to be increased in migraineurs, although this issue has not been extensively investigated. Several studies have also addressed the possible association between migraine and hemorrhagic stroke. Although the results of these individual studies were conflicting, their meta-analysis showed that migraine is associated with a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of hemorrhagic stroke (including intracerebral and subarachnoid hemorrhage). Some studies have identified migraine also as a possible risk factor for cardiac vascular events while others have yielded negative results. A meta-analysis did not show an increased risk of myocardial infarction in subjects with any migraine vs no migraine but subsequently, data has pointed to an association between any migraine with cardiac ischemic disease. Migraine has also been associated by some studies with vascular mortality and with vascular diseases in regions other than the brain and the heart. Several studies have also indicated that compared with nonmigraineurs, migraineurs have a higher burden of asymptomatic white matter brain lesions and, according to some studies, also infarct-like lesions at brain magnetic resonance. The mechanisms underlying the relationship between migraine and cardiovascular disease are still unclear. The possible explanation may rely on a peculiar vascular vulnerability of migraineurs that may contribute to the pathogenesis of migraine and, in the presence of some other unknown factors may also contribute, over time, to the development of cardiovascular disease. At the moment, there are no reliable features that may indicate which subjects, across the overall migraine population, will develop vascular events and so far, no drugs are recommended for the vascular prevention in migraineurs unless other clear indications are present. In general, the acute treatment and the secondary prevention measures of a patient with stroke who has a history of migraine do not differ from that of other stroke patients. There is currently no direct evidence to support that a migraine prophylactic treatment will reduce future stroke risk in secondary prevention. PMID:25059466

Sacco, Simona; Kurth, Tobias

2014-09-01

159

[Therapeutic Strategies. Cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia in elderly and women].  

PubMed

The management of cardiovascular risk and dyslipidemia are justified in guidelines. In the elderly, when they are in primary prevention, recommendations are controversial, even if there is evidence in reducing morbidity. In secondary prevention, between 65 and 85 years, there is enough evidence to recommend statins. The decision to start or to continue further treatment must be complemented by comprehensive assessment of the risk-benefit factor. In elderly patients we have to support in decision-making, we take clinical judgment and not just the age criteria. In women the risk is underestimated and may be untreated. The recomendations are the same as in men. During pregnancy there are particular recommendations. PMID:23786854

Morales, Clotilde; Royuela, Meritxell

2013-01-01

160

Osteoporosis--a risk factor for cardiovascular disease?  

PubMed

Osteoporosis is a serious health problem worldwide that is associated with an increased risk of fractures and mortality. Vascular calcification is a well-defined independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Major advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of osteoporosis and vascular calcification indicate that these two processes share common pathogenetic mechanisms. Multiple factors including proteins (such as bone morphogenetic proteins, receptor activator of nuclear factor ?B ligand, osteoprotegerin, matrix Gla protein and cathepsins), parathyroid hormone, phosphate, oxidized lipids and vitamins D and K are implicated in both bone and vascular metabolism, illustrating the interaction of these two, seemingly unrelated, conditions. Many clinical studies have now confirmed the correlation between osteoporosis and vascular calcification as well as the increased risk of CVD in patients with osteoporosis. Here, we explore the proposed mechanistic similarities between osteoporosis and vascular calcification and present an overview of the clinical data that support the interaction between these conditions. PMID:22890244

Lampropoulos, Christos E; Papaioannou, Ioanna; D'Cruz, David P

2012-10-01

161

Prehypertension: A Warning Sign of Future Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

Since the report from the national high blood pressure (BP) education program working group on BP in children and adolescents and the introduction of a new description called prehypertension many data have been provided on its rate of progression to hypertension, its prevalence and association with other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and its therapy. Making a diagnosis of prehypertension in a child or adolescent identifies an individual at increased risk for early-onset CV disease who requires specific treatment. Thus, routine BP measurement is highly recommended at every health-care encounter beginning at 3 years of age. This review will present updated data on prehypertension in children and adolescents to increase awareness of health-care providers to the seriousness of this condition. Optimal BP measurement techniques as well as the evaluation and management of prehypertension will be discussed and preventive strategies to reduce the CV risk will be presented.

Assadi, Farahnak

2014-01-01

162

History of the Evolution of Cardiovascular Risk Factors and the Predictive Value of Traditional Risk-Factor-Based Risk Assessment  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The near epidemic rise in cardiovascular disease deaths in the early and middle twentieth century necessitated a more complete\\u000a understanding of the risk factors for these illnesses. Through histologic examinations, animal studies, clinical and geographical\\u000a observations and, ultimately, through large, prospective epidemiologic studies, the major traditional risk factors for cardiovascular\\u000a disease were discovered, which paved the way for successful public

Amit Khera

163

Muscular fitness and clustered cardiovascular disease risk in Australian youth.  

PubMed

Low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) but the association of muscular fitness phenotypes (strength, endurance and power) on CVD risk in youth has not been examined. We examined the cross-sectional association between muscular fitness phenotypes with individual and clustered CVD risk factors and determined if any potential associations are independent of CRF. Participants were 1,642 youth aged 9, 12, and 15 years from the Australian Schools Health and Fitness Survey that had muscular strength (dynamometer), power (standing long-jump), and endurance (push-ups) as well as CRF (1.6 km run-time) measured. Outcomes included established risk factors (body mass index, waist circumference, blood lipids and blood pressure) and a clustered CVD risk-score. Muscular strength, endurance, and power were inversely associated with clustered CVD risk (all P < 0.05). After adjustment for body mass index, the association remained for muscular endurance and power (all P ? 0.001), but not strength. Muscular power was inversely related to prevalence of clustered CVD risk (?80th percentile) within low (P trend < 0.001), moderate (Ptrend < 0.001), and high (Ptrend = 0.001) CRF categories. Among youth, low muscular fitness levels as well as low CRF should be avoided for primary CVD prevention. PMID:22183088

Magnussen, Costan G; Schmidt, Michael D; Dwyer, Terence; Venn, Alison

2012-08-01

164

Postprandial insulin resistance as an early predictor of cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia and oxidative stress are risk factors related to cardiovascular diseases including congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, ventricular hypertrophy, endothelial nitric oxide impairment in systemic blood vessels and the heart, atherosclerosis, and hypercoagulability of blood. The traditional focus on insulin sensitivity and blood levels of markers of risk determined in the fasted state is inconsistent with the large volume of recent data that indicates that the metabolic defect in the pre-diabetic and diabetic condition relates more strongly to postprandial deficiency than to the fasting state. Risk factors for adverse cardiovascular events can be detected in the pre-diabetic insulin-resistant subject based upon the metabolic response to a test meal even in the absence of altered fasting parameters. The normal response to a mixed meal includes a doubling of insulin action secondary to insulin-induced release of a putative hepatic insulin sensitizing substance (HISS) that acts selectively on skeletal muscle. HISS is released only in the fed state and accounts for meal-induced insulin sensitization. Blockade of HISS release leads to a condition referred to as HISS-dependent insulin resistance, which is suggested as the primary postprandial metabolic defect, accounting for postprandial hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, and increased oxidative stress in the pre-diabetic and diabetic condition. HISS-dependent insulin resistance represents a novel hypothesis and suggests a new diagnostic and therapeutic target.

Lautt, W Wayne

2007-01-01

165

Effects of cocoa flavanols on risk factors for cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

Epidemiologic investigations support the hypothesis that regular consumption of flavonoid-containing foods can reduce the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). While flavonoids are ubiquitous in plants, cocoa can be particularly rich in a sub-class of flavonoids known as flavanols. A number of human dietary intervention trials with flavanol-containing cocoa products have demonstrated improvements in endothelial and platelet function, as well as blood pressure. These studies provide direct evidence for the potential cardiovascular benefits of flavanol-containing foods and help to substantiate the epidemiological data. In this review, results from selective published trials with cocoa and chocolate focused on risk for CVD will be discussed along with a study we recently completed evaluating the effects of the daily consumption of flavanol-containing dark chocolate (CocoaVia?) with and without plant sterol esters on CVD markers in a normotensive population with mild hypercholesterolemia. In this study, the daily consumption of flavanol-containing dark chocolate was associated with a significant mean reduction of 5.8 mmHg in systolic blood pressure. Together the results of these human dietary intervention trials provide scientific evidence of the vascular effects of cocoa flavanols and suggest that the regular consumption of cocoa products containing flavanols may reduce risk of CVD. PMID:18296357

Erdman, John W; Carson, LeaAnn; Kwik-Uribe, Catherine; Evans, Ellen M; Allen, Robin R

2008-01-01

166

Extreme thrombocytosis and cardiovascular surgery: risks and management.  

PubMed

Extreme thrombocytosis is a major risk factor for excessive bleeding and for thrombosis, either of which can complicate cardiovascular surgical and interventional procedures. Extreme thrombocytosis can also cause an unusual syndrome, erythromelalgia, that results in a type of chronic microvascular occlusive arterial disease. We present the differential diagnosis of conditions that may lead to extreme thrombocytosis, 3 cases (each of which illustrates a different potential complication), and a review of the pertinent medical literature. Correcting excessive thrombocytosis is typically not difficult, whether electively or acutely, and effective therapy usually controls thrombosis and excessive hemorrhage post-procedurally. PMID:23304015

Natelson, Ethan A

2012-01-01

167

Role of vitamin D receptor activators on cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular complications are the main cause of death in patients with chronic renal disease. In those patients, vascular calcifications and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) are common findings that increase the incidence of cardiac-related deaths. The cardiovascular risk factors associated with renal patients are specific for this population, with hyperphosphatemia among the most common findings. Hyperphosphatemia per se is able to increase vascular calcification with the subsequent decrease in vascular compliance and related disorders. Thus, a strict control of serum phosphate is recommended in renal patients. Recent experimental results have shown that active vitamin D compounds can reduce LVH by direct effects in the myocardium. However, some of these compounds show as a secondary unwanted effect and increase in serum phosphorus. New available vitamin D receptor activators with lower effect in serum phosphorus are available. Thus, a severe control of serum phosphorus plus administration of active vitamin D compounds with no hyperphosphatemic effects could be a very effective treatment against cardiovascular complications in chronic kidney disease patients. PMID:19034326

Valdivielso, Jose M; Ayus, Juan C

2008-12-01

168

Cardiovascular risk reduction: what do recent trials with rosuvastatin tell us?  

PubMed

Abundant evidence from large-scale clinical trials supports the importance of lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. The LDL-C targets in various guidelines remain important treatment goals but, even in trials where statin therapy achieves substantial reduction of LDL-C, a significant number of CVD events still occur and the residual risk remains high. These findings suggest that lipid parameters other than LDL-C, such as high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides, and LDL particle size, can influence the risk of CVD. On this basis, other strategies that can alter the lipid profile, in particular raising HDL.C, may provide additional benefits. Other factors such as HDL-C functionality and susceptibility to oxidation and inflammatory factors can also influence cardiovascular risk. In addition to the modifications of the lipid profile, statins have cholesterol-independent beneficial pleiotropic effects. The contribution of these effects to event reduction is not yet fully understood. Recently, the body of evidence has expanded to support the use of intensive statin therapy in broader patient populations. The JUPITER trial has shown the benefit of intensive statin treatment in low-risk subjects with high levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and average levels of LDL-C. Unlike the setting of primary and secondary prevention, the results of statin trials in patients with heart failure have shown no clear benefit in terms of survival. The recently published AURORA trial was carried out to investigate the effect of rosuvastatin in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing chronic hemodialysis. In this trial no benefit on cardiovascular events was shown with statin therapy. In conclusion, large outcomes trials have clearly shown that statin treatments have a favorable benefit/risk profile in a large range of patients at different levels of risk, with the exception of patients with heart failure and those with renal disease undergoing dialysis. Further evidence is needed on the role of therapeutic strategies on the so-called residual risk. PMID:19444394

Fabbri, Gianna; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro

2009-05-01

169

Managing tobacco use: the neglected cardiovascular disease risk factor.  

PubMed

Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and the leading avoidable cause of death worldwide. Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) increases the risk of CVD among non-smokers. Smoking cessation benefits all smokers, regardless of age or amount smoked. The excess risk of CVD is rapidly reversible, and stopping smoking after a myocardial infarction reduces an individual's risk of CVD mortality by 36% over 2 years. Smoking cessation is a key component of primary and secondary CVD prevention strategies, but tobacco use often receives less attention from cardiologists than other risk factors, despite the availability of proven treatments that improve smoking cessation rates. Both psychosocial counselling and pharmacotherapy are effective methods to help smokers quit, but they are most effective when used together. The first-line medications licensed to aid smoking cessation, nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion and varenicline, are effective in and appropriate for patients with CVD. An evidence-based approach for physicians is to routinely ask all patients about smoking status and SHS exposure, advise all smokers to quit and all patients to adopt smoke-free policies for their home and car, and offer all smokers in the office or hospital brief counselling, smoking cessation pharmacotherapy, and referral to local programmes where psychosocial support can be sustained in person or by telephone. Like other chronic diseases, tobacco use requires a long-term management strategy. It deserves to be managed as intensively as other CVD risk factors. PMID:24014389

Rigotti, Nancy A; Clair, Carole

2013-11-01

170

Sex-specific differences in cardiovascular risk factors and blood pressure control in hypertensive patients.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular risk factors are frequently undertreated in women. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence of additional cardiovascular risk factors and the total cardiovascular risk differ between hypertensive men and women. There are also limited data regarding rates of blood pressure control in the two sexes outside the United States. The authors aimed to compare the cardiovascular risk profile between sexes. A total of 1810 hypertensive patients (40.4% men, age 56.5±13.5 years) attending the hypertension outpatient clinic of our department were studied. Men were more frequently smokers than women and were more heavy smokers than the latter. Serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were lower and serum triglyceride levels were higher in men. On the other hand, abdominal obesity and chronic kidney disease were more prevalent in women. The estimated cardiovascular risk was higher in men than in women but the prevalence of established CVD did not differ between the sexes. The percentage of patients with controlled hypertension and the number of antihypertensive medications were similar in men and women. In conclusion, hypertensive men have more adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile and greater estimated cardiovascular risk than women. However, the prevalence of established CVD does not differ between sexes. These findings further reinforce current guidelines that recommend that management of hypertension and of other cardiovascular risk factors should be as aggressive in women as in men in order to prevent cardiovascular events. PMID:24621371

Tziomalos, Konstantinos; Giampatzis, Vasilios; Baltatzi, Maria; Efthymiou, Elias; Psianou, Konstantia; Papastergiou, Natalia; Magkou, Dimitra; Bougatsa, Vagia; Savopoulos, Christos; Hatzitolios, Apostolos I

2014-04-01

171

Status of Novel Cardiovascular Risk Factor and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in an Urban Cuban Population--A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in Cuba, yet the prevalence of novel risk factors is not known. To examine the prevalence of risk factors of traditional and novel cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among an urban Cuban population, a cross-sectional pilot survey was undertaken in Havana city, Cuba. Ninety-seven adults aged 45-60 years registered to receive medical care at a policlinic. The prevalences of rates of CVD risk factors were: hypertension (?140/90 mmHg) (53.6%), hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol >5.2 mmol/L) (47.0%), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (<1.03 mmol/L) (64.3%); diabetes (self-reported) (24.6%); metabolic syndrome (ATP III criteria) (58.2%); overweight and obesity (body mass index ?25 kg/m2) (78.0%); current smoking (39.3%); elevated level of C-reactive protein (3 15 ?mol/L) (11.1%). The total carotenoid status was independently associa-ted with waist-circumference and risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In this small unrepresentative sample of people aged 40-65 years from Havana city, there was a high prevalence of traditional and novel CVD risk factors. The total serum carotenoid status appeared to be associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors.

Rodriguez-Ojea, Arturo; Alonso, Celia; Yarnell, John W.G.

2011-01-01

172

Status of novel cardiovascular risk factor and cardiovascular disease risk in an urban Cuban population--a pilot study.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in Cuba, yet the prevalence of novel risk factors is not known. To examine the prevalence of risk factors of traditional and novel cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among an urban Cuban population, a cross-sectional pilot survey was undertaken in Havana city, Cuba. Ninety-seven adults aged 45-60 years registered to receive medical care at a policlinic. The prevalences of rates of CVD risk factors were: hypertension (> or =140/90 mmHg) (53.6%), hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol >5.2 mmol/L) (47.0%), low high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol (<1.03 mmol/L) (64.3%); diabetes (self-reported) (24.6%); metabolic syndrome (ATP III criteria) (58.2%); overweight and obesity (body mass index > or = 25 kg/m2) (78.0%); current smoking (39.3%); elevated level of C-reactive protein (3 15 micromol/L) (11.1%). The total carotenoid status was independently associated with waist-circumference and risk of diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In this small unrepresentative sample of people aged 40-65 years from Havana city, there was a high prevalence of traditional and novel CVD risk factors. The total serum carotenoid status appeared to be associated with an increased prevalence of CVD risk factors. PMID:22106757

Rodriguez-Ojea, Arturo; Alonso, Celia; Yarnell, John W G; Woodside, Jayne V

2011-10-01

173

Work stress and risk of cardiovascular mortality: prospective cohort study of industrial employees  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective To examine the association between work stress, according to the job strain model and the effort›reward imbalance model, and the risk of death from cardiovascular disease. Design Prospective cohort study. Baseline examination in 1973 determined cases of cardiovascular disease, behavioural and biological risks, and stressful characteristics of work. Biological risks were measured at 5 year and 10 year follow

Mika Kivim; Jussi Vahtera

2002-01-01

174

Arterial stiffness, central hemodynamics, and cardiovascular risk in hypertension.  

PubMed

This review summarizes several scientific contributions at the recent Satellite Symposium of the European Society of Hypertension, held in Milan, Italy. Arterial stiffening and its hemodynamic consequences can be easily and reliably measured using a range of noninvasive techniques. However, like blood pressure (BP) measurements, arterial stiffness should be measured carefully under standardized patient conditions. Carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity has been proposed as the gold standard for arterial stiffness measurement and is a well recognized predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcome. Systolic BP and pulse pressure in the ascending aorta may be lower than pressures measured in the upper limb, especially in young individuals. A number of studies suggest closer correlation of end-organ damage with central BP than with peripheral BP, and central BP may provide additional prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk. Moreover, BP-lowering drugs can have differential effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics compared with brachial BP. This may explain the greater beneficial effect provided by newer antihypertensive drugs beyond peripheral BP reduction. Although many methodological problems still hinder the wide clinical application of parameters of arterial stiffness, these will likely contribute to cardiovascular assessment and management in future clinical practice. Each of the abovementioned parameters reflects a different characteristic of the atherosclerotic process, involving functional and/or morphological changes in the vessel wall. Therefore, acquiring simultaneous measurements of different parameters of vascular function and structure could theoretically enhance the power to improve risk stratification. Continuous technological effort is necessary to refine our methods of investigation in order to detect early arterial abnormalities. Arterial stiffness and its consequences represent the great challenge of the twenty-first century for affluent countries, and "de-stiffening" will be the goal of the next decades. PMID:22174583

Palatini, Paolo; Casiglia, Edoardo; G?sowski, Jerzy; G?uszek, Jerzy; Jankowski, Piotr; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Saladini, Francesca; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Van Bortel, Luc; Wojciechowska, Wiktoria; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina

2011-01-01

175

Gestational diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk after pregnancy.  

PubMed

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects many women in pregnancy and is enhanced by epidemic conditions of obesity, increasing age at the time of the first pregnancy, stressful life conditions, a sedentary lifestyle with less physical activity and unhealthy nutrition with highly processed, high-calorie food intake. GDM does not affect the mother and offspring in pregnancy alone, as there is compelling evidence of the long-term effects of the hyperglycemic state in pregnancy postpartum. Type 2 diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome are more common in GDM women, and even the offspring of GDM women are reported to have higher obesity rates and a higher risk for noncommunicable diseases. Early prevention of risk factors seems to be key to overcoming the vicious cycle of cardiometabolic disease onset. PMID:24328601

Harreiter, Jürgen; Dovjak, Gregor; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

2014-01-01

176

Whole Body Bone Tissue and Cardiovascular Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis  

PubMed Central

Introduction. Atherosclerosis and osteoporosis share an age-independent bidirectional correlation. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) represents a risk factor for both conditions. Objectives. The study aims to evaluate the connection between the estimated cardiovascular risk (CVR) and the loss of bone tissue in RA patients. Methods. The study has a prospective cross-sectional design and it includes female in-patients with RA or without autoimmune diseases; bone tissue was measured using whole body dual X-ray absorptiometry (wbDXA); CVR was estimated using SCORE charts and PROCAM applications. Results. There were 75?RA women and 66 normal women of similar age. The wbDXA bone indices correlate significantly, negatively, and age-independently with the estimated CVR. The whole body bone percent (wbBP) was a significant predictor of estimated CVR, explaining 26% of SCORE variation along with low density lipoprotein (P < 0.001) and 49.7% of PROCAM variation along with glycemia and menopause duration (P < 0.001). Although obese patients had less bone relative to body composition (wbBP), in terms of quantity their bone content was significantly higher than that of nonobese patients. Conclusions. Female patients with RA and female patients with cardiovascular morbidity have a lower whole body bone percent. Obese female individuals have higher whole body bone mass than nonobese patients.

Popescu, Claudiu; Bojinca, Violeta; Opris, Daniela

2014-01-01

177

Evaluating obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

Obesity continues to be a growing public health problem. According to the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 17 percent of persons two to 19 years of age are overweight. The number of obese children and adolescents has tripled in the past 20 years. Obesity in adults is associated with cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. The growing prevalence of overweight in children and adolescents is paralleled by the growth of its associated complications in that population: hypertension, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and metabolic syndrome. A modification of the metabolic syndrome criteria designed for children and adolescents shows that as many as 50 percent of those who are severely overweight have the syndrome. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force has not found sufficient evidence to support screening children for obesity or other cardiovascular risk factors. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association have adopted a more aggressive stance, based largely on consensus opinion. Current suggestions include focusing on children whose body mass indexes exceed the 85th percentile; who are rapidly gaining weight; who have a family history of type 2 diabetes or hypercholesterolemia; or who have hypertension or signs of insulin resistance. Physician advocacy for healthy communities and institutions that foster physical activity, good eating habits, and healthy lifestyles is also encouraged. PMID:19007051

Spiotta, Roseann T; Luma, Gregory B

2008-11-01

178

Association between Birth Weight and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background Birth weight (BW) is a medium- and long-term risk determinant of cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To assess the association between BW and cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents of the city of Salvador, Bahia state. Methods Cross-sectional study with comparison of BW groups. Sample comprising 250 adolescents classified according to the BMI as follows: high-normal (? 50th percentile and < 85th percentile); overweight (? 85th percentile and < 95th percentile); and obesity (? 95th percentile). The risk variables compared were as follows: waist circumference (WC); arterial blood pressure; lipid profile; glycemia; serum insulin; HOMA-IR; and metabolic syndrome. The BW was informed by parents and classified as follows: low (BW ? 2,500g); normal (BW > 2,500g and < 4,000g); and high (BW ? 4,000g). Results One hundred and fifty-three (61.2%) girls, age 13.74 ± 2.03 years, normal BW 80.8%, low BW 8.0%, and high BW 11.2%. The high BW group as compared with the normal BW group showed a higher frequency of obesity (42.9%, p=0.005), elevated SBP and DBP (42.9%, p=0.000 and 35.7%, p=0.007, respectively), and metabolic syndrome (46.4%, p=0.002). High BW adolescents as compared with normal BW adolescents had a prevalence ratio for high SBP 3.3 (95% CI: 1.7-6.4) and obesity 2.6 (95% CI: 1.3-5.2). The WC of high BW adolescents was 83.3 ± 10.1 (p=0.038). The lipid profile showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion Our findings suggest that obesity, elevated SBP and DBP, and metabolic syndrome during adolescence might be associated with high BW.

de Sousa, Maria Amenaide Carvalho Alves; Guimaraes, Isabel Cristina Britto; Daltro, Carla; Guimaraes, Armenio Costa

2013-01-01

179

Increased cardiovascular risk in South African patients with Addison's disease.  

PubMed

Patients with Addison's disease (AD) are believed to be at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). South Africa, like the rest of the developing world is experiencing an increase in CVD and patients with AD may be at double the risk of their peers. We wished to explore AD patients' CVD risk factors. A cross-sectional nationwide study in South Africa of patients with AD was conducted. A cohort of 147 patients with AD and 147 healthy control subjects were matched by age, gender, ethnicity, and BMI as far as was possible. Lipoproteins and highly-sensitive C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP) were the main outcome measures. AD patients had significantly higher triglycerides; (p=0.001), lower HDLC (p<0.001), higher hs-CRP (p<0.001), and more small dense LDL; (p=0.002) than controls. Nonesterified fatty acids were lower in patients (p<0.001). Approximately 65% [95% confidence interval (CI 55.6-72.4%)] had hypercholesterolaemia, 75% (CI 64.8-81.2%) had low HDLC, and 75% (CI 68.0-84.1%) had a higher LDLC. Thirteen percent of AD patients had diabetes mellitus, but none of the risk factors differed from the nondiabetics. Only HDLC correlated positively with daily hydrocortisone dose (r=0.32; p=0.005). In conclusion dyslipidaemia is common in South African AD patients; CVD risk assessment and intervention are probably warranted in the management of these patients. PMID:23918685

Ross, I L; Bergthorsdottir, R; Levitt, N S; Schatz, D A; Johannsson, G; Marais, A D

2013-11-01

180

Early identification of cardiovascular risk using genomics and proteomics  

PubMed Central

Coronary heart disease (CHD) will soon become the leading cause of death and morbidity in the world. Early detection and treatment of CHD is thus imperative to improve global health. Atherosclerosis of the coronary arteries is a complex multifactorial disease process involving multiple pathways that can be influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. With the recent advances in genomics and proteomics, many new risk factors with small-to-moderate effects are likely to be identified. Additionally, individualized risk stratification and targeted therapy may become feasible; each individual could potentially be assessed with a panel of tests for genomic and proteomic markers and, on the basis of the individual’s composite risk profile, preventive and therapeutic steps could then be undertaken. With a multimarker approach, it may also be possible to identify alterations in pathways involved in atherogenesis, rather than focus on individual risk factors. In this article, we use the specific example of atherosclerosis to discuss the role of genomics and proteomics in cardiovascular risk assessment.

Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Cooper, Leslie T.

2010-01-01

181

Hyperhomocysteinemia: An emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease.  

PubMed

There is considerable epidemiological evidence, which confirms the importance of plasma homocysteine as a powerful predictor of future risk of coronary heart disease and other complications of atherosclerosis. Treatment of hyperhomocysteinemia varies with the underlying cause. However, an inexpensive vitamin supplementation with folic acid, vitamin B12 and vitamin B 6 is generally effective in reducing homocysteine concentrations. Several randomised, controlled trials evaluating the effects of folic acid based supplements on homocysteine concentrations have been conducted over the last decade. In most patients, folic acid alone, and in combination of vitamin B12 and B6, has been shown to reduce homocysteine concentrations within four to six weeks after the initiation of therapy (34).However, no study has yet demonstrated that lowering of homocysteine by vitamin supplementation decreases the cardiovascular morbidity or mortality. Avoidance of excessive meat intake and increased consumption of fresh vegetables and fruits is a dietary measure, which has many health benefits, including a potential to reduce elevated homocysteine levels. The other reasonable approach is to determine levels of fasting homocysteine in high risk patients and it may be advisable to increase their intake of vitamin fortified foods and/or to suggest the daily use of supplemental vitamins. Several large scale randomised trials like Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE-2) Study, Mcmaster University, Canada, Study of the Effectiveness of Additional Reductions in Cholesterol and Homocysteine (SERCH), Clinical Trial Service Unit, Oxford, U.K, Cambridge Heart Antioxidant Study (CHAOS-2) University of Cambridge, U.K, Bergen Vitamin Study, University of Bergen Norway, Women's Antioxidant and Cardiovascular Disease Study (WACS) Harvard Medical School, U.S.A, Prevention with a combined inhibitor and folate in Coronary Heart Disease (PACIFIC) study, University of Sydney, Australia, and many others are ongoing to assess the effect of homocysteine-lowering by vitamin supplementation on risk of vascular disease. PMID:23105365

Govindaraju, V; Neelam; Manjunath, C N; Venkataramiah, H; Raghu, T R

2003-01-01

182

Circadian Role in Daily Pattern of Cardiovascular Risk  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous epidemiological studies demonstrate that sudden cardiac death, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke have a 24-hour daily pattern with a broad peak between 9-11am. Such a daily pattern in cardiovascular risk could be attributable to external factors, such as the daily behavior patterns, including sleep-wake cycles and activity levels, or internal factors, such as the endogenous circadian pacemaker. Findings of significant alternations in the temporal organization and nonlinear properties of heartbeat fluctuations with disease and with sleep-wake transitions raise the intriguing possibility that changes in the mechanism of control associated with behavioral sleep-wake transition may be responsible for the increased cardiac instability observed in particular circadian phases. Alternatively, we hypothesize that there is a circadian clock, independent of the sleep-wake cycle, which affects the cardiac dynamics leading to increased cardiovascular risk. We analyzed continuous recordings from healthy subjects during 7 cycles of forced desynchrony routine wherein subjects' sleep-wake cycles are adjusted to 28 hours so that their behaviors occur across all circadian phases. Heartbeat data were divided into one-hour segments. For each segment, we estimated the correlations and the nonlinear properties of the heartbeat fluctuations at the corresponding circadian phase. Since the sleep and wake contributions are equally weighted in our experiment, a change of the properties of the heartbeat dynamics with circadian phase suggest a circadian rhythm. We show significant circadian-mediated alterations in the correlation and nonlinear properties of the heartbeat resembling those observed in patients with heart failure. Remarkably, these dynamical alterations are centered at 60 degrees circadian phase, coinciding with the 9-11am window of cardiac risk.

Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael F.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven A.

2004-03-01

183

Issues of Fish Consumption for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction  

PubMed Central

Increasing fish consumption is recommended for intake of omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids and to confer benefits for the risk reduction of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Most Americans are not achieving intake levels that comply with current recommendations. It is the goal of this review to provide an overview of the issues affecting this shortfall of intake. Herein we describe the relationship between fish intake and CVD risk reduction as well as the other nutritional contributions of fish to the diet. Currently recommended intake levels are described and estimates of fish consumption at a food disappearance and individual level are reported. Risk and benefit factors influencing the choice to consume fish are outlined. The multiple factors influencing fish availability from global capture and aquaculture are described as are other pertinent issues of fish nutrition, production, sustainability, and consumption patterns. This review highlights some of the work that needs to be carried out to meet the demand for fish and to positively affect intake levels to meet fish intake recommendations for CVD risk reduction.

Raatz, Susan K.; Silverstein, Jeffrey T.; Jahns, Lisa; Picklo, Matthew J.

2013-01-01

184

The emerging characterization of lysine residue deacetylation on the modulation of mitochondrial function and cardiovascular biology  

PubMed Central

There is emerging recognition of a novel fuel and redox sensing regulatory program that controls cellular adaptation via non-histone protein lysine-residue acetyl post-translation modifications. This program functions in tissues with high energy demand and oxidative capacity and is highly enriched in the heart. Deacetylation is regulated by NAD+-dependent activation of the sirtuin family of proteins while acetyltransferase modifications are controlled by less clearly delineated acetyltransferases. Subcellular localization specific protein targets of lysine-acetyl modification have been identified in the nucleus, cytoplasm and mitochondria. Despite distinct subcellular localizations, these modifications appear, in large part, to modify mitochondrial properties including respiration, energy production, apoptosis and anti-oxidant defenses. These mitochondrial regulatory programs are important in cardiovascular biology, although how protein acetyl modifications effects cardiovascular pathophysiology has not been extensively explored. This review will introduce the role of non-histone protein lysine-residue acetyl modifications, discuss their regulation and biochemistry and present the direct and indirect data implicating their involvement in the heart and vasculature.

Lu, Zhongping; Scott, Iain; Webster, Bradley R.; Sack, Michael N.

2009-01-01

185

Associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance with cardiovascular risk factors.  

PubMed

The aim was to study the associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance with single and clustered cardiovascular risk factors. Muscular endurance, maximal strength, cardiorespiratory fitness and waist circumference were measured in 686 young men (25±5 years). Cardiovascular risk factors (plasma glucose, serum high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure) were determined. The risk factors were transformed to z-scores and the mean of values formed clustered cardiovascular risk factor. Muscular endurance was inversely associated with triglycerides, s-LDL-cholesterol, glucose and blood pressure (?=-0.09 to -?0.23, p<0.05), and positively with s-HDL cholesterol (?=0.17, p<0.001) independent of cardiorespiratory fitness. Muscular endurance was negatively associated with the clustered cardiovascular risk factor independent of cardiorespiratory fitness (?=-0.26, p<0.05), whereas maximal strength was not associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors or the clustered cardiovascular risk factor independent of cardiorespiratory fitness. Furthermore, cardiorespiratory fitness was inversely associated with triglycerides, s-LDL-cholesterol and the clustered cardiovascular risk factor (?=-0.14 to -?0.24, p<0.005), as well as positively with s-HDL cholesterol (?=0.11, p<0.05) independent of muscular fitness. This cross-sectional study demonstrated that in young men muscular endurance and cardiorespiratory fitness were independently associated with the clustering of cardiovascular risk factors, whereas maximal strength was not. PMID:24022567

Vaara, J P; Fogelholm, M; Vasankari, T; Santtila, M; Häkkinen, K; Kyröläinen, H

2014-04-01

186

Dietary risk assessment for cardiovascular disease among central Maine adolescents.  

PubMed

Dietary risk for cardiovascular disease was assessed in 97 adolescents enrolled in health classes in two high schools in rural, central Maine, using three-day food records and written questionnaires of self-perceived food practices and cardiovascular nutrition knowledge. Mean percent of kilocalories from fat was 36% for both males and females. Compared to American Heart Association guidelines, 80% males and 73% females had more than 30% kilocalories from fat; 37% males and 16% females had dietary cholesterol intakes above 300 milligrams. More than 50% of males but less than 25% of females had sodium intakes greater than 3,000 milligrams. Mean dietary fiber intake of females (6 +/- 4 grams) was significantly lower than the fiber intake of males (11 +/- 8 grams). During adolescence, greater emphasis should be placed on modifying food behaviors that may be detrimental to heart health if continued into adulthood. Individualization provided within nutrition education curricula is necessary to meet the needs presented by differences in gender and variation among adolescents. PMID:1479839

White, A A; Klimis-Tavantzis, D J

1992-11-01

187

Cardiovascular Risk Attributable to Diabetes in Southern Brazil  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To analyze the effect of diabetes on general and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity in southern Brazil. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A population-based cohort study of 1,091 individuals was conducted. Diabetes was ascertained by medical history. The vital status of 982 individuals and the incidence of events were ascertained during another visit and through hospital records, death certificates, and verbal necropsy with relatives. RESULTS The mean ± SD age of participants was 43.1 ± 17 years, and 55.7% were women. The prevalence of diabetes was 4.2%, and the mean follow-up time was 5.3 ± 0.07 years. Mortality was 36.3% and 6.6% in participants with or without diabetes, respectively; the incidence of CVD was 20.8% and 3.0%, with an adjusted hazard ratio of 4.4 (95% CI 2.4–7.9). Diabetic population-attributable risk (PAR) for CVD mortality was 10.1% and 13.1% for total CVD. CONCLUSIONS Diabetes is responsible for a large PAR for overall mortality and cardiovascular events in Brazil.

Moreira, Leila B.; Fuchs, Sandra C.; Wiehe, Mario; Neyeloff, Jeruza L.; Picon, Rafael V.; Moreira, Marina B.; Gus, Miguel; Fuchs, Flavio D.

2009-01-01

188

Orthostatic hypertension-a new haemodynamic cardiovascular risk factor.  

PubMed

Orthostatic hypertension-a condition characterized by a hyperactive pressor response to orthostatic stress-is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease and is associated with hypertensive target-organ damage (resulting in silent cerebrovascular disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, carotid atherosclerosis and/or chronic kidney disease) and cardiovascular events (such as coronary artery disease and lacunar stroke). The condition is also considered to be a form of prehypertension as it precedes hypertension in young, normotensive adults. Orthostatic blood pressure changes can be assessed using orthostatic stress tests, including clinic active standing tests, home blood pressure monitoring and the head-up tilting test. Devices for home and for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring that are equipped with position sensors and do not induce a white-coat effect have increased the sensitivity and specificity of diagnosis of out-of-clinic orthostatic hypertension. Potential major mechanisms of orthostatic hypertension are sympathetic hyperactivity (as a result of hypersensitivity of the cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreceptor reflex) and ?-adrenergic hyperactivation. Orthostatic hypertension is also associated with morning blood pressure surge and extreme nocturnal blood pressure dipping, both of which increase the pulsatile haemodynamic stress of central arterial pressure and blood flow in patients with systemic haemodynamic atherothrombotic syndrome. PMID:24189649

Kario, Kazuomi

2013-12-01

189

Adiposopathy and thyroid disease: tracing the pathway to cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Adiposopathy, defined as functionally disturbed adipose tissue mainly composed of large adipocytes and induced by chronic excess of food intake, has been associated with immune, metabolic and endocrine derangements promoting inflammation and, eventually, cardiovascular disease. Adiposopathy may positively influence thyrotropin-stimulating hormone, by raising leptin levels, and triggering autoimmunity. In this regard, it is hypothesized that the increased thyrotropin-stimulating hormone is independent of the negative regulation of the thyroid hormone, thereby constituting a secondary phenomenon and not a causal effect. Replacement therapy with thyroid hormones should therefore be applied following strict individualized consideration. Leptin is involved in the immune response and neuroendocrine appetite regulation, while leptin resistance may further promote autoimmune disease. The lipid derangement in adiposopathy may be aggravated in the presence of hypothyroidism and thus considerably augment cardiovascular risk. Lifestyle-modification counselling, including low-fat dietary intake and regular physical exercise, is today the cornerstone of adiposopathy treatment. Meanwhile, new drug formulations, such as leptin and leptin analogs, 5-HT2C-receptor agonist, and potent thyromimetics, currently comprise a promising armamentarium against adiposity and adiposopathy. PMID:22894634

Duntas, Leonidas; Micic, Dragan

2012-06-01

190

Kennedy Space Center Cardiovascular Disease Risk Reduction Program evaluation.  

PubMed

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors. PMID:18561517

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

191

Kennedy space center cardiovascular disease risk reduction program evaluation  

PubMed Central

This program evaluation examined the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) Risk Reduction Program which aims to identify CVD risk factors and reduce these risk factors through health education phone counseling. High risk participants (those having two or more elevated lipid values) are identified from monthly voluntary CVD screenings and counseled. Phone counseling consists of reviewing lab values with the participant, discussing dietary fat intake frequency using an intake questionnaire, and promoting the increase in exercise frequency. The participants are followed-up at two-months and five-months for relevant metrics including blood pressure, weight, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, dietary fat intake, and exercise frequency. Data for three years of the KSC CVD Program included 366 participants, average age of 49 years, 75% male, and 25% female. For those with complete two and five month follow-up data, significant baseline to two-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in systolic blood pressure (p = 0.03); diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.002); total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary fat intake (all three at p < 0.0001) as well as a significant increase in exercise frequency (p = 0.04). Significant baseline to five-month follow-up comparisons included decreases in triglycerides (p = 0.05); and total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and dietary intake (all three at p < 0.0001). These program evaluation results indicate that providing brief phone health education counseling and information at the worksite to high risk CVD participants may impact CVD risk factors.

Calderon, Kristine S; Smallwood, Charles; Tipton, David A

2008-01-01

192

Novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis.  

PubMed

Since cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we aimed to determine factors associated with such a complication in a large series of Colombian patients. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 800 consecutive Colombian patients with RA were assessed for variables associated with CVD. Furthermore, a systematic literature review was performed to address the state of the art about non-traditional risk factors for CVD in RA. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines were followed in data extraction, analysis, and reporting of articles selected. Hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, abnormal body mass index, abdominal obesity, and current smoking were all traditional risk factors significantly associated with CVD in Colombians. As non-traditional risk factors, familial autoimmunity, more than 10 years of duration of the disease, patients working on household duties, use of systemic steroids, and low education level were associated with CVD in the studied population. Out of a total of 9,812 articles identified in PubMed and Scopus databases, 140 fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were included. Through this systematic review, several factors and outcomes related to CVD were confirmed and identified. These were categorized into genetics, RA-related, and others. Traditional risk factors do not completely explain the high rates of CVD in patients with RA; thus, novel risk factors related to autoimmunity are now recognized predicting the presence of CVD as strong as traditional risk factors. Our results may assist health professionals and policymakers in making decisions about CVD in patients with RA. PMID:23584985

Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben-Dario; Pineda-Tamayo, Ricardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

2013-07-01

193

[Risk-benefit balance in cardiovascular imaging: the radiation issue].  

PubMed

Every year 5 billion diagnostic imaging procedures are performed worldwide, and about 1 out of 2 tests are cardiovascular examinations. According to recent estimates, 30% to 50% of all examinations are partially or totally inappropriate. This represents a potential damage in patients undergoing imaging tests (who take the acute risks of a stress test procedure and/or a contrast study without a commensurable benefit), an exorbitant cost for the society, and an excessive delay in the waiting lists for other patients needing the examination. In case of ionizing radiation, the reduction of useless imaging tests would improve the quality of care also through abatement of the long-term risks related to the dose employed. The radiation dose equivalent of common cardiological imaging examinations corresponds to about 500, 750 and 1000 chest X-rays for stress sestamibi testing, multislice cardiac computed tomography and coronary stenting, respectively. Although direct evaluation of the incidence of cancer in patients submitted to these procedures is not available, according to the latest 2006 Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation Committee VII the estimated risk of cancer is about 1 in 750 for a computed tomography scan - higher in women (1/500), lower in the elderly (1/1500), and the highest in children (1/100 in female children aged <1 year). Such a risk is probably not acceptable when a diagnostic procedure is inappropriately applied for mass screening (when the risk side of the risk-benefit balance is not considered) or when similar information can be obtained by other means. By contrast, it is fully acceptable in appropriately selected groups as a filter to more invasive, risky and costly procedures. PMID:19119690

Picano, Eugenio

2008-12-01

194

Mania and mortality: Why the excess cardiovascular risk in bipolar disorder?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Individuals with bipolar disorder experience twice the cardiovascular mortality expected from general population estimates.\\u000a The metabolic syndrome is more common in those with bipolar disorder, with a prevalence ratio of 1.6, and includes many traditional\\u000a cardiovascular risk factors, which may explain much of the elevated risk. Manic symptom burden also predicts cardiovascular\\u000a mortality, begging questions regarding other explanations for elevated

Dylan P. Murray; Miriam Weiner; Maithri Prabhakar; Jess G. Fiedorowicz

2009-01-01

195

Hyperlipidemia as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Synopsis Elevated levels of blood lipids are well documented risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Current classification schemes and treatment levels for hyperlipidemia are based on the National Cholesterol Education Panel’s (NCEP) Adult Treatment Program-3 (ATP-III) guidelines. Statins are the preferred class of drugs to lower elevated low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). There are other classes to augment or substitute for statins, such as ezetimibe, fibrates, niacin and dietary supplements. Extensive research over the last decade has raised the question whether or not ATP-III guidelines are sufficiently aggressive. New guidelines from ATP-IV are expected to be released in the near future, but in the meantime physicians are faced with uncertainty about how low to target LDL-C, whether to pharmacologically treat high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglyceride (TG) levels and how best to achieve target goals.

Nelson, Robert H.

2012-01-01

196

Developing the 2011 Integrated Pediatric Guidelines for Cardiovascular Risk Reduction.  

PubMed

This article reviews aspects of development of the recently released "Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents" for pediatric care providers that remain in the area of human judgment. Discussed will be the context in which the guidelines were developed, the formal evidence review process, a consideration of how quality grades were established, key social/ethical issues that the panel confronted, and a critique of the final work with recommendations for future guideline development. Lessons learned are that both a formal evidence review process is essential to developing a credible document, and human judgment is critical to producing a meaningful result. Guideline development is a dynamic process that must be continuously self-critical as new evidence is acquired and sociopolitical and environmental contexts evolve. PMID:22492765

Gidding, Samuel S; Daniels, Stephen R; Kavey, Rae Ellen W

2012-05-01

197

Nephron mass and cardiovascular and renal disease risks.  

PubMed

The nephron endowment begins with the complex process of nephrogenesis, which is controlled through genetic and environmental influences from preconception up until approximately 36 weeks of gestation. The total number of nephrons in human beings averages about 1 million per kidney but varies up to 10-fold, from approximately 200,000 to more than 2 million. Low nephron mass is associated with the development of hypertension and, in some ethnic populations, the concurrence of cardiovascular and renal disease risks in later life. Kidney size and nephron number also are related directly to birth weight with persons born preterm or with evidence of intrauterine growth restriction more likely to develop certain diseases in later life. PMID:19615565

Abitbol, Carolyn L; Ingelfinger, Julie R

2009-07-01

198

Homocysteine: cardiovascular risk factor in children and adolescents?  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to identify publications in literature that investigated Homocysteine (He) as a risk factor for CVD among children and adolescents. An active search for information in LILACS, IBECS, Science Direct, Medline and Cochrane Library databases was conducted using the following combination of keywords "homocysteine", "cardiovascular diseases", "child" and "adolescent". Fifteen articles were analyzed showing direct relationship with increasing age (8 studies) and male gender (10 studies), and an inverse relationship with serum vitamins B6, B12 and folate levels. Thus, the results suggest that more research must be carried through in order to determine in a more coherent way the causes of the hiperhomocisteinemia in the pediatric population, guiding for an adequate diet, rich in nutrients necessary to favor the metabolism of the He. PMID:24182942

Leal, Adriana Amorim De Farias; Palmeira, Astrid Camêlo; Castro, Gabriella Menezes Almeida De; Simões, Mônica Oliveira Da Silva; Ramos, Alessandra Teixeira; Medeiros, Carla Campos Muniz

2013-01-01

199

[Apolipoprotein B and A-I: cardiovascular risk factor?].  

PubMed

Apolipoprotein (apo) B is present in atherogenic lipoproteins (remnant Qm and VLDL, LDL and Lp (a)) and apo A is present in non-atherogenic lipoprotein (HDL). Measurement of the apos is automated, standardized, with a small variation of coefficient and does not require fasting blood samples. The authors reviewed clinical, epidemiological and therapeutic trials on hyperlipidemia with apo B and A-I evaluation. These works showed the importance of apo B and A-I as cardiovascular risk factors. Experts recommended apo B / apo A-I ratio as an alternative to TC / HDL-c ratio for risk estimate. Future positioning from the Guidelines is expected to include apos in individual risk prediction and as a therapeutic target. The authors suggest that, in clinical practice, measurement of apo B is necessary for coronary heart disease patients with desirable LDLc levels or when this assessment is not possible and the measurement of apo A-I if HDL-c values are very low. PMID:17665079

Forti, Neusa; Diament, Jayme

2007-01-01

200

Clinical use of antidepressant therapy and associated cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

A number of different psychotropic agents have been associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and these relationships have been difficult to interpret due to the presence of confounding factors. Recently, there has been renewed interest in the potential for certain antidepressants to cause QT prolongation, which is a predisposing factor for arrhythmia. However, the optimum means of determining QT remains contentious due to discrepancies between methods that may be readily applied in a clinical setting versus more detailed techniques during regulatory assessment. A number of different pharmacological mechanisms might explain the occurrence of adverse cardiac effects, and these differ according to the type of antidepressant agent. Emerging data indicate that citalopram exhibits a dose-effect relationship for QT prolongation. Whereas cardiotoxicity is readily apparent in the context of intentional antidepressant overdose, the occurrence of cardiac effects as a result of therapeutic administration is less certain. Pre-existing cardiac disease and other factors that independently predispose to arrhythmia are important considerations. Therefore, clinical judgment is needed to evaluate the overall risk or benefit of a particular antidepressant in any patient. Close monitoring should be considered for those at greatest risk of QT prolongation and arrhythmia.

Waring, W Stephen

2012-01-01

201

Management of cardiovascular risk with RAS inhibitor\\/CCB combination therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypertension is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), including stroke, myocardial infarction, kidney disease and heart failure. Considerable research has been undertaken to delineate the differential effects of various classes of antihypertensive agents in delaying or preventing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Although possible benefits may result from specific agents or classes of agents in certain high-risk subgroups, prompt

B Dahlöf

2009-01-01

202

Comparison of cardiovascular risk factors between sri lankans living in kandy and oslo  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: South Asians living in western countries are known to have unfavourable cardiovascular risk profiles. Studies indicate migrants are worse off when compared to those living in country of origin. The purpose of this study was to compare selected cardiovascular risk factors between migrant Sri Lankans living in Oslo, Norway and Urban dwellers from Kandy, Sri Lanka. METHODS: Data on

Sampath UB Tennakoon; Bernadette N Kumar; Danasela B Nugegoda; Haakon E Meyer

2010-01-01

203

Determination of the BMI threshold that predicts cardiovascular risk and insulin resistance in late childhood  

Microsoft Academic Search

AimsBody mass index (BMI, kg\\/m2) thresholds of children predicting cardiovascular risk, reported in previous studies were inconsistent and that predicting increased insulin resistance is lacking. We determined the BMI threshold that predicts increased cardiovascular risk and insulin resistance in children.

Chanwon Kim; Bomtaeck Kim; Namseok Joo; Hyoungjune Lim; Youngsu Ju; Seiwon Yang; Belong Cho; Kyunghee Park

2010-01-01

204

Cardiovascular risk factor assessment after pre-eclampsia in primary care  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Pre-eclampsia is associated with an increased risk of development of cardiovascular disease later in life. It is not known how general practitioners in the Netherlands care for these women after delivery with respect to cardiovascular risk factor management. METHODS: Review of medical records of 1196 women in four primary health care centres, who were registered from January 2000 until

Marie-Elise Nijdam; Monique R Timmerman; Arie Franx; Hein W Bruinse; Mattijs E Numans; Diederick E Grobbee; Michiel L Bots

2009-01-01

205

Cyclooxygenase2 selective inhibitors and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: balancing gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Differences between gastrointestinal and cardiovascular effects of traditional NSAID or cyclooxygenase-2 selective inhibitor (coxib) are affected by drug, dose, duration, outcome definition, and patient gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risk factors. We calculated the absolute risk for each effect. METHODS: We sought studies with large amounts of information to calculate annualised rates for clearly defined gastrointestinal (complicated upper gastrointestinal perforations, ulcers,

R Andrew Moore; Sheena Derry; Henry J McQuay

2007-01-01

206

Cardiovascular risk factors after Kawasaki disease: A case-control study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To determine cardiovascular risk profiles of patients with Kawasaki disease and to relate them to a noninvasive measure of endothelial function. Study design: Case-control study. Cardiovascular risk assessment including brachial artery reactivity was performed in 24 patients 11.3 ± 1.8 (mean ± SD) years after Kawasaki disease and in 11 subjects in a normal control group. Results: The case

Anna A. E e Silva; Yasuki Maeno; Aijaz Hashmi; Jeffrey F. Smallhorn; Earl D. Silverman; Brian W. McCrindle

2001-01-01

207

Clinical Utility of Multiple Biomarker Panels for Cardiovascular Disease Risk Prediction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Current cardiovascular risk prediction is imprecise, with clinical treatment aimed at those with high risk of disease while\\u000a neglecting those at intermediate risk who might benefit from early treatment. Biomarkers can capture features of subclinical\\u000a atherosclerosis, but although many studies have shown their association with cardiovascular risk, whether they can improve\\u000a the performance of prediction algorithms is contested. The combined

Maria Hughes; Frank Kee; Veikko Salomaa

2011-01-01

208

Ankle-brachial index and the incidence of cardiovascular events in the Mediterranean low cardiovascular risk population ARTPER cohort  

PubMed Central

Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) of the lower limbs is a cardiovascular disease highly prevalent particularly in the asymptomatic form. Its prevalence starts to be a concern in low coronary risk countries like Spain. Few studies have analyzed the relationship between ankle-brachial index (ABI) and cardiovascular morbi-mortality in low cardiovascular risk countries like Spain where we observe significant low incidence of ischemic heart diseases together with high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship between pathological ABI and incidence of cardiovascular events (coronary disease, cerebrovascular disease, symptomatic aneurism of abdominal aorta, vascular surgery) and death in the >49 year population-based cohort in Spain (ARTPER). Methods Baseline ABI was measured in 3,786 randomly selected patients from 28 Primary Health Centers in Barcelona, distributed as: ABI<0.9 peripheral arterial disease (PAD), ABI ?1.4 arterial calcification (AC), ABI 0.9-1.4 healthy; and followed during 4 years. Results 3,307 subjects were included after excluding those with previous vascular events. Subjects with abnormal ABI were older with higher proportion of men, smokers and diabetics. 260 people presented cardiovascular events (incidence 2,117/100,000 person-years) and 124 died from any cause (incidence 978/100,000 person-years). PAD had two-fold greater risk of coronary disease (adjusted hazard ratio (HR)?=?2.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-3.2) and increased risk of vascular surgery (HR?=?5.6, 95%CI 2.8-11.5) and mortality (HR?=?1.8, 95%CI 1.4-2.5). AC increased twice risk of cerebrovascular events (HR?=?1.9, 95%CI 1.0-3.5) with no relationship with ischemic heart disease. Conclusions PAD increases coronary disease risk and AC cerebrovascular disease risk in low cardiovascular risk Mediterranean population. ABI could be a useful tool to detect patients at risk in Primary Health Care.

2013-01-01

209

Plasma Lipid Composition and Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease  

PubMed Central

Aims We tested whether characteristic changes of the plasma lipidome in individuals with comparable total lipids level associate with future cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcome and whether 23 validated gene variants associated with coronary artery disease (CAD) affect CVD associated lipid species. Methods and Results Screening of the fasted plasma lipidome was performed by top-down shotgun analysis and lipidome compositions compared between incident CVD cases (n?=?211) and controls (n?=?216) from the prospective population-based MDC study using logistic regression adjusting for Framingham risk factors. Associations with incident CVD were seen for eight lipid species (0.21?q?0.23). Each standard deviation unit higher baseline levels of two lysophosphatidylcholine species (LPC), LPC16?0 and LPC20?4, was associated with a decreased risk for CVD (P?=?0.024–0.028). Sphingomyelin (SM) 38?2 was associated with increased odds of CVD (P?=?0.057). Five triglyceride (TAG) species were associated with protection (P?=?0.031–0.049). LPC16?0 was negatively correlated with the carotid intima-media thickness (P?=?0.010) and with HbA1c (P?=?0.012) whereas SM38?2 was positively correlated with LDL-cholesterol (P?=?0.0*10?6) and the q-values were good (q?0.03). The risk allele of 8 CAD-associated gene variants showed significant association with the plasma level of several lipid species. However, the q-values were high for many of the associations (0.015?q?0.75). Risk allele carriers of 3 CAD-loci had reduced level of LPC16?0 and/or LPC 20?4 (P?0.056). Conclusion Our study suggests that CVD development is preceded by reduced levels of LPC16?0, LPC20?4 and some specific TAG species and by increased levels of SM38?2. It also indicates that certain lipid species are intermediate phenotypes between genetic susceptibility and overt CVD. But it is a preliminary study that awaits replication in a larger population because statistical significance was lost for the associations between lipid species and future cardiovascular events when correcting for multiple testing.

Fernandez, Celine; Sandin, Marianne; Sampaio, Julio L.; Almgren, Peter; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Hoffmann, Michal; Hedner, Thomas; Wahlstrand, Bjorn; Simons, Kai; Shevchenko, Andrej; James, Peter; Melander, Olle

2013-01-01

210

Cardiovascular pharmacotherapy and herbal medicines: the risk of drug interaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Use of herbal medicines among patients under cardiovascular pharmacotherapy is widespread. In this paper, we have reviewed the literature to determine the possible interactions between herbal medicines and cardiovascular drugs. The Medline database was searched for clinical articles published between January 1996 and February 2003. Forty-three case reports and eight clinical trials were identified. Warfarin was the most common cardiovascular

Angelo A. Izzo; Giulia Di Carlo; Francesca Borrelli; Edzard Ernst

2005-01-01

211

Associations between Conventional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in Men  

PubMed Central

Context Previous studies have examined the associations of individual clinical risk factors with risk of peripheral artery disease (PAD), but the combined effects of these risk factors are largely unknown. Objective To estimate the degree to which four conventional cardiovascular risk factors, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and type 2 diabetes, are associated with the risk of PAD among men. Design, settings and participants We prospectively followed 44,985 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study without a history of cardiovascular disease at baseline for 25 years (1986-2011). The presence of risk factors was updated biennially during follow-up. Main outcome measure Clinically significant PAD (defined as limb amputation/revascularization, angiogram reporting vascular obstruction of ?50%, ankle-brachial index<0.90 or physician-diagnosed PAD). Results During a median follow-up of 24.2 years (interquartile range 20.8-24.7 years), 537 PAD cases occurred. Each risk factor was significantly and independently associated with a higher risk of PAD after adjustment for the other three risk factors and confounders. The age-adjusted incidence rates per 100,000 person years were 6 cases for 0 risk factors, 18 cases for 1 risk factor, 39 cases for 2 risk factors, 76 cases for 3 risk factors and 139 cases for 4 risk factors. The multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for each additional risk factor compared was 2.06 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.92-2.32). Men without any of the four risk factors had a HR of PAD of 0.23 (95% CI, 0.14-0.36) compared with all other men in the cohort. In 96% (95% CI, 94-98%) of PAD cases, at least one of the four risk factors was present at the time of PAD diagnosis. The population-attributable risk associated with these four risk factors was 75% (95% CI, 64-87%). The incidence of PAD among men with all four risk factors was 1.4/1,000. Conclusion Among men in this cohort, smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia and type 2 diabetes account for most of the risk associated with development of clinically significant PAD.

Joosten, Michel M.; Pai, Jennifer K.; Bertoia, Monica L.; Rimm, Eric B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Mittleman, Murray A.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.

2013-01-01

212

Effects of tea and coffee on cardiovascular disease risk.  

PubMed

Tea and coffee have been associated with risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), both positively and negatively. Epidemiological data suggest that black and green tea may reduce the risk of both coronary heart disease and stroke by between 10 and 20%. Experimental and clinical trial data generally indicate either neutral or beneficial effects on risk factors and pathways linked to the development of CVD. Controversy still exists regarding the effects of coffee, where there have been concerns regarding associations with hypercholesterolaemia, hypertension and myocardial infarction. However, long term moderate intake of coffee is not associated with detrimental effects in healthy individuals and may even protect against the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The detrimental effects of coffee may be associated with the acute pressor effects, most likely due to caffeine at high daily intakes, and lipids from boiled coffee can contribute to raised serum cholesterol. Genetic polymorphisms in enzymes involved in uptake, metabolism and excretion of tea and coffee compounds are also associated with differential biological effects. Potential mechanisms by which tea and coffee phytochemicals can exert effects for CVD protection include the regulation of vascular tone through effects on endothelial function, improved glucose metabolism, increased reverse cholesterol transport and inhibition of foam cell formation, inhibition of oxidative stress, immunomodulation and effects on platelet function (adhesion and activation, aggregation and clotting). The phytochemical compounds in tea and coffee and their metabolites are suggested to influence protective endogenous pathways by modulation of gene-expression. It is not known exactly which compounds are responsible for the suggestive protective effects of tea and coffee. Although many biologically active compounds have been identified with known biological effects, tea and coffee contain many unidentified compounds with potential bioactivity. PMID:22456725

Bøhn, Siv K; Ward, Natalie C; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Croft, Kevin D

2012-06-01

213

[Cardiovascular risk factors on the Framingham Risk Score among hypertensive patients attended by family health teams].  

PubMed

The Framingham Risk Score (FRS) is used to stratify cardiovascular risk. This study sought to identify the prevalence of risk factors used in the FRS and the use of drugs that reduce cardiovascular risk among hypertensive patients attended by the Family Health Strategy (FHS). It is cross-sectional study, which evaluated a random sample of hypertensive patients in the FHS in northern Minas Gerais. Data were collected through interviews and from medical records. 505 hypertensive patients were evaluated in 9 municipalities of the region, with a predominance of women; 325 (64.4%), mean age of 66.4 years. In 90% of hypertensive patients there was at least one associated risk factor. The grouping of three or more factors occurred in 79 (15.7%) patients. Dyslipidemia was found in 188 (37.2%), diabetes in 101 (20%) and smoking in 36 (7.1%). The use of anti-hypertensive drugs was observed in 481 (95.2%) patients. The use of other cardioprotective drugs was higher among patients with 3 or more risk factors: 45.6% used antiplatelet and 27.8% used lipid-lowering drugs. The prevalence of risk factors from the FRS in the population studied was quite high and the use of cardioprotective drugs was seen to be restricted. Strategies to increase the use of FRS may improve the management of hypertension in the FHS. PMID:24897474

Pimenta, Henderson Barbosa; Caldeira, Antônio Prates

2014-06-01

214

Lipoprotein-Associated Phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2): A Novel and Promising Biomarker for Cardiovascular Risks Assessment  

PubMed Central

Atherosclerosis and its manifestations namely cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although intensified interventions have been applied, the residual cardiovascular (CV) risks are still very high. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is a novel and unique biomarker highly specific for vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Both pro-atherogenic property of Lp-PLA2 and positive correlation with CV events have already been demonstrated by a large number of scientific and clinical studies. Currently, in the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guideline, Lp-PLA2 has been recommended as an adjunct to traditional risk factors in assessing future CV risks. Encouragingly, darapladib, an orally Lp-PLA2 specific inhibitor, has been tested in basic research and preclinical trials and the outcomes are quite striking. Additionally, there are two phase III ongoing clinical trials in evaluating the efficacy and safety of darapladib on cardiovascular outcomes. With regard to the potential values of Lp-PLA2 in risk stratification, therapeutic regimen establishment and prognosis evaluation in patients with moderate or high risk, our present review is going to summarize the relevant data about the bio-chemical characteristics of Lp-PLA2, the actions of Lp-PLA2 on atherosclerosis and the results of Lp-PLA2 in scientific research and clinical studies.

Cai, Anping; Zheng, Dongdan; Qiu, Ruofeng; Mai, Weiyi; Zhou, Yingling

2013-01-01

215

Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA(2)): a novel and promising biomarker for cardiovascular risks assessment.  

PubMed

Atherosclerosis and its manifestations namely cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although intensified interventions have been applied, the residual cardiovascular (CV) risks are still very high. Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA(2)) is a novel and unique biomarker highly specific for vascular inflammation and atherosclerosis. Both pro-atherogenic property of Lp-PLA(2) and positive correlation with CV events have already been demonstrated by a large number of scientific and clinical studies. Currently, in the Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) guideline, Lp-PLA(2) has been recommended as an adjunct to traditional risk factors in assessing future CV risks. Encouragingly, darapladib, an orally Lp-PLA(2) specific inhibitor, has been tested in basic research and preclinical trials and the outcomes are quite striking. Additionally, there are two phase III ongoing clinical trials in evaluating the efficacy and safety of darapladib on cardiovascular outcomes. With regard to the potential values of Lp-PLA(2) in risk stratification, therapeutic regimen establishment and prognosis evaluation in patients with moderate or high risk, our present review is going to summarize the relevant data about the bio-chemical characteristics of Lp-PLA(2), the actions of Lp-PLA(2) on atherosclerosis and the results of Lp-PLA(2) in scientific research and clinical studies. PMID:23478277

Cai, Anping; Zheng, Dongdan; Qiu, Ruofeng; Mai, Weiyi; Zhou, Yingling

2013-01-01

216

Regulatory Risk Assessment of Pesticide Residues in Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background information describing current approaches taken by different countries to risk assessment in regard of pesticide residues in air is presented with a view to stimulating discussion of the subject in order to identify means for improving both the underlying science and administrative procedures concerned. Fundamental regulatory objectives are explored, alternative guidelines for conduct of exposure evaluation, risk assessment and

A. J. Gilbert

1999-01-01

217

Contribution of Individual Risk Factor Changes to Reductions in Population Absolute Cardiovascular Risk  

PubMed Central

Background. Few studies have investigated individual risk factor contributions to absolute cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Even fewer have examined changes in individual risk factors as components of overall modifiable risk change following a CVD prevention intervention. Design. Longitudinal study of population CVD risk factor changes following a health screening and enhanced support programme. Methods. The contribution of individual risk factors to the estimated absolute CVD risk in a population of high risk patients identified from general practice records was evaluated. Further, the proportion of the modifiable risk attributable to each factor that was removed following one year of enhanced support was estimated. Results. Mean age of patients (533 males, 68 females) was 63.7 (6.4) years. High cholesterol (57%) was most prevalent, followed by smoking (53%) and high blood pressure (26%). Smoking (57%) made the greatest contribution to the modifiable population CVD risk, followed by raised blood pressure (26%) and raised cholesterol (17%). After one year of enhanced support, the modifiable population risk attributed to smoking (56%), high blood pressure (68%), and high cholesterol (53%) was removed. Conclusion. Approximately 59% of the modifiable risk attributable to the combination of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and current smoking was removed after intervention.

Cochrane, Thomas; Davey, Rachel; Iqbal, Zafar; Kumar, Jagdish; Mawby, Yvonne; Chambers, Ruth

2014-01-01

218

Central Versus Peripheral Cardiovascular Risk in Metabolic Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Individuals with metabolic syndrome (MetS; i.e., three of five of the following risk factors (RFs): elevated blood pressure, waist circumference, triglycerides, blood glucose, or reduced HDL) are thought to be prone to serious cardiovascular disease and there is debate as to whether the disease begins in the peripheral vasculature or centrally. This study investigates hemodynamics, cardiac function/morphology, and mechanical properties of the central (heart, carotid artery) or peripheral [total peripheral resistance (TPR), forearm vascular bed] vasculature in individuals without (1–2 RFs: n?=?28), or with (?3 RFs: n?=?46) MetS. After adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use, those with MetS had lower mitral valve E/A ratios (<3 RFs: 1.24?±?0.07; ?3 RFs: 1.01?±?0.04; P?=?0.025), and higher TPR index (<3 RFs: 48?±?2?mmHg/L/min/m2; ?3 RFs: 53?±?2?mmHg/L/min/m2; P?=?0.04). There were no differences in heart size, carotid artery measurements, cardiovagal baroreflex, pulse-wave velocity, stroke volume index, or cardiac output index due to MetS after adjustments for statin and blood pressure medication use. The use of statins was associated with increased inertia in the brachial vascular bed, increased HbA1c and decreased LDL cholesterol. The independent use of anti-hypertensive medication was associated with decreased predicted VO2max, triglycerides, diastolic blood pressure, interventricular septum thickness, calculated left ventricle mass, left ventricle posterior wall thickness, and left ventricle pre-ejection period, but increased carotid stiffness, HDL cholesterol, and heart rate. These data imply that both a central cardiac effect and a peripheral effect of vascular resistance are expressed in MetS. These data also indicate that variance in between-group responses due to pharmacological treatments are important factors to consider in studying cardiovascular changes in these individuals.

Edgell, H.; Petrella, R. J.; Hodges, G. J.; Shoemaker, J. K.

2012-01-01

219

Apelin: a peptide involved in cardiovascular risk in hemodialysis patients?  

PubMed

Inflammation, oxidative stress, and obesity are important features associated with pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, a major contributor to the mortality of hemodialysis (HD) patients. Apelin is an adipokine involved in a variety of physiological functions; however, little is known about apelin in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, the purpose of this study was to analyze apelin plasma levels in HD patients and verify whether there is any relationship with inflammation, oxidative markers, and obesity. Twenty-four HD patients [53.6 ± 14.4 years, 14 men, and body mass index (BMI) of 25.0 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)] were studied and compared with 15 healthy subjects (51.3 ± 13.5 years, 7 men, and BMI of 26.3 ± 3.7 kg/m(2)). Plasma apelin-12 and -36 were measured using the enzyme immunometric assay method. Plasma electronegative low-density lipoprotein [LDL(-)] levels were measured using ELISA method, and tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-6, leptin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 levels were measured by a multiplex assay kit. C-Reactive protein (CRP) was determined by immunoturbidimetry. Anthropometric data were also evaluated. There was no difference between apelin-36 levels in HD patients (0.82 ± 0.60 ng/mL) and healthy subjects (0.83 ± 0.23 ng/mL). In contrast, apelin-12 levels were significantly higher in patients (0.34 ± 0.15 ng/mL vs. 0.24 ± 0.13 ng/mL in healthy subjects). TNF-?, CRP, and LDL(-) levels were higher in patients; however, there was no correlation among apelin-12 or -36 and inflammatory or oxidative markers. The adiposity parameters were also not associated with apelin-12 or -36. In conclusion, plasma apelin seems to be not associated with cardiovascular risk in HD patients. PMID:22417287

Leal, Viviane O; Lobo, Julie C; Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Farage, Najla E; Calixto, Antonio; Geloneze, Bruno; Mafra, Denise

2012-01-01

220

A novel risk classification paradigm for patients with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

We used baseline data from the NAVIGATOR trial to (1) identify risk factors for diabetes progression in those with impaired glucose tolerance and high cardiovascular risk, (2) create models predicting 5-year incident diabetes, and (3) provide risk classification tools to guide clinical interventions. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models estimated 5-year incident diabetes risk and simplified models examined the relative importance of measures of glycemia in assessing diabetes risk. The C-statistic was used to compare models; reclassification analyses compare the models' ability to identify risk groups defined by potential therapies (routine or intensive lifestyle advice or pharmacologic therapy). Diabetes developed in 3,254 (35%) participants over 5 years median follow-up. The full prediction model included fasting and 2-hour glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values but demonstrated only moderate discrimination for diabetes (C = 0.70). Simplified models with only fasting glucose (C = 0.67) or oral glucose tolerance test values (C = 0.68) had higher C statistics than models with HbA1c alone (C = 0.63). The models were unlikely to inappropriately reclassify participants to risk groups that might receive pharmacologic therapy. Our results confirm that in a population with dysglycemia and high cardiovascular risk, traditional risk factors are appropriate predictors and glucose values are better predictors than HbA1c, but discrimination is moderate at best, illustrating the challenges of predicting diabetes in a high-risk population. In conclusion, our novel risk classification paradigm based on potential treatment could be used to guide clinical practice based on cost and availability of screening tests. PMID:23608615

Bethel, M Angelyn; Chacra, Antonio R; Deedwania, Prakash; Fulcher, Gregory R; Holman, Rury R; Jenssen, Trond; Kahn, Steven E; Levitt, Naomi S; McMurray, John J V; Califf, Robert M; Raptis, Sotirios A; Thomas, Laine; Sun, Jie-Lena; Haffner, Steven M

2013-07-15

221

Olive oil intake and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in the PREDIMED Study  

PubMed Central

Background It is unknown whether individuals at high cardiovascular risk sustain a benefit in cardiovascular disease from increased olive oil consumption. The aim was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We included 7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55 to 80 years, from the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) study, a multicenter, randomized, controlled, clinical trial. Participants were randomized to one of three interventions: Mediterranean Diets supplemented with nuts or extra-virgin olive oil, or a control low-fat diet. The present analysis was conducted as an observational prospective cohort study. The median follow-up was 4.8 years. Cardiovascular disease (stroke, myocardial infarction and cardiovascular death) and mortality were ascertained by medical records and National Death Index. Olive oil consumption was evaluated with validated food frequency questionnaires. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards and generalized estimating equations were used to assess the association between baseline and yearly repeated measurements of olive oil intake, cardiovascular disease and mortality. Results During follow-up, 277 cardiovascular events and 323 deaths occurred. Participants in the highest energy-adjusted tertile of baseline total olive oil and extra-virgin olive oil consumption had 35% (HR: 0.65; 95% CI: 0.47 to 0.89) and 39% (HR: 0.61; 95% CI: 0.44 to 0.85) cardiovascular disease risk reduction, respectively, compared to the reference. Higher baseline total olive oil consumption was associated with 48% (HR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29 to 0.93) reduced risk of cardiovascular mortality. For each 10 g/d increase in extra-virgin olive oil consumption, cardiovascular disease and mortality risk decreased by 10% and 7%, respectively. No significant associations were found for cancer and all-cause mortality. The associations between cardiovascular events and extra virgin olive oil intake were significant in the Mediterranean diet intervention groups and not in the control group. Conclusions Olive oil consumption, specifically the extra-virgin variety, is associated with reduced risks of cardiovascular disease and mortality in individuals at high cardiovascular risk. Trial registration This study was registered at controlled-trials.com (http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN35739639). International Standard Randomized Controlled Trial Number (ISRCTN): 35739639. Registration date: 5 October 2005.

2014-01-01

222

Type II diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular risk factors: Current therapeutic approaches  

PubMed Central

Worldwide, approximately 200 million people currently have type II diabetes mellitus (DM), a prevalence that has been predicted to increase to 366 million by 2030. Rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and morbidity are particularly high in this population, representing a significant cost for health care systems. Type II DM patients generally carry a number of risk factors for CVD, including hyperglycemia, abnormal lipid profiles, alterations in inflammatory mediators and coagulation/thrombolytic parameters, as well as other ‘nontraditional’ risk factors, many of which may be closely associated with insulin resistance. Therefore, successful management of CVD associated with diabetes represents a major challenge to the clinicians. An effective way of tackling this problem is to detect the associated risk factors and to target treatment toward their improvement. Targeting hyperglycemia alone does not reduce the excess risk in diabetes, highlighting the need for aggressive treatment of other risk factors. Although the current use of statin therapy is effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, residual risk remains for other independent lipid and nonlipid factors. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? appears to be closely involved in regulating risk markers at multiple levels. A relatively new class of therapeutic agents that activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-?, the thiazolidinedione insulin-sensitizing agents, is currently used to manage type II DM. These agents display a number of potential antiatherogenic properties, including effects on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as other beneficial nonlipid effects, such as regulating levels of mediators involved in inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. Research data suggest that simple strategies combining thiazolidinediones and statins could have complementary effects on CVD risk-factor profiles in diabetes, alongside the ability to control glycemia.

Kalofoutis, Christos; Piperi, Christina; Kalofoutis, Anastasios; Harris, Fred; Phoenix, David; Singh, Jaipaul

2007-01-01

223

Pesticide residues and bees--a risk assessment.  

PubMed

Bees are essential pollinators of many plants in natural ecosystems and agricultural crops alike. In recent years the decline and disappearance of bee species in the wild and the collapse of honey bee colonies have concerned ecologists and apiculturalists, who search for causes and solutions to this problem. Whilst biological factors such as viral diseases, mite and parasite infections are undoubtedly involved, it is also evident that pesticides applied to agricultural crops have a negative impact on bees. Most risk assessments have focused on direct acute exposure of bees to agrochemicals from spray drift. However, the large number of pesticide residues found in pollen and honey demand a thorough evaluation of all residual compounds so as to identify those of highest risk to bees. Using data from recent residue surveys and toxicity of pesticides to honey and bumble bees, a comprehensive evaluation of risks under current exposure conditions is presented here. Standard risk assessments are complemented with new approaches that take into account time-cumulative effects over time, especially with dietary exposures. Whilst overall risks appear to be low, our analysis indicates that residues of pyrethroid and neonicotinoid insecticides pose the highest risk by contact exposure of bees with contaminated pollen. However, the synergism of ergosterol inhibiting fungicides with those two classes of insecticides results in much higher risks in spite of the low prevalence of their combined residues. Risks by ingestion of contaminated pollen and honey are of some concern for systemic insecticides, particularly imidacloprid and thiamethoxam, chlorpyrifos and the mixtures of cyhalothrin and ergosterol inhibiting fungicides. More attention should be paid to specific residue mixtures that may result in synergistic toxicity to bees. PMID:24718419

Sanchez-Bayo, Francisco; Goka, Koichi

2014-01-01

224

The Quest for the Optimal Assessment of Global Cardiovascular Risk: Are Traditional Risk Factors and Metabolic Syndrome Partners in Crime?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Global risk calculators such as the Framingham risk score generally take into account traditional risk factors such as age, sex, blood pressure, smoking status, total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and the presence of diabetes which are recommended to be used in clinical practice to estimate patients’ cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Over the last decades, the prevalence of obesity

Benoit J. Arsenault; Philippe Pibarot; Jean-Pierre Després

2009-01-01

225

Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chinese American Children: Associations between Overweight, Acculturation, and Physical Activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

IntroductionUnderstanding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors among Chinese American children would allow us to target individuals in this group who are at the greatest risk for developing CVD early in life. The purpose of this study is to examine cardiovascular risk factors (increased blood pressure [BP], total cholesterol, low-density lipoproteins, triglycerides, decreased high-density lipoproteins, and increased body mass index [BMI])

Jyu-Lin Chen; Yuaner Wu

2008-01-01

226

Copper, ceruloplasmin, and long-term cardiovascular and total mortality (The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study).  

PubMed

Abstract Background. Copper and its main transport protein ceruloplasmin have been suggested to promote the development of atherosclerosis. Most of the data come from experimental and animal model studies. Copper and mortality have not been simultaneously evaluated in patients undergoing coronary angiography. Methods and results. We examined whether serum copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations are associated with angiographic coronary artery disease (CAD) and mortality from all causes and cardiovascular causes in 3253 participants of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study. Age and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for death from any cause were 2.23 (95% CI, 1.85-2.68) for copper and 2.63 (95% CI, 2.17-3.20) for ceruloplasmin when we compared the highest with the lowest quartiles. Corresponding hazard ratios (HR) for death from cardiovascular causes were 2.58 (95% CI, 2.05-3.25) and 3.02 (95% CI, 2.36-3.86), respectively. Further adjustments for various risk factors and clinical variables considerably attenuated these associations, which, however, were still statistically significant and the results remained consistent across subgroups. Conclusions. The elevated concentrations of both copper and ceruloplasmin are independently associated with increased risk of mortality from all causes and from cardiovascular causes. PMID:24605902

Grammer, T B; Kleber, M E; Silbernagel, G; Pilz, S; Scharnagl, H; Lerchbaum, E; Tomaschitz, A; Koenig, W; März, W

2014-06-01

227

Management of dyslipidemia as a cardiovascular risk factor in individuals with nonalcoholic Fatty liver disease.  

PubMed

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most frequent cause of liver disease in the United States and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cardiovascular (CV) mortality, independent of traditional cardiovascular risk factors. CVD is one of the most common causes of death among individuals with NAFLD and management of NAFLD must extend beyond liver disease to include CVD risk modification. Clinicians should assess CVD risk with the Framingham Risk Score and screen for CVD risk factors including dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, tobacco use, and the metabolic syndrome. CVD risk factors, particularly dyslipidemia, require aggressive medical management to reduce the high risk of CVD events and death in individuals with NAFLD. PMID:23962548

Corey, Kathleen E; Chalasani, Naga

2014-07-01

228

Mercury as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases.  

PubMed

Mercury is a heavy metal that exists naturally in the environment. Major sources include the burning of fossil fuels (especially coal) and municipal waste incineration. Mercury can exist in several forms, with the most hazardous being organic methylmercury. In waterways (lakes, rivers, reservoirs, etc.), mercury is converted to methylmercury, which then accumulates in fish, especially in large predatory fish. Fish and fish products are the major--if not the only--source of methylmercury in humans. Mercury has long been recognized as a neurotoxin for humans, but in the last 10 years, its potentially harmful effects on cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have raised a cause for concern, mostly due to the proposed role of mercury in oxidative stress propagation. Some epidemiological studies have indeed found an association between increased levels of mercury in the body and risk of CVD. There are several plausible mechanisms to explain the association; these are discussed in this review. We also review the epidemiological studies that have investigated the association between mercury and CVD. PMID:16781863

Virtanen, Jyrki K; Rissanen, Tiina H; Voutilainen, Sari; Tuomainen, Tomi-Pekka

2007-02-01

229

Hypertension Subtype and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Chinese Adults  

PubMed Central

Background We examined the relationship between hypertension subtype and cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and mortality in Chinese adults. Methods and Results We conducted a prospective cohort study in a nationally representative sample of 169,871 Chinese men and women aged 40 years and older. Data on systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and other variables were obtained at a baseline examination in 1991 using standard protocols. Follow-up evaluation was conducted in 1999–2000, with a response rate of 93.4%. Hypertension subtypes were defined as combined systolic and diastolic hypertension (SDH: SBP?140 and DBP?90 mm Hg), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH: SBP?140 and DBP<90 mm Hg), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH: SBP<140 and DBP?90 mm Hg), and two categories of treated hypertension (SBP<140 and DBP<90 mm Hg or SBP?140 and/or DBP?90 mm Hg). After excluding participants with missing BP values, 169,577 adults were included in the analyses. Compared to normotensives, relative risks (95% confidence interval) of CVD incidence and mortality were 2.73 (2.60–2.86) and 2.53 (2.39–2.68) for SDH, 1.78 (1.69–1.87) and 1.68 (1.58–1.78) for ISH, 1.59 (1.43–1.76) and 1.45 (1.27–1.65) for IDH, 2.01 (1.64–2.48) and 1.61 (1.28–2.03) for treated hypertension with SBP<140 and DBP<90 mm Hg, and 3.37 (3.07–3.69) and 2.88 (2.60–3.19) for treated hypertension with SBP?140 and/or DBP?90 mm Hg, respectively, after adjustment for important covariables. Conclusions Our results indicate that all hypertension subtypes are associated with significantly increased risk of CVD in Chinese adults. Primary prevention of hypertension should be a public health priority in the Chinese population.

Kelly, Tanika N.; Gu, Dongfeng; Chen, Jing; Huang, Jian-feng; Chen, Ji-chun; Duan, Xiufang; Wu, Xigui; Yau, C. Lillian; Whelton, Paul K.; He, Jiang

2009-01-01

230

Risk of cardiovascular events in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome  

PubMed Central

Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have increased prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors. However, data on the incidence of CV events are lacking in this population. Using Rochester Epidemiology Project resources, we conducted a retrospective cohort study comparing CV events in women with PCOS with those of women without PCOS in Olmsted County, Minnesota. Between 1966 and 1988, 309 women with PCOS and 343 without PCOS were identified. Mean (SD) age at PCOS diagnosis was 25.0 (5.3) years; mean age at last follow-up was 46.7 years. Mean (SD) follow-up was 23.7 (13.7) years. Women with PCOS had a higher body mass index (29.4 kg/m2 vs 28.3 kg/m2; p=.01). Prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and hypertension and levels of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides were similar in the two groups. We observed no increase in CV events, including myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.32 to 1.72; p=.48); coronary artery bypass graft surgery (adjusted HR 1.52; 95% CI 0.42 to 5.48; p=.52); death (adjusted HR 1.03; 95% CI, 0.29 to 3.71; p=.96); death due to CV disease (adjusted HR 5.67; 95% CI 0.51 to 63.7; p=.16); or stroke (adjusted HR 1.05; 95% CI 0.28 to 3.92; p=.94). Although women with PCOS weighed more than controls, there was no increased prevalence of other CV risk factors. Furthermore, we found no increase in CV events. While prospective studies are needed to confirm these findings, women with PCOS do not appear to have adverse CV outcomes in midlife.

Iftikhar, S.; Collazo-Clavell, M.L.; Roger, V.L.; St. Sauver, J.; Brown, R.D.; Cha, S.; Rhodes, D.J.

2013-01-01

231

Social networks of health care providers and patients in cardiovascular risk management: a study protocol  

PubMed Central

Background In recent years, preventive and clinical interventions for cardiovascular risk management have been implemented widely in primary care in the Netherlands. Although this has enhanced quality and outcomes of cardiovascular risk management, further improvement remains possible. In the planned observational study, we aim to examine the role of social networks of healthcare providers and patients in quality and outcomes of cardiovascular risk management. Methods/Design In a longitudinal observational study, data on social networks of approximately 300 primary care providers from 30 general practices and 900 cardiovascular patients will be collected twice, with a six month interval, using a mix of measures. Social networks are documented with specifically designed questionnaires for patients, relatives, and healthcare professionals. For each included patient, we will extract from medical records to gather data on clinical processes and cardiovascular risk predictors. Data on self-management and psychosocial outcomes of patients will be collected using questionnaires for patients. The analysis focuses on identifying network characteristics, which are associated with (changes in) cardiovascular risk management or self-management. Discussion This research will provide insight into the role of social networks of patients and providers in cardiovascular risk management in primary practice. Trial registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR4069.

2014-01-01

232

Indications for and utilization of angiotensin receptor II blockers in patients at high cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

The worldwide burden of cardiovascular disease is growing. In addition to lifestyle changes, pharmacologic agents that can modify cardiovascular disease processes have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Antihypertensive agents are widely used to reduce the risk of cardiovascular events partly beyond that of blood pressure-lowering. In particular, the angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), which antagonize the vasoconstrictive and proinflammatory/pro-proliferative effects of angiotensin II, have been shown to be cardio vascularly protective and well tolerated. Although the eight currently available ARBs are all indicated for the treatment of hypertension, they have partly different pharmacology, and their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties differ. ARB trials for reduction of cardiovascular risk can be broadly categorized into those in patients with/without hypertension and additional risk factors, in patients with evidence of cardiovascular disease, and in patients with severe cardiovascular disease, such as heart failure. These differences have led to their indications in different populations. For hypertensive patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, losartan was approved to have an indication for stroke prevention, while for most patients at high-risk for cardiovascular events, telmisartan is an appropriate therapy because it has a cardiovascular preventive indication. Other ARBs are indicated for narrowly defined high-risk patients, such as those with hypertension or heart failure. Although in one analysis a possible link between ARBs and increased risks of cancer has surfaced, several meta-analyses, using the most comprehensive data available, have found no link between any ARB, or the class as a whole, and cancer. Most recently, the US Food and Drug Administration completed a review of the potential risk of cancer and concluded that treatment with an ARB medication does not increase the risk of developing cancer. This review discusses the clinical evidence supporting the different indications for each of the ARBs and the outstanding safety of this drug class.

Farsang, Csaba

2011-01-01

233

Interstate Variation in Modifiable Risk Factors and Cardiovascular Mortality in the United States  

PubMed Central

Objective We investigated the role of state-level differences in modifiable cardiovascular (CV) risk factors in contributing to state disparities in cardiovascular mortality rates in the US. Methods Adults aged 45–74 in 2010 were examined. We constructed a CV risk index summarizing state-level exposure to current smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, alcohol abstinence, hypertension, elevated cholesterol, and diabetes using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Outcomes were cardiovascular, coronary heart disease, and stroke mortality. Linear regression was used to estimate associations between the CV risk index and mortality outcomes. Models accounted for state-level socioeconomic characteristics and other potential confounders. Results Risk factors were highly correlated at the state-level (Cronbach's alpha 0.85 (men) and 0.92 (women). Each +1SD difference in the cardiovascular risk index was associated with higher adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates by 41.0 (95%CI?=?26.3, 55.7) and 33.3 (95%CI?=?24.4, 42.2) deaths per 100,000 for men and women, respectively. The index accounted for 8% (men) and 11% (women) of the variation in state-level cardiovascular mortality. Comparable associations were also observed for coronary heart disease and stroke mortality. Conclusions CV risk factors were highly correlated at the state-level and were independently associated with state CV mortality, suggesting the utility of generalized CV risk reduction.

Patel, Shivani A.; Narayan, K. M. Venkat; Ali, Mohammed K.; Mehta, Neil K.

2014-01-01

234

EVALUATION OF OXIDATIVE STRESS AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK FACTORS IN TYPE II DIABETIC POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN  

Microsoft Academic Search

The risk of Ischemic heart disease increases in women after the menopause. Women with type 2 diabetes appear to lose the protection against cardiovascular disease afforded by estrogen. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between oxidative stress and cardiovascular disease parameters in postmenopausal women with and without diabetes, also to evaluate the association of diabetes mellitus

KHOLOUD S. RAMADAN; KHALED Z. EL-KARMOUTY

2009-01-01

235

Dialysis in 2011: Can cardiovascular risk in dialysis patients be decreased?  

PubMed

More than 1.4 million patients are on renal replacement therapy worldwide. Mortality in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) is as high as that seen in some types of metastatic cancer, and premature cardiovascular disease is the major killer in ESRD. Several publications in 2011 addressed how interventions can modify cardiovascular risk factors and improve outcomes. PMID:22158474

Stenvinkel, Peter; Bárány, Peter

2012-02-01

236

The Influence of a Vegetarian Diet on Haemostatic Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in Africans  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dietary habits have been implicated in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels and decreased fibrinolytic activity have been identified as major independent cardiovascular risk factors. In this study, we compared the blood pressure, plasma fibrinogen concentration, and fibrinolytic activity of 40 nonvegetarians (NON-VEGs) with 36 vegetarians (8 VEGs and 28 SEMI-VEGs). The latter group consisted of students

A. A Famodu; O Osilesi; Y. O Makinde; O. A Osonuga; T. A Fakoya; E. O Ogunyemi; I. E Egbenehkhuere

1999-01-01

237

Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease in School Children - a Pilot Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To assess the frequencies of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in school children. The informa- tion may help in designing interventions aimed at modifying unhealthy lifestyle in children, which may reduce the later incidence of cardiovascular disease in adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 206 students (ages 14-18 years), enrolled in higher sec- ondary school. Students were

A. K. Khuwaja; Z. Fatmi; W. B. Soomro; N. K. Khuwaja

2003-01-01

238

Update on C-reactive protein as a risk marker in cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Update on C-reactive protein as a risk marker in cardiovascular disease. Atherosclerosis is characterized by a nonspecific local inflammatory process, which is accompanied by a systemic response. A number of prospective studies have convincingly demonstrated a strong and independent association between even slightly elevated concentrations of systemic markers of inflammation, like C-reactive protein (CRP), and cardiovascular events in initially healthy

Wolfgang Koenig

2003-01-01

239

Nontraditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a reduced lifespan, and a substantial proportion of these individuals die from cardiovascular disease. Although a large percentage of patients with CKD have traditional cardiac risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension and abnormalities in cholesterol, interventions to address these factors—which have significantly decreased cardiovascular mortality in the general population—have not shown such benefit

Jessica Kendrick; Michel B Chonchol

2008-01-01

240

Patients with Subclinical Cushing's Syndrome due to Adrenal Adenoma Have Increased Cardiovascular Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

of the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. In this cross- sectional study we assessed the cardiovascular profile in 28 consecutive SCS patients (19 women and 9 men; aged 56 10.6 yr) compared with 100 controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index. Systolic (P < 0.001) and diastolic (P < 0.005) blood pressures were higher in patients, as were

LIBUSE TAUCHMANOVA; RICCARDO ROSSI; BERNADETTE BIONDI; MELANIA PULCRANO; VINCENZO NUZZO; EMILIANO-ANTONIO PALMIERI; SERAFINO FAZIO; GAETANO LOMBARDI

241

Cardiovascular risk and combined oral contraceptives: clinical decisions in settings of uncertainty.  

PubMed

Although generally safe, combined oral contraceptives (COCs) are associated with risks, including an estimated 2-fold increased relative risk of cardiovascular events. For most women taking COCs for contraception, absolute cardiovascular risks are very low, and the overall risks of COCs are outweighed by the risks of unwanted pregnancy. Nonetheless, risks of COCs may be excessive in some women, and both the American College of Obstetricians (ACOG) and the World Health Organization (WHO) have offered contraindications for COC use. Complicating this issue, COCs are commonly used for reasons other than contraception (eg, polycystic ovary syndrome, which is associated with subfertility and cardiovascular risk factors). Thus, in some clinical scenarios, ACOG and WHO guidelines may offer incomplete guidance regarding whether COC use would be associated with an unacceptable risk-benefit ratio. We propose that cardiovascular risk calculators may be helpful in some patients, as an adjunct to ACOG and WHO guidelines, by allowing physicians to estimate the attributable risk of COC-related cardiovascular events. PMID:22360920

Beller, Jennifer P; McCartney, Christopher R

2013-01-01

242

The impact of C reactive protein on global cardiovascular risk on patients with coronary artery disease.  

PubMed

Introduction. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the major cause of premature death worldwide. Hundreds of risk factors have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Recent extensive evidence supports inflammation as a key pathogenetic mechanism in the development and progression of atherosclerosis and in triggering clinical atherothrombotic CVD events. C-reactive protein (CRP) is one possible marker of vascular inflammation and plays a direct role in promoting vascular inflammation, vessel damage and clinical CVD events. Material and method. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between CRP level and the global cardiovascular risk. We evaluated 100 patients with cardiovascular risk factors, using the systematic coronary risk evalution (SCORE) charts for high risk regions of Europe and we determined the CRP level, using the nephelometric method. Results. By their SCORE chart, 44% of the patients are in the moderate risk category, and almost 40% in the high risk category, the rest of them (16%) are in the low and very high risk category. A statistically significant p value (p<0.05) was observed between patients with CRP<10mg/L, who had a lower sistolic blood pressure than patients with CRP?10mg/L, Conclusion. The CRP level over 10mg/L is correlated with an over 4% risk of developing a fatal CVD in 10 years. The acute phase reactant, CRP, a simple downstream marker of inflammation, has now emerged as a major cardiovascular risk factor. PMID:24778862

Cozlea, D L; Farcas, D M; Nagy, A; Keresztesi, A A; Tifrea, Ramona; Cozlea, L; Cara?ca, E

2013-10-01

243

Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle-brachial index  

PubMed Central

Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ? 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors.

Syvanen, Kari; Korhonen, Paivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

2011-01-01

244

Cardiovascular Risk in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

PubMed Central

Rising rates of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus in children have led to increased concern regarding cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk during childhood. Diabetic children face prolonged exposure to hyperglycemia, and have increased risk of both microvascular and macrovascular disease. These circumstances may result in a generation of young adults presenting with cardiovascular outcomes, a tremendous personal and public health toll. In this article, we review CVD risk in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, discuss aspects of pathophysiology, and review current methods of CVD risk assessment. We also identify crucial areas in need of future research in order to devise effective prevention and treatment of CVD risk in children.

Magge, Sheela N.

2012-01-01

245

Application of the tissue residue approach in ecological risk assessment.  

PubMed

The objective of this work is to present a critical review of the application of the tissue residue approach (TRA) in ecological risk and/or impact assessment (ERA) of chemical stressors and environmental criteria development. A secondary goal is to develop a framework for integrating the TRA into ecological assessments along with traditional, exposure concentration-based assessment approaches. Although widely recognized for its toxicological appeal, the utility of the TRA in specific applications will depend on numerous factors, such as chemical properties, exposure characteristics, assessment type, availability of tissue residue-response data, and ability to quantify chemical exposure. Therefore, the decision to use the TRA should include an evaluation of the relative strengths, limitations, and uncertainties among exposure and residue-based methods for characterizing toxicological effects. Furthermore, rather than supplanting exposure concentration-based toxicity assessments, the TRA can be highly effective for evaluating and reducing uncertainty when used in a complementary manner (e.g., when evaluating multiple lines of evidence in field studies). To address limitations with the available tissue residue-response data, approaches for extrapolating residue-based toxicity data across species, tissues, and exposure durations are discussed. Some of these approaches rely on predicted residue-response relationships or toxicological models that have an implicit residue-response basis (e.g., biotic ligand model). Because risk to an organism is a function of both its exposure potential and inherent sensitivity (i.e., on a residue basis), bioaccumulation models will be required not only for translating tissue residue criteria into corresponding water and sediment criteria, but also for defining the most vulnerable species in an assemblage (i.e., highly exposed and highly sensitive species). Application of the TRA in ecological assessments and criteria development are summarized for bioaccumulative organic chemicals, TBT, and in situ bioassays using bivalve molluscs. PMID:21184572

Sappington, Keith G; Bridges, Todd S; Bradbury, Steven P; Erickson, Russell J; Hendriks, A Jan; Lanno, Roman P; Meador, James P; Mount, David R; Salazar, Mike H; Spry, Doug J

2011-01-01

246

The Impact of NSAID Treatment on Cardiovascular Risk - Insight from Danish Observational Data.  

PubMed

This MiniReview describes the present evidence for the relationship between cardiovascular risk and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with special focus using Danish register-based data. NSAIDs are among the most widely used drugs worldwide and mainly used for management of pain and inflammatory conditions. Through the past decade, much attention has been given to the cardiovascular safety of these drugs, and several studies have shown increased risk of adverse cardiovascular effects associated with NSAID use. Current guidelines discourage any use of NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular disease, yet over a period of 8-10 years, 35-44% of patients with myocardial infarction or heart failure were exposed to NSAIDs in Denmark. Furthermore, NSAID use was associated with an increased risk of death or myocardial infarction by up to 5 times that of non-users. There was also a clear indication for a dose-related response in risk associated with NSAID therapy, supporting a causal association. Notably, the cardiovascular risk associated with NSAID treatment was prevalent at start of treatment, suggesting no safe treatment window for NSAIDs in patients with cardiovascular disease. Thus, evidence from observational studies is accumulating, suggesting that NSAIDs are a major public health concern due to the widespread use of these drugs. Although it seems unlikely that we can completely avoid use of NSAIDs, even among high-risk patients, these results highlight the importance of balancing the benefit versus the risk of treatment before initiating NSAID treatment. PMID:24690187

Schjerning Olsen, Anne-Marie; Fosbøl, Emil L; Gislason, Gunnar H

2014-08-01

247

Effect of Motorized Scooters on Quality of Life and Cardiovascular Risk.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Physical inactivity increases cardiovascular risk. The possible adverse effects of regular motorized scooter use, recently popularized for patients with physical limitations, has not been previously examined. We performed a single-center, retrospective co...

B. W. Zagol R. A. Krasuski

2010-01-01

248

Effects of Endurance and Resistance Training on Cardiovascular Risk in Military Eligible Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall hypothesis is that the decline in physical activity habits and resultant increase in body fat reduces exercise capacity and muscle mass in military women. These lifestyle changes worsen cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, continued involve...

A. W. Gardner E. T. Poehlman

1999-01-01

249

Effects of Endurance and Resistance Training on Cardiovascular Risk in Military Eligible Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall hypothesis is that the decline in physical activity habits and resultant increase in body fat reduces exercise capacity and muscle mass in military women. These lifestyle changes worsen metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, con...

A. W. Gardner E. T. Poehlman

1997-01-01

250

Effects of Endurance and Resistance Training on Cardiovascular Risk in Military Eligible Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall hypothesis is that the decline in physical activity habits and resultant increase in body fat reduces exercise capacity and muscle mass in military women. These lifestyle changes worsen cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, continued involve...

E. T. Poehlman A. W. Gardner

2000-01-01

251

Effects of Endurance and Resistance Training on Cardiovascular Risk in Military Eligible Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall hypothesis is that the decline in physical activity habits and resultant increase in body fat reduces exercise capacity and muscle mass in military women. These lifestyle changes worsen cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, continued involve...

A. W. Gardner E. T. Poehlman

1998-01-01

252

Effects of Endurance and Resistance Training on Cardiovascular Risk in Military Eligible Women.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The overall Hypothesis is that the decline in physical activity habits and resultant increase in body fat reduce exercise capacity and muscle mass in military women. These lifestyle changes worsen cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, continued involvem...

A. W. Gardner E. T. Poehlman

2001-01-01

253

Cardiovascular Risk Comparisons of Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents in the TRICARE Population.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This report examines differences in risk of myocardial infarction and stroke (cardiovascular events) between the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors Rofecoxib, Celecoxib, and Valdecoxib, and the traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) N...

K. L. Lefebvre

2005-01-01

254

Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully managing modifiable CVD risk factors in patients with T2DM. Therapeutic strategies should include lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and prothrombotic factors. This article discusses the impact of modifying these CVD risk factors in the context of T2DM; the clinical evidence is summarized, and current guidelines are also discussed. The cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure are well established. For aspirin therapy, any cardiovascular benefits must be balanced against the associated bleeding risk, with current evidence supporting this strategy only in certain patients who are at increased CVD risk. Although overweight, obesity, and hyperglycemia are clearly associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the effect of their modification on this risk is less well defined by available clinical trial evidence. However, for glucose-lowering drugs, further evidence is expected from several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials. Taken together, the evidence highlights the value of early intervention and targeting multiple risk factors with both lifestyle and pharmacological strategies to give the best chance of reducing macrovascular complications in the long term. PMID:24920930

Lorber, Daniel

2014-01-01

255

Cardiovascular risk factors in economically disadvantaged women: a study of prevalence and awareness.  

PubMed

This study examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among low-income women and assessed the level of awareness and attitudes about these risk factors in the community. A survey instrument was developed and administered by a single researcher to a convenience sample of women in health clinics and nonclinical community settings. These settings included: an academic clinic, community clinics, women's shelters, free meal sites, community centers, public housing units, and private homes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Two hundred two women were selected without regard to age or race. The mean number of cardiovascular risk factors per subject was 2.6 (SD 1.4). Each of eight established cardiovascular risk factors was identified by 4% to 34% of subjects. Among those women with a specific risk factor, only 0% to 45% reported that they were at increased risk due to the presence of that factor. The prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among low-income women is substantial. Knowledge and understanding of these risk factors is suboptimal, particularly among women personally affected by risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:9770952

Poduri, A; Grisso, J A

1998-09-01

256

Importance of cardiovascular disease risk management in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus  

PubMed Central

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is commonly accompanied by other cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors, such as hypertension, obesity, and dyslipidemia. Furthermore, CVD is the most common cause of death in people with T2DM. It is therefore of critical importance to minimize the risk of macrovascular complications by carefully managing modifiable CVD risk factors in patients with T2DM. Therapeutic strategies should include lifestyle and pharmacological interventions targeting hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and prothrombotic factors. This article discusses the impact of modifying these CVD risk factors in the context of T2DM; the clinical evidence is summarized, and current guidelines are also discussed. The cardiovascular benefits of smoking cessation, increasing physical activity, and reducing low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and blood pressure are well established. For aspirin therapy, any cardiovascular benefits must be balanced against the associated bleeding risk, with current evidence supporting this strategy only in certain patients who are at increased CVD risk. Although overweight, obesity, and hyperglycemia are clearly associated with increased cardiovascular risk, the effect of their modification on this risk is less well defined by available clinical trial evidence. However, for glucose-lowering drugs, further evidence is expected from several ongoing cardiovascular outcome trials. Taken together, the evidence highlights the value of early intervention and targeting multiple risk factors with both lifestyle and pharmacological strategies to give the best chance of reducing macrovascular complications in the long term.

Lorber, Daniel

2014-01-01

257

Exercise, fitness, and cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article highlights research supporting the concept that increased physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness attenuate\\u000a risk of cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. Increased activity and fitness also attenuate\\u000a risk of developing cardiovascular disease in persons who have type 2 diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Although controversial,\\u000a relationships between physical activity\\/physical fitness and type 2 diabetes\\/metabolic syndrome

Glen E. Duncan; RCEP SM

2006-01-01

258

The Extended Relationship between Child Cardiovascular Risks and Academic Performance Measures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To examine the relationship between children’s overweight status and other cardiovascular risk fitness factors and academic performance among fifth-grade students.Research Methods and Procedures: Using a sample of 968 fifth-grade students (50.7% boys; mean age = 10.6 years), children’s cardiovascular risks (BMI, blood pressure, acanthosis nigricans) and fitness measures were compared with their mean group performance scores across four subscales

Lesley A. Cottrell; Karen Northrup; Richard Wittberg

2007-01-01

259

Cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD): the CKD-mineral bone disorder (CKD-MBD)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent advances in our understanding of the excess mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) due to cardiovascular complications,\\u000a obtained through observational studies, demonstrate that vascular calcification and hyperphosphatemia are major cardiovascular\\u000a risk factors. Mechanistic studies demonstrate that these two risk factors are related and that hyperphosphatemia directly\\u000a stimulates vascular calcification. The role of hyperphosphatemia in stimulating vascular calcification in CKD

Keith A. Hruska; Eric T. Choi; Imran Memon; T. Keefe Davis; Suresh Mathew

2010-01-01

260

Comorbidities and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Older Breast Cancer Survivors  

PubMed Central

Objective To evaluate cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in older breast cancer survivors compared with a group of women without breast cancer. Study Design The retrospective study included (1) women aged 65 or more years who were initially diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer from 1990 to 1994 in 6 US health plans and who survived at least 5 years postdiagnosis (cases) and (2) a matched comparison group. They were followed for a maximum of 15 years. Methods Data sources included medical charts and electronic health records. Cases (n = 1361) were matched on age, health plan site, and enrollment year to women in the comparison group (n = 1361). Subjects were followed to the first CVD outcome, health plan disenrollment, death, or study end. We compared rates of CVD in these 2 groups and used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the hazard ratio (HR), considering body mass index, smoking history, diabetes, and hypertension. Results The strongest predictors of CVD were smoking history (HR = 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15–1.46), diabetes (HR = 1.72; 95% CI, 1.48–1.99), and hypertension (HR = 1.48; 95% CI, 1.31–1.67) rather than breast cancer case-comparison status (HR = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.87–1.09). Conclusion Results suggest that long-term prognosis in breast cancer patients is affected by management of preexisting conditions. Assessment of comorbid conditions and effective management of diabetes and hypertension in older breast cancer survivors may lead to longer overall survival.

Haque, Reina; Prout, Marianne; Geiger, Ann M.; Kamineni, Aruna; Thwin, Soe Soe; Avila, Chantal; Silliman, Rebecca A.; Quinn, Virginia; Yood, Marianne Ulcickas

2014-01-01

261

DNA Methylation as a Biomarker for Cardiovascular Disease Risk  

PubMed Central

Background Elevated serum homocysteine is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This may reflect a reduced systemic remethylation capacity, which would be expected to cause decreased genomic DNA methylation in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL). Methodology/Principal Findings We examined the association between prevalence of CVD (myocardial infarction, stroke) and its predisposing conditions (hypertension, diabetes) and PBL global genomic DNA methylation as represented by ALU and Satellite 2 (AS) repetitive element DNA methylation in 286 participants of the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based prospective investigation of 63,257 men and women aged 45–74 years recruited during 1993–1998. Men exhibited significantly higher global DNA methylation [geometric mean (95% confidence interval (CI)): 159 (143, 178)] than women [133 (121, 147)] (P?=?0·01). Global DNA methylation was significantly elevated in men with a history of CVD or its predisposing conditions at baseline (P?=?0·03) but not in women (P?=?0·53). Fifty-two subjects (22 men, 30 women) who were negative for these CVD/predisposing conditions at baseline acquired one or more of these conditions by the time of their follow-up I interviews, which took place on average about 5·8 years post-enrollment. Global DNA methylation levels of the 22 incident cases in men were intermediate (AS, 177) relative to the 56 male subjects who remained free of CVD/predisposing conditions at follow-up (lowest AS, 132) and the 51 male subjects with a diagnosis of CVD or predisposing conditions reported at baseline (highest AS 184) (P for trend?=?0.0008) No such association was observed in women (P?=?0.91). Baseline body mass index was positively associated with AS in both men and women (P?=?0·007). Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that elevated, not decreased, PBL DNA methylation is positively associated with prevalence of CVD/predisposing conditions and obesity in Singapore Chinese.

Kim, Myungjin; Long, Tiffany I.; Arakawa, Kazuko; Wang, Renwei; Yu, Mimi C.; Laird, Peter W.

2010-01-01

262

Estimated GFR Associates with Cardiovascular Risk Factors Independently of Measured GFR  

PubMed Central

Estimation of the GFR (eGFR) using creatinine- or cystatin C–based equations is imperfect, especially when the true GFR is normal or near-normal. Modest reductions in eGFR from the normal range variably predict cardiovascular morbidity. If eGFR associates not only with measured GFR (mGFR) but also with cardiovascular risk factors, the effects of these non–GFR-related factors might bias the association between eGFR and outcome. To investigate these potential non–GFR-related associations between eGFR and cardiovascular risk factors, we measured GFR by iohexol clearance in a sample from the general population (age 50 to 62 years) without known cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or kidney disease. Even after adjustment for mGFR, eGFR associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors in multiple regression analyses. More risk factors influenced cystatin C–based eGFR than creatinine-based eGFR, adjusted for mGFR, and some of the risk factors exhibited nonlinear effects in generalized additive models (P < 0.05). These results suggest that eGFR, calculated using standard creatinine- or cystatin C–based equations, partially depends on factors other than the true GFR. Thus, estimates of cardiovascular risk associated with small changes in eGFR must be interpreted with caution.

Melsom, Toralf; Ingebretsen, Ole C.; Jenssen, Trond; Nj?lstad, Inger; Solbu, Marit D.; Toft, Ingrid; Eriksen, Bj?rn O.

2011-01-01

263

Frequency of private spiritual activity and cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative  

PubMed Central

Purpose Spirituality has been associated with better cardiac autonomic balance, but its association with cardiovascular risk is not well studied. We examined whether more frequent private spiritual activity was associated with reduced cardiovascular risk in postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study. Methods Frequency of private spiritual activity (prayer, Bible reading, and meditation) was self-reported at year 5 of follow-up. Cardiovascular outcomes were centrally adjudicated, and cardiovascular risk was estimated from proportional hazards models. Results Final models included 43,708 women (mean age, 68.9 ± 7.3 years; median follow-up, 7.0 years) free of cardiac disease through year 5 of follow-up. In age-adjusted models, private spiritual activity was associated with increased cardiovascular risk (hazard ratio [HR], 1.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02–1.31 for weekly vs. never; HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11–1.40 for daily vs. never). In multivariate models adjusted for demographics, lifestyle, risk factors, and psychosocial factors, such association remained significant only in the group with daily activity (HR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03–1.30). Subgroup analyses indicate this association may be driven by the presence of severe chronic diseases. Conclusions Among aging women, higher frequency of private spiritual activity was associated with increased cardiovascular risk, likely reflecting a mobilization of spiritual resources to cope with aging and illness.

Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Fitchett, George; Hovey, Kathleen M.; Schnall, Eliezer; Thomson, Cynthia; Andrews, Christopher A.; Crawford, Sybil; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Post, Stephen; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Ockene, Judith

2013-01-01

264

Estimated GFR associates with cardiovascular risk factors independently of measured GFR.  

PubMed

Estimation of the GFR (eGFR) using creatinine- or cystatin C-based equations is imperfect, especially when the true GFR is normal or near-normal. Modest reductions in eGFR from the normal range variably predict cardiovascular morbidity. If eGFR associates not only with measured GFR (mGFR) but also with cardiovascular risk factors, the effects of these non-GFR-related factors might bias the association between eGFR and outcome. To investigate these potential non-GFR-related associations between eGFR and cardiovascular risk factors, we measured GFR by iohexol clearance in a sample from the general population (age 50 to 62 years) without known cardiovascular disease, diabetes, or kidney disease. Even after adjustment for mGFR, eGFR associated with traditional cardiovascular risk factors in multiple regression analyses. More risk factors influenced cystatin C-based eGFR than creatinine-based eGFR, adjusted for mGFR, and some of the risk factors exhibited nonlinear effects in generalized additive models (P<0.05). These results suggest that eGFR, calculated using standard creatinine- or cystatin C-based equations, partially depends on factors other than the true GFR. Thus, estimates of cardiovascular risk associated with small changes in eGFR must be interpreted with caution. PMID:21454717

Mathisen, Ulla Dorte; Melsom, Toralf; Ingebretsen, Ole C; Jenssen, Trond; Njølstad, Inger; Solbu, Marit D; Toft, Ingrid; Eriksen, Bjørn O

2011-05-01

265

Harnessing Health IT for Improved Cardiovascular Risk Management  

Microsoft Academic Search

Robyn Whittaker and colleagues argue that IT-based programs can improve cardiovascular disease management and patient empowerment, but must be accompanied by supportive social and political environments and active patient and clinician engagement.

Sue Wells; Robyn Whittaker; Enid Dorey; Chris Bullen

2010-01-01

266

Cardiovascular Risk of Celecoxib in 6 Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trials  

PubMed Central

Background Observational studies and randomized trials have reported increased cardiovascular risk associated with cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors. Prior placebo-controlled randomized studies had limited ability to assess the relationship of either celecoxib dose or pretreatment cardiovascular status to risk associated with celecoxib. Our aim was to assess the cardiovascular risk associated with celecoxib in 3 dose regimens and to assess the relationship between baseline cardiovascular risk and effect of celecoxib on cardiovascular events. Methods and Results We performed a patient-level pooled analysis of adjudicated data from 7950 patients in 6 placebo-controlled trials comparing celecoxib with placebo for conditions other than arthritis with a planned follow-up of at least 3 years. Patients were administered celecoxib in 3 dose regimens: 400 mg QD, 200 mg BID, or 400 mg BID. From the pooled data, we calculated a hazard ratio for all dose regimens combined and individual hazard ratios for each dose regimen and examined whether celecoxib-related risk was associated with baseline cardiovascular risk. The primary end point was the combination of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, or thromboembolic event. With 16 070 patient-years of follow-up, the hazard ratio for the composite end point combining the tested doses was 1.6 (95% CI, 1.1 to 2.3). The risk, which increased with dose regimen (P=0.0005), was lowest for the 400-mg-QD dose (hazard ratio, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6 to 2.0), intermediate for the 200-mg-BID dose (hazard ratio, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 3.1), and highest for the 400-mg-BID dose (hazard ratio, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.5 to 6.1). Patients at highest baseline risk demonstrated disproportionately greater risk of celecoxib-related adverse events (P for interaction=0.034). Conclusions We observed evidence of differential cardiovascular risk as a function of celecoxib dose regimen and baseline cardiovascular risk. By further clarifying the extent of celecoxib-related cardiovascular risk, these findings may help guide treatment decisions for patients who derive clinical benefit from selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition.

Solomon, Scott D.; Wittes, Janet; Finn, Peter V.; Fowler, Robert; Viner, Jaye; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Arber, Nadir; Levin, Bernard; Meinert, Curtis L.; Martin, Barbara; Pater, Joseph L.; Goss, Paul E.; Lance, Peter; Obara, Stefanie; Chew, Emily Y.; Kim, Jonghyeon; Arndt, Gretchen; Hawk, Ernest

2010-01-01

267

Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among adults without obvious cardiovascular disease in a rural community in Ekiti State, Southwest Nigeria  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease worldwide is largely driven by modifiable risk factors. This study sought to identify and determine the prevalence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors according to sex in inhabitants of a rural community in a developing country. Methods This cross-sectional study included participants aged ?40 years in the rural community of Aaye Ekiti, Ekiti State, Southwest Nigeria. All participants who met the inclusion criteria were drawn from the 161 households in the community. Data on the following were collected: arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, dyslipidaemia, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and sociodemographic parameters. These were analysed with SPSS version 16.0 software. Results The 104 participants (33 male, 71 female) had a mean age (± standard deviation) of 66.77?±?12.06 years (range, 40–88 years). The majority of the participants (56.7%) were aged 60–79 years. Hypertension was present in 66.4%, diabetes mellitus in 4.8%, abdominal obesity in 38.46%, smoking in 2.9%, physical inactivity in 29.8%, and high alcohol consumption in 1%. Dyslipidaemia, as represented by low HDL-C, occurred in 30%. There were borderline high levels of TC in 4.5%, LDL-C in 1.1%, and TG in 12.5%, but no subject had a high level. Abdominal obesity, alcohol consumption and smoking were statistically significantly associated with sex. Conclusion In this study, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, apart from hypertension, obesity, physical inactivity and low HDL-C had a low prevalence in the rural Nigerian community. However, the high prevalence of hypertension in this poor community suggests a high risk of a future cardiovascular event.

2013-01-01

268

General Cardiovascular Risk Profile for Use in Primary Care The Framingham Heart Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Separate multivariable risk algorithms are commonly used to assess risk of specific atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, ie, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and heart failure. The present report presents a single multivariable risk function that predicts risk of developing all CVD and of its constituents. Methods and Results—We used Cox proportional-hazards regression to evaluate the risk

Ralph B. D'Agostino; Ramachandran S. Vasan; Michael J. Pencina; Philip A. Wolf; Mark Cobain; Joseph M. Massaro; William B. Kannel

2011-01-01

269

Efficacy of statins for primary prevention in people at low cardiovascular risk: a meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background: Statins were initially used to improve cardiovascular outcomes in people with established coronary artery disease, but recently their use has become more common in people at low cardiovascular risk. We did a systematic review of randomized trials to assess the efficacy and harms of statins in these individuals. Methods: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE (to Jan. 28, 2011), registries of health technology assessments and clinical trials, and reference lists of relevant reviews. We included trials that randomly assigned participants at low cardiovascular risk to receive a statin versus a placebo or no statin. We defined low risk as an observed 10-year risk of less than 20% for cardiovascular-related death or nonfatal myocardial infarction, but we explored other definitions in sensitivity analyses. Results: We identified 29 eligible trials involving a total of 80 711 participants. All-cause mortality was significantly lower among patients receiving a statin than among controls (relative risk [RR] 0.90, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.84–0.97) for trials with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease < 20% [primary analysis] and 0.83, 95% CI 0.73–0.94, for trials with 10-year risk < 10% [sensitivity analysis]). Patients in the statin group were also significantly less likely than controls to have nonfatal myocardial infarction (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.49–0.84) and nonfatal stroke (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.68–0.96). Neither metaregression nor stratified analyses suggested statistically significant differences in efficacy between high-and low-potency statins, or larger reductions in cholesterol. Interpretation: Statins were found to be efficacious in preventing death and cardiovascular morbidity in people at low cardiovascular risk. Reductions in relative risk were similar to those seen in patients with a history of coronary artery disease.

Tonelli, Marcello; Lloyd, Anita; Clement, Fiona; Conly, Jon; Husereau, Don; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Klarenbach, Scott; McAlister, Finlay A.; Wiebe, Natasha; Manns, Braden

2011-01-01

270

A Survey of Needs of Texas Biology Teachers Relative to Teaching Cardiovascular Diseases and Associated Risk Factors.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The data show that biology teachers spend relatively little time on diseases of the cardiovascular system. Approximately one period per year is spent on each of eight given cardiovascular disease risk factors. (MP)

White, Robert C.; And Others

1978-01-01

271

Novel Measures of Heart Rate Variability Predict Cardiovascular Mortality in Older Adults Independent of Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors  

PubMed Central

Novel HRV Predicts CV Mortality in the Elderly Background It is unknown whether abnormal heart rate turbulence (HRT) and abnormal fractal properties of heart rate variability identify older adults at increased risk of cardiovascular death (CVdth). Methods Data from 1,172 community-dwelling adults, ages 72 ± 5 (65–93) years, who participated in the Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS), a study of risk factors for CV disease in people ?65 years. HRT and the short-term fractal scaling exponent (DFA1) derived from 24-hour Holter recordings. HRT categorized as: normal (turbulence slope [TS] and turbulence onset [TO] normal) or abnormal (TS and/or TO abnormal). DFA1 categorized as low (?1) or high (>1). Cox regression analyses stratified by Framingham Risk Score (FRS) strata (low = <10, mid = 10–20, and high >20) and adjusted for prevalent clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD), diabetes, and quartiles of ventricular premature beat counts (VPCs). Results CVdths (N = 172) occurred over a median follow-up of 12.3 years. Within each FRS stratum, low DFA1+abnormal HRT predicted risk of CVdth (RR=7.7 for low FRS; 3.6, mid FRS; 2.8, high FRS). Among high FRS stratum participants, low DFA1 alone also predicted CVdth (RR = 2.0). VPCs in the highest quartile predicted CVdth, but only in the high FRS group. Clinical CV disease predicted CVdth at each FRS stratum (RR = 2.9, low; 2.6, mid; and 1.9, high). Diabetes predicted CVdth in the highest FRS group only (RR = 2.2). Conclusions The combination of low DFA1 + abnormal HRT is a strong risk factor for CVdth among older adults even after adjustment for conventional CVD risk measures and the presence of CVD.

STEIN, PHYLLIS K.; BARZILAY, JOSHUA I.; CHAVES, PAULO H.M.; MISTRETTA, STEPHANIE Q.; DOMITROVICH, PETER P.; GOTTDIENER, JOHN S.; RICH, MICHAEL W.; KLEIGER, ROBERT E.

2013-01-01

272

Screening of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Diabetes: Questions Concerning Prediabetes and Low-Mid Income Countries  

PubMed Central

Background: The prevalence of prediabetes is increasing world-wide and this condition predisposes to substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease in addition to developing diabetes mellitus (DM). This article debates screening for early identification and intervention of cardiovascular risk in prediabetes. Discussion: Screening methods exist for cardiovascular disease, but the models have diabetes and smoking status as dichotomous variables. A [Yes or No] response in regards to diabetes then ignores dysglycemia in prediabetes individuals who may nevertheless have hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress. Therefore, the sufferers are treated like healthy persons in such screening models. The problem is worse especially in the low - mid income countries where diagnostic services are either inaccessible or unaffordable for comprehensive testing. Conclusion: To improve early intervention of cardiovascular risk in subclinical diabetes, a model that employs a combination of blood glucose level and an index of oxidative damage is imperative to cater for prediabetes.

Bwititi, Phillip Taderera; Nwose, Ezekiel Uba

2014-01-01

273

Cardiovascular considerations in middle-aged athletes at risk for coronary artery disease.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of death in the United States despite a 50% decrease in deaths from myocardial infarction and stroke in the past 30 years associated with improvements in blood pressure and lipid control. The National Health and Nutrition Evaluation Survey found that the least prevalent metrics of cardiovascular health in adults were healthy diets, normal weights, and optimal levels of exercise. A further reduction in rates of cardiovascular disease will require an increase in exercise. Clinicians who encourage exercise in middle-aged patients face several dilemmas. This article reviews exercise-related risks for sudden death and the performance of a global cardiovascular risk assessment. The need for additional preexercise risk stratification with electrocardiogram, graded exercise testing, or echocardiography is outlined. In addition, the optimum choice of medications for hypertension or dyslipidemia treatment and the effects of these medications and aspirin on endurance exercise are reviewed. PMID:23478556

Reamy, Brian V; Ledford, Christopher C

2013-01-01

274

A prospective evaluation of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A 2 levels and the risk of future cardiovascular events in women  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESWe sought to determine prospectively whether lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) was a predictor of future cardiovascular risk in women.BACKGROUNDInflammatory markers may help predict cardiovascular risk. Lp-PLA2 levels have recently been hypothesized to be an independent predictor of cardiovascular risk in hypercholesterolemic men.METHODSWe conducted a prospective, nested case-control study among 28,263 apparently healthy middle-aged women to assess the risk of death

Gavin J Blake; Nisha Dada; Jonathan C Fox; JoAnn E Manson; Paul M Ridker

2001-01-01

275

Projections of preventable risks for cardiovascular disease in Canada to 2021: a microsimulation modelling approach  

PubMed Central

Background Reductions in preventable risks associated with cardiovascular disease have contributed to a steady decrease in its incidence over the past 50 years in most developed countries. However, it is unclear whether this trend will continue. Our objective was to examine future risk by projecting trends in preventable risk factors in Canada to 2021. Methods We created a population-based microsimulation model using national data on births, deaths and migration; socioeconomic data; cardiovascular disease risk factors; and algorithms for changes in these risk factors (based on sociodemographic characteristics and previous cardiovascular disease risk). An initial population of 22.5 million people, representing the Canadian adult population in 2001, had 13 characteristics including the risk factors used in clinical risk prediction. There were 6.1 million potential exposure profiles for each person each year. Outcome measures included annual prevalence of risk factors (smoking, obesity, diabetes, hypertension and lipid levels) and of co-occurring risks. Results From 2003 to 2009, the projected risks of cardiovascular disease based on the microsimulation model closely approximated those based on national surveys. Except for obesity and diabetes, all risk factors were projected to decrease through to 2021. The largest projected decreases were for the prevalence of smoking (from 25.7% in 2001 to 17.7% in 2021) and uncontrolled hypertension (from 16.1% to 10.8%). Between 2015 and 2017, obesity was projected to surpass smoking as the most prevalent risk factor. Interpretation Risks of cardiovascular disease are projected to decrease modestly in Canada, leading to a likely continuing decline in its incidence.

Manuel, Douglas G.; Tuna, Meltem; Hennessy, Deirdre; Okhmatovskaia, Anya; Fines, Philippe; Tanuseputro, Peter; Tu, Jack V.; Flanagan, William

2014-01-01

276

Cardiovascular risk estimated after 13 years of follow-up in a low-incidence Mediterranean region with high-prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Murcia (south-east Spain) shows increased cardiovascular (CV) morbimortality as compared to other Spanish regions. Our objective was to assess the CV risk associated with major risk factors (RF) among adult population of Murcia. METHODS: A cohort of 2314 subjects (18-70 years) with full biochemical and questionnaire data was followed-up for 13 years. Incident cases of ischemic heart disease and

José M Huerta; María-José Tormo; Diana Gavrila; Carmen Navarro

2010-01-01

277

Cardiovascular risk assessment in low-resource settings: a consensus document of the European Society of Hypertension Working Group on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Risk in Low Resource Settings.  

PubMed

The Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study 2010 confirms ischemic heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death and that hypertension is the main associated risk factor worldwide. How best to respond to the rising prevalence of hypertension in resource-deprived settings is a topic of ongoing public-health debate and discussion. In low-income and middle-income countries, socioeconomic inequality and cultural factors play a role both in the development of risk factors and in the access to care. In Europe, cultural barriers and poor communication between health systems and migrants may limit migrants from receiving appropriate prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. To use more efficiently resources available and to make treatment cost-effective at the patient level, cardiovascular risk approach is now recommended. In 2011, The European Society of Hypertension established a Working Group on 'Hypertension and Cardiovascular risk in low resource settings', which brought together cardiologists, diabetologists, nephrologists, clinical trialists, epidemiologists, economists, and other stakeholders to review current strategies for cardiovascular risk assessment in population studies in low-income and middle-income countries, their limitations, possible improvements, and future interests in screening programs. This report summarizes current evidence and presents highlights of unmet needs. PMID:24577410

Modesti, Pietro A; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Agyemang, Charles; Basu, Sanjay; Benetos, Athanase; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Ceriello, Antonio; Del Prato, Stefano; Kalyesubula, Robert; O'Brien, Eoin; Kilama, Michael O; Perlini, Stefano; Picano, Eugenio; Reboldi, Gianpaolo; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Stuckler, David; Twagirumukiza, Marc; Van Bortel, Luc M; Watfa, Ghassan; Zhao, Dong; Parati, Gianfranco

2014-05-01

278

Snacking patterns, diet quality, and cardiovascular risk factors in adults  

PubMed Central

Background The relationship of snacking patterns on nutrient intake and cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) in adults is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the associations of snacking patterns with nutrient intake, diet quality, and a selection of CVRF in adults participating in the 2001-2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Methods 24-hour dietary recalls were used to determine intake and cluster analysis was used to identify the snacking patterns. Height and weight were obtained and the health indices that were evaluated included diastolic and systolic blood pressure, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triacylglycerides, blood glucose, and insulin. Results The sample was participants (n = 18,988) 19+ years (50% males; 11% African-Americans; 72% white, 12% Hispanic-Americans, and 5% other). Cluster analyses generated 12 distinct snacking patterns, explaining 61% of the variance in snacking. Comparisons of snacking patterns were made to the no snack pattern. It was found that miscellaneous snacks constituted the most common snacking pattern (17%) followed by cakes/cookies/pastries (12%) and sweets (9%). Most snacking patterns were associated with higher energy intakes. Snacking patterns cakes/cookies/pastries, vegetables/legumes, crackers/salty snacks, other grains and whole fruit were associated with lower intakes of saturated fatty acids. Added sugars intakes were higher in the cakes/cookies/pastries, sweets, milk desserts, and soft drinks patterns. Five snack patterns (cakes/cookies/pastries, sweets, vegetable/legumes, milk desserts, soft drinks) were associated with lower sodium intakes. Several snack patterns were associated with higher intakes of potassium, calcium, fiber, vitamin A, and magnesium. Five snacking patterns (miscellaneous snacks; vegetables/legumes; crackers/salty snacks; other grains; and whole fruit) were associated with better diet quality scores. Alcohol was associated with a lower body mass index and milk desserts were associated with a lower waist circumference. No snack patterns were associated with other CVRF studied. Conclusions Overall, several snacking patterns were associated with better diet quality than those consuming no snacks. Yet, the majority of the snacking patterns were not associated with CVRF. Education is needed to improve snacking patterns in terms of nutrients to limit in the diet along with more nutrient-dense foods to be included in snacks.

2014-01-01

279

Clinical Gaze in Risk-Factor Haze: Swedish GPs' Perceptions of Prescribing Cardiovascular Preventive Drugs  

PubMed Central

Aims. To explore general practitioners' (GPs') descriptions of their thoughts and action when prescribing cardiovascular preventive drugs. Methods. Qualitative content analysis of transcribed group interviews with 14 participants from two primary health care centres in the southeast of Sweden. Results. GPs' prescribing of cardiovascular preventive drugs, from their own descriptions, involved “the patient as calculated” and “the inclination to prescribe,” which were negotiated in the interaction with “the patient in front of me.” In situations with high cardiovascular risk, the GPs reported a tendency to adopt a directive consultation style. In situations with low cardiovascular risk and great uncertainty about the net benefit of preventive drugs, the GPs described a preference for an informed patient choice. Conclusions. Our findings suggest that GPs mainly involve patients at low and uncertain risk of cardiovascular disease in treatment decisions, whereas patient involvement tends to decrease when GPs judge the cardiovascular risk as high. Our findings may serve as a memento for clinicians, and we suggest them to be considered in training in communication skills.

Hultberg, Josabeth; Rudebeck, Carl Edvard

2012-01-01

280

Genetic Variants of Diabetes Risk and Incident Cardiovascular Events in Chronic Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective To determine whether information from genetic risk variants for diabetes is associated with cardiovascular events incidence. Methods From the about 30 known genes associated with diabetes, we genotyped single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the 10 loci most associated with type-2 diabetes in 425 subjects from the MASS-II Study, a randomized study in patients with multi-vessel coronary artery disease. The combined genetic information was evaluated by number of risk alleles for diabetes. Performance of genetic models relative to major cardiovascular events incidence was analyzed through Kaplan-Meier curve comparison and Cox Hazard Models and the discriminatory ability of models was assessed for cardiovascular events by calculating the area under the ROC curve. Results Genetic information was able to predict 5-year incidence of major cardiovascular events and overall-mortality in non-diabetic individuals, even after adjustment for potential confounders including fasting glycemia. Non-diabetic individuals with high genetic risk had a similar incidence of events then diabetic individuals (cumulative hazard of 33.0 versus 35.1% of diabetic subjects). The addition of combined genetic information to clinical predictors significantly improved the AUC for cardiovascular events incidence (AUC?=?0.641 versus 0.610). Conclusions Combined information of genetic variants for diabetes risk is associated to major cardiovascular events incidence, including overall mortality, in non-diabetic individuals with coronary artery disease. Clinical Trial Registration Information Medicine, Angioplasty, or Surgery Study (MASS II). Unique identifier: ISRCTN66068876 URL.

Sousa, Andre Gustavo P.; Lopes, Neuza H.; Hueb, Whady A.; Krieger, Jose Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre C.

2011-01-01

281

Mini Review: Physical activity and fitness and its relations to cardiovascular disease risk factors in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES:This paper aim to review the newest literature linking physical inactivity and low fitness to metabolic disorders including cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and obesity.METHODS:There is a rationale for early prevention of CVD if (a) children have a risk factor profile, where risk for future disease is increased, (b) physical activity and CVD risk factors track into adulthood, and (c)

K Froberg; L B Andersen

2005-01-01

282

Cardiovascular risk factors and migraine without aura: A case-control study  

PubMed Central

Background Migraine with aura (MA) has been identified as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous observation has also found higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in migraineurs without aura (MO), but the results have been conflicting. The present study was conducted to assess the association between cardiovascular risk factors and migraine without aura among Iranians. Methods In our study the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, and family history of early coronary artery disease, were studied in 347 migraineurs without aura and 267 non-migraineurs. The odds ratio (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was used to assess the strength of the association. Results Patients with migraine without aura were at an increased risk of developing hypertension (ORadj = 1.9; P = 0.029), but there was no difference in other cardiovascular risk profiles, including hyperglycemia, dyslipidemia, obesity, cigarette smoking, and family history of early coronary artery disease. Conclusion Our study revealed that the prevalence of hypertension was higher in migraineurs without aura in comparison with non-migraineurs. Therefore, physicians are supposed to be more vigilant in examining these patients and take care not to prescribe medications that may provoke hypertension.

Harandi, Samaneh Aalami; Sadatnaseri, Azadeh; Hosseini, S. Hamed; Jahromi, Soodeh Razeghi

2013-01-01

283

Expert perspective: reducing cardiovascular risk in metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus beyond low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering.  

PubMed

Even with optimal statin therapy, many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus or metabolic syndrome fail to achieve all lipid targets and remain at high risk of cardiovascular events. Add-on lipid-modifying therapy that is effective in improving the triglyceride and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol abnormalities characteristic of these conditions is a recommended approach to reduce this risk. Fibrates or niacin is a logical option, supported by clinical studies showing improved lipid control in combination with a statin. Of the fibrates, fenofibrate may offer microvascular benefits in type 2 diabetes--as demonstrated by the Diabetes Atherosclerosis Intervention Study (DAIS) and the Fenofibrate Intervention and Event Lowering in Diabetes (FIELD) study--as well as a low risk of myopathy when combined with statins compared with gemfibrozil. Although there is good evidence that both agents favorably affect clinical outcome, we need to evaluate their impact against a baseline of statin therapy. We await data from ongoing large-scale studies to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these combinations and to determine the most appropriate option for reducing residual cardiovascular risk in this important patient population. PMID:19084089

Jones, Peter H

2008-12-22

284

Factor Analysis of Clustered Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescence Obesity Is the Predominant Correlate of Risk Among Youth  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—Clustering of cardiovascular (CV) risks begins in childhood, yet studies of the factor structure underlying this clustering have focused on adults. The increasing rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes and the growing importance of metabolic syndrome among adolescents make assessment of CV risk clustering even more urgent in this age group. Methods and Results—Exploratory factor analysis (principal components analysis)

Elizabeth Goodman; Lawrence M. Dolan; John A. Morrison; Stephen R. Daniels

285

The role of C-reactive protein polymorphisms in inflammation and cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Interest in C-reactive protein (CRP) and the association of its serum level in apparently healthy individuals to their cardiovascular disease risk has soared over the past decade. Recent studies have shown that the interindividual variations in CRP levels not only reflect environmental cues but are also a consequence of the genetic variation in the CRP gene itself. The importance of the relationship of CRP gene variants to CRP serum level and cardiovascular disease risk is important to establish CRP gene profiling as a clinical risk prediction tool and also to help test the cause-effect relationship between CRP and vascular disease. This article reviews recent studies that address the relationship of CRP gene polymorphisms to inflammation and cardiovascular risk. PMID:19228486

Hage, Fadi G; Szalai, Alexander J

2009-03-01

286

Pulse Pressure Predicts Cardiovascular Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Pulse pressure (PP), a marker of arterial stiffness, is a better predictor of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk than systolic blood pressure (SBP) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in older adults. Whether this is also true in subjects with type 2 diabetes, who are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease, is unknown.Methods: Data on 2911 type 2 diabetic subjects

John R. Cockcroft; Ian B. Wilkinson; Marc Evans; Philip McEwan; John R. Peters; Steve Davies; Maurice F. Scanlon; Craig J. Currie

2005-01-01

287

School Children Have Leading Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes: The Wausau SCHOOL Project  

Microsoft Academic Search

Introduction: Risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes acquired in childhood commonly persist in later life and are particularly strong predictors of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults. A rising tide of obesity and other lifestyle-related risk factors threat- ens to negate much of the success achieved in the pre- vention and treatment of these diseases. The SCHOOL project (School Children

Patrick Hughes; David K. Murdock; Karen Olson; Ryan Juza; Kirk Jenkins; Amalia Wegner; Bryan Hendricks

2006-01-01

288

A Nurse-Based Pilot Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Primary Care Setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of a nurse-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor reduction program among patients at a primary care outpatient clinic. Study Design: Preintervention and postintervention longitu- dinal, prospective pilot study to evaluate patients' achievement of CVD risk factor reduction. Patients and Methods: A total of 436 patients at a primary care clinic in suburban Minneapolis, Minnesota, were

Carol P. McPherson; Karen K. Swenson; Donald A. Pine; Linda Leimer

2002-01-01

289

Cardiovascular risk factors in Mexican American adults: a transcultural analysis of NHANES III, 1988-1994.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which cardiovascular disease risk factors differ among subgroups of Mexican Americans living in the United States. METHODS: Using data from a national sample (1988-1994) of 1387 Mexican American women and 1404 Mexican American men, aged 25 to 64 years, we examined an estimate of coronary heart disease mortality risk and 5 primary cardiovascular disease risk factors: systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cigarette smoking, non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Differences in risk were evaluated by country of birth and primary language spoken. RESULTS: Estimated 10-year coronary heart disease mortality risk per 1000 persons, adjusted for age and education, was highest for US-born Spanish-speaking men and women (27.5 and 11.4, respectively), intermediate for US-born English-speaking men and women (22.5 and 7.0), and lowest for Mexican-born men and women (20.0 and 6.6). A similar pattern of higher risk among US-born Spanish-speaking men and women was demonstrated for each of the 5 cardiovascular disease risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: These findings illustrate the heterogeneity of the Mexican American population and identify a new group at substantial risk for cardiovascular disease and in need of effective heart disease prevention programs.

Sundquist, J; Winkleby, M A

1999-01-01

290

Plasma Lipidomic Profiling of Treated HIV-Positive Individuals and the Implications for Cardiovascular Risk Prediction  

PubMed Central

Background The increased risk of coronary artery disease in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients is collectively contributed to by the human immunodeficiency virus and antiretroviral-associated dyslipidaemia. In this study, we investigate the characterisation of the plasma lipid profiles of treated HIV patients and the relationship of 316 plasma lipid species across multiple lipid classes with the risk of future cardiovascular events in HIV- positive patients. Methods In a retrospective case-control study, we analysed plasma lipid profiles of 113 subjects. Cases (n?=?23) were HIV-positive individuals with a stored blood sample available 12 months prior to their diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). They were age and sex matched to HIV-positive individuals without a diagnosis of CAD (n?=?45) and with healthy HIV-negative volunteers (n?=?45). Results Association of plasma lipid species and classes with HIV infection and cardiovascular risk in HIV were determined. In multiple logistic regression, we identified 83 lipids species and 7 lipid classes significantly associated with HIV infection and a further identified 74 lipid species and 8 lipid classes significantly associated with future cardiovascular events in HIV-positive subjects. Risk prediction models incorporating lipid species attained an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.78 (0.775, 0.785)) and outperformed all other tested markers and risk scores in the identification of HIV-positive subjects with increased risk of cardiovascular events. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that HIV-positive patients have significant differences in their plasma lipid profiles compared with healthy HIV-negative controls and that numerous lipid species were significantly associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. This suggests a potential novel application for plasma lipids in cardiovascular risk screening of HIV-positive patients.

Wong, Gerard; Trevillyan, Janine M.; Fatou, Benoit; Cinel, Michelle; Weir, Jacquelyn M.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Meikle, Peter J.

2014-01-01

291

Asymmetrical Dimethylarginine Independently Predicts Total and Cardiovascular Mortality in Individuals with Angiographic Coronary Artery Disease (The Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) is increased in conditions associated with increased risk of atherosclerosis. We investigated the use of ADMA to predict total and cardiovascular mortality in patients scheduled for coronary angiography. Methods: In 2543 persons with and 695 without coro- nary artery disease (CAD) identified by angiography we measured ADMA and recorded total and cardiovascular mortality during a median

Andreas Meinitzer; Ursula Seelhorst; Britta Wellnitz; Gabriele Halwachs-Baumann; Bernhard O. Boehm; Bernhard R. Winkelmann; Winfried Marz

292

Erythropoietin Promotes Deleterious Cardiovascular Effects and Mortality Risk in a Rat Model of Chronic Sports Doping  

Microsoft Academic Search

Athletes who abuse recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) consider only the benefit to performance and usually ignore the\\u000a potential short and long-term liabilities. Elevated haematocrit and dehydratation associated with intense exercise may reveal\\u000a undetected cardiovascular risk, but the mechanisms underlying it remain to be fully explained. This study aimed to evaluate\\u000a the cardiovascular effects of rhEPO in rats under chronic aerobic

Nuno Piloto; Helena M. Teixeira; Edite Teixeira-Lemos; Belmiro Parada; Patrícia Garrido; José Sereno; Rui Pinto; Lina Carvalho; Elísio Costa; Luís Belo; Alice Santos-Silva; Frederico Teixeira; Flávio Reis

2009-01-01

293

Impact of surgical and nonsurgical weight loss on diabetes resolution and cardiovascular risk reduction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Weight loss favorably modifies most cardiovascular risk factors, in particular the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome,\\u000a type 2 diabetes mellitus, and hypertension. Treating the spectrum of diabetes by promoting disease control or resolution invariably\\u000a improves cardiovascular outcomes. However, in clinical trials and routine medical practice, long-term weight loss has been\\u000a difficult to achieve due to wavering patient motivation, inadequate resources,

Katherine E. Nori Janosz; Kerstyn C. Zalesin; Wendy M. Miller; Peter A. McCullough; Barry A. Franklin

2009-01-01

294

Hypertriglyceridemia: changes in the plasma lipoproteins associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing body of evidence from epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory data that indicates that elevated triglyceride levels are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Identification and quantification of atherogenic lipoproteins in patients with hypertriglyceridemia are important steps in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Increased levels of apoC-III, apoC-I, or apoA-II on the apoB-containing lipoproteins may alter lipoprotein

H. Bryan Brewer

1999-01-01

295

What are the basic self-monitoring components for cardiovascular risk management?  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Self-monitoring is increasingly recommended as a method of managing cardiovascular disease. However, the design, implementation and reproducibility of the self-monitoring interventions appear to vary considerably. We examined the interventions included in systematic reviews of self-monitoring for four clinical problems that increase cardiovascular disease risk. METHODS: We searched Medline and Cochrane databases for systematic reviews of self-monitoring for: heart failure,

Alison M Ward; Carl Heneghan; Rafael Perera; Dan Lasserson; David Nunan; David Mant; Paul Glasziou

2010-01-01

296

Plant-based dietary patterns in the control of obesity and cardiovascular risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Obesity and cardiovascular disease are uncommon in people consuming plant-based diets. In contrast, overweight and obesity\\u000a are surging in US children and adults, increasing their risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Plant-based diets are\\u000a primarily comprised of whole plant foods that are rich in fiber and several beneficial phytochemicals and low to moderate\\u000a in fat. Plant-based dietary patterns have been

Antonella Dewell; Dean Ornish

2007-01-01

297

Cardiorespiratory fitness and physical activity as risk predictors of future atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical fitness and activity status are well-documented risk predictors of cardiovascular and total mortality. The purpose\\u000a of this article is to show how cardiorespiratory fitness predicts atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Measurement of\\u000a maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), defined with or without ventilatory gas analysis during exercise testing, can provide a good estimate for cardiorespiratory\\u000a fitness, which is an independent marker of the

Jari A. Laukkanen; Sudhir Kurl; Jukka T. Salonen

2002-01-01

298

Vegetarian Dietary Patterns as a Means to Achieve Reduction in Cardiovascular Disease and Diabetes Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes are uncommon in people consuming vegetarian and vegan diets. Vegetarian and vegan\\u000a dietary patterns tend to result in lower body weight and better nutritional profiles than conventional healthy eating patterns\\u000a and have been shown to be an effective tool for management of cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk. The consistency of\\u000a observed beneficial outcomes with

Amy Joy Lanou; Barbara Svenson

2010-01-01

299

Reference frame for home pulse pressure based on cardiovascular risk in 6470 subjects from 5 populations.  

PubMed

The absence of an outcome-driven reference frame for self-measured pulse pressure (PP) limits its clinical applicability. In an attempt to derive an operational threshold for self-measured PP, we analyzed 6470 participants (mean age 59.3 years; 56.9% women; 22.5% on antihypertensive treatment) from 5 general population cohorts included in the International Database on HOme blood pressure in relation to Cardiovascular Outcome. During 8.3 years of follow-up (median), 294 cardiovascular deaths, 393 strokes and 336 cardiac events occurred. In 3285 younger subjects (<60 years), home PP only predicted all-cause and cardiovascular mortality (P?0.036), whereas in 3185 older subjects (?60 years) PP predicted total and cardiovascular mortality (P?0.0067) and all cardiovascular and coronary events (P?0.044). However, PP did not substantially refine risk prediction based on classical risk factors including mean blood pressure (generalized R(2) statistic ?0.20%). In older subjects, the adjusted hazard ratios expressing the risk in the upper decile of home PP (?76?mm?Hg) versus the average risk in whole population were 1.41 (95% confidence interval, 1.09-1.81; P=0.0081) for all-cause mortality, 1.62 (1.11-2.35; P=0.012) for cardiovascular mortality and 1.31 (1.00-1.70; P=0.047) for all fatal and nonfatal cardiovascular end points combined. The low number of events precluded an analysis by tenths of the PP distribution in younger participants. In conclusion, a home PP of ?76?mm?Hg predicted cardiovascular outcomes in the elderly with the exception of stroke, whereas in younger subjects no threshold could be established. PMID:24646650

Aparicio, Lucas S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Asayama, Kei; Barochiner, Jessica; Boggia, José; Gu, Yu-Mei; Cuffaro, Paula E; Liu, Yan-Ping; Niiranen, Teemu J; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Johansson, Jouni K; Kikuya, Masahiro; Hozawa, Atsushi; Tsuji, Ichiro; Imai, Yutaka; Sandoya, Edgardo; Stergiou, George S; Waisman, Gabriel D; Staessen, Jan A

2014-07-01

300

Plasma total homocysteine levels in patients with early-onset coronary heart disease and a low cardiovascular risk profile  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mild hyperhomocysteinemia has been associated with an increased risk to develop premature coronary heart disease. Recently, the homocysteine concentration has been positively correlated with several main cardiovascular risk factors. We addressed the issue as to whether patients with coronary heart disease and a low cardiovascular risk profile also have a higher prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia than matched controls. Ninety-five patients (aged

Markus G. Donner; Gernot K. Klein; Peter B. Mathes; Peter Schwandt; Werner O. Richter

1998-01-01

301

The Bold Promise Project: a system change in primary care to support cardiovascular risk screening in New Zealand  

Microsoft Academic Search

Methods Several system changes were developed within primary care practice management software to identify the patient cohort eligible for cardiovascular risk screening, to calculate cardiovascular disease risk (CVR), and to extract the data for reporting on screening outcomes and clinical management indicators in high risk patients. Following a baseline audit, the system changes were piloted over 12 months in three

Gary Sinclair; Andrew Kerr

302

The role of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 on cardiovascular disease risk assessment and plaque rupture: a clinical review  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the last several last decades, reduction in lipids has been the main focus to decrease the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Several lines of evidence, however, have indicated that lipids account only for the <50% of variability in cardiovascular risk in the United States. Therefore, for better identification of people at high cardiovascular risk, a more effective and

Kota J. Reddy; Manmeet Singh; Joey R. Bangit; Richard R. Batsell

2009-01-01

303

Cardiovascular disease assessment in rheumatoid arthritis: a guide to translating knowledge of cardiovascular risk into clinical practice.  

PubMed

As physicians we like to have evidence for making decisions about interventions to improve health. The evidence vacuum in the field of cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and clinical outcome in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has received vigorous attention in the recent literature. There is broad agreement that a patient with RA fulfilling the criteria established for the general population on CVD risk reduction should receive proven interventions, including smoking cessation, weight reduction, blood pressure control and lipid-lowering therapy. In accordance with these recommendations, and despite all the uncertainties about CVD treatment threshold, targets and outcome results in RA, we firmly advocate that CVD risk should be assessed and acted on in patients with RA as recommended for the general population, even while educational CVD-preventive programmes are being developed and hard CVD end point studies are undertaken in this patient population. The initial strategies for implementing CVD risk evaluation will necessarily be modest at first. There are several possible strategies for collection of data that can be incorporated into the daily routine during rheumatology consultations at outpatient clinics. We recommend starting with these simple procedures: 1. CVD risk factor recording and evaluation using risk calculators available for the general population 2. Referral of patients with high CVD risk to a primary care physician or a cardiologist skilled in this subject for follow-up 3. Providing information about excess CVD risk and how to modify it to the patients as major stakeholders. PMID:24608403

Semb, Anne Grete; Rollefstad, Silvia; van Riel, Piet; Kitas, George D; Matteson, Eric L; Gabriel, Sherine E

2014-07-01

304

[Association of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase activity A2 with cardiovascular risk factors].  

PubMed

Background: Lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 (Lp-PLA2) is an inflammatory biomarker involved in atherosclerosis and directly associated with cardiovascular events. Aim: To determine Lp-PLA2 levels in asymptomatic subjects with differing cardiovascular risk. Material and Methods: We studied 152 subjects aged 46 ± 11 years (69 women). We recorded traditional cardiovascular risk factors, creatinine, ultrasensitive C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, fasting lipids, blood sugar and activity levels of Lp-PLA2. Cardiovascular risk was classified according to the number of risk factors of each subject (0,1-2 or ? 3 risk factors). Besides, we calculated global Framingham risk score. Results: The average Framingham score of participants was 6%. Twenty percent of participants had no risk factors, 46% had 1 or 2 and 34% had ? 3. Mean Lp-PLA2 levels were 185 ± 48 nmol/ml/min (201 ± 49 in men and 166 ± 38 in women). Lp-PLA2 correlated significantly (p < 0,05 for all) with non-HDL cholesterol, LDL, HDL, creatinine, waist circumference, body mass index and Framingham risk score. There was no correlation with blood sugar, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen or smoking status. Lp-PLA2 levels were significantly higher according to the number of risk factors: 0 factors: 163 ± 43, 1-2 factors: 185 ± 45 and ? 3 factors: 201 ± 47 nmol/ml/min, respectively. Linear regression analysis showed that the best predictor of Lp-PLA2 was non-HDL cholesterol (? = 0,74; p < 0,0001). Conclusions: Lp-PLA2 activity increased along with the number of cardiovascular risk factors and was correlated mainly with non -HDL cholesterol. PMID:24718463

Acevedo, Mónica; Varleta, Paola; Kramer, Verónica; Quiroga, Teresa; Prieto, Carolina; Parada, Jacqueline; Adasme, Marcela; Briones, Luisa; Navarrete, Carlos

2013-11-01

305

Cardiovascular multimorbidity: the effect of ethnicity on prevalence and risk factor management  

PubMed Central

Background Multimorbidity is common in primary care populations. Within cardiovascular disease, important differences in disease prevalence and risk factor management by ethnicity are recognised. Aim To examine the population burden of cardiovascular multimorbidity and the management of modifiable risk factors by ethnicity. Design and setting Cross-sectional study of general practices (148/151) in the east London primary care trusts of Tower Hamlets, City and Hackney, and Newham, with a total population size of 843 720. Method Using MIQUEST, patient data were extracted from five cardiovascular registers. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the risk of being multimorbid by ethnic group, and the control of risk factors by ethnicity and burden of cardiovascular multimorbidity. Results The crude prevalence of cardiovascular multimorbidity among patients with at least one cardiovascular condition was 34%. People of non-white ethnicity are more likely to be multimorbid than groups of white ethnicity, with adjusted odds ratios of 2.04 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.94 to 2.15) for South Asians and 1.23 (95% CI = 1.18 to 1.29) for groups of black ethnicity. Achievement of targets for blood pressure, cholesterol, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) was higher for patients who were multimorbid than unimorbid. For cholesterol and blood pressure, South Asian patients achieved better control than those of white and black ethnicity. For HbA1c levels, patients of white ethnicity had an advantage over other groups as the morbidity burden increased. Conclusion The burden of multiple disease varies by ethnicity. Risk factor management improves with increasing levels of cardiovascular multimorbidity, but clinically important differences by ethnicity remain and contribute to health inequalities.

Mathur, Rohini; Hull, Sally A; Badrick, Ellena; Robson, John

2011-01-01

306

Erectile Dysfunction and Hypertension: Impact on Cardiovascular Risk and Treatment  

PubMed Central

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common complaint in hypertensive men and can represent a systemic vascular disease, an adverse effect of antihypertensive medication or a frequent concern that may impair drug compliance. ED has been considered an early marker of cardiovascular disease. The connection between both conditions seems to be located in the endothelium, which may become unable to generate the necessary dilatation in penile vascular bed in response to sexual excitement, producing persistent impairment in erection. On the other hand, the real influence of antihypertensive drugs in erectile function still deserves discussion. Therefore, regardless of ED mechanism in hypertension, early diagnosis and correct approach of sexual life represent an important step of cardiovascular evaluation which certainly contributes for a better choice of hypertension treatment, preventing some complications and restoring the quality of life.

Javaroni, Valter; Neves, Mario Fritsch

2012-01-01

307

Interaction between renal function and microalbuminuria for cardiovascular risk in hypertension: the nordic diltiazem study.  

PubMed

We investigated whether renal function and microalbuminuria are independent predictors and whether any interaction exists between them, regarding future cardiovascular disease in hypertensive patients (n=10 881) followed for 4.5 years. The primary end points (PEs) were fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke and other cardiovascular deaths. Creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), estimated using the formulas of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study group and Cockroft and Gault and in a subsample (n=4929) of microalbuminuria and interaction terms of microalbuminuria and renal function, were related to the risk of the PE using Cox proportional hazards model after full adjustment. Increased creatinine (P<0.001), decreased GFR from Cockroft and Gault (P=0.001), and decreased GFR from the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease study group (P=0.001) were all independent risk factors for the PE. Stepwise exclusion of patients with the poorest renal function excluded the possibility that the relationship between decreasing renal function and the PE was driven only by patients with severely impaired renal function. Microalbuminuria and all 3 of the indices of renal function predicted the PE independent of each other. There was a significant interaction between microalbuminuria and GFR from Cockroft and Gault (P=0.040) in prediction of the PE. Both renal function and microalbuminuria add independent prognostic information regarding cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. The cardiovascular risk associated with microalbuminuria increases with a decline in GFR, as demonstrated by a significant interaction between microalbuminuria and GFR from Cockroft and Gault. Because estimation of the total cardiovascular risk is essential for the aggressiveness of risk factor interventions, simultaneous inclusion of GFR and microalbuminuria in global cardiovascular risk assessment is essential. PMID:18504324

Färbom, Patrik; Wahlstrand, Björn; Almgren, Peter; Skrtic, Stanko; Lanke, Jan; Weiss, Lars; Kjeldsen, Sverre; Hedner, Thomas; Melander, Olle

2008-07-01

308

Chronobiology: Influences on Metabolic Syndrome and Cardiovascular Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

Circadian rhythmicity has been widely studied in the cardiovascular system and has a relevant role in three different areas:\\u000a heart, vascular smooth muscle, and hemostatic capacity of blood. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and chronodisruption are also highly\\u000a interconnected. Epidemiologic studies show that shift workers and short sleepers develop obesity and MetS impairments more\\u000a frequently. In addition, studies performed in experimental models

Marta Garaulet; Juan Antonio Madrid

2010-01-01

309

Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Characterization of Atherosclerotic Disease Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Over 80 million people in the United States exhibit one or more forms of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and atherosclerotic\\u000a CVD (mainly coronary heart disease and stroke) is, by far, the leading cause of death among men and women. More women die\\u000a from CVD in the United States each year than men. Atherosclerotic CVD has become a worldwide pandemic. While CVD

Kevin C. Maki; Martyn R. Rubin

310

Cardiovascular Risks in Prediabetes: Preliminary Data on "Vasculopathy Triad"  

PubMed Central

Background: Subclinical cardiovascular disease is inherent in complications of diabetes mellitus. It occurs before the obvert manifestation of cardiovascular disease complication in diabetes, and involves vasculopathy triad or three major vascular events comprising stasis, endothelial dysfunction, and atherothrombosis. Aim: This study was to examine evidence of vasculopathy triad in prediabetes, biomarkers of stasis, endothelial dysfunction, and atherothrombosis in prediabetes were compared with apparently healthy group. Materials and Methods: Eighty-one participants with results for plasma D-dimer, homocysteine, and whole blood viscosity were selected from a research database. The participants consisted of control (n = 44) and prediabetes (n = 37) based on clinical history and laboratory results. Results: Multivariate analysis shows a significantly higher level of vasculopathy in prediabetes than in the control group (P > 0.0001). Blood viscosity (P < 0.04) and homocysteine (P < 0.03) are significantly higher in prediabetes than in controls. Average levels for plasma D-dimer are also higher in prediabetes than in control, but not statistically significant in this particular analysis. Conclusion: This study suggests a novel application of known idea, vasculopathy triad that could be used for assessment of subclinical cardiovascular disease in prediabetes.

Nwose, Ezekiel U; Richards, Ross S; Bwititi, Phillip T

2014-01-01

311

Erectile dysfunction in primary care: a focus on cardiometabolic risk evaluation and stratification for future cardiovascular events.  

PubMed

An association between erectile dysfunction (ED) and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that ED is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk and even further, a marker for the burden of both obstructive and non-obstructive coronary artery disease. Therefore, the primary care physician (PCP) must assess the presence or absence of ED in every man > 39 years of age, especially if that man is asymptomatic of signs and symptoms of coronary artery disease. Assessment and management of ED may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger middle-aged men. The initial ED evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic ED and ED of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic ED, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with ED who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of selected prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with ED, particularly CT calcium scoring. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk factor management in all men with vasculogenic ED. PMID:24978630

Miner, Martin; Rosenberg, Matt T; Barkin, Jack

2014-06-01

312

Do prescription stimulants increase the risk of adverse cardiovascular events?: A systematic review  

PubMed Central

Background There is increasing concern that prescription stimulants may be associated with adverse cardiovascular events such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Public health concerns are amplified by increasing use of prescription stimulants among adults. Methods The objective of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the evidence of an association between prescription stimulant use and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Google Scholar searches were conducted using key words related to these topics (MESH): ADHD; Adults; Amphetamine; Amphetamines; Arrhythmias, Cardiac; Cardiovascular Diseases; Cardiovascular System; Central Nervous Stimulants; Cerebrovascular; Cohort Studies; Case–control Studies; Death; Death, Sudden, Cardiac; Dextroamphetamine; Drug Toxicity; Methamphetamine; Methylphenidate; Myocardial Infarction; Stimulant; Stroke; Safety. Eligible studies were population-based studies of children, adolescents, or adults using prescription stimulant use as the independent variable and a hard cardiovascular outcome as the dependent variable. Results Ten population-based observational studies which evaluated prescription stimulant use with cardiovascular outcomes were reviewed. Six out of seven studies in children and adolescents did not show an association between stimulant use and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In contrast, two out of three studies in adults found an association. Conclusions Findings of an association between prescription stimulant use and adverse cardiovascular outcomes are mixed. Studies of children and adolescents suggest that statistical power is limited in available study populations, and the absolute risk of an event is low. More suggestive of a safety signal, studies of adults found an increased risk for transient ischemic attack and sudden death/ventricular arrhythmia. Interpretation was limited due to differences in population, cardiovascular outcome selection/ascertainment, and methodology. Accounting for confounding and selection biases in these studies is of particular concern. Future studies should address this and other methodological issues.

2012-01-01

313

Cardiovascular risk scores: qualitative study of how primary care practitioners understand and use them  

PubMed Central

Background The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidelines and the Quality Outcomes Framework require practitioners to use cardiovascular risk scores in assessments for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Aim To explore GPs understanding and use of cardiovascular risk scores. Design and setting Qualitative study with purposive maximum variation sampling of 20 GPs working in Oxfordshire, UK. Method Thematic analysis of transcriptions of face-to-face interviews with participants undertaken by two individuals (one clinical, one non-clinical). Results GPs use cardiovascular risk scores primarily to guide treatment decisions by estimating the risk of a vascular event if the patient remains untreated. They expressed considerable uncertainty about how and whether to take account of existing drug treatment or other types of prior risk modification. They were also unclear about the choice between the older scores, based on the Framingham study, and newer scores, such as QRISK®. There was substantial variation in opinion about whether scores could legitimately be used to illustrate to patients the change in risk as a result of treatment. The overall impression was of considerable confusion. Conclusion The drive to estimate risk more precisely by qualifying guidance and promoting new scores based on partially-treated populations appears to have created unnecessary confusion for little obvious benefit. National guidance needs to be simplified, and, to be fit for purpose, better reflect the ways in which cardiovascular risk scores are currently used in general practice. Patients may be better served by simple advice to use a Framingham score and exercise more clinical judgement, explaining to patients the necessary imprecision of any individual estimate of risk.

Liew, Su May; Blacklock, Claire; Hislop, Jenny; Glasziou, Paul; Mant, David

2013-01-01

314

Uric Acid as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality in Overweight/Obese Individuals  

PubMed Central

Background The predictive value of serum uric acid (SUA) for adverse cardiovascular events among obese and overweight patients is not known, but potentially important because of the relation between hyperuricaemia and obesity. Methods The relationship between SUA and risk of cardiovascular adverse outcomes (nonfatal myocardial infarction, nonfatal stroke, resuscitated cardiac arrest or cardiovascular death) and all-cause mortality, respectively, was evaluated in a post-hoc analysis of the Sibutramine Cardiovascular OUTcomes (SCOUT) trial. Participants enrolled in SCOUT were obese or overweight with pre-existing diabetes and/or cardiovascular disease (CVD). Cox models were used to assess the role of SUA as an independent risk factor. Results 9742 subjects were included in the study; 83.6% had diabetes, and 75.1% had CVD. During an average follow-up time of 4.2 years, 1043 subjects had a primary outcome (myocardial infarction, resuscitated cardiac arrest, stroke, or cardiovascular death), and 816 died. In a univariate Cox model, the highest SUA quartile was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular adverse outcomes compared with the lowest SUA quartile in women (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.20–2.10). In multivariate analyses, adjusting for known cardiovascular risk factors the increased risk for the highest SUA quartile was no longer statistically significant among women (HR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.72–1.36) nor was it among men. Analyses of all-cause mortality found an interaction between sex and SUA. In a multivariate Cox model including women only, the highest SUA quartile was associated with an increased risk in all-cause mortality compared to the lowest SUA quartile (HR: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.08–2.12). No relationship was observed in men (HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.82–1.36). Conclusion SUA was not an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and death in these high-risk overweight/obese people. However, our results suggested that SUA was an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in women.

Skak-Nielsen, Helle; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Finer, Nick; Caterson, Ian D.; Van Gaal, Luc; James, W. Philip T; Maggioni, Aldo Pietro; Sharma, Arya M.; Coutinho, Walmir; Andersson, Charlotte

2013-01-01

315

Periodic Limb Movements during Sleep: A New Sleep-Related Cardiovascular Risk Factor?  

PubMed Central

In recent years, a growing body of evidence suggests that periodic limb movements during sleep (PLMS) are associated with hypertension, cardiovascular, and cerebrovascular risk. However, several non-mutually exclusive mechanisms may determine a higher cardiovascular risk in patients with PLMS and the link between the two remains controversial. Prospective data are scant and the temporal relationship between PLMS and acute vascular events is difficult to ascertain because although PLMS may lead to acute vascular events such as stroke, stroke may also give rise to PLMS. This article describes the clinical and polygraphic features of PLMS and examines the literature evidence linking PLMS with an increased risk for the development and progression of cardiovascular diseases, discussing the possible pathways of this association.

Alessandria, Maria; Provini, Federica

2013-01-01

316

Cardiovascular Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease: Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System  

PubMed Central

Patients with chronic kidney disease are at significantly increased risk for cardiovascular disease and sudden cardiac death. One mechanism underlying increased cardiovascular risk in patients with renal failure includes overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Multiple human and animal studies have shown that central sympathetic outflow is chronically elevated in patients with both end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). SNS overactivation, in turn, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and sudden death by increasing arterial blood pressure, arrythmogenicity, left ventricular hypertrophy, and coronary vasoconstriction and contributes to the progression renal disease. This paper will examine the evidence for SNS overactivation in renal failure from both human and experimental studies and discuss mechanisms of SNS overactivity in CKD and therapeutic implications.

Park, Jeanie

2012-01-01

317

[Preventive role of the occupational physician faced with cardiovascular risk factors].  

PubMed

The preventive role of the occupational practitioner and occupational medicine no longer has to be demonstrated. As far as cardiovascular risk factors are concerned, on the one hand there are a certain number of cardiovascular diseases which have their origin in certain occupational fields (this concerns 10 pictures of occupational diseases which are entitled to compensation) and, on the other hand, occupational medicine has an important role to play when faced with the usual cardiovascular risks such as sedentary life style, obesity or excess weight, alcohol, tobacco, diabetes, fatigue and stress. Apart from giving advice to employees (health education) and instantly replying to the risk by individual or collective prevention and by medical and technical prevention, there is epidemiological observation and the investigation of quantitative or quantifiable "indicators". All these roles imply interdisciplinary dialogue and community participation so as to be able to counteract environmental hazards, rehabilitate vulnerable subjects, and develop health. PMID:2772061

Perret, J

1989-01-01

318

Structural, biochemical and non-traditional cardiovascular risk markers in PCOS.  

PubMed

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous syndrome of reproductive and metabolic derangements. The combination of anovulation and hyperandrogenism signifies the classic form of PCOS which displays the adverse metabolic phenotype of the syndrome. This phenotype includes visceral obesity and insulin resistance as well as a constellation of other traditional cardiovascular risk factors, mainly low grade inflammation, disturbances of glucose metabolism and dyslipidemia. The resultant increased risk for cardiovascular disease may affect not only obese but also lean women with classic PCOS. The mechanisms underlying the increased cardiovascular risk in the context of PCOS may include not only metabolic aberrations, but also hormonal factors, in particular hyperandrogenemia. However, the consequences in terms of CV morbidity remain questionable due to the difficulties in conducting long-term, prospective studies aimed at identifying potential late-arriving clinical outcomes. PMID:23448483

Christakou, Charikleia; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia

2013-01-01

319

Cardiovascular risk management in rheumatoid arthritis: are we still waiting for the first step?  

PubMed Central

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a similar cardiovascular risk to that in diabetes, and therefore cardiovascular risk management (CV-RM) - that is, identification and treatment of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) - is mandatory. However, whether and to what extent this is done in daily clinical practice is unknown. In a retrospective cohort investigation, CV-RM was therefore compared between rheumatologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). Remarkably, CRFs in RA were less frequently identified and managed by rheumatologists in comparison with PCPs. In addition, PCPs assessed CRFs less frequently in RA than in diabetes. Obviously, there is a clear need for improvement of CV-RM in RA and this should be a joint effort from the rheumatologist and the PCP.

2013-01-01

320

Comparison of 24-hour cardiovascular and autonomic function in paraplegia, tetraplegia, and control groups: Implications for cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Background Fluctuations in 24-hour cardiovascular hemodynamics, specifically heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP), are thought to reflect autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity. Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) represent a model of ANS dysfunction, which may affect 24-hour hemodynamics and predispose these individuals to increased cardiovascular disease risk. Objective To determine 24-hour cardiovascular and ANS function among individuals with tetraplegia (n = 20; TETRA: C4–C8), high paraplegia (n = 10; HP: T2–T5), low paraplegia (n = 9; LP: T7–T12), and non-SCI controls (n = 10). Twenty-four-hour ANS function was assessed by time domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV); the standard deviation of the 5-minute average R–R intervals (SDANN; milliseconds/ms), and the root-mean square of the standard deviation of the R–R intervals (rMSSD; ms). Subjects wore 24-hour ambulatory monitors to record HR, HRV, and BP. Mixed analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significantly lower 24-hour BP in the tetraplegic group; however, BP did not differ between the HP, LP, and control groups. Mixed ANOVA suggested significantly elevated 24-hour HR in the HP and LP groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.05); daytime HR was higher in both paraplegic groups compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01) and nighttime HR was significantly elevated in the LP group compared to the TETRA and control groups (P < 0.01). Twenty-four-hour SDANN was significantly increased in the HP group compared to the LP and TETRA groups (P < 0.05) and rMSSD was significantly lower in the LP compared to the other three groups (P < 0.05). Elevated 24-hour HR in persons with paraplegia, in concert with altered HRV dynamics, may impart significant adverse cardiovascular consequences, which are currently unappreciated.

Rosado-Rivera, Dwindally; Radulovic, M.; Handrakis, John P.; Cirnigliaro, Christopher M.; Jensen, A. Marley; Kirshblum, Steve; Bauman, William A.; Wecht, Jill Maria

2011-01-01

321

Is global cardiovascular risk considered in current practice? Treatment and control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes according to patients' risk level  

PubMed Central

Objectives To assess the pharmacological treatment and the control of major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in everyday practice according to the patients’ cardiovascular risk level. Methods In a cross-sectional study general practitioners (GPs) had to identify a random sample of their patients with cardiovascular risk factors or diseases and collect essential data on the pharmacological treatment and control of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes according to the patients’ cardiovascular risk level and history of cardiovascular disease. Participants were subjects of both sexes, aged 40–80 years, with at least one known cardiovascular risk factor or a history of cardiovascular diseases. Results From June to December 2000, 162 Italian GPs enrolled 3120 of their patients (2470 hypertensives, 1373 hyperlipidemics, and 604 diabetics). Despite the positive association between the perceived level of global cardiovascular risk and lipid-lowering drug prescriptions in hyperlipidemic subjects (from 26% for lowest risk to 56% for highest risk p < 0.0001) or the prescription of combination therapy in hypertensives (from 41% to 70%, p < 0.0001) and diabetics (from 24% to 43%, p = 0.057), control was still inadequate in 48% of diabetics, 77% of hypertensives, and 85% of hyperlipidemics, with no increase in patients at highest risk. Trends for treatment and control were similar in patients with cardiovascular diseases. Conclusions Even in high-risk patients, despite a tendency towards more intensive treatment, pharmacological therapy is still under used and the degree of control of blood pressure, cholesterol level and diabetes is largely unsatisfactory.

Roccatagliata, Daria; Avanzini, Fausto; Monesi, Lara; Caimi, Vittorio; Lauri, Davide; Longoni, Paolo; Marchioli, Roberto; Tombesi, Massimo; Tognoni, Gianni; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla

2006-01-01

322

Cardiovascular and lifestyle risk factors in lumbar radicular pain or clinically defined sciatica: a systematic review  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lumbar radicular pain is a fairly common health problem, yet its risk factors are far from clear. There are no published systematic\\u000a reviews on associations between cardiovascular or lifestyle risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica. The aim of\\u000a this systematic literature review was to assess associations between these risk factors and lumbar radicular pain or sciatica.\\u000a We conducted

Rahman Shiri; Jaro Karppinen; Päivi Leino-Arjas; Svetlana Solovieva; Helena Varonen; Eija Kalso; Olavi Ukkola; Eira Viikari-Juntura

2007-01-01

323

Ankle Brachial Index as a Marker of Atherosclerosis in Chinese Patients with High Cardiovascular Risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

To obtain reliable data on the epidemiology, co-morbidities and risk factor profile of peripheral arterial disease (PAD), we evaluated the clinical significance of the ankle brachial index (ABI) as an indicator of PAD in Chinese patients at high cardiovascular (CV) risk. ABI was measured in 5,646 Chinese patients at high CV risk, and PAD was defined as an ABI<0.9 in

Buaijiaer Hasimu; Jue Li; Tomohiro Nakayama; Jinming Yu; Jingang Yang; Xiankai Li; Dayi Hu

2006-01-01

324

Vascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome in men  

PubMed Central

Background Prevalences of vascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome increase with age. Prior studies analyzing the associations between vascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease, and restless legs syndrome found controversial results. We therefore aim to evaluate the association between prevalent vascular risk factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 22,786 participants of the US Physicians’ Health Studies I and II. Restless legs syndrome was classified according to the four minimal diagnostic criteria. Vascular risk factors and restless legs syndrome symptoms were self-reported. Prevalent cardiovascular disease events including major cardiovascular disease, stroke and myocardial infarction were confirmed by medical record review. Age- and multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between vascular risk factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease events and restless legs syndrome. Results The mean age of the cohort 67.8 years. Restless legs syndrome prevalence was 7.5% and increased significantly with age. Diabetes significantly increased the odds (OR: 1.41, 95%CI: 1.21–1.65), while frequent exercise (OR: 0.78, 95%CI: 0.67–0.91) and alcohol consumption of one or more drinks per day (OR: 0.80, 95%CI: 0.69–0.92) significantly reduced the odds of restless legs syndrome in multivariable-adjusted models. Prevalent stroke showed an increased multivariable-adjusted OR of 1.40 (1.05–1.86) while men with prevalent myocardial infarction had a decreased OR of 0.73 (0.55–0.97) for restless legs syndrome. Conclusions The restless legs syndrome prevalence among US male physicians is similar to men of the same age group in other western countries. A history of diabetes is the most consistent risk factor associated with restless legs syndrome. Prevalent stroke and myocardial infarction are related to restless legs syndrome prevalence.

Winter, Anke C.; Berger, Klaus; Glynn, Robert J; Buring, Julie E.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Schurks, Markus; Kurth, Tobias

2012-01-01

325

Novel cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac event predictors in female inactive systemic lupus erythematosus patients.  

PubMed

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with severe and premature cardiovascular disease, which cannot be explained by traditional risk factors alone. This study aims to investigate novel cardiovascular risk factors and cardiac event predictors in inactive SLE female patients who do not have any major cardiovascular risk factors. Twenty-five inactive (SLE disease activity index score <4) SLE female patients and 22 healthy control women were studied. SLE patients with a history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking, or coronary artery disease (CAD) were excluded. Venous blood samples were analyzed for lipid subfractions and novel cardiovascular risk factors such as lipoprotein (a), homocysteine, fibrinogen, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and serum amyloid A (SAA) levels. Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) from the brachial artery at baseline and during reactive hyperemia. SLE patients and controls were similar in terms of age (40+/-10 years vs 38+/-10 years, p = NS). No significant difference was found between the groups regarding family history of premature CAD, blood pressure, body mass index, lipoprotein (a), homocysteine, fibrinogen, SAA, apoprotein A-1 and B levels. Compared with the controls, SLE patients had higher levels of hs-CRP [median (range): 1.82 (0.02-0.98) vs 0.68 (0.02-0.35), p=0.04]. FMD was lower in SLE patients than controls (7.1+/-2.1 vs 11.4+/-1.2%, p<0.001). Increased levels of hs-CRP and decreased FMD were found in inactive SLE patients. Increased hs-CRP levels may reflect ongoing low-grade inflammation that could be a cause of impaired FMD in SLE patients. These findings suggest that SLE patients without traditional major cardiovascular risk factors may have increased risk of cardiovascular disease and future cardiac events. PMID:16909327

Karadag, Omer; Calguneri, Meral; Atalar, Enver; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Akdogan, Ali; Kalyoncu, Umut; Bilgen, Sule Apras; Ozer, Necla; Ertenli, A Ihsan; Ovunc, Kenan; Kiraz, Sedat

2007-05-01

326

Risk factors for cardiovascular mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, a prospective cohort study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disease. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is common and a major cause of mortality. Studies on cardiovascular morbidity are abundant, whereas mortality studies focusing on cardiovascular outcomes are scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate causes of death and baseline predictors of overall (OM), non-vascular (N-VM), and specifically cardiovascular (CVM) mortality in SLE, and to evaluate systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE). Methods 208 SLE patients were included 1995-1999 and followed up after 12 years. Clinical evaluation, CVD risk factors, and biomarkers were recorded at inclusion. Death certificates and autopsy protocols were collected. Causes of death were divided into CVM (ischemic vascular and general atherosclerotic diseases), N-VM and death due to pulmonary hypertension. Predictors of mortality were investigated using multivariable Cox regression. SCORE and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) were calculated. Results During follow-up 42 patients died at mean age of 62 years. SMR 2.4 (CI 1.7-3.0). 48% of deaths were caused by CVM. SCORE underestimated CVM but not to a significant level. Age, high cystatin C levels and established arterial disease were the strongest predictors for all- cause mortality. After adjusting for these in multivariable analyses, only smoking among traditional risk factors, and high soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), anti-beta2 glycoprotein-1 (abeta2GP1) and any antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) among biomarkers, remained predictive of CVM. Conclusion With the exception of smoking, traditional risk factors do not capture the main underlying risk factors for CVM in SLE. Rather, cystatin C levels, inflammatory and endothelial markers, and antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) differentiate patients with favorable versus severe cardiovascular prognosis. Our results suggest that these new biomarkers are useful in evaluating the future risk of cardiovascular mortality in SLE patients.

2012-01-01

327

Cardiovascular risk factors associated with insulin resistance: effects of oral antidiabetic agents.  

PubMed

Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have a greater risk of cardiovascular disease than nondiabetic individuals. These patients are often insulin resistant and have an associated clustering of risk factors that contribute to cardiovascular disease. The risk factors include dyslipidemia, hypertension, altered hemostasis, and chronic inflammation. A primary objective in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus is normalization of blood glucose levels; however, some of the oral drugs used to control blood glucose levels have significant effects on these risk factors. In this article, we review the current data involving the modification of these cardiovascular risk factors by the biguanide (metformin), the thiazolidinediones (troglitazone, rosiglitazone, and pioglitazone), the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors (miglitol, acarbose), and the insulin secretagogs (glyburide [glibenclamide], glipizide, chlorpropamide, tolbutamide, tolazamide, glimepiride, repaglinide, and nateglinide). Generally, the thiazolidinediones improve hemostasis and endothelial function and reduce blood pressure, while having variable effects on dyslipidemia. Metformin improves dyslipidemia and altered hemostasis and decreases plasma C-reactive protein levels with little or no effect on blood pressure. Data on the effects of the alpha-glucosidase inhibitors and insulin secretagogs are sparse; however, these drugs appear to have little or no effect on cardiovascular risk factors. PMID:15901207

Granberry, Mark C; Fonseca, Vivian A

2005-01-01

328

Clinical Effect of Lifestyle Modification on Cardiovascular Risk in Prehypertensives: PREHIPER I Study.  

PubMed

The objective was to determine the effect of lifestyle modification on cardiovascular risk in individuals with prehypertension, which is defined as a systolic blood pressure between 120mm Hg and 139mm Hg and a diastolic pressure between 80mm Hg and 89mm Hg. A randomized clinical trial was carried out in prehypertensives to compare those who took part in a program involving dietary modification, physical activity, and educational sessions with those who followed normal recommendations. Cardiovascular risk was evaluated using the Framingham risk score and the chi-squared test, the Mann-Whitney Utest and the Friedman test. The mean Framingham score in the intervention group decreased from 5 (rank, -10 to 12) to 3.5 (rank, -11 to 10; P<.05) and the probability of a cardiovascular event at 10 years decreased from 5.29(3.88) to 4.24(2.86) (P<.05). This improvement was associated with a relative risk of 0.30 (95% confidence interval, 0.11 to 0.83) and a relative risk reduction of -69.8% (95% confidence interval, -89% to -16.9%). There was no change in control subjects. Lifestyle modification decreased cardiovascular risk in individuals with prehypertension. PMID:24774290

Márquez-Celedonio, Félix G; Téxon-Fernández, Obdulia; Chávez-Negrete, Adolfo; Hernández-López, Sergio; Marín-Rendón, Sadoc; Berlín-Lascurain, Susana

2009-01-01

329

[Clinical effect of lifestyle modification on cardiovascular risk in prehypertensives: PREHIPER I study].  

PubMed

The objective was to determine the effect of lifestyle modification on cardiovascular risk in individuals with prehypertension, which is defined as a systolic blood pressure between 120 mmHg and 139 mmHg and a diastolic pressure between 80 mmHg and 89 mmHg. A randomized clinical trial was carried out in prehypertensives to compare those who took part in a program involving dietary modification, physical activity and educational sessions with those who followed normal recommendations. Cardiovascular risk was evaluated using the Framingham risk score and the chi-squared test, the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Friedman test. The mean Framingham score in the intervention group decreased from 5 (rank, -10 to 12) to 3.5 (rank, -11 to 10; P< .05) and the probability of a cardiovascular event at 10 years decreased from 5.29+/-3.88 to 4.24+/-2.86 (P< .05). This improvement was associated with a relative risk of 0.30 (95% confidence interval, 0.11 to 0.83) and a relative risk reduction of -69.8% (95% confidence interval -89% to -16.9%). There was no change in control subjects. Lifestyle modification decreased cardiovascular risk in individuals with prehypertension. PMID:19150019

Márquez-Celedonio, Félix G; Téxon-Fernández, Obdulia; Chávez-Negrete, Adolfo; Hernández-López, Sergio; Marín-Rendón, Sadoc; Berlín-Lascurain, Susana

2009-01-01

330

Cost-effectiveness of cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in primary care  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is largely preventable and prevention expenditures are relatively low. The randomised controlled SPRING-trial (SPRING-RCT) shows that cardiovascular risk management by practice nurses in general practice with and without self-monitoring both decreases cardiovascular risk, with no additional effect of self-monitoring. For considering future approaches of cardiovascular risk reduction, cost effectiveness analyses of regular care and additional self-monitoring are performed from a societal perspective on data from the SPRING-RCT. Methods Direct medical and productivity costs are analysed alongside the SPRING-RCT, studying 179 participants (men aged 50–75 years, women aged 55–75 years), with an elevated cardiovascular risk, in 20 general practices in the Netherlands. Standard cardiovascular treatment according to Dutch guidelines is compared with additional counselling based on self-monitoring at home (pedometer, weighing scale and/ or blood pressure device) both by trained practice nurses. Cost-effectiveness is evaluated for both treatment groups and patient categories (age, sex, education). Results Costs are €98 and €187 per percentage decrease in 10-year cardiovascular mortality estimation, for the control and intervention group respectively. In both groups lost productivity causes the majority of the costs. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio is approximately €1100 (95% CI: -5157 to 6150). Self-monitoring may be cost effective for females and higher educated participants, however confidence intervals are wide. Conclusions In this study population, regular treatment is more cost effective than counselling based on self-monitoring, with the majority of costs caused by lost productivity. Trial registration Trialregister.nl identifier: http://NTR2188

2013-01-01

331

Vascular calcifications as a marker of increased cardiovascular risk: A meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background: Several imaging techniques may reveal calcification of the arterial wall or cardiac valves. Many studies indicate that the risk for cardiovascular disease is increased when calcification is present. Recent meta-analyses on coronary calcification and cardiovascular risk may be confounded by indication. Therefore, this meta-analysis was performed with extensive subgroup analysis to assess the overall cardiovascular risk of finding calcification in any arterial wall or cardiac valve when using different imaging techniques. Methods and results: A meta-analysis of prospective studies reporting calcifications and cardiovascular end-points was performed. Thirty articles were selected. The overall odds ratios (95% confidence interval [CI]) for calcifications versus no calcifications in 218,080 subjects after a mean follow-up of 10.1 years amounted to 4.62 (CI 2.24 to 9.53) for all cause mortality, 3.94 (CI 2.39 to 6.50) for cardiovascular mortality, 3.74 (CI 2.56 to 5.45) for coronary events, 2.21 (CI 1.81 to 2.69) for stroke, and 3.41 (CI 2.71 to 4.30) for any cardiovascular event. Heterogeneity was largely explained by length of follow up and sort of imaging technique. Subgroup analysis of patients with end stage renal disease revealed a much higher odds ratio for any event of 6.22 (CI 2.73 to 14.14). Conclusion: The presence of calcification in any arterial wall is associated with a 3–4-fold higher risk for mortality and cardiovascular events. Interpretation of the pooled estimates has to be done with caution because of heterogeneity across studies.

Rennenberg, R J M W; Kessels, A G H; Schurgers, L J; van Engelshoven, J M A; de Leeuw, P W; Kroon, A A

2009-01-01

332

Early effects of gastric bypass on endothelial function, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk in obese patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Obesity is associated with a chronic low-grade inflammatory state, insulin resistance, and endothelial dysfunction, all of\\u000a which contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that gastric bypass would produce rapid improvements\\u000a in endothelial function, reduce inflammation, and lead to a decrease in cardiovascular risk.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  We performed a prospective study of morbidly obese patients who underwent laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric

Stacy A. BrethauerHelen; Helen M. Heneghan; Shai Eldar; Patrick Gatmaitan; Hazel Huang; Sangeeta Kashyap; Heather L. Gornik; John P. Kirwan; Philip R. Schauer

2011-01-01

333

Clinical efficacy and safety of statins in managing cardiovascular risk  

PubMed Central

Since their introduction in the 1980s, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) have emerged as the one of the best-selling medication classes to date, with numerous trials demonstrating powerful efficacy in preventing cardiovascular outcomes. As our understanding of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and atherosclerosis continues to grow, the concept of ‘lower is better’ has corresponded with a ‘more is better’ approach to statin-based therapy. This review provides a detailed understanding of the clinical efficacy and safety of statins with a particular emphasis on the third generation drug, rosuvastatin.

Kapur, Navin K; Musunuru, Kiran

2008-01-01

334

Inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular risk assessment. Current knowledge and future perspectives.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. However, it appears that currently available risk assessment tools often underestimate risk, especially for patients in the intermediate-risk category. Considering the socioeconomic cost, it is imperative to correctly identify patients in the intermediate-risk category who would benefit from more aggressive treatment. A plethora of experimental and observational studies provide support that lipoprotein associated phospholipase A2 (Lp- PLA2) and secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2)) as well as high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) are useful biomarkers of cardiovascular risk. Particularly, Lp-PLA2) has also been addressed as pharmacological target and we are eagerly awaiting the results of ongoing phase III clinical trials. In this review we discuss the current literature regarding the pros and cons of these biomarkers. PMID:23286437

Moutzouri, Elisavet; Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Tselepis, Alexandros D

2013-01-01

335

The differential impact of subjective and objective aspects of social engagement on cardiovascular risk factors  

PubMed Central

Background This article provides new insights into the impact of social engagement on CVD risk factors in older adults. We hypothesized that objective (social participation, social ties and marital status) and subjective (emotional support) aspects of social engagement are independently associated with objective measures of cardiovascular risk. Methods Data from the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA) were analyzed. The effects of social participation, social ties, marital status, and emotional support on hypertension, obesity, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen were estimated by logistic regression controlling for age, sex, education, physical function, depression, cardiovascular disease, other chronic diseases, physical activity, and smoking. Results Social participation is a consistent predictor of low risk for four risk factors, even after controlling for a wide range of covariates. Being married is associated with lower risk for hypertension. Social ties and emotional support are not significantly associated with any of the cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that participation in social activities has a stronger association with CV risk factors than marital status, social ties or emotional support. Different forms of social engagement may therefore have different implications for the biological risk factors involved.

2010-01-01

336

Heated vegetable oils and cardiovascular disease risk factors.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It may result from the interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors including sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits. The quality of dietary oils and fats has been widely recognised to be inextricably linked to the pathogenesis of CVD. Vegetable oil is one of the essential dietary components in daily food consumption. However, the benefits of vegetable oil can be deteriorated by repeated heating that leads to lipid oxidation. The practice of using repeatedly heated cooking oil is not uncommon as it will reduce the cost of food preparation. Thermal oxidation yields new functional groups which may be potentially hazardous to cardiovascular health. Prolonged consumption of the repeatedly heated oil has been shown to increase blood pressure and total cholesterol, cause vascular inflammation as well as vascular changes which predispose to atherosclerosis. The harmful effect of heated oils is attributed to products generated from lipid oxidation during heating process. In view of the potential hazard of oxidation products, therefore this review article will provide an insight and awareness to the general public on the consumption of repeatedly heated oils which is detrimental to health. PMID:24632108

Ng, Chun-Yi; Leong, Xin-Fang; Masbah, Norliana; Adam, Siti Khadijah; Kamisah, Yusof; Jaarin, Kamsiah

2014-04-01

337

Reprint of "heated vegetable oils and cardiovascular disease risk factors".  

PubMed

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. It may result from the interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors including sedentary lifestyle and dietary habits. The quality of dietary oils and fats has been widely recognised to be inextricably linked to the pathogenesis of CVD. Vegetable oil is one of the essential dietary components in daily food consumption. However, the benefits of vegetable oil can be deteriorated by repeated heating that leads to lipid oxidation. The practice of using repeatedly heated cooking oil is not uncommon as it will reduce the cost of food preparation. Thermal oxidation yields new functional groups which may be potentially hazardous to cardiovascular health. Prolonged consumption of the repeatedly heated oil has been shown to increase blood pressure and total cholesterol, cause vascular inflammation as well as vascular changes which predispose to atherosclerosis. The harmful effect of heated oils is attributed to products generated from lipid oxidation during heating process. In view of the potential hazard of oxidation products, therefore this review article will provide an insight and awareness to the general public on the consumption of repeatedly heated oils which is detrimental to health. PMID:24846858

Ng, Chun-Yi; Leong, Xin-Fang; Masbah, Norliana; Adam, Siti Khadijah; Kamisah, Yusof; Jaarin, Kamsiah

2014-07-01

338

Does Ginkgo biloba reduce risk of cardiovascular events?  

PubMed Central

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) was a preplanned secondary outcome of the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEM) Study. The trial previously reported that Ginkgo biloba (G. biloba) had no effect on the primary outcome, incident dementia. Methods and Results The double-blind trial randomized 3069 participants over 75 years of age to 120 mg of G. biloba EGb 761 twice daily or placebo. Mean follow up was 6.1 years. The identification and classification of CVD was based on methods used in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Differences in time to event between G. biloba and placebo were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards regression adjusted for age and gender. There were 355 deaths in the study, 87 due to coronary heart disease with no differences between G. biloba and placebo. There were no differences in incident myocardial infarction (n=164), angina pectoris (n=207) or stroke (151) between G. biloba and placebo. There were 24 hemorrhagic strokes, 16 on G. biloba and 8 on placebo (not significant). There were only 35 peripheral vascular disease (PVD) events, 12 (0.8%) on G. biloba and 23 (1.5%) on placebo (p=0.04 exact test). Most of the PVD cases had either vascular surgery or amputation. Conclusion There was no evidence that G. biloba reduced total or CVD mortality or CVD events. There were more PVD events in the placebo arm. G. biloba cannot be recommended for preventing CVD. Further clinical trials of PVD outcomes might be indicated.

Kuller, Lewis H.; Ives, Diane G.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Carlson, Michelle C.; Mercado, Carla; Lopez, Oscar L.; Burke, Gregory L.; Furberg, Curt D.; DeKosky, Steven T.

2010-01-01

339

Cardiovascular and cognitive fitness at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia.  

PubMed

Patients with early-onset dementia are a significantly under-recognized subgroup of patients with an increasing prevalence. Epidemiological studies are limited and studies of modifiable risk factors, such as physical fitness, are lacking. We aimed to investigate the associations between cardiovascular fitness individually and in combination with cognitive performance at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life. We performed a population-based cohort study of over 1.1 million Swedish, 18-year-old, male conscripts, who underwent conscription exams between 1968 and 2005. These males were then followed for up to 42 years. Objective data on cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance were collected during conscription exams and were subsequently linked with hospital registries to calculate later risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment using Cox proportional hazards models controlling for several confounders. The scores from the exams were divided into tertiles (low, medium, high) for the analyses. The mean follow-up time for the analyses was 25.7 years (standard deviation: 9.3) and the median was 27 years. In total, 30 195 315 person-years of follow-up were included in the study. In fully adjusted models, both low cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance (compared to high) at age 18 were associated with increased risk for future early-onset dementia (cardiovascular fitness, n = 662 events: hazard ratio 2.49, 95%, confidence interval 1.87-3.32; cognitive performance, n = 657 events: hazard ratio 4.11, 95%, confidence interval 3.19-5.29) and mild cognitive impairment (cardiovascular fitness, n = 213 events: hazard ratio 3.57, 95%, confidence interval 2.23-5.74; cognitive performance, n = 212 events: hazard ratio 3.23, 95%, confidence interval 2.12-4.95). Poor performance on both cardiovascular fitness and cognitive tests was associated with a >7-fold (hazard ratio 7.34, 95%, confidence interval 5.08-10.58) and a >8-fold (hazard ratio 8.44, 95%, confidence interval 4.64-15.37) increased risk of early-onset dementia and early-onset mild cognitive impairment, respectively. In conclusion, lower cardiovascular fitness and cognitive performance in early adulthood were associated with an increased risk of early-onset dementia and mild cognitive impairment later in life, and the greatest risks were observed for individuals with a combination of low cardiovascular fitness and low cognitive performance. PMID:24604561

Nyberg, Jenny; Åberg, Maria A I; Schiöler, Linus; Nilsson, Michael; Wallin, Anders; Torén, Kjell; Kuhn, H Georg

2014-05-01

340

Interactions of grapefruit juice and cardiovascular medications: A potential risk of toxicity  

PubMed Central

Recently, drug interactions with grapefruit juice (GFJ) have received considerable attention from basic scientists, physicians, industry and drug regulatory agencies. GFJ has been shown to inhibit cytochrome P-450 3A4 isoenzyme and P-glycoprotein transporters in the intestine and liver. The GFJ-induced inhibitory effects are considered to be responsible for alterations in drug bioavailability, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes when drugs are ingested concurrently with GFJ. However, little or no interaction is observed when GFJ is taken concomitantly with parentally administered drugs. It is well known that risk factors for cardiovascular disease increase with advancing age, while hepatic metabolic activity decreases in elderly individuals. It is, therefore, possible that the combination of GFJ and cardiovascular medications may pose a health risk, especially in elderly patients. A number of studies have shown interactions of GFJ with cardiovascular drugs such as calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin II receptor antagonists, beta-blockers, and statins. Such interactions are likely to change the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these drugs, consequently causing undesirable health effects. Therefore, health care professionals and the public need to be advised of the potential risks associated with the concomitant use of GFJ and interacting medications, especially cardiovascular drugs and agents with a narrow therapeutic index. This review focuses on the adverse interactions of GFJ and cardiovascular medications, and the proposed underlying mechanisms of such interactions.

Lim, Gareth E; Li, Timao; Buttar, Harpal S

2003-01-01

341

Cardiovascular Risk Factors Promote Brain Hypoperfusion Leading to Cognitive Decline and Dementia  

PubMed Central

Heart disease is the major leading cause of death and disability in the world. Mainly affecting the elderly population, heart disease and its main outcome, cardiovascular disease, have become an important risk factor in the development of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper examines the evidence linking chronic brain hypoperfusion induced by a variety of cardiovascular deficits in the development of cognitive impairment preceding AD. The evidence indicates a strong association between AD and cardiovascular risk factors, including ApoE4, atrial fibrillation, thrombotic events, hypertension, hypotension, heart failure, high serum markers of inflammation, coronary artery disease, low cardiac index, and valvular pathology. In elderly people whose cerebral perfusion is already diminished by their advanced age, additional reduction of cerebral blood flow stemming from abnormalities in the heart-brain vascular loop ostensibly increases the probability of developing AD. Evidence also suggests that a neuronal energy crisis brought on by relentless brain hypoperfusion may be responsible for protein synthesis abnormalities that later result in the classic neurodegenerative lesions involving the formation of amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Insight into how cardiovascular risk factors can induce progressive cognitive impairment offers an enhanced understanding of the multifactorial pathophysiology characterizing AD and ways at preventing or managing the cardiovascular precursors of this dementia.

de la Torre, Jack C.

2012-01-01

342

Serum copper and zinc and the risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease  

SciTech Connect

To investigate the association of serum copper and zinc with mortality from cancer and cardiovascular disease, the authors performed a case-control analysis of data obtained in a Dutch prospective follow-up study. Cancer (n = 64) and cardiovascular disease (n = 62) deaths and their matched controls were taken from a cohort of 10,532 persons examined in 1975-1978. Trace elements were measured in baseline serum samples, which had been stored during the six to nine years of follow-up. The adjusted risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease was about four times higher for subjects in the highest serum copper quintile (> 1.43 mg/liter) compared with those with normal levels. The excess mortality observed in subjects with low copper status suggests a U-shaped relation. No significant change in the risk of death from cancer and cardiovascular disease was found for subjects with low or high baseline levels of serum zinc. However, a protective effect of a high zinc status on the risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease is compatible with the data. For definitive conclusions, analysis of larger prospective data sets is recommended.

Kok, F.J.; Van Duijn, C.M.; Hofman, A.; Van der Voet, G.B.; De Wolff, F.A.; Paays, C.H.Ch.; Valkenburg, H.A.

1988-08-01

343

Sex Differences in Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: The PERU MIGRANT Study  

PubMed Central

Introduction Although men and women have similar risk factors for cardiovascular disease, many social behaviors in developing countries differ by sex. Rural-to-urban migrants have different cardiovascular risk profiles than rural or urban dwellers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the sex differences with specific cardiovascular risk factors in rural-to-urban migrants. Methods and Results We used the rural-to-urban migrant group of the PERU MIGRANT cross-sectional study to investigate the sex differences in specific cardiovascular risk factors: obesity, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, as well as exposures of socioeconomic status, acculturation surrogates and behavioral characteristics. Logistic regression analysis was used to characterize strength of association between sex and our outcomes adjusting for potential confounders. The sample of migrants was 589 (mean age 46.5 years) and 52.4% were female. In the adjusted models, women were more likely to be obese (OR=5.97; 95%CI: 3.21–11) and have metabolic syndrome (OR=2.22; 95%CI: 1.39–3.55) than men, explaining the greatest variability for obesity and metabolic syndrome but not for hypertension. Conclusions Our results suggest that interventions for CVD in Peru should be sex-specific and address the unique health needs of migrant populations living in urban shantytowns since the risk factors for obesity and metabolic syndrome differ between males and females.

Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Benziger, Catherine Pastorius; Gilman, Robert H.; Smeeth, Liam; Miranda, J. Jaime

2012-01-01

344

Rheumatoid Arthritis Impacts on the Independent Relationships between Circulating Adiponectin Concentrations and Cardiovascular Metabolic Risk  

PubMed Central

Adiponectin and leptin are likely involved in the pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and therefore potential new therapeutic targets. Adiponectin inhibition could be expected to enhance cardiovascular metabolic risk. However, it is unknown whether RA changes the influence of adipokines on cardiovascular metabolic risk. We determined whether RA impacts on the independent relationships of circulating leptin and adiponectin concentrations with cardiovascular risk factors and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in 277 black African subjects from a developing population; 119 had RA. RA impacted on the relationships of adiponectin concentrations with lipid concentrations and blood pressure, independent of confounders including adiposity (interaction P < 0.05). This translated into an association of adiponectin concentrations with more favorable lipid variables including HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0005), non-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.007), and triglyceride (P = 0.005) concentrations, total cholesterol-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0002) and triglycerides-HDL cholesterol (P = 0.0003) ratios, and higher systolic (P = 0.0006), diastolic (P = 0.0004), and mean blood pressure (P = 0.0007) in RA but not non-RA subjects. Leptin was not associated with metabolic risk after adjustment for adiposity. The cIMT did not differ by RA status, and adipokine concentrations were unrelated to atherosclerosis. This study suggests that leptin and adiponectin inhibition may not alter overall cardiovascular risk and disease in RA.

Dessein, Patrick H.; Norton, Gavin R.; Badenhorst, Margaret; Woodiwiss, Angela J.; Solomon, Ahmed

2013-01-01

345

In-vivo-validation of a cardiovascular risk prediction tool: the arriba-pro study  

PubMed Central

Background Calculation of individual risk is the cornerstone of effective cardiovascular prevention. arriba is a software to estimate the individual risk to suffer a cardiovascular event in 10 years. Prognosis and the absolute effects of pharmacological and lifestyle interventions help the patient make a well-informed decision. The risk calculation algorithm currently used in arriba is based on the Framingham risk algorithm calibrated to the German setting. The objective of this study is to evaluate and adapt the algorithm for the target population in primary care in Germany. Methods/design arriba-pro will be conducted within the primary care scheme provided by a large health care insurer in Baden-Württemberg, Germany. Patients who are counseled with arriba by their general practitioners (GPs) will be included in the arriba-pro cohort. Exposure data from the consultation with arriba such as demographic data and risk factors will be recorded automatically by the practice software and transferred to the study centre. Information on relevant prescription drugs (effect modifiers) and cardiovascular events (outcomes) will be derived from administrative sources. Discussion The study is unique in simulating a therapy naïve cohort, matching exactly research and application setting, using a robust administrative data base, and, finally, including patients with known cardiovascular disease who have been excluded from previous studies. Trial registration The study is registered with Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien (DRKS00004633).

2013-01-01

346

Cardiovascular risk assessment of dyslipidemic children: analysis of biomarkers to identify monogenic dyslipidemia.  

PubMed

The distinction between a monogenic dyslipidemia and a polygenic/environmental dyslipidemia is important for the cardiovascular risk assessment, counseling, and treatment of these patients. The present work aims to perform the cardiovascular risk assessment of dyslipidemic children to identify useful biomarkers for clinical criteria improvement in clinical settings. Main cardiovascular risk factors were analyzed in a cohort of 237 unrelated children with clinical diagnosis of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). About 40% carried at least two cardiovascular risk factors and 37.6% had FH, presenting mutations in LDLR and APOB. FH children showed significant elevated atherogenic markers and lower concentration of antiatherogenic particles. Children without a molecular diagnosis of FH had higher levels of TGs, apoC2, apoC3, and higher frequency of BMI and overweight/obesity, suggesting that environmental factors can be the underlying cause of their hypercholesterolem?ia. An apoB/apoA1 ratio ?0.68 was identified as the best biomarker (area under the curve = 0.835) to differentiate FH from other dyslipidemias. The inclusion in clinical criteria of a higher cut-off point for LDL cholesterol or an apoB/apoA1 ratio ?0.68 optimized the criteria sensitivity and specificity. The correct identification, at an early age, of all children at-risk is of great importance so that specific interventions can be implemented. apoB/apoA1 can improve the identification of FH patients. PMID:24627126

Medeiros, Ana Margarida; Alves, Ana Catarina; Aguiar, Pedro; Bourbon, Mafalda

2014-05-01

347

Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Austria.  

PubMed

Mortality of cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 1 diabetes is increased 2- to 20-fold compared to non-diabetic individuals. In young adults with type 1 diabetes, cardiovascular events are more often the cause of premature death than nephropathy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and extent of cardiovascular risk factors in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes in Austria. In a cross sectional study data of children with type 1 diabetes <18 years of age treated at the Children's department of the University Hospitals of Vienna and Graz were collected. We recorded body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, HbA1c, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol according to age, sex, age at manifestation, diabetes duration, and insulin requirement. From 264 patients (49.4% male) complete data were available. Of all patients, 76.1% had one or more risk factors, 20.8% had two or more, 10.2% had three or more, and 4.9% had four or more risk factors. Insufficient glycemic control was the most frequent risk factor, present in 60.6% of our patients, followed by elevated triglycerides (22.7%) and increased body mass index (20.1%). Higher prevalence of risk factors was correlated with increasing age, diabetes duration, HbA1c, and insulin requirement. In conclusion, children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes have a much higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors compared to non-diabetic individuals. To prevent future cardiovascular events, achieving the best possible glycemic control, early detection of further risk factors, and adequate intervention are highly important. PMID:22422191

Steigleder-Schweiger, Claudia; Rami-Merhar, Birgit; Waldhör, Thomas; Fröhlich-Reiterer, Elke; Schwarz, Ines; Fritsch, Maria; Borkenstein, Martin; Schober, Edith

2012-08-01

348

Shorter height is related to lower cardiovascular disease risk - A narrative review  

PubMed Central

Numerous Western studies have shown a negative correlation between height and cardiovascular disease. However, these correlations do not prove causation. This review provides a variety of studies showing short people have little to no cardiovascular disease. When shorter people are compared to taller people, a number of biological mechanisms evolve favoring shorter people, including reduced telomere shortening, lower atrial fibrillation, higher heart pumping efficiency, lower DNA damage, lower risk of blood clots, lower left ventricular hypertrophy and superior blood parameters. The causes of increased heart disease among shorter people in the developed world are related to lower income, excessive weight, poor diet, lifestyle factors, catch-up growth, childhood illness and poor environmental conditions. For short people in developed countries, the data indicate that a plant-based diet, leanness and regular exercise can substantially reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Samaras, Thomas T.

2013-01-01

349

Vascular risk factors, cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome in women  

PubMed Central

Background Previous studies evaluating the association between cardiovascular disease and vascular risk factors with restless legs syndrome showed inconsistent results, especially for the potential relation between various vascular risk factors and restless legs syndrome. We therefore aimed to analyze the relationship between vascular risk factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome. Methods This is a cross-sectional study of 30,262 female health professionals participating in the Women's Health Study (WHS). Restless legs syndrome was defined according to diagnostic criteria of the International Restless Legs Study Group. Information on vascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, body mass index, alcohol, smoking, exercise, family history of myocardial infarction) was self-reported. Cardiovascular disease events (coronary revascularization, myocardial infarction, stroke) were confirmed by medical record review. Prevalent major cardiovascular disease was defined as non-fatal stroke or non-fatal myocardial infarction. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association between vascular risk factors, prevalent cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome. Results Of the 30,262 participants (mean age: 63.6 years), 3,624 (12.0%) reported restless legs syndrome. In multivariable-adjusted models, body mass index (OR for BMI ?35kg/m2: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.17–1.56), diabetes (OR: 1.19, 95%CI: 1.04–1.35), hypercholesterolemia (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 1.09–1.26), smoking status (OR for ?15 cigarettes/day: 1.41, 95%CI: 1.19–1.66) and exercise (OR for exercise ? 4 times/week: 0.84, 95%CI: 0.74–0.95) were associated with restless legs syndrome prevalence. We found no association between prevalent cardiovascular disease (major cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, stroke) and restless legs syndrome prevalence. Women who underwent coronary revascularization had a multivariable-adjusted OR of 1.39 (1.10–1.77) for restless legs syndrome. Conclusion In this large cohort of female health professionals, various vascular risk factors are associated with restless legs syndrome prevalence. We could not confirm results of previous reports indicating an association between prevalent cardiovascular disease and restless legs syndrome.

Winter, Anke C.; Schurks, Markus; Glynn, Robert J; Buring, Julie E.; Gaziano, J. Michael; Berger, Klaus; Kurth, Tobias

2013-01-01

350

Risk of idiopathic cardiovascular death and rionfatal venous thromboembolism in women using oral contraceptives with differing progestagen components  

Microsoft Academic Search

SummaryConcern about the risks of cardiovascular illness in women using combined oral contraceptives (OC) containing the progestagens desogestrel and gestodene prompted two studies of data from the UK General Practice Research Database. We compared the risks of certain cardiovascular illnesses in otherwise healthy women exposed to one of three OCs containing In the first study, based on some 470 general

H Jick; S. S Jick; M. W Myers; C Vasilakis; V Gurewich

1995-01-01

351

Multiple genetic loci influence serum urate levels and their relationship with gout and cardiovascular disease risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background - Elevated serum urate levels can lead to gout and are associated with cardiovascular risk factors. We performed a genome-wide association study to search for genetic susceptibility loci for serum urate and gout and investigated the causal nature of the associations of serum urate with gout and selected cardiovascular risk factors and coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods and Results

Q. Yang; A. Köttgen; A. Dehghan; A. V. Smith; N. L. Glazer; M. H. Chen; D. I. Chasman; T. Aspelund; G. Eiriksdottir; T. B. Harris; L. J. Launer; M. A. Nalls; D. G. Hernandez; D. E. Arking; E. Boerwinkle; M. L. Grove; M. Li; W. H. Linda Kao; M. Chonchol; T. Haritunians; T. Lumley; B. M. Psaty; M. G. Shlipak; S. J. Hwang; M. G. Larson; C. J. O'Donnell; A. Upadhyay; P. Tikka-Kleemola; A. Hofman; F. Rivadeneira Ramirez; B. H. Ch. Stricker; A. G. Uitterlinden; G. Paré; A. N. Parker; P. M. Ridker; D. S. Siscovick; V. Gudnason; J. C. M. Witteman; C. S. Fox; J. Coresh

2010-01-01

352

Relevance of conventional cardiovascular risk factors for the prediction of coronary artery disease in diabetic patients on renal replacement therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

in diabetic patients with chronic renal failure. Therefore coronary angiography should be performed Background: Diabetic patients undergoing renal replacement therapy have a high cardiovascular mor- in all diabetic patients prior to renal transplantation. tality. As the rate of patients with diabetic nephropathy rises, adequate risk stratification subsequent to renal Key words: cardiovascular risk factors; coronary angi- transplantation is warranted. It

Michael Koch; Frank Gradaus; Frank-Chris Schoebel; Matthias Leschke; Bernd Grabensee

353

Influence of anti-tumour necrosis factor therapy on cardiovascular risk factors in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is known to increase the concentrations of interleukin (IL) 6 and C reactive protein (CRP) and to induce proatherogenic changes in the lipid profile and may increase the cardiovascular risk of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory disorders. OBJECTIVE: To assess whether anti-TNF therapy modifies the cardiovascular risk profile in patients with RA.

C. Popa; M. G. Netea; T. R. D. J. Radstake; A. F. H. Stalenhoef; P. Barrera Rico

2004-01-01

354

Low birth weight and longitudinal trends of cardiovascular risk factor variables from childhood to adolescence: the bogalusa heart study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Several studies have linked low birth weight to adverse levels of cardiovascular risk factors and related diseases. However, information is sparse at a community level in the U.S. general population regarding the effects of low birth weight on the longitudinal trends in cardiovascular risk factor variables measured concurrently from childhood to adolescence. METHODS: Longitudinal analysis was performed retrospectively on

Maria G Frontini; Sathanur R Srinivasan; Jihua Xu; Gerald S Berenson

2004-01-01

355

Cardiovascular risk estimation in women with a history of hypertensive pregnancy disorders at term: a longitudinal follow-up study.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease is associated with major morbidity and mortality in women in the Western world. Prediction of an individual cardiovascular disease risk in young women is difficult. It is known that women with hypertensive pregnancy complications have an increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease in later life and pregnancy might be used as a cardiovascular stress test to identify women who are at high risk for cardiovascular disease. In this study we assess the possibility of long term cardiovascular risk prediction in women with a history of hypertensive pregnancy disorders at term. METHODS: In a longitudinal follow-up study, between June 2008 and November 2010, 300 women with a history of hypertensive pregnancy disorders at term (HTP cohort) and 94 women with a history of normotensive pregnancies at term (NTP cohort) were included. From the cardiovascular risk status that was known two years after index pregnancy we calculated individual (extrapolated) 10-and 30-year cardiovascular event risks using four different risk prediction models including the Framingham risk score, the SCORE score and the Reynolds risk score. Continuous data were analyzed using the Student's T test and Mann--Whitney U test and categorical data by the Chi-squared test. A poisson regression analysis was performed to calculate the incidence risk ratios and corresponding 95% confidence intervals for the different cardiovascular risk estimation categories. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 2.5 years, HTP women had significantly higher mean (SD) extrapolated 10-year cardiovascular event risks (HTP 7.2% (3.7); NTP 4.4% (1.9) (p<.001, IRR 5.8, 95% CI 1.9 to 19)) and 30-year cardiovascular event risks (HTP 11% (7.6); NTP 7.3% (3.5) (p<.001, IRR 2.7, 95% CI 1.6 to 4.5)) as compared to NTP women calculated by the Framingham risk scores. The SCORE score and the Reynolds risk score showed similar significant results. CONCLUSIONS: Women with a history of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia at term have higher predicted (extrapolated) 10-year and 30-year cardiovascular event risks as compared to women with a history of uncomplicated pregnancies. Further large prospective studies have to evaluate whether hypertensive pregnancy disorders have to be included as an independent variable in cardiovascular risk prediction models for women. PMID:23734952

Hermes, Wietske; Tamsma, Jouke T; Grootendorst, Diana C; Franx, Arie; van der Post, Joris; van Pampus, Maria G; Bloemenkamp, Kitty Wm; Porath, Martina; Mol, Ben W; de Groot, Christianne Jm

2013-06-01

356

Obesity-related cardiovascular risk factors after long- term resistance training and ginger supplementation  

PubMed Central

Obesity and its metabolic consequences are major risk factors for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, lifestyle interventions, including exercise training and dietary components may decrease cardiovascular risk. Hence, this study was conducted to assess the effects of ginger supplementation and progressive resistance training on some cardiovascular risk factors in obese men. In a randomized double-blind design, 32 obese Iranian men (BMI ? 30) were assigned in to one of four groups: Placebo (PL, n = 8); ginger group (GI, n = 8) that consumed 1 gr ginger/d for 10 wk; resistance training plus placebo (RTPL, n = 8); and 1gr ginger plus resistance exercise (RTGI, n = 8). Progressive resistance training was performed three days per week for 10 weeks and included eight exercises. At baseline and after 10 weeks, body composition and anthropometric indices were measured. To identify other risk factors, venous blood samples were obtained before and 48-72 hours after the last training session for measurement of blood lipids (LDL-C, HDL-C, TG), systemic inflammation (CRP), and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). After 10 weeks both RTGI and RTPL groups showed significant decreases in waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), body fat percent, body fat mass, total cholesterol, and insulin resistance (p < 0.05) and a significant increase in fat free mass (FFM) (p < 0.05), while it remained unchanged in PL and GI. Further, significant decreases in the mean values of CRP were observed in all groups except PL (p < 0.05). Our results reveal that resistance training is an effective therapeutic strategy to reduce cardiovascular risk in obese Iranian men. Further, ginger supplementation alone or in combination with resistance training, also reduces chronic inflammation. However more research on the efficacy of this supplement to reduce cardiovascular risk in humans is required. Key points Long- term resistance training reduced cardiovascular risk factors in obese men. Ginger supplementation can also decrease chronic low grade inflammation in obese men. More researches are warranted to elicit the effects of these interventions on cardiovascular risk factors in humans.

Atashak, Sirvan; Peeri, Maghsoud; Azarbayjani, Mohammad Ali; Stannard, Stephen Robert; Haghighi, Marjan Mosalman

2011-01-01

357

Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular risk factors: a systematic review.  

PubMed

The aim of this paper was to systematically review and analyze the epidemiological evidence on the role of Mediterranean diet (MD) in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Fifty-eight studies exploring the relation between MD and lipoprotein concentration, antioxidative capacity and inflammatory markers, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, were identified and selected. These included 33 cross-sectional, 9 cohort, and 16 intervention studies. Most of the studies showed favorable effects of MD on CVD, although a certain degree of controversy remains in the respect of some issues, as obesity. Important methodological differences and limitations in the studies make difficult to compare results, thus further studies, particularly randomized clinical trials, are needed to finally substantiate the benefits of MD and to shed some lights on mechanisms. PMID:24261534

Grosso, Giuseppe; Mistretta, Antonio; Frigiola, Alessandro; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Biondi, Antonio; Basile, Francesco; Vitaglione, Paola; D'Orazio, Nicolantonio; Galvano, Fabio

2014-01-01

358

View of statins as antimicrobials in cardiovascular risk modification.  

PubMed

Atherosclerosis is a complex arterial pathological development underlying heart attack and stroke and a leading cause of death in developed and now also in developing countries. The primary processes that lead to the inflammatory lipid-laden proliferative lesion, obstructing the blood flow, and referred to as atherosclerotic plaque are dyslipidaemia and inflammation. Here, we will review one of the most efficient classes of drugs indicated for management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), statins. We will assess their pleiotropic effects that emerged from CVD applications, focusing this review specifically on plausible antimicrobial activity. Only recently gaining strength, the recognition of possible antibacterial activity may extend the statin applicability for vascular as well as to other critical inflammatory conditions. PMID:24623278

Kozarov, Emil; Padro, Teresa; Badimon, Lina

2014-06-01

359

Aspirin resistance as cardiovascular risk after kidney transplantation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

International surveys have shown that the leading cause of death after kidney transplantation has cardiovascular origin with a prevalence of 35-40%. As a preventive strategy these patients receive aspirin (ASA) therapy, even though their rate of aspirin resistance is still unknown. In our study, platelet aggregation measurements were performed between 2009 and 2012 investigating the laboratory effect of low-dose aspirin (100 mg) treatment using a CARAT TX4 optical aggregometer. ASA therapy was considered clinically effective in case of low ( i.e., below 40%) epinephrine-induced (10 ?M) platelet aggregation index. Rate of aspirin resistance, morbidity and mortality data of kidney transplanted patients (n = 255, mean age: 49 ± 12 years) were compared to a patient population with cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases (n = 346, mean age: 52.6 ± 11 years). Rate of aspirin resistance was significantly higher in the renal transplantation group (RT) compared to the positive control group (PC) (35.9% vs. 25.6%, p < 0.002). Morbidity analysis demonstrated significantly higher incidence of myocardial infarction, hypertension and diabetes mellitus in the RT group (p < 0.05). The subgroup analysis revealed significantly higher incidence of infarction and stroke in the ASA resistant RT group compared to the RT patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the incidence of myocardial infarction and hypertension was significantly higher in the non-resistant RT group than in the group of PC patients without ASA resistance (p < 0.05). These results may suggest that the elevated rate of aspirin resistance contributes to the high cardiovascular mortality after kidney transplantation.

Sandor, Barbara; Varga, Adam; Rabai, Miklos; Toth, Andras; Papp, Judit; Toth, Kalman; Szakaly, Peter

2014-05-01

360

Relationship between Anthropometric Measures and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Children and Adolescents  

PubMed Central

Background Obesity has been identified as an important risk factor in the development of cardiovascular diseases; however, other factors, combined or not with obesity, can influence cardiovascular risk and should be considered in cardiovascular risk stratification in pediatrics. Objective To analyze the association between anthropometry measures and cardiovascular risk factors, to investigate the determinants to changes in blood pressure (BP), and to propose a prediction equation to waist circumference (WC) in children and adolescents. Methods We evaluated 1,950 children and adolescents, aged 7 to 18 years. Visceral fat was assessed by WC and waist hip relationship, BP and body mass index (BMI). In a randomly selected subsample of these volunteers (n = 578), total cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides levels were evaluated. Results WC was positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.85; p < 0.001) and BP (SBP r = 0.45 and DBP = 0.37; p < 0.001). Glycaemia and triglycerides showed a weak correlation with WC (r = 0.110; p = 0.008 e r = 0.201; p < 0.001, respectively). Total cholesterol did not correlate with any of the variables. Age, BMI and WC were significant predictors on the regression models for BP (p < 0.001). We propose a WC prediction equation for children and adolescents: boys: y = 17.243 + 0.316 (height in cm); girls: y = 25.197 + 0.256 (height in cm). Conclusion WC is associated with cardiovascular risk factors and presents itself as a risk factor predictor of hypertension in children and adolescents. The WC prediction equation proposed by us should be tested in future studies.

Burgos, Miria Suzana; Burgos, Leandro Tibirica; Camargo, Marcelo Dias; Franke, Silvia Isabel Rech; Pra, Daniel; da Silva, Antonio Marcos Vargas; Borges, Tassia Silvana; Todendi, Pamela Ferreira; Reckziegel, Miriam Beatris; Reuter, Cezane Priscila

2013-01-01

361

Identifying Risk Factors for the Prediction of Hospital Readmission among Older Persons with Cardiovascular Disease.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Older persons (55 years and older) with cardiovascular disease are at increased risk for hospital readmission when compared to other subgroups of our population. This issue presents an economic problem, a concern for the quality and type of care provided, and an urgent need to implement innovative strategies designed to reduce the rising cost of…

Middleton, Renee Annette

362

Cardiovascular disease and risk factors in law enforcement personnel: a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Law enforcement is a high-stress occupation that is prone to increasing the prevalence and incidence of cardiovascular disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that police officers and related public safety personnel have an increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Currently employed police personnel have a high prevalence of traditional risk factors, including hypertension, hyperlipidemia, metabolic syndrome, cigarette smoking, and a sedentary lifestyle. Obesity may be more common in police officers compared with civilians, whereas diabetes is present less frequently. Law enforcement personnel are also exposed to occupation-specific risk factors that include sudden physical exertion, acute and chronic psychological stress, shift work, and noise. Workplace programs to promote the health and fitness of police officers are commonly lacking, but can be an effective means for reducing cardiovascular risk. Physicians should be familiar with the essential job tasks required for police officers to determine whether the individual is fit for duty. Governmental agencies have established strategic goals to reduce cardiovascular complications and improve the health and wellness of public safety personnel. PMID:22314143

Zimmerman, Franklin H

2012-01-01

363

Cardiovascular risk in obese and nonobese patients with type 2 diabetes in the West Indies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the impact of obesity on glycemic control and the risk of progressing to cardiovascular disease (CVD) in obese and nonobese type 2 diabetic patients in primary care settings.Methods: One hundred and ninety patients (64 men, 126 women) with type 2 diabetes (mean duration 9.2 years) were studied after an overnight fast. Weight, height, waist and hip circumferences

Chidum E. Ezenwaka; Nkechi V. Offiah

2001-01-01

364

Non invasive vascular evaluation and subclinical atherosclerosis: a new perspective to evaluate cardiovascular risk.  

PubMed

Techniques as Intima Media Thickness (IMT) and (Pulse Wave velocity) PWV have been strongly suggested by European and American Guidelines to assess subclinical ahterosclerotic vascular disease as target organ damage, and when they are present, they have been clearly associated to an increased risk of cardiovascular complications and death. PMID:21096833

Forcada, Pedro J

2010-01-01

365

Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Firefighters: A Prospective Cohort Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: Obesity, despite being a significant determinant of fitness for duty, is reaching epidemic levels in the workplace. Firefighters’ fitness is important to their health and to public safety.Research Methods and Procedures: We examined the distribution of BMI and its association with major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in Massachusetts firefighters who underwent baseline (1996) and annual medical examinations through

Elpidoforos S. Soteriades; Russ Hauser; Ichiro Kawachi; Dimitrios Liarokapis; David C. Christiani; Stefanos N. Kales

2005-01-01

366

Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) a novel cardiovascular risk factor - evidence from epidemiological and prospective clinical trials  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a growing clinical evidence to support the hypothesis that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase is a new independent cardiovascular risk factor. ADMA mediates endothelial dysfunction in lipid disorders, coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. The aim of this review was to summarize the latest evidence from epidemiological and prospective

Andrzej Szuba; Maciej Podgórski

367

Hyperhomocysteinemia, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular risk: the potential role of ADMA  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyperhomocysteinemia is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke. The mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of hyperhomocysteinemia are not completely defined, but endothelial dysfunction resulting from impaired bioavailability of nitric oxide is a consistent finding in experimental models. One potential mechanism for decreased nitric oxide bioavailability is inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase by its endogenous inhibitor, asymmetric dimethylarginine

Steven R. Lentz; Roman N. Rodionov; Sanjana Dayal

2003-01-01

368

Temperament in Childhood Predicts Body Mass in Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined associations of temperament at ages 6 to 12 with body-mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) at ages 24 to 30 years. The participants were 619 men and women derived from the population-based Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Temperament was operationalized as (negative) emotionality, sociability, and activity. High emotionality predicted increased BMI, independently of WC, and

Laura Pulkki-Råback; Marko Elovainio; Mika Kivimäki; Olli T. Raitakari; Liisa Keltikangas-Järvinen

2005-01-01

369

Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Variants, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Myocardial Infarction in the Costa Rica Study  

PubMed Central

Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturases (FADS) has previously been linked to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk. The goal of our study was to test associations between six common FADS polymorphisms (rs174556, rs3834458, rs174570, rs2524299, rs174589, rs174627), intermediate cardiovascular risk factors, and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in a matched population based case–control study of Costa Rican adults (n?=?1756). Generalized linear models and multiple conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of interest. Analyses involving intermediate cardiovascular risk factors and MI were also conducted in two replication cohorts, The Nurses’ Health Study (n?=?1200) and The Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n?=?1295). In the Costa Rica Study, genetic variation in the FADS cluster was associated with a robust linear decrease in adipose gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, and eicosapentaenoic fatty acids, and significant or borderline significant increases in the eicosadienoic, eicosatrienoic, and dihomo-gamma-linolenic fatty acids. However, the associations with adipose tissue fatty acids did not translate into changes in inflammatory biomarkers, blood lipids, or the risk of MI in the discovery or the replication cohorts. In conclusion, fatty acid desaturase polymorphisms impact long-chain PUFA biosynthesis, but their overall effect on cardiovascular health likely involves multiple pathways and merits further investigation.

Aslibekyan, S.; Jensen, M. K.; Campos, H.; Linkletter, C. D.; Loucks, E. B.; Ordovas, J. M.; Deka, R.; Rimm, E. B.; Baylin, A.

2012-01-01

370

Waist-to-Height Ratio and Body Mass Index as Indicators of Cardiovascular Risk in Youth  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: The purpose of this investigation was to determine if waist-to-height ratio (WHTR) or body mass index (BMI) is the better indicator of cardiovascular disease risk in children and adolescents of varying ages. Methods: Data from children and adolescents (N?=?2300) who were part of the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination…

Keefer, Daniel J.; Caputo, Jennifer L.; Tseh, Wayland

2013-01-01

371

Association of vitamin D deficiency and coronary artery disease with cardiovascular risk factors  

PubMed Central

Background: Vitamin D deficiency is a prevalent condition in many countries. The aim of this study is to elucidate whether deficient vitamin D status is associated with coronary artery disease considering cardiovascular risk factors. Materials and Methods: We measured 25 (OH) D serum levels in 57 patients that were diagnosed with coronary artery disease upon coronary angiography and 62 individuals in the control group who were matched for age and sex with the patients and examined the association between serum 25 (OH) D and coronary artery disease with regard to cardiovascular risk factors. Results: The odds ratio of being affected by coronary artery disease in individuals with vitamin D deficiency (25 (OH) D < 30 ng/ml) was 5.8 (1.77 - 18.94) after adjustment with cardiovascular risk factors, i.e., blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, obesity, physical activity and high blood cholesterol in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: Low levels of 25 (OH) D are associated with prevalent coronary artery disease independent of cardiovascular risk factors. Further investigations could demonstrate the need for vitamin D supplementations in order to prevent atherosclerosis.

Siadat, Zahra Dana; Kiani, Keyvan; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Shariat, Amir Sina; Farajzadegan, Ziba; Kheirmand, Maryam

2012-01-01

372

Fatty Acid desaturase gene variants, cardiovascular risk factors, and myocardial infarction in the costa rica study.  

PubMed

Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturases (FADS) has previously been linked to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk. The goal of our study was to test associations between six common FADS polymorphisms (rs174556, rs3834458, rs174570, rs2524299, rs174589, rs174627), intermediate cardiovascular risk factors, and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in a matched population based case-control study of Costa Rican adults (n?=?1756). Generalized linear models and multiple conditional logistic regression models were used to assess the associations of interest. Analyses involving intermediate cardiovascular risk factors and MI were also conducted in two replication cohorts, The Nurses' Health Study (n?=?1200) and The Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (n?=?1295). In the Costa Rica Study, genetic variation in the FADS cluster was associated with a robust linear decrease in adipose gamma-linolenic, arachidonic, and eicosapentaenoic fatty acids, and significant or borderline significant increases in the eicosadienoic, eicosatrienoic, and dihomo-gamma-linolenic fatty acids. However, the associations with adipose tissue fatty acids did not translate into changes in inflammatory biomarkers, blood lipids, or the risk of MI in the discovery or the replication cohorts. In conclusion, fatty acid desaturase polymorphisms impact long-chain PUFA biosynthesis, but their overall effect on cardiovascular health likely involves multiple pathways and merits further investigation. PMID:22563332

Aslibekyan, S; Jensen, M K; Campos, H; Linkletter, C D; Loucks, E B; Ordovas, J M; Deka, R; Rimm, E B; Baylin, A

2012-01-01

373

Prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors in the urban population of Soussa in Tunisia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background With the epidemiological transition phenom- enon, Tunisia is now facing the growing prevalence of chronic diseases. Environmental and behavioural changes such as the adoption of new dietary habits and a sedentary lifestyle, and the stress of urbanization and of working conditions all lead to the rise in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Methods The aim of this study is

H. Ghannem; A. Hadj Fredj

374

Identifying Cardiovascular Risk Factors in a Patient Population With Coronary Artery Ectasia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coronary artery ectasia (CAE) is frequently considered as a form of coronary artery disease. Cardiovascular risk factors were determined in a patient population with CAE. The 51 patients with isolated CAE (group 1), 61 patients with CAE coexisting with significant coronary stenosis (group 2), and 62 subjects with significant coronary stenosis (group 3) were included in the study, and the

Mustafa Saglam; Osman Karakaya; Irfan Barutcu; Ali Metin Esen; Muhsin Turkmen; Ramazan Kargin; Ozlem Esen; Nihal Ozdemir; Cihangir Kaymaz

2008-01-01

375

Research report Therapeutic drug and cardiovascular disease risk monitoring in patients with bipolar disorder  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: We assessed whether patients with bipolar disorder received serum drug level and toxicity monitoring for mood stabilizers and assessment of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related risk factors attributed to atypical antipsychotic medications. Methods: A population-based study of individuals with bipolar disorder was conducted between July 2004 and July 2006. Based on American Psychiatric and American Diabetes Association guidelines, we assessed whether

Amy M. Kilbourne; Edward P. Post; Mark S. Bauer; John E. Zeber; Laurel A. Copeland; Chester B. Good; Harold Alan Pincus

376

Altered Control of Cortisol Secretion in Adult Men with Low Birth Weight and Cardiovascular Risk Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

It has been suggested that increased activity of the hypothalamic- pituitary-adrenal axis may link low birth weight with subsequent development of cardiovascular risk factors and disease. Two hundred and five men, aged 66 -77 yr, who were born and still live in East Hertfordshire underwent an overnight very low dose (0.25 mg) dexa- methasone suppression test followed by a low

REBECCA M. REYNOLDS; BRIAN R. WALKER; HOLLY E. SYDDALL; RUTH ANDREW; PETER J. WOOD; CHRISTOPHER B. WHORWOOD; DAVID I. W. PHILLIPS

2010-01-01

377

Metabolic syndrome and 10-year cardiovascular disease risk in the Hoorn study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Different definitions of the metabolic syndrome have been proposed. Their value in a clinical setting to assess cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is still unclear. We compared the definitions proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP), World Health Organization (WHO), European Group for the Study of Insulin Resistance (EGIR), and American College of Endocrinology (ACE)

J. M. Dekker; C. J. Girman; T. Rhodes; M. G. A. A. M. Nijpels; C. D. A. Stehouwer; L. M. Bouter; R. J. Heine

2005-01-01

378

Therapies for type 2 diabetes: lowering HbA1c and associated cardiovascular risk factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVES: To summarize data supporting the effects of antidiabetes agents on glucose control and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Studies reporting on the effects of antidiabetes agents on glycemic control, body weight, lipid levels, and blood pressure parameters are reviewed and summarized for the purpose of selecting optimal therapeutic regimens for patients with type 2

L. Romayne Kurukulasuriya; James R Sowers

2010-01-01

379

A Community Health Advisor Program to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk among Rural African-American Women  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Uniontown, Alabama Community Health Project trained and facilitated Community Health Advisors (CHAs) in conducting a theory-based intervention designed to reduce the risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among rural African-American women. The multiphased project included formative evaluation and community organization, CHA recruitment and…

Cornell, C. E.; Littleton, M. A.; Greene, P. G.; Pulley, L.; Brownstein, J. N.; Sanderson, B. K.; Stalker, V. G.; Matson-Koffman, D.; Struempler, B.; Raczynski, J. M.

2009-01-01

380

Effects of age at menarche, reproductive years, and menopause on metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundEarly menarche is associated with increased adult body fatness, however, this association has been studied primarily in young women. The impact of changes in some metabolic risk factors of cardiovascular disease (CVD) after menopause remains controversial and ageing is an important confounder.

Yan Feng; Xiumei Hong; Elissa Wilker; Zhiping Li; Wenbin Zhang; Delai Jin; Xue Liu; Tonghua Zang; Xiping Xu; Xin Xu

2008-01-01

381

The Relationship Between Aerobic Fitness and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in the Canadian Forces.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Aerobic fitness and the incidence of risk factors related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) were compared for 1595 Canadian servicemen 20-50 years of age. Aerobic power (V02 max) was predicted from heart rates during submaximal exercise performed on a bicyc...

T. E. Brown W. S. Myles C. L. Allen

1979-01-01

382

Cardiovascular risk factors in an Iranian urban population: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study (Phase 1)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary. Objectives: Coronary artery disease is becoming more prevalent in developing countries, particularly in urban areas. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among Tehran urban population. Methods: The prevalence and distribution of high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, dyslipoproteinemia, diabetes mellitus, and obesity was determined in 15005 subjects, aged three years and over, selected by

Fereidoun Azizi; Maziar Rahmani; Habib Emami; P. Mirmiran; R. Hajipour; M. Madjid; J. Ghanbili; A. Ghanbarian; J. Mehrabi; N. Saadat; P. Salehi; N. Mortazavi; P. Heydarian; N. Sarbazi; S. Allahverdian; N. Saadati; E. Ainy; S. Moeini

2002-01-01

383

Association between Depression Symptoms with Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Patients Undergoing Peritoneal Dialysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite medical progress, high morbidity and mortality rates, due primarily to cardiovascular diseases, have persisted