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Sample records for residual stress analysis

  1. Residual Stress Analysis in Thick Uranium Films

    SciTech Connect

    Hodge, A M; Foreman, R J; Gallegos, G F

    2004-12-06

    Residual stress analysis was performed on thick, 1.0 to 25 {micro}m, depleted Uranium (DU) films deposited on an Al substrate by magnetron sputtering. Two distinct characterization techniques were used to measure substrate curvature before and after deposition. Stress evaluation was performed using the Benabdi/Roche equation, which is based on beam theory of a bi-layer material. The residual stress evolution was studied as a function of coating thickness and applied negative bias voltage (0-300V). The stresses developed were always compressive; however, increasing the coating thickness and applying a bias voltage presented a trend towards more tensile stresses and thus an overall reduction of residual stresses.

  2. Quantifying Residual Stresses by Means of Thermoelastic Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    This study focused on the application of the Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) technique as a tool for assessing the residual stress state of structures. TSA is based on the fact that materials experience small temperature changes when compressed or expanded. When a structure is cyclically loaded, a surface temperature profile results which correlates to the surface stresses. The cyclic surface temperature is measured with an infrared camera. Traditionally, the amplitude of a TSA signal was theoretically defined to be linearly dependent on the cyclic stress amplitude. Recent studies have established that the temperature response is also dependent on the cyclic mean stress (i.e., the static stress state of the structure). In a previous study by the authors, it was shown that mean stresses significantly influenced the TSA results for titanium- and nickel-based alloys. This study continued the effort of accurate direct measurements of the mean stress effect by implementing various experimental modifications. In addition, a more in-depth analysis was conducted which involved analyzing the second harmonic of the temperature response. By obtaining the amplitudes of the first and second harmonics, the stress amplitude and the mean stress at a given point on a structure subjected to a cyclic load can be simultaneously obtained. The experimental results showed good agreement with the theoretical predictions for both the first and second harmonics of the temperature response. As a result, confidence was achieved concerning the ability to simultaneously obtain values for the static stress state as well as the cyclic stress amplitude of structures subjected to cyclic loads using the TSA technique. With continued research, it is now feasible to establish a protocol that would enable the monitoring of residual stresses in structures utilizing TSA.

  3. A stress-free model for residual stress assessment using thermoelastic stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Geoffrey; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Achintha, Mithila; Robinson, Andrew F.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic Stress Analysis (TSA) has been proposed as a method of obtaining residual stresses. The results of a preliminary study demonstrated that when Al-2024 plate containing holes that were plastically deformed by cold expansion process to 2% and 4% strain the thermoelastic response in the material around the hole was different to that obtained from a plate that had not experienced any plastic cold expansion (i.e. a reference specimen). This observation provides an opportunity for obtaining residual stresses based on TSA data. In many applications a reference specimen (i.e. residual stress free specimen) may not be available for comparison, so a synthetic, digital bitmap has been proposed as an alternative. An elastic finite element model is created using commercially available software Abaqus/Standard and the resultant stress field is extracted. The simulated stress field from the model is mapped onto a grid that matches the TSA pixel data from a physical reference specimen. This stress field is then converted to a ΔT/T field that can be compared to the full-field TSA data. When the reference experimental data is subtracted from the, bitmap dataset the resultant ΔT/T field is approximately zero. Further work proposes replacing the experimental reference data with that from specimens that have undergone cold expansion with the aim of revealing the regions affected by residual stress through a departure from zero in the resultant stress field. The paper demonstrates the first steps necessary for deriving the residual stresses from a general specimen using TSA.

  4. Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis of residual stress and carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. M.; Stevens, K. J.; Kaiser, A. B.

    2001-04-01

    Magnetic Barkhausen noise analysis is an effective non-destructive testing technique for determining both residual stress and carburization, with potential for improving the accuracy of remaining-life estimates of critical components in operational plant such as that used in thermal power stations and the petrochemical industry. We have measured Barkhausen noise in magnetic Durehete 1055 samples under stress and in carburized ethylene pyrolysis tubes. The Barkhausen power as a function of applied field is modeled using Sablik's function for Barkhausen power as a function of irreversible differential permeability (μirr); the Jiles-Atherton model of hysteresis is used to determine μirr as a function of applied field.

  5. Consideratons Regarding the Alignment of Diffractometers for Residual stress Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, Thomas R; Cavin, Odis Burl; Matlock, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Proper alignment of an X-ray diffractometer is critical to performing credible measurements, particularly for residual stress determinations. This article will emphasize practical aspects of diffractometer alignment and standards usage with regards to residual strain measurement. Essentially, what to do when one is confronted with a residual stress problem and an unfamiliar goniometer. Various alignment techniques, use of standards, and related issues will be discussed.

  6. Residue stress analysis of molding aspherical plastic lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ying; Cheng, Yuan-Chieh; Chang, Shenq-Tsong; Huang, Ting-Ming

    2015-09-01

    The aspherical plastic lens is widely used in commercial optical products. Warpage and residue stress are two important factors that influence wavefront error. Several investigators have discussed warpage. We propose a methodology to study the effect of residue stress on wavefront error. Mold flow software was adopted to calculate the residue stress in injection processes. Optical software was used to find optical ray paths through the lens. Corresponding Optical Path Different (OPD) in each ray path was simulated by self-developed software. A 50-mm diameter plastic lens was used in this study. The mild- and high-frequency wavefront errors and the stress OPD effect at the injection area were found to be a result of the molding process. The proposed methodology was found to be very suitable for finding the effect of residue stress on wavefront error in plastic lenses.

  7. Mode-coupling analysis of residual stresses in colloidal glasses.

    PubMed

    Fritschi, S; Fuchs, M; Voigtmann, Th

    2014-07-21

    We present results from computer simulation and mode-coupling theory of the glass transition for the nonequilibrium relaxation of stresses in a colloidal glass former after the cessation of shear flow. In the ideal glass, persistent residual stresses are found that depend on the flow history. The partial decay of stresses from the steady state to this residual stress is governed by the previous shear rate. We rationalize this observation in a schematic model of mode-coupling theory. The results from Brownian-dynamics simulations of a glassy two-dimensional hard-disk system are in qualitative agreement with the predictions of the theory. PMID:24841537

  8. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: An NDE Tool for the Residual Stress Assessment of Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2000-01-01

    During manufacturing, certain propulsion components that will be used in a cyclic fatigue environment are fabricated to contain compressive residual stresses on their surfaces because these stresses inhibit the nucleation of cracks. Overloads and elevated temperature excursions cause the induced residual stresses to dissipate while the component is still in service, lowering its resistance to crack initiation. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field has focused on employing the Thermoelastic Stress Analysis technique (TSA, also recognized as SPATE: Stress Pattern Analysis by Thermal Emission) as a tool for monitoring the residual stress state of propulsion components. TSA is based on the fact that materials experience small temperature changes when they are compressed or expanded. When a structure is cyclically loaded (i.e., cyclically compressed and expanded), the resulting surface-temperature profile correlates to the stress state of the structure s surface. The surface-temperature variations resulting from a cyclic load are measured with an infrared camera. Traditionally, the temperature amplitude of a TSA signal has been theoretically defined to be linearly dependent on the cyclic stress amplitude. As a result, the temperature amplitude resulting from an applied cyclic stress was assumed to be independent of the cyclic mean stress.

  9. Neutron diffractometer RSND for residual stress analysis at CAEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Wang, Hong; Sun, Guangai; Chen, Bo; Chen, Yanzhou; Pang, Beibei; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Yun; Zhang, Changsheng; Gong, Jian; Liu, Yaoguang

    2015-05-01

    Residual Stress Neutron Diffractometer (RSND) has been built at China Academy of Engineering Physics (CAEP) in Mianyang. Due to its excellent flexibility, the residual stress measurement on different samples, as well as in-situ study for materials science, can be carried out through RSND. The basic tests on its intensity and resolution and some preliminary experimental results under mechanical load, demonstrate the high quality of RSND.

  10. Residual stress measurement and analysis using ultrasonic techniques.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noronha, P. J.; Chapman, J. R.; Wert, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    A technique which utilizes ultrasonic radiation has been developed to measure residual stresses in metals. This technique makes it possible to detect and measure the magnitude of the principle stresses and also to obtain their direction. The velocities of ultrasonic waves in materials are measured as the time to travel a fixed path length, and the change in transit time is related to the applied stress. The linear relationship obtained allows a procedure based on this principle to be used for the measurement of residual stress using surface waves and shear waves. A method for plotting stress profiles through a material using surface waves uses varying frequencies for the ultrasonic wave. A limitation of the shear wave method is considered. The system used for this technique is called the Modified Time of Flight System.

  11. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  12. Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator Residual Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury S.; Brust, Frederick W.; Phillips, Dawn R.; Cheston, Derrick

    2008-01-01

    The structural analyses described in the present report were performed in support of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) Critical Initial Flaw Size (CIFS) assessment for the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS) common shell segment. An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The Ares system of space launch vehicles is the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration s plan for replacement of the aging space shuttle. The new Ares space launch system is somewhat of a combination of the space shuttle system and the Saturn launch vehicles used prior to the shuttle. Here, a series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on fatigue and fracture life. The results of this effort served as one of the critical load inputs required to perform a CIFS assessment of the same segment.

  13. Residual Stress Analysis of Cold-Sprayed Copper Coatings by Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenya; Yang, Kang; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhou, Xianglin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an analysis on the residual stress evolution of cold-sprayed copper coatings on Cu and Al substrates was performed. To investigate the influences of particle velocity, temperature and material combination on the final residual stresses, an integrated frame of calculation was proposed based on the simulation results obtained from the developed thermo-mechanically coupled Eulerian model. In a single Cu splat, generally speaking, the maximum residual stress and plastic deformation are concentrated at the outside contact zone rather than at the center point of initial impact. The action of friction shear between the particle and substrate during impacting should be considered as one of the essential factors on the final residual stress. And the states of residual stresses can vary significantly depending on the material combination, particle velocity, and temperature. In a single pass Cu coating, the residual stress fluctuates across the coating and there exists both compressive stress and tensile stress within the coating. At a certain range of impacting velocities, the resultant residual stresses increase with the increase of particle velocity. The present simulated results are related to the reported experiments by others, showing that the residual stress states and stress change trend are different from some of the reported results.

  14. Effects of weld residual stresses on crack-opening area analysis of pipes for LBB applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P.; Rahman, S.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    This paper summarizes four different studies undertaken to evaluate the effects of weld residual stresses on the crack-opening behavior of a circumferential through-wall crack in the center of a girth weld. The effect of weld residual stress on the crack-opening-area and leak-rate analyses of a pipe is not well understood. There are no simple analyses to account for these effects, and, therefore, they are frequently neglected. The four studies involved the following efforts: (1) Full-field thermoplastic finite element residual stress analyses of a crack in the center of a girth weld, (2) A comparison of the crack-opening displacements from a full-field thermoplastic residual stress analysis with a crack-face pressure elastic stress analysis to determine the residual stress effects on the crack-opening displacement, (3) The effects of hydrostatic testing on the residual stresses and the resulting crack-opening displacement, and (4) The effect of residual stresses on crack-opening displacement with different normal operating stresses.

  15. Creation Of The Residual Stress By Influence Of Wear Of Cutting Tool And Their Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordík, Marek; Čilliková, Mária; Mrazik, Jozef; Martinček, Juraj; Janota, Miroslav; Nicielnik, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this paper is analysis of turned bearing ring made of material 14109 (DIN 100Cr6) without heat treatment. For the analysis a mechanical destructive method was chosen. Analysis focused on existence and character of residual stresses after turning operation of bearing ring by tool with different level of wear. The experiment reveals the relationships between residual stress creation and cutting tool wear.

  16. Simplified micromechanical equations for thermal residual stress analysis of coated fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The fabrication of metal matrix composites poses unique problems to the materials engineer. The large thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) mismatch between the fiber and matrix leads to high tensile residual stresses at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface which could lead to premature matrix cracking during cooldown. Fiber coatings could be used to reduce thermal residual stresses. A simple closed form analysis, based on a three phase composite cylinder model, was developed to calculate thermal residual stresses in a fiber/interphase/matrix system. Parametric studies showed that the tensile thermal residual stresses at the F/M interface were very sensitive to the CTE and thickness of the interphase layer. The modulus of the layer had only a moderate effect on tensile residual stresses. For a silicon carbide titanium aluminide composite, the tangential stresses were 20 to 30 pct. larger than the axial stresses, over a wide range of interphase layer properties, indicating a tendency to form radial matrix cracks during cooldown. Guidelines for the selection of appropriate material properties of the fiber coating were also derived in order to minimize thermal residual stresses in the matrix during fabrication.

  17. Simplified micromechanical equations for thermal residual stress analysis of coated fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naik, Rajiv A.

    1992-01-01

    The fabrication of metal matrix composites poses unique problems to the materials engineer. The large thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the fiber and matrix leads to high tensile residual stresses at the fiber/matrix interface which could lead to premature matrix cracking during cooldown. Fiber coating could be used to reduce thermal residual stresses. A simple closed-form analysis, based on a three-phase composite cylinder model, was developed to calculate thermal residual stresses in a fiber/interface/matrix system. Guidelines, in the form of simple equations, for the selection of appropriate material properties of the fiber coating, were also derived to minimize thermal residual stresses in the matrix during fabrication.

  18. Numerical analysis of residual stress distribution in tubes with spiral weld cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Swindeman, R.W.; Feng, Z.; Jirinec, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with spiral weld cladding were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to determine the residual stress-strain state in the weld clad tube and verify the developed FE model, which might serve for future parametric sensitivity studies of various welding parameters on residual stresses in such tubes. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential weld cladding process of Alloy 625 on SA210 carbon steel tube and to analyze the residual stress-strain state. The analysis was uncoupled in that the thermal and mechanical analyses were conducted in two separate runs. The results show high tensile residual stresses in the weld cladding and at the interface with a gradual transition to compressive stresses at the inner tube surface. A neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the clad tube. Comparison with the FE results shows good overall agreement. The agreement is excellent in radial and axial elastic strain components, whereas the calculated tangential elastic strain overpredicted the measured value. The difference is discussed, and certain conclusions are given. Finally, some attempts on how to prevent or relieve high tensile stresses in the weld cladding are presented and discussed in this paper.

  19. Residual stress analysis of multilayer environmental barrier coatings.

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, B.; Almer, J.; Weyant, C.; Lee, K.; Faber, K.; Northwestern Univ.; Rolls-Royce Corp.

    2009-02-01

    Silicon-based ceramics (SiC, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) are promising materials systems for high-temperature structural applications in gas turbine engines. However, the silica layer that forms on these materials is susceptible to attack from water vapor present in combustion environments. To protect against this degradation, environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) have been developed to shield the underlying substrate and prevent degradation. Here we report on elastic and thermal properties, as well as internal stresses of candidate multilayer coatings, as measured in situ using microfocused high-energy X-rays in a transmission diffraction geometry. Doped aluminosilicate coatings were investigated for their stability on a SiC/SiC melt-infiltrated substrate. The coatings consisted of a Ba{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} topcoat with a mullite or mullite+SrAl{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 8} interlayer, and a silicon bond coat. A numerical model was used to compare the stress results with an ideal coating system. Experiments were carried out on as-sprayed and heat-treated samples in order to analyze the strain and phase evolution as a function of multilayer depth and temperature. The phase transformation of the topcoat promoted healing of cracks in the EBC and reduced stresses in the underlying layers and the addition of SAS to the interlayer reduced stresses in thermally cycled coatings, but did not stop cracks from forming.

  20. Residual Stress Analysis of Overspeeded Disk with Central Hole by X-ray Diffraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, James N

    1948-01-01

    An X-ray - diffraction analysis of residual surface stresses after plastic strain was introduced in a parallel-sided 3S-O aluminum disk with a central hole by two types of centrifugal overspeed is reported. Both tangential and radial stresses were generally tensile with large local variations near the hole where surface stresses may have been partly superficial. These stresses were both tensile and compressive dependent on the distance from the disk center when mass compression was effected near the hole.

  1. Depth-resolved residual stress analysis of thin coatings by a new FIB-DIC method

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, Marco; Eberl, Christoph; Bemporad, Edoardo; Pharr, George Mathews

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology for the measurement of depth sensitive residual stress profiles of thin coatings with sub-micrometer resolution is presented. The two step method consists of incremental focused ion beam (FIB) ring-core milling, combined with high-resolution in situ SEM-FEG imaging of the relaxing surface and a full field strain analysis by digital image correlation (DIC). The through-thickness profile of the residual stress can be obtained by comparison of the experimentally measured surface strain with finite element modeling using Schajer's integral method. In this work, a chromium nitride (CrN) CAE-PVD 3.0 {mu}m coating on steel substrate, and a gold MS-PVD 1.5 {mu}m on silicon were selected for the experimental implementation. Incremental FIB milling was conducted using an optimized milling strategy that produces minimum re-deposition over the sample surface. Results showed an average residual stress of {sigma} = -5.15 GPa in the CrN coating and {sigma} = +194 MPa in the Au coating. These values are in reasonable agreement with estimates obtained by other conventional techniques. The depth profiles revealed an increasing residual stress from surface to the coating/surface interface for both coatings. This observation is likely related to stress relaxation during grain growth, which was observed in microstructural cross sections, as predicted by existing models for structure-stress evolution in PVD coatings. A correlation between the observed stress gradients and the in-service mechanical behavior of the coatings is proposed. Finally, critical aspects of the technique and the influence of microstructure and elastic anisotropy on stress analysis are analyzed and discussed.

  2. Investigation and Analysis of Weld Induced Residual Stresses in Two Dissimilar Pipes by Finite Element Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadimi, S.; Khoushehmehr, R. J.; Rohani, B.; Mostafapour, A.

    In the present study, Manual Metal Arc Welding (MMAW) of austenitic stainless steel to carbon steel were studied. The Schaeffler diagram were used in determining suitable filler metal for this process and then the finite element analysis of residual stresses in butt welding of two dissimilar pipes is performed with the commercial software ANSYS, which includes moving heat source, material deposit, temperature dependant material properties, metal plasticity and elasticity, transient heat transfer and mechanical analysis. The residual stresses distribution and magnitude in the hoop and axial directions in the inner and outer surfaces of two dissimilar pipes were obtained. Welding simulation considered as a sequentially coupled thermo-mechanical analysis and the element birth and death technique was employed for simulation of filler metal deposition.

  3. Finite element analysis of the residual thermal stresses on functionally gradated dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Henriques, B; Miranda, G; Gasik, M; Souza, J C M; Nascimento, R M; Silva, F S

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study, using the finite element method (FEM), the distribution of thermal residual stresses arising in metal-ceramic dental restorations after cooling from the processing temperature. Three different interface configurations were studied: with conventional sharp transition; one with a 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer; and one with a compositionally functionally gradated material (FGM) interlayer. The FE analysis was performed based on experimental data obtained from Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) and Dilatometry (DIL) studies of the monolithic materials and metal/ceramic composites. Results have shown significant benefits of using the 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer and the FGM interlayer over the conventional sharp transition interface configuration in reduction of the thermal residual stress and improvement of stress profiles. Maximum stresses magnitudes were reduced by 10% for the crowns with 50% metal-50% ceramic interlayer and by 20% with FGM interlayer. The reduction in stress magnitude and smoothness of the stress distribution profile due to the gradated architectures might explain the improved behavior of these novel dental restorative systems relative to the conventional one, demonstrated by in-vitro studies already reported in literature. PMID:26122789

  4. Residual stresses in material processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kozaczek, K.J.; Watkins, T.R.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, Xun-Li; Spooner, S.

    1994-09-01

    Material manufacturing processes often introduce residual stresses into the product. The residual stresses affect the properties of the material and often are detrimental. Therefore, the distribution and magnitude of residual stresses in the final product are usually an important factor in manufacturing process optimization or component life prediction. The present paper briefly discusses the causes of residual stresses. It then adresses the direct, nondestructive methods of residual stress measurement by X-ray and neutron diffraction. Examples are presented to demonstrate the importance of residual stress measurement in machining and joining operations.

  5. Residual stress analysis in forming process of filament wound thick-walled CFRP pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo, Toshimi; Sekine, Hideki; Nakano, Kunio

    1995-11-01

    Residual stress analysis for the cracking phenomenon of filament would thick-walled CFRP pipes, which frequently occurs in the forming process of curing and thermal cycling through the course of the wet filament winding, was made from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. A simple analytical model to study the cracking in the CFRP pipes was proposed. The pipes are multilayered and reinforced in the axial and circumferential directions alternatively by carbon fibers. Taking account of the anisotropy of mechanical and thermal properties including the shrinkage strain, which depend considerably on the temperature, the residual stresses in the CFRP pipes were elucidated in the forming process, particularly, in cooling of the cure process.

  6. 3D Dynamic Finite Element Analysis of the Nonuniform Residual Stress in Ultrasonic Impact Treatment Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shengsun; Guo, Chaobo; Wang, Dongpo; Wang, Zhijiang

    2016-07-01

    The nonuniform distributions of the residual stress were simulated by a 3D finite element model to analyze the elastic-plastic dynamic ultrasonic impact treatment (UIT) process of multiple impacts on the 2024 aluminum alloy. The evolution of the stress during the impact process was discussed. The successive impacts during the UIT process improve the uniformity of the plastic deformation and decrease the maximum compressive residual stress beneath the former impact indentations. The influences of different controlled parameters, including the initial impact velocity, pin diameter, pin tip, device moving, and offset distances, on the residual stress distributions were analyzed. The influences of the controlled parameters on the residual stress distributions are apparent in the offset direction due to the different surface coverage in different directions. The influences can be used to understand the UIT process and to obtain the desired residual stress by optimizing the controlled parameters.

  7. Neutron diffraction analysis of residual strain/stress distribution in the vicinity of high strength welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mráz, L.; Karlsson, L.; Hamák, I.; Vrána, M.; Mikula, P.

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses resulting from non homogeneous heat distribution during welding process belong to most significant factor influencing behavior of welded structures. These stresses are responsible for defect occurrence during welding and they are also responsible for crack initiation and propagation at the either static or dynamic load. The significant effect of weld metal chemical composition as well as the effect of fatigue load and local plastic deformation on residual stress distribution and fatigue life have been recognized for high strength steels welds. The changes in residual stress distribution have then positive effect on cold cracking behavior and also on fatigue properties of the welds [1-3]. Several experimental methods, both destructive and non-destructive, such as hole drilling method, X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and others, have been used to examine residual stress distribution in all three significant orientations in the vicinity of the welds. The present contribution summarizes the results of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stress distribution in the vicinity of single-pass high-strength-steel welds having different chemical composition as well as the influence of fatigue load and local plastic deformation. It has been observed that the chemical composition of the weld metal has a significant influence on the stress distribution around the weld. Similarly, by aplying both cyclic load or pre-stress load on the specimens, stress relaxation was observed even in the region of approximately 40 mm far from the weld toe.

  8. Three dimensional finite element simulation and analysis of residual stress in milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao; Sun, Yazhou; Liang, Yingchun; Lu, Zesheng

    2010-10-01

    Framework parts are extensively used in aerospace industry and milling is its main processing method. This study aims at the milling of aluminum alloy 2024-T351. With the analysis of the milling cutter structure, the virtual topology technology was used to carry on the pretreatment of the milling cutter model, and the adaptive meshing technique was applied. Johnson-Cook's coupled thermo-mechanical model was used as the material model of workpiece. Johnson-Cook's shear failure principle was used as the material failure criterion. The modified Coulomb's law whose slide friction area is combined with sticking friction was used to compute the friction between tool and workpiece. And a more realistic three-dimensional finite element model of milling was finally established. The process of chip formation was simulated in this model. The distribution of surface residual stress at different spindle speed was obtained through finite element simulating. And with the analysis of the results, the basic affecting law of spindle speed to residual stress of machined surface was found, which provides a basis for practical machining.

  9. Residual stress characteristics of butt-welded flange by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Lun; Yang, Xiao-Hong; Ran, Guo-Wei; Xiao, Tian-Jiao; Yan, Si-Bo

    2011-06-01

    Finite element simulation is utilized in an aluminum alloy 2014 butt-welded flange under AC Tungsten Inert Gas (AC-TIG) welding condition. The simulated results are in good agreement with the residual stress for the plate test using the actual welding parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of residual stress could be investigated in detail in several aspects, such as the welding structures, the welding sequences, the time intervals, preheating, and repair weld. The intermittent welding may be more convenient and advantageous for the practical applications to reduce the stress, and the local repair welding may cause more stress within the repairing region obviously.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Residual Stress for Copper Base Brazed Stainless Steel Plate-Fin Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Qiaoyun; Ling, Xiang

    2010-07-01

    Copper base stainless steel plate-fin structure has been widely used as a heat exchanger in many fields. The nonlinear thermal reaction on the residual stress in brazing process of the plate-fin structure was studied in this paper. A finite element model (FEM) was proposed to simulate the heat transfer and the sequential residual stress generated in the plate-fin and filler metals based on thermal elastic-plastic theory. By the stress distribution in four paths marked in the structure obtained from FEM results, it is found that the maximum residual tensile stress occurs in the brazed joint next to the plate side and a crack would initiate in this region. Also, the first principle stresses of reference nodes were calculated and the conclusion is consistent with the simulation results. These results would provide some constructive instructions in the practical brazing procedure.

  11. Residual stress measurement in YBCO thin films.

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, J. H.; Singh, J. P.

    2002-05-13

    Residual stress in YBCO films on Ag and Hastelloy C substrates was determined by using 3-D optical interferometry and laser scanning to measure the change in curvature radius before and after film deposition. The residual stress was obtained by appropriate analysis of curvature measurements. Consistent with residual thermal stress calculations based on the thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between the substrates and YBCO film, the measured residual stress in the YBCO film on Hastelloy C substrate was tensile, while it was compressive on the Ag substrate. The stress values measured by the two techniques were generally in good agreement, suggesting that optical interferometry and laser scanning have promise for measuring residual stresses in thin films.

  12. JOINING OF MOLYBDENUM DISILICIDE TO STAINLESS STEEL USING AMORPHOUS METAL BRAZES-RESIDUAL STRESS ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    VAIDYA, RAJENDRA U; KAUTZ, DOUGLAS D.; GALLEGOS, DAVID E.

    2007-01-30

    Molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2})/stainless steel 316 L jOints were produced by high temperature brazing using a cobalt-based metallic-glass (METGLAS{trademark} 2714A). Successful joining was completed in two different ways; either by feeding excess braze into the braze gap upon heating or by constraining the MoSi{sub 2}/stainiess steel assembly with an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) fixture during the heating cycle. These steps were necessary to ensure the production of a high quality void free joint. Residual stress measurements were completed on these joints. Indentation results show higher tensile residual stresses in the stainless steel for the joint with the external constraint, in comparison to the unconstrained state. In contrast, the compressive residual stresses In the MoSi{sub 2} (as measured by X-ray diffraction) were lower in the constrained state relative to the unconstrained state. These results and a lack of residual stress balance indicate that the stress state in the braze is significantly different under the two joining conditions and the volume of the braze plays an important role in the development of the residual stresses. Push-out tests carried out on these joints gave higher joint strengths in the unconstrained as compared to the constrained condition. The results of this study have important implications on the selection of the appropriate joining process (use of constraint versus extra braze).

  13. A quasi-linear analysis of the impurity effect on turbulent momentum transport and residual stress

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, S. H. Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-08-15

    We study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  14. Automation of a neutron diffractometer for analysis of residual stress inside complex engineering components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguly, S.; James, J. A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Tanguy, A.

    2010-06-01

    Residual stress measurement using neutron diffraction is becoming an increasingly important tool in engineering stress analysis. To this effect, a new generation of dedicated engineering strain instruments are being built at neutron sources, offering considerable improvements in both counting time and spatial resolution. Alongside these improvements, measurements in complex geometry prototype components are increasingly in demand. As a result, there is a strong drive towards integrated sample positioning systems that allow for simplified setup and operating of experiments on components with complex geometries. The present study details work carried out at the ENGIN-X instrument at the UK’s ISIS pulsed neutron source, on measurements in a prototype metal matrix composite (MMC) aircraft wheel, forged from a billet produced through a powder-metallurgy route. The measurement was designed to obtain the macrostress and misfit stresses developed in the matrix and in the reinforcement phase in the wheel during fabrication. The study also demonstrates the use of the SScanSS software for experimental design and implementation, which was developed to complement the advances in the instrumentation of new strain mapping diffractometers. SScanSS simplifies the precise spatial location of the measuring gauge volume inside such complex components.

  15. Residual stress analysis of TiN film fabricated by plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxi; Xu, Qian; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Chuanqi; Tang, Baoyin

    2013-02-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN) films were fabricated on AISI52100 bearing steel surface employing a hybrid plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PIIID) technique. The chemical composition, morphology and microstructure of TiN films were characterized by atomic force microscope (AFM), energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The residual stress of TiN films under different deposition parameter conditions were measured by means of glazing incidence angle X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) method. The influence of film thickness and X-ray glazing incidence angle on residual stress were investigated. AFM observation reveals that the TiN films have extremely smooth surface, high uniformity and efficiency of space filling over large areas. XRD analysis results indicate that TiN phase exists in the surface modified layer and exhibits a preferred orientation with the (2 0 0) plane. The GIXRD data shows that the residual stress in as-deposited TiN films is compressive stress, and the residual stress value decreases with the film thickness and increases with the glazing incidence angle. The compressive stress reduces from 2.164 GPa to 1.163 GPa, which corresponds to the film thickness from 1.5 μm to 4.5 μm, respectively. Reasonably selecting PIIID process parameters for TiN films fabrication, the residual stress in the film can be controlled effectively.

  16. X-ray diffraction analysis of residual stress in zirconia dental composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahkarami, Masoud

    Dental restoration ceramic is a complex system to be characterized. Beside its essential biocompatibility, and pleasant appearance, it requires being mechanically strong in a catastrophic loading environment. Any design is restricted with geometry boundary and material property limits. Inspired by natural teeth, a multilayer ceramic is a smart way of achieving an enhanced restoration. Bi-layers of zirconia core covered by porcelain are known as one of the best multilayer restorations. Residual stresses may be introduced into a bi-layer dental ceramic restoration during its entire manufacturing process due to thermal expansion and elastic property mismatch. It is impossible to achieve a free of residual stresses bi-layer zirconia-porcelain restoration. The idea is to take the advantage of residual stress in design in such a way to prevent the crack initiation and progression. The hypothesis is a compressive residual stress at external contact surface would be enabling the restoration to endure a greater tensile stress. Optimizing the layers thickness, manufacturing process, and validating 3D simulations require development of new techniques of thickness, residual stresses and phase transformation measurement. In the present work, a combined mirco-tomography and finite element based method were adapted for thickness measurement. Two new 2D X-ray diffraction based techniques were adapted for phase transformation area mapping and combined phase transformation and residual stress measurement. Concerning the complex geometry of crown, an efficient method for X-ray diffraction data collection mapping on a given curved surface was developed. Finally a novel method for 3D dimensional x-ray diffraction data collection and visualization were introduced.

  17. Elastoplastic analysis of process induced residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yongxiong; Liang Xiubing; Liu Yan; Xu Binshi

    2010-07-15

    The residual stresses induced from thermal spraying process have been extensively investigated in previous studies. However, most of such works were focused on the elastic deformation range. In this paper, an elastoplastic model for predicting the residual stresses in thermally sprayed coatings was developed, in which two main contributions were considered, namely the deposition induced stress and that due to differential thermal contraction between the substrate and coating during cooling. The deposition induced stress was analyzed based on the assumption that the coating is formed layer-by-layer, and then a misfit strain is accommodated within the multilayer structure after the addition of each layer (plastic deformation is induced consequently). From a knowledge of specimen dimensions, processing temperatures, and material properties, residual stress distributions within the structure can be determined by implementing the model with a simple computer program. A case study for the plasma sprayed NiCoCrAlY on Inconel 718 system was performed finally. Besides some similar phenomena observed from the present study as compared with previous elastic model reported in literature, the elastoplastic model also provides some interesting features for prediction of the residual stresses.

  18. FEA predictions of residual stress in stainless steel compared to neutron and x-ray diffraction measurements. [Finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Flower, E.C.; MacEwen, S.R.; Holden, T.M.

    1987-05-01

    Residual stresses in a body arise from nonuniform plastic deformation and continue to be an important consideration in the design and the fabrication of metal components. The finite element method offers a potentially powerful tool for predicting these stresses. However, it is important to first verify this method through careful analysis and experimentation. This paper describes experiments using neutron and x-ray diffraction to provide quantitative data to compare to finite element analysis predictions of deformation induced residual stress in a plane stress austenitic stainless steel ring. Good agreement was found between the experimental results and the numerical predictions. Effects of the formulation of the finite element model on the analysis, constitutive parameters and effects of machining damage in the experiments are addressed.

  19. Ultrasonics used to measure residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Ultrasonic method is used to measure residual stress in metal structures. By using this method, various forms of wave propagation in metals are possible, and more thorough analysis of complex geometric structures may be had.

  20. Implementation of thermal residual stresses in the analysis of fiber bridged matrix crack growth in titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, John G., Jr.; Johnson, W. Steven

    1994-01-01

    In this research, thermal residual stresses were incorporated in an analysis of fiber-bridged matrix cracks in unidirectional and cross-ply titanium matrix composites (TMC) containing center holes or center notches. Two TMC were investigated, namely, SCS-6/Timelal-21S laminates. Experimentally, matrix crack initiation and growth were monitored during tension-tension fatigue tests conducted at room temperature and at an elevated temperature of 200 C. Analytically, thermal residual stresses were included in a fiber bridging (FB) model. The local R-ratio and stress-intensity factor in the matrix due to thermal and mechanical loadings were calculated and used to evaluate the matrix crack growth behavior in the two materials studied. The frictional shear stress term, tau, assumed in this model was used as a curve-fitting parameter to matrix crack growth data. The scatter band in the values of tau used to fit the matrix crack growth data was significantly reduced when thermal residual stresses were included in the fiber bridging analysis. For a given material system, lay-up and temperature, a single value of tau was sufficient to analyze the crack growth data. It was revealed in this study that thermal residual stresses are an important factor overlooked in the original FB models.

  1. X-Ray Diffraction Analysis of Residual Stress in Thin Polycrystalline Anatase Films and Elastic Anisotropy of Anatase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matěj, Z.; Kužel, R.; Nichtová, L.

    2011-11-01

    The importance of residual stress in anatase thin films for their photo-induced hydrophilicity was proved recently. Detailed X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies of residual stresses in titanium dioxide films are presented here. Measurements including multiple hkl reflections on several series of these films revealed the presence of tensile stresses in the films that were obtained by crystallization from amorphous state. Significant anisotropy of the strain was also found and compared with that of anatase, resulting from its theoretically calculated single-crystal elastic constants. The XRD data support the experimental evidence of the hypothesis that the [00 l] axis is the elastically soft anatase direction, whereas the directions in the [ h00] × [ hk0] plane are elastically stiff. This is in agreement with the anisotropy predicted by single-crystal elastic constants that are obtained from ab-initio calculations. Residual stress analysis for materials with tetragonal symmetry is described and the theory is used to analyze the data. The anisotropy is very different from that for the rutile phase, and the experimental results agree well with the values calculated for anatase. A simplified method of XRD residual stress analysis in thin anatase films by total pattern fitting (TPF) is also presented. Tensile stresses are formed during the crystallization process and increase rapidly with reduced film thickness. They inhibit crystallization, which is then very slow in the thinnest films.

  2. A photoelastic measurement system for residual stress analysis in scintillating crystals by conoscopic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, L.; Paone, N.; Scalise, L.; Rinaldi, D.

    2015-06-01

    The assessment of the stress state of scintillating crystals is an important issue for producers as well as users of such materials, because residual stress may arise during growth process. In this paper, a measurement system, based on the use of a photoelastic, conoscopic optical setup, is proposed for the assessment of stress state in scintillating crystals. Local stress values can be measured on the crystal in order to observe their spatial distribution. With the proposed system, it is possible to vary the dimensions of the inspected measurement volume. It has been validated with reference to a known stress state induced in a birefringent crystal sample and it has been tested for the case of loaded and unloaded samples, showing sub-millimetric spatial resolution and stress uncertainty ≤0.25 MPa. The proposed measurement system is a valid method for the inspection of scintillating crystals required by producers and users of such materials.

  3. Weld Residual Stress and Distortion Analysis of the ARES I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, Ivatury; Dawicke, David; Cheston, Derrick; Phillips, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). The Ares system of space launch vehicles is the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration s plan for replacement of the aging space shuttle. The new Ares space launch system is somewhat of a combination of the space shuttle system and the Saturn launch vehicles used prior to the shuttle. Here, a series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on fatigue and fracture life. While the main focus of this paper is a discussion of the weld modeling procedures and results for the USS, a short summary of the CIFS assessment is provided.

  4. Residual stresses in welded plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Edward L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a simple model which could be used to study residual stress. The mechanism that results in residual stresses in the welding process starts with the deposition of molten weld metal which heats the immediately adjacent material. After solidification of weld material, normal thermal shrinkage is resisted by the adjacent, cooler material. When the thermal strain exceeds the elastic strain corresponding to the yield point stress, the stress level is limited by this value, which decreases with increasing temperature. Cooling then causes elastic unloading which is restrained by the adjoining material. Permanent plastic strain occurs, and tension is caused in the region immediately adjacent to the weld material. Compression arises in the metal farther from the weld in order to maintain overall static equilibrium. Subsequent repair welds may add to the level of residual stresses. The level of residual stress is related to the onset of fracture during welding. Thus, it is of great importance to be able to predict the level of residual stresses remaining after a weld procedure, and to determine the factors, such as weld speed, temperature, direction, and number of passes, which may affect the magnitude of remaining residual stress. It was hoped to use traditional analytical modeling techniques so that it would be easier to comprehend the effect of these variables on the resulting stress. This approach was chosen in place of finite element methods so as to facilitate the understanding of the physical processes. The accuracy of the results was checked with some existing experimental studies giving residual stress levels found from x-ray diffraction measurements.

  5. Finite-element analysis of a magnetic sensor to detect permeability changes due to residual stresses in ferromagnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govindaraju, Madhav R.; Katragadda, Gopichand; Wallace, John L.

    1998-03-01

    High strength steel alloys (such as 300 M) used in naval aircraft engine and landing gear components are subjected to cyclic loading in service and found to be highly susceptible to fatigue cracking. There is a critical need for nondestructive evaluation techniques which can detect both cracking and potential crack nucleation sites within these components. An innovative electromagnetic technology called the stress induced-magnetic-anisotropy (SMA) technique has been proposed to be used to detect and evaluate residual stresses. SMA measures residual stresses by sensing the changes in magnetic flux induced in directions parallel and perpendicular to the stress. A novel probe and instrumentation is being developed to simultaneously detect both subsurface residual stresses and stress-induced cracking in coated and uncoated ferromagnetic structures. Finite element analysis has been used to determine the distribution of magnetic flux density and inductance of the probe under varying AC fields. Using ANSYSTM EMAG, the effect of varying frequency of the excitation field, permeability and dimensions of the core have been analyzed. The paper describes how finite element analysis can be used in design and development of the probe and in understanding its behavior.

  6. Numerical Parametric Analysis of Bond Coat Thickness Effect on Residual Stresses in Zirconia-Based Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Musharaf; Hasham, Hasan Junaid; Baig, Yasir

    2016-02-01

    Numerical-based finite element investigation has been conducted to explain the effect of bond coat thickness on stress distribution in traditional and nanostructured yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based thermal barrier coatings (TBC). Stress components have been determined to quantitatively analyze the mechanical response of both kinds of coatings under the thermal shock effect. It has been found that maximum radial tensile and compressive stresses that exist at thermally grown oxide (TGO)/bond coat interface and within TGO respectively decrease with an increase in bond coat thickness. Effect of bond coat thickness on axial tensile stresses is not significant. However, axial compressive stresses that exist at the edge of the specimen near bond coat/substrate interface decrease appreciably with the increase in bond coat thickness. Residual stress profile as a function of bond coat thickness is further explained for comparative analysis of both coatings to draw some useful conclusions helpful in failure studies of TBCs.

  7. Residual stress and debonding analysis using a fiber Bragg grating in a model composite specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpo, F.; Dunkel, G.; Humbert, L.; Botsis, J.

    2005-05-01

    Optical Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors are excellent non-destructive tools for internal strain characterization of composite materials and structures. They can be embedded at selected locations during material preparation to provide accurate in-situ measurements. In this study, long-gauge-FBGs are introduced in cylindrical specimens of epoxy. This configuration is particularly attractive because it simplifies the study of some relevant phenomena in micromechanics of composites, for instance residual stresses and fracture of the fibre-matrix interface. Because the matrix epoxy shrinks during the polymerisation process, the optical sensor undergoes substantial non-uniform strain along the fibre. The response of a FBG to a non-uniform strain distribution is investigated using a new Optical Low-Coherence Reflectometry (OLCR) technique developed at EPFL. This method provides a direct reconstruction of the optical period and the corresponding strain distribution along the grating without any a priori assumption about the strain field. Considering the non-uniform residual strain as a reference state, new Bragg wavelength distributions are obtained for two configurations. First, a new Bragg wavelength distribution is measured as a function of the depth of circular cracks machined in the radial direction. These measurements lead to the knowledge of (a) the zone of perturbation of the reinforcing fibre on the residual stresses and (b) the effect of the presence of the mechanically induced crack on the residual stress state in the specimen. A finite element modelling of the residual stress field based on an equivalent thermo-elastic approach is also proposed, showing a very good agreement with experimental data. Second, an interface crack (debonding) between the epoxy and the fibre is introduced by fatigue and monitored using a specifically designed video acquisition system. The induced variations in the FBG response are measured when the fibre is unloaded and then

  8. Analysis of welding-induced residual stresses with the ADINA system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkening, W.W,; Snow, J.L.

    1993-12-01

    Welding-induced residual stresses analysis procedure (WIRSAP), based on ADINA system of nonlinear finite element software, is described and results of several WIRSAP analyses are discussed. Several 2D axisymmetric WIRSAP analyses were performed for pipe girth welds and for several multi-pass girth-like welds attaching small nozzles to large, thick-walled pressure vessels. The analytical methodology follows closely Rybicki et al, enhanced by several specialized modeling techniques available in ADINA. The element birth option is used to simulate the addition of weld metal, and the mixed pressure/ displacement element formulation is used, in conjunction with temperature-dependent bi-linear plasticity material model. Some of the welds analyzed involve backing rings, which were subsequently `machined off` via use of the element death option. The auto-time-stepping algorithm and matrix update iteration scheme are used in structural solutions. WIRSAP involves, a pass-by-pass analysis of uncoupled thermal and structural problems, but some analyses have been performed with an ``enveloping`` technique for grouping several weld passes together. The analyses are all 2D, but most are large problems and pose challenge to software and hardware. Operations are performed on a network of Silicon Graphics workstations, and ADINA and ADINA-T are executed on a 64 MW, eight-processor CRAY YIMP. Nominally 50 solution steps are utilized for each weld pass and weld joints involving as many as 31 individual weld passes analyzed on a pass-by-pass basis. Results from several WIRSAP analyses are discussed, and potential use of WIRSAP in a hypothetic attachment weld design optimization study is illustrated.

  9. Analysis of welding-induced residual stresses with the ADINA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkening, W. W.; Snow, J. L.

    1993-12-01

    Welding-induced residual stresses analysis procedure (WIRSAP), based on ADINA system of nonlinear finite element software, is described and results of several WIRSAP analyses are discussed. Several 2D axisymmetric WIRSAP analyses were performed for pipe girth welds and for several multi-pass girth-like welds attaching small nozzles to large, thick-walled pressure vessels. The analytical methodology follows closely Rybicki et al, enhanced by several specialized modeling techniques available in ADINA. The element birth option is used to simulate the addition of weld metal, and the mixed pressure/displacement element formulation is used, in conjunction with temperature-dependent bi-linear plasticity material model. Some of the welds analyzed involve backing rings, which were subsequently 'machined off' via use of the element death option. The auto-time-stepping algorithm and matrix update iteration scheme are used in structural solutions. WIRSAP involves, a pass-by-pass analysis of uncoupled thermal and structural problems, but some analyses have been performed with an 'enveloping' technique for grouping several weld passes together. The analyses are all 2D, but most are large problems and pose challenge to software and hardware. Operations are performed on a network of Silicon Graphics workstations, and ADINA and ADINA-T are executed on a 64 MW, eight-processor CRAY YIMP. Nominally 50 solution steps are utilized for each weld pass and weld joints involving as many as 31 individual weld passes analyzed on a pass-by-pass basis. Results from several WIRSAP analyses are discussed, and potential use of WIRSAP in a hypothetic attachment weld design optimization study is illustrated.

  10. Residual Stress Predictions in Polycrystalline Alumina

    SciTech Connect

    VEDULA,VENKATA R.; GLASS,S. JILL; SAYLOR,DAVID M.; ROHRER,GREGORY S.; CARTER,W. CRAIG; LANGER,STEPHEN A.

    1999-12-13

    Microstructure-level residual stresses arise in polycrystalline ceramics during processing as a result of thermal expansion anisotropy and crystallographic disorientation across the grain boundaries. Depending upon the grain size, the magnitude of these stresses can be sufficiently high to cause spontaneous microcracking during the processing of these materials. They are also likely to affect where cracks initiate and propagate under macroscopic loading. The magnitudes of residual stresses in untextured and textured alumina samples were predicted using object oriented finite (OOF) element analysis and experimentally determined grain orientations. The crystallographic orientations were obtained by electron-backscattered diffraction (EBSD). The residual stresses were lower and the stress distributions were narrower in the textured samples compared to those in the untextured samples. Crack initiation and propagation were also simulated using the Griffith fracture criterion. The grain boundary to surface energy ratios required for computations were estimated using AFM groove measurements.

  11. Residual stress analysis of graphite/polyimide composites using the concept of metallic inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, Danut

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the use of metal particles (Al, Ag, Nb) embedded between the first and second plies of 6-ply unidirectional and 4-ply 8-harness satin weave cloth carbon/polyimide laminates, as strain sensors for the determination of residual and applied stresses by x-ray diffraction. XRD measurements were made using a Siemens D500 diffractometer with parallel-beam optics a solid state detector and Cu K a radiation. Specimens were subjected to bending loads while irradiated, using a 4-point bending device mounted on the D500 goniometer. Finite Element calculations were performed on a specimen with an isolated spherical particle located at half the distance between neutral axis and the surface of the specimen for the 4-ply laminate and two thirds the distance for the 6-ply laminate. ANSYS v.5.2 was used with tetrahedral Solid92 elements. Eshelby calculations were done using the Eshelby tensor for a spherical inclusion embedded in an infinite homogeneous anisotropic matrix, the known strain matrix for bending and the matrices for thermal expansion of the composite and the metal inclusion. FEM and Eshelby method results were found to be equivalent for an isolated particle in a large volume of matrix, i.e. a volume fraction of filler approaching zero. For XRD measurements, a certain minimum concentration of filler was required in order to have enough diffracted x-ray intensity to obtain measurable peak positions within acceptable limits of errors. For multiple inclusions, the slopes of strains and stresses versus outer pin displacement inside the inclusions do not differ significantly from those in single inclusions, however a remarkable change is in the intercept. This is due to a constant stress-strain field that is added to each particle single solution, because of the multiple inclusion interaction. Strains and stresses obtained by XRD in the embedded particles were sensitive to the residual stresses in the as-cured laminates and

  12. Residual stress measurement in thin films using a slitting method with geometric phase analysis under a dual beam (FIB/SEM) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ronghua; Xie, Huimin; Dai, Xianglu; Zhu, Jianguo; Jin, Aizi

    2014-09-01

    Stress generated during thin film deposition is a critical issue for many applications. In general, the possible origins of the residual stress include intrinsic and extrinsic stresses. Since high residual stresses can cause detrimental effects on the film, such as delamination and wrinkle, it is of great importance to quantify the residual stress for the optimal design and the evaluation of its mechanical behavior. In this study, a method combining focused ion beam (FIB) milling and geometric phase analysis (GPA) is developed to assess the residual stress of thin films. The procedures of the residual stress measurement using this method include grating fabrication and slot milling by FIB, high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM) imaging of the grating before and after stress relaxation, and deformation analysis by GPA. The residual stress can be inferred from the released deformation using the reference displacements of the finite element model. As an application, this method was utilized to measure the residual stress in a TiAlSiN film, and the measured result is in good agreement with that obtained by the curvature method. In order to analyze the measurement error, the influence factors of Ga+ bombardment and the deposited platinum layer on the stress calculation are also discussed in detail.

  13. Residual stress impairs pump function after surgical ventricular remodeling: A finite element analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pantoja, Joe Luis; Zhang, Zhihong; Tartibi, Mehrzad; Sun, Kay; Macmillan, Warrick; Guccione, Julius M.; Ge, Liang; Ratcliffe, Mark B.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Surgical ventricular restoration (Dor procedure) is generally thought to reduce left ventricular (LV) myofiber stress (FS) but to adversely affect pump function. However, the underlying mechanism is unclear. The goal of this study was to determine the effect of residual stress (RS) on LV FS and pump function after the Dor procedure. Methods Previously described finite element models of the LV based on MRI data obtained in five sheep 16 weeks after antero-apical myocardial infarction were used. Simulated Dacron patches that were elliptical and 25% of the infarct opening area were implanted using a virtual suture technique (VIRTUAL-DOR). In each case, diastole and systole were simulated and RS, FS, LV volumes, systolic and diastolic function, and pump (Starling) function were calculated. Results VIRTUAL-DOR was associated with significant RS that was tensile (2.89±1.31 kPa) in the remote myocardium and compressive (234.15±65.53 kPa) in the borderzone (BZ). VIRTUAL-DOR+RS (compared to VIRTUAL-DOR-NO-RS) was associated with further reduction in regional diastolic and systolic FS with the greatest change in the BZ (43.5-fold and 7.1-fold respectively, p<0.0001). VIRTUAL-DOR+RS was also associated with further reduction in systolic and diastolic volumes (7.9%, p=0.0606 and 10.6%, p=0.0630, respectively). The resultant effect was a further reduction in pump function after VIRTUAL-DOR+RS. Conclusion Residual stress that occurs after the Dor procedure is positive (tensile) in the remote myocardium and negative (compressive) in the BZ and associated with reductions in fiber stress and LV volumes. The resultant effect is a further reduction in LV pump (Starling) function. PMID:26341601

  14. Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings

    SciTech Connect

    Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

  15. RESIDUAL STRESSES IN 3013 CONTAINERS

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Dunn, K.

    2009-11-10

    The DOE Complex is packaging plutonium-bearing materials for storage and eventual disposition or disposal. The materials are handled according to the DOE-STD-3013 which outlines general requirements for stabilization, packaging and long-term storage. The storage vessels for the plutonium-bearing materials are termed 3013 containers. Stress corrosion cracking has been identified as a potential container degradation mode and this work determined that the residual stresses in the containers are sufficient to support such cracking. Sections of the 3013 outer, inner, and convenience containers, in both the as-fabricated condition and the closure welded condition, were evaluated per ASTM standard G-36. The standard requires exposure to a boiling magnesium chloride solution, which is an aggressive testing solution. Tests in a less aggressive 40% calcium chloride solution were also conducted. These tests were used to reveal the relative stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the as fabricated 3013 containers. Significant cracking was observed in all containers in areas near welds and transitions in the container diameter. Stress corrosion cracks developed in both the lid and the body of gas tungsten arc welded and laser closure welded containers. The development of stress corrosion cracks in the as-fabricated and in the closure welded container samples demonstrates that the residual stresses in the 3013 containers are sufficient to support stress corrosion cracking if the environmental conditions inside the containers do not preclude the cracking process.

  16. Effects of residual stresses on fracture of welded pipes

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Y.C.; Kim, M,; Pan, J.; Brust, F.W.

    1996-12-01

    Thermal residual stresses induced by multi-pass butt welding processes of stainless steel pipes are obtained by a thermoelastic-plastic finite element analysis with the assumption of axisymmetric conditions. After the welding processes, circumferential part-through cracks are introduced at the locations having the highest axial residual stress. Crack-tip parameters are sought for characterizing the crack-tip stress and deformation field under subsequent applied axial stresses. The computational results indicate that without residual stress mitigation processes, the residual stresses are quite large and the J integrals for several arbitrary paths are path dependent under the range of axial stresses. Therefore, J cannot be used as a characterizing parameter under the applied stresses. The results also show that, as the axial stress becomes large, the J integrals for different paths follow the same trend as those without residual stresses. This indicates that the residual stress effects become less significant when the deformation due to the applied axial stress becomes dominant. Finally, a computationally convenient parameter, the crack tip opening angle (CTOA), which can take into account the effects of residual stresses near the tip, is adopted for characterizing the crack tip deformation. The CTOA results suggest that with residual stresses the propensity for subcritical crack growth via a stress corrosion cracking or fatigue crack growth mechanism in welds may be higher than that without residual stresses.

  17. Variable-load stress analysis of threaded connections of high-strength materials with allowance for process-induced residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, V. F.; Konovalov, G. V.; Minin, B. V.; Kirpichev, V. A.

    Results of residual stress measurements and fatigue tests are presented for bolts of VT16 titanium alloy manufactured by various methods. A method is proposed for plotting the maximum-amplitude diagram of the stress cycle of a threaded joint with allowance for the residual stresses in the thread grooves. The calculated results are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Measurements of residual stress in fracture mechanics coupons

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B; Hill, Michael R; Nav Dalen, John E

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of residual stress in coupons used for fracture mechanics testing. The primary objective of the measurements is to quantify the distribution of residual stress acting to open (and/or close) the crack across the crack plane. The slitting method and the contour method are two destructive residual stress measurement methods particularly capable of addressing that objective, and these were applied to measure residual stress in a set of identically prepared compact tension (C(T)) coupons. Comparison of the results of the two measurement methods provides some useful observations. Results from fracture mechanics tests of residual stress bearing coupons and fracture analysis, based on linear superposition of applied and residual stresses, show consistent behavior of coupons having various levels of residual stress.

  19. Residual stress depth profiles of ausrolled 9310 gear steel

    SciTech Connect

    Paliani, C.M.; Queeney, R.A.; Kozaczek, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    Residual Stress analysis utilizing x-ray diffraction in conjunction with material removal by chemical polishing provides a very effective method of analyzing the near surface residual stress profile of steels. In this experiment, residual stress profiling has been used to analyze the effects of surface ausrolling during the marquenching of a 9310 gear steel which has been carburized to 1% carbon. The ausrolling process is an advanced thermomechanical processing technique used to ausform only the critical surface layer of gears and produce a hard, tough, fine-grained martensitic product. This study compares the residual stress profile of a marquenched specimen with a moderately deformed ausrolled specimen and with a heavily deformed ausrolled specimen, in order to correlate the effects of residual stress with the improved fatigue properties of the gear steel. While no significant variation was observed between the residual stress profile of the marquenched specimens (no deformation) and the line contact ausrolled specimens (moderate deformation), significant increases in the amount of compressive residual stress was noted in the residual stress profile of the point contact ausrolled (heavily deformed) samples. The maximum increase in compressive residual stress due to point contact ausrolling was approximately 500 MPa, when compared to the marquenched sample. This increased residual compressive stress will lower the effective shear stresses during rolling contact fatigue and would therefore explain some of the increase the rolling contact fatigue endurance of the point contact ausrolled specimens.

  20. Evaluation on double-wall-tube residual stress distribution of sodium-heated steam generator by neutron diffraction and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kisohara, N.; Suzuki, H.; Akita, K.; Kasahara, N.

    2012-07-01

    A double-wall-tube is nominated for the steam generator heat transfer tube of future sodium fast reactors (SFRs) in Japan, to decrease the possibility of sodium/water reaction. The double-wall-tube consists of an inner tube and an outer tube, and they are mechanically contacted to keep the heat transfer of the interface between the inner and outer tubes by their residual stress. During long term SG operation, the contact stress at the interface gradually falls down due to stress relaxation. This phenomenon might increase the thermal resistance of the interface and degrade the tube heat transfer performance. The contact stress relaxation can be predicted by numerical analysis, and the analysis requires the data of the initial residual stress distributions in the tubes. However, unclear initial residual stress distributions prevent precious relaxation evaluation. In order to resolve this issue, a neutron diffraction method was employed to reveal the tri-axial (radius, hoop and longitudinal) initial residual stress distributions in the double-wall-tube. Strain gauges also were used to evaluate the contact stress. The measurement results were analyzed using a JAEA's structural computer code to determine the initial residual stress distributions. Based on the stress distributions, the structural computer code has predicted the transition of the relaxation and the decrease of the contact stress. The radial and longitudinal temperature distributions in the tubes were input to the structural analysis model. Since the radial thermal expansion difference between the inner (colder) and outer (hotter) tube reduces the contact stress and the tube inside steam pressure contributes to increasing it, the analytical model also took these effects into consideration. It has been conduced that the inner and outer tubes are contacted with sufficient stresses during the plant life time, and that effective heat transfer degradation dose not occur in the double-wall-tube SG. (authors)

  1. Analysis of residual stress in the resin of metal-resin adhesion structures by scanning acoustic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Hiroki; Endo, Kazuhiko; Nagano-Takebe, Futami; Ida, Yusuke; Kakino, Ken; Narita, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    The residual stress caused by polymerization shrinkage and thermal contraction of a heat-curing resin containing 4-META on a metal-resin structure was measured by a scanning acoustic microscope. The tensile residual stress in the resin occurred within 70 µm of the adhesion interface with a flat plate specimen. The maximum tensile stress was about 58 MPa at the interface. On a metal plate specimen with retention holes, ring-like cracks in the resin occurred around the retention holes with the adhesive specimen and many linear cracks occurred in the resin vertical to the longitudinal direction of the metal frame with the non-adhesive specimens. There was tensile residual stress on the resin surface at the center of the retention holes of the adhesion specimen, indicating that the stress in the specimen with surface treatment for adhesion was higher than in that without surface treatment. PMID:24240901

  2. Residual stress determination from a laser-based curvature measurement

    SciTech Connect

    W. D. Swank; R. A. Gavalya; J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2000-05-08

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  3. Residual Stress Determination from a Laser-Based Curvature Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Swank, William David; Gavalya, Rick Allen; Wright, Julie Knibloe; Wright, Richard Neil

    2000-05-01

    Thermally sprayed coating characteristics and mechanical properties are in part a result of the residual stress developed during the fabrication process. The total stress state in a coating/substrate is comprised of the quench stress and the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch stress. The quench stress is developed when molten particles impact the substrate and rapidly cool and solidify. The CTE mismatch stress results from a large difference in the thermal expansion coefficients of the coating and substrate material. It comes into effect when the substrate/coating combination cools from the equilibrated deposit temperature to room temperature. This paper describes a laser-based technique for measuring the curvature of a coated substrate and the analysis required to determine residual stress from curvature measurements. Quench stresses were determined by heating the specimen back to the deposit temperature thus removing the CTE mismatch stress. By subtracting the quench stress from the total residual stress at room temperature, the CTE mismatch stress was estimated. Residual stress measurements for thick (>1mm) spinel coatings with a Ni-Al bond coat on 304 stainless steel substrates were made. It was determined that a significant portion of the residual stress results from the quenching stress of the bond coat and that the spinel coating produces a larger CTE mismatch stress than quench stress.

  4. A finite element model for residual stress in repair welds

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Z.; Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Goodwin, G.M.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Zacharia, T.

    1996-03-28

    This paper describes a three-dimensional finite element model for calculation of the residual stress distribution caused by repair welding. Special user subroutines were developed to simulate the continuous deposition of filler metal during welding. The model was then tested by simulating the residual stress/strain field of a FeAl weld overlay clad on a 2{1/4}Cr-1 Mo steel plate, for which neutron diffraction measurement data of the residual strain field were available. It is shown that the calculated residual stress distribution was consistent with that determined with neutron diffraction. High tensile residual stresses in both the longitudinal and transverse directions were observed around the weld toe at the end of the weld. The strong spatial dependency of the residual stresses in the region around the weld demonstrates that the common two-dimensional cross-section finite element models should not be used for repair welding analysis.

  5. On Residual Stresses in Resistance Spot-Welded Aluminum Alloy 6061-T6: Experimental and Numerical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshari, D.; Sedighi, M.; Karimi, M. R.; Barsoum, Z.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, an electro-thermal-structural-coupled finite element (FE) model and x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements have been utilized to analyze distribution of residual stresses in an aluminum alloy 6061-T6 resistance spot-welded joint with 2-mm-thickness sheet. Increasing the aluminum sheet thickness to more than 1 mm leads to creating difficulty in spot-welding process and increases the complexity of the FE model. The electrical and thermal contact conductances, as mandatory factors are applied in contact areas of electrode-workpiece and workpiece-workpiece to resolve the complexity of the FE model. The physical and mechanical properties of the material are defined as thermal dependent to improve the accuracy of the model. Furthermore, the electrodes are removed after the holding cycle using the birth-and-death elements method. The results have a good agreement with experimental data obtained from x-ray diffraction residual stress measurements. However, the highest internal tensile residual stress occurs in the center of the nugget zone and decreases toward nugget edge; surface residual stress increases toward the edge of the welding zone and afterward, the area decreases slightly.

  6. A Benchmark Study on Casting Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Eric M.; Watkins, Thomas R; Schmidlin, Joshua E; Dutler, S. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stringent regulatory requirements, such as Tier IV norms, have pushed the cast iron for automotive applications to its limit. The castings need to be designed with closer tolerances by incorporating hitherto unknowns, such as residual stresses arising due to thermal gradients, phase and microstructural changes during solidification phenomenon. Residual stresses were earlier neglected in the casting designs by incorporating large factors of safety. Experimental measurement of residual stress in a casting through neutron or X-ray diffraction, sectioning or hole drilling, magnetic, electric or photoelastic measurements is very difficult and time consuming exercise. A detailed multi-physics model, incorporating thermo-mechanical and phase transformation phenomenon, provides an attractive alternative to assess the residual stresses generated during casting. However, before relying on the simulation methodology, it is important to rigorously validate the prediction capability by comparing it to experimental measurements. In the present work, a benchmark study was undertaken for casting residual stress measurements through neutron diffraction, which was subsequently used to validate the accuracy of simulation prediction. The stress lattice specimen geometry was designed such that subsequent castings would generate adequate residual stresses during solidification and cooling, without any cracks. The residual stresses in the cast specimen were measured using neutron diffraction. Considering the difficulty in accessing the neutron diffraction facility, these measurements can be considered as benchmark for casting simulation validations. Simulations were performed using the identical specimen geometry and casting conditions for predictions of residual stresses. The simulation predictions were found to agree well with the experimentally measured residual stresses. The experimentally validated model can be subsequently used to predict residual stresses in different cast

  7. Residual stress patterns in steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Wang, X.L.; David, S.A.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.; Swainson, I.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron strain scanning of residual stress is a valuable nondestructive tool for evaluation of residual stress in welds. The penetrating characteristic of neutrons permits mapping of strain patterns with a spatial resolution approaching 1mm at depths of 20mm in steels. While the overall patterns of the residual stress tensor in a weld are understood, the detailed patterns depend on welding process parameters and the effects of solid state transformation. The residual strain profiles in two multi-pass austenitic welds and a ferritic steel weld are presented. The stress-free lattice parameters within the fusion zone and the adjacent heat affected zone in the two austenitic welds show that the interpretation of residual stress from strains are affected by welding parameters. An interpretation of the residual strain pattern in the ferritic steel plate can be made using the strain measurements of a Gleeble test bar which has undergone the solid state austenite decomposition.

  8. Grinding Induced Changes in Residual Stresses of Carburized Gears

    SciTech Connect

    Lemaster, Robert A; Boggs, Bryan L; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Hubbard, Camden R; Watkins, Thomas R

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study performed to measure the change in residual stress that results from the finish grinding of carburized gears. Residual stresses were measured in five gears using the x-ray diffraction equipment in the Large Specimen Residual Stress Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two of the gears were hobbed, carburized, quenched and tempered, but not finished. The remaining three gears were processed similarly, but were finish ground. The residual stresses were measured at 64 different locations on a tooth from each gear. Residual stresses were also measured at fewer points on other teeth to determine the tooth-to-tooth variation. Tooth profile measurements were made of the finished and unfinished gear samples. The results show a fairly uniform and constant compressive residual field in the nonfinished gears. There was a significant reduction in the average residual stress measured in the finished gears. Additionally, there was a significant increase in the variability of the residual stress that was introduced by the grinding process. Analysis of the data suggests a linear relationship between the change in average residual stress and the amount of material removed by the grinding process.

  9. Residual stress analysis of fixed retainer wires after in vitro loading: can mastication-induced stresses produce an unfavorable effect?

    PubMed

    Sifakakis, Iosif; Eliades, Theodore; Bourauel, Christoph

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare four different types of fixed canine-to-canine retainer regarding the maximum and residual force system generated on a canine during the intrusive in vitro loading of the rest of the anterior teeth. Retainers constructed from Ortho-FlexTech gold chain 0.038 × 0.016-inch (rectangular, 0.96 × 0.40 mm(²)), Tru-Chrome® 7-strand twisted 0.027-inch (round, 0.68 mm diameter) steel wire, and Wildcat 0.0175-inch (round, 0.44 mm) and 0.0215-inch (round, 0.55 mm) 3-strand Twistflex steel wire bonded on the anterior teeth of an acrylic resin model, installed in the Orthodontic Measurement and Simulation System. The force system on the canine was recorded during the loading of the anterior teeth as well as the residual force system at the same tooth after the unloading. During maximum loading, the gold chain exerted the lowest and the 0.0215-inch archwire the highest force and moment magnitude. Residual forces and moments were exerted on the canine after the unloading in all retainer types, i.e., the evaluated fixed retainers were not passive after in vitro vertical loading. The lowest magnitude was measured in gold chain retainers and the highest in cases of the high formable/low yield strength 0.027-inch archwire. This fact may explain the unexpected movements of teeth bonded on fixed retainers detected long-term in vivo. PMID:26057215

  10. Numerical sensitivity analysis of welding-induced residual stress depending on variations in continuous cooling transformation behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, C.; Schwenk, C.; Rethmeier, M.; Caron, J.

    2011-06-01

    The usage of continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams in numerical welding simulations is state of the art. Nevertheless, specifications provide limits in chemical composition of materials which result in different CCT behavior and CCT diagrams, respectively. Therefore, it is necessary to analyze the influence of variations in CCT diagrams on the developing residual stresses. In the present paper, four CCT diagrams and their effect on numerical calculation of residual stresses are investigated for the widely used structural steel S355J2 + N welded by the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process. Rather than performing an arbitrary adjustment of CCT behavior, four justifiable data sets were used as input to the numerical calculation: data available in the Sysweld database, experimental data acquired through Gleeble dilatometry tests, and TTT/CCT predictions calculated from the JMatPro and Edison Welding Institute (EWI) Virtual Joining Portal software. The performed numerical analyses resulted in noticeable deviations in residual stresses considering the different CCT diagrams. Furthermore, possibilities to improve the prediction of distortions and residual stress based on CCT behavior are discussed.

  11. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volumeconstancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  12. Improved analytical model for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    The analytical model of residual stress in orthogonal cutting proposed by Jiann is an important tool for residual stress prediction in orthogonal cutting. In application of the model, a problem of low precision of the surface residual stress prediction is found. By theoretical analysis, several shortages of Jiann's model are picked out, including: inappropriate boundary conditions, unreasonable calculation method of thermal stress, ignorance of stress constraint and cyclic loading algorithm. These shortages may directly lead to the low precision of the surface residual stress prediction. To eliminate these shortages and make the prediction more accurate, an improved model is proposed. In this model, a new contact boundary condition between tool and workpiece is used to make it in accord with the real cutting process; an improved calculation method of thermal stress is adopted; a stress constraint is added according to the volume-constancy of plastic deformation; and the accumulative effect of the stresses during cyclic loading is considered. At last, an experiment for measuring residual stress in cutting AISI 1045 steel is conducted. Also, Jiann's model and the improved model are simulated under the same conditions with cutting experiment. The comparisons show that the surface residual stresses predicted by the improved model is closer to the experimental results than the results predicted by Jiann's model.

  13. Fractal and probability analysis of creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr-1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Mengjia; Xu, Jijin; Lu, Hao; Chen, Jieshi; Chen, Junmei; Wei, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    In order to clarify creep crack growth behavior in 2.25Cr-1.6W steel incorporating residual stresses, creep crack tests were carried out on the tension creep specimens, in which the residual stresses were generated by local remelting and cooling. Residual stresses in the specimens were measured using Synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques. The fracture surface of the creep specimen was analyzed using statistical methods and fractal analysis. The relation between fractal dimension of the fracture surface and fracture mode of the creep specimen was discussed. Due to different fracture mechanisms, the probability density functions of the height coordinates vary with the intergranular crack percentage. Good fitting was found between Gaussian distribution and the probability function of height coordinates of the high percentage intergranular crack surface.

  14. Axial residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The axial residual stress distribution as a function of radius was determined from the fiber surface to the core including the average residual stress in the core. Such measurements on boron on tungsten (B/W) fibers show that the residual stresses for 102, 142, 203, and 366 micron diameter fibers were similar, being compressive at the surface and changing monotonically to a region of tensile within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile stress of about 860 mn/sq.m and then decreases to a compressive stress near the tungsten boride core. Data were presented for 203 micron diameter B/W fibers that show annealing above 900 C reduces the residual stresses. A comparison between 102 micron diameter B/W and boron on carbon (b/C) shows that the residual stresses were similar in the outer regions of the fibers, but that large differences near and in the core were observed. The effects of these residual stresses on the fracture of boron fibers were discussed.

  15. Thermal Residual Stress in Environmental Barrier Coated Silicon Nitride - Modeled

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Abdul-Aziz; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2009-01-01

    When exposed to combustion environments containing moisture both un-reinforced and fiber reinforced silicon based ceramic materials tend to undergo surface recession. To avoid surface recession environmental barrier coating systems are required. However, due to differences in the elastic and thermal properties of the substrate and the environmental barrier coating, thermal residual stresses can be generated in the coated substrate. Depending on their magnitude and nature thermal residual stresses can have significant influence on the strength and fracture behavior of coated substrates. To determine the maximum residual stresses developed during deposition of the coatings, a finite element model (FEM) was developed. Using this model, the thermal residual stresses were predicted in silicon nitride substrates coated with three environmental coating systems namely barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS), rare earth mono silicate (REMS) and earth mono di-silicate (REDS). A parametric study was also conducted to determine the influence of coating layer thickness and material parameters on thermal residual stress. Results indicate that z-direction stresses in all three systems are small and negligible, but maximum in-plane stresses can be significant depending on the composition of the constituent layer and the distance from the substrate. The BSAS and REDS systems show much lower thermal residual stresses than REMS system. Parametric analysis indicates that in each system, the thermal residual stresses can be decreased with decreasing the modulus and thickness of the coating.

  16. Longitudinal residual stresses in boron fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behrendt, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    A method of measuring the longitudinal residual stress distribution in boron fibers is presented. The residual stresses in commercial CVD boron on tungsten fibers of 102, 142, and 203 microns (4, 5.6, and 8 mil) diameters were determined. Results for the three sizes show a compressive stress at the surface 800 to -1400 MN/sq m 120 to -200 ksi), changing monotonically to a region of tensile stress within the boron. At approximately 25 percent of the original radius, the stress reaches a maximum tensile 600 to 1000 MN/sq m(90 to 150 ksi) and then decreases to compressive near the tungsten boride core. The core itself is under a compressive stress of approximately -1300 MN/sq m (-190 ksi). The effects of surface removal on core residual stress and core-initiated fracture are discussed.

  17. Residual stresses in injection molded products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jansen, K. M. B.

    2015-12-01

    During the molding process residual stresses are formed due to thermal contraction during cooling as well as the local pressure history during solidification. In this paper a simple analytical model is reviewed which relates residual stresses, product shrinkage as well as warpage to the temperature and pressure histories during molding. Precise excimer laser layer removal measurements were performed to verify the predicted residual stress distributions. In addition, detailed shrinkage and warpage measurements on a large series of polymers and for different molding conditions were performed and are shown to compare well with the model predictions.

  18. Residual stress effects in stress-corrosion cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Toribio, J.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a wide variety of residual stress effects in stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) of metallic materials on the basis of previous research of the author on high-strength steel in the form of hot-rolled bars and cold-drawn wires for prestressed concrete. It is seen that internal residual stress fields in the material play a very important -- if not decisive -- role in the SCC behavior of any engineering material, especially residual stresses generated near the free surface or in the vicinity of a crack tip.

  19. Measurment Of Residual Stress In Ferromagnetic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, Min; Yost, William T.; Kushnick, Peter W.; Grainger, John L.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetoacoustic (MAC) and magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) techniques combined to provide complete characterization of residual stresses in ferromagnetic structural materials. Combination of MAC and MAE techniques makes it possible to characterize residual tension and compression without being limited by surface conditions and unavailability of calibration standards. Significant in field of characterization of materials as well as detection of fatigue failure.

  20. Numerical analysis of residual stresses in preforms of stress applying part for PANDA-type polarization maintaining optical fibers in view of technological imperfections of the doped zone geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trufanov, Aleksandr N.; Trufanov, Nikolay A.; Semenov, Nikita V.

    2016-09-01

    The experimental data analysis of the stress applying rod section geometry for the PANDA-type polarization maintaining optical fiber has been performed. The dependencies of the change in the radial dimensions of the preform and the doping boundary on the angular coordinate have been obtained. The original algorithm of experimental data statistic analysis, which enables determination of the specimens' characteristic form of section, has been described. The influence of actual doped zone geometry on the residual stress fields formed during the stress rod preform fabrication has been investigated. It has been established that the deviation of the boundary between pure silica and the doped zone from the circular shape results in dissymmetry and local concentrations of the residual stress fields along the section, which can cause preforms destruction at high degrees of doping. The observed geometry deviations of up to 10% lead to the increase of the maximum stress intensity value by over 20%.

  1. Residual Stress Testing of Outer 3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.

    2004-02-12

    A Gas Tungsten Arc Welded (GTAW) outer 3013 container and a laser welded outer 3013 container have been tested for residual stresses according to the American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) Standard G-36-94 [1]. This ASTM standard describes a procedure for conducting stress-corrosion cracking tests in boiling magnesium chloride (MgCl2) solution. Container sections in both the as-fabricated condition as well as the closure welded condition were evaluated. Significantly large residual stresses were observed in the bottom half of the as-fabricated container, a result of the base to can fabrication weld because through wall cracks were observed perpendicular to the weld. This observation indicates that regardless of the closure weld technique, sufficient residual stresses exist in the as-fabricated container to provide the stress necessary for stress corrosion cracking of the container, at the base fabrication weld. Additionally, sufficiently high residual stresses were observed in both the lid and the body of the GTAW as well as the laser closure welded containers. The stresses are oriented perpendicular to the closure weld in both the container lid and the container body. Although the boiling MgCl2 test is not a quantitative test, a comparison of the test results from the closure welds shows that there are noticeably more through wall cracks in the laser closure welded container than in the GTAW closure welded container.

  2. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  3. X-ray analysis of residual stress gradients in TiN coatings by a Laplace space approach and cross-sectional nanodiffraction: a critical comparison

    PubMed Central

    Stefenelli, Mario; Todt, Juraj; Riedl, Angelika; Ecker, Werner; Müller, Thomas; Daniel, Rostislav; Burghammer, Manfred; Keckes, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Novel scanning synchrotron cross-sectional nanobeam and conventional laboratory as well as synchrotron Laplace X-ray diffraction methods are used to characterize residual stresses in exemplary 11.5 µm-thick TiN coatings. Both real and Laplace space approaches reveal a homogeneous tensile stress state and a very pronounced compressive stress gradient in as-deposited and blasted coatings, respectively. The unique capabilities of the cross-sectional approach operating with a beam size of 100 nm in diameter allow the analysis of stress variation with sub-micrometre resolution at arbitrary depths and the correlation of the stress evolution with the local coating microstructure. Finally, advantages and disadvantages of both approaches are extensively discussed. PMID:24068842

  4. PUFF TOO: a residual stress experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.W.

    1980-04-01

    Following the passage of the dynamic effects in a contained explosive detonation, there remains a strong compressive stress field in the material about the cavity. In this experiment, a 454-kg (1000 lb) sphere of high explosive was detonated in saturated ashfall tuff. Instrumentation measured peak stresses over the range of 0.1 to 6.0 GPa (1 to 6 kbar) and the complete stress-time waveform, including the so-called residual stress, at the 0.1 GPa (1 kbar) peak stress range. Mineback revealed detonation-induced fractures and fractures induced by postevent work.

  5. Accuracy evaluation of residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yerman, J.A.; Kroenke, W.C.; Long, W.H.

    1996-05-01

    The accuracy of residual stress measurement techniques is difficult to assess due to the lack of available reference standards. To satisfy the need for reference standards, two specimens were designed and developed to provide known stress magnitudes and distributions: one with a uniform stress distribution and one with a nonuniform linear stress distribution. A reusable, portable load fixture was developed for use with each of the two specimens. Extensive bench testing was performed to determine if the specimens provide desired known stress magnitudes and distributions and stability of the known stress with time. The testing indicated that the nonuniform linear specimen and load fixture provided the desired known stress magnitude and distribution but that modifications were required for the uniform stress specimen. A trial use of the specimens and load fixtures using hole drilling was successful.

  6. Residual stress measurements in carbon steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Min, N.

    1986-01-01

    External dc magnetic field-induced changes in natural velocity of Rayleigh surface waves were measured in steel specimens under various stress conditions. The low field slopes of curves representing the fractional changes of natural velocity were proved to provide correct stress information in steels with different metallurgical properties. The slopes of curves under uniaxial compression, exceeding about one third of the yield stress, fell below zero in all the specimens when magnetized along the stress axis. The slopes under tension varied among different steels but remained positive in any circumstances. The stress effect was observed for both applied and residual stress. A physical interpretation of these results is given based on the stress-induced domain structure changes and the delta epsilon effect. Most importantly, it is found that the influence of detailed metallurgical properties cause only secondary effects on the obtained stress information.

  7. System and method for measuring residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Prime, Michael B.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for determining the residual stress within an elastic object. In the method, an elastic object is cut along a path having a known configuration. The cut creates a portion of the object having a new free surface. The free surface then deforms to a contour which is different from the path. Next, the contour is measured to determine how much deformation has occurred across the new free surface. Points defining the contour are collected in an empirical data set. The portion of the object is then modeled in a computer simulator. The points in the empirical data set are entered into the computer simulator. The computer simulator then calculates the residual stress along the path which caused the points within the object to move to the positions measured in the empirical data set. The calculated residual stress is then presented in a useful format to an analyst.

  8. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-01

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: Ta). Above Ta these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  9. Modeling Residual Stresses in Ceramic Plates

    SciTech Connect

    Cantavella, V.; Moreno, A.; Mezquita, A.; Reig, Y.

    2008-02-15

    The generation of residual stresses during cooling of layered ceramic plates has been modeled. Each plate comprises a body and two thin layers (engobe and glaze). The model takes into account two types of stresses: thermal stresses, resulting from temperature gradients inside the plate during cooling, and the stresses produced by the mismatch of the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the layers. The body has been simulated using a linear viscoelastic constitutive equation. The engobe and the glaze layer have been considered as elastic solids below a certain temperature (setting temperature: T{sub a}). Above T{sub a} these two layers have no mechanical influence on the body.

  10. Residual stresses and plastic deformation in GTA-welded steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brand, P.C. ); Keijser, T.H. de; Ouden, G. den )

    1993-03-01

    Residual stresses and plastic deformation in single pass GTA welded low-carbon steel were studied by means of x-ray diffraction in combination with optical microscopy and hardness measurements. The residual stresses and the amount of plastic deformation (microstrain) were obtained from x-ray diffraction line positions and line broading. Since the plates were polished before welding, it was possible to observe in the optical microscope two types of Lueders bands. During heating curved Lueders bands and during cooling straight Lueders bands perpendicular to the weld are formed. The curved Lueders bands extend over a larger distance from the weld than the straight Lueders bands. The amount of plastic deformation as obtained from the x-ray diffraction analysis is in agreement with these observations. An explanation is offered for the stresses measured in combination with plastic deformations observed. It is concluded that in the present experiments plastic deformation is the main cause of the residual stresses.

  11. Residual Stresses and Critical Initial Flaw Size Analyses of Welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brust, Frederick W.; Raju, Ivatury, S.; Dawocke, David S.; Cheston, Derrick

    2009-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). A series of weld analyses are performed to determine the residual stresses in a critical region of the USS. Weld residual stresses both increase constraint and mean stress thereby having an important effect on the fatigue life. The purpose of the weld analyses was to model the weld process using a variety of sequences to determine the 'best' sequence in terms of weld residual stresses and distortions. The many factors examined in this study include weld design (single-V, double-V groove), weld sequence, boundary conditions, and material properties, among others. The results of this weld analysis are included with service loads to perform a fatigue and critical initial flaw size evaluation.

  12. Photoelastic measurements of residual stresses for NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redner, Alex S.

    1988-01-01

    Photoelastic measurements of residual strains are used extensively in the QC and inspection of transparent materials. A new method of measurements, based on Spectral Contents Analysis, is described in this paper. The method uses a personal computer for photoelastic data acquisition, eliminating personal skill and subjectivity. the new tool should make the measurements of residual strains for QC simpler and more reliable.

  13. Creep Deformation, Rupture Analysis, Heat Treatment and Residual Stress Measurement of Monolithic and Welded Grade 91 Steel for Power Plant Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Triratna

    Modified 9Cr-1 Mo (Grade 91) steel is currently considered as a candidate material for reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) and reactor internals for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), and in fossil-fuel fired power plants at higher temperatures and stresses. The tensile creep behavior of Grade 91 steel was studied in the temperature range of 600°C to 750°C and stresses between 35 MPa and 350 MPa. Heat treatment of Grade 91 steel was studied by normalizing and tempering the steel at various temperatures and times. Moreover, Thermo-Ca1c(TM) calculation was used to predict the precipitate stability and their evolution, and construct carbon isopleths of Grade 91 steel. Residual stress distribution across gas tungsten arc welds (GTAW) in Grade 91 steel was measured by the time-of-flight neutron diffraction using the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) diffractometer at Lujan Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, USA. Analysis of creep results yielded stress exponents of ˜9-11 in the higher stress regime and ˜1 in the lower stress regime. The creep behavior of Grade 91 steel was described by the modified Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn relation. The rate-controlling creep deformation mechanism in the high stress regime was identified as the edge dislocation climb with a stress exponent of n = 5. On the other hand, the deformation mechanism in the Newtonian viscous creep regime (n = 1) was identified as the Nabarro-Herring creep. Creep rupture data were analyzed in terms of Monkman-Grant relation and Larson-Miller parameter. Creep damage tolerance factor and stress exponent were used to identify the cause of creep damage. The fracture surface morphology of the ruptured specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy to elucidate the failure mechanisms. Fracture mechanism map for Grade 91 steel was developed based on the available material parameters and experimental observations. The microstructural

  14. Effects of cutting and specimen size on neutron measurement of residual stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, M.; Luzin, V.; Kirstein, O.

    2010-11-01

    To perform neutron residual stress measurements it is often necessary to cut samples to a manageable size. The effects of cutting a girth welded pipe were investigated with analytical methods and finite element analysis. The effect of cutting on measured stresses was calculated. A simplified method of modelling residual stresses in welds, "chill modelling", is introduced. In ring slitting a cut is made in the axial direction and the deformation is maeesured. The change in elastic stress can be calculated and added to neutron diffraction measurements made on a cut ring to calculate the original stresses. Residual stress measurements were performed to validate the ring slitting correction using ANSTO's residual stress diffractometer Kowari.

  15. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  16. Patterns of residual stresses due to welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Botros, B. M.

    1983-01-01

    Residual stresses caused by welding result from the nonuniform rate of cooling and the restrained thermal contraction or non-uniform plastic deformation. From the zone of extremely high temperature at the weld, heat flows into both the adjoining cool body and the surrounding atmosphere. The weld metal solidifies under very rapid cooling. The plasticity of the hot metal allows adjustment initially, but as the structure cools the rigidity of the surrounding cold metal inhibits further contraction. The zone is compressed and the weld is put under tensile stresses of high magnitude. The danger of cracking in these structural elements is great. Change in specific volume is caused by the change in temperature.

  17. Lamination residual stresses in fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the magnitude of lamination residual stresses in angle-ply composites and to evaluate their effects on composite structural integrity. The materials investigated were boron/epoxy, boron/polyimide, graphite/low modulus epoxy, graphite/high modulus epoxy, graphite/polyimide and s-glass/epoxy. These materials were fully characterized. Static properties of laminates were also determined. Experimental techniques using embedded strain gages were developed and used to measure residual strains during curing. The extent of relaxation of lamination residual stresses was investigated. It was concluded that the degree of such relaxation is low. The behavior of angle-ply laminates subjected to thermal cycling, tensile load cycling, and combined thermal cycling with tensile load was investigated. In most cases these cycling programs did not have any measurable influence on residual strength and stiffness of the laminates. In the tensile load cycling tests, the graphite/polyimide shows the highest endurance with 10 million cycle runouts at loads up to 90 percent of the static strength.

  18. The formation mechanism and the influence factor of residual stress in machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhaoxu; Li, Bin; Xiong, Liangshan

    2014-09-01

    Residual stresses generated in cutting process have important influences on workpiece performance. The paper presents a method of theoretical analysis in order to explicate the formation mechanism of residual stresses in cutting. An important conclusion is drawn that the accumulated plastic strain is the main factor which determines the nature and the magnitude of surface residual stresses in the workpiece. On the basis of the analytical model for residual stress, a series of simulations for residual stress prediction during cutting AISI 1045 steel are implemented in order to obtain the influences of cutting speed, depth of cut and tool edge radius on surface residual stress in the workpiece. And these influences are explained from the perspective of formation mechanism of residual stress in cutting. The conclusions have good applicability and can be used to guide the parameters selection in actual production.

  19. Measurement of residual stresses using fracture mechanics weight functions

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Y.

    2000-10-01

    A residual stress measurement method has been developed to quantify through-the-thickness residual stresses. Accurate measurement of residual stresses is crucial for many engineering structures. Fabrication processes such as welding and machining generate residual stresses that are difficult to predict. Residual stresses affect the integrity of structures through promoting failures due to brittle fracture, fatigue, stress corrosion cracking, and wear. In this work, the weight function theory of fracture mechanics is used to measure residual stresses. The weight function theory is an important development in computational fracture mechanics. Stress intensity factors for arbitrary stress distribution on the crack faces can be accurately and efficiently computed for predicting crack growth. This paper demonstrates that the weight functions are equally useful in measuring residual stresses. In this method, an artificial crack is created by a thin cut in a structure containing residual stresses. The cut relieves the residual stresses normal to the crack-face and allows the relieved residual stresses to deform the structure. Strain gages placed adjacent to the cut measure the relieved strains corresponding to incrementally increasing depths of the cut. The weight functions of the cracked body relate the measured strains to the residual stresses normal to the cut within the structure. The procedure details, such as numerical integration of the singular functions in applying the weight function method, will be discussed.

  20. Residual stresses and vector hysteresis modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ktena, Aphrodite

    2016-04-01

    Residual stresses in magnetic materials, whether the result of processing or intentional loading, leave their footprint on macroscopic data, such hysteresis loops and differential permeability measurements. A Preisach-type vector model is used to reproduce the phenomenology observed based on assumptions deduced from the data: internal stresses lead to smaller and misaligned grains, hence increased domain wall pinning and angular dispersion of local easy axes, favouring rotation as a magnetization reversal mechanism; misaligned grains contribute to magnetostatic fields opposing the direction of the applied field. The model is using a vector operator which accounts for both reversible and irreversible processes; the Preisach concept for interactions for the role of stress related demagnetizing fields; and a characteristic probability density function which is constructed as a weighed sum of constituent functions: the material is modeled as consisting of various subsystems, e.g. reversal mechanisms or areas subject to strong/weak long range interactions and each subsystem is represented by a constituent probability density function. Our assumptions are validated since the model reproduces the hysteresis loops and differential permeability curves observed experimentally and calculations involving rotating inputs at various residual stress levels are consistent and in agreement with experimental evidence.

  1. A micro-mechanical analysis of thermo-elastic properties and local residual stresses in ductile iron based on a new anisotropic model for the graphite nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriollo, Tito; Thorborg, Jesper; Tiedje, Niels; Hattel, Jesper

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the thermo-elastic behavior of the graphite nodules contained in ductile iron is derived on the basis of recent transmission electron microscopy investigations of their real internal structure. The proposed model is initially validated by performing a finite element homogenization analysis to verify its consistency with the room-temperature elastic properties of ductile iron measured at the macro scale. Subsequently, it is used to investigate the formation of local residual stresses around the graphite particles by simulating the manufacturing process of a typical ferritic ductile iron grade, and the results are compared with preliminary measurements using synchrotron x-rays. Finally, the obtained accurate description of the stress & strain field at the micro scale is used to shed light on common failure modes reported for the nodules and on some peculiar properties observed in ductile iron at both micro and macro scale.

  2. Residual Stresses in 21-6-9 Stainless Steel Warm Forgings

    SciTech Connect

    Everhart, Wesley A.; Lee, Jordan D.; Broecker, Daniel J.; Bartow, John P.; McQueen, Jamie M.; Switzner, Nathan T.; Neidt, Tod M.; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Brown, Donald W.

    2012-11-14

    Forging residual stresses are detrimental to the production and performance of derived machined parts due to machining distortions, corrosion drivers and fatigue crack drivers. Residual strains in a 21-6-9 stainless steel warm High Energy Rate Forging (HERF) were measured via neutron diffraction. The finite element analysis (FEA) method was used to predict the residual stresses that occur during forging and water quenching. The experimentally measured residual strains were used to calibrate simulations of the three-dimensional residual stress state of the forging. ABAQUS simulation tools predicted residual strains that tend to match with experimental results when varying yield strength is considered.

  3. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2013-04-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  4. Preparation of carbon nanotubes as the conductive coating layer on flexible thermal-resistant substrate by permeating method and its residual stress analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Wen-Kai; Huang, Szu-Chun; Yu, Hsin Her

    2014-03-01

    A polyarylate (PAR) substrate was first prepared by hot pressing and then carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were coated on its surface by a low-temperature spraying method. In order to eliminate the residual stress and enhance the adhesive ability between the substrate and the coated CNT layer, an optimal thermo-permeating process is proposed. The relationship between the thickness of the permeating layer and the residual stress of coating layers was investigated. Triple-layer structure models were provided to evaluate the residual stress of coating layers. The experimental results show that if the sample was treated by the optimal thermo-permeating process, its residual stress was dramatically reduced from 1.7×103 MPa to 0.45 Pa; meanwhile, its adhesive ability was intensively enhanced from 1B to 5B according to ASTM D3359 adhesion classifications.

  5. Residual Stress Assessment in Thin Angle Ply Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddour, A. S.; Al-Hassani, S. T. S.; Hinton, M. J.

    2003-05-01

    This preliminary study aims to investigate the residual stresses developed in hot cured thin-walled angle-ply filament wound tubes made of E-glass/epoxy, Kevlar/epoxy and carbon/epoxy materials. The residual stresses were estimated from change in geometry of these tubes when axially slitted at ambient temperature. Three basic deformation modes; namely opening up, closing-in and twisting, were observed and these depended on the winding angle, material and wall thickness. The residual stresses were also determined from hoop and axial strain gauges mounted on both the inner and outer surfaces at various locations around the tube. The stresses were compared with theoretical prediction based upon a linear thermo-elastic analysis. Both the predicted and measured values were found to increase with increasing hoop stiffness but there was a large discrepancy between the predicted and measured data, reaching a factor of 5 for the thinnest case. When compared with predicted failure stresses, the experimentally determined stresses were some 15% of the computed compressive strength.

  6. Residual Stress Measurement Using Rectangular Spiral Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyan; Plotnikov, Yuri

    2008-02-01

    Shot peening process provides compressive residual stress within a depth of about 150˜200 um from the surface. It has been demonstrated that multi-frequency eddy current measurement can be effectively used for the residual stress estimation on Ni-based superalloys. In order to measure the stress profile over the entire compressive zone, the probe needs to work in a wide frequency range from 0.1 MHz to above 50 MHz. Due to its wide bandwidth and high precision fabrication process, spiral coils fabricated on flexible substrate using photolithographic technology are good candidate for this task It is useful to develop a coil model in order to optimize coil design, minimize liftoff effect and maximize coil gauge factor. In this work, a 3D analytical model was used to simulate rectangular spiral coil response on a half-space conductor. The results were compared with commercial available 3D finite element software and experimental results. The analytical model was also used to simulate 4-point calibration process that was used to calculate apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC). The experimental setup was described and AECC profile was obtained for shot-peening samples with different peening intensity and different heat treatment.

  7. The effect of microstructure on residual-stress development in short-fiber composites

    SciTech Connect

    Eduljee, R.F.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this study was the identification of the key processing and microstructural parameters that affect thermal residual stresses through a series of parametric analyses on an infinite-plate geometry. In these analyses polycarbonate was chosen as a representative amorphous resin while polyetheretherketone (PEEK) was used as an example of a semicrystalline resin. The residual stress model of Indenbom was used to investigate residual stresses in amorphous polymers. Due to the inapplicability of this model to semicrystalline polymers and composites where the material properties varied through the thickness of the specimen, a residual stress model based on incremental stress analysis was developed. The parametric analyses on the neat polymers showed that the thermal history and the thermoelastic properties played major roles in the residual stress development in both amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. Crystallization increased the level of residual stresses. The mechanisms for this increase are discussed.

  8. Analysis of residual stress and hardness in regions of pre-manufactured and manual bends in fixation plates for maxillary advancement.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Marcelo Marotta; Lauria, Andrezza; Mendes, Marcelo Breno Meneses; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves; Claro, Cristiane Aparecida de Assis; Moreira, Roger William Fernandes

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze, through Vickers hardness test and photoelasticity analysis, pre-bent areas, manually bent areas, and areas without bends of 10-mm advancement pre-bent titanium plates (Leibinger system). The work was divided into three groups: group I-region without bend, group II-region of 90° manual bend, and group III-region of 90° pre-fabricated bends. All the materials were evaluated through hardness analysis by the Vickers hardness test, stress analysis by residual images obtained in a polariscope, and photoelastic analysis by reflection during the manual bending. The data obtained from the hardness tests were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests at a significance level of 5 %. The pre-bent plate (group III) showed hardness means statistically significantly higher (P < 0.05) than those of the other groups (I-region without bends, II-90° manually bent region). Through the study of photoelastic reflection, it was possible to identify that the stress gradually increased, reaching a pink color (1.81 δ / λ), as the bending was performed. A general analysis of the results showed that the bent plate region of pre-bent titanium presented the best results. PMID:25944727

  9. Effect of Measured Welding Residual Stresses on Crack Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hampton, Roy W.; Nelson, Drew; Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Welding residual stresses in thin plate A516-70 steel and 2219-T87 aluminum butt weldments were measured by the strain-gage hole drilling and X-ray diffraction methods. The residual stress data were used to construct 3D strain fields which were modeled as thermally induced strains. These 3D strain fields were then analyzed with the WARP31) FEM fracture analysis code in order to predict their effect on fatigue and on fracture. For analyses of fatigue crack advance and subsequent verification testing, fatigue crack growth increments were simulated by successive saw-cuts and incremental loading to generate, as a function of crack length, effects on crack growth of the interaction between residual stresses and load induced stresses. The specimen experimental response was characterized and compared to the WARM linear elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis predictions. To perform the fracture analysis, the plate material's crack tearing resistance was determined by tests of thin plate M(T) specimens. Fracture analyses of these specimen were performed using WARP31D to determine the critical Crack Tip Opening Angle [CTOA] of each material. These critical CTOA values were used to predict crack tearing and fracture in the weldments. To verify the fracture predictions, weldment M(T) specimen were tested in monotonic loading to fracture while characterizing the fracture process.

  10. Method For Characterizing Residual Stress In Metals

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Loren A.; Michel, David J.; Wyatt, Jeffrey R.

    2002-12-03

    A method is provided for measuring the residual stress in metals. The method includes the steps of drilling one or more holes in a metal workpiece to a preselected depth and mounting one or more acoustic sensors on the metal workpiece and connecting the sensors to an electronic detecting and recording device. A liquid metal capable of penetrating into the metal workpiece placed at the bottom of the hole or holes. A recording is made over a period of time (typically within about two hours) of the magnitude and number of noise events which occur as the liquid metal penetrates into the metal workpiece. The magnitude and number of noise events are then correlated to the internal stress in the region of the workpiece at the bottom of the hole.

  11. Residual Stresses Modeled in Thermal Barrier Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freborg, A. M.; Ferguson, B. L.; Petrus, G. J.; Brindley, W. J.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) applications continue to increase as the need for greater engine efficiency in aircraft and land-based gas turbines increases. However, durability and reliability issues limit the benefits that can be derived from TBC's. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms that cause TBC failure is a key to increasing, as well as predicting, TBC durability. Oxidation of the bond coat has been repeatedly identified as one of the major factors affecting the durability of the ceramic top coat during service. However, the mechanisms by which oxidation facilitates TBC failure are poorly understood and require further characterization. In addition, researchers have suspected that other bond coat and top coat factors might influence TBC thermal fatigue life, both separately and through interactions with the mechanism of oxidation. These other factors include the bond coat coefficient of thermal expansion, the bond coat roughness, and the creep behavior of both the ceramic and bond coat layers. Although it is difficult to design an experiment to examine these factors unambiguously, it is possible to design a computer modeling "experiment" to examine the action and interaction of these factors, as well as to determine failure drivers for TBC's. Previous computer models have examined some of these factors separately to determine their effect on coating residual stresses, but none have examined all the factors concurrently. The purpose of this research, which was performed at DCT, Inc., in contract with the NASA Lewis Research Center, was to develop an inclusive finite element model to characterize the effects of oxidation on the residual stresses within the TBC system during thermal cycling as well as to examine the interaction of oxidation with the other factors affecting TBC life. The plasma sprayed, two-layer thermal barrier coating that was modeled incorporated a superalloy substrate, a NiCrAlY bond coat, and a ZrO2-8 wt % Y2O3 ceramic top coat. We

  12. Airplane Stress Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahm, A F; Crook, L H

    1918-01-01

    Report presents stress analysis of individual components of an airplane. Normal and abnormal loads, sudden loads, simple stresses, indirect simple stresses, resultant unit stress, repetitive and equivalent stress, maximum steady load and stress are considered.

  13. Residual stresses in continuous graphite fiber Al metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Hun Sub; Zong, Gui Sheng; Marcus, Harris L.

    1988-01-01

    The residual stresses in graphite fiber reinforced aluminum (Gr/Al) composites with various thermal histories are measured using X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods. The XRD stress analysis is based on the determination of lattice strains by precise measurements of the interplanar spacings in different directions of the sample. The sample is a plate consisting of two-ply P 100 Gr/Al 6061 precursor wires and Al 6061 overlayers. Prior to XRD measurement, the 6061 overlayers are electrochemically removed. In order to calibrate the relationship between stress magnitude and lattice spacing shift, samples of Al 6061 are loaded at varying stress levels in a three-point bend fixture, while the stresses are simultaneously determined by XRD and surface-attached strain gages. The stresses determined by XRD closely match those determined by the strain gages. Using these calibrations, the longitudinal residual stresses of P 100 Gr/Al 6061 composites are measured for various heat treatments, and the results are presented.

  14. Characterization of Residual Stress Effects on Fatigue Crack Growth of a Friction Stir Welded Aluminum Alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, John A.; Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; James, Mark A.; Brazill, Richard L.; Schultz, Robert W.; Donald, J. Keith; Blair, Amy

    2015-01-01

    An on-line compliance-based method to account for residual stress effects in stress-intensity factor and fatigue crack growth property determinations has been evaluated. Residual stress intensity factor results determined from specimens containing friction stir weld induced residual stresses are presented, and the on-line method results were found to be in excellent agreement with residual stress-intensity factor data obtained using the cut compliance method. Variable stress-intensity factor tests were designed to demonstrate that a simple superposition model, summing the applied stress-intensity factor with the residual stress-intensity factor, can be used to determine the total crack-tip stress-intensity factor. Finite element, VCCT (virtual crack closure technique), and J-integral analysis methods have been used to characterize weld-induced residual stress using thermal expansion/contraction in the form of an equivalent delta T (change in local temperature during welding) to simulate the welding process. This equivalent delta T was established and applied to analyze different specimen configurations to predict residual stress distributions and associated residual stress-intensity factor values. The predictions were found to agree well with experimental results obtained using the crack- and cut-compliance methods.

  15. A micromechanical study of residual stresses in functionally graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Dao, M.; Gu, P.; Maewal, A.; Asaro, R.J.

    1997-08-01

    A physically based computational micromechanics model is developed to study random and discrete microstructures in functionally graded materials (FGMs). The influences of discrete microstructure on residual stress distributions at grain size level are examined with respect to material gradient and FGM volume percentage (within a ceramic-FGM-metal three-layer structure). Both thermoelastic and thermoplastic deformation are considered, and the plastic behavior of metal grains is modeled at the single crystal level using crystal plasticity theory. The results are compared with those obtained using a continuous model which does not consider the microstructural randomness and discreteness. In an averaged sense both the micromechanics model and the continuous model give practically the same macroscopic stresses; whereas the discrete micromechanics model predicts fairly high residual stress concentrations at the grain size level (i.e., higher than 700 MPa in 5--6 vol% FGM grains) with only a 300 C temperature drop in a Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} FGM system. Statistical analysis shows that the residual stress concentrations are insensitive to material gradient and FGM volume percentage. The need to consider microstructural details in FGM microstructures is evident. The results obtained provide some insights for improving the reliability of FGMs against fracture and delamination.

  16. An approximate method for residual stress calculation infunctionally graded materials

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, T.L.

    1999-06-02

    Thermal residual stresses in functionally graded materials(FGMs) arise primarily from nonlinear spatial variations in the thermalexpansion coefficient, but can be significantly adjusted by variations inmodulus. Thermoelastic analysis of FGMs is complicated by such modulusgradients. A class of problems for which thermal stress solutions formaterials with constant modulus can be used as a basis for approximationsfor FGMs is discussed. The size of the error in this approximation due togradients in elastic modulus is investigated. Analytical and finiteelement solutions for the thermal stresses in various FGM geometries arecompared to results from this approximate method. In a geometry ofpractical interest, a right cylinder graded along the z-axis, the errorfor a Ni-Al2O3 FGM was found to be within 15 percent for all gradientsconsidered. The form of the approximation makes it easier to identifydesirable types of spatial nonlinearity in expansion coefficient andvariations in modulus: this would allow the manipulation of the locationof compressive stresses.

  17. Residual Stresses in Porcelain-veneered Zirconia Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Baldassarri, Marta; Stappert, Christian F. J.; Wolff, Mark S.; Thompson, Van P.; Zhang, Yu

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Compressive stress has been intentionally introduced into the overlay porcelain of zirconia-ceramic prostheses to prevent veneer fracture. However, recent theoretical analysis has predicted that the residual stresses in the porcelain may be also tensile in nature. This study aims to determine the type and magnitude of the residual stresses in the porcelain veneers of full-contour fixed-dental prostheses (FDPs) with an anatomic zirconia coping design and in control porcelain with the zirconia removed using a well-established Vickers indentation method. Methods Six 3-unit zirconia FDPs were manufactured (NobelBiocare, Gothenburg, Sweden). Porcelain was hand-veneered using a slow cooling rate. Each FDP was sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane for Vickers indentations (n = 143; load = 9.8 N; dwell time = 5 s). Tests were performed in the veneer of porcelain-zirconia specimens (bilayers, n = 4) and porcelain specimens without zirconia cores (monolayers, n = 2). Results The average crack lengths and standard deviation, in the transverse and radial directions (i.e. parallel and perpendicular to the veneer/core interface, respectively), were 67 ± 12 μm and 52 ± 8 μm for the bilayers and 64 ± 8 μm and 64 ± 7 μm for the monolayers. These results indicated a major hoop compressive stress (~40 to 50 MPa) and a moderate radial tensile stress (~10 MPa) in the bulk of the porcelain veneer. Significance Vickers indentation is a powerful method to determine the residual stresses in veneered zirconia systems. Our findings revealed the presence of a radial tensile stress in the overlay porcelain, which may contributed to the large clinical chip fractures observed in these prostheses. PMID:22578663

  18. Residual stresses calculation in autofrettage using variable material properties method

    SciTech Connect

    Jahed, H.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Autofrettaged cylinders are used for variety of applications in chemical and nuclear industries where large internal pressures have to be withstood. Autofrettage is in the process by which beneficial residual stresses are introduced into thick-walled tubes by initially subjected the tube to high internal pressure which causes inelastic deformation. Here, the variable material properties method is employed to obtain elastic-plastic analysis of an autofrettaged tube. This method develops inelastic solution from the elastic solution by treating the material properties as field variables. The distribution of these parameters are obtained in an iterative manner as a part of the solution. An energy based scheme is used to update these variables. The residual stress field of autofrettaged tubes based on the actual material curve and isotropic and kinematic hardening models are obtained. The results are shown to be in good agreement with the published experimental and finite element results.

  19. THE CONTOUR METHOD: SIMPLE 2-D MAPPING OF RESIDUAL STRESSES

    SciTech Connect

    M. PRIME; A. GONZALES

    2000-06-01

    We present an entirely new method for measuring residual stress that is extremely simple to apply yet more powerful than existing techniques. In this method, a part is carefully cut in two. The contour of the resulting new surface is measured to determine the displacements normal to the surface caused by the release of the residual stresses. Analytically, the opposite of these measured displacements are applied as boundary conditions to the surface in a finite element model. By Bueckner's superposition principle, this gives the original residual stresses normal to the plane of the cut. Unlike other relaxation methods for measuring residual stress, the measured data can be used to solve directly for the stresses without a tedious inversion technique. At the same time, an arbitrary two-dimensional variation in stresses can be determined. We demonstrate the method on a steel specimen with a known residual stress profile.

  20. Residual stress and crack propagation in laminated composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yttergren, R.M.F.; Zeng, K.; Rowcliffe, D.J.

    1994-12-31

    Residual stress distributions in several laminated ceramic composites were measured by an indentation technique. The material included alumina-zirconia laminated composites, containing strong interfaces, and alumina-porcelain laminated composites with both weak and strong interfaces. The residual stress in these material originates from the mismatch of the thermal properties, differences in elastic properties, and different shrinkage of the laminates during sintering. An experimental technique is presented which gives a direct view of the residual stress state in the materials. Values of residual tensile stress are presented as a function of position relative to the interface in each material.

  1. Measuring of residual stresses in thermal sprayed coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, O.C.

    1995-12-31

    The Modified Almen Method (MAM) uses the deformation of test samples for measuring the residual stress and with small mathematical expenditure it yields the distribution in the coating. This paper presents the basic theory of MAM and the boundary conditions for using this method for the classification of thermal sprayed coatings with respect to the residual stress. The residual stress distribution of different HVOF coatings are shown in this work. Typical spray parameters are compared. The results are also compared with the ones calculated with other methods for the determination of the residual stress in thermal sprayed coatings.

  2. Measurement of residual stress in bent pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alers, G. A.; McColskey, J. D.

    2002-05-01

    Buried gas and oil pipelines can be subjected to unexpected bending loads caused by such earth movements as earthquakes, wash-outs, road building, or mining subsidence as well as by denting from unintentional digging. In order to make a fitness-for-service assessment, it is necessary to measure any residual stresses that are left in the pipe wall as well as the degree of plastic flow within regions of severe damage. A portable instrument that uses EMATs to rapidly measure ultrasonic shear wave birefringence in the wall of a pipe has been developed and applied to a 5 m (15 ft) long section of 0.56 m (22 in) diameter linepipe loaded in three point bending by a 22 MN (five million pound) load frame. The results showed that: (1) a large correction for shear wave anisotropy caused by texture in the steel had to be introduced and (2) the degree of plastic flow could be deduced from changes in the texture contribution alone. An attempt to separate the stress and texture effects by using SH wave modes in the pipe wall proved unreliable because of magnetostrictive effects in the periodic permanent magnet EMATs used for these experiments.

  3. Morphology of residually stressed tubular tissues: Beyond the elastic multiplicative decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Destrade, M.; Gower, A. L.; Taffetani, M.

    2016-05-01

    Many interesting shapes appearing in the biological world are formed by the onset of mechanical instability. In this work we consider how the build-up of residual stress can cause a solid to buckle. In all past studies a fictitious (virtual) stress-free state was required to calculate the residual stress. In contrast, we use a model which is simple and allows the prescription of any residual stress field. We specialize the analysis to an elastic tube subject to a two-dimensional residual stress, and find that incremental wrinkles can appear on its inner or its outer face, depending on the location of the highest value of the residual hoop stress. We further validate the predictions of the incremental theory with finite element simulations, which allow us to go beyond this threshold and predict the shape, number and amplitude of the resulting creases.

  4. Prediction of residual stress and distortion from residual stress in heat treated and machined aluminum parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Robert

    Parts machined from relatively large thickness cross sections can experience significant deformations from high residual stresses that develop in the part during the heat treatment used to form the aluminum alloy. Uphill quenching is a process that can create a part with low residual stress and stable dimensions when the process is controlled properly. The uphill quenching process involves a solution heat treat, quench, cool to liquid nitrogen, steam blast, and then age to final temper. In this thesis two parts were modeled using ANSYS. The first part underwent the uphill quench process in the rough machined state. The second part was modeled in the stock material shape and only underwent a solution heat treat, quench, and age to final temper. After the residual stress in the second part was predicted the excess material was removed by killing the associated elements and the deformation of the final machined part was predicted. For both parts analyzed measurements were made and compared against predictions with fairly good results.

  5. Residual stresses in darrieus vertical axis wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.

    1981-04-01

    A numerical package called RESID has been assembled to calculate the residual stresses in VAWT blades induced during cold forming. Using a strength of materials - elementary beam theory approach, RESID models the material response with a bilinear stress-strain curve, and the cross-sectional geometry with an array of area increments. Through an iterative solution procedure residual stresses are predicted for a specified final radius of curvature or applied bending moment. RESID results are compared to theoretical solutions for simple geometries and with MARC Finite element results for VAWT blade geometries. Calculating residual stress levels, determining acceptable residual stress levels, and a method of reducing residual stresses are discussed. A complete listing and sample run are included in the appendicies.

  6. Residual stress of physical vapor-deposited polycrystalline multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Song; Zhang, Hui; Zheng, LiLi

    2015-02-01

    An extended one-dimensional stress model for the deposition of multilayer films is built based on the existing stress model by considering the influence of deposition conditions. Both thermal stress and intrinsic stress are considered to constitute the final residual stress in the model. The deposition process conditions such as deposition temperature, oxygen pressure, and film growth rate are correlated to the full stress model to analyze the final residual stress distribution, and thus the deformation of the deposited multilayer system under different process conditions. Also, the model is numerically realized with in-house built code. A deposition of Ag-Cu multilayer system is simulated with the as-built extended stress model, and the final residual stresses under different deposition conditions are discussed with part of the results compared with experiment from other literature.

  7. Residual stresses in sapphire rods grown by the Stepanov method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krymov, V. M.; Nosov, Yu. G.; Bakholdin, S. I.; Galaktionov, E. V.; Maslov, V. N.; Tropp, E. A.

    2015-04-01

    The residual stresses in cylindrical [0001] sapphire crystals have been studied using the polarization-optical method. The angle between the optical axes 2 V and the difference in the normal components of the tensor of elastic residual stresses (σφ - σ r ) have been determined from the isogyre divergence. It has been found that a tangential tensile stress of no more than 20 MPa acts on the ingot surface. The residual stresses have been compared with the calculated thermoelastic stresses generated during the crystal growth in a given heating zone. It has been shown that the determined pattern of residual stresses can be caused by thermoelastic stresses developing in the immediate vicinity of the crystallization front.

  8. Residual gas analysis device

    DOEpatents

    Thornberg, Steven M.

    2012-07-31

    A system is provided for testing the hermeticity of a package, such as a microelectromechanical systems package containing a sealed gas volume, with a sampling device that has the capability to isolate the package and breach the gas seal connected to a pulse valve that can controllably transmit small volumes down to 2 nanoliters to a gas chamber for analysis using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy diagnostics.

  9. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects of both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.

  10. Residual stress within nanoscale metallic multilayer systems during thermal cycling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Economy, David Ross; Cordill, Megan Jo; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kennedy, Marian S.

    2015-09-21

    Projected applications for nanoscale metallic multilayers will include wide temperature ranges. Since film residual stress has been known to alter system reliability, stress development within new film structures with high interfacial densities should be characterized to identify potential long-term performance barriers. To understand factors contributing to thermal stress evolution within nanoscale metallic multilayers, stress in Cu/Nb systems adhered to Si substrates was calculated from curvature measurements collected during cycling between 25 °C and 400 °C. Additionally, stress within each type of component layers was calculated from shifts in the primary peak position from in-situ heated X-ray diffraction. The effects ofmore » both film architecture (layer thickness) and layer order in metallic multilayers were tracked and compared with monolithic Cu and Nb films. Analysis indicated that the thermoelastic slope of nanoscale metallic multilayer films depends on thermal expansion mismatch, elastic modulus of the components, and also interfacial density. The layer thickness (i.e. interfacial density) affected thermoelastic slope magnitude while layer order had minimal impact on stress responses after the initial thermal cycle. When comparing stress responses of monolithic Cu and Nb films to those of the Cu/Nb systems, the nanoscale metallic multilayers show a similar increase in stress above 200 °C to the Nb monolithic films, indicating that Nb components play a larger role in stress development than Cu. Local stress calculations from X-ray diffraction peak shifts collected during heating reveal that the component layers within a multilayer film respond similarly to their monolithic counterparts.« less

  11. Residual stress in spin-cast polyurethane thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-01

    Residual stress is inevitable during spin-casting. Herein, we report a straightforward method to evaluate the residual stress in as-cast polyurethane thin films using area shrinkage measurement of films in floating state, which shows that the residual stress is independent of radial location on the substrate and decreased with decreasing film thickness below a critical value. We demonstrate that the residual stress is developed due to the solvent evaporation after vitrification during spin-casting and the polymer chains in thin films may undergo vitrification at an increased concentration. The buildup of residual stress in spin-cast polymer films provides an insight into the size effects on the nature of polymer thin films.

  12. Residual stress in spin-cast polyurethane thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Li

    2015-01-19

    Residual stress is inevitable during spin-casting. Herein, we report a straightforward method to evaluate the residual stress in as-cast polyurethane thin films using area shrinkage measurement of films in floating state, which shows that the residual stress is independent of radial location on the substrate and decreased with decreasing film thickness below a critical value. We demonstrate that the residual stress is developed due to the solvent evaporation after vitrification during spin-casting and the polymer chains in thin films may undergo vitrification at an increased concentration. The buildup of residual stress in spin-cast polymer films provides an insight into the size effects on the nature of polymer thin films.

  13. Nondestructive Testing Residual Stress Using Ultrasonic Critical Refracted Longitudinal Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Chunguang; Song, Wentao; Pan, Qinxue; Li, Huanxin; Liu, Shuai

    Residual stress has significant impacts on the performance of the mechanical components, especially on its strength, fatigue life and corrosion resistance and dimensional stability. Based on theory of acoustoelasticity, the testing principle of ultrasonic LCR wave method is analyzed. The testing system of residual stress is build. The method of calibration of stress coefficient is proposed in order to improve the detection precision. At last, through experiments and applications on residual stress testing of oil pipeline weld joint, vehicle's torsion shaft, glass and ceramics, gear tooth root, and so on, the result show that it deserved to be studied deeply on application and popularization of ultrasonic LCR wave method.

  14. Low-field magnetoacoustic residual stress measurement in steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Utrata, D.; Heyman, J. S.; Allison, S. G.

    1987-01-01

    Much of the recent development of the magnetoacoustic technique has been devoted to refine this technique as a reliable and practical tool for measuring bulk residual stress in steel components. For this, the effects of structural and metallurgical properties on the magnetoacoustic interaction have been studied for various types of steel samples. Also, progress is being made to obtain quantitative residual stress measurements in railroad wheels. This paper reviews the physical basis and the experimental results of the magnetoacoustic stress measurements in steels.

  15. Residual stress distribution in FeAl weld overlay on steel

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.L.; Spooner, S.; Hubbard, C.R.; Maziasz, P.J.; Goodwin, G.M.; Feng, Z.; Zacharia, T.

    1994-12-31

    Neutron diffraction was used to measure the residual stress distribution in an FeAl weld overlay on steel. It was found that the residual stresses accumulated during welding were essentially removed by the post-weld heat treatment that was applied to the specimen; most residual stresses in the specimen developed during cooling following the post-weld heat treatment. The experimental data were compared with a plasto-elastic finite element analysis. While some disagreement exists in absolute strain values, there is satisfactory agreement in strain spatial distribution between the experimental data and the finite element analysis.

  16. Residual Stress of Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors with Ni-Electrodes (Ni-MLCCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Yukie; Nomura, Takeshi; Takenaka, Tadashi

    2003-09-01

    The residual stress of multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs) has been studied. The capacitance decreased significantly under external compressive stress applied to MLCCs in the thickness direction, on the other hand, the capacitance increased under external stress in the width direction. These capacitance changes depended on the number of dielectric layers in MLCCs. The compressive residual stress at the surface of MLCCs has been shown by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The stress increased with the number of dielectric layers in MLCCs. Moreover the tensile stress was confirmed in the thickness direction of MLCCs by XRD analysis also. Therefore the dependence of electrical characteristics dependence on the number of dielectric layers, i.e., apparent dielectric constant, temperature dependence of capacitance, and aging deterioration can be explained by the residual stress.

  17. Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Kosanke, Kenneth L; Dujay, Richard C; Kosanke, Bonnie J

    2006-03-01

    Pyrotechnic reaction residue particle (PRRP) production, sampling and analysis are all very similar to that for primer gunshot residue. In both cases, the preferred method of analysis uses scanning electron microscopy to locate suspect particles and then uses energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy to characterize the particle's constituent chemical elements. There are relatively few times when standard micro-analytical chemistry performed on pyrotechnic residues may not provide sufficient information for forensic investigators. However, on those occasions, PRRP analysis provides a greatly improved ability to discriminate between materials of pyrotechnic origin and other unrelated substances also present. The greater specificity of PRRP analysis is the result of its analyzing a large number of individual micron-sized particles, rather than producing only a single integrated result such as produced using standard micro-analytical chemistry. For example, PRRP analyses are used to demonstrate its ability to successfully (1) discriminate between pyrotechnic residues and unrelated background contamination, (2) identify that two different pyrotechnic compositions had previously been exploded within the same device, and (3) establish the chronology of an incident involving two separate and closely occurring explosions. PMID:16566762

  18. Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening in stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, N.; Miwa, Y.; Kondo, K.; Kaji, Y.

    2009-04-01

    Effects of residual stress on irradiation hardening were studied in advance for predicting irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking. The specimens of SUS316 and SUS316L with several % plastic strains, which correspond to weld residual stress, were prepared by bending and keeping deformation under irradiation. Ion irradiations of 12 MeV Ni 3+ were performed at 330, 400 and 550 oC to 45 dpa. No bended specimen was simultaneously irradiated with the bended specimen. The residual stress was estimated by X-ray residual stress measurements before and after the irradiation. The micro-hardness was measured by using nanoindenter. The residual stress did not relax even for the case of the higher temperature aging at 500 oC for the same time of irradiation. The residual stress after ion irradiation up to high dpa, however, relaxed at these experimental temperatures. The irradiation hardening of stressed specimen was obviously lower than that of un-stressed one in case of SUS316L irradiated at 300 oC to 12 dpa.

  19. Calculation of residual stresses induced during laser quench-hardening of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkovskii, I.V.

    1992-06-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of the quasi-stationary uncoupled problem of thermoelastic-plasticity with the goal of estimating the amount of residual stress in steel after laser quench-hardening. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Analysis of changes in hardness of a metal surface layer in areas of high stress and methods of determining residual life of parts for mining machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvonarev, I. E.; Ivanov, S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The methodological bases for determining the energy resource of mechanical transmissions details for mining machines are considered. Based on the analysis of the accumulation of damage in metal gears, a method of estimating residual life of coarse-toothed wheels by periodically measuring the hardness of the surface layer of the teeth is justified. The regularities in change of hardness of coarse-tooth gear, conditioned by a change in metal strength properties that take into account the micro- and macromechanisms of plastic and elastic deformation, distortion of the metal crystal lattice with formation and movement of vacancies and dislocations. Experimental setup was built and the results of laboratory experiments are given related to the process of destruction of non-standard samples under different loads. Comparison of dimensions and hardness values of the sample allows concluding that a larger deformation corresponds to a greater increase in hardness, their limit value for the material being in the fracture zone. It is established that the detected changes in the local hardness occurs in areas of increased stresses above the limit of proportionality and the work of fracture forces attributed to dislocations density adjacent to the fracture plane expressed in terms of hardness increment is constant.

  1. Assessment of Bending Fatigue Strength of Crankshaft Sections with Consideration of Quenching Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, W. J.; Dong, C.; Li, X.

    2016-03-01

    High-cycle bending fatigue is the primary failure mode of crankshafts in engines. Compressive residual stresses are often introduced by induction quenching to improve the fatigue strength of crankshafts. The residual stresses, which are commonly obtained by numerical methods, such as the finite element method (FEM), should be included in fatigue failure analysis to predict the fatigue strength of crankshafts accurately. In this study, the simulation method and theory of quenching process are presented and applied to investigate the residual stresses of a diesel engine crankshaft. The coupling calculation of temperature, microstructure, and stress fields of the crankshaft section is conducted by FEM. Then, the fatigue strength of the crankshaft section is analytically assessed by Susmel and Lazzarin's criterion based on the critical plane approach that superimposes the residual stresses onto the bending stresses. The resonant bending fatigue tests of the crankshaft sections are conducted, and the tests and analytical assessments yield consistent results.

  2. Lamination residual stresses in hybrid composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.; Liber, T.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to study lamination residual stresses for various material and loading parameters. The effects of hybridization on residual stresses and residual properties after thermal cycling under load were determined in angle-ply graphite/Kevlar/epoxy and graphite/S-glass/epoxy laminates. Residual strains in the graphite plies are not appreciably affected by the type and number of hybridizing plies. Computed residual stresses at room temperature in the S-glass plies reach values up to seventy-five percent of the transverse strength of the material. Computed residual stresses in the graphite plies exceed the static strength by approximately ten percent. In the case of Kevlar plies, computed residual stresses far exceed the static strength indicating possible early failure of these plies. Static testing of the hybrids above indicates that failure is governed by the ultimate strain of the graphite plies. In thermally cycled hybrids, in general, residual moduli were somewhat lower and residual strengths were higher than initial values.

  3. Evaluation Of Residual Stresses In Inner Ring Of The Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malotová, Šárka; Hemžský, Pavel; Pitela, David; Nicielnik, Henryk; Šoková, Dagmar; Kyncl, Ladislav; Mrázik, Jozef

    2015-12-01

    Residual stresses are undesirable and it should not be underestimated. They occur in many components and it is necessary to identify and try to avoid them. For detection the Residual stresses, there are many methods, but not all are suitable, because they can completely destroy of the components. The article deals with the evaluation of Residual stresses in the inner rings of Bearings, which are made from steel 100Cr6 (ČSN 14 109.4. The surfaces were turning at different cutting parameters and subsequently are evaluated Residual stresses. The stresses have been evaluated by non - destructive method X - Ray. The experiment was realized in cooperation Faculty of Mechanical Engineering VSB - TU Ostrava and Faculty of Mechanical Engineering of ZU Zilina - machining in the laboratories of ZU Žilina, Slovak Republic.

  4. Residual stresses in cross-ply composite tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, D.; Hyer, M. W.

    1984-01-01

    The residual thermal stresses in 4-layer cross-ply tubes are studied. The tubes considered has a small radius to wall-thickness ratios and so elasticity solutions were used. The residual thermal stress problem was considered to be axisymmetric and three elasticity solutions were derived and the results compared with the results using classical lamination theory. The comparison illustrates the limitations of classical lamination theory. The three elasticity solutions derived were: plane stress, plane strain, and generalized plane strain, the latter being the most realistic. Residual stresses in both the hoop and axial direction is significant. Stacking arrangement effects the residual stress to some extent, as do the material properties of the individual lamina. The benefits of hybrid construction are briefly discussed.

  5. Residual stress measurements of tension leg platform tendon welds

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.S.; Smith, J.D.

    1994-12-31

    Results of fatigue test of prototype welded tendons showed that fatigue life was greatly reduced for the weld repaired joint. Since tensile residual stresses near the fusion boundary were suspected to cause the fatigue life reduction, these residual stresses were measured. Residual stresses of girth welded tendon pipes for a tension leg platform (TLP) were obtained for various fabrication conditions. The stresses were measured experimentally using the blind hole drilling (BHD) technique, X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique and Barkhausen Noise (BHN) method. The results of these measurements illustrate the reliability of each measurement technique. Effects of joint configuration, weld repair, weld cap grinding, and pre-fatigue test on residual stresses were discussed.

  6. Optimization of machining and vibration parameters for residual stresses minimization in ultrasonic assisted turning of 4340 hardened steel.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Varun; Pandey, Pulak M

    2016-08-01

    The residual stresses generated in the machined work piece have detrimental effect on fatigue life, corrosion resistance and tribological properties. However, the effect of cutting and vibration parameters on residual stresses in Ultrasonic Assisted Turning (UAT) has not been dealt with. The present paper highlights the effect of feed rate, depth of cut, cutting velocity and percentage intensity of ultrasonic power on residual stress generation. XRD analysis has been carried out to measure the residual stress while turning 4340 hardened steel using UAT. The experiments were performed based on response surface methodology to develop statistical model for residual stress. The outcome of ANOVA revealed that percentage intensity and feed rate significantly affect the residual stress generation. The significant interactions between process parameters have also been presented tin order to understand the thermo-mechanical mechanism responsible for residual stress generation. PMID:27179142

  7. Methodologies for measuring residual stress distributions in epitaxial thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Ruan, H. H.; Zhang, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    Residual stresses in a thin film deposited on a dissimilar substrate can bring about various interface or subsurface damages, such as delamination, dislocation, twinning and cracking. In high performance integrated circuits and MEMS, a too high residual stress can significantly alter their electronic properties. A proper residual stress characterization needs the description of full stress tensors and their variations with thickness. The problem is that film thickness measurement requires different means, and that direct measurement techniques to fulfill the tasks are not straightforward. This paper provides a simple method using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman scattering for the measurement of residual stresses and their thickness dependence. Using the epitaxial silicon film on a sapphire substrate as an example, this paper demonstrates that the improved XRD technique can make use of multiple diffraction peaks to give rise to a highly accurate stress tensor. The co-existence of silicon and sapphire peaks in a Raman spectrum then allows a simultaneous measurement of film thickness from the peak intensity ratio and the residual stress from the peak shift. The paper also concludes the relation between film thickness and residual stresses.

  8. Water aging reverses residual stresses in hydrophilic dental composites.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Ferracane, J L

    2014-02-01

    Dental composites develop residual stresses during polymerization due to shrinkage. These stresses may change with time because of relaxation and water sorption in the oral environment. This phenomenon is likely dependent on the composition of the materials, specifically their hydrophilic characteristics, and could result in deleterious stresses on restorative materials and tooth structure. The purpose of this experiment was to use the thin ring-slitting method to compare the residual stress generated within composite materials of varying hydrophilicity when aged in wet and dry conditions after polymerization. Water sorption, solubility, elastic modulus, and residual stresses were measured in 6 commercial composites/cements aged in water and dry conditions. The self-adhesive resin cement showed the highest water sorption and solubility. All composites showed initial residual contraction stresses, which were maintained when aged dry. Residual stresses in 2 of the self-adhesive cements and the polyacid-modified composite aged in wet conditions resulted in a net expansion. This experiment verified that residual shrinkage stresses in dental composites can be reversed during aging in water, resulting in a net expansion, with the effect directly related to their hydrophilic properties. PMID:24272790

  9. Measured residual stresses in overlay pipe weldments removed from service

    SciTech Connect

    Shack, W.J.

    1985-02-01

    Surface and throughwall residual stresses were measured on an elbow-to-pipe weldment that had been removed from the Hatch-2 reactor about a year after the application of a weld overlay. The results were compared with experimental measurements on three mock-up weldments and with finite-element calculations. The comparison shows that there are significant differences in the form and magnitude of the residual stress distributions. However, even after more than a year of service, the residual stresses over most of the inner surface of the actual plant weldment with an overlay were strongly compressive. 3 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Residual stress characterization of welds and post-weld processes using x-ray diffraction techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauss, Michael E.; Pineault, James A.; Eckersley, John S.

    1998-03-01

    This paper illustrates the importance of residual stress characterization in welds and post weld processes. The failure to characterize residual stresses created during welding and/or post weld processes can lead to unexpected occurrences of stress corrosion cracking, distortion, fatigue cracking as well as instances of over design or over processing. The development of automated residual stress mapping and the availability of portable and fast equipment have now made the characterization of residual stresses using x-ray diffraction practical for process control and optimization. The paper presents examples where x-ray diffraction residual stress characterization techniques were applied on various kinds of welds including arc welds, TIG welds, resistance welds, laser welds and electron beam welds. The nondestructive nature of the x-ray diffraction technique has made the residual stress characterization of welds a useful tool for process optimization and failure analysis, particularly since components can be measured before and after welding and post welding processes. Some examples presented show the residual stresses before and after the application of post weld processes such as shot peening, grinding and heat treatment.

  11. Effect of Residual Stresses on the Hardness of Bulk Metallic Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Bei, Hongbin; Gao, Y. F.; Lu, Zhao Ping; Nieh, T. G.

    2011-01-01

    Nanoindentation experiments were conducted on Zr-based metallic glass samples, which were elastically and plastically bent in order to investigate the effect of residual stresses on hardness. It was found that tensile residual stress reduced the hardness significantly, while compressive residual stress produced only a small effect on the hardness. These observations are consistent with three-dimensional continuum-plasticity-based finite-element simulations. The hardness was also found to vary more significantly with residual stresses, in particular in tension, than that caused by shear-banding-induced softening, suggesting hardness measurement is a practical method for the evaluation of tensile residual stresses in a metallic glass. Hardness variation in the bent sample was correlated with the residual-stress induced volume dilatation through a free-volume-based model. In this paper, we also present a detailed stress analysis based on yield asymmetry under tension and compression to describe the distribution of residual stresses in bent metallic glass specimens. The calculations agree well with the hardness variations measured experimentally.

  12. Noninvasive in vivo determination of residual strains and stresses.

    PubMed

    Donmazov, Samir; Piskin, Senol; Pekkan, Kerem

    2015-06-01

    Vascular growth and remodeling during embryonic development are associated with blood flow and pressure induced stress distribution, in which residual strains and stresses play a central role. Residual strains are typically measured by performing in vitro tests on the excised vascular tissue. In this paper, we investigated the possibility of estimating residual strains and stresses using physiological pressure-radius data obtained through in vivo noninvasive measurement techniques, such as optical coherence tomography or ultrasound modalities. This analytical approach first tested with in vitro results using experimental data sets for three different arteries such as rabbit carotid artery, rabbit thoracic artery, and human carotid artery based on Fung's pseudostrain energy function and Delfino's exponential strain energy function (SEF). We also examined residual strains and stresses in the human swine iliac artery using the in vivo experimental ultrasound data sets corresponding to the systolic-to-diastolic region only. This allowed computation of the in vivo residual stress information for loading and unloading states separately. Residual strain parameters as well as the material parameters were successfully computed with high accuracy, where the relative errors are introduced in the range of 0-7.5%. Corresponding residual stress distributions demonstrated global errors all in acceptable ranges. A slight discrepancy was observed in the computed reduced axial force. Results of computations performed based on in vivo experimental data obtained from loading and unloading states of the artery exhibited alterations in material properties and residual strain parameters as well. Emerging noninvasive measurement techniques combined with the present analytical approach can be used to estimate residual strains and stresses in vascular tissues as a precursor for growth estimates. This approach is also validated with a finite element model of a general two-layered artery

  13. Power-law creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidon, Pierre; Manneville, Sebastien

    We report on the interplay between creep and residual stresses in carbopol microgels. When a constant shear stress σ is applied below the yield stress σc, the strain is shown to increase as a power law of time, γ (t) =γ0 +(t / τ) α , with and exponent α ~= 0 . 38 that is strongly reminiscent of Andrade creep in hard solids. For applied shear stresses lower than some characteristic value of about σc / 10 , the microgels experience a more complex creep behavior that we link to the existence of residual stresses and to weak aging of the system after preshear. The influence of the preshear protocol, of boundary conditions and of microgel concentration on residual stresses is investigated. We discuss our results in light of previous works on colloidal glasses and other soft glassy systems.

  14. Residual stresses in weld deposited clad pressure vessels and nozzles

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.P.; Mabe, W.R.; Shadley, J.R.; Rybicki, E.F.

    1998-04-01

    Results of through-thickness residual stress measurements are provided for a variety of samples of weld deposited 308/309L stainless steel and Alloy 600 cladding on low-alloy pressure vessel ferritic steels. Clad thicknesses between 5 and 9mm on samples that vary in thickness from 45 to 200mm were studied. The samples were taken from flat plates, from a spherical head of a pressure vessel, from a ring-segment of a nozzle bore, and from the transition radius between a nozzle and a pressure vessel shell. A layer removal method was used to measure the residual stresses. The effects of uncertainties in elastic constants (Young`s modulus and Poisson`s ratio) as well as experimental error are assessed. All measurements were done at room temperature. The results of this work indicate that curvature plays a significant role in cladding residual stress and that tensile residual stresses as high as the yield stress can be measured in the cladding material. Since the vessel from which the spherical and nozzle corner samples were taken was hydrotested, and the flat plate specimens were taken from specimens used in mechanical fatigue testing, these results suggest that rather high tensile residual stresses can be retained in the cladding material even after some mechanical loading associated with hydrotesting and that higher levels of hydrotest loading would be required to alter the cladding residual stresses.

  15. Roller Burnishing - A Cold Working Tool to Reduce Weld Induced Residual Stress

    SciTech Connect

    John Martin

    2002-02-19

    The possibility of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in regions of tensile residual stress introduced by weld deposited material has been a concern where environmental effects can reduce component life. Roller burnishing, a form of mechanical cold-working, has been considered as a means of providing for residual stress state improvements. This paper provides a computational evaluation of the roller burnishing process to address the permanent deformation needed to introduce a desirable residual stress state. The analysis uses a series of incrementally applied pressure loadings and finite element methodology to simulate the behavior of a roller burnishing tool. Various magnitudes of applied pressure loadings coupled with different size plates and boundary conditions are examined to assess the degree and depth of the residual compressive stress state after cold working. Both kinematic and isotropic hardening laws are evaluated.

  16. Evaluation of residual stress in sputtered tantalum thin-film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-masha'al, Asa'ad; Bunting, Andrew; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-05-01

    The influence of deposition conditions on the residual stress of sputtered tantalum thin-film has been evaluated in the present study. Films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and curvature measurement method has been employed to calculate the residual stress of the films. Transitions of tantalum film stress from compressive to tensile state have been observed as the sputtering pressure increases. Also, the effect of annealing process at temperature range of 90-300 °C in oxygen ambient on the residual stress of the films has been studied. The results demonstrate that the residual stress of the films that have been deposited at lower sputtering pressure has become more compressive when annealed at 300 °C. Furthermore, the impact of exposure to atmospheric ambient on the tantalum film stress has been investigated by monitoring the variation of the residual stress of both annealed and unannealed films over time. The as-deposited films have been exposed to pure Argon energy bombardment and as result, a high compressive stress has been developed in the films.

  17. Residual stresses and damage in unidirectional model composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, A.; Moschler, J.W.; Mall, S.; Kerans, R.J.; Pagano, N.J.

    1989-10-01

    Unidirectional model composites were fabricated with SiC fibers and different borosilicate glasses to study the effect of residual stress states on the damage progression in these composites. A specially designed straining stage was employed to study the failure modes in these materials under stepwise loading. Although both fiber and matrix cracks were observed in all specimens, the mechanisms of failure were found to be different and strongly dependent on the residual stress state in these materials. 15 refs.

  18. Digital image correlation utilization in pipeline oriented residual stress estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brynk, Tomasz; Mezyk, Dariusz; Kukla, Dominik

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the paper is to present an idea of the utilization of Digital Image Correlation (DIC) method for industrial pipelines residual stress oriented investigation. For this purpose results of tests performed in laboratory and industrial conditions are presented. Obtained results showed that DIC method gives reliable near drilled hole strain/displacement distribution maps which may be used for accurate residual stress calculations.

  19. Method for residual stress relief and retained austenite destabilization

    DOEpatents

    Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2004-08-10

    A method using of a magnetic field to affect residual stress relief or phase transformations in a metallic material is disclosed. In a first aspect of the method, residual stress relief of a material is achieved at ambient temperatures by placing the material in a magnetic field. In a second aspect of the method, retained austenite stabilization is reversed in a ferrous alloy by applying a magnetic field to the alloy at ambient temperatures.

  20. Residual stress and plastic anisotropy in indented 2024-T351 aluminum disks

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, Bjorn; Prime, Michael B; Saurabh, Kabra; Brown, Donald W; Pagliaro, Pierluigi; Backlund, Peter; Shaw, Sanjiv; Criss, Everett

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have proven that generating a well defined residual stress state using the indented disk approach is an excellent way to validate experimental and modeling techniques for measuring and predicting residual stresses. The previous studies dealt with indented stainless steel disks, and included experimental determination of residual stresses using the Contour Method and neutron diffraction measurements. The measured residual stress states showed good agreement between the techniques, and a Finite Element Model predicted residual stress state based upon material properties determined form standard tension and compression/tension tests was also in good agreement with the measurements. In the present work, disks of 2024-T351 Aluminum were investigated. As before, the residual stress profile was measured using neutron diffraction and the Contour Method and Finite Element Modeling was employed to predict the residual stress profile. Analysis and comparison of the three techniques were complicated by the fact that the experimental data shows evidence of plastic anisotropy and strong Bauschinger effect within the indented disks.

  1. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulnessmore » of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).« less

  2. Estimation of uncertainty for contour method residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Mitchell D.; DeWald, Adrian T.; Prime, Michael B.; Hill, Michael R.

    2014-12-03

    This paper describes a methodology for the estimation of measurement uncertainty for the contour method, where the contour method is an experimental technique for measuring a two-dimensional map of residual stress over a plane. Random error sources including the error arising from noise in displacement measurements and the smoothing of the displacement surfaces are accounted for in the uncertainty analysis. The output is a two-dimensional, spatially varying uncertainty estimate such that every point on the cross-section where residual stress is determined has a corresponding uncertainty value. Both numerical and physical experiments are reported, which are used to support the usefulness of the proposed uncertainty estimator. The uncertainty estimator shows the contour method to have larger uncertainty near the perimeter of the measurement plane. For the experiments, which were performed on a quenched aluminum bar with a cross section of 51 × 76 mm, the estimated uncertainty was approximately 5 MPa (σ/E = 7 · 10⁻⁵) over the majority of the cross-section, with localized areas of higher uncertainty, up to 10 MPa (σ/E = 14 · 10⁻⁵).

  3. Residual stresses in a cast iron automotive brake disc rotor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ripley, Maurice I.; Kirstein, Oliver

    2006-11-01

    Runout, and consequent juddering and pulsation through the brake pedal, is a multi-million dollar per year warranty problem for car manufacturers. There is some suspicion that the runout can be caused by relaxation of residual casting stresses when the disc is overheated during severe-braking episodes. We report here neutron-diffraction measurements of the levels and distribution of residual strains in a used cast iron brake disc rotor. The difficulties of measuring stresses in grey cast iron are outlined and three-dimensional residual-strain distributions are presented and their possible effects discussed.

  4. Stress Free Temperature Testing and Residual Stress Calculations on Out-of-Autoclave Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah; Tate, LaNetra C.; Danley, Susan; Sampson, Jeff; Taylor, Brian; Miller, Sandi

    2012-01-01

    Future launch vehicles will require the incorporation large composite parts that will make up primary and secondary components of the vehicle. NASA has explored the feasibility of manufacturing these large components using Out-of-Autoclave impregnated carbon fiber composite systems through many composites development projects. Most recently, the Composites for Exploration Project has been looking at the development of a 10 meter diameter fairing structure, similar in size to what will be required for a heavy launch vehicle. The development of new material systems requires the investigation of the material properties and the stress in the parts. Residual stress is an important factor to incorporate when modeling the stresses that a part is undergoing. Testing was performed to verify the stress free temperature with two-ply asymmetric panels. A comparison was done between three newly developed out of autoclave IM7 /Bismalieimide (BMI) systems. This paper presents the testing results and the analysis performed to determine the residual stress of the materials.

  5. Environmental Stress Testing of the Single Sample Cylinder: A Proven Consensus Standard for Internal Gas Analysis (IGA) or Residual Gas Analysis (RGA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuessler, Philipp WH

    2010-01-01

    In August 2008, Schuessler Consulting was contracted by NASA GSFC in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) program to perform two separate studies on moisture laden air in a stainless steel cylinder that had been designed to become a consensus standard for Test Method 1018. This Test Method was originally released for hybrids under Mil. Std. 883 but was quickly utilized on other microelectronic devices under the auspice of Mil. Std. 750. The cylinder had subsequently been fabricated for the 750 community. It was back-filled with moist air and subsequently analyzed over a period of time under a previous NASA contract. It had been shown that moisture in the 4000 - 5000 ppm range could be analyzed rather precisely with a mass spectrometer, commonly referred to as a Residual Gas Analyzer (RGA). The scope of this study was to ascertain if the composition and precision varied as a function of thermal shock at sub-zero temperatures and whether there was consensus when the standard was submitted to other RGA units. It was demonstrated and published that the consensus standard would yield precise RGA data for moisture within +/- 1% when optimized for a given RGA unit. It has been subsequently shown in this study at Oneida Research Services, that sub-zero storage did not affect that precision when a well-defined protocol for the analysis was followed. The consensus standard was taken to a second facility for analysis where it was found that moisture adsorption on the transfer lines caused precision to drop to +/- 12%. The Single Sample Cylinder (SSC) is a one liter stainless steel cylinder with associated sampling valves and has considerable weight and volume. But this considerable size allows for approximately 300 gas samples of the same composition to be delivered to any RGA unit. Lastly, a smaller cylinder, approximately 75 cc, of a second consensus standard was fabricated and tested with a different mix of fixed gases where moisture was kept in the

  6. Nondestructive method for measuring residual stresses in metals, a concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwebel, C. D.

    1968-01-01

    Nondestructive direct measurement of residual surface stresses in metals can be made because metal under stress has a different electrochemical solution potential than in the unstressed condition. The method uses two matched electrolytic cells to cancel extraneous effects on the actual solution potential of the metal specimen.

  7. Determination of Residual Stress in Composite Materials Using Ultrasonic Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rokhlin, S. I.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of high temperature composites can be significantly affected by the presence of residual stresses. These stresses arise during cooling processes from fabrication to room temperature due to mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients between matrix and fiber materials. This effect is especially pronounced in metal matrix and intermetallic composites. It can lead to plastic deformations, matrix cracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding. In this work the feasibility of ultrasonic techniques for residual stress assessment in composites is addressed. A novel technique for absolute stress determination in orthotropic materials from angular dependencies of ultrasonic velocities is described. The technique is applicable for determination of both applied and residual stresses and does not require calibration measurements on a reference sample. The important advantage of this method is that stress is determined simultaneously with stress-dependent elastic constants and is thus decoupled from the material texture. It is demonstrated that when the principal plane stress directions coincide with acoustical axes, the angular velocity data in the plane perpendicular to the stress plane may be used to determine both stress components. When the stress is off the acoustical axes, the shear and the difference of the normal stress components may be determined from the angular dependence of group velocities in the plane of stresses. Synthetic sets of experimental data corresponding to materials with different anisotropy and stress levels are used to check the applicability of the technique. The method is also verified experimentally. A high precision ultrasonic wave transmission technique is developed to measure angular dependence of ultrasonic velocities. Examples of stress determination from experimental velocity data are given. A method is presented for determination of velocities of ultrasonic waves propagating through the composite material with residual

  8. Modelling of residually stressed materials with application to AAA.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, T; Dorfmann, L; Ogden, R W

    2016-08-01

    Residual stresses are generated in living tissues by processes of growth and adaptation and they significantly influence the mechanical behaviour of the tissues. Thus, to effectively model the elastic response of the tissues relative to a residually stressed configuration the residual stresses need to be incorporated into the constitutive equations. The purposes of this paper are (a) to summarise a general elastic constitutive formulation that includes residual stress, (b) to specify the tensors needed for the three-dimensional implementation of the theory in a nonlinear finite element code, and (c) to use the theory and its implementation to evaluate the wall stress distribution in an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) using patient specific geometry and material model parameters. The considered material is anisotropic with two preferred directions indicating the orientation of the collagen fibres in the aortic tissue. The method described in this paper is general and can be used, by specifying appropriate energy functions, to investigate other residually stressed biological systems. PMID:26874252

  9. A New Methodology For In-Situ Residual Stress Measurement In MEMS Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastiani, M.; Bemporad, E.; Melone, G.; Rizzi, L.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, a new approach is presented for local residual stress measurement in MEMS structures. The newly proposed approach involves incremental focused ion beam (FIB) milling of annular trenches at material surface, combined with high resolution SEM imaging and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis for the measurement of the strain relief over the surface of the remaining central pillar. The proposed technique allows investigating the average residual stress on suspended micro-structures, with a spatial resolution lower than 1 μm. Results are presented for residual stress measurement on double clamped micro-beams, whose layers are obtained by DC-sputtering (PVD) deposition. Residual stresses were also independently measured by the conventional curvature method (Stoney's equation) on a similar homogeneous coating obtained by the same deposition parameters and a comparison and discussion of obtained results is performed.

  10. A New Methodology For In-Situ Residual Stress Measurement In MEMS Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sebastiani, M.; Bemporad, E.; Melone, G.; Rizzi, L.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2010-11-24

    In this paper, a new approach is presented for local residual stress measurement in MEMS structures. The newly proposed approach involves incremental focused ion beam (FIB) milling of annular trenches at material surface, combined with high resolution SEM imaging and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) analysis for the measurement of the strain relief over the surface of the remaining central pillar. The proposed technique allows investigating the average residual stress on suspended micro-structures, with a spatial resolution lower than 1 {mu}m. Results are presented for residual stress measurement on double clamped micro-beams, whose layers are obtained by DC-sputtering (PVD) deposition. Residual stresses were also independently measured by the conventional curvature method (Stoney's equation) on a similar homogeneous coating obtained by the same deposition parameters and a comparison and discussion of obtained results is performed.

  11. Thermoelastic Stress Analysis: The Mean Stress Effect in Metallic Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Baaklini, George Y.

    1999-01-01

    The primary objective of this study involved the utilization of the thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) method to demonstrate the mean stress dependence of the thermoelastic constant. Titanium and nickel base alloys, commonly employed in aerospace gas turbines, were the materials of interest. The repeatability of the results was studied through a statistical analysis of the data. Although the mean stress dependence was well established, the ability to confidently quantify it was diminished by the experimental variations. If calibration of the thermoelastic response to mean stress can be successfully implemented, it is feasible to use the relationship to determine a structure's residual stress state.

  12. Residual stress measurement and microstructural characterization of thick beryllium films

    SciTech Connect

    Detor, A; Wang, M; Hodge, A M; Chason, E; Walton, C; Hamza, A V; Xu, H; Nikroo, A

    2008-02-11

    Beryllium films are synthesized by a magnetron sputtering technique incorporating in-situ residual stress measurement. Monitoring the stress evolution in real time provides quantitative through-thickness information on the effects of various processing parameters, including sputtering gas pressure and substrate biasing. Specimens produced over a wide range of stress states are characterized via transmission and scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy, in order to correlate the stress data with microstructure. A columnar grain structure is observed for all specimens, and surface morphology is found to be strongly dependent on processing conditions. Analytical models of stress generation are reviewed and discussed in terms of the observed microstructure.

  13. Optimizing amorphous indium zinc oxide film growth for low residual stress and high electrical conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Sigdel, A. K.; Gennett, T.; Berry, J. J.; Perkins, J. D.; Ginley, D. S.; Packard, C. E.

    2013-10-01

    With recent advances in flexible electronics, there is a growing need for transparent conductors with optimum conductivity tailored to the application and nearly zero residual stress to ensure mechanical reliability. Within amorphous transparent conducting oxide (TCO) systems, a variety of sputter growth parameters have been shown to separately impact film stress and optoelectronic properties due to the complex nature of the deposition process. We apply a statistical design of experiments (DOE) approach to identify growth parameter-material property relationships in amorphous indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) thin films and observed large, compressive residual stresses in films grown under conditions typically used for the deposition of highly conductive samples. Power, growth pressure, oxygen partial pressure, and RF power ratio (RF/(RF + DC)) were varied according to a full-factorial test matrix and each film was characterized. The resulting regression model and analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant contributions to the residual stress from individual growth parameters as well as interactions of different growth parameters, but no conditions were found within the initial growth space that simultaneously produced low residual stress and high electrical conductivity. Extrapolation of the model results to lower oxygen partial pressures, combined with prior knowledge of conductivity-growth parameter relationships in the IZO system, allowed the selection of two promising growth conditions that were both empirically verified to achieve nearly zero residual stress and electrical conductivities >1480 S/cm. This work shows that a-IZO can be simultaneously optimized for high conductivity and low residual stress.

  14. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Residual Stress from Diamagnetic Velocity Shears

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltz, R. E.; Staebler, G. M.; Solomon, W. M.

    2010-11-01

    Residual stress refers to the remaining toroidal angular momentum (TAM) flux (divided by major radius) when the shear in the parallel velocity (and parallel velocity itself) vanishes. Previously [1] we demonstrated with gyrokinetic (GYRO) simulations that TAM pinching from the diamagnetic level shear in the ExB velocity could provide the residual stress needed for spontaneous toroidal rotation. Here we show that the shear in the diamagnetic velocities themselves provide comparable residual stress (and level of stabilization). The sign of the residual stress, quantified by the ratio of TAM flow to ion power flow (M/P), depends on the signs of the various velocity shears as well as ion (ITG) versus electron (TEM) mode directed turbulence. The residual stress from these temperature and density gradient diamagnetic velocity shears is demonstrated in global gyrokinetic simulation of ``null'' rotation DIIID discharges by matching M/P profiles within experimental error. 8pt [1] R.E. Waltz, G.M. Staebler, J. Candy, and F.L. Hinton, Phys. Plasmas 14, 122507 (2007); errata 16, 079902 (2009).

  15. Residual stresses in oxide scale formed on Fe-17Cr stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Xiao, Ji; Prud'homme, Nathalie; Chen, Zhe; Ji, Vincent

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate residual stresses in the oxide scale formed on ferritic stainless steel, which is proposed to be used as interconnector in the planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The oxidation of the alloy has been conducted at 700 °C, 800 °C and 900 °C for 12-96 h by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) system. The oxide surface morphology, cross-section microstructure and the chemical composition of the oxide scale were studied after oxidation, and the residual stresses distribution of the oxide scale were determined at room temperature. It has been found that the oxide scale composed of an inner Cr2O3 layer and an outer Mn1.5Cr1.5O4 spinel layer, the residual stresses in both oxide layers are compressive and the growth stresses plays an important role. The competition of the stresses generation and relaxation during oxidation and cooling affects the residual stresses level. The evolution of residual stresses in the two layers is different according to the oxidation temperature, and the stresses in the two layers are interactional.

  16. Development of process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    Nayama, Michisuke; Sakamoto, Naruo; Akitomo, Norio; Toyoda, Masao

    1995-12-31

    The authors develop new process to control residual stress distribution of butt weld joint of cylinder. This process, which is heating circularly at both side of butt weld joint and letting cool, can reduce tensile residual stress on inner surface near weld joint by operation from only outside of cylinder and its required temperature rise of this process is lower than ordinary PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) process. This paper describes the procedure and conditions of the process named ``both side heating`` by authors. The appropriate range of process conditions to get sufficient effect is confirmed by FEM stress history analysis and experiment in this paper. Experiments show that the inner residual stress near weld is reduced to compression from over yield stress at as weld condition in austenitic stainless steel pipe to pipe joints, pipe to elbow joints and pipe to valve joint after application of the process.

  17. Residual stresses in weld overlay tubes: A finite element study

    SciTech Connect

    Taljat, B.; Zacharia, T.; Wang, X.L.; Keiser, J.R.; Feng, Z.; Jirinec, M.J.

    1997-01-03

    Residual stresses and strains in a tube with circumferential weld overlay were analyzed by the finite element (FE) method. The objective of this work was to develop and verify a FE model, to determine the magnitude and distribution of residual stresses in the weld overlay tube, and to evaluate the significance of two contributing factors to residual stress: (1) difference in material properties between tube and weld material, and (2) thermal gradients in the weld. An axisymmetric FE model was developed to simulate the circumferential two-layer welding process of alloy 625 overlay on SA210 tube. The first layer was modeled as a gas metal arc welding process with filler metal, whereas the autogenous gas tungsten arc welding process was modeled for the second layer. Neutron diffraction technique was used to experimentally determine residual elastic strains in the weld overlay tube. Comparison with the FE results shows overall good agreement. Both the experimental and FE results show high compressive stresses at the inside tube surface and high tensile stresses in the weld overlay. This suggests that weld overlay may be used to relieve tensile or produce compressive stresses at the inside tube surface, which is significant for applications where crack initiation is found at the root pass of the joining weld.

  18. Residual stresses in injection molded shape memory polymer parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katmer, Sukran; Esen, Huseyin; Karatas, Cetin

    2016-03-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are materials which have shape memory effect (SME). SME is a property which has the ability to change shape when induced by a stimulator such as temperature, moisture, pH, electric current, magnetic field, light, etc. A process, known as programming, is applied to SMP parts in order to alter them from their permanent shape to their temporary shape. In this study we investigated effects of injection molding and programming processes on residual stresses in molded thermoplastic polyurethane shape memory polymer, experimentally. The residual stresses were measured by layer removal method. The study shows that injection molding and programming process conditions have significantly influence on residual stresses in molded shape memory polyurethane parts.

  19. Residual stress measurements in polycrystalline graphite with micro-Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Ram; Jones, Abbie N.; Edge, Ruth; Marsden, Barry J.

    2015-06-01

    Micro-Raman microscopy technique is applied to evaluate unevenly distributed residual stresses in the various constituents of polygranular reactor grades graphite. The wavenumber based Raman shift (cm-1) corresponds to the local residual stress and measurements of stress dependent first order Raman spectra in graphite have enabled localized residual stress values to be determined. The bulk polygranular graphite of reactor grades - Gilsocarbon, NBG-18 and PGA - are examined to illustrate the residual stress variations in their constituents. Binder phase and filler particles have shown to be under compressive and tensile stresses, respectively. Among the studied graphite grades, the binder phase in Gilsocarbon has the highest residual stress and NBG-18 has the lowest value. Filler particles in Gilsocarbon have the highest residual stress and PGA showed the lowest, this is most likely due to the morphology of the coke particles used in the manufacturing and applied processing techniques for fabrications. Stresses have also been evaluated along the peripheral of pores and at the tips of the cracks. Cracks in filler and binder phases have shown mixed behaviour, compressive as well as tensile, whereas pores in binder and filler particles have shown compressive behaviour. The stresses in these graphitic constituents are of the order of MPa. Non-destructive analyses presented in this study make the current state-of-the-art technique a powerful method for the study of stress variations near the graphite surface and are expected to increase its use further in property determination analysis of low to highly fluence irradiated graphite samples from the material test reactors.

  20. Phase composition and residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betsofen, S. Ya.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Ashmarin, A. A.; Molostov, D. E.

    2015-10-01

    The phase composition and the residual stresses in multilayer thermal barrier coatings, which consist of an external ZrO2-8Y2O3 ceramic layer, an intermediate gradient (metal ceramic) layer, and a transient metallic NiCrAlY sublayer, are studied. It is shown that an increase in the specific volume of the metallic sublayer as a result of the formation of thermal growing oxide Al2O3 generates high compressive stresses in this sublayer. The ceramic layer undergoes tensile stresses in this case. A method is proposed to estimate the stresses in gradient coatings from X-ray diffraction results.

  1. Remarks on Residual Stress Measurement by Hole-Drilling and Electronic Speckle Pattern Interferometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Hole drilling is the most widespread method for measuring residual stress. It is based on the principle that drilling a hole in the material causes a local stress relaxation; the initial residual stress can be calculated by measuring strain in correspondence with each drill depth. Recently optical techniques were introduced to measure strain; in this case, the accuracy of the final results depends, among other factors, on the proper choice of the area of analysis. Deformations are in fact analyzed within an annulus determined by two parameters: the internal and the external radius. In this paper, the influence of the choice of the area of analysis was analysed. A known stress field was introduced on a Ti grade 5 sample and then the stress was measured in correspondence with different values of the internal and the external radius of analysis; results were finally compared with the expected theoretical value. PMID:25276850

  2. Modeling of residual stresses by HY-100 weldments

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; Taljat, B.; Radhakrishnan, B.

    1997-02-01

    Residual stress distribution in a HY-100 steel disk, induced by GTA spot welding, was analyzed by finite element (FE) formulations and measured by neutron diffraction (ND). Computations used temperature- dependent thermophysical and mechanical properties. FE model predictions are in good agreement with ND data in far heat affected zone (HAZ) and in base metal. Predicted residual stresses in fusion zone and near HAZ were higher than those measured by ND. This discrepancy was attributed to microstructural changes and associated material properties in the HAZ and fusion zone due to phase transformations during the weld thermal cycle.

  3. On Taylor-Series Approximations of Residual Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruett, C. David

    1999-01-01

    Although subgrid-scale models of similarity type are insufficiently dissipative for practical applications to large-eddy simulation, in recently published a priori analyses, they perform remarkably well in the sense of correlating highly against exact residual stresses. Here, Taylor-series expansions of residual stress are exploited to explain the observed behavior and "success" of similarity models. Until very recently, little attention has been given to issues related to the convergence of such expansions. Here, we re-express the convergence criterion of Vasilyev [J. Comput. Phys., 146 (1998)] in terms of the transfer function and the wavenumber cutoff of the grid filter.

  4. Mapping Residual Stress Distributions at the Micron Scale in Amorphous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winiarski, Bartlomiej; Langford, Richard M.; Tian, Jiawan; Yokoyama, Yoshihiko; Liaw, Peter K.; Withers, Philip J.

    2010-07-01

    Residual stresses in crystalline or glassy materials often play a key role in the performance of advanced devices and components. However, stresses in amorphous materials cannot easily be determined at the micron scale by diffraction, or by other conventional laboratory methods. In this article, a technique for mapping residual stress profiles in amorphous materials with high spatial definition is presented. By applying a focused ion beam (FIB)-based semidestructive mechanical relaxation method, the stresses are mapped in a peened and fatigued bulk metallic glass (BMG) (Zr50Cu40Al10 at. pct). The residual stresses are inferred using finite element analysis (FEA) of the surface relaxations, as measured by digital image correlation (DIC), that occur when a microslot is micromachined by FIB. Further, we have shown that acceptable accuracy can in most cases be achieved using a simple analytical model of the slot. It was found that the fatigue cycling significantly changes the distribution of compressive residual stresses with depth in the plastically deformed surface layer. Our observations point to the scalability of this method to map residual stresses in volumes as small as 1 × 1 × 0.2 μm3 or less.

  5. Residual Stress Measurements of Explosively Clad Cylindrical Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Douglas J; Watkins, Thomas R; Hubbard, Camden R; Hill, M. R.; Meith, W. A.

    2012-01-01

    Tantalum refractory liners were explosively clad into cylindrical pressure vessels, some of which had been previously autofrettaged. Using explosive cladding, the refractory liner formed a metallurgical bond with the steel of the pressure vessel at a cost of induced strain. Two techniques were employed to determine the residual stress state of the clad steel cylinders: neutron diffraction and mechanical slitting. Neutron diffraction is typically nondestructive; however, due to attenuation along the beam path, the cylinders had to be sectioned into rings that were nominally 25 mm thick. Slitting is a destructive method, requiring the sectioning of the cylindrical samples. Both techniques provided triaxial stress data and useful information on the effects of explosive cladding. The stress profiles in the hoop and radial directions were similar for an autofrettaged, nonclad vessel and a clad, nonautofrettaged vessel. The stress profiles in the axial direction appeared to be different. Further, the data suggested that residual stresses from the autofrettage and explosive cladding processes were not additive, in part due to evidence of reverse yielding. The residual stress data are presented, compared and discussed.

  6. Surface Residual Stresses in Ti-6Al-4V Friction Stir Welds: Pre- and Post-Thermal Stress Relief

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, P.; Ramulu, M.

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the residual stresses present in titanium friction stir welds and if a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle would be effective in minimizing those weld-induced residual stresses. Surface residual stresses in titanium 6Al-4V alloy friction stir welds were measured in butt joint thicknesses ranging from 3 to 12 mm. The residual stress states were also evaluated after the welds were subjected to a post-weld thermal stress relief cycle of 760 °C for 45 min. High (300-400 MPa) tensile residual stresses were observed in the longitudinal direction prior to stress relief and compressive residual stresses were measured in the transverse direction. After stress relief, the residual stresses were decreased by an order of magnitude to negligible levels.

  7. Study on residual stresses in ultrasonic torsional vibration assisted micro-milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zesheng; Hu, Haijun; Sun, Yazhou; Sun, Qing

    2010-10-01

    It is well known that machining induced residual stresses can seriously affect the dimensional accuracy, corrosion and wear resistance, etc., and further influence the longevity and reliability of Micro-Optical Components (MOC). In Ultrasonic Torsional Vibration Assisted Micro-milling (UTVAM), cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank are the main factors which affect residual stresses. A 2D model of UTVAM was established with FE analysis software ABAQUS. Johnson-Cook's flow stress model and shear failure principle are used as the workpiece material model and failure principle, while friction between tool and workpiece uses modified Coulomb's law whose sliding friction area is combined with sticking friction. By means of FEA, the influence rules of cutting parameters, vibration parameters, mill cutter parameters, the status of wear length of tool flank on residual stresses are obtained, which provides a basis for choosing optimal process parameters and improving the longevity and reliability of MOC.

  8. The inclusion of weld residual stress in fracture margin assessments of embrittled nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, T.L.; Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Analyses were performed to determine the impact of weld residual stresses in a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) on (1) the generation of pressure temperature (P-T) curves required for maintaining specified fracture prevention margins during nuclear plant startup and shutdown, and (2) the conditional probability of vessel failure due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) loading. The through wall residual stress distribution in an axially oriented weld was derived using measurements taken from a shell segment of a canceled RPV and finite element thermal stress analyses. The P-T curve derived from the best estimate load analysis and a t / 8 deep flaw, based on K{sub Ic}, was less limiting than the one derived from the current methodology prescribed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The inclusion of the weld residual stresses increased the conditional probability of cleavage fracture due to PTS loading by a factor ranging from 2 to 4.

  9. Residual stress distribution in oxide films formed on Zircaloy-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawabe, T.; Sonoda, T.; Furuya, M.; Kitajima, S.; Takano, H.

    2015-11-01

    In order to evaluate residual the stress distribution in oxides formed on zirconium alloys, synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed on the oxides formed on Zircaloy-2 after autoclave treatment at a temperature of 360° C in pure water. The use of a micro-beam XRD and a micro-sized cross-sectional sample achieved the detailed local characterization of the oxides. The oxide microstructure was observed by TEM following the micro-beam XRD measurements. The residual compressive stress increased in the vicinity of the oxide/metal interface of the pre-transition oxide. Highly oriented columnar grains of a monoclinic phase were observed in that region. Furthermore, at the interface of the post-first transition oxide, there was only a small increase in the residual compressive stress and the columnar grains had a more random orientation. The volume fraction of the tetragonal phase increased with the residual compressive stress. The results are discussed in terms of the formation and transition of the protective oxide.

  10. Determination of the residual stress-crack opening relationship of SFRC flexural members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaklauskas, Gintaris; Gribniak, Viktor; Meskenas, Adas; Rimkus, Arvydas; Kaklauskas, Arturas; Kupliauskas, Rimantas

    2013-10-01

    Steel fibre reinforced concrete (SFRC) has become widespread material in building areas such as underground shotcrete structures or industrial floors. However, due to the absence of universally accepted guidelines for SFRC, application fields of this material are still limited. This paper deals with assessment of the residual stresses of tensile SFRC. An adequate method for determination of residual stress-crack opening relation, based on test data of three-point bending beams is proposed. To verify the analysis results a numerical modelling is utilized employing a nonlinear finite element analysis program. Simulated load-crack width curves were compared with the experimental data validating adequacy of the proposed model.

  11. Measurements of residual stresses and surface topography using optical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baishi

    The dissertation presents two breakthrough optical interferometric techniques for the measurements of both whole-field residual stresses and surface topography. First, the whole-field residual stress measurement technique is developed for the first time using moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry coupled high temperature resistant grating technique and thermal annealing. In the measurement, a special high temperature resistant cross grating is firstly made on the sample surface, and the whole-field residual stress relief is achieved by thermal annealing. Moire interferometry and Twyman/Green interferometry are then utilized to measure both in-plane and out-of-plane deformations generated by the residual stress relaxation, and then to obtain the whole-field strain redistribution due to the residual stress relief. The technique has been successfully applied to the measurement of the whole-field generalized 2-D residual stresses (i.e. both in-plane stresses and the out-of-plane normal stresses) in the rail using a transverse rail slice based on plausible assumptions. Its comparison to hole-drilling method with moire interferometry shows good quantitative agreement. Some key issues for further development are identified and discussed. Second, a novel polarization phase-stepping shearing interferometry (PPSSI) is presented for the calibration-free measurement of surface topography regardless of any surface reflectivity variation. The PPSSI incorporates the polarization phase modulation and Nomarski shearing interferometry to measure wavefront phase difference, or surface slope, irrespective of any wavefront amplitude change. The principle and theory of the PPSSI are described using Jones matrix method. Experimental results and its applications to the topographic measurements and flat wafers and speckle samples are shown. In addition, the modulation transfer function (MTF) and impulse response of a PPSSI system are studied both analytically and

  12. Nondestructive testing and characterization of residual stress field using an ultrasonic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wentao; Xu, Chunguang; Pan, Qinxue; Song, Jianfeng

    2016-03-01

    To address the difficulty in testing and calibrating the stress gradient in the depth direction of mechanical components, a new technology of nondestructive testing and characterization of the residual stress gradient field by ultrasonic method is proposed based on acoustoelasticity theory. By carrying out theoretical analysis, the sensitivity coefficients of different types of ultrasonic are obtained by taking the low carbon steel(12%C) as a research object. By fixing the interval distance between sending and receiving transducers, the mathematical expressions of the change of stress and the variation of time are established. To design one sending-one receiving and oblique incidence ultrasonic detection probes, according to Snell law, the critically refracted longitudinal wave (LCR wave) is excited at a certain depth of the fixed distance of the tested components. Then, the relationship between the depth of LCR wave detection and the center frequency of the probe in Q235 steel is obtained through experimental study. To detect the stress gradient in the depth direction, a stress gradient LCR wave detection model is established, through which the stress gradient formula is derived by the relationship between center frequency and detecting depth. A C-shaped stress specimen of Q235 steel is designed to conduct stress loading tests, and the stress is measured with the five group probes at different center frequencies. The accuracy of ultrasonic testing is verified by X-ray stress analyzer. The stress value of each specific depth is calculated using the stress gradient formula. Accordingly, the ultrasonic characterization of residual stress field is realized. Characterization results show that the stress gradient distribution is consistent with the simulation in ANSYS. The new technology can be widely applied in the detection of the residual stress gradient field caused by mechanical processing, such as welding and shot peening.

  13. FEM simulation of residual stresses induced by laser Peening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyre, P.; Sollier, A.; Chaieb, I.; Berthe, L.; Bartnicki, E.; Braham, C.; Fabbro, R.

    2003-08-01

    Benefits from laser Peening have been demonstrated several times in fields like fatigue, wear or stress corrosion cracking. However, in spite of recent work on the calculation of residual stresses, very few authors have considered a finite element method (FEM) approach to predict laser-induced mechanical effect. This comes mainly from the high strain rates involved during LP (10^6 s^{-1}), that necessitate the precise determination of dynamic properties, and also from the possible combination of thermal and mechanical loadings in the case of LP without protective coatings. In this paper, we aim at presenting a global approach of the problem, starting from the determination of loading conditions and dynamic yield strengths, to finish with FEM calculation of residual stress fields induced on a 12% Cr martensitic stainless steel and a 7075 aluminium alloy.

  14. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  15. Residual Stress in Brazing of Submicron Al2O3 to WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunder, T.; Piquerez, A.; Bach, M.; Mille, P.

    2016-06-01

    This study evaluated the residual stresses induced by brazing and grinding submicron Al2O3, using different methods. Energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry analysis (EDX) of 72Ag-Cu filler and filler/WC-Co interface showed evidence of atomic diffusion and possible formation of titanium oxide layers between the joint and the bonding materials. An analytical model supported by the finite element method (FEM) based on strain determination due to the difference in variation of thermal expansion was used to assess the stress distribution at the coupling interface and in bulk materials. The model took into account the evolution of the Young's modulus and of the thermal expansion with temperature. The model could be used to follow strain and stress evolutions of the bonded materials during the cooling cycle. The maximum stress rose above -300 MPa at the center of the 100 × 100 × 3 mm ceramic plates. The residual stresses on the external surface of ceramic were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and indentation fracture method (IFM). After brazing and grinding the plate, the principal stresses were 128.1 and 94.9 MPa, and the shear stress was -20.1 MPa. Microscopic examination revealed grain pull-out promoted by the global residual stresses induced by the brazing and grinding processes. The surface stresses evaluated by the different methods were reasonably correlated.

  16. Long-Term Stability of Residual Stress Improvement by Water Jet Peening Considering Working Processes.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Osawa, Yusuke; Itoh, Shinsuke; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi

    2013-06-01

    To prevent primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC), water jet peening (WJP) has been used on the welds of Ni-based alloys in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Before WJP, the welds are machined and buffed in order to conduct a penetrant test (PT) to verify the weld qualities to access, and microstructure evolution takes place in the target area due to the severe plastic deformation. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP might be unstable under elevated temperatures because of the high dislocation density in the compressive stress layer. Therefore, the stability of the compressive residual stresses caused by WJP was investigated during long-term operation by considering the microstructure evolution due to the working processes. The following conclusions were made: The compressive residual stresses were slightly relaxed in the surface layers of the thermally aged specimens. There were no differences in the magnitude of the relaxation based on temperature or time. The compressive residual stresses induced by WJP were confirmed to remain stable under elevated temperatures. The stress relaxation at the surface followed the Johnson-Mehl equation, which states that stress relaxation can occur due to the recovery of severe plastic strain, since the estimated activation energy agrees very well with the self-diffusion energy for Ni. By utilizing the additivity rule, it was indicated that stress relaxation due to recovery is completed during the startup process. It was proposed that the long-term stability of WJP under elevated temperatures must be assessed based on compressive stresses with respect to the yield stress. Thermal elastic-plastic creep analysis was performed to predict the effect of creep strain. After 100 yr of simulated continuous operation at 80% capacity, there was little change in the WJP compressive stresses under an actual operating temperature of 623 K. Therefore, the long-term stability of WJP during actual operation was

  17. Investigation of residual stresses in a multipass weld in 1 in. stainless steel plate

    SciTech Connect

    Spooner, S.; Fernandez Baca, J.A.; David, S.A.; Hubbard, C.R.; Holden, T.M.; Root, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Residual stresses and strains were measured in two welded 25-mm thick plates of type 304 stainless steel by the neutron diffraction. The filler metal was type 308 stainless steel and the weld zone had a two phase microstructure in which the austenitic phase lattice parameter differs from the base metal. In these circumstances stain-free samples were taken from the weld zone area for analysis of the lattice parameters and ferrite content using neutron powder diffraction. Corrections for lattice parameter variation were applied permitting the calculation of residual strains and stresses in weld zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. One of the two welds was examined without stress relief and the other was given a stress relief treatment consisting of vibration at a frequency below the resonant condition dudng welding. In both plates the largest residual stress component (longitudinal) is found in the fusion zone near the boundary between the weld zone and the heat affected zone. This longitudinal component is 400 {plus_minus} 50 MPa in tension. The normal stresses are generally close to zero although large fluctuations are found in the weld zone. The transverse stresses are as high as 200 MPa in the weld zone and decrease to 50 MPa {plus_minus} 40 MPa. The lattice parameter variation was equivalent to 5 {times} l0{minus}4 compressive strain and the ferrite content approached 9 percent at the center of the weld zone. Variations in residual stresses with thickness through the base metal plate were small. The treated plate and untreated plate showed nearly identical patterns of stress distribution. Differences in the measured stresses between vibratory-stress-relief treated and untreated plates fall within error bars of the stress determination in these particular 25 mm thick 300-type stainless steel plates.

  18. Forging And Milling Contribution On Residual Stresses For A Textured Biphasic Titanium Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Deleuze, C.; Fabre, A.; Barrallier, L.; Molinas, O.

    2011-01-17

    Ti-10V-2Fe-3Al is a biphasic titanium alloy ({alpha}+{beta}) used in aeronautical applications for its mechanical properties, such as its yield strength of 1200 MPa and it weighs 40% less than steel. This alloy is particularly useful for vital parts with complex geometry, because of its high forging capability. In order to predict the capability for fatigue lifetime, the designers need to know the residual stresses. X-Ray diffraction is the main experimental technique used to determine residual stresses on the surface. In this case, stress levels are primarily influenced by the complex forging and milling process. On this alloy in particular, it may be difficult to characterize stress due to modification of the microstructure close to the surface. Results obtained by x-ray analysis depend on the correct definition of the shape of the diffraction peaks. The more precisely defined the position of the peak, the more accurately the stresses are evaluated. This paper presents a method to detect if residual stresses can be characterized by x-ray diffraction. The characterization of hardness seems to be a relevant technique to quickly analyze the capability of x-ray diffraction to determine residual stresses.

  19. Finite Element Modeling and Validation of Residual Stresses in 304 L Girth Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dike, J.J.; Ortega, A.R.; Cadden, C.H.; Rangaswamy, P. Brown, D.

    1998-06-01

    Three dimensional finite element simulations of thermal and mechanical response of a 304 L stainless steel pipe subjected to a circumferential autogenous gas tungsten arc weld were used to predict residual stresses in the pipe. Energy is input into the thermal model using a volumetric heat source. Temperature histories from the thermal analysis are used as loads in the mechanical analyses. In the mechanical analyses, a state variable constitutive model was used to describe the material behavior. The model accounts for strain rate, temperature, and load path histories. The predicted stresses are compared with x-ray diffraction determinations of residual stress in the hoop and circumferential directions on the outside surface of the pipe. Calculated stress profiles fell within the measured data. Reasons for observed scatter in measured stresses are discussed.

  20. Bioinjection Treatment: Effects of Post-Injection Residual Stress on Left Ventricular Wall Stress

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Lik Chuan; Wall, Samuel T.; Genet, Martin; Hinson, Andy; Guccione, Julius M.

    2014-01-01

    Injection of biomaterials into diseased myocardium has been associated with decreased myofiber stress, restored left ventricular (LV) geometry and improved LV function. However, its exact mechanism(s) of action remained unclear. In this work, we present the first patient-specific computational model of biomaterial injection that accounts for the possibility of residual strain and stress introduced by this treatment. We show that the presence of residual stress can create more heterogeneous regional myofiber stress and strain fields. Our simulation results show that the treatment generates low stress and stretch areas between injection sites, and high stress and stretch areas between the injections and both the endocardium and epicardium. Globally, these local changes are translated into an increase in average myofiber stress and its standard deviation (from 6.9 ± 4.6 to 11.2 ± 48.8 kPa and 30 ± 15 to 35.1 ± 50.9 kPa at end-diastole and end-systole, respectively). We also show that the myofiber stress field is sensitive to the void-to-injection size ratio – for a constant void size, the myofiber stress field became less heterogeneous with decreasing injection volume. These results suggest that the residual stress and strain possibly generated by biomaterial injection treatment can have large effects on the regional myocardial stress and strain fields, which may be important in the remodeling process. PMID:25065728

  1. Stress analysis of header material sets

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, C.M.; Merten, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    Header design ideology and material selection are described. Current header designs utilize a glass-ceramic insulator which is bonded to a current carrying pin and a metal shell. Residual stresses in the header occur as a result of cooling from the glass softening temperature and are attributable to differences within the header material set in coefficients of thermal expansion. A stress analysis is undertaken to model the residual thermal stresses in glass-ceramic headers. A feature of this model is that it simulates bonding at glass-ceramic to metal interfaces by precluding interfacial sliding. Residual stresses for four material sets are analyzed. These material sets are chosen to illustrate the various stress states which can arise due to differing combinations of coefficients of thermal expansion within a material set. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Impurity Effects on Momentum Transport and Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Sehoon; Jhang, Hogun; Singh, R.

    2015-11-01

    Impurities are inevitable during tokamak plasma operation because of strong interaction of plasma and plasma facing component and helium ash as a byproduct of fusion process. They cause problems such as radiation power loss and fusion fuel dilution. On the other hands, they are used to diagnosis plasma parameters (CES, XICS etc) and to suppress edge-localized mode by wall-coating. In this research, we study the impact of impurities on turbulence driven intrinsic rotation (via residual stress) in the context of the quasi-linear theory. A two-fluid formulation for main and impurity ions is employed to study ion temperature gradient modes in sheared slab geometry modified by the presence of impurities. An effective form of the parallel Reynolds stress is derived in the center of mass frame of a coupled main ion-impurity system. Analyses show that the contents and the radial profile of impurities have a strong influence on the residual stress. In particular, an impurity profile aligned with that of main ions is shown to cause a considerable reduction of the residual stress, which may lead to the reduction of turbulence driven intrinsic rotation.

  3. Residual stress measurements in forced convective quenched steel bars by means of neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Hernandez-Morales, B.; Hawbolt, B.E.; Brimacombe, J.K.

    1996-12-31

    The residual stress distributions in 38.1 mm-dia., forced convective quenched bars of interstitial-free (IF), 1045 carbon, and alloyed steels were determined by neutron diffraction. The IF and 1045 carbon steel quenched bars exhibited compressive axial and circumferential (hoop) residual stresses near the surface and tensile values at the center. The radial residual stresses were tensile at all radial positions, decreasing towards zero near the surface. In contrast, the measured axial and circumferential components of the residual stress tensor in the alloyed eutectoid steel quenched bar were tensile near the surface and decreased to compressive values at the center. The radial component showed a maximum compressive value at the center and approached zero close to the surface. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing of the three steel specimens, revealed that the IF steel had transformed completely to ferrite, while the 1045 carbon steel bar transformed to martensite near the surface and a mixture of pearlite, ferrite and martensite at the center. On the other hand, the alloyed eutectoid steel specimen transformed entirely to martensite with small amounts of bainite near the center of the rod. The observed differences in the residual stress distributions in the three steels were explained based on the sequence of phase transformations that took place during quenching.

  4. Residual Stress Measurements After Proof and Flight: ETP-0403

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Ronald L..

    1997-01-01

    The intent of this testing was to evaluate the residual stresses that occur in and around the attachment details of a case stiffener segment that has been subjected to flight/recovery followed by proof loading. Not measured in this test were stresses relieved at joint disassembly due to out-of-round and interference effects, and those released by cutting the specimens out of the case segment. The test article was lightweight case stiffener segment 1U50715, S/N L023 which was flown in the forward stiffener position on flight SRM 14A and in the aft position on flight SRM24A. Both of these flights were flown with the 3 stiffener ring configuration. Stiffener L023 had a stiffener ring installed only on the aft stub in its first flight, and it had both rings installed on its second flight. No significant post flight damage was found on either flight. Finally, the segment was used on the DM-8 static test motor in the forward position. No stiffener rings were installed. It had only one proof pressurization prior to assignment to its first use, and it was cleaned and proof tested after each flight. Thus, the segment had seen 3 proof tests, two flight pressurizations, and two low intensity water impacts prior to manufacturing for use on DM-8. On DM-8 it received one static firing pressurization in the horizontal configuration. Residual stresses at the surface and in depth were evaluated by both the x-ray diffraction and neutron beam diffraction methods. The x-ray diffraction evaluations were conducted by Technology for Energy Corporation (TEC) at their facilities in Knoxville, TN. The neutron beam evaluations were done by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories in Ontario. The results showed general agreement with relatively high compressive residual stresses on the surface and moderate to low subsurface tensile residual stresses.

  5. Evaluation of Surface Residual Stresses in Friction Stir Welds Due to Laser and Shot Peening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatamleh, Omar; Rivero, Iris V.; Lyons, Jed

    2007-01-01

    The effects of laser, and shot peening on the residual stresses in Friction Stir Welds (FSW) has been investigated. The surface residual stresses were measured at five different locations across the weld in order to produce an adequate residual stress profile. The residual stresses before and after sectioning the coupon from the welded plate were also measured, and the effect of coupon size on the residual stress relaxation was determined and characterized. Measurements indicate that residual stresses were not uniform along the welded plate, and large variation in stress magnitude could be exhibited at various locations along the FSW plate. Sectioning resulted in significant residual stress relaxation in the longitudinal direction attributed to the large change in dimensions in this direction. Overall, Laser and shot peening resulted in a significant reduction in tensile residual stresses at the surface of the specimens.

  6. Residual stress, mechanical behavior and electrical properties of Cu/Nb thin-film multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, A.J. Jr.; Hundley, M.F.; Jervis, T.R.; Kung, H.H.; Scarborough, W.K.; Walter, K.C.; Nastasi, M.; Embury, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    Effect of compositional wavelength (modulation) on residual stress, electrical resistivities and mechanical properties of Cu/Nb thin-film multilayers sputtered onto single-crystal Si substrates, was evaluated. Electrical resistivities were measured down to 4 K using a standard 4-point probe. Differential specimen curvature was used to determine residual stress, and a microprobe was used to obtain hardness and elastic modulus. Profilometry, ion-beam analysis and TEM were used. Hardness of the Cu-Nb multilayers increased with decreasing compositional wavelength so that the layered structures had hardness values in excess of either constituent and the hardness predicted by the rule of mixtures. A peak in net residual compressive stress of the multilayers was observed at a compositional wavelength of 100 nm. No resistivity plateau was observed within the composition wavelength range studied.

  7. Experimental determination of the residual stresses in a Kraft recovery boiler tube

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xun-Li; Payzant, E.A.; Taljat, B.

    1997-07-01

    Neutron diffraction was used to determine the residual stresses in a spiral weld overlay tube used in Kraft recovery boilers by the pulp and paper industry. The specimen was a 2.5 inches OD carbon steel tube covered with a layer of Inconel 625 weld overlay. Residual strains in the carbon steel and weld overlay layers were determined using the ferritic (211) and austenitic (311) reflections, respectively. Residual stresses in each material were derived from the measured strains using Hooke`s law and appropriate elastic constants. Tensile stress regions were found not only in the weld metal but also in the heat affected zone in the carbon steel. The maximum tensile stress was located in the weld overlay layer and was found to be 360 MPa, or about 75% of the yield strength of the weld metal. The experimental data were compared with a finite element analysis based on an uncoupled thermal-mechanical formulation. Overall, the modeling results were in satisfactory agreement with the experimental data, although the hoop strain (stress) appears to have been overestimated by the finite element model. Additional neutron diffraction measurements on an annealed tube confirmed that these welding residual stresses were eliminated after annealing at 900{degrees}C for 20 minutes. 18 refs., 7 figs.

  8. Burst Ductility of Zirconium Clads: The Defining Role of Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kanjarla, A. K.; Lodh, Arijit; Singh, Jaiveer; Singh, Ramesh; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, Indradev

    2016-08-01

    Closed end burst tests, using room temperature water as pressurizing medium, were performed on a number of industrially produced zirconium (Zr) clads. A total of 31 samples were selected based on observed differences in burst ductility. The latter was represented as total circumferential elongation or TCE. The selected samples, with a range of TCE values (5 to 35 pct), did not show any correlation with mechanical properties along axial direction, microstructural parameters, crystallographic textures, and outer tube-surface normal ( σ 11) and shear ( τ 13) components of the residual stress matrix. TCEs, however, had a clear correlation with hydrostatic residual stress ( P h), as estimated from tri-axial stress analysis on the outer tube surface. Estimated P h also scaled with measured normal stress ( σ 33) at the tube cross section. An elastic-plastic finite element model with ductile damage failure criterion was developed to understand the burst mechanism of zirconium clads. Experimentally measured P h gradients were imposed on a solid element continuum finite element (FE) simulation to mimic the residual stresses present prior to pressurization. Trends in experimental TCEs were also brought out with computationally efficient shell element-based FE simulations imposing the outer tube-surface P h values. Suitable components of the residual stress matrix thus determined the burst performance of the Zr clads.

  9. Burst Ductility of Zirconium Clads: The Defining Role of Residual Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Gulshan; Kanjarla, A. K.; Lodh, Arijit; Singh, Jaiveer; Singh, Ramesh; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G. K.; Saibaba, N.; Doherty, R. D.; Samajdar, Indradev

    2016-05-01

    Closed end burst tests, using room temperature water as pressurizing medium, were performed on a number of industrially produced zirconium (Zr) clads. A total of 31 samples were selected based on observed differences in burst ductility. The latter was represented as total circumferential elongation or TCE. The selected samples, with a range of TCE values (5 to 35 pct), did not show any correlation with mechanical properties along axial direction, microstructural parameters, crystallographic textures, and outer tube-surface normal (σ 11) and shear (τ 13) components of the residual stress matrix. TCEs, however, had a clear correlation with hydrostatic residual stress (P h), as estimated from tri-axial stress analysis on the outer tube surface. Estimated P h also scaled with measured normal stress (σ 33) at the tube cross section. An elastic-plastic finite element model with ductile damage failure criterion was developed to understand the burst mechanism of zirconium clads. Experimentally measured P h gradients were imposed on a solid element continuum finite element (FE) simulation to mimic the residual stresses present prior to pressurization. Trends in experimental TCEs were also brought out with computationally efficient shell element-based FE simulations imposing the outer tube-surface P h values. Suitable components of the residual stress matrix thus determined the burst performance of the Zr clads.

  10. Dual-axis hole-drilling ESPI residual stress measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Steinzig, Michael; Schajer, Gary

    2008-01-01

    A novel dual-axis ESPI hole-drilling residual stress measurement method is presented. The method enables the evaluation of all the in-plane normal stress components with similar response to measurement errors, significantly lower than with single-axis measurements. A numerical method is described that takes advantage of, and compactly handles, the additional optical data that are available from the second measurement axis. Experimental tests were conducted on a calibrated specimen to demonstrate the proposed method, and the results supported theoretical expectations.

  11. A residual stress study in similar and dissimilar welds

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Eisazadeh, Hamid; Goldak, John A.; Aidun, Daryush K.; Coules, Harry E.; Bunn, Jeffrey R; Achuthan, A.

    2016-04-01

    Residual strain distributions in similar and dissimilar welds were measured using neutron diffraction (ND) method. Then, using three strain components, three-dimensional stress states were calculated. The results were used to determine the effect of the martensitic phase transformation and material properties on residual stress (RS) distribution. It was observed that smaller longitudinal RS was induced in the low carbon steel side of dissimilar weld when compared to its similar weld. Also, it was found that the transverse RS near and within the weld zone (WZ) in dissimilar weld exhibited a distinctive trend, with tensile mode reaching the yield strength ofmore » the base metal (BM). In order to characterize the WZ in dissimilar weld, we deployed optical microscopy, hardness, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). This study not only provides further insight into the RS state in similar and dissimilar welds; it also delivers important consequences of phase transformation in the latter case.« less

  12. Mechanical relaxation of localized residual stresses associatedwith foreign object damage

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, B.L.; Chen, X.; Peters, J.O.; Hutchinson, J.H.; Ritchie,R.O.

    2002-05-01

    Foreign-object damage associated with the ingestion ofdebris into aircraft turbine engines can lead to a marked degradation inthe high-cycle fatigue life of turbine components. This degradation isgenerally considered to be associated with the premature initiation offatigue cracks at or near the damage sites; this is suspected to be dueto, at least in part, the impact-induced residual stress state, which canbe strongly tensile in these locations.

  13. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-01

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction. Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge® software, is based on data taken from Outeiro & al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature. Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R&D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  14. Modelling Of Residual Stresses Induced By High Speed Milling Process

    SciTech Connect

    Desmaison, Olivier; Mocellin, Katia; Jardin, Nicolas

    2011-05-04

    Maintenance processes used in heavy industries often include high speed milling operations. The reliability of the post-process material state has to be studied. Numerical simulation appears to be a very interesting way to supply an efficient residual stresses (RS) distribution prediction.Because the adiabatic shear band and the serrated chip shaping are features of the austenitic stainless steel high speed machining, a 2D high speed orthogonal cutting model is briefly presented. This finite element model, developed on Forge registered software, is based on data taken from Outeiro and al.'s paper [1]. A new behaviour law fully coupling Johnson-Cook's constitutive law and Latham and Cockcroft's damage model is detailed in this paper. It ensures results that fit those found in literature.Then, the numerical tools used on the 2D model are integrated to a 3D high speed milling model. Residual stresses distribution is analysed, on the surface and into the depth of the material. Various revolutions and passes of the two teeth hemispheric mill on the workpiece are simulated. Thus the sensitivity of the residual stresses generation to the cutting conditions can be discussed. In order to validate the 3D model, a comparison of the cutting forces measured by EDF R and D to those given by numerical simulations is achieved.

  15. Risk/Stress Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwerdtfeger, Don; Howell, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Identifies stress as a definite health hazard and risk factor involved in a variety of health situations. Proposes that stress identification efforts be considered in environmental analysis so that a more complete approach to risk assessment and management and health hazard prevention can occur. (ML)

  16. Tank 12H residuals sample analysis report

    SciTech Connect

    Oji, L. N.; Shine, E. P.; Diprete, D. P.; Coleman, C. J.; Hay, M. S.

    2015-06-11

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) to provide sample preparation and analysis of the Tank 12H final characterization samples to determine the residual tank inventory prior to grouting. Eleven Tank 12H floor and mound residual material samples and three cooling coil scrape samples were collected and delivered to SRNL between May and August of 2014.

  17. Residual stress alleviation of aircraft metal structures reinforced with filamentary composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, J. B.; June, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    Methods to eliminate or reduce residual stresses in aircraft metal structures reinforced by filamentary composites are discussed. Residual stress level reductions were achieved by modifying the manufacturing procedures used during adhesive bonding. The residual stress alleviation techniques involved various forms of mechanical constraint which were applied to the components during bonding. Nine methods were evaluated, covering a wide range in complexity. All methods investigated during the program affected the residual stress level. In general, residual stresses were reduced by 70 percent or more from the stress level produced by conventional adhesive bonding procedures.

  18. Determination and modeling of residual stress in functionally graded WC-Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahvilian, Leila

    Gradual variations in composition and/or structure through the volume of functionally graded materials (FGMs) generally result in corresponding continuous spatial variations in mechanical/physical properties, and often in significant residual stresses that develop during processing. Due to inhomogeneous properties in these materials, residual stress measurement in FGMs can be a very challenging problem. In this study, residual stresses in functionally graded cemented tungsten carbide (FG-WC-Co) were investigated by numerical, analytical and experimental approaches by means of a layer removal technique. The numerical method consisted of finite element analysis (FEA) modeling for the FGM plate, in order to calculate residual stress distribution over the volume and to develop a method for predicting residual stress levels in closely related materials. The analytical procedure embodied a mathematical approach to determine residual stress distributions, and analytically determined values are compared with those obtained from FEA modeling and experimental results. The experimental approach consisted of fabricating and heat treating FG-WC-Co flat samples, then measuring strain changes by strain gauge after each sequential layer removal from the opposite side of the specimen from the graded region. Good agreement was found between analytical, numerical and experimental results. Furthermore, thermal residual stress distribution in FG-WC-Co hollow cylinder was examined with an emphasis on the effects of key variables, the gradient profile and the gradient thickness, on the magnitude and distribution of the stress field. An analytical direct solution based on solving the governing equations of a cylinder composed of a uniform inner core and a functionally graded outer shell was developed. The cylindrical compound was considered as two separate elements: homogeneous cylinder and functionally graded shell. Material properties, such as the elastic modulus and the coefficient of

  19. Quantification of Residual Stress from Photonic Signatures of Fused Silica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William E.

    2013-01-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 +/- 0.54 x 10(exp -12)/Pa. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented. Keywords: Glass, fused silica, photoelasticity, residual stress

  20. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Hayward, Maurice; Yost, William T.

    2014-02-01

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10-12 Pa-1. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA's Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  1. Phase composition and residual stresses in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozovan, A. A.; Betsofen, S. Ya; Ashmarin, A. A.; Ryabenko, B. V.; Ivanova, S. V.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray study of the phase composition and residual stresses distribution in two-layer APS coatings showed that the ceramic layer consists of t-ZrO2 phase with tetragonal lattice and the metal underlayer γ-solid solution based on nickel. In the transition zone thickness of ∼ 100 pm as the distance from the surface was revealed a gradual transition from t-ZrO2 to γ-solid solution. Increase in the specific volume of the metal underlayer resulting TGO growing leads to the formation of this layer high compressive stresses up to 600 MPa. In this case, the ceramic layer contains tensile stress up to 200 MPa.

  2. Thermoelastic Residual Stresses and Deformations at Laser Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusarov, A. V.; Malakhova-Ziablova, I. S.; Pavlov, M. D.

    A thermoelastic model implying relaxation of stresses at melting is applied for materials with arbitrary thermoelastic properties and the melting point. The range of Poisson's ratio 0.17 - 0.34 is numerically studied. The residual stresses are independent of the space scale. In narrow remelted zones and beads the maximum longitudinal tensile stress is approximately twice as high as the transverse one. The calculations predict cracking of alumina, even with 1600 oC preheating, plastic deformation or cracking of hard metal alloys H13 and TA6 V, and no destruction of polystyrene and thestrongest grades of quartz glass. The calculation results can be used for predicting the thermomechanical stability of materials at laser treatment.

  3. Consequences of Residual Stresses in Thin Polymer Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiter, Guenter

    2010-03-01

    In our quest for making functional devices smaller, the thickness of polymer films has reached values even smaller than the diameter of the unperturbed molecule. However, despite enormous efforts over the last decade, our understanding of the origin of some puzzling properties of such thin films is still not satisfactory and several peculiar observations remain rather mysterious. In this context, we explore the consequences of the transition from a dilute polymer solution to the glassy state with respect to the properties of polymers in thin films. This transition is likely to result in residual stresses, arising from out-of-equilibrium chain conformations due to rapid solvent loss. Consequently, depending on thermal history and ageing time, such films exhibit significant changes even in the glassy state ^ which we quantify by performing detailed studies of viscoelastic dewetting of thin polystyrene films on solid substrates. We explored relaxation times, residual stresses, and temporal changes of the stability of non-equilibrated thin films as they progress toward stable equilibrium behaviors. To do so, we have focused primarily on times shorter than the reptation time of the polymer. The number of spontaneously nucleated holes per unit area is seen to decrease as the films were aged below the glass transition, showing the meta-stability of the system. The ratio of stress over elastic modulus was found to increase strongly with decreasing film thickness and increasing chain length. Full equilibration of chain conformations required long times comparable to bulk reptation times. However, for chains longer than about 3000 monomers, the residual stress relaxed faster, at a rate independent of chain length. We present some tentative ideas on the relation between these observed atypical mechanical and relaxational behaviors and meta-stable states introduced by sample preparation.

  4. Dependence of diffuse ultrasonic backscatter on residual stress in 1080 steel.

    PubMed

    Du, Hualong; Turner, Joseph A

    2016-04-01

    In this article, the effects of residual stress on the ultrasonic scattering in a quenched steel sample are investigated by calculating the change of spatial variance amplitudes of ultrasonic signals after removing residual stress via annealing. The experimental results show that the average spatial variance amplitude decreases by about 11.89% for a scan area on the quenched surface after removing residual stress. This quantity was used to estimate the residual stress based on the developed stress-dependent backscatter model. In addition, the residual stress on the whole scan area was mapped by calculating the change of the spatial variance amplitude for each subarea after annealing, respectively. Diffuse ultrasonic backscatter signals show a high sensitivity to residual stress such that this technique has potential as a non-destructive method for measuring residual stress. PMID:26784273

  5. Study of Welding Distortion and Residual Stress Considering Nonlinear Yield Stress Curves and Multi-constraint Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Youmin; Zhang, Guojun; Huang, Yu

    2016-08-01

    Inherent strain analysis has been successfully applied to predict welding deformations of large-scale structural components, while thermal-elastic-plastic finite element method is rarely used for its disadvantages of long calculation period and large storage space. In this paper, a hybrid model considering nonlinear yield stress curves and multi-constraint equations to thermal-elastic-plastic analysis is further proposed to predict welding distortions and residual stresses of large-scale structures. For welding T-joint structural steel S355JR by metal active gas welding, the published experiment results of temperature and displacement fields are applied to illustrate the credibility of the proposed integration model. By comparing numerical results of four different cases with the experiment results, it is verified that prediction precision of welding deformations and residual stresses is apparently improved considering the power-law hardening model, and computational time is also obviously shortened about 30.14% using multi-constraint equations. On the whole, the proposed hybrid method can be further used to precisely and efficiently predict welding deformations and residual stresses of large-scale structures.

  6. Method and apparatus for determination of material residual stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, Engmin J. (Inventor); Flom, Yury (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A device for the determination of residual stress in a material sample consisting of a sensor coil, adjacent to the material sample, whose resistance varies according to the amount of stress within the material sample, a mechanical push-pull machine for imparting a gradually increasing compressional and tensional force on the material sample, and an impedance gain/phase analyzer and personal computer (PC) for sending an input signal to and receiving an input signal from the sensor coil is presented. The PC will measure and record the change in resistance of the sensor coil and the corresponding amount of strain of the sample. The PC will then determine, from the measurements of change of resistance and corresponding strain of the sample, the point at which the resistance of the sensor coil is at a minimum and the corresponding value and type of strain of the sample at that minimum resistance point, thereby, enabling a calculation of the residual stress in the sample.

  7. Neutron diffraction residual stress studies for aero-engine component applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clay, K.; Small, C.

    1991-12-01

    Computer graphics for a presentation describing how Rolls-Royce is refining the method of residual stress measurement by neutron diffraction to suit the characteristic stress fields of components are presented. Results to date are given. An outline of how this residual stress data is to be used in developing stress models for critical rotating components is given.

  8. NEUTRON DIFFRACTION MEASUREMENT OF RESIDUAL STRESSES IN FRICTION STIR PROCESSED NANOCOMPOSITE SURFACE LAYER

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Hanbing; Hubbard, Camden R; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Feng, Zhili; Qu, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully used to stir and mix nano-sized Al2O3 particles into a Al6061-T6 aluminum plate to form a nanocomposite layer up to 3 mm thick. This nanocomposite surface has demonstrated significantly improved surface hardness, yield strength, and wear-resistance without sacrificing the substrate ductility and conductivity. Neutron diffraction analysis was conducted to determine the residual stress distribution in the nanocomposite surface layer. For comparison, the residual stress of the aluminum surface that was processed similarly but had no particle involved was also measured. Results showed that the macro-level residual stresses in the FSP zone without particles are low due to the annealing effect induced by the long heating time and large heat input. The macro-level residual stresses in the FSP-processed Al-Al2O3 nanocomposite zone are tensile up to 100 MPa in all three directions. The details of the results will be further discussed in the paper.

  9. Experimental study of cumulative effect of residual stress on machined surface on HSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueen; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2010-03-01

    The high speed milling experiments are performed for hardened H13 die steel by using coated ball end milling cutter, the experiment was design for testing distribution properties of the residual stress in HSM. And the residual stress of the work-piece surface on the feed and cross feed direction are measured by the X-ray stress analyzer (X-stress 3000), and the distribution characteristics of residual stress is analyzed. The result shows that the residual stress presents gradient distribution on feed direction, and furthermore, the three-dimensional surface micro topography has been observed by the WykoNT9300, it shows that the micro topography has no close relation with the residual stress. In addition, the cumulative effect is discussed for explaining the phenomena. It could be one explanation for the residual stress gradient on the machined surface on mechanism.

  10. Experimental study of cumulative effect of residual stress on machined surface on HSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yueen; Zhao, Jun; Wang, Wei

    2009-12-01

    The high speed milling experiments are performed for hardened H13 die steel by using coated ball end milling cutter, the experiment was design for testing distribution properties of the residual stress in HSM. And the residual stress of the work-piece surface on the feed and cross feed direction are measured by the X-ray stress analyzer (X-stress 3000), and the distribution characteristics of residual stress is analyzed. The result shows that the residual stress presents gradient distribution on feed direction, and furthermore, the three-dimensional surface micro topography has been observed by the WykoNT9300, it shows that the micro topography has no close relation with the residual stress. In addition, the cumulative effect is discussed for explaining the phenomena. It could be one explanation for the residual stress gradient on the machined surface on mechanism.

  11. Residual stresses in sputter-deposited copper/330 stainless steel multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Misra, A.

    2004-12-15

    The evolution of residual stresses as a function of bilayer period from 10 nm to 1 {mu}m in sputter-deposited Cu/330 stainless-steel (SS) multilayered films is evaluated by the substrate curvature technique. The multilayer stress evolution is compared with residual stresses in single layer Cu films and single layer 330 SS films, also measured by substrate curvature technique, with respective film thicknesses varying from 5 to 500 nm. Both single layer and multilayer films exhibit high tensile residual stresses that increase with decreasing layer thickness, but are found to be lower than the respective yield strengths. The intrinsic tensile residual stress evolution with film thickness is explained using the island coalescence model. The difference between the multilayer residual stress and the average residual stresses in single-layered Cu and 330 SS films is interpreted in terms of interface stress.

  12. Residual stresses in sputter-deposited copper/330 stainless steel multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Misra, A.

    2004-12-01

    The evolution of residual stresses as a function of bilayer period from 10nmto1μm in sputter-deposited Cu/330 stainless-steel (SS) multilayered films is evaluated by the substrate curvature technique. The multilayer stress evolution is compared with residual stresses in single layer Cu films and single layer 330 SS films, also measured by substrate curvature technique, with respective film thicknesses varying from 5to500nm. Both single layer and multilayer films exhibit high tensile residual stresses that increase with decreasing layer thickness, but are found to be lower than the respective yield strengths. The intrinsic tensile residual stress evolution with film thickness is explained using the island coalescence model. The difference between the multilayer residual stress and the average residual stresses in single-layered Cu and 330 SS films is interpreted in terms of interface stress.

  13. Development of residual stress in sol-gel derived Pb(Zr ,Ti)O3 films: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corkovic, S.; Whatmore, R. W.; Zhang, Q.

    2008-04-01

    Residual stresses develop in the sol-gel-derived ferroelectric thin films during the transformation of the metal-organic gel to the metal oxide upon thermal treatment and due to the thermal and elastic mismatch between the Pb(Zrx,Ti1-x)O3 (PZT) film and the substrate materials during cooling. In this study, residual stresses were determined using the wafer curvature method after the deposition of multilayer PZT film on platinized (100) silicon wafers. A multilayer model for stress analysis was used to calculate the residual stress in PZT films of three different compositions: x =0.4, x =0.52, and x =0.6. Orientation dependent residual stresses were found in compositions containing the tetragonal phase, with x =0.4 and x =0.52. Depending on the fraction of (100) orientated domains low compressive or low tensile stress was found in Pb(Zr0.4Ti0.6)O3 (PZT 40/60). Higher residual stress was found in PZT films consisting of only rhombohedral crystallographic structure (PZT 60/40) while the residual stress in PZT films with morphotropic boundary composition (PZT 52/48) was significantly dependent on the film orientation and the phase composition and could range from 17to90MPa. The effect of the film orientation on residual stress was found to be a function of the anisotropic thermal expansion coefficient of PZT. The contribution of the thermal and elastic properties of materials to the total wafer curvature was investigated and discussed. Finally, the residual stress results calculated with the four layer model were compared to the results calculated using the Stoney equation.

  14. The effects of residual stress, viscoelastic and thermodynamic parameters on apparent fracture toughness of dental bilayer ceramic composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taskonak, Burak

    Bilayer dental ceramic composites used for fixed partial dentures are becoming more widely used in dental practices because of their biocompatibility, aesthetic properties, and chemical durability. However, large statistical variations in the strength of ceramics are associated with the structural flaws as a result of processing and complex stress states within the surfaces of the materials because of thermal properties of each layer. In addition, partial delaminations of the veneer layer and connector fractures of bilayer ceramic fixed partial dentures (FPDs) have been observed in a clinical study which is a part of this dissertation. Analysis of fracture surfaces of failed FPDs reveals that such fractures of the veneering ceramic are most likely caused by lateral crack growth. Global residual stresses associated with the coefficient of thermal expansion differences between core and veneering ceramics can cause lateral crack initiation. Also, rapid cooling of bilayer ceramics from the sintering temperature of the glass veneer may not allow the interfacial stresses in the viscoelastic glass to relax to equilibrium values. This can further contribute to the propagation of lateral cracks. Furthermore, local residual stresses that develop in the plastic deformation zone below sharp contact areas on the occlusal surface are another contributor to lateral crack growth. Superposition of global residual stresses and a Boussinesq stress field can incrementally increase the possibility of lateral crack growth. The long-range goals of this study are to critically analyze the lateral crack growth mechanisms associated with residual stresses, to modify residual tensile stress distributions by controlled heat treatment, and to minimize the probability of veneering ceramic fractures. Four approaches were used to accomplish these goals: (1) clinical evaluation of a bilayer ceramic fixed partial denture system; (2) fracture surface analysis of clinically failed FPDs; (3

  15. Transient and residual stresses and displacements in self-curing bone cement - Part II: thermoelastic analysis of the stem fixation system.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, A M; Nair, R; Burke, D L; Miller, J

    1982-02-01

    In this second part of a two-part report, an idealized model of the stem fixation system is analyzed to determine the adverse effects of the thermal stresses and displacements of bone cement during its curing process. The Shaffer-Levitsky stress-rate strain-rate law for chemically hardening material has been used. The results show that if the cement is surrounded by cancellous bone, as opposed to cortical bone, then transient tensile circumferential stresses in the cement and similar radial stresses at the stem/cement interface are generated. The former may cause flaws and voids within the still cement, while the latter may cause gaps at the interface. PMID:7078115

  16. Quantifying residual stress in nanoscale thin polymer films via surface wrinkling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun Young; Chastek, Thomas Q; Fasolka, Michael J; Ro, Hyun Wook; Stafford, Christopher M

    2009-04-28

    Residual stress, a pervasive consequence of solid materials processing, is stress that remains in a material after external forces have been removed. In polymeric materials, residual stress results from processes, such as film formation, that force and then trap polymer chains into nonequilibrium stressed conformations. In solvent-cast films, which are central to a wide range of technologies, residual stress can cause detrimental effects, including microscopic defect formation and macroscopic dimensional changes. Since residual stress is difficult to measure accurately, particularly in nanoscale thin polymer films, it remains a challenge to understand and control. We present here a quantitative method of assessing residual stress in polymer thin films by monitoring the onset of strain-induced wrinkling instabilities. Using this approach, we show that thin (>100 nm) polystyrene films prepared via spin-coating possess residual stresses of approximately 30 MPa, close to the crazing and yield stress. In contrast to conventional stress measurement techniques such as wafer curvature, our technique has the resolution to measure residual stress in films as thin as 25 nm. Furthermore, we measure the dissipation of residual stress through two relaxation mechanisms: thermal annealing and plasticizer addition. In quantifying the amount of residual stress in these films, we find that the residual stress gradually decreases with increasing annealing time and plasticizer amounts. Our robust and simple route to measure residual stress adds a key component to the understanding of polymer thin film behavior and will enable identification of more effective processing routes that mitigate the detrimental effects of residual stress. PMID:19298053

  17. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  18. A wafer mapping technique for residual stress in surface micromachined films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavone, G.; Murray, J.; Smith, S.; Desmulliez, M. P. Y.; Mount, A. R.; Walton, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The design of MEMS devices employing movable structures is crucially dependant on the mechanical behaviour of the deposited materials. It is therefore important to be able to fully characterize the micromachined films and predict with confidence the mechanical properties of patterned structures. This paper presents a characterization technique that enables the residual stress in MEMS films to be mapped at the wafer level by using microstructures released by surface micromachining. These dedicated MEMS test structures and the associated measurement techniques are used to extract localized information on the strain and Young’s modulus of the film under investigation. The residual stress is then determined by numerically coupling this data with a finite element analysis of the structure. This paper illustrates the measurement routine and demonstrates it with a case study using electrochemically deposited alloys of nickel and iron, particularly prone to develop high levels of residual stress. The results show that the technique enables wafer mapping of film non-uniformities and identifies wafer-to-wafer differences. A comparison between the results obtained from the mapping technique and conventional wafer bow measurements highlights the benefits of using a procedure tailored to films that are non-uniform, patterned and surface-micromachined, as opposed to simple standard stress extraction methods. The presented technique reveals detailed information that is generally unexplored when using conventional stress extraction methods such as wafer bow measurements.

  19. Young's Modulus, Residual Stress, and Crystal Orientation of Doubly Clamped Silicon Nanowire Beams.

    PubMed

    Calahorra, Y; Shtempluck, O; Kotchetkov, V; Yaish, Y E

    2015-05-13

    Initial or residual stress plays an important role in nanoelectronics. Valley degeneracy in silicon nanowires (SiNWs) is partially lifted due to built-in stresses, and consequently, electron-phonon scattering rate is reduced and device mobility and performance are improved. In this study we use a nonlinear model describing the force-deflection relationship to extract the Young's modulus, the residual stress, and the crystallographic growth orientation of SiNW beams. Measurements were performed on suspended doubly clamped SiNWs subjected to atomic force microscopy (AFM) three-point bending constraints. The nanowires comprised different growth directions and two SiO2 sheath thicknesses, and underwent different rapid thermal annealing processes. Analysis showed that rapid thermal annealing introduces compressive strains into the SiNWs and may result in buckling of the SiNWs. Furthermore, the core-shell model together with the residual stress analysis accurately describe the Young's modulus of oxide covered SiNWs and the crystal orientation of the measured nanowires. PMID:25826449

  20. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  1. Nondestructive characterization of residual stress within CMOS-based composite microcantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rendon-Hernandez, Adrian A.; Camacho-Leon, Sergio; Martinez-Chapa, Sergio O.

    2013-04-01

    Residual stress can affect the performance of thin-film micromachined structures and lead to curling in cantilevers as well as distortion in the frequency of resonant devices. As the origin of residual stress is dependent on the fabrication processes, a nondestructive method for characterization of residual stress independent of processes conditions is desirable for supporting the design of microcantilever-based microsystems. In this paper we present a nondestructive characterization of the residual stress within composite microcantilever beams providing valuable insights toward predicting their deflection profile after mechanical releasing from the substrate. The approach relies on the assumption of a linear gradient stress and a quadratic deflection profile across a composite microcantilever.

  2. Nondestructive evaluation of residual stress in short-fiber reinforced plastics by x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Tokoro, Syouhei; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki; Egami, Noboru

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray diffraction method is used to measure the residual stress in injection-molded plates of short-fiber reinforced plastics (SFRP) made of crystalline thermoplastics, polyphenylene sulphide (PPS), reinforced by carbon fibers with 30 mass%. Based on the orientation of carbon fibers, injection molded plates can be modeled as three-layered lamella where the core layer is sandwiched by skin layers. The stress in the matrix in the skin layer was measured using Cr-Kα radiation with the sin2Ψ method. Since the X-ray penetration depth is shallow, the state of stresses measured by X-rays in FRP can be assumed to be plane stress. The X-ray measurement of stress in carbon fibers was not possible because of high texture. A new method was proposed to evaluate the macrostress in SFRP from the measurement of the matrix stress. According to micromechanics analysis of SFRP, the matrix stresses in the fiber direction, σ1m, and perpendicular to the fiber direction, σ2m, and shear stress τ12m can be expressed as the functions of the applied (macro-) stresses, σ1A, σ2A , τ12A as follows: σ1m = α11σ1A +α12σ2A, σ2m = α21σ1A + α22σ2A, τ12m = α66τ12A, where α11 ,α12, α21, α22, α66 are stress-partitioning coefficients. Using skin-layer strips cut parallel, perpendicular and 45° to the molding direction, the stress in the matrix was measured under the uniaxial applied stress and the stress-partitioning coefficients of the above equations were determined. Once these relations are established, the macrostress in SFRP can be determined from the measurements of the matrix stresses by X-rays.

  3. Operator Manual for X-ray Residual Stress Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.C.

    2003-07-30

    This document is intended to serve as a operator manual for remote control of the TEC x-ray diffraction system. It is assumed that the reader is familiar with the operation of the SaraTEC{trademark} 1630 Acquisition Manager software for the TEC 1630 X-Ray Diffraction System. This manual describes the operation of the new TEC Remote Serial Control Module (RCSM) that runs on the TEC computer and Run-the-System that runs on the motion control computer. The basic goal is to add enough control of the TEC system to enable stress mapping. In stress mapping, the specimen is positioned using our X-Y-Z-Phi translation system and data is collected using the TEC system. The process is then repeated for the next position using a table of preset positions. X-Y-Z-Phi axis management is handled by ''Run-the-System'', the LabVIEW program originally developed for the Neutron Residual Stress Mapping Facility, running on a separate computer from the one that controls the TEC. Run-the-System also manages all remote start, stop, and configuration commands that are sent to the TEC system. The two computers communicate over an RS-232 serial line.

  4. Quantification of residual stress from photonic signatures of fused silica

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.; Hayward, Maurice

    2014-02-18

    A commercially available grey-field polariscope (GFP) instrument for photoelastic examination is used to assess impact damage inflicted upon the outer-most pane of Space Shuttle windows made from fused silica. A method and apparatus for calibration of the stress-optic coefficient using four-point bending is discussed. The results are validated on known material (acrylic) and are found to agree with literature values to within 6%. The calibration procedure is then applied to fused-silica specimens and the stress-optic coefficient is determined to be 2.43 ± 0.54 × 10{sup −12} Pa{sup −1}. Fused silica specimens containing impacts artificially made at NASA’s Hypervelocity Impact Technology Facility (HIT-F), to simulate damage typical during space flight, are examined. The damage sites are cored from fused silica window carcasses and examined with the GFP. The calibrated GFP measurements of residual stress patterns surrounding the damage sites are presented.

  5. Microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed Inconel 718 nickel-base superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fencheng; Lin, Xin; Yang, Gaolin; Song, Menghua; Chen, Jing; Huang, Weidong

    2011-02-01

    The microstructure and residual stress of laser rapid formed (LRFed) nickel-base superalloy Inconel 718 was investigated. The as-deposited microstructure of an LRFed Inconel 718 alloy is composed of columnar dendrites growing epitaxially along the deposition direction, and the columnar dendrites transformed to unevenly distributed equiaxed grains after annealing treatment at high temperature. Residual stress evaluation in microstructure scale by Vickers micro-indentation method indicates that the residual thermal stress is unevenly distributed in the LRFed sample, and it has a significant effect on the recrystallization during solution annealing treatment. The residual stress is introduced by rapid heating and cooling during laser rapid forming. There is an alternative distribution between high residual stress regions and low residual stress regions, within a single deposited layer, resulting in a similar distribution of recrystallized grain size.

  6. Mechanical Characterization of Thermomechanical Matrix Residual Stresses Incurred During MMC Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castelli, Michael G.

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, much effort has been spent examining the residual stress-strain states of advanced composites. Such examinations are motivated by a number of significant concerns that affect composite development, processing, and analysis. The room-temperature residual stress states incurred in many advanced composite systems are often quite large and can introduce damage even prior to the first external mechanical loading of the material. These stresses, which are induced during the cooldown following high-temperature consolidation, result from the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and matrix. Experimental techniques commonly used to evaluate composite internal residual stress states are non-mechanical in nature and generally include forms of x-ray and neutron diffraction. Such approaches are usually complex, involving a number of assumptions and limitations associated with a wide range of issues, including the depth of penetration, the volume of material being assessed, and erroneous effects associated with oriented grains. Furthermore, and more important to the present research, these techniques can assess only "single time" stress in the composite. That is, little, if any, information is obtained that addresses the time-dependent point at which internal stresses begin to accumulate, the manner in which the accumulation occurs, and the presiding relationships between thermoelastic, thermoplastic, and thermoviscous behaviors. To address these critical issues, researchers at the NASA Lewis Research Center developed and implemented an innovative mechanical test technique to examine in real time, the time-dependent thermomechanical stress behavior of a matrix alloy as it went through a consolidation cycle.

  7. Permethylation Linkage Analysis Techniques for Residual Carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Permethylation analysis is the classic approach to establishing the position of glycosidic linkages between sugar residues. Typically, the carbohydrate is derivatized to form acid-stable methyl ethers, hydrolyzed, peracetylated, and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The pos...

  8. Residual stress variation due to piping processes of austenitic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ihara, R.; Hashimoto, T.; Mochizuki, M.

    2012-08-01

    In nuclear power plants, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been observed near the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the primary loop recirculation pipes made of austenitic stainless steel type 316L. Residual stress is a major cause of SCC. In the joining process of pipes, butt-welding is conducted after machining. Machining is performed to match the inside pipe diameter. Residual stress is generated by both machining and welding. In the case of welding after machining in manufacturing processes of pipes, it appears that residual stress due to machining is varied by the welding thermal cycle. In this study, residual stress variation caused by manufacturing processes was investigated. Residual stress variation was examined by the X-ray diffraction method. The residual stress distribution generated by welding after machining has a local maximum point in the HAZ. The Vickers hardness distribution also has a local maximum point. By the EBSD method, it is clarified that recovery and recrystallization due to welding heat do not occurred in the local maximum point. Residual stress distribution results from the superposition effect of hardening due to machining and welding. The location and value of the local maximum stress are varied by welding conditions. The region of the local maximum stress corresponds to the region where SCC has been observed. Therefore, in addition to a part of the manufacturing processes such as welding or machining, evaluation of all parts of the processes is important to investigate the effect of residual stress distribution on SCC.

  9. Metallurgical characterization and determination of residual stresses of coatings formed by thermal spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laribi, M.; Mesrati, N.; Vannes, A. B.; Treheux, D.

    2003-06-01

    This work presents an experimental determination of residual stresses in 35CrMo4 (Euronorm) low alloyed steel substrates with thermally sprayed coatings. Two different materials were separately deposited. The first one consisted of a blend of two superalloys: Cr-Ni steel and Cr-Mn steel, designated 55E and 65E, respectively. The second material was molybdenum. In a first part, basic characteristics of the deposited layers (metallographic analysis, hardness, and adhesion) are presented. In a second part, the determination of the residual stresses, in both substrate and thermal sprayed layers is performed using an extensometric method in combination with a simultaneous progressive electrolytic polishing. The influence of a nickel-aluminum (80:20%) bond-coat and/or a post-annealing at 850 °C in air for 1 h is studied.

  10. The influence of deformation-induced residual stresses on the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of dual-phase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hance, Brandon Michael

    It was hypothesized that, in dual-phase (DP) steels, strain partitioning between ferrite (alpha) and martensite (alpha') during deformation results in a distribution of post-deformation residual stresses that, in turn, affects the subsequent strength, work hardening behavior and formability when the strain path is changed. The post-forming deformation-induced residual stress state was expected to depend upon the microstructure, the amount of strain and the prestrain path. The primary objective of this research program was to understand the influence of deformation-induced residual stresses on the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of DP steels. Three commercially produced sheet steels were considered in this analysis: (1) a DP steel with approximately 15 vol. % martensite, (2) a conventional high-strength, low-alloy (HSLA) steel, and (3) a conventional, ultra-low-carbon interstitial-free (IF) steel. Samples of each steel were subjected to various prestrain levels in various plane-stress forming modes, including uniaxial tension, plane strain and balanced biaxial stretching. Neutron diffraction experiments confirmed the presence of large post-forming deformation-induced residual stresses in the ferrite phase of the DP steel. The deformation-alphainduced residual stress state varied systematically with the prestrain mode, where the principal residual stress components are proportional to the principal strain components of the prestrain mode, but opposite in sign. For the first time, and by direct experimental correlation, it was shown that deformation-induced residual stresses greatly affect the post-forming tensile stress/strain behavior of DP steels. As previously reported in the literature, the formability (residual tensile ductility) of the IF steel and the HSLA steel was adversely affected by strain path changes. The DP steel presents a formability advantage over the conventional IF and HSLA steels, and is expected to be particularly well suited for