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Sample records for resin cement relyx

  1. Do resin cements influence the cuspal deflection of teeth restored with composite resin inlays?

    PubMed

    da Rosa, Helen C V; Marcondes, Maurem L; de Souza, Niélli C; Weber, João B B; Spohr, Ana M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different resin cements on the cuspal deflection of endodontically treated teeth restored with composite resin inlays. Sixty upper premolars were randomly divided into five groups (n=12): 1 - sound teeth; 2 - cavity; 3 - Rely X ARC; 4 - RelyX Unicem; 5 - SeT. The teeth from groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 received a MOD preparation and endodontic treatment. Impressions were made with vinyl polysiloxane and poured using type IV die stone in groups 3, 4 and 5. Inlays with composite resin were built over each cast and luted with the resin cements. A 200 N load was applied on the occlusal surface, and cuspal deflection was measured using a micrometer. After 24 h, cuspal deflection was measured again using a 300 N load. The Student t-test showed that there was no statistically significant difference between the 200 N and 300 N occlusal loads only for the sound teeth group (p = 0.389) and the RelyX ARC group (p = 0.188). ANOVA and Tukey'test showed that the sound teeth had the lowest mean cuspal deflection, differing statistically from the other groups (p<0.05). The highest cuspal deflections were obtained in the SeT group and the cavity group, with no statistical difference between them. Intermediate values were obtained in RelyX ARC group and RelyX Unicem group, which differed statistically. The self-adhesive resin cements RelyX Unicem and SeT showed less capacity to maintain the stiffness of the tooth/restoration complex than the conventional resin cement RelyX ARC. PMID:25950160

  2. Interfacial ultramorphology evaluation of resin luting cements to dentin: a correlative scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Vermelho, Paulo Moreira; Andr, Carolina Bosso; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the dentin-resin cements interfacial ultramorphologies using two different methods: scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Four commercial products were evaluated: two conventional cementing system (RelyX ARC/Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus, 3M ESPE and Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond, Kuraray) and two self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE and Clearfil SA Cement, Kuraray). Prepolymerized resin disks (Sinfony, 3M ESPE) were cemented on oclusal dentin surfaces of 24 third human molars, simulating the indirect restorations. After 24 h, teeth were sectioned into 0.9-mm thick slabs and processed for microscopy analyses (SEM or TEM/ n = 3). Qualitative characterization of dentin-resin cement interface was performed. Hybrid layer formation with long and dense resin tags was observed only for RelyX ARC cementing system. Clearfil Esthetic Cement/DC Bond system revealed few and short resin tags formation, whereas no hybridization and resin tags were detected for self-adhesive resin cements. Some interfacial regions exhibited that the self-adhesive resin cements were not bonded to dentin, presenting bubbles or voids at the interfaces. In conclusion, TEM and SEM bonding interface analyses showed ultramorphological variations among resin cements, which are directly related to dental bonding strategies used for each resin cement tested. PMID:24030836

  3. Study of deformation of resin cements used in fixing of root posts through fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulido, C. A.; Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Kalinowski, H. J.; Gomes, O. M. M.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the polymerization shrinkage "in situ" in resin cements inside the root canal during the fixation of glass fiber posts. For cementation teeth were randomly divided into 2 groups according to the resin cement used: Group1 - resin cement dual Relyx ARC (3M/ESPE), and Group 2 - resin cement dual Relyx U200 (3M/ESPE). Before inserting the resin cement into the root canal, two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and pasted in the region without contact with the canal, one at the apical and other at the coronal thirds of the post. The sensors measured the deformation of the resin cements in coronal and apical root thirds to obtain the values in micro-strain (μɛ).

  4. Influence of Relining Post on the Bond Strength of Resin Cements.

    PubMed

    Conde, Daniele Meira; Rodrigues, Vandilson Pinheiro; Carvalho Souza, Soraia de Fátima; Bauer, José Roberto Oliveira; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; Linares Lima, Suellen Nogueira; Filho, Etevaldo Matos Maia; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho; de Mendonça, Adriano Augusto Melo; Lima, Darlon Martins

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluated the influence of relining fiber posts on the bond strength (BS) of resin cements in the root canal. Forty bovine teeth were divided in four groups (n = 10): G1 (ARC)-fiber post cemented with resin cement RelyX ARC; G2 (ARC+Z350)-relined fiber post cemented with RelyX ARC; G3 (U200)-fiber post cemented with self-adhesive cement RelyX U200; G4 (U200+Z350)-relined fiber post cemented with RelyX U200. The roots were sectioned in six 1.2-mm slices and the push-out test was performed. Data were analyzed by three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Tukey's test (a = 0.05). For the conventional resin cement, there was no significant difference between groups G1-ARC (15.5 ± 3.8) and G2-ARC+Z350 (16.1 ± 4.5). For the self-adhesive cement, the results revealed higher BS values for relined posts G4-U200 + Z350 (19.9 ± 7.9) as compared to non-relined posts G3-U200 (14.4 ± 4.5). For both cements, in groups of relined posts, the apical and the cervical thirds presented similar BS. Relining enhances the performance of the self-adhesive resin cement, and the interaction between relining and root third influences the BS to the conventional resin cement. PMID:26329411

  5. Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

  6. Bond Strength of Resin Cements to Noble and Base Metal Alloys with Different Surface Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Raeisosadat, Farkhondeh; Ghavam, Maryam; Hasani Tabatabaei, Masoomeh; Arami, Sakineh; Sedaghati, Maedeh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The bond strength of resin cements to metal alloys depends on the type of the metal, conditioning methods and the adhesive resins used. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength of resin cements to base and noble metal alloys after sand blasting or application of silano-pen. Materials and Method: Cylinders of light cured Z 250 composite were cemented to “Degubond 4” (Au Pd) and “Verabond” (Ni Cr) alloys by either RelyX Unicem or Panavia F2, after sandblasting or treating the alloys with Silano-Pen. The shear bond strengths were evaluated. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and t tests at a significance level of P<0.05. Results: When the alloys were treated by Silano-Pen, RelyX Unicem showed a higher bond strength for Degubond 4 (P=0.021) and Verabond (P< 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the bond strength of Panavia F2 to the alloys after either of surface treatments, Degubond 4 (P=0.291) and Verabond (P=0.899). Panavia F2 showed a higher bond strength to sandblasted Verabond compared to RelyX Unicem (P=0.003). The bond strength of RelyX Unicem was significantly higher to Silano-Pen treated Verabond (P=0.011). The bond strength of the cements to sandblasted Degubond 4 showed no significant difference (P=0.59). RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated Degubond 4 (P=0.035). Conclusion: The bond strength of resin cements to Verabond alloy was significantly higher than Degubond 4. RelyX Unicem had a higher bond strength to Silano-Pen treated alloys. Surface treatments of the alloys did not affect the bond strength of Panavia F2. PMID:25628687

  7. Effect of resin cement, aging process and root level on the bond strength of the resin-fiber posts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuhim, Khalid Salman

    Background. Little is known about the long-term clinical bonding effectiveness of the Fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts cemented with self-etch adhesive systems. Bond stability and longevity of the cemented post are adversely affected by physical and chemical factors over time, such as expansion and contraction stresses caused by thermal changes and occlusal load. This clinical condition can be simulated in vitro by thermocyclic loading; and bonding effectiveness can be evaluated by applying the micropush out test. Therefore, more in vitro studies are needed to evaluate the bond strength of the fiber posts cemented with different resin cement systems after simulating the artificial aging induced by thermocycling. The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two different resin cement systems (total etch, and self-etch resin cement system) used for cementation of fiber reinforced composite posts in three different aging periods using thermocycling. Methods. Following IRB approval, sixty freshly extracted bicuspid single rooted natural teeth were endodontically treated, and the post-spaces were prepared to receive a fiber-post cemented with either a total etch resin cement (Rely-X Ultimate) or with a self-etch resin cement (Rely-X Unicem). No thermocycling, 20,000 and 40,000 cycles was used to age the specimens. Teeth were randomly allocated into six different groups: G1 - Control: Rely-X Ultimate cement with no thermocycling. G2: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 20,000 thermocycling. G3: Rely-X Ultimate cement with 40,000 thermocycling. G4: Rely-X Unicem cement. G5: Rely-X Unicem cement. G6: Rely-X Unicem cement. Microtensile bond strength determined using a micropush out test on a universal testing machine (MTS). Additionally, the failure mode of each specimen was observed under a stereomicroscope (Olympus) at 40x magnification. Finally, one representative sample was randomly selected from each of the five failure modes for scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of the surface morphology in order to obtain SEM images of the failure patterns at 29--70x magnifications. Statistical analysis: Nested general linear and generalized linear model was created to look for statistical significance. Level of significance was set at P < 0.05. Results. No significant differences were found on the bond strength between the two types of resin cement systems (total etch and self-etch). Regarding the thermocycling effect, the bond strengths of the group of 40,000 cycles was significantly lower than the 20,000 cycle group. In addition, the bond strengths of the specimens collected from the coronal third of the root were significantly lower than the specimens from the apical third. A Fisher's Exact test was applied to evaluate the failure mode differences, and showed statistically significant differences between the groups. Conclusions . The bond strength to the root canal dentin did not vary with the type of resin cement systems (total-etch vs self-etch). The microtensile bond strength values of FRC posts were significantly affected by increasing the thermocycling, and were significantly different among the different longitudinal levels of the root canal.

  8. Evaluation of tensile retention of Y-TZP crowns cemented on resin composite cores: effect of the cement and Y-TZP surface conditioning.

    PubMed

    Rippe, M P; Amaral, R; Oliveira, F S; Cesar, P F; Scotti, R; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of the cement type (adhesive resin, self-adhesive, glass ionomer, and zinc phosphate) on the retention of crowns made of yttria-stabilized polycrystalline tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP). Therefore, 108 freshly extracted molars were embedded in acrylic resin, perpendicular to their long axis, and prepared for full crowns: the crown preparations were removed and reconstructed using composite resin plus fiber posts with dimensions identical to the prepared dentin. The preparations were impressed using addition silicone, and Y-TZP copings were produced, which presented a special setup for the tensile testing. Cementation was performed with two adhesive resin cements (Multilink Automix, Ivoclar-Vivadent; RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE, St Paul, MN, USA), one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE), one glass ionomer based cement (RelyX Luting, 3M ESPE), and one zinc phosphate cement (Cimento de Zinco, SS White, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). For the resin cement groups, the inner surfaces of the crowns were subjected to three surface treatments: cleaning with isopropyl alcohol, tribochemical silica coating, or application of a thin low-fusing glass porcelain layer plus silanization. After 24 hours, all groups were subjected to thermocycling (6000 cycles) and included in a special device for tensile testing in a universal testing machine to test the retention of the infrastructure. After testing, the failure modes of all samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. The Kruskal-Wallis test showed that the surface treatment and cement type (α=0.05) affected the tensile retention results. The Multilink cement presented the highest tensile retention values, but that result was not statistically different from RelyX ARC. The surface treatment was statistically relevant only for the Multilink cement. The cement choice was shown to be more important than the crown surface treatment for cementation of a Y-TZP crown to a composite resin substrate. PMID:25162722

  9. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond strength, self-adhesive cement, silane, dentin, indirect composite. PMID:26855700

  10. Comparison of the flexural strength of two dual cure adhesive resin cements under oral simulated conditions: an in-vitro study.

    PubMed

    Awasthi, P; Nair, A; Regish, K M; Viswambaran, M; Kumar, M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the flexural strength of the newly developed self-adhesive dual cure resin cement and compare it with conventional resin cement under oral simulated conditions. A conventional resin cement (Calibra) and self adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100) were selected and 40 specimens of each cement were fabricated for the study. Half of these specimens were polymerized directly whereas the other half were polymerized through 2 mm of porcelain disc. Specimens were tested after 24hrs and after 30 days immersion in artificial saliva. A three point bending test was performed using universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Overall RelyX U100 showed higher mean flexural strength compared to Calibra (141.55 MPa, 119.46MPa, respectively). When the specimens of both the cements were light cured through 2 mm porcelain disc, their flexural strength decreased significantly. The mean flexural strength of both self adhesive and conventional dual cure adhesive resin cements was increased significantly after storage in artificial saliva for 30 days at 37 degreeC. Among the two dual cure resin cements, the self adhesive dual cure cement (RelyX U100) showed increased overall mean flexural strength as compared to conventional resin cement (Calibra) under all the curing and storage protocols. PMID:23888528

  11. Tensile Bond Strength of Self Adhesive Resin Cement After Various Surface Treatment of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Sekhri, Sahil; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In self adhesive resin cements adhesion is achieved to dental surface without surface pre-treatment, and requires only single step application. This makes the luting procedure less technique-sensitive and decreases postoperative sensitivity. Aim The purpose of this study was to evaluate bond strength of self adhesive resin after surface treatment of enamel for bonding base metal alloy. Materials and Methods On the labial surface of 64 central incisor rectangular base metal block of dimension 6 mm length, 5mm width and 1 mm height was cemented with RelyX U200 and Maxcem Elite self adhesive cements with and without surface treatment of enamel. Surface treatment of enamel was application of etchant, one step bonding agent and both. Tensile bond strength of specimen was measured with universal testing machine at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Results Least tensile bond strength (MPa) was in control group i.e. 1.33 (0.32) & 1.59 (0.299), Highest bond strength observed when enamel treated with both etchant and bonding agent i.e. 2.72 (0.43) & 2.97 (0.19) for Relyx U200 and Elite cement. When alone etchant and bonding agent were applied alone bond strength is 2.19 (0.18) & 2.24 (0.47) for Relyx U200, and 2.38 (0.27) 2.49 (0.16) for Max-cem elite. Mean bond strength was higher in case of Max-cem Elite as compared to RelyX U200 resin cement, although differences were non–significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Surface treatment of enamel increases the bond strength of self adhesive resin cement. PMID:26894165

  12. Restoration of Strip Crown with a Resin-Bonded Composite Cement in Early Childhood Caries

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Mi-ae; Kim, Ah-hyeon; Shim, Youn-soo; An, So-youn

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early childhood caries is a widely prevalent disease throughout the world. It is necessary to treat this condition in early childhood; however, child behavior management may be particularly challenging during treatment. To overcome this challenge, we used Carigel to remove caries and RelyX Unicem resin cement for strip crown restoration. It not only has the desired aesthetic effect but is also more effective for primary teeth, which are used for a shorter period than permanent teeth are. Case Presentation. We report a case of three pediatric patients with early childhood caries, in whom caries was removed by using Carigel to avoid the risk of pulpal exposure associated with high-speed handpieces. Subsequently, aesthetic restoration was performed using strip crown with RelyX Unicem self-adhesive resin cement. Conclusion. RelyX Unicem has the following advantages: (1) not requiring have any special skills for the dentist for performing the procedure, (2) decreased occurrence of bubbles during injection of the cement, and (3) overall short duration of the procedure. Thus, it is appropriate for the treatment of pediatric patients whose behavior is difficult to manage. However, further studies are required in order to establish the use of RelyX Unicem as a stable restorative material in early childhood caries. PMID:24490090

  13. Influence of chlorhexidine on dentin adhesive interface micromorphology and nanoleakage expression of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stape, Thiago Henrique Scarabello; Menezes, Murilo De Sousa; Barreto, Bruno De Castro Ferreira; Naves, Lucas Zago; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Quagliatto, Paulo Sérgio; Martins, Luís Roberto Marcondes

    2013-08-01

    This study focused on adhesive interface morphologic characterization and nanoleakage expression of resin cements bonded to human dentin pretreated with 1% chlorhexidine (CHX). Thirty-two non-carious human third molars were ground flat to expose superficial dentin. Resin composite blocks were luted to the exposed dentin using one conventional (RelyX ARC) and one self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100), with/without CHX pretreatment. Four groups (n = 8) were obtained: control groups (ARC and U100); experimental groups (ARC/CHX and U100/CHX) were pretreated with 1% CHX prior to the luting process. After storage in water for 24 h, the bonded teeth were sectioned into 0.9 × 0.9 mm(2) sticks producing a minimum of 12 sticks per tooth. Four sticks from each tooth were prepared for hybrid layer evaluation by scanning electron microscope analysis. The remaining sticks were immersed in silver nitrate for 24 h for either nanoleakage evaluation along the bonded interfaces or after rupture. Nanoleakage samples were carbon coated and examined using backscattered electron mode. Well-established hybrid layers were observed in the groups luted with RelyX ARC. Nanoleakage evaluation revealed increase nanoleakage in groups treated with CHX for both resin cements. Group U100/CHX exhibited the most pronouncing nanoleakage expression along with porous zones adjacent to the CHX pretreated dentin. The results suggest a possible incompatibility between CHX and RelyX U100 that raises the concern that the use of CHX with self-adhesive cements may adversely affect resin-dentin bond. PMID:23737406

  14. Degree of Conversion and Mechanical Properties of Resin Cements Cured Through Different All-Ceramic Systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Camila de Carvalho Almança; Rodrigues, Renata Borges; Silva, André Luis Faria E; Simamoto Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Soares, Carlos José; Novais, Veridiana Resende

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the degree of conversion (DC), Vickers microhardness (VH) and elastic modulus (E) of resin cements cured through different ceramic systems. One 1.5-mm-thick disc of each ceramic system (feldspathic, lithium dissilicate and zircônia veneered with feldspathic) was used. Three dual-cured (Allcem, Variolink II and RelyX U200) and one chemically-cured (Multilink) resin cements were activated through ceramic discs. For dual-cured resin cements was used a conventional halogen light-curing unit (Optilux 501 at 650 mW/cm2 for 120 s). Samples cured without the ceramic disc were used as control. The samples were stored at 37 °C for 24 h. ATR/FTIR spectrometry was used to evaluate the extent of polymerization in the samples (n=5). Micromechanical properties - VH and E - of the resin cements (n=5) were measured with a dynamic indentation test. Data were statistically analyzed with two-way ANOVA, Tukey's test and Pearson's correlation (α=0.05). DC was affected only by the type of resin cement (p=0.001). For VH, significant interaction was detected between resin cement and ceramic (p=0.045). The dual-cured resin cements showed no significant differences in mean values for E and significantly higher values than the chemically-cured resin cement. The degree of conversion and the mechanical properties of the evaluated resin cements depend on their activation mode and the type of ceramics used in 1.5 mm thickness. The dual-cured resin cements performed better than the chemically-cured resin cement in all studied properties. PMID:26647933

  15. Evaluation of bond strength between leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based ceramics to dentin after cementation with conventional and self-adhesive resin agents.

    PubMed

    Rigolin, Fernando J; Miranda, Milton E; Flório, Flávia M; Basting, Roberta T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microtensile bond strength of two heat-pressed ceramics (leucite-based--IPS Empress Esthetic/Ivoclar Vivadent, and lithium disilicate-based --IPS e.max Press/Ivoclar Vivadent) to dentin with the use of conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. The occlusal surface of 60 intact human molars was removed and the dentin was exposed. Ceramic blocks were cemented randomly with regard to the cementation systems (n = 10): conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II/Ivoclar Vivadent), conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink/Ivoclar Vivadent), and dual self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U100/3M ESPE). The dual cementation systems were photoactivated with a LED light device (Radii Cal, SDI) for 40 seconds. The specimens were sectioned to obtain sticks of approximately 1 mm2 for microtensile tests on a universal testing machine (EMIC). The type of fracture was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) showed that there was no difference between types of ceramic. Average microtensile bond strength was higher for the conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and the self-adhesive dual resin cement (RelyX U100), despite greater prevalence of premature loss of the sticks with the latter. Average bond strength was lower when the conventional self-polymerizing resin cement (Multilink) was used. Leucite-based and lithium disilicate-based cements present similar bond strength to the dentin with conventional dual resin cement (Variolink II) and a dual self-adhesive cement (RelyX U100). PMID:25335361

  16. Do Resin Cements Alter Action Potentials of Isolated Rat Sciatic Nerve?

    PubMed Central

    Ertan, Ahmet Atila; Beriat, Nilufer Celebi; Onur, Mehmet Ali; Tan, Gamze; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects dual-cure resin cements on nerve conduction. Methods: Panavia F, RelyX ARC, and Variolink II polymerized either by light-emitting diode (LED) or quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) were used in the study (n=10). The conductance of sciatic nerves of 50 rats were measured before and after contact with the specimens for 1 h. Results: The time-dependent change in nerve conductance and the comparison of LED versus QTH showed that differences between groups are significant (P<.05). For both polymerization techniques, pair-wise comparisons of resin cements showed that the nerve conductance between groups is different (P<.05). RelyX ARC elicited irreversible inhibition of compound action potentials (more than 50% change) and Panavia F and Variolink II polymerized by LED and QTH did not alter nerve conduction beyond physiologic limits. Conclusions: Resin cements may alter nerve conductance and even lead to neurotoxic effects. PMID:21494389

  17. Effect of dentin pretreatment and curing mode on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Youm, Seung-Hyun; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim was to evaluate the effect of curing mode and different dentin surface pretreatment on microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six extracted human permanent molars were sectioned horizontally exposing flat dentin surface. The teeth were divided into 12 groups (3 teeth/group) according to the dentin surface pretreatment methods (control, 18% EDTA, 10% Polyacrylic acid) and curing mode (self-curing vs. light-curing) of cement. After pretreatment, composite resin blocks were cemented with the following: (a) G-CEM LinkAce; (b) RelyX U200, followed by either self-curing or light-curing. After storage, the teeth were sectioned and µTBS test was performed using a microtensile testing machine. The data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, Student T-test and Scheffe's post-hoc test at P<.05 level. RESULTS For G-CEM LinkAce cement groups, polyacrylic acid pretreatment showed the highest µTBS in the self-cured group. In the light-cured group, no significant improvements were observed according to the dentin surface pretreatment. There were no significant differences between curing modes. Both dentin surface pretreatment methods helped to increase the µTBS of RelyX U200 resin cement significantly and degree of pretreatment effect was similar. No significant differences were found regarding curing modes except control groups. In the comparisons of two self-adhesive resin cements, all groups within the same pretreatment and curing mode were significantly different excluding self-cured control groups. CONCLUSION Selecting RelyX U200 used in this study and application of dentin surface pretreatment with EDTA and polyacrylic acid might be recommended to enhance the bond strength of cement to dentin. PMID:26330979

  18. The impact of endodontic irrigating solutions on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts luted with resin cements.

    PubMed

    da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo; Andrea Pelegrine, Rina; de Magalhes Silveira, Cludia Fernandes; da Silveira Bueno, Vanessa Castro Pestana; de Oliveira Alves, Vanessa; Sanches Cunha, Rodrigo; da Silveira Pereira, Gisele Damiana; Sartini Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei

    2016-01-01

    Resin-based restorative materials, widely used to cement posts, may be influenced by irrigants used during endodontic chemical-mechanical preparation. This study evaluated the impact of endodontic irrigating solutions and adhesive cement systems on the push-out shear bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin. Ninety-six bovine incisors were divided into 12 groups (4 irrigants 3 resin cements; n = 8). Prepared canals were irrigated with saline solution, 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), 5.25% NaOCl, or 2% chlorhexidine gel, and posts were cemented with RelyX ARC, Panavia F, or RelyX U100. The bond strength was evaluated by means of the push-out test, and results were subjected to analysis of variance. The mean bond strength observed for the combination of 5.25% NaOCl irrigant and RelyX U100 cement was significantly lower (8.82 MPa) than the values found for the other groups (P < 0.05). The other combinations of irrigating solution and resin cement had no adverse effect on the bond strength of the glass fiber posts to dentin. PMID:26742163

  19. Push-out bond strength of quartz fibre posts to root canal dentin using total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Navimipour, Elmira J.; Shakerifar, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Several adhesive systems are available for cementation of fibre posts into the root canal. The aim of the present study was to investigate the push-out bond strengths of quartz fibre posts to root dentin with the use of different total-etch and self-adhesive resin cements. Study Design: Ninety single-rooted human premolars were endodontically treated and standardized post-spaces were prepared. Fibre posts were cemented with different luting agents: total-etch (Nexus NX3, Duo-Link, and RelyX ARC) and self-adhesive resin cements (Maxcem Elite, BisCem, and RelyX Unicem). Three post/dentin sections (coronal, middle and apical) were obtained from each specimen, and push-out bond strength test was performed in each section at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data was analyzed with two-factor and one-way analysis of variance and a post-hoc Tukey test at a significance level of p < 0.05. Results: Cement type, canal region, and their interaction significantly influenced bond strength. Significantly higher bond strength values were observed in the apical region of self-adhesive cements. Only Duo-Link and RelyX ARC cements resulted in homogeneous bond strengths. Conclusions: Cementation of quartz fibre posts using self-adhesive cements provided higher push-out bond strengths especially in the apical region, while total-etch cements resulted in more uniform bond strengths in different regions of the root canal. Key words: Push-out bond strength; quartz fibre post; total-etch resin cement; self-adhesive resin cement. PMID:22143695

  20. Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (?TBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher ?TBS (p<0.05) compared to the U100, except when EDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher ?TBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher ?TBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC. PMID:22335305

  1. Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.

    PubMed

    de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (α=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane. PMID:25252257

  2. Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2010-08-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

  3. Try-in Pastes Versus Resin Cements: A Color Comparison.

    PubMed

    Vaz, Edenize Cristina; Vaz, Maysa Magalhães; Rodrigues Gonçalves de Oliveira, Maria Beatriz; Takano, Alfa Emília; de Carvalho Cardoso, Paula; de Torres, Érica Miranda; Gonzaga Lopes, Lawrence

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the color of ceramic veneer restorations using different shades of try-in pastes and resin cement. Researchers found no differences between try-in pastes and resin cements after cementation. PMID:27213935

  4. In vitro evaluation of the bonding durability of self-adhesive resin cement to titanium using highly accelerated life test.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Shinya, Akiyoshi

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bonding durability of three self-adhesive resin cements to titanium using the Highly Accelerated Life Test (HALT). The following self-adhesive resin cements were used to bond pairs of titanium blocks together according to manufacturers' instructions: RelyX Unicem, Breeze, and Clearfil SA Luting. After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, bonded specimens (n=15) immersed in 37°C water were subjected to cyclic shear load testing regimes of 20, 30, or 40 kg using a fatigue testing machine. Cyclic loading continued until failure occurred, and the number of cycles taken to reach failure was recorded. The bonding durability of a self-adhesive resin cement to titanium was largely influenced by the weight of impact load. HALT showed that Clearfil SA Luting, which contained MDP monomer, yielded the highest median bonding lifetime to titanium. PMID:22123007

  5. The effect of curing light and chemical catalyst on the degree of conversion of two dual cured resin luting cements.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Eduardo Jos; Prieto, Lcia Trazzi; Soares, Giulliana Panfiglio; Dias, Carlos Tadeu dos Santos; Aguiar, Flvio Henrique Baggio; Paulillo, Lus Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different curing lights and chemical catalysts on the degree of conversion of resin luting cements. A total of 60 disk-shaped specimens of RelyX ARC or Panavia F of diameter 5 mm and thickness 0.5 mm were prepared and the respective chemical catalyst (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus or ED Primer) was added. The specimens were light-cured using different curing units (an argon ion laser, an LED or a quartz-tungsten-halogen light) through shade A2 composite disks of diameter 10 mm and thickness 2 mm. After 24 h of dry storage at 37C, the degree of conversion of the resin luting cements was measured by Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy. For statistical analysis, ANOVA and the Tukey test were used, with p ? 0.05. Panavia F when used without catalyst and cured using the LED or the argon ion laser showed degree of conversion values significantly lower than RelyX ARC, with and without catalyst, and cured with any of the light sources. Therefore, the degree of conversion of Panavia F with ED Primer cured with the quartz-tungsten-halogen light was significantly different from that of RelyX ARC regardless of the use of the chemical catalyst and light curing source. In conclusion, RelyX ARC can be cured satisfactorily with the argon ion laser, LED or quartz-tungsten-halogen light with or without a chemical catalyst. To obtain a satisfactory degree of conversion, Panavia F luting cement should be used with ED Primer and cured with halogen light. PMID:21104286

  6. Color stability of composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darrell S; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Whisler, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    This study sought to determine the difference in color stability of resin cements after one year of storage in water. Three commercial resin cements (Nexus 3, Calibra, Variolink 2) were evaluated under three different curing conditions (photo-, dual-, and self-cure) over three storage time periods (3, 6, and 12 months). A plastic mold was used to prepare cylindrical specimens of each of the three resin cements. For the phototcured specimens, only the base component of the resin cement was cured. For the dual- and self-cure specimens, the base and catalyst of the cements were mixed according to the manufacturer's instructions, syringed into the mold, and either photocured as before (dual-cure) or allowed to chemically set (self-cure). The total amount of color change (delta E) was calculated using a spectrophotometer after 24 hours (baseline) and after 3, 6, and 12 months of storage in distilled water. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA and a Tukey test. After one year of storage, Nexus 3 demonstated the lowest color change values (delta E) under all curing conditions, although it was not significantly different from Variolink 2 when photocured or Calibra when self-cured. New resin cements without a traditional benzoyl peroxide/amine redox initiator system, such as Nexus 3, could be more color-stable over time. PMID:22313825

  7. Shear bond strength of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with three different generations of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Ghani, Zuryati; Jaafar, Wahyuni; Foo, Siew Fon; Ariffin, Zaihan; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the shear bond strength between the dentin substrate and computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing feldspathic ceramic and nano resin ceramics blocks cemented with resin cement. Materials and Methods: Sixty cuboidal blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 5 mm) were fabricated in equal numbers from feldspathic ceramic CEREC® Blocs PC and nano resin ceramic Lava™ Ultimate, and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10). Each block was cemented to the dentin of 60 extracted human premolar using Variolink® II/Syntac Classic (multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding), NX3 Nexus® (two-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding) and RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive cement. All specimens were thermocycled, and shear bond strength testing was done using the universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA. Results: Combination of CEREC® Blocs PC and Variolink® II showed the highest mean shear bond strength (8.71 Mpa), while the lowest of 2.06 Mpa were observed in Lava™ Ultimate and RelyX™ U200. There was no significant difference in the mean shear bond strength between different blocks. Conclusion: Variolink® II cement using multi-steps etch-and-rinse adhesive bonding provided a higher shear bond strength than the self-adhesive cement RelyX U200. The shear bond strength was not affected by the type of blocks used. PMID:26430296

  8. The influence of four dual-cure resin cements and surface treatment selection to bond strength of fiber post.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Liu, Hong; Qian, Yue-Tong; Zhu, Song; Zhao, Su-Qian

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we evaluate the influence of post surface pre-treatments on the bond strength of four different cements to glass fiber posts. Eighty extracted human maxillary central incisors and canines were endodontically treated and standardized post spaces were prepared. Four post pre-treatments were tested: (i) no pre-treatment (NS, control), (ii) sandblasting (SA), (iii) silanization (SI) and (iv) sandblasting followed by silanization (SS). Per pre-treatment, four dual-cure resin cements were used for luting posts: DMG LUXACORE Smartmix Dual, Multilink Automix, RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0. All the specimens were subjected to micro push-out test. Two-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc tests were performed (α=0.05) to analyze the data. Bond strength was significantly affected by the type of resin cement, and bond strengths of RelyX Unicem and Panavia F2.0 to the fiber posts were significantly higher than the other cement groups. Sandblasting significantly increased the bond strength of DMG group to the fiber posts. PMID:24177170

  9. Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadjoo, Nisa

    Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond strengths for all three cements were observed with Scotchbond Universal surface treatment (p=0.0041). Calibra in combination with aluminum oxide air abrasion resulted in statistically lowest bond strength at 12.0 +/- 3.9 MPa. The predominant mode of failure was cohesive with cement remaining principally on the zirconium oxide samples in 57.5% of the specimens, followed by cement found on both the zirconium oxide samples and composite rods (mixed) in 32.5% of the samples. Only 10% of the specimens were found with cement on the composite rods (adhesive failure). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the MDP-containing resin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air abrasion particle + Scotchbond Universal surface treatment demonstrated the highest bond strength regardless of the cement. Significance: The variation of surface conditioning methods yielded different results in accordance with the cement types. Overall, Scotchbond Universal adhesive + air abrasion yielded the highest bond strengths among all three surface treatments. The phosphate monomer-containing luting system, Panavia SA, is acceptable for bonding to zirconia ceramics.

  10. Effect of ceramic veneer opacity and exposure time on the polymerization efficiency of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Archegas, Luc Regina Panka; de Menezes Caldas, Danillo Biazzetto; Rached, rodrigo Nunes; Soares, Paulo; Souza, Evelise Machado

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the degree of conversion (DC), hardness (H), and modulus of elasticity (E) of a dual-cured resin cement, a light-cured resin cement, and a flowable resin cured through opaque or translucent ceramic with different exposure times. RelyX ARC (dual), RelyX Veneer (light-cured), and Filtek Z350 Flow resin specimens 0.5 mm thick were cured for 40, 80, and 120 seconds through 1-mm thick translucent or opaque feldspathic ceramic disks (n=10). The specimens were stored at 37C for 24 hours. Half of each specimen was used to test the DC and the other half to test H and E. The DC was determined in a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in absorbance mode at peaks of 1638 cm(-1) and 1610 cm(-1). H and E were determined using nanoindentation with one loading cycle and a maximum load of 400 mN. The data were analyzed with three-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Games-Howell test, and the Pearson correlation test (?=0.05). Statistically significant differences were found for all three factors (material, opacity, and exposure time), as well as interaction between them. The opaque ceramic resulted in lower DC, H, and E than the translucent ceramic for an exposure time of 40 seconds. An exposure time of 120 seconds resulted in a similar DC for all materials, irrespective of the opacity of the ceramic. Materials cured for 120 seconds had higher H and E than those cured for 40 seconds. The exposure time and opacity of the ceramic exerted an influence on the DC, H, and E of the materials evaluated. PMID:22313282

  11. Light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness and microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Kaya, Bekir M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia and the light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness. Study design: A total of 126 disc-shaped specimens (2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter) were prepared from dual-cured resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Panavia F and Clearfil SA cement). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen and light emitting diode light curing units under different thicknesses of zirconia. Then the specimens (n=7/per group) were stored in dry conditions in total dark at 37C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester. Statistical significance was determined using multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (alpha=.05). Light transmittance of different thicknesses of zirconia (0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mm) was measured using a hand-held radiometer (Demetron, Kerr). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test (alpha=.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that resin cement and light curing unit had significant effects on microhardness (p < 0.001). Additionally, greater zirconia thickness resulted in lower transmittance. There was no correlation between the amount of light transmitted and microhardness of dual-cured resin cements (r = 0.073, p = 0.295). Conclusion: Although different zirconia thicknesses might result in insufficient light transmission, dual-cured resin cements under zirconia restorations could have adequate microhardness. Key words:Zirconia, microhardness, light transmittance, resin cement. PMID:23385497

  12. Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values. PMID:25004052

  13. Dual and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements as thin films.

    PubMed

    Moraes, R R; Boscato, N; Jardim, P S; Schneider, L F J

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the dual- and self-curing potential of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) as thin, clinically-relevant cement films was investigated. The SARCs tested were: BisCem (BSC; Bisco), Maxcem Elite (MXE; Kerr), RelyX Unicem clicker (UNI; 3M ESPE), seT capsule (SET; SDI), and SmartCem 2 (SC2; Dentsply Caulk). The conventional cement RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) was tested as a reference. The degree of conversion (DC) as a function of time was evaluated by real-time Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflectance (ATR) device. The cements were either photoactivated for 40 seconds (dual-cure mode) or not photoactivated (self-cure mode). The cement film thickness was 50 ± 10 μm. The DC (%) was evaluated 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 minutes after placing the cement on the ATR cell. Data for DC as a function of time were analyzed by two-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). DC values at 30 minutes for the self- and dual-cure modes were submitted to one-way ANOVA. Post hoc comparisons were performed using the Student-Newman-Keuls test (p<0.05). The rate and the extent of conversion were lower for the SARCs compared with the conventional cement. Means ± standard deviations (SD) for the dual-cure mode at 30 minutes were: 75 ± 5 (ARC)a, 73 ± 8 (SET)a, 61 ± 4 (MXE)b, 51 ± 9 (BSC)c, 51 ± 4 (UNI)c, and 48 ± 3 (SC2)c, while in the self-cure mode means and SD were 62 ± 6 (ARC)a, 54 ± 3 (MXE)b, 40 ± 6 (SC2)c, 35 ± 2 (UNI)c, 35 ± 3 (SET)c, and 11 ± 3 (BSC)d. The DC for the dual-cure mode was generally higher than the self-cure, irrespective of the time. Discrepancies in DC between the dual- and self-cure modes from 11% to 79% were observed. In conclusion, SARCs may present slower rate of polymerization and lower final DC than conventional resin cements, in either the dual- or self-cure mode. PMID:21864125

  14. Immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements and retention of glass-fiber posts.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Borges, Marcela Gonçalves; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of immediate and delayed photoactivation of self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs) on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted into root canals. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and post holes of 9 mm in depth were prepared. Fiber posts were luted using one of two SARCs, BisCem (Bisco Inc., Schaumburg, USA) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE, Saint Paul, USA), or a regular (etch-and-rinse) resin cement (AllCem; FGM, Joinvile, Brazil). Photoactivation was performed immediately, or at 5 or 10 min after cementation. Root/post specimens were transversely sectioned 7 days after luting into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing in a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' method (α = 0.05). Immediate photoactivation resulted in the highest bond strength for Unicem. BisCem demonstrated higher bond strength values when photoactivated after a 10-min delay. Immediate photoactivation yielded the lowest bond strengths for AllCem, although no differences in bond strength were observed between photoactivation delayed by 5 and 10 min. In conclusion, the moment of resin cement photoactivation may affect the intraradicular retention of fiber posts, depending upon the resin cement used for luting. PMID:25006624

  15. Intra-radicular dentin treatments and retention of fiber posts with self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Reis, Giselle Rodrigues dos; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treating intraradicular dentin with irrigating solutions on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and 9-mm-deep postholes were prepared. Before inserting the cement, the root canals were irrigated with various solutions: 11.5% polyacrylic acid for 30 s, 17% EDTA for 60 s, or 5% NaOCl for 60 s, respectively. Irrigation with distilled water was used in the control group. After all specimens had been rinsed with distilled water, the excess moisture was removed and the posts were luted using either BisCem (Bisco) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE). Seven days after luting, the specimens were sectioned transversally into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing on a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data (n = 6 per group) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' test (α = 0.05). For Unicem, EDTA showed lower bond strength than the other solutions, which had similar results. For BisCem, EDTA showed higher bond strength than the other treatments, while application of NaOCl yielded higher bond strength than polyacrylic acid whereas the control group had intermediate results. In conclusion, irrigating root canals before insertion of self-adhesive resin cements, especially EDTA, might interfere with retention of the fiber posts. PMID:23306622

  16. Push-out bond strengths of fiber-reinforced composite posts with various resin cements according to the root level

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Noh, Young-Sin; Lee, Yoon; Min, Kyung-San

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine whether the push-out bond strengths between the radicular dentin and fiber reinforced-composite (FRC) posts with various resin cements decreased or not, according to the coronal, middle or apical level of the root. MATERIALS AND METHODS FRC posts were cemented with one of five resin cement groups (RelyX Unicem: Uni, Contax with activator & LuxaCore-Dual: LuA, Contax & LuxaCore-Dual: Lu, Panavia F 2.0: PA, Super-Bond C&B: SB) into extracted human mandibular premolars. The roots were sliced into discs at the coronal, middle and apical levels. Push-out bond strength tests were performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min, and the failure aspect was analyzed. RESULTS There were no significant differences (P>.05) in the bond strengths of the different resin cements at the coronal level, but there were significant differences in the bond strengths at the middle and apical levels (P<.05). Only the Uni and LuA cements did not show any significant decrease in their bond strengths at all the root levels (P>.05); all other groups had a significant decrease in bond strength at the middle or apical level (P<.05). The failure aspect was dominantly cohesive at the coronal level of all resin cements (P<.05), whereas it was dominantly adhesive at the apical level. CONCLUSION All resin cement groups showed decreases in bond strengths at the middle or apical level except LuA and Uni. PMID:24049569

  17. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    PubMed Central

    RAMOS, Marcelo Barbosa; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-ESPE and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray) used for cementing fiber-reinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron) under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. Material and methods Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a) no light activation; b) light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c) light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds) for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. Results Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. Conclusions The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent. PMID:23138743

  18. Qualitative evaluation of scanning electron microscopy methods in a study of the resin cement/dentine adhesive interface.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Carolina N D B; Daleprane, Bruno; Barbosa, Paola F; Moreira, Allyson N; de Magalhães, Cláudia S

    2014-02-01

    Sample preparation and imaging techniques for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of dehydrated dental samples can hinder the structural analyses. This study qualitatively evaluated images obtained with two different protocols of SEM preparation and analysis to assess the dentine adhesive interface. The crown and root dentine of 12 bovine incisors were subjected to cementation with the resin cement RelyX U100 or RelyX ARC/SBMP (n = 6). After storage for 7 days in a moist environment at 37 ± 1°C, the dentine samples were dehydrated in an ascending alcohol series, and three specimens from each group were coated with gold or carbon and examined in a high-vacuum (JEOL JSM-6360LV, 10 kV) or low-vacuum (FEI Quanta 200F, 15-30 kV) microscope. Images were obtained at magnifications between 50 and 2,000×, but with different working distances. The use of high vacuum for carbon and gold coating and SEM visualization led to cracks in the samples. A small number of cracks can be described in the specimens subjected to the low-vacuum technique. The protocol for SEM imaging in low vacuum was considered more appropriate for preservation of the integrity of the evaluated structures. PMID:24188716

  19. Bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dry and moist dentin.

    PubMed

    André, Carolina Bosso; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Ayres, Ana Paula Almeida; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Giannini, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of humidity conditions and evaluation times on the dentin bond strength (DBS) of two self-adhesive resin cements (RC). The RC used were: RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) and Clearfil SA Cement (Kuraray Med.). One hundred and twenty coronal portions of bovine incisors (n = 10) were used. Buccal surfaces were abraded in order to expose a flat dentinal surface (180-grit SiC) and to standardize the smear layer formation (600-grit SiC). The humidity conditions tested were: dry (air-dried for 10 s), slightly moist (water application with disposable applicator on dried dentin and water excess removed with absorbent paper), and moist (same application without water removal). The RC were used according to the manufacturers' recommendations and were applied to prepolymerized resin discs (2 mm thick; Sinfony, 3M ESPE), which were subsequently bonded to the dentin surfaces. After 24 h, half of the teeth were prepared for the microtensile bond strength test, while the other half were stored in water for 6 months and tested in tension (0.5 mm/min) until failure. A 3-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test were performed (preset alpha of 0.05). No RC showed any reduction of DBS after 6 months, and no significant difference was observed between them. The moist dentin increased the bond strength of Clearfil SA Cement for both periods of time. Humidity conditions can change the DBS; however, the study's results were product-dependent. PMID:24036976

  20. Resistance to bond degradation between dual-cure resin cements and pre-treated sintered CAD-CAM dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Osorio, Raquel; Monticelli, Francesca; Osorio, Estrella; Toledano, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bond stability of resin cements when luted to glass-reinforced alumina and zirconia CAD/CAM dental ceramics. Study design: Eighteen glass-infiltrated alumina and eighteen densely sintered zirconia blocks were randomly conditioned as follows: Group 1: No treatment; Group 2: Sandblasting (125 µm Al2O3-particles); and Group 3: Silica-coating (50 µm silica-modified Al2O3-particles). Composite samples were randomly bonded to the pre-treated ceramic surfaces using different resin cements: Subgroup 1: Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC); Subgroup 2: RelyX Unicem (RXU); and Subgroup 3: Calibra (CAL). After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into 1 ± 0.1 mm2 sticks. One-half of the beams were tested for microtensile bond strength (MTBS). The remaining one-half was immersed in 10 % NaOCl aqueous solution (NaOClaq) for 5 h before testing. The fracture pattern and morphology of the debonded surfaces were assessed with a field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM). A multiple ANOVA was conducted to analyze the contributions of ceramic composition, surface treatment, resin cement type, and chemical challenging to MTBS. The Tukey test was run for multiple comparisons (p < 0.05). Results: After 24 h, CEC luted to pre-treated zirconia achieved the highest MTBS. Using RXU, alumina and zirconia registered comparable MTBS. CAL failed prematurely, except when luted to sandblasted zirconia. After NaOClaq storage, CEC significantly lowered MTBS when luted to zirconia or alumina. RXU decreased MTBS only when bonded to silica-coated alumina. CAL recorded 100 % of pre-testing failures. Micromorphological alterations were evident after NaOClaq immersion. Conclusions: Resin-ceramic interfacial longevity depended on cement selection rather than on surface pre-treatments. The MDP-containing and the self-adhesive resin cements were both suitable for luting CAD/CAM ceramics. Despite both cements being prone to degradation, RXU luted to zirconia or untreated or sandblasted alumina showed the most stable interfaces. CAL experimented spontaneous debonding in all tested groups. Key words:CAD/CAM ceramic, alumina, zirconia, resin cement, surface pre-treatment, sandblasting, silica-coating, chemical aging, bond degradation, microtensile bond strength. PMID:22322517

  1. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested. PMID:27041021

  2. Early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement light cured through resin overlays with different dentin-layer thicknesses.

    PubMed

    Chang, H-S; Kim, J-W

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether dentin-layer thickness of resin overlays could affect the early hardness and shear bond strength of dual-cure resin cement (DCRC, RelyX ARC) after light curing with light curing units (LCUs) of various power densities: Optilux 360 (360), Elipar Freelight 2 (FL2), and Elipar S10 (S10). Resin overlays were fabricated using an indirect composite resin (Sinfony) with a dentin layer, an enamel layer, and a translucent layer of 0.5 mm thickness each (0.5-0.5-0.5) or of 0.2 mm, 0.5 mm, and 0.8 mm thickness (0.2-0.5-0.8), respectively. The DCRC was light cured for 40 seconds through the overlays, and surface hardness and shear bond strength to bovine dentin were tested 10 minutes after the start of light curing. Surface hardness was higher when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when the DCRC was light cured through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination with all LCUs. The ratio of upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured through resin overlays relative to the upper surface hardness of DCRC light cured directly was more than 90% only when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination. The shear bond strength value was higher when the DCRC was light cured with S10 through the 0.2-0.5-0.8 combination than when light cured with S10 through the 0.5-0.5-0.5 combination. This study indicates that reducing the dentin-layer thickness while increasing the translucent-layer thickness of resin inlays can increase the photopolymerization of DCRC, thereby increasing the early bond strength of resin inlays to dentin. PMID:24191869

  3. Statistical failure analysis of adhesive resin cement bonded dental ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaou; Katsube, Noriko; Seghi, Robert R; Rokhlin, Stanislav I.

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this work is to quantitatively examine the effect of adhesive resin cement on the probability of crack initiation from the internal surface of ceramic dental restorations. The possible crack bridging mechanism and residual stress effect of the resin cement on the ceramic surface are examined. Based on the fracture-mechanics-based failure probability model, we predict the failure probability of glass-ceramic disks bonded to simulated dentin subjected to indentation loads. The theoretical predictions match experimental data suggesting that both resin bridging and shrinkage plays an important role and need to be considered for accurate prognostics to occur. PMID:18670583

  4. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Arslan Malkoç, Meral; Demir, Necla; Şengün, Abdulkadir; Bozkurt, Şerife Buket; Hakki, Sema Sezen

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements. PMID:25736260

  5. Cytotoxicity evaluation of luting resin cements on bovine dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs) by real-time cell analysis.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Arslan Malkoç M; Demir N; Şengün A; Bozkurt ŞB; Hakki SS

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cytotoxicity of resin cements on dental pulp-derived cells (bDPCs), Bifix QM (BQM), Choice 2(C2), RelyX U200(RU200), Maxcem Elite(ME), and Multilink Automix(MA) were tested. The materials were incubated in DMEM for 72 h. A real-time cell analyzer was used to evaluate cell survival. The statistical analyses used were one-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer tests. BQM, RU200, and ME demonstrated a significant decrease in the bDPCs' index at 24 and 72 h (p≤0.001). These materials were found to be the most toxic resin cements, as compared to the control and other tested materials (C2 and MA). However, C2 and MA showed a better survival rate, compared to BQM, RU200, and ME, and had lower cell index than the control group. The cytotoxic effects of resin cements on pulpa should be evaluated during the selection of proper cements.

  6. Evaluation of TEGDMA leaching from four resin cements by HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Altintas, Subutay Han; Usumez, Aslihan

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the elution of TEGDMA from dual cured resin cements, used for bonding of ceramic restoration by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Methods: Forty freshly extracted caries and restoration free molar teeth used in this study. Standardized Class I preparations were prepared in all teeth. Ceramic inlays were cemented with one of the dual cured resin cements (Variolink II, Rely X ARC, Rely X Unicem and Resilute). After cementation, specimens were stored in 75% ethanol solution. HPLC was used to analyze the amounts of TEGDMA in different time intervals. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests were used to evaluate the results (P<.05). Results: The amount of TEGDMA eluted from Resilute was the highest and the amount of TEG-DMA eluted from Rely X Unicem was the lowest (P<.05). The total amount of monomers was the highest after 21 days (P<.05). Conclusion: In the case of resin cements, elution of TEGDMA was the highest in Resilute and lowest in Rely X Unicem. The amount of TEGDMA eluted from resin cements was influenced by the time. PMID:22904653

  7. Resin cementation of zirconia ceramics with different bonding agents

    PubMed Central

    Tanış, Merve Çakırbay; Akay, Canan; Karakış, Duygu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sandblasting and different chemical bonding agents on shear bond strength of zirconia and conventional resin cement. In this study, 35 zirconia specimens were treated as follows: Group I: control; Group II: sandblasting; Group III: sandblasting + Monobond S; Group IV: sandblasting + Monobond Plus; Group V: sandblasting + Z-Prime Plus. The specimens in each group were bonded with conventional composite resin cement Variolink II. After cementation, specimens were stored in distilled water (at 37 °C) for 24 h and shear test was performed. The highest shear bond strength values were observed in Groups IV and V. The lowest shear bond strength values were observed in Group I. Using 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogenphosphate monomer-containing priming agents, e.g. Monobond Plus and Z-PRIME Plus, combined with sandblasting can be an effective method for resin bonding of zirconia restorations. PMID:26019653

  8. Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs

    PubMed Central

    CEKIC-NAGAS, Isil; ERGUN, Gulfem

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc) and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start) by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter) were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes), light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes) and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes) curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group) were stored dry in the dark at 37C for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV). For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37C and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days) and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. Results Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p<0.05) on microhardness, diametral tensile strength, water solubility and sorption. However, no significant differences (p>0.05) were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties. PMID:21710093

  9. Analysis of Self-Adhesive Resin Cement Microshear Bond Strength on Leucite-Reinforced Glass-Ceramic with/without Pure Silane Primer or Universal Adhesive Surface Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Woo, Jung-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Hwang, Ji-Yun; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of self-adhesive resin (SA) cement on leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic using silane or universal adhesive. Materials and Methods. Ceramic blocks were etched with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid and divided into three groups (n = 16): (1) negative control (NC) without treatment; (2) Single Bond Universal (SBU); (3) RelyX Ceramic Primer as positive control (PC). RelyX Unicem resin cement was light-cured, and μSBS was evaluated with/without thermocycling. The μSBS was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. The fractured surfaces were examined using stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results. Without thermocycling, μSBS was highest for PC (30.50 MPa ± 3.40), followed by SBU (27.33 MPa ± 2.81) and NC (20.18 MPa ± 2.01) (P < 0.05). Thermocycling significantly reduced μSBS in SBU (22.49 MPa ± 4.11) (P < 0.05), but not in NC (20.68 MPa ± 4.60) and PC (28.77 MPa ± 3.52) (P > 0.05). PC and NC predominantly fractured by cohesive failure within the ceramic and mixed failure, respectively. Conclusion. SBU treatment improves μSBS between SA cement and glass ceramics, but to a lower value than PC, and the improvement is eradicated by thermocycling. NC exhibited the lowest μSBS, which remained unchanged after thermocycling. PMID:26557660

  10. The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.

    PubMed

    Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement. PMID:18833862

  11. Evaluation of pH, ultimate tensile strength, and micro-shear bond strength of two self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Costa, Luciana Artioli; Carneiro, Karina Kato; Tanaka, Auro; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the pH, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and micro-shear bond strength (µSBS) of two self-adhesive resin cements to enamel and dentin. Sound bovine incisors (n = 10) and two self-adhesive resin cements (i.e., RelyX U-100 and seT PP) were used. The pH of the resin cements was measured using a pH-indicator paper (n = 3). Specimens for UTS were obtained from an hourglass-shaped mold. For µSBS, cylinders with internal diameter of 0.75 mm and height of 0.5 mm were bonded to the flat enamel and dentin surfaces. Bonded cylinders were tested in the shear mode using a loop wire. The fracture mode was also evaluated. The cement seT PP showed a low pH; U-100 showed significantly higher UTS (49.9 ± 2.0) than seT PP (40.0 ± 2.1) (p < 0.05) and high µSBS to enamel (10.7 ± 3.7). The lowest µSBS was found for seT PP to dentin (0.7 ± 0.6); seT PP to enamel (4.8 ± 1.7), and for U-100 to dentin (7.2 ± 1.9), showing an intermediate µSBS value (p < 0.05). Adhesive failure was the most frequently observed failure mode. The resin cement that presented the lowest pH and UTS also presented the lowest micro-shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. PMID:25337932

  12. Solubility and sorption of resin-based luting cements.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, L A; Kerby, R E; McMillen, K; Clelland, N

    2000-01-01

    This study compared the seven-day water sorption, water solubility and lactic acid solubility of three composite cements and three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements. Disc-shaped specimens measuring 15 mm x 0.5 mm were prepared according to each manufacturer's specifications and desiccated to a constant mass. Specimens were then placed in distilled water at 37 degrees C for seven days. Acid solubility was performed in 0.01 M lactic acid. The weight changes of the specimens after immersion in distilled water or 0.01 M lactic acid were measured using an electronic analytical balance. A one-way ANOVA followed by the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch (REGW) multiple range test was performed on all data. Significant differences (p < 0.05) were found among several cements tested for each of the properties investigated. Due to their hydrophilic nature, all resin-modified glass-ionomer cements showed significantly higher water sorption compared to composite cements. PMID:11203853

  13. The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55℃. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

  14. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3, silanization after hydrogen peroxide etching; group 4, silanization with warm drying at 80℃ after hydrogen peroxide etching. After storage of the specimens in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours, the shear bond strength (in MPa) between the fiber post and resin cement was measured using a universal testing machine. The fractured surface of the fiber post was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post-hoc analysis with Tukey's HSD test (α=0.05). RESULTS Silanization of the fiber post (Group 2) significantly increased the bond strength in comparison with the non treated control (Group 1) (P<.05). Heat drying after silanization also significantly increased the bond strength (Group 3 and 4) (P<.05). However, no effect was determined for hydrogen peroxide etching before applying silane agent (Group 2 and 3) (P>.05). CONCLUSION Fiber post silanization and subsequent heat treatment (80℃) with warm air blower can be beneficial in clinical post cementation. However, hydrogen peroxide etching prior to silanization was not effective in this study. PMID:27141252

  15. Laboratory evaluation of a compomer and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement for orthodontic bonding.

    PubMed

    Millett, D T; Cattanach, D; McFadzean, R; Pattison, J; McColl, J

    1999-02-01

    The mean shear debonding force of stainless steel orthodontic brackets with microetched bases bonded with either a compomer or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement was assessed. In addition, the amount of cement remaining on the enamel surface following bracket removal was evaluated. Finally, survival time of orthodontic brackets bonded with these materials was assessed following simulated mechanical stress in a ball mill. Debonding force and survival time data were compared with those obtained for brackets bonded with a chemically cured resin adhesive, a light-cured resin adhesive, and a conventional glass ionomer cement. There were no significant differences in mean shear debonding force of brackets bonded with the compomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, chemically cured resin adhesive, or the light-cured resin adhesive. Brackets bonded with a conventional glass ionomer cement had a significantly lower mean shear debonding force than that recorded for the other materials. The Adhesive Remnant Index (ARI) mode score indicated that significantly less cement remained on the enamel following debonding of brackets cemented with resin-modified or conventional glass ionomers compared with other adhesives. The median survival time for brackets cemented with the compomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, chemically cured resin, or light-cured resin were significantly longer than for brackets cemented with conventional glass ionomer. The compomer and the resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive appear to offer viable alternatives to the more commonly used resin adhesives for bracket bonding. PMID:10022186

  16. Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

  17. The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Barekatain, Behnaz; Naseri, Roohollah; Zarezadeh, Hossein; Askari, Navid; Nasiri, Saman

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove a cemented post from a root canal requiring endodontic retreatment. Various results have been reported from the studies that evaluated the effect of ultrasonic instruments in removing the posts cemented with resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic energy on the retention of prefabricated metal post cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty eight extracted single root premolars were decoronated with a diamond disc leaving a 13 mm long root and endodontically treated. The root canals were obturated by gutta-percha up to 5 mm with vertical condensation method and the 8 mm post-space was prepared to receive a no. 2 long Dentorama post. The roots were placed in an incubator for 48 h in 37°C and 100% humidity. After mounting the teeth in acrylic blocks, posts were cemented in the root canals using Panavia F2.0 in 24 specimens and Maxcem Elite in 24 others. For half of the specimens in each subgroup, an ultrasonic device was applied for 4 min. Universal testing machine was used to measure the force needed to remove the posts with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the post came out of the canal. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results: The removal force was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia) and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite) resin cements. PMID:24379864

  18. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation

    PubMed Central

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity6 and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  19. Cytotoxicity evaluation of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation.

    PubMed

    Dioguardi, M; Perrone, D; Troiano, G; Laino, L; Ardito, F; Lauritano, F; Cicciù, M; Muzio, L Lo

    2015-01-01

    Custom-cast posts and cores are usually used to treat endodontically treated teeth. However, several researches have underlined how these devices may be a much higher elastic modulus than the supporting dentine and the difference in the modulus could lead to stress concentrating in the cement lute, leading to failure. The role of the cement seems to play a fundamental role in order to transfer the strength during the chewing phases. Aim of this research is to record the rate of cytotoxicity of five different dual-cured resin cements used for fiber posts cementation. We tested the cytotoxicity of this five materials on MG63 osteoblast-like cells through two different methods: MTT ([3-4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide succinate) assay which tests for mitochondrial enzyme activity(6) and xCELLigence® system. PMID:26309592

  20. The shear bond strength between luting cements and zirconia ceramics after two pre-treatments.

    PubMed

    Piwowarczyk, Andree; Lauer, Hans-Christoph; Sorensen, John A

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear-bond strength of 11 luting cements from different material classes to manufactured pre-treated zirconia ceramics (Lava: 97% ZrO2, stabilized with 3% Y2O3). In addition, the influence of the curing method on shear-bond strength was investigated. The cements examined were one zinc-phosphate cement (Fleck's zinc cement), two standard glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, Ketac-Cem), three resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (Fuji Plus, Fuji Cem, RelyX Luting), four standard resin cements (RelyX ARC, Panavia F, Variolink II, Compolute) and one self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem). The ceramic surface was sand-blasted with 100-microm alumina or tribochemically coated with silica. After bonding procedure, one group was tested after 30 minutes (Time I), the other group was stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 14 days and subsequently thermocycled 1000 times (Time II). Statistical analysis was performed by multifactorial ANOVA models with interactions. For multiple pairwise comparisons, the Tukey method was used. After sandblasting, the highest shear-bond strength was obtained for the self-adhesive universal resin cement at 9.7 MPa (Time I) and 12.7 MPa (Time II), respectively. When using the Rocatec system, the highest values were found for one of the resin cements at 15.0 MPa (Time I) and for the self-adhesive universal resin cement at 19.9 MPa (Time II). PMID:15986960

  1. Strengthening of Porcelain Provided by Resin Cements and Flowable Composites.

    PubMed

    Spazzin, A O; Guarda, G B; Oliveira-Ogliari, A; Leal, F B; Correr-Sobrinho, L; Moraes, R R

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mechanical properties of resin-based luting agents on the strength of resin-coated porcelain. The luting agents tested were two flowable resin composites (Filtek Z350 Flow and Tetric-N Flow), a light-cured resin cement (Variolink Veneer [VV]), and a dual-cured resin cement (Variolink II) in either light-cured (base paste) or dual-cured (base + catalyst pastes [VD]) mode. Flexural strength (σf) and modulus of elasticity (Ef) of the luting agents were measured in three-point bending mode (n=5). Porcelain discs (Vita VM7) were tested either untreated (control) or acid etched, silanized, and coated with the luting agents. Biaxial flexural strength (σbf) of the porcelain discs was tested using a ball-on-ring setup (n=30). The σbf of the resin-coated specimens was calculated at z-axial positions for multilayer specimens in the ball-on-ring test: position z = 0 (ceramic surface at the bonded interface) and position z = -t2 (luting agent surface above ring). The σf and Ef data were subjected to analysis of variance and the Student-Newman-Keuls test (α=0.05). A Weibull analysis was performed for σbf data. Weibull modulus (m) and characteristic strength (σ0) were calculated. Linear regression analyses investigated the relationship between mechanical properties of the luting agents and the strengthening of porcelain. VD had higher and VV had lower mechanical strength than the other materials. At z = 0, all resin-coated groups had higher σbf than the control group. No significant differences between the luting agents were observed for σbf and σ0. At z = -t2, VD had the highest σbf and σ0, whereas VV had the poorest results. No significant differences in m were observed across groups. A linear increase in flexural strength of the porcelain was associated with increased σf and Ef of the luting agents at position z = -t2. In conclusion, resin coating and use of luting agents with better physical properties generally improved the mechanical performance of porcelain. PMID:26266657

  2. Push-Out Bond Strength Evaluation of Glass Fiber Posts With Different Resin Cements and Application Techniques.

    PubMed

    Durski, M T; Metz, M J; Thompson, J Y; Mascarenhas, A K; Crim, G A; Vieira, S; Mazur, R F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the push-out strength of two different adhesive cements (total etch and self-adhesive) for glass fiber post (GFP) cementation using two different techniques (microbrush and elongation tip) of cement application. In addition, this study evaluated the effect of total-etch conditioning before the use of a self-adhesive cement. Sixty premolar specimens with a single root canal were selected, endodontically treated, and shaped for GFP cementation. The specimens were randomly placed into one of six groups according to the cement and technique used: RelyX ARC (ARC): ARC + microbrush, ARC + elongation tip; RelyX Unicem (RU): RU + microbrush, RU + elongation tip; or RelyX Unicem + 37% phosphoric acid (RUE): RUE + microbrush, RUE + elongation tip. Each specimen root was cut perpendicular to the vertical axis yielding six 1.0-mm-thick sections. Push-out strength test was performed, followed by statistical analysis using three-way analysis of variance and the Games-Howell test (p<0.05). Statistically significant differences between the groups were found (p< 0.05). The cervical third of the roots had the highest mean push-out strength values, while the apical third had the lowest mean values regardless of the technique used. The elongation technique produced higher mean push-out strength values compared to the microbrush technique. The self-etch adhesive cement had the highest mean push-out strength value in all thirds. The addition of a conditioning step before the self-etch adhesive cementation appears to be effective in enhancing push-out strength with GFPs. PMID:26332737

  3. Do conventional glass ionomer cements release more fluoride than resin-modified glass ionomer cements?

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Martinho, Roberto Luiz de Menezes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcácio; Rebelo, Maria Augusta Bessa; Pontes, Danielson Guedes

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the fluoride release of conventional glass ionomer cements (GICs) and resin-modified GICs. Materials and Methods The cements were grouped as follows: G1 (Vidrion R, SS White), G2 (Vitro Fil, DFL), G3 (Vitro Molar, DFL), G4 (Bioglass R, Biodinâmica), and G5 (Ketac Fil, 3M ESPE), as conventional GICs, and G6 (Vitremer, 3M ESPE), G7 (Vitro Fil LC, DFL), and G8 (Resiglass, Biodinâmica) as resin-modified GICs. Six specimens (8.60 mm in diameter; 1.65 mm in thickness) of each material were prepared using a stainless steel mold. The specimens were immersed in a demineralizing solution (pH 4.3) for 6 hr and a remineralizing solution (pH 7.0) for 18 hr a day. The fluoride ions were measured for 15 days. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's test with 5% significance were applied. Results The highest amounts of fluoride release were found during the first 24 hr for all cements, decreasing abruptly on day 2, and reaching gradually decreasing levels on day 7. Based on these results, the decreasing scale of fluoride release was as follows: G2 > G3 > G8 = G4 = G7 > G6 = G1 > G5 (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were wide variations among the materials in terms of the cumulative amount of fluoride ion released, and the amount of fluoride release could not be attributed to the category of cement, that is, conventional GICs or resin-modified GICs. PMID:26295024

  4. Color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs associated with try-in pastes and with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Rigoni, Paulo; Amaral, Flávia Lucisano Botelho do; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes; Basting, Roberta Tarkany

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro color agreement between nanofluorapatite ceramic discs (e.max Ceram / Ivoclar Vivadent / A2) associated with try-in pastes and those bonded with resin cements (Vitique / DMG/ try-in shade A2½ and cement shade A2½, Variolink II / Ivoclar Vivadent / try-in shade A1 and cement shade A1, and Choice 2 / Bisco / try-in shade A2 and cement shade A2), and to evaluate the shade stability of the discs bonded with resin cements. The shades of composite resin discs (Lliss / FGM / A2) and nanofluorapatite ceramic discs with try-in pastes or cements were evaluated according to the Vita Classical shade guide by a digital spectrophotometer (Micro EspectroShade, MHT) immediately after placing the try-in pastes or resin cements between composite resin discs and ceramic discs. Other evaluations were performed at 2, 5, and 6 day intervals after cementation with the resin cements. All ceramic discs that received try-in pastes presented an A2 shade. There was no statistical difference in the shade of the ceramic specimens fixed with different cements at the different intervals, as evaluated by the Friedman test (p > 0.05). Two try-in pastes presented shade compatibility with those recommended by the manufacturers. There was no similarity of shades between the ceramic discs with try-in pastes and those with the respective resin cements. Shade stability was observed in ceramic discs with resin cements within the intervals evaluated. PMID:23184164

  5. Effect of gap size and cement type on gingival microleakage in Class V resin composite inlays.

    PubMed

    Browning, W D; Safirstein, J

    1997-08-01

    Microleakage along the gingival interface was measured in 52 teeth that had received standardized preparations at a fixed depth of 2.0 mm and were restored with Class V composite inlays. Two fabrication techniques and two types of luting cement were compared. Twenty-six teeth were cemented with a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, and 26 were cemented with a conventional resin cement. Half of the inlay patterns in each cementation group were fabricated directly on the tooth, and half were fabricated indirectly on stone dies. The resin cement was more significantly effective in preventing leakage than the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. There was no statistically significant difference between inlay fabrication techniques. For those inlays cemented with the resin cement, the mean leakage was substantially lower for the indirect patterns than for the direct group. Although this difference was not statistically significant, it suggests that the slightly larger interfacial gap resulting from the fabrication of indirect patterns is effective in creating a better seal. PMID:9477882

  6. The tensile strength of the union between various glass ionomer cements and various composite resins.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J

    1989-04-01

    Increasing use is being made of the glass ionomer cements as a lining for composite resin restorations, particularly when restoring posterior teeth. It has been suggested that it is possible to obtain a mechanical union between the two materials by etching the surface of the cement. This paper discusses the result of testing a broad variety of combinations of different glass ionomer cements and composite resins that have been reported on previously, and suggests that a number of factors need to be taken into account if the optimum physical properties are to be achieved from the union. There would appear to be four main factors which dictate the final strength of the union. The tensile strength of the cement itself is of primary importance and it seems the wettability of the resin bonding agent is also significant. When using some of the less heavily filled composite resins, the stresses set up by the setting contraction of the resin may be too great and, finally, the more heavily filled composite resins for restoration of posterior teeth often prove difficult to adapt to the underlying cement. With careful clinical handling, the so-called 'sandwich' technique is very useful. However, not all combinations of glass ionomer cement and composite resin will unite with sufficient strength to be successful clinically. PMID:2658936

  7. Evaluation of the flexural strength of dual-cure composite resin cements.

    PubMed

    Duymus, Zeynep Yesil; Yaniko?lu, Nuran Dinckal; Alkurt, Murat

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate of flexural strength of some adhesive resin cements. Three dual-cure composite resin cements (Nexus 3; Variolink II, Panavia F) were prepared. The manufacturer's mixing directions for the cements were followed. Adhesive resin cement was mixed, placed in the rectangular portion of the mold. Fifteen specimens were prepared for each cements. The cements were light-activated with light lamp for 40 s on both and top and bottom surfaces. The each cement specimens were divided into three groups according to time of storage and stored in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days. Total 45 specimens were stored at 37C (98.6 0F) in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days prior to tests. The flexural strength was tested w?th a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (0.02 in.) The maximum load was recorded as MPa. The results were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Duncan test. The Panavia F resin cements content Bisphenol A was showed the highest flexural strength (80.80 MPa) (11.71 ksi) for 24 h. The lowest flexural strength was observed in Nexus 3 (51.00 MPa) (7.39 ksi). It was found significant interaction of material and time (p < 0.05). The types of cement and time of storage was statistically significant on the flexural strengths (p < 0.001). PMID:23359518

  8. The root canal bonding of chemical-cured total-etch resin cements.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Mikako; Okamura, Kenji; Wu, Hongxia; Takahashi, Yutaka; Koytchev, Evgeni V; Imazato, Satoshi; Ebisu, Shigeyuki

    2008-05-01

    Discovering a durable restorative method to reconstruct and reinforce pulpless teeth is a vital key to help prevent root fractures. Complete and firm adhesion of resin cement in root canal dentin using a post is critical to achieve it. The null hypothesis in the present study was that the bond strength of dual-cured and chemical-cured adhesive resin cements to root canal dentin is not affected by their vertical locations in the root canal. In the experiments, extracted human incisors restored with fiber-reinforced posts and adhesive resin cements were subjected to microtensile bond strength testing. Then, the failure modes and the dentin-bonding interfaces were observed. Self-etch and self-adhesive dual-cured resin cements showed frequent pretesting failure despite using a silane coupling agent. Chemical-cured total-etch adhesive material showed stable bonding performances throughout the entire post space and thus has an advantage in post-core restorations. PMID:18436039

  9. Influence of volume and activation mode on polymerization shrinkage forces of resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ishikiriama, Sergio Kiyoshi; Maenosono, Rafael Massunari; Oda, Denise Ferracioli; Ordez-Aguilera, Juan Fernando; Wang, Linda; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2013-01-01

    The concern with the polymerization shrinkage of restorative resin composites also applies to resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of volume and polymerization mode on forces generated during polymerization shrinkage (FGPS) of resin cements. Two light-cured resin cements--Variolink II (VL; Ivoclar Vivadent) and Nexus 3 (NX; Kerr)--and two self-cured resin cements - Multilink (ML; Ivoclar Vivadent) and Cement Post (CP; Angelus) - were inserted between two rectangular steel bases (6x2 mm) with distance set at 0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 mm, establishing a variation of volume. These steel bases were attached to a universal test machine with 50 kg load cell and forces (N) were registered for 10 min. Values of maximum forces generated by each material were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test for individual comparisons (?=0.05). VL, NX and CP developed increasing FGPS as the volume of material increased, while ML presented the opposite behavior. It may be concluded that higher volume increases FGPS even with a concomitant decrease of C-factor, unless the resin cements present lower force generation rates as a function of time in combination with a low C-factor, resulting in stress relief and consequently lower values of FGPS. PMID:24173249

  10. Correlation between clinical performance and degree of conversion of resin cements: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    DE SOUZA, Grace; BRAGA, Roberto Ruggiero; CESAR, Paulo Francisco; LOPES, Guilherme Carpena

    2015-01-01

    Resin-based cements have been frequently employed in clinical practice to lute indirect restorations. However, there are numerous factors that may compromise the clinical performance of those cements. The aim of this literature review is to present and discuss some of the clinical factors that may affect the performance of current resin-based luting systems. Resin cements may have three different curing mechanisms: chemical curing, photo curing or a combination of both. Chemically cured systems are recommended to be used under opaque or thick restorations, due to the reduced access of the light. Photo-cured cements are mainly indicated for translucent veneers, due to the possibility of light transmission through the restoration. Dual-cured are more versatile systems and, theoretically, can be used in either situation, since the presence of both curing mechanisms might guarantee a high degree of conversion (DC) under every condition. However, it has been demonstrated that clinical procedures and characteristics of the materials may have many different implications in the DC of currently available resin cements, affecting their mechanical properties, bond strength to the substrate and the esthetic results of the restoration. Factors such as curing mechanism, choice of adhesive system, indirect restorative material and light-curing device may affect the degree of conversion of the cement and, therefore, have an effect on the clinical performance of resin-based cements. Specific measures are to be taken to ensure a higher DC of the luting system to be used. PMID:26398507

  11. Cement waste-form development for ion-exchange resins at the Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Veazey, G.W.; Ames, R.L.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the development of a cement waste form to stabilize ion-exchange resins at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). These resins have an elevated potential for ignition due to inadequate wetness and contact with nitrates. The work focused on the preparation and performance evaluation of several Portland cement/resin formulations. The performance standards were chosen to address Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and Environmental Protection Agency Resource Conservation and Recovery Act requirements, compatibility with Rocky Flats equipment, and throughput efficiency. The work was performed with surrogate gel-type Dowex cation- and anion-exchange resins chosen to be representative of the resin inventory at RFETS. Work was initiated with nonactinide resins to establish formulation ranges that would meet performance standards. Results were then verified and refined with actinide-containing resins. The final recommended formulation that passed all performance standards was determined to be a cement/water/resin (C/W/R) wt % ratio of 63/27/10 at a pH of 9 to 12. The recommendations include the acceptable compositional ranges for each component of the C/W/R ratio. Also included in this report are a recommended procedure, an equipment list, and observations/suggestions for implementation at RFETS. In addition, information is included that explains why denitration of the resin is unnecessary for stabilizing its ignitability potential.

  12. Modification of resin modified glass ionomer cement by addition of bioactive glass nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Valanezhad, Alireza; Odatsu, Tetsuro; Udoh, Koichi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Sawase, Takashi; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, sol-gel derived nanoparticle calcium silicate bioactive glass was added to the resin-modified light cure glass-ionomer cement to assess the influence of additional bioactive glass nanoparticles on the mechanical and biological properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement. The fabricated bioactive glass nanoparticles added resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (GICs) were immersed in the phosphate buffer solution for 28 days to mimic real condition for the mechanical properties. Resin-modified GICs containing 3, 5 and 10 % bioactive glass nanoparticles improved the flexural strength compared to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement and the samples containing 15 and 20 % bioactive glass nanoparticles before and after immersing in the phosphate buffer solution. Characterization of the samples successfully expressed the cause of the critical condition for mechanical properties. Cell study clarified that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement with high concentrations of bioactive glass nanoparticles has higher cell viability and better cell morphology compare to control groups. The results for mechanical properties and toxicity approved that the considering in selection of an optimum condition would have been a more satisfying conclusion for this study. PMID:26610926

  13. In vitro investigation of fluoride ion release from four resin-modified glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Musa, A; Pearson, G J; Gelbier, M

    1996-05-01

    Conventional glass ionomer cements are known to release fluoride ions to the surroundings. Recently, resin-modified glass ionomer cements have been produced. These have differing chemical formulations and this may affect their ability to release fluoride ions. The study evaluates both the fluoride release and compressive strength of one conventional and four resin-modified glass ionomer cements with respect to time. The results showed that the formulation of the resin-modified materials influenced the fluoride release. One resin-modified glass ionomer (PhotacFil) released more fluoride than all other materials, while Vitremer, Fuji II LC and Chemfil Superior release similar amounts. Variglass had a very much smaller elution of fluoride ions. This suggests that there is considerable variation in fluoride release between materials of similar generic origin. The compressive strength of these materials was not affected with time. PMID:8736738

  14. Strength properties of visible-light-cured resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Kerby, R E; Knobloch, L; Thakur, A

    1997-01-01

    A new generation of glass ionomers containing polymerizable methacrylate monomers and/or prepolymers are now available for use as direct esthetic restorative materials. Proper clinical application of these new resin-modified glass ionomers requires an understanding of their benefits and limitations. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the compressive and diametral tensile strength at 1 hour, 24 hours, and 7 days of three visible-light-cured glass-ionomer cements, a polyacid-modified composite resin, and a composite resin core build-up material under both light-cure and dark-cure conditions. Statistical analysis indicated significant differences between several of the cements tested for both compressive and diametral tensile strengths at all three testing times (P > 0.05). Prosthodent composite resin and Vitremer tricure visible-light-cured glass-ionomer cement are significantly greater in both compressive and diametral tensile strength than any of the other materials tested after 7 days. PMID:9484165

  15. An in vitro study to compare the effect of two etching techniques on the tensile bond strength of resin cement bonded to base metal alloy and enamel.

    PubMed

    Sudheer, Arunachalam; Shetty, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    Resin-bonded retainers are being preferred for anterior restorations. To increase the retentive strength of the metal fixed to the tooth, the retainer surface has to be etched. Different etching techniques are described in the literature with different researchers expressing the superiority of one technique over the other. This study was conducted to compare electro chemical and chemical etching techniques and the mode of bond failure. Twenty human maxillary premolars with the crown portion separated from root were embedded in resin block such that mesial or distal portion of it was exposed on the top of the block. 4 × 5 mm area was marked on the tooth, and wax pattern was prepared to cover the exact area, with the opposite end having a hook like structure which was later attached to universal testing machine. Wiron99 Ni-Cr alloy was used for casting. Once the casting and etching procedures were finished, wax patterns were invested, casted and half the samples were etched chemically using Aqua-regia and the other half samples were etched electrochemically. The castings were cleaned and cemented to tooth structure using Rely-X ARC (3 M ESPE, USA) resin cement. Specimens were fixed to universal testing machine and de-bonded. The load required to de-bond and mode of de-bonding was noted. Results were subjected to five different statistical tests, each test specific to the variable being tested. The mean failure load was calculated as 5.95 kg for electrochemically etched samples and that of chemically etched samples was calculated as 11.15 kg. The standard deviation of the force required to debond the specimens (Kgf) was calculated and found to be 0.65 for electrochemically etched samples and 1.11 for chemically etched samples. The following conclusions have been drawn from the study. 1. Chemical etching of the samples created better retentive surfaces than electrochemical etching. 2. The results of mode of de-bonding show that in case of chemical etching maximum debonding occurred at resin-enamel interface and in electrochemical type it occurred at resin-metal interface. PMID:24431780

  16. Comparative Evaluation of Bond Strength of Dual-Cured Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Poluri, Ramya Krishna; Nagaraj, Hema; Siddaruju, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare the microtensile bond strength of resin cements to enamel and dentin and to determine the type of bond failure using stereomicroscope. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and divided into two main groups i.e., Group A for enamel and Group B for dentin. Each group is again subdivided into four subgroups, which are as follows; Subgroup 1 for Calibra resin cement, Subgroup 2 for Paracem, Subgroup 3 for Variolink II and Subgroup 4 for Rely X ARC. These resin cements were applied on enamel and dentin according to manufacturer’s instructions followed by incremental build-up of composite resin on the top of resin cements. Each tooth was sectioned perpendicular to the resin-substrate interface with a slow speed diamond saw under water cooling yielding sections of approximately 1 mm2. On an average, three sections from each tooth were used for testing. The beams obtained after sectioning were stressed to failure under tension in a custom made stainless steel forceps held in a universal testing machine (Lloyd) at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Results were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance, independent t-test, and Tukey’s HSD post-hoc test. Results: Cements bonded to enamel substrates showed higher mean bond strength compared to dentin, which is statistically significant. Rely X ARC showed highest mean bond strength to both the substrates. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength to enamel and dentin and, Rely X ARC resin cement showed higher bond strength compared with the other groups. PMID:26225104

  17. Comparison of Flexural Strength of Resin Cements After Storing in Different Media and Bleaching Agents.

    PubMed

    Geramipanah, Farideh; Rezaei, Susan Mir Mohammad; Jafary, Maryam; Sadighpour, Leyla

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of different storage media and bleaching treatments on the flexural strength of two resin cements (Panavia and BisCem). One hundred rectangular-shaped specimens were prepared with two resin cements and were stored in five media types (n = 10): distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA), sodium hydroxide (NH), in-office bleaching (OB) and home bleaching (HB). There was significant interaction between the solutions and cements (p < 0.05). The lowest three-point flexural strength was found in sodium hydroxide for both cements (p < 0.05). Both cements exhibited significant increase in flexural strength following home and in-office bleaching (except Panavia in OB) (p < 0.05) compared with immersion in distilled water. Panavia recorded significantly higher flexural strength compared with BisCem in all media (p < 0.002), with the exception of in-office bleaching. PMID:26373198

  18. Effect of blastfurnace slag addition to Portland cement for cationic exchange resins encapsulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafond, E.; Cau Dit Coumes, C.; Gauffinet, S.; Chartier, D.; Le Bescop, P.; Stefan, L.; Nonat, A.

    2013-07-01

    In the nuclear industry, cement-based materials are extensively used to encapsulate spent ion exchange resins (IERs) before their final disposal in a repository. It is well known that the cement has to be carefully selected to prevent any deleterious expansion of the solidified waste form, but the reasons for this possible expansion are not clearly established. This work aims at filling the gap. The swelling pressure of IERs is first investigated as a function of ions exchange and ionic strength. It is shown that pressures of a few tenths of MPa can be produced by decreases in the ionic strength of the bulk solution, or by ion exchanges (2Na+ instead of Ca2+, Na+ instead of K+). Then, the chemical evolution of cationic resins initially in the Na+ form is characterized in CEM I (Portland cement) and CEM III (Portland cement + blastfurnace slag) cements at early age and an explanation is proposed for the better stability of CEM III material.

  19. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  20. Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material

    SciTech Connect

    Laili, Zalina; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Wahab, Mohd Abdul

    2015-04-29

    Solidification of radioactive waste resins using cement mixed with organic material i.e. biochar is described in this paper. Different percentage of biochar (0%, 5%, 8%, 11%, 14% and 18%) was investigated in this study. The characteristics such as compressive strength and leaching behavior were examined in order to evaluate the performance of solidified radioactive waste resins. The results showed that the amount of biochar affect the compressive strength of the solidified resins. Based on the data obtained for the leaching experiments performed, only one formulation showed the leached of Cs-134 from the solidified radioactive waste resins.

  1. Influence of Temporary Cements on the Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Cement to the Metal Coronal Substrate.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, Raniel Fernandes; Aguiar, Caio Rocha de; Jacob, Eduardo Santana; Macedo, Ana Paula; Mattos, Maria da Gloria Chiarello de; Antunes, Rossana Pereira de Almeida

    2015-12-01

    This research evaluated the influence of temporary cements (eugenol-containing [EC] or eugenol-free [EF]) on the tensile strength of Ni-Cr copings fixed with self-adhesive resin cement to the metal coronal substrate. Thirty-six temporary crowns were divided into 4 groups (n=9) according to the temporary cements: Provy, Dentsply (eugenol-containing), Temp Cem, Vigodent (eugenol-containing), RelyX Temp NE, 3M ESPE (eugenol-free) and Temp Bond NE, Kerr Corp (eugenol-free). After 24 h of temporary cementation, tensile strength tests were performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and 1 kN (100 kgf) load cell. Afterwards, the cast metal cores were cleaned by scraping with curettes and air jet. Thirty-six Ni-Cr copings were cemented to the cast metal cores with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE). Tensile strength tests were performed again. In the temporary cementation, Temp Bond NE (12.91±2.54) and Temp Cem (12.22±2.96) presented the highest values of tensile strength and were statistically similar to each other (p>0.05). Statistically significant difference (p<0.05) was observed only between Provy (164.44±31.23) and Temp Bond NE (88.48±21.83) after cementation of Ni-Cr copings with self-adhesive resin cement. In addition, Temp Cem (120.68±48.27) and RelyX Temp NE (103.04±26.09) showed intermediate tensile strength values. In conclusion, the Provy eugenol-containing temporary cement was associated with the highest bond strength among the resin cements when Ni-Cr copings were cemented to cast metal cores. However, the eugenol cannot be considered a determining factor in increased bond strength, since the other tested cements (1 eugenol-containing and 2 eugenol-free) were similar. PMID:26963209

  2. Adhesion of indirect MOD resin composite inlays luted with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements.

    PubMed

    Inukai, T; Abe, T; Ito, Y; Pilecki, P; Wilson, R F; Watson, T F; Foxton, R M

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of loading on the bond strength to dentin and microleakage of MOD indirect composite restorations bonded with self-adhesive and self-etching resin cements with or without acid etching of the proximal enamel margins. Class II MOD cavities were prepared in 48 molar teeth into dentin and divided into three groups of 16 teeth. Impressions were taken and indirect composite inlays fabricated (Estenia C & B). The enamel margins of the proximal boxes of half the specimens were phosphoric acid etched, and the inlays were cemented with one of three cements (Panavia F 2.0, SA Cement, or Rely X Unicem). After luting, eight teeth in each cement group were mechanically loaded at 2.5 cycles/s for 250,000 cycles. Unloaded teeth acted as controls. Teeth were stored in Rhodamine B solution for 24 hours, sectioned buccolingually at the proximal boxes to examine microleakage using confocal microscopy, and further sectioned for ?TBS testing of the resin-dentin interface. Analysis of variance was performed to assess the effect of loading and acid etching on microleakage and bond strength. Acid etching had no effect on microleakage. No significant difference in the dentin bond strengths between the three cements existed after loading. Panavia F 2.0 exhibited a significant reduction in bond strength. With regard to microleakage at the proximal boxes, loading had no effect on dye penetration at the cavity floor. However, at the axial walls, loading had a significant deleterious effect on Panavia F 2.0. No difference in microleakage existed between the three cements at both sites before and after loading. In conclusion, the two tested self-adhesive cements exhibited similar bond strengths before and after loading to the self-etching resin cement. Loading reduced dentin bond strengths and increased microleakage at the resin-dentin interface. However, acid etching of the enamel margins had no significant effect on microleakage in the approximal regions of the bonded inlays. PMID:22360367

  3. Cementation of ILW ion exchange resins: Impact of sulfate ions released by radiolysis on hydrated matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frizon, F.; Cau-dit-Coumes, C.

    2006-12-01

    Some of the ion exchange resins used during treatment of spent nuclear fuels are intermediate level radioactive wastes which may be damaged by radiolysis process, releasing sulfate ions directly into the cement-based encapsulating material. This work consists in an experimental study of the resulting sulfate attack on the properties of the hydrated matrix: dimensional stability, mineralogy and microstructure of the samples, as well as variations in the chemical composition of the curing solution, were studied during six months. Three sites of delayed ettringite formation were detected: into the cement matrix near the surface exposed to solution, localized in the interfacial transition zone between cement matrix and resins, or progressively replacing the portlandite that initially fulfilled the cracks of anionic resins. During the experiment period, the ettringite precipitation and the expansion detected were moderate, and did not lead to cracking. The material involved was considered as having a good resistance to sulfate attack.

  4. A medicated polycarboxylate cement to prevent complications in composite resin therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Y.; Shintani, H.; Yamaki, M. )

    1990-01-01

    Preparative treatment is the preferred method to protect the dentin and pulp from complications in composite resin therapy. This study investigated the in vivo effects of the polycarboxylate cement containing zinc fluoride and tannic acid in composite resin restorations. Scanning electron micrographs established that the composite resin failed to contact the axial wall. The gaps varied from 10 to 60 microns. However, this polycarboxylate cement was shown to provide excellent adaptation to dentin when used as a base and its chemical adhesion allowed it to make close contact with the unetched dentin. The newly developed electron probe x-ray microanalyzer revealed that the in vivo penetration of fluoride and zinc occurred through the dentinal tubules. When this polycarboxylate cement was used, the orifices of dentinal tubules were partially occluded, possibly with the smear layer fixed by tannic acid. In addition, by releasing the components, this polycarboxylate cement adds acid resistance to dentin and increases the resistance of dentin collagen to proteolytic enzymes. As such this polycarboxylate cement offers advantages as a base to composite resin therapy.

  5. Direct Tensile Strength and Characteristics of Dentin Restored with All-Ceramic, Resin-Composite, and Cast Metal Prostheses Cemented with Resin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Piemjai, Morakot; Nakabayashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-01

    A dentin-cement-prosthesis complex restored with either all-porcelain, cured resin-composite, or cast base metal alloy and cemented with either of the different resin cements was trimmed into a mini-dumbbell shape for tensile testing. The fractured surfaces and characterization of the dentin-cement interface of bonded specimens were investigated using a Scanning Electron Microscope. A significantly higher tensile strength of all-porcelain (12.5 ± 2.2 MPa) than that of cast metal (9.2 ± 3.5 MPa) restorations was revealed with cohesive failure in the cement and failure at the prosthesis-cement interface in Super-Bond C&B group. No significant difference in tensile strength was found among the types of restorations using the other three cements with adhesive failure on the dentin side and cohesive failure in the cured resin. SEM micrographs demonstrated the consistent hybridized dentin in Super-Bond C&B specimens that could resist degradation when immersed in hydrochloric acid followed by NaOCl solutions whereas a detached and degraded interfacial layer was found for the other cements. The results suggest that when complete hybridization of resin into dentin occurs tensile strength at the dentin-cement is higher than at the cement-prosthesis interfaces. The impermeable hybridized dentin can protect the underlying dentin and pulp from acid demineralization, even if detachment of the prosthesis has occurred. PMID:26539520

  6. Influence of the feldspathic ceramic thickness and shade on the microhardness of dual resin cement.

    PubMed

    Soares, Carlos José; da Silva, Natéricia Rezende; Fonseca, Rodrigo Borges

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the microhardness of a dual resin cement under the influence of thickness and shade of a feldspathic ceramic. Ninety-five bovine incisors were selected; the crowns, with the roots removed, were embedded in a polystyrene resin and were randomly divided into 19 groups (n=5). On the buccal surface, a standardized cavity, 4.0 mm in diameter and 1.0 mm in depth, was prepared. Ceramic restorations (Noritake Ex 3) were manufactured with 4.0 mm diameter and 1, 2 and 4-mm thicknesses at shades A1, A2, A3, A3.5 and A4. A dual resin cement (Rely X-ARC) was inserted into the prepared cavity. A mylar strip was positioned over the prepared cavity, and light curing was performed for 40 seconds following the protocols: controls-without insertion of the restoration at distances of 0.0, 1.0, 2.0 and 4.0 mm. The remaining groups had the restorations positioned between the resin cement and light source during polymerization. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the cement layer with 50 g of load application for 30 seconds, with 5 indentations for each sample. Two-way ANOVA (5 x 3) and Tukey test (alpha = 0.05) were used to compare the results. The chemical curing of the dual resin cement was not sufficient to compensate for the energy attenuation promoted by the interposition of A3.5 and A4 ceramic material with 4-mm of thickness. The thickness had a greater influence on the cement microhardness than the ceramic restoration shade. PMID:16802648

  7. Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 μm/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 μm/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

  8. Bonding All-Ceramic Restorations with Two Resins Cement Techniques: A Clinical Report of Three-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; Rocha, Eduardo Passos; de Almeida, Erika Oliveira; Junior, Amilcar Chagas Freitas; Martini, Ana Paula

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics have been widely used for esthetic and functional improvements. The resin cement is the material of choice for bonding ceramics to dental substrate and it can also dictate the final esthetic appearance and strength of the restoration. The correct use of the wide spectrum of resin luting agents available depends on the dental tooth substrate. This article presents three-year clinical results of a 41 years old female patient B.H.C complaining about her unattractive smile. Two all-ceramic crowns and two laminates veneers were placed in the maxillary incisors and cemented with a self-adhesive resin luting cement and conventional resin luting cement, respectively. After a three-year follow-up, the restorations and cement/teeth interface were clinically perfect with no chipping, fractures or discoloration. Proper use of different resin luting cements shows clinical appropriate behavior after a three-year follow-up. Self-adhesive resin luting cement may be used for cementing all-ceramic crowns with high predictability of success, mainly if there is a large dentin surface available for bonding and no enamel at the finish line. Otherwise, conventional resin luting agent should be used for achieving an adequate bonding strength to enamel. PMID:21912505

  9. Effects of surface treatments, thermocycling, and cyclic loading on the bond strength of a resin cement bonded to a lithium disilicate glass ceramic.

    PubMed

    Guarda, G B; Correr, A B; Gonçalves, L S; Costa, A R; Borges, G A; Sinhoreti, M A C; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objectives : The aim of this present study was to investigate the effect of two surface treatments, fatigue and thermocycling, on the microtensile bond strength of a newly introduced lithium disilicate glass ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) and a dual-cured resin cement. Methods : A total of 18 ceramic blocks (10 mm long × 7 mm wide × 3.0 mm thick) were fabricated and divided into six groups (n=3): groups 1, 2, and 3-air particle abraded for five seconds with 50-μm aluminum oxide particles; groups 4, 5, and 6-acid etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds. A silane coupling agent was applied onto all specimens and allowed to dry for five seconds, and the ceramic blocks were bonded to a block of composite Tetric N-Ceram (Ivoclar Vivadent) with RelyX ARC (3M ESPE) resin cement and placed under a 500-g static load for two minutes. The cement excess was removed with a disposable microbrush, and four periods of light activation for 40 seconds each were performed at right angles using an LED curing unit (UltraLume LED 5, Ultradent) with a final 40 second light exposure from the top surface. All of the specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Groups 2 and 5 were submitted to 3,000 thermal cycles between 5°C and 55°C, and groups 3 and 6 were submitted to a fatigue test of 100,000 cycles at 2 Hz. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the bonding area to obtain beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) (30 beams per group) and submitted to a microtensile bond strength test in a testing machine (EZ Test) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (p≤0.05). Results : The microtensile bond strength values (MPa) were 26.9 ± 6.9, 22.2 ± 7.8, and 21.2 ± 9.1 for groups 1-3 and 35.0 ± 9.6, 24.3 ± 8.9, and 23.9 ± 6.3 for groups 4-6. For the control group, fatigue testing and thermocycling produced a predominance of adhesive failures. Fatigue and thermocycling significantly decreased the microtensile bond strength for both ceramic surface treatments when compared with the control groups. Etching with 10% hydrofluoric acid significantly increased the microtensile bond strength for the control group. PMID:22856682

  10. Effect of Different Thicknesses of Pressable Ceramic Veneers on Polymerization of Light-cured and Dual-cured Resin Cements

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Lopez, Arnaldo; Berzins, David W.; Prasad, Soni; Ahn, Kwang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Aim This study evaluated the effects of ceramic veneer thicknesses on the polymerization of two different resin cements. Materials and Methods A total of 80 ceramic veneer discs were fabricated by using a pressable ceramic material (e.max Press; Ivoclar Vivadent) from a Low Translucency (LT) ingot (A1 shade). These discs were divided into light-cured (LC; NX3 Nexus LC; Kerr) and dual-cured (DC; NX3 Nexus DC; Kerr) and each group was further divided into 4 subgroups, based on ceramic disc thickness (0.3 mm, 0.6 mm, 0.9 mm, and 1.2 mm). The values of Vickers microhardness (MH) and degree of conversion (DOC) were obtained for each specimen after a 24-hour storage period. Association between ceramic thickness, resin cement type, and light intensity readings (mW/cm2) with respect to microhardness and degree of conversion was statistically evaluated by using ANOVA. Results For the DOC values, there was no significant difference observed among the LC resin cement subgroups, except in the 1.2 mm subgroup; only the DOC value (14.0 ± 7.4%) of 1.2 mm DC resin cement had significantly difference from that value (28.9 ± 7.5%) of 1.2 mm LC resin cement (P<.05). For the MH values between LC and DC resin cement groups, there was statistically significant difference (P<.05); overall, the MH values of LC resin cement groups demonstrated higher values than DC resin cement groups. On the other hands, among the DC resin cement subgroups, the MH values of 1.2 mm DC subgroup was significantly lower than the 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm subgroups (P<.05). However, among the LC subgroups, there was no statistically significant difference among them (P >.05). Conclusion The degree of conversion and hardness of the resin cement was unaffected with veneering thicknesses between 0.3 and 0.9 mm. However, the DC resin cement group resulted in a significantly lower DOC and MH values for the 1.2 mm subgroup. Clinical Significance While clinically adequate polymerization of LC resin cement can be achieved with a maximum 1.2 mm of porcelain veneer restoration, the increase of curing time or light intensity is clinically needed for DC resin cements at the thickness of more than 0.9 mm. PMID:26162252

  11. Novel fabrication method for zirconia restorations: bonding strength of machinable ceramic to zirconia with resin cements.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, Soichi; Terui, Yuichi; Higuchi, Daisuke; Goto, Daisuke; Hotta, Yasuhiro; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    A novel method was developed to fabricate all-ceramic restorations which comprised CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic bonded to CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using resin cement. The feasibility of this fabrication method was assessed in this study by investigating the bonding strength of a machinable ceramic to zirconia. A machinable ceramic was bonded to a zirconia plate using three kinds of resin cements: ResiCem (RE), Panavia (PA), and Multilink (ML). Conventional porcelain-fused-to-zirconia specimens were also prepared to serve as control. Shear bond strength test (SBT) and Schwickerath crack initiation test (SCT) were carried out. SBT revealed that PA (40.42 MPa) yielded a significantly higher bonding strength than RE (28.01 MPa) and ML (18.89 MPa). SCT revealed that the bonding strengths of test groups using resin cement were significantly higher than those of Control. Notably, the bonding strengths of RE and ML were above 25 MPa even after 10,000 times of thermal cycling -adequately meeting the ISO 9693 standard for metal-ceramic restorations. These results affirmed the feasibility of the novel fabrication method, in that a CAD/CAM-fabricated machinable ceramic is bonded to a CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia framework using a resin cement. PMID:21597207

  12. Radiopacity of different resin-based and conventional luting cements compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gürel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different resin-based luting materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disc specimens (N=130, n=10 per group) (diameter: 6 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared from 10 resin-based and 3 conventional luting cements. Human canine dentin (n=10), bovine enamel (n=10), bovine dentin (n=10) and Aluminium (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted and equivalent Al thickness values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The radiopacity values of conventional cements and two resin luting materials (Rely X Unicem and Variolink II), were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel that could be preferred for restorations cemented on enamel. Since all examined resin-based luting materials showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than that of human and bovine dentin, they could be considered suitable for the restorations cemented on dentin. PMID:22277608

  13. The efficiency of different light sources to polymerize resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers.

    PubMed

    Usumez, A; Ozturk, A N; Usumez, S; Ozturk, B

    2004-02-01

    Plasma arc light units for curing resin composites have been introduced with the claim of relatively short curing times. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two different light sources to polymerize dual curing resin cement beneath porcelain laminate veneers. Twenty extracted healthy human maxillary centrals were used. Teeth were sectioned 2 mm below the cemento-enamel junction and crown parts were embedded into self-cure acrylic resin, labial surface facing up. Cavity preparation was carried out on labial surfaces. These teeth were divided into two groups of 10 each. The resin cement/veneer combination was exposed to two different photo polymerization units. A conventional halogen light (Hilux 350, Express Dental Products) and a plasma arc light (Power PAC, ADT) were used to polymerize resin cement. Ten specimens were polymerized conventionally (40 s) and the other specimens by plasma arc curing (PAC) (6 s). Two samples from each tooth measuring 1.2 x 1.2 x 5 mm were prepared. These sections were subjected to microshear testing and failure values were recorded. Statistically significant differences were found between the bond strength of veneers exposed to conventional light and PAC unit (P < 0.001). Samples polymerized with halogen light showed better bond strength. The results of this study suggest that the curing efficiency of PAC through ceramic was lower compared with conventional polymerization for the exposure durations tested in this study. PMID:15009601

  14. Bond strength of two resin cements to titanium after different surface conditioning methods.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength of two resin cements (Panavia F and Super Bond) to titanium after various surface conditioning techniques. The cements were applied using polyethylene tubes. After thermocycling, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine for shear bond strength. Panavia F demonstrated significantly higher bond strength values than Super Bond. Of the conditioning techniques, Al2O3+Silane+Sinfony and Silano Pen+AP demonstrated significantly lower bond strength values than Al2O3+Cesead II Opaque Primer and 110 µm SiOx+Silane. The combination of Panavia and 110 µm SiOx+Silane, Al2O3+AP, or Al2O3+Cesead II, and the combination of Super Bond and 110 µm SiOx+Silane or Al2O3+Cesead II, can be recommended for improving the bond strength of resin cement to titanium. PMID:22313994

  15. Factors affecting on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, V. R. G.; Bandéca, M. C.; Calixto, L. R.; Nadalin, M. R.; Saade, E. G.; Oliveira-Junior, O. B.; Andrade, M. F.

    2009-09-01

    Luting materials provides the retention of endodontic post. However, the failures of endodontic posts predominantly occurred are the losses of retention. Thus, the alternating use to remove the smear layer, open the dentine tubules, and/or etch the inter-tubular dentine can be provided by EDTA. This study was performed to evaluate effect of EDTA on bond strength of glass fiber post cemented with different resin cements to root canal. Fifty bovine incisors were selected and the crowns were removed to obtain a remaining 14-mm-height root. The roots were randomly distributed into five groups: GI: RelyX™ ARC/LED; GII: RelyX™ U100/LED; GIII EDTA/RelyX™ U100/LED; GIV: Multilink™; and GV: EDTA/Multlink™. After endodontic treatment, the post space was prepared with the drills designated for the quartz-coated-carbon-fiber post Aestheti-Post®. Before application of resin cements, root canals were irrigated with 17% EDTA (GIII and GV) during 1 min, rinsed with distilled water and dried using paper points. The light-cured materials were light-activated with UltraLume LED 5 (Ultradent, South Jordan, Utah) with power density of 1315 mW/cm2. Specimens were perpendicularly sectioned into approximately 1 mm thick sections and the stubs were performed on Universal Testing Machine. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc tests showed significant statistical different between RelyX™ ARC (GI) and RelyX™ U100 independent of the pre-treatment (GII to GIII) ( P < 0.05). The Multlink™ showed between RelyX™ ARC and RelyX™ U100 (GI to GIII; GII to GV) ( P < 0.05). The ANOVA showed significant statistical similar ( P > 0.05) to all resin cements between the Cervical to Apical regions (GI to GV). The use of 17% EDTA showed no difference significant between the resin cements evaluated (GII to GIII; GIV to GV). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the use of EDTA did not provide efficiency on bond strength. The RelyX™ ARC showed higher bond strength values than RelyX™ U100.

  16. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    PubMed

    zcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (? = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ? 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 3.8, 18.9 3.9, 5.5 4.5, 3.1 3.6, 1.1 2.5, 15.5 2.6, 7 4.3 and 7.1 5.8, 15.1 7.8, 8.4 7.3, 7.5 7.3, 4.9 5.1, 12.5 2.1, 6 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p < 0.05). On the SD, bond strength of resin cements with "etch-and-rinse" adhesive systems (Variolink II, Bifix QM, Super-Bond C&B) showed similar results being higher than those of the simplified ones. Simplified cements and RMGIC as control material showed inferior adhesion to superficial and deep dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested. PMID:21833482

  17. Retentive force and microleakage of stainless steel crowns cemented with three different luting agents.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yucel; Dalmis, Anya; Gurbuz, Taskin; Simsek, Sera

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this investigation was to compare the tensile strength, microleakage, and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) evaluations of SSCs cemented using different adhesive cements on primary molars. Sixty-three extracted primary first molars were used. Tooth preparations were done. Crowns were altered and adapted for investigation purpose, and then cemented using glass ionomer cement (Aqua Meron), resin modified cement (RelyX Luting), and resin cement (Panavia F) on the prepared teeth. Samples were divided into two groups of 30 samples each for tensile strength and microleakage tests. The remaining three samples were used for SEM evaluation. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. The statistical analysis of ANOVA revealed significant differences among the groups for both tensile strength and microleakage tests (p < 0.05). Tukey test showed statistically significant difference between Panavia F and RelyX Luting (p < 0.05), but none between the others (p > 0.05). This study showed that the higher the retentive force a crown possessed, the lower would be the possibility of microleakage. PMID:15688722

  18. Effects of post surface conditioning before silanization on bond strength between fiber post and resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Ranjbarian, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Post surface conditioning is necessary to expose the glass fibers to enable bonding between fiber post and resin cement. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning on tensile bond strength (TBS) of a glass fiber reinforced post to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS In this in vitro study, 40 extracted single canal central incisors were endodontically treated and post spaces were prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups according to the methods of post surface treatment (n=10): 1) Silanization after etching with 20% H2O2, 2) Silanization after airborne-particle abrasion, 3) Silanization, and 4) No conditioning (Control). Adhesive resin cement (Panavia F 2.0) was used for cementation of the fiber posts to the root canal dentin. Three slices of 3 mm thick were obtained from each root. A universal testing machine was used with a cross-head speed of 1 mm/minute for performing the push-out tests. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests were used for analyzing data (α=0.05). RESULTS It is revealed that different surface treatments and root dentin regions had significant effects on TBS, but the interaction between surface treatments and root canal regions had no significant effect on TBS. There was significant difference among H2O2 + Silane Group and other three groups. CONCLUSION There were significant differences among the mean TBS values of different surface treatments. Application of hydrogen peroxide before silanization increased the bond strength between resin cements and fiber posts. The mean TBS mean values was significantly greater in the coronal region of root canal than the middle and apical thirds. PMID:23755337

  19. Effect of Coloring–by-Dipping on Microtensile Bond Strength of Zirconia to Resin Cement

    PubMed Central

    Mahshid, Minoo; Berijani, Naeem; Sadr, Seyed Jalil; Homayoon, Sepide Sorour

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Studies on the effect of coloring procedures on the bond strength of zirconia to resin cement are lacking in the literature. This study evaluated the effect of dipping of zirconia ceramic in different liquid color shades on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin cement. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 100 microbar specimens divided into five groups of B2, C1, D4, A3 and control (not colored). To prepare the microbars, 20 white zirconia ceramic blocks, measuring 5×11×11 mm, were dipped in A3, B2, C1 or D4 liquid color shades for 10 seconds (five blocks for each color shade) and five blocks were not colored as controls. All the zirconia blocks were sintered in a sintering furnace. Composite blocks of similar dimensions were fabricated and bonded to zirconia ceramic blocks using Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. Zirconia-cement-composite blocks were sectioned into microbars measuring 1×1×10 mm. The MTBS of microbars was measured by a testing machine. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. All tests were carried out at 0.05 level of significance. Results: Statistically significant differences were found among the groups in MTBS (P<0.001). The D4 group had the highest MTBS value (39.16 ± 6.52 MPa). Conclusion: Dipping affected the MTBS of zirconia ceramic to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement; however, a similar pattern of change was not seen due to the different liquid color shades. PMID:26884775

  20. EFFECT OF FLUORIDE-CONTAINING DESENSITIZING AGENTS ON THE BOND STRENGTH OF RESIN-BASED CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Saraç, Duygu; Külünk, Safak; Saraç, Y. Sinasi; Karakas, Özlem

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents containing different amounts of fluoride on the shear bond strength of a dual polymerized resin cement and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Material and Methods: One hundred human molars were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and prepared until the dentin surface was exposed. The specimens were treated with one of four desensitizing agents: Bifluorid 12, Fluoridin, Thermoline and PrepEze. The remaining 20 specimens served as untreated controls. All groups were further divided into 2 subgroups in which a dual polymerized resin cement (Bifix QM) or a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (AVANTO) was used. The shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine at a 0.5 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed statistically with a 2-way ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and regression analysis (α=0.05). The effect of the desensitizing agents on the dentin surface was examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: The fluoride-containing desensitizing agents affected the bond strength of the resin-based cements to dentin (p<0.001). PrepEze showed the highest bond strength values in all groups (p<0.001). Conclusion: Regression analysis showed a reverse relation between bond strength values of resin cements to dentin and the amount of fluoride in the desensitizing agent (p<0.05). PMID:19936532

  1. SEM analysis of microstructure of adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with self-etching primer.

    PubMed

    Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Yoshida, Eiji; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the microstructure of the adhesive interface between resin cement and dentin treated with a self-etching primer by SEM in order to clarify the adhesive efficiencies of four self-etch type resin cement systems, Bistite II (BII), Linkmax (LM), Panavia F2.0 (PF), and ResiCem (RC) to dentin. The fluidity and inorganic filler content of these cements were also determined to examine their influences on the adhesion. A hybrid layer with 0.5-1.5 m thickness and many resin tags could be confirmed clearly at the interface between BII cement and dentin, but was not observed distinctly for the other resin cements. It was suggested that the hybrid layer and resin tags might contribute to the high adhesive efficiency for BII. As the fluidity of cement had been adjusted to be suitable for luting in all cements, it did not significantly influence the adhesive efficiency of cement. PMID:21778607

  2. Evaluation of shear bond strength between dual cure resin cement and zirconia ceramic after thermocycling treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Jin; Kang, Cheol-Kyun; Oh, Ju-Won

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was performed to evaluate shear bond strength (SBS) between three dual-cured resin cements and silica coated zirconia, before and after thermocycling treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty specimens were cut in 15 × 2.75 mm discs using zirconia. After air blasting of 50 µm alumina, samples were prepared by tribochemical silica coating with Rocatec™ plus. The specimens were divided into three groups according to the dual-cure resin cement used: (1) Calibra silane+Calibra®, (2) Monobond S+Multilink® N and (3) ESPN sil+RelyX™ Unicem Clicker. After the resin cement was bonded to the zirconia using a Teflon mold, photopolymerization was carried out. Only 10 specimens in each group were thermocycled 6,000 times. Depending on thermocycling treatment, each group was divided into two subgroups (n=10) and SBS was measured by applying force at the speed of 1 mm/min using a universal testing machine. To find out the differences in SBS according to the types of cements and thermocycling using the SPSS, two-way ANOVA was conducted and post-hoc analysis was performed by Turkey's test. RESULTS In non-thermal aged groups, SBS of Multilink group (M1) was higher than that of Calibra (C1) and Unicem (U1) group (P<.05). Moreover, even after thermocycling treatment, SBS of Multilink group (M2) was higher than the other groups (C2 and U2). All three cements showed lower SBS after the thermocycling than before the treatments. But Multilink and Unicem had a significant difference (P<.05). CONCLUSION In this experiment, Multilink showed the highest SBS before and after thermocycling. Also, bond strengths of all three cements decreased after thermocycling. PMID:25722830

  3. Bonding of hybrid ionomers and resin cements to modified orthodontic band materials.

    PubMed

    Mennemeyer, V A; Neuman, P; Powers, J M

    1999-02-01

    Orthodontic bands often fail clinically at the band-cement interface. Hybrid ionomer and resin cements and a glass ionomer control were bonded to photo-etched and standard band materials, both of which were tested in as-received and air-abraded conditions. Cements were placed in a 3 mm diameter mold at the bonding interface and bonded to 6 x 6 mm stainless steel band specimens mounted to acrylic blocks. Specimens were stored in water for 24 hours at 37 degreesC and debonded in tension on a testing machine at 0.05 cm/minutes. Bond strengths (MPa) were calculated and data were analyzed by analysis of variance. Bond strengths to as-received bands were less than 3.4 MPa for cements tested, whereas bond strengths to air-abraded bands ranged from 7.1 to 17.7 MPa, except for the glass ionomer control. Air abrasion of band materials provides highly increased bond strength of hybrid ionomer and resin cements. PMID:9971924

  4. Effect of solution temperature on the mechanical properties of dual-cure resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Kang, En-Sook; Jeon, Yeong-Chan; Huh, Jung-Bo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study was to evaluate the effect of the solution temperature on the mechanical properties of dualcure resin cements. MATERIALS AND METHODS For the study, five dual-cure resin cements were chosen and light cured. To evaluate the effect of temperature on the specimens, the light-cured specimens were immersed in deionized water at three different temperatures (4, 37 and 60℃) for 7 days. The control specimens were aged in a 37℃ dry and dark chamber for 24 hours. The mechanical properties of the light-cured specimens were evaluated using the Vickers hardness test, three-point bending test, and compression test, respectively. Both flexural and compressive properties were evaluated using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed using a two way ANOVA with Tukey test to perform multiple comparisons (α=0.05). RESULTS After immersion, the specimens showed significantly different microhardness, flexural, and compressive properties compared to the control case regardless of solution temperatures. Depending on the resin brand, the microhardness difference between the top and bottom surfaces ranged approximately 3.3-12.2%. Among the specimens, BisCem and Calibra showed the highest and lowest decrease of flexural strength, respectively. Also, Calibra and Multilink Automix showed the highest and lowest decrease of compressive strength, respectively compared to the control case. CONCLUSION The examined dual-cure resin cements had compatible flexural and compressive properties with most methacrylate-based composite resins and the underlying dentin regardless of solution temperature. However, the effect of the solution temperature on the mechanical properties was not consistent and depended more on the resin brand. PMID:23755338

  5. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J.R.; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Materials and Methods: Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Results: Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10 specimens cemented with modified-resin cement. Conclusion: Resin sealer decreased casting retentive stress by 46% when it was used with Zinc phosphate. However, sealer use resulted in 60% increased retention when it was used with Glass ionomer cement. The modified-resin cement produced the highest mean dislodgement stress, which nearly always exceeded the strength of the tooth. PMID:24783150

  6. Effect of flexural strength of orthodontic resin cement on bond strength of metal brackets to enamel surfaces.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun

    2011-04-01

    Three types of experimental resin cements with different curing systems, dual, light, and chemical, were designed. The relationship between the flexural strengths of the three experimental and five commercial (Beauty Ortho Bond, Transbond™ XT, Light Cure Bond, Kurasper® F, and Super Bond) orthodontic resin cements on the tensile bond strength (TBS) and shear bond strength (SBS) of metal brackets to enamel was determined. Seven specimen bars of each resin were prepared for measuring the flexural strengths of the resins. Bonded specimens of each resin were prepared, seven for measuring TBS and seven SBS for after bonding of a metal bracket to a maxillary central human labial anterior tooth using experimental and commercial resin cements. The results were analysed by one-way analysis of variance and Scheffé's multiple comparison tests. The level of statistical significance was set at 0.05. Increases in the flexural strength of the resin cements were related to increases in the TBS and SBS of the metal bracket. While the light-curing cements exhibited a strong linear correlation between flexural strengths and TBS or SBS, the dual- and chemical-curing cements exhibited a different flexural strength effect on both TBS and SBS. This was a result of the adhesive layer under the metal bracket, which could be chemically cured, in contrast to the light-curing cement. To control setting time and to obtain higher initial TBS and SBS by polymerizing the resin cement under the bracket, a dual-curing system, that combines both light- and chemical-curing systems, is essential. PMID:20937669

  7. Effect of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems on hardness uniformity of resin cements after glass fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    Grande da Cruz, Fernanda Zander; Grande, Christiana Zander; Roderjan, Douglas Augusto; Galvão Arrais, César Augusto; Bührer Samra, Adriana Postiglione; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesive systems on Vickers hardness (VHN) uniformity of dual-cured resin cements after fiber post cementation. Methods: Fifty glass fiber posts were cemented into bovine roots using the following cementing systems: Prime&Bond 2.1 Dual Cure and Enforce with light-activation (PBDC-LCEN); Prime&Bond 2.1 and Enforce with light-activation (PB-CLEN); Prime&Bond 2.1 Dual Cure and Enforce without light exposure (PBDC-SCEN); ED Primer and Panavia 21 (ED-SCPN); and Clearfil SE Bond and Panavia 21 (CF-SCPN). The roots were stored in distilled water for 72 h and transversely sectioned into thirds (coronal, medium, and apical). The VHN values of the resin cement layers were measured close to the post and to the dentin wall on the transversely sectioned flat surfaces. The results were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey’s post-hoc test (pre-set alpha of 5%). Results: Most resin cements presented higher VHN values near the post than near the dentin wall. The ED-SCPN group showed the highest VHN values regardless of the root third, while the self-cured group PBDC-SCEN exhibited the lowest values. The resin cements from the light-activated groups PBDC-LCEN and PB-LCEN showed lower VHN values at the apical third than at the coronal third. The VHN values were not influenced by the root third in self-cured groups PBDC-SCEN, ED-SCPN, and ED-SCPN. Conclusion: Depending on the product, bonding agents might promote changes in hardness uniformity of resin cements after post cementation. PMID:22904652

  8. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p < 0.001). This study shows that decreasing of the angle between the ceramic surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice. PMID:25958172

  9. Effects of Mechanical and Chemical Pretreatments of Zirconia or Fiber Posts on Resin Cement Bonding

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Hui; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chen; Sun, Ying Chun; Gao, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The bonding strength between resin cement and posts is important for post and core restorations. An important method of improving the bonding strength is the use of various surface pretreatments of the post. In this study, the surfaces of zirconia (fiber) posts were treated by mechanical and/or chemical methods such as sandblasting and silanization. The bonding strength between the zirconia (fiber) post and the resin cement was measured by a push-out method after thermocycling based on the adhesion to Panavia F 2.0 resin cement. The zirconia and fiber posts exhibited different bonding strengths after sandblasting and/or silanization because of the different strengths and chemical structures. The zirconia post showed a high bonding strength of up to 17.1 MPa after a combined treatment of sandblasting and silanization because of the rough surface and covalent bonds at the interface. This effect was also enhanced by using 1,2-bis(trimethoxysilyl)ethane for the formation of a flexible layer at the interface. In contrast, a high bonding strength of 13.9 MPa was obtained for the fiber post treated by silane agents because the sandblasting treatment resulted in damage to the fiber post, as observed by scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the improvement in the bonding strength between the post and the resin cement could be controlled by different chemical and/or mechanical treatments. Enhanced bonding strength depended on covalent bonding and the surface roughness. A zirconia post with high bonding strength could potentially be used for the restoration of teeth in the future. PMID:26066349

  10. Effect of veneering materials and curing methods on resin cement knoop hardness.

    PubMed

    Tango, Rubens Nisie; Sinhoreti, Mrio Alexandre Coelho; Correr, Amrico Bortolazzo; Correr-Sobrinho, Loureno; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop hardness of Enforce resin cement activated by the either chemical/physical or physical mode, and light cured directly and through ceramic (HeraCeram) or composite resin (Artglass). Light curing were performed with either conventional halogen light (QTH; XL2500) for 40 s or xenon plasma arc (PAC; Apollo 95E) for 3 s. Bovine incisors had their buccal surfaces flattened and hybridized. On these surfaces a mold was seated and filled with cement. A 1.5-mm-thick disc of the veneering material was seated over this set for light curing. After storage (24 h/37 masculineC), specimens (n=10) were sectioned for hardness (KHN) measurements in a micro-hardness tester (50 gf load/ 15 s). Data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). It was observed that the dual cure mode yielded higher hardness compared to the physical mode alone, except for direct light curing with the QTH unit and through Artglass. Higher hardness was observed with QTH compared to PAC, except for Artglass/dual groups, in which similar hardness means were obtained. Low KHN means were obtained with PAC for both Artglass and HeraCeram. It may be concluded that the hardness of resin cements may be influenced by the presence of an indirect restorative material and the type of light-curing unit. PMID:18176716

  11. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 2: Effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Asuka; Matsumoto, Mariko; Higashi, Mami; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of ultrasonic and acid cleaning on resin cement bonding to CAD/CAM resin blocks. One of two resin cements, PANAVIA V5 (PV5) or PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX (PSA), were bonded to one of 24 CAD/CAM blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK). Each cement group was divided into four subgroups: no cleaning (Ctl), ultrasonic cleaning (Uc), acid cleaning (Ac) and Uc+Ac. Micro-tensile bond strengths (µTBSs) were measured immediately and 1, 3, and 6 months after water storage. Block surfaces after each treatment were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=40), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=696) and 'water aging' (p<0.001, F=71). The PV5 group exhibited higher µTBS values than the PSA group. Although cleaning after sandblasting was effective in removing residual alumina particles, it did not affect the long-term bonding durability with non-contaminated CAD/CAM resin blocks. PMID:26830822

  12. Nanoindentation Study of Resin Impregnated Sandstone and Early-Age Cement Paste Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, W.; Fonteyn, M. T. J.; Hughes, J.; Pearce, C.

    Nanoindentation testing requires well prepared samples with a good surface finish. Achieving a good surface finish is difficult for heterogeneous materials, particularly those with weak and fragile structures/phases, which are easily damaged or lost during preparation. The loss of weak structures can be drastically reduced by impregnating the sample with a resin before cutting and polishing. This technique is commonly used in SEM microscopy but has not been used for nanoindentation-testing before. This paper reports an investigation to extract micro-mechanical properties of different phases in resin impregnated sandstone and 1-day hydrated cement samples. The results appeared to show that it is feasible to use resin impregnated specimens for nanoindentation study of both materials.

  13. Cytotoxicity Comparison of Harvard Zinc Phosphate Cement Versus Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus Resin Cements on Rat L929-fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Mahasti, Sahabi; Sattari, Mandana; Romoozi, Elham; Akbar-zadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Resin cements, regardless of their biocompatibility, have been widely used in restorative dentistry during the recent years. These cements contain hydroxy ethyl methacrylate (HEMA) molecules which are claimed to penetrate into dentinal tubules and may affect dental pulp. Since tooth preparation for metal ceramic restorations involves a large surface of the tooth, cytotoxicity of these cements would be more important in fixed prosthodontic treatments. The purpose of this study was to compare the cytotoxicity of two resin cements (Panavia F2 and Rely X Plus) versus zinc phosphate cement (Harvard) using rat L929-fibroblasts in vitro. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, ninety hollow glass cylinders (internal diameter 5-mm, height 2-mm) were made and divided into three groups. Each group was filled with one of three experimental cements; Harvard Zinc Phosphate cement, Panavia F2 resin cement and Rely X Plus resin cement. L929- Fibroblast were passaged and subsequently cultured in 6-well plates of 5×105 cells each. The culture medium was RPMI_ 1640. All samples were incubated in CO2. Using enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay, the cytotoxicity of the cements was investigated at 1 hour, 24 hours and one week post exposure. Statistical analyses were performed via two-way ANOVA and honestly significant difference (HSD) Tukey tests. Results: This study revealed significant differences between the three cements at the different time intervals. Harvard cement displayed the greatest cytotoxicity at all three intervals. After 1 hour Panavia F2 showed the next greatest cytotoxicity, but after 24-hours and oneweek intervals Rely X Plus showed the next greatest cytotoxicity. The results further showed that cytotoxicity decreased significantly in the Panavia F2 group with time (p<0.005), cytotoxicity increased significantly in the Rely X Plus group with time (p<0.001), and the Harvard cement group failed to showed no noticeable change in cytotoxicity with time. Conclusion: Although this study has limitations, it provides evidence that Harvard zinc phosphate cement is the most cytotoxic product and Panavia F2 appears to be the least cytotoxic cement over time. PMID:23508355

  14. Push-out bond strength of a fiber post system with two resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Mosharraf, Ramin; Haerian, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Debonding is a common cause of failure encountered with fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts, and usually occurs along the post space-dentin adhesive interface. The aim of this in vitro study is to evaluate the regional push-out bond strength of a fiber-reinforced post system, using two resin cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study 20 maxillary central incisors were decoronated and the roots were endodontically treated. Following post space preparation, the roots were divided into two groups of 10 specimens each. Fiber-reinforced composite posts were cemented with two resin cement systems: (a) Self-etch system (Panavia F2.0/ED-primer II) and (b) conventional system (Variolink II/Excite DSC). Three slices of each root, with a thickness of 3 mm, were prepared. The push-out test was performed with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute, and bond strength values were calculated. The data were analyzed with a two-way Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe tests (α=.05). Results: There were no significant differences between the mean push-out bond strengths of two experimental groups (Panavia F: 12.59±5.44, Variolink II: 12.49±4.52 MPa) (P=0.920), but there were significant differences between the mean push out bond strengths of the root dentin regions (P<0.001). Conclusion: Under the conditions of this study, there was no significant difference between the mean push out bond strength of self-etching and the conventional resin cement systems. The coronal region of the root dentin showed a significantly higher bond strength than the apical region. PMID:23372603

  15. Push-out bond strength of an experimental self-adhesive resin cement.

    PubMed

    Juloski, Jelena; Fadda, Giovanni M; Radovic, Ivana; Chieffi, Nicoletta; Vulicevic, Zoran R; Aragoneses, Juan M; Ferrari, Marco

    2013-02-01

    The adhesion of fiber posts luted with simplified adhesive systems has been a matter of great interest over the past years. The aim of this study was to assess the post retentive potential of experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP) when used alone and in combination with a self-etch adhesive. Fiber posts were placed in endodontically treated teeth and divided into four groups (n=6) according the luting material, as follows: group 1 (EXP alone); group 2 (EXP used with self-etch adhesive); group 3 (marketed dual-cured cement used with self-etch adhesive); and group 4 (marketed self-adhesive cement). The push-out test was used to assess the retentive strength of fiber posts (expressed in MPa), and specimens were analyzed under a stereomicroscope to determine failure mode. The adhesive interface between the cement and root canal dentin for each group was evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. The post retentive potential of group 1 (EXP) (7.484.35 MPa) was comparable with that of marketed cements from group 4 (6.793.68 MPa) and group 3 (8.774.58 MPa). When EXP was used in combination with self-etch adhesive (group 2), significantly higher push-out bond-strength values were measured (15.874.68 MPa) compared with the other groups. PMID:23331424

  16. Effect of adding ethylene glycol dimethacrylate to resin cements: durability against thermal stress of adhesion to titanium.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Ikeda, Y

    1997-06-01

    The present study was conducted to examine the effect of the addition of a dimethacrylate to resin cements on bond strength between titanium and resin after thermocycling. Titanium disks, polished and treated with a phosphate monomer, were bonded to acrylic rods using two types of experimental resin cements. The cements were composed of methyl methacrylate (MMA) containing a tributylborane initiator and 0-10 wt% of ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and two types of polymer component of hard poly (MMA) or soft fluoropolymer (2-6F). The bonded specimens were subjected to a thermocycling test in water and then to tensile strength testing. The addition of 5% or more dimethacrylate monomer to the two MMA-based resin cements caused a drastic decrease in bond strength to the metal after the thermocycling test. The resin prepared with soft 2-6F as a polymer component was significantly more durable than the rigid type resin based on PMMA. However, even a 1% addition of ECDMA to the 2-6F resin resulted in a significant decrease in durability. PMID:9550003

  17. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    PubMed Central

    de MENDONÇA, Luana Menezes; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; LANZA, Marcos Daniel Septímio; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; de CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001) and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). Conclusion The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties. PMID:25141200

  18. Bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive and conventional-type adhesive resin cements to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Part 1: Effects of sandblasting and silanization.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Mami; Matsumoto, Mariko; Kawaguchi, Asuka; Miura, Jiro; Minamino, Takuya; Kabetani, Tomoshige; Takeshige, Fumio; Mine, Atsushi; Yatani, Hirofumi

    2016-01-01

    The present study assessed the effect of sandblasting and silanization on resin cement bond strengths to CAD/CAM resin blocks. Twenty four blocks (KATANA AVENCIA BLOCK) were divided into two resin cement groups (PANAVIA V5 [PV5] and PANAVIA SA CEMENT HANDMIX [PSA]), and further divided into four subgroups representing different surface treatment methods: no treatment (Ctl), silanization (Si), sandblasting (Sb), and Sb+Si. After resin application, microtensile bond strengths (μTBSs) were measured immediately, 1, 3 and 6 months after water storage. In addition, surfaces resulting from each of the treatment methods were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Three-way analysis of variance revealed a statistically significant effect for the parameters 'surface treatment' (p<0.001, F=370), 'resin cement' (p<0.001, F=103, PSA

  19. Effects of barriers on chemical and biological properties of two dual resin cements.

    PubMed

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Iori, Andrea; Rossini, Carlo; Martorana, Giuseppe E; Ciasca, Gabriele; Arcovito, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Lupi, Alessandro; Marigo, Luca

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of conversion, monomer release, and cytotoxicity of two dual-cure resin cements (Cement-One and SmartCem2), light-cured across two indirect restorative materials in an attempt to simulate in vitro the clinical conditions. The results obtained show that the degree of conversion was influenced by both barriers, but the effect of the composite material was greater than that of the ceramic one. The amount of monomers released from the polymerized materials in the absence of barriers was significantly lower than that released in the presence of either the ceramic or the composite barrier. However, a higher amount of monomers was released in the presence of the ceramic barrier. All materials, in all the experimental conditions employed, induced slight cytotoxicity (5-10%) on human pulp cells. Our examinations showed that the two resin cements had similar chemical and biological properties. The decreased degree of conversion of the dual-curing self-adhesive composite showed that the light-curing component of these materials has an important role in the polymerization process. In clinical practice, it is therefore important to pay attention to the thickness of the material used for the reconstruction. PMID:25735897

  20. Tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement and titanium-reinforced apatite dental implants in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, M; Tabata, T; Nakabayashi, N; Yamashita, Y; Borgese, D

    1993-01-01

    Abutment and root portion divided two-piece dental implants were designed to modify the one-piece dense hydroxyapatite (D-HAP) implant. The initial placement of the root portion endosseously ensured an aseptic environment and physical stability for the implant during the bone healing period. The outer D-HAP shell of the root portion was fortified by an inner titanium cylinder and cemented with an adhesive resin cement containing 4-methacryloyoxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) and reinforced by fine apatite filler. Upon attaining integration of the bone and implant, the abutment was screwed and fixed into the screw hole of the root portion. The tissue response of both the apatite-filled resin cement and root portion of the two-piece implant was studied by animal canine experiments. Light and electron microscopic examination of specimens taken from experimental animal tissue showed bone contacted directly not only the exposed apatite filler at the surface of the apatite-filled resin cement, but also the resin portion. These findings of direct bone contact suggested that the tissue response of apatite-filled resin cement was approximately similar to the usual D-HAP. Because most of the surface of the outer D-HAP shell of the root portion came in contact with bone, it prevented the deposition of contamination on the D-HAP surface during the manufacturing procedures of the root portion. PMID:10148567

  1. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1week at 37C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p?cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also. PMID:21350865

  2. 3D micro-CT analysis of void formations and push-out bonding strength of resin cements used for fiber post cementation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To investigate the void parameters within the resin cements used for fiber post cementation by micro-CT (µCT) and regional push-out bonding strength. MATERIALS AND METHODS Twenty-one, single and round shaped roots were enlarged with a low-speed drill following by endodontic treatment. The roots were divided into three groups (n=7) and fiber posts were cemented with Maxcem Elite, Multilink N and Superbond C&B resin cements. Specimens were scanned using µCT scanner at resolution of 13.7 µm. The number, area, and volume of voids between dentin and post were evaluated. A method of analysis based on the post segmentation was used, and coronal, middle and apical thirds considered separately. After the µCT analysis, roots were embedded in epoxy resin and sectioned into 2 mm thick slices (63 sections in total). Push-out testing was performed with universal testing device at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed. Data were analyzed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U tests (α=.05). RESULTS Overall, significant differences between the resin cements and the post level were observed in the void number, area, and volume (P<.05). Super-Bond C&B showed the most void formation (44.86 ± 22.71). Multilink N showed the least void surface (3.51 ± 2.24 mm2) and volume (0.01 ± 0.01 mm3). Regional push-out bond strength of the cements was not different (P>.05). CONCLUSION µCT proved to be a powerful non-destructive 3D analysis tool for visualizing the void parameters. Multilink N had the lowest void parameters. When efficiency of all cements was evaluated, direct relationship between the post region and push-out bonding strength was not observed. PMID:27141253

  3. An investigation into the use of two polyacid-modified composite resins (compomers) and a resin-modified glass poly(alkenoate) cement used to retain orthodontic bands.

    PubMed

    Williams, P H; Sherriff, M; Ireland, A J

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a conventional glass poly(alkenoate) cement (Intact) and newer polyacid-modified composite resin cements (Transbond Plus and Ultra Band-Lok) to retain orthodontic bands. In the in vitro part of this study, stainless steel bands were cemented to 240 extracted third molar teeth in three test groups comprising Intact, Transbond Plus and Ultra Band-Lok. The force to deband (N) for all three cements was recorded using an Instron universal testing machine after the following observation periods: 20 minutes and 3, 6 and 12 months. The results indicated that all three cements increased their median force to deband after 12 months. Of the two compomers, Transbondtrade mark Plus demonstrated the highest median force to deband at all four time intervals. In the in vivo part of the study, 30 patients participated in a randomized cross-mouth clinical trial where the molar bands were cemented in place using either Intact or Transbond Plus. Ultra Band-Lok was not used in the clinical part of the study. The results showed there to be no clinically significant difference in band failure rates between the two cements. When patients were asked to score each for taste, there was a significant difference, with the glass poly(alkenoate) cement (Intact) being more acceptable than the polyacid-modified composite Transbond Plus (P < 0.001). No significant differences were observed in the in vitro median force to deband or in vivo band failure rates between the glass poly(alkenoate) cement and the polyacid-modified composite resins. The choice of cementing agent can therefore be made on patient factors, e.g. taste, or operator factors, e.g. ease of handling, cost and shelf life. PMID:15947223

  4. Bonding of Resin Cement to Zirconia with High Pressure Primer Coating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-jie; Jiao, Kai; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Li-juan; Fang, Ming; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiang; Tay, Franklin R.; Chen, Ji-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of air-drying pressure during ceramic primer coating on zirconia/resin bonding and the surface characteristics of the primed zirconia. Methods Two ceramic primers (Clearfil Ceramic Primer, CCP, Kuraray Medical Inc. and Z-Prime Plus, ZPP, Bisco Inc.) were applied on the surface of air-abraded zirconia (Katana zirconia, Noritake) and dried at 4 different air pressures (0.1–0.4 MPa). The primed zirconia ceramic specimens were bonded with a resin-based luting agent (SA Luting Cement, Kuraray). Micro-shear bond strengths of the bonded specimens were tested after 3 days of water storage or 5,000× thermocycling (n = 12). Failure modes of the fractured specimens were examined with scanning electron miscopy. The effects of air pressure on the thickness of the primer layers and the surface roughness (Sa) of primed zirconia were evaluated using spectroscopic ellipsometry (n = 6), optical profilometry and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) (n = 6), respectively. Results Clearfil Ceramic Primer air-dried at 0.3 and 0.4 MPa, yielding significantly higher µSBS than gentle air-drying subgroups (p<0.05). Compared to vigorous drying conditions, Z-Prime Plus air-dried at 0.2 MPa exhibited significantly higher µSBS (p<0.05). Increasing air-drying pressure reduced the film thickness for both primers. Profilometry measurements and ESEM showed rougher surfaces in the high pressure subgroups of CCP and intermediate pressure subgroup of ZPP. Conclusion Air-drying pressure influences resin/zirconia bond strength and durability significantly. Higher air-drying pressure (0.3-0.4 MPa) for CCP and intermediate pressure (0.2 MPa) for ZPP are recommended to produce strong, durable bonds between resin cement and zirconia ceramics. PMID:24992678

  5. Resin-modified glass ionomer, modified composite or conventional glass ionomer for band cementation?--an in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Millett, D T; Cummings, A; Letters, S; Roger, E; Love, J

    2003-12-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the mean shear-peel bond strength and predominant site of bond failure of micro-etched orthodontic bands cemented with resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC; Fuji Ortho LC or 3M Multi-Cure), a modified composite or a conventional GIC. The survival time of bands was also assessed following simulated mechanical stress in a ball mill. One hundred and twenty molar bands were cemented to extracted human third molars. Eighty bands (20 cemented with each cement) were used to assess the debonding force and 40 bands (10 cemented with each cement) were used to determine survival time. The specimens were prepared in accordance with the manufacturers' instructions for each cement. After storage in a humidor at 37 degrees C for 24 hours, the shear debonding force was assessed for each specimen using a Nene M3000 testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The predominant site of band failure was recorded visually for all specimens as either at the band/cement or cement/enamel interface. Survival time was assessed following application of mechanical stress in a ball mill. There was no significant difference in mean shear-peel bond strength between the cement groups (P = 0.816). The proportion of specimens failing at each interface differed significantly between cement groups (P < 0.001). The predominant site of bond failure for bands cemented with the RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC) or the modified composite was at the enamel/cement interface, whereas bands cemented with 3M Multi-Cure failed predominantly at the cement/band interface. Conventional GIC specimens failed mostly at the enamel/cement interface. The mean survival time of bands cemented with either of the RMGICs or with the modified composite was significantly longer than for those cemented with the conventional GIC. The findings indicate that although there appears to be equivalence in the mean shear-peel bond strength of the band cements assessed, the fatigue properties of the conventional GIC when subjected to simulated mechanical stress seem inferior to those of the other cements for band cementation. PMID:14700267

  6. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Ccement type did not (p=0.148) (CC=SA). The interaction terms were significant (p=0.014). Failure types were predominantly adhesive. Air-abrasion and the use of the universal primer improved the bond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used. PMID:26509232

  7. Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

  8. Effect of Surface Treatment with Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser on Bond Strength between Cement Resin and Zirconia

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Atefat, Mohammad; Beheshti, Maryam; Safavi, Nassimeh; Mojtahedi, Maryam; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Since it is not possible to form an adequate micromechanical bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using common surface treatment techniques, laser pretreatment has been suggested for zirconia ceramic surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Methods: In this in vitro study thirty discs of zirconia with a diameter of 6 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into two groups of 15. In the test group the zirconia disc surfaces were irradiated by CO2 laser with an output power of 3 W and energy density of 265.39 j/cm2. Composite resin discs were fabricated by plastic molds, measuring 3 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness and were cemented on zirconia disk surfaces with Panavia F2.0 resin cement (Kuraray Co. Ltd, Osaka, Japan). Shear bond strength was measured by a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The fracture type was assessed under a stereomicroscope at ×40. Surface morphologies of two specimens of the test group were evaluated under SEM before and after laser pretreatment. Data was analyzed by paired t-test (p value < 0.05). Results: The mean SBS values of the laser and control groups were 12.12 ± 3.02 and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Surface treatment with CO2 laser significantly increased SBS between resin cement and zirconia ceramic (p value = 0.001). Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, surface treatment with CO2 laser increased the SBS between resin cement and the zirconia ceramic. PMID:25653809

  9. Antibacterial activity of resin adhesives, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a compomer in contact with dentin caries samples.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M; Castillo, A; Bravo, M; Liébana, J; Carrión, P

    2000-01-01

    A total of 103 clinical samples of carious dentin were used to study the antibacterial action of different dental resin adhesive materials (Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Prime&Bond 2.0) glass ionomer cements (Ketac-Cem, Ketac-Bond, Ketac-Silver, Ketac-Fil) resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Vitremer and Vitrebond) and a compomer (Dyract). The agar plate diffusion method was used for the microbial cultures and a chlorhexidine control. The growth of the caries-producing microorganisms was effectively inhibited by the Vitremer and Vitrebond cements, and to a lesser extent by the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in the antibacterial activity of the products tested. PMID:11203829

  10. Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in bond strength between AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p > 0.05). Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials. PMID:25383347

  11. Comparative leaching studies of [sup 60]Co from spent radioactive ion-exchange resin incorporated in cement

    SciTech Connect

    Plecas, I.; Peric, A.; Glodic, S.; Kostadinovic, A. )

    1995-02-01

    Leaching of [sup 60]Co from ion-exchange resin incorporated in cement using two methods based on theoretical equation has been developed. These were: Method 1, diffusion equation derived for a plane source model and Method 2, empirical model employing a polynomial equation. Results presented in this paper are examples of data obtained in a cement testing project which will influence the design of the future radioactive waste storage center.

  12. Color changes in resin cement polymerized with different curing lights under indirect restorations

    PubMed Central

    Bayindir, Funda; Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya; Karataş, Ozcan; Gurpinar, Aysel

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of different interface materials and curing units on color changes in a resin cement material. Materials and Methods: Three interface materials and different curing systems, quartz-tungsten-halogen and polywave and monowave light-emitting diode (LED) light curing units, were studied at two-time intervals. Polystyrene strip was used as a control group. All measurements were made on a white background for standard color measurement. According to the CIE L*a*b* color space, the baseline color values of each specimen were measured. Differences between the measurements were calculated as ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's tests (α = 0.05) with SPSS 20.0 software (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). ANOVA revealed significance for interface materials and curing units and time for ΔE (P < 0.05). Results: Interaction between polymerizing units, material and time was not significant (P > 0.05). Monowave LED exhibited significantly higher color changes than the other units ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 2.94 ± 0.44]). QTH promoted composite specimens significantly less color change ([P < 0.05] [ΔE 0.87 ± 0.41]). Conclusion: This study concluded that color of resin cement used in the adhesion of indirect restorations was affected by curing device light and indirect restoration material type. PMID:26957793

  13. Controlled, prospective, randomized, clinical evaluation of partial ceramic crowns inserted with RelyX Unicem with or without selective enamel etching. Results after 2 years.

    PubMed

    Schenke, Frederike; Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Moder, Daniel; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-04-01

    Among the materials used for luting indirect restorations, growing interest has been directed towards the use of self-adhesive resin cements. The aim of this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical performance of the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem (RXU) for luting partial ceramic crowns (PCCs). In addition, the influence of selective enamel etching prior to luting (RXU+E) was assessed. Two-year results are reported. Thirty-four patients (68 PCCs) had originally received the intended treatment at baseline (BL). Twenty-nine patients (14 male, 15 female) with a total of 58 PCCs participated in the 2-year recall. In each patient, one PCC had been placed with RXU, one PCC with RXU+E. Restorations were evaluated at BL and 24 months after placement using modified United States Public Health Service criteria for postoperative hypersensitivity, anatomic form, marginal adaptation, marginal discoloration, surface texture and recurrent caries. Additionally, the "percentage failure" within the 2-year recall period for all restorations (n = 68) was calculated according to ADA Program Guidelines. Target value for acceptability of each procedure was <5% failure within 24 m. For statistical analysis of the data, the chi-square test was applied (α = 0.05). The median patient age was 41 years (24-59 years). Median PBI was 8% (5-10%). Twenty-two RXU PCCs were placed in molars, seven in premolars. Twenty-one RXU+E PCCs were placed in molars, eight in premolars. Statistically significant changes were observed for marginal adaptation (MA) and marginal discoloration (MD) between BL and 2 years but not between the two groups (RXU, RXU+E). Percentage of alfa values at BL for MA (RXU, 97% and RXU+E, 100%) and for MD (RXU, 97% and RXU+E, 97%) decreased to RXU, 14% and RXU+E, 28% for MA and to RXU, 50% and RXU+E, 59% for MD after 24 months. Within the observation period, three failures were recorded with RXU (5.1% failure), one failure was recorded for RXU+E (1.7% failure), but a significant influence of selective enamel etching on failure could not be verified. Although the results of the present study reveal a slight tendency for more favourable results if selective enamel etching is applied prior to insertion of ceramic PCCs with a self-adhesive luting material, longer-term evaluation is needed to confirm this. Additional selective enamel etching with a self-adhesive luting material does not considerably improve clinical performance of the restorations within the observation period reported, neither does it impose a hazard with respect to postoperative hypersensitivity. PMID:21431338

  14. A comparison of the in vitro cytotoxicity of conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate cytotoxicity of experimental conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements on UMR-106 osteoblast cell cultures and cell cultures of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts specimens were prepared for every experimental material and divided into: group 1. Conventional glass-ionomer cements: GC Fuji IX GP Fast, GC Fuji Triage and Ketac Silver; group 2. Resin modified glass-ionomer cements: GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji Plus and Vitrebond; group 3. Positive control was presented by specimens of composite Vit-l-ecence® and negative control-group 4. was presented by α-minimum essential medium for UMR-106 – osteoblast-like cells and Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium for NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Both cell cultures were exposed to 10% of eluate of each single specimen of each experimental material. Experimental dishes were incubated for 24 h. Cell metabolism was evaluated using methyltetrazolium assay. Kruskal-Wallis test and Tukey-Kramer post hoc test for the materials evaluated on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, as well as UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells showed significantly more cytotoxicity of RMGICs, predominantly Vitrebond to both GICs and composite-Vit-l-ecence®. The lowest influence on cell’s metabolism on UMR-106 osteoblas-like cells was shown by Ketac Silver and the lowest influence on cell’s metabolism on NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells was shown by Fuji IX GP Fast. Statistical evaluation of sensitivity of cell lines UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells and NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells, using Mann-Whitney test, showed that NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells were more sensitive for the evaluation of cytotoxicity of dental materials. PMID:23198945

  15. In-depth polymerization of a self-adhesive dual-cured resin cement.

    PubMed

    Puppin-Rontani, R M; Dinelli, R G; de Paula, A B; Fucio, S B P; Ambrosano, G M B; Pascon, F M

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess Knoop hardness at different depths of a dual-cured self-adhesive resin cement through different thicknesses of Empress Esthetic® ceramic.Flattened bovine dentin was embedded in resin. The cement was inserted into a rubber mold (0.8 x 5 mm) that was placed between two polyvinyl chloride plastic films and placed over the flat dentin and light cured by Elipar Trilight-QTH (800 mW/cm2) or Ultra-Lumelight-emitting diode (LED 5; 1585 mW/cm2) over ceramic disks 1.4 or 2 mm thick. The specimens(n=6) were stored for 24 hours before Knoop hardness (KHN) was measured. The data were submitted to analysis of variance in a factorial split-plot design and Tukey's test (a=0.05).There was significant interaction among the study factors. In the groups cured by the QTHunit, an increase in ceramic thickness resulted in reduced cement hardness values at all depths, with the highest values always being found in the center (1.4 mm, 58.1; 2 mm, 50.1)and the lowest values at the bottom (1.4 mm,23.8; 2 mm, 20.2). When using the LED unit, the hardness values diminished with increased ceramic thickness only on the top (1.4 mm,51.5; 2 mm, 42.3). In the group with the 1.4-mm-thick disk, the LED curing unit resulted in similar values on the top (51.5) and center(51.9) and lower values on the bottom (24.2).However, when the cement was light cured through the 2-mm disk, the highest hardness value was obtained in the center (51.8), followed by the top (42.3) and bottom (19.9),results similar to those obtained with the QTH curing unit (center > top > bottom). The hardness values of the studied cement at different depths were dependent on the ceramic thickness but not on the light curing units used. PMID:22166106

  16. Temporary zinc oxide-eugenol cement: eugenol quantity in dentin and bond strength of resin composite.

    PubMed

    Koch, Tamara; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Malinovskii, Vladimir; Flury, Simon; Hner, Robert; Lussi, Adrian

    2013-08-01

    Uptake of eugenol from eugenol-containing temporary materials may reduce the adhesion of subsequent resin-based restorations. This study investigated the effect of duration of exposure to zinc oxide-eugenol (ZOE) cement on the quantity of eugenol retained in dentin and on the microtensile bond strength (?TBS) of the resin composite. The ZOE cement (IRM Caps) was applied onto the dentin of human molars (21 per group) for 1, 7, or 28 d. One half of each molar was used to determine the quantity of eugenol (by spectrofluorimetry) and the other half was used for ?TBS testing. The ZOE-exposed dentin was treated with either OptiBond FL using phosphoric acid (H?PO?) or with Gluma Classic using ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) conditioning. One group without conditioning (for eugenol quantity) and two groups not exposed to ZOE (for eugenol quantity and ?TBS testing) served as controls. The quantity of eugenol ranged between 0.33 and 2.9 nmol mg? of dentin (median values). No effect of the duration of exposure to ZOE was found. Conditioning with H?PO? or EDTA significantly reduced the quantity of eugenol in dentin. Nevertheless, for OptiBond FL, exposure to ZOE significantly decreased the ?TBS, regardless of the duration of exposure. For Gluma Classic, the ?TBS decreased after exposure to ZOE for 7 and 28 d. OptiBond FL yielded a significantly higher ?TBS than did Gluma Classic. Thus, ZOE should be avoided in cavities later to be restored with resin-based materials. PMID:23841789

  17. Comparison of Microleakage and Thickness of Resin Cement in Ceramic Inlays with Various Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Alaghemand, Homayoun; Abolghasemzadeh, Faezeh; Pakdel, Farzaneh; Judi Chelan, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Microleakage is still one of the major problems of composite-based restorations.This study compared the microleakage and thickness of resin cement in ceramic inlays with various temperatures. Materials and methods. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal and lingual aspects of thirty human molars with occlusal margins in enamel and gingival margins in dentin (3 mm wide, 5 mm long and 2 mm deep). Laboratory-made inlays (LMI) were used for buccal cavities, and CAD/CAM inlays (CMI) were used for lingual cavities. All the cavities were divided into six groups (n=10): 1) LMI at -5°C; 2) LMI at 50°C; 3) LMI at room temperature (25°C); 4) CMI at -5°C; 5) CMI at 50°C; 6) CMI at room temperature (25°C). Inlays were bonded to cavities in a pulp pressure- and temperature-simulating device. After thermocycling and dye penetration, the teeth were divided into two mesiodistal halves. Amount of dye penetration and film thickness were measured under a stereomicroscope and analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon and Spearman's correlation tests ( = 0.05). Results. There were no statistically significant differences in leakage between different inlay temperatures (P > 0.05). The mean cement thickness in laboratory-made inlays (gingival margin, 83.7 ± 11 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 19) was greater than that in CAD/CAM inlays (gingival margin, 69 ± 16 and occlusal margin, 84.7 ± 16). No correlation was found be-tween cement thickness and microleakage either in enamel or dentin for any of the ceramic systems. Conclusion. Differences in inlay temperature had no effect on microleakage. CAD/CAM inlays had lower cement thickness than laboratory-made inlays, but this was not related to their microleakage. PMID:25024839

  18. BOND STRENGTH DURABILITY OF SELF-ETCHING ADHESIVES AND RESIN CEMENTS TO DENTIN

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Carolina de Andrade Lima; de Melo, Renata Marques; Passos, Sheila Pestana; Camargo, Fernanda Pelógia; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Balducci, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of one- (Xeno III, Dentsply) and two-step (Tyrian-One Step Plus, Bisco) self-etching adhesive systems bonded to dentin and cemented to chemically cured (C&B Metabond) or light-cured paste of a dual-cure resin cement (Variolink II, Ivoclar) within a short (24 h) and long period of evaluation (90 days). Material and Methods: Forty recently extracted human molars had their roots removed and their occlusal dentin exposed and ground wet with 600-grit SiC paper. After application of one of the adhesives, the resin cement was applied to the bonded surface and a composite resin block was incrementally built up to a height of 5 mm (n=10). The restored teeth were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. The teeth were then cut along two axes (x and y), producing beam-shaped specimens with 0.8 mm2 cross-sectional area, which were subjected to μTBS testing at a crosshead speed of 0.05 mm/min and stressed to failure after 24 h or 90 days of storage in water. The μTBS data in MPa were subjected to three-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α= 0.05). Results: The interaction effect for all three factors was statistically significant (three-way ANOVA, p<0.001). All eight experimental means (MPa) were compared by the Tukey's test (p<0.05) and the following results were obtained: Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/24 h (22.4±7.3); Tyrian-One Step Plus/Variolink II/24 h (39.4±11.6); Xeno III/C&B/24 h (40.3±12.9); Xeno III/Variolink II/24 h (25.8±10.5); Tyrian-One Step Plus/C&B/90 d (22.1±12.8) Tyrian-One Step Plus/VariolinkII/90 d (24.2±14.2); Xeno III/C&B/90 d (27.0±13.5); Xeno III/Variolink II/ 90 d (33.0±8.9). Conclusions: Xeno III/Variolink II was the luting agent/adhesive combination that provided the most promising bond strength after 90 days of storage in water. PMID:19466243

  19. The adhesive system and root canal region do not influence the degree of conversion of dual resin cement

    PubMed Central

    PEREIRA, Priscilla Cristoforides; de MELO, Renata Marques; CHAVES, Carolina; GALHANO, Graziela A. P.; BOTTINO, Marco Antonio; BALDUCCI, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of two adhesive systems and the post space region on the degree of conversion of dual resin cement and its bond strength to root dentin. Material and Methods One three-step etch-andrinse (All-bond 2, Bisco) and another one-step self-etch (Xeno III, Dentsply) adhesive systems were applied on 20 (n=10) crownless bovine incisors, at 12-mm-deep post space preparation, and a fiber post (DT Light Post, Bisco) was cemented using a dual cure resin cement (Duo-Link, Bisco). Three transverse sections (3 mm) were obtained, being one from each study region (cervical, middle and apical). The degree of conversion of the dual cure resin cement was determined by a micro-Raman spectrometer. The data (%) were submitted to repeated-measures analysis of variance and Tukey's test (p<0.05). Results For both groups, the degree of conversion means (%) (All bond 2cervical = 69.3; All bond 2middle = 55.1; All bond 2apical= 56; Xeno IIIcervical = 68.7; Xeno IIImiddle = 68.8; Xeno IIIapical = 54.3) were not significantly different along the post space regions (p<0.05). Conclusion Neither the adhesive nor the post space region influenced the degree of conversion of the cement layer. PMID:21085803

  20. Effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG Lasers on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramic

    PubMed Central

    Kasraei, Shahin; Yarmohamadi, Ebrahim; Shabani, Amanj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Because of poor bond between resin cement and zirconia ceramics, laser surface treatments have been suggested to improve adhesion. The present study evaluated the effect of CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers on the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic. Materials and Methods: Ninety zirconia disks (6×2 mm) were randomly divided into six groups of 15. In the control group, no surface treatment was used. In the test groups, laser surface treatment was accomplished using CO2 and Nd:YAG lasers, respectively (groups two and three). Composite resin disks (3×2 mm) were fabricated and cemented to zirconia disks with self-etch resin cement and stored in distilled water for 24 hours. In the test groups four-six, the samples were prepared as in groups one-three and then thermocycled and stored in distilled water for six months. The SBS tests were performed (strain rate of 0.5 mm/min). The fracture modes were observed via stereomicroscopy. Data were analyzed with one and two-way ANOVA, independent t and Tukey’s tests. Results: The SBS values of Nd:YAG group (18.95±3.46MPa) was significantly higher than that of the CO2 group (14.00±1.96MPa), but lower than that of controls (23.35±3.12MPa). After thermocycling and six months of water storage, the SBS of the untreated group (1.80±1.23 MPa) was significantly lower than that of the laser groups. In groups stored for 24 hours, 60% of the failures were adhesive; however, after thermocycling and six months of water storage, 100% of failures were adhesive. Conclusion: Bonding durability of resin cement to zirconia improved with CO2 and Nd:YAG laser surface treatment of zirconia ceramic. PMID:27148380

  1. Si-based thin film coating on Y-TZP: Influence of deposition parameters on adhesion of resin cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette; Massi, Marcos; Silva, Alecssandro de Moura; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Özcan, Mutlu

    2013-10-01

    This study evaluated the influence of deposition parameters for Si-based thin films using magnetron sputtering for coating zirconia and subsequent adhesion of resin cement. Zirconia ceramic blocks were randomly divided into 8 groups and specimens were either ground finished and polished or conditioned using air-abrasion with alumina particles coated with silica. In the remaining groups, the polished specimens were coated with Si-based film coating with argon/oxygen magnetron discharge at 8:1 or 20:1 flux. In one group, Si-based film coating was performed on air-abraded surfaces. After application of bonding agent, resin cement was bonded. Profilometry, goniometry, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy analysis were performed on the conditioned zirconia surfaces. Adhesion of resin cement to zirconia was tested using shear bond test and debonded surfaces were examined using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Si-based film coating applied on air-abraded rough zirconia surfaces increased the adhesion of the resin cement (22.78 ± 5.2 MPa) compared to those of other methods (0-14.62 MPa) (p = 0.05). Mixed type of failures were more frequent in Si film coated groups on either polished or air-abraded groups. Si-based thin films increased wettability compared to the control group but did not change the roughness, considering the parameters evaluated. Deposition parameters of Si-based thin film and after application of air-abrasion influenced the initial adhesion of resin cement to zirconia.

  2. Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups. PMID:22379131

  3. Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to a porcelain-fusing noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Stoknorm, R; Isidor, F; Ravnholt, G

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the tensile bond strength of resin composites to a noble alloy for ceramic bonding after various surface treatments. The flat end of bars cast in the alloy were used as test specimens. Eighteen clinically relevant combinations of luting agent, airborne particle abrasion, and surface treatment were applied. After surface treatment, two bars were bonded together. Resin cement, either dual-polymerizing (Twinlook) or chemically polymerizing (Panavia EX, Panavia 21, or RBBC), was used as a luting agent. The specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermal cycles between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C before tensile bond strength testing. The highest median bond strengths were obtained using the Silicoater MD method/Twinlook (20.6 to 26.1 MPa) or with tin-plating/ Panavia EX (24.0 MPa), but more low values were recorded among the latter specimens. Tin-plating/Panavia 21 gave median tensile bond strengths (18.1 MPa) similar to tin-plating/Panavia EX. The Silicoater MD method resulted in similar bond strengths with or without the addition of a layer of Opaquer. The traditional Silicoater method (8.0 to 12.4 MPa) gave significantly lower median tensile bond strength values, and the lost sugar crystals method resulted in a tensile bond strength of 15.4 MPa. PMID:8957870

  4. Histological assessment of pulpal responses to resin modified glass ionomer cements in human teeth

    PubMed Central

    Eskandarizadeh, Ali; Parizi, Molook Torabi; Goroohi, Hossein; Badrian, Hamid; Asadi, Abbas; Khalighinejad, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Background: The biocompatibility of resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) as a lining material is still under question. The present study evaluated the response of the pulp-dentin complex following application of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement, calcium hydroxide and conventional glass-ionomer in deep cavities prepared in human teeth. Materials and Methods: In this controlled clinical trial, 30 deep class V buccal cavities (3 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm) were prepared in human premolars treatment planned to be extracted for orthodontic reasons and divided into 3 groups. Groups were lined by a RMGI (Vivaglass), conventional glass Ionomer (Ionocid) and calcium hydroxide respectively. The cavities were subsequently filled with amalgam. Each group was then divided into two sub-groups according to time intervals 5 and 30 days. The patients were referred to Kerman Dental School and in accordance with orthodontic treatment plan; premolars were extracted and then prepared for histological assessment. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid Schiff techniques. All of the samples were examined using a number of criteria including odontoblastic changes, inflammatory cells response, reactionary dentin formation and presence of microorganisms. The data were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was no significant difference among odontoblastic changes, reactionary dentin, presence of bacteria and inflammatory cells response of the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ionocid and Vivaglass resin-modified glass ionomers can be used as lining materials in human teeth. PMID:25878679

  5. An Investigation on Load Bearing Capacities of Cement and Resin Grouted Rock Bolts Installed in Weak Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyoncu Erguler, Guzide; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2015-04-01

    Rock bolts have been considered one of indispensable support method to improve load bearing capacity of many underground engineering projects, and thus, various types of them have been developed until now for different purposes. Although mechanically anchored rock bolts can be successfully installed to prevent structurally controlled instabilities in hard rocks, in comparison with cement and resin grouted rock bolts, these types of anchors are not so effective in weak rocks characterized by relatively low mechanical properties. In order to investigate the applicability and to measure relative performance of cement and resin grouted rock bolts into weak and heavily jointed rock mass, a research program mainly consisting of pull-out tests was performed in a metal mine in Turkey. The rock materials excavated in this underground mining were described as basalt, tuff, ore dominated volcanic rocks and dacite. To achieve more representative results for rock materials found in this mining and openings excavated in varied dimensions, the pull-out tests were conducted on rock bolts used in many different locations where more convergences were measured and deformation dependent instability was expected to cause greater engineering problems. It is well known that the capacity of rock bolts depends on the length, diameter and density of the bolt pattern, and so considering the thickness of plastic zone in the studied openings, the length and diameter of rock bolts were taken as 2.4 m. and 25 mm., respectively. The spacing between rows changed between 70 and 180 cm. In this study, totally twenty five pull-out tests were performed to have a general understanding about axial load bearing capacity and support reaction curves of cement and resin grouted rock bolts. When pull load-displacement curves belongs to cement and resin grouted rock bolts were compared with each other, it was determined that cement grouted rock bolts carry more load ranging between 115.6 kN and 127.5 kN with a mean value of 119.4 kN. However, the axial pull-load obtained from resin grouted rock bolts ranged from 2.9 to 110.9 kN with a mean value of 45.7 kN. Achieving relatively lower axial pull loads for resin grouted rock bolts were attributed to the tendency of resin to flow easily throughout surfaces of discontinuities. During site investigation, it was concluded that 27 of 72 resin grouted rock bolts and 8 of 56 cement grouted rock bolts were determined to lose their support capacities. According to these observations, it was found that while support recovery of cement grouted increase to 85.7%, this ratio decreased to about 62.5% for resin grouted rock bolts. When these observations and pull-out test results are considered, it can be concluded that installing cement grouted rock bolts can be more effective than resin grouted rock bolts to support mining operated in weak and heavily jointed rock masses.

  6. Influence of Photoinitiator and Light-Curing Source on Bond Strength of Experimental Resin Cements to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Segreto, Dario Raimundo; Naufel, Fabiana Scarparo; Brandt, William Cunha; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated the bond strength (BS) of experimental resin cements formulated with different photoinitiators when activated by two kinds of light-curing units (LCUs) through a ceramic material. Seven resin blends with different camphorquinone (CQ) and/or phenylpropanedione (PPD) concentrations (weight) were prepared: C5: 0.5% CQ; C8: 0.8% CQ; P5: 0.5% PPD; P8: 0.8% PPD; C1P4: 0.1% CQ and 0.4% PPD; C4P1: 0.4% CQ and 0.1% PPD; C4P4: 0.4% CQ and 0.4% PPD. Two LCUs were used: one quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH - 850 mW/cm²) and one light-emitting diode (LED - 1300 mW/cm²). The microtensile bond strength of each blend was assessed. Data were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The BS values did not exhibit significant differences for LCUs, regardless of the photoinitiator type. Three cements showed significant differences: P5 and C5 had higher BS with QTH, and C4P1 with LED. For QTH, P5 showed the highest and C1P4 the lowest BS. For the LED, C4P1 showed the highest BS of all the cements. The results indicated that PPD was a viable alternative in the formulation of photocured resin cements, reducing or eliminating CQ that is yellowish without impairing the bond strength. Furthermore, both LED and QTH were effective in curing resin cements that contain PPD or CQ. PMID:27007352

  7. Adhesive strength of self-adhesive resins to lithium disilicate ceramic and dentin: effect of dentin chelating agents.

    PubMed

    Saker, Samah; Alnazzawi, Ahmad; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the effect of different chelating agents on microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin. The occlusal surfaces of extracted human mandibular molars (N = 80) were cut horizontally to expose sound dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20 per group) and dentin surfaces were conditioned according to one of the following methods: group C: no treatment (control group); group CH: 0.2 % chitosan; group E: 17 % ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and group P: 25 % polyacrylic acid (PAA). Lithium disilicate glass ceramic (e.max CAD) blocks were cemented to conditioned dentin surfaces with self-adhesive cements (RelyX Unicem or Clearfil SA) and photo-polymerized. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h and thermocycled for 6,000 times. The beams were obtained from bonded ceramic-cement-tooth assemblies and were subjected to the MTBS test (1 mm/min). Failure types were analyzed and selected beams were examined under scanning electron microscope. Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (P < 0.05). While cement type significantly affected the MTBS results (P < 0.05), no significant difference was observed between the dentin chelating agents (P = 0.785). Interaction terms were not significant (P = 0.114). Control group with no dentin conditioning presented significantly lower results with both cements (RelyX Unicem: 8.1 ± 1.9(a), Clearfil SA: 8 ± 1.6(a)) than those of conditioned groups (19.3 ± 4.2(b)-24.5 ± 5.2(b)) (P < 0.05). Failure types were predominantly adhesive in all groups. Chitosan (2 %), EDTA (17 %) or PAA (25 %) could all be used as dentin chelating agents in conjunction with self-adhesive resin cements tested. PMID:25424594

  8. Shear Bond Strength of Calcium Enriched Mixture Cement and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate to Composite Resin with Two Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Motahhari, Paria; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Immediate restoration after vital pulp therapy is essential in order to create and maintain effective coronal seal. Purpose of Study: The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength of recently used pulp capping materials: white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium enriched mixture cement (CEM) to composite resin with the use of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems and compare them with the bond strength of commonly used resin modified glass ionomer (RMGI) cement. Materials and Methods: Forty specimens from each test material were fabricated, measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth. The specimens of each material were divided into 2 groups of 20 specimens according to the adhesive system (Single Bond vs. Clearfil SE Bond) used for bonding of resin composite. The shear bond strength values were measured at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min and fractured surfaces were examined. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and a post hoc Tukeys test (P<0.05). Results: Analysis of data showed a significantly higher bond strength for RMGI compared to MTA and CEM (P<0.001); however, no significant differences were observed in the bond strength values of MTA and CEM (P=0.9). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in relation to the type of the adhesive system irrespective of the type of the material used (P=0.95) All the failures were of cohesive type in RMGI, MTA and CEM. Conclusion: Bond strength of RMGI cement to composite resin was higher than that of MTA or CEM cement irrespective of the type of the adhesive system. PMID:25628696

  9. INFLUENCE OF ENERGY DENSITY OF DIFFERENT LIGHT SOURCES ON KNOOP HARDNESS OF A DUAL-CURED RESIN CEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Piva, Evandro; Correr, Loureno; Sinhoreti, Mario Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Simonides; Demarco, Flvio Fernando; Powers, John Michael

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness of a dual-cured resin-based luting cement irradiated with different light sources as well energy density through a ceramic sample. Three light-curing unit (LCUs) were tested: tungsten halogen light (HAL), light-emitting diode (LED) and xenon plasma-arc (PAC) lamp. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated from a resin-based cement (Enforce). Three energy doses were used by modifying the irradiance (I) of each LCU and the irradiation time (T): 24 Jcm-2 (I/2x2T), 24 Jcm-2 (IxT) and 48 Jcm-2 (Ix2T). Energy doses were applied through a 2.0-mm-thick ceramic sample (Duceram Plus). Three groups underwent direct irradiation over the resin cement with the different LCUs and a chemically-activated group served as a control. Thirteen groups were tested (n=10). Knoop hardness number (KHN) means were obtained from cross-sectional areas. Two-way ANOVA and the Holm-Sidak method were used for statistical comparisons of activation mode and energy doses (?=5%). Application of 48 J.cm-2 energy dose through the ceramic using LED (50.52.8) and HAL (50.93.7) produced significantly higher KHN means (p<0.05) than the control (44.73.8). LED showed statistically similar performance to HAL. Only HAL showed a relationship between the increase of LCU energy dose and hardness increase. PMID:19089216

  10. A Confocal Microscopic Evaluation of the Dehydration Effect on Conventional, Resin Reinforced Powder/Liquid and Paste to Paste Glass Ionomer Luting Cements

    PubMed Central

    George, Liza; Kandaswamy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of dehydration of resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system, resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cements in three different quantities and to compare them with a conventional glass ionomer luting cement using confocal laser scanning microscope. Materials and Methods: A conventional glass ionomer (Group I), a resin modified powder/liquid system (Group II), and a resin-modified paste/paste system (Group III) were selected for the study. In Group III, there were three subgroups based on the quantity of material dispensed. 50 premolar teeth were selected and randomly divided among the groups with 10 samples in each. The teeth were ground flat to expose a flat occlusal dentin. A device was made to standardize the thickness of cement placed on the teeth. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 h and then longitudinally sectioned to examine the tooth dentin interface under a confocal microscope. The specimens were allowed to dehydrate under the microscope for different time intervals. The width of the crack after dehydration near the dentinal interface was measured at definite intervals in all the groups and analyzed statistically using Student’s t-test. Results: Conventional glass ionomer cement showed the maximum width of the crack followed by resin modified paste/paste system during the dehydration period. Resin modified powder/liquid system did not show cohesive failure. Conclusions: Conventional glass ionomer luting cement is more susceptible to cohesive failure when subjected to dehydration compared to resin-modified glass ionomer paste/paste luting cement. Among the luting cements, resin-modified glass ionomer powder/liquid system showed the best results when subjected to dehydration. PMID:26464535

  11. Effects of adding silica particles on certain properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement

    PubMed Central

    Felemban, Nayef H.; Ebrahim, Mohamed I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of incorporation of silica particles with different concentrations on some properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC): Microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Materials and Methods: Silica particle was incorporated into RMGIC powder to study its effects, one type of RMGIC (Type II visible light-cured) and three concentrations of silica particles (0.06, 0.08, and 0.1% weight) were used. One hundred and twenty specimens were fabricated for measuring microleakage, compressive strength, tensile strength, water sorption, and solubility. Statistical Analysis: One-way analysis of variance and Tukey's tests were used for measuring significance between means where P ≤ 0.05. Results: RMGIC specimens without any additives showed significantly highest microleakage and lowest compressive and tensile strengths. Conclusion: Silica particles added to RMGIC have the potential as a reliable restorative material with increased compressive strength, tensile strength, and water sorption but decreased microleakage and water solubility. PMID:27095901

  12. Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

  13. Cytotoxicity of a calcium aluminate cement in comparison with other dental cements and resin-based materials.

    PubMed

    Franz, Alexander; Konradsson, Katarina; König, Franz; Van Dijken, Jan W V; Schedle, Andreas

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the cytotoxic effects of a calcium aluminate cement with several currently used direct restorative materials. Specimens of three composites (QuiXfil, Tetric Ceram, Filtek Supreme), one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard Cement), one glass ionomer cement (Ketac Molar), and one calcium aluminate cement (DoxaDent), were used fresh or after 7-days' preincubation in cell culture medium at 37 degrees C, pH 7.2. PVC strips for ISO 10993-5 cytotoxicity test were used as positive control and glass specimens as negative control. L-929 fibroblasts (5-ml aliquots, containing 3 x 10(4) cells/ml), cultivated in DMEM with 10% FCS, 1% glutamine, and 1% penicillin/streptomycin at 37 degrees C/5% CO2 and trypsinized, were exposed to the specimens for 72 h. The cells were harvested, centrifuged, and resuspended in 500 microl DMEM and then counted in 500 microl DMEM for 30 s with a flow cytometer at 488 nm. The analysis of variance comparing the six materials showed different influences on L-929 fibroblast cytotoxicity (p <0.0001). The cytotoxicity of all specimens diminished with increasing preincubation time (p <0.0001). Fresh DoxaDent exhibited the lowest cytotoxicity, followed by QuiXfil. Ketac Molar showed the highest cytotoxicity. After 7 days of preincubation, Harvard Cement and Filtek Supreme demonstrated more cytotoxicity than the other materials (p <0.005). PMID:16428175

  14. A long term study of fluoride release from metal-containing conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Williams, J A; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine long term release of fluoride from a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji II LC (FLC)) compared with that from two conventional acid-base setting cements (HiDense (HD) and KetacSilver (KS)) marketed for similar restorative purposes. Fluoride release from discs of cement immersed in water or artificial saliva was measured for 2.7 years using an ion selective electrode technique. The RMGIC was affected by water if immersed immediately after setting. This is similar to conventional acid-base cements and the experimental method was designed to allow for this. Over the 2.7-year period, the RMGIC and HD released similar amounts of fluoride into both water and artificial saliva. In water, the RMGIC released the most fluoride, while in artificial saliva the highest release was from HD. KS released the least amount of fluoride in both immersing liquids. In artificial saliva, release was reduced to 17-25% of that found in water, with the RMGIC showing the greatest reduction. Both acid-base cured cements showed changes in colour over the 2.7-year span, while the colour of the RMGIC was stable. It was concluded that the RMGIC released equivalent or greater amounts of fluoride than the two acid-base cure glass-ionomers over a period of 2.7 years. PMID:11298908

  15. Pre-heated dual-cured resin cements: analysis of the degree of conversion and ultimate tensile strength.

    PubMed

    Frana, Flvio lvares; Oliveira, Michele de; Rodrigues, Jos Augusto; Arrais, Csar Augusto Galvo

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of conversion (DC) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of dual-cured resin cements heated to 50 C prior to and during polymerization. Disc- and hourglass-shaped specimens of Rely X ARC (RX) and Variolink II (VII) were obtained using addition silicon molds. The products were manipulated at 25 C or 50 C and were subjected to 3 curing conditions: light-activation through a glass slide or through a pre-cured 2-mm thick resin composite disc, or they were allowed to self-cure (SC). All specimens were dark-stored dry for 15 days. For DC analysis, the resin cements were placed into the mold located on the center of a horizontal diamond on the attenuated total reflectance element in the optical bench of a Fourier Transformed Infrared spectrometer. Infrared spectra (n = 6) were collected between 1680 and 1500 cm-1, and DC was calculated by standard methods using changes in ratios of aliphatic-to-aromatic C=C absorption peaks from uncured and cured states. For UTS test, specimens (n = 10) were tested in tension in a universal testing machine (crosshead speed of 1 mm/min) until failure. DC and UTS data were submitted to 2-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test (?= 5%). Both products showed higher DC at 50 C than at 25 C in all curing conditions. No significant difference in UTS was noted between most light-activated groups at 25 C and those at 50 C. VII SC groups showed higher UTS at 50 C than at 25 C (p < 0.05). Increased temperature led to higher DC, but its effects on resin cement UTS depended on the curing condition. PMID:21537644

  16. Effects of ceramic component on cephalexin release from bioactive bone cement consisting of Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin and bioactive glass ceramics.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, M; Fujita, H; Nakamura, T; Kokubo, T

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effect of amount of ceramic cement powder on drug release from bioactive bone cement. The associated bone-bonding strength was also investigated. The bioactive bone cement under investigation consisted of bisphenol-alpha-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA), triethylene-glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin and a combination of apatite- and wollastonite-containing glass-ceramic (A-W GC) powder. A-W GC powder (50%, 70% and 80% w/w) containing 5% cephalexin (CEX) powder hardened within 5 min after mixing with Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin. The compressive strength of the cement with or without drug increased with increasing the amount of ceramic powder. The compressive strength of the 80% ceramic cement without the incorporation of cephalexin was 194 MPa. This compressive strength was about 3 times higher than that for polymethylmethacrylate cement. After the cement was implanted in the proximal metaphysis of the tibiae of male rabbits, the failure load for the cement was found to increase with increasing of the amount of ceramic powder. This finding suggested that the cement formed a bonding with bone. In vitro CEX release from bioactive bone cement pellets in a simulated body fluid at pH 7.25 and 37 degrees C continued for more than 2 weeks. Drug release profile followed the Higuchi equation initially, but not at later stages. The drug release rate increased with increasing amount of ceramic powder in the mixture. Since the pore volume of the cement increased with increasing of amount of ceramic powder, the drug diffused in the pores between the ceramics particle and polymer matrix. As hydroxyapatite precipitated on the cement surface, the drug release rate decreased, as observed at the later release stage. These results suggest that varying the amount of ceramic powder in the cement system could control the drug release rate from bioactive bone cement. PMID:11281575

  17. Do blood contamination and haemostatic agents affect microtensile bond strength of dual cured resin cement to dentin?

    PubMed Central

    KİLİC, Kerem; ARSLAN, Soley; DEMETOGLU, Goknil Alkan; ZARARSIZ, Gokmen; KESİM, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of blood contamination and haemostatic agents such as Ankaferd Blood Stopper (ABS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on the microtensile bond strength between dual cured resin cement-dentin interface. Material and Methods: Twelve pressed lithium disilicate glass ceramics were luted to flat occlusal dentin surfaces with Panavia F under the following conditions: Control Group: no contamination, Group Blood: blood contamination, Group ABS: ABS contamination Group H2O2: H2O2 contamination. The specimens were sectioned to the beams and microtensile testing was carried out. Failure modes were classified under stereomicroscope. Two specimens were randomly selected from each group, and SEM analyses were performed. Results: There were significant differences in microtensile bond strengths (µTBS) between the control and blood-contaminated groups (p<0.05), whereas there were no significant differences found between the control and the other groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Contamination by blood of dentin surface prior to bonding reduced the bond strength between resin cement and the dentin. Ankaferd Blood Stoper and H2O2 could be used safely as blood stopping agents during cementation of all-ceramics to dentin to prevent bond failure due to blood contamination. PMID:23559118

  18. EFFECT OF LIGHT CURING UNIT ON RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS-IONOMER CEMENTS: A MICROHARDNESS ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Cefaly, Daniela Francisca Gigo; de Mello, Liliam Lucia Carrara Paes; Wang, Linda; Lauris, Jos Roberto Pereira; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the microhardness of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) photoactivated with a blue light-emitting diode (LED) curing light. Material and Methods: Thirty specimens were distributed in 3 groups: Fuji II LC Improved/GC (RM1), Vitremer/3M ESPE (RM2) and Filtek Z250/ 3M ESPE (RM3). Two commercial light-curing units were used to polymerize the materials: LED/Ultrablue IS and a halogen light/XL3000 (QTH). After 24 h, Knoop microhardness test was performed. Data were submitted to three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test at a pre-set alpha of 0.05. Results: At the top surface, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) in the microhardness was seen when the LED and QTH lights were used for all materials. At the bottom surface, microhardness mean value of RM2 was significantly higher when the QTH light was used (p<0.05). For RM1, statistically significant higher values (p<0.05) were seen when the LED light was used. No statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was seen at the bottom surface for RM3, irrespective of the light used. Top-to-bottom surface comparison showed no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) for both RMGICs, regardless of the light used. For RM3, microhardness mean value at the top was significantly higher (p<0.05) than bottom microhardness when both curing units were used. Conclusion: The microhardness values seen when a LED light was used varied depending on the restorative material tested. PMID:19466242

  19. Effect of sandblasting, silica coating, and laser treatment on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to resin cements.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Nasrin; Hooshmand, Tabassom; Heidari, Solmaz; Khoshro, Kimia

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of laser irradiation as well as other surface treatment methods on the microtensile bond strength of a dental zirconia ceramic to the two types of resin cements. Zirconia ceramic blocks (ICE Zirkon) were sintered according to the manufacturer's instructions and duplicated in resin composites. The ceramic specimens were divided into four groups according to the following surface treatments: no surface treatment (control), sandblasting with alumina, silica coating plus silanization, and Nd:YAG laser irradiation. The specimens were divided equally and then bonded with Panavia F2.0 (self-etching resin cement) and Clearfil SA Luting (self-adhesive resin cement) to the composite blocks. The bonded ceramic-composite blocks were stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 72 h, cut to prepare bar-shaped specimens with a bonding area of approximately 1 mm(2), and thermocycled for 3000 cycles between 5 and 55 °C, and the microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test. The results showed that the self-adhesive resin cement used in this study did not improve the microtensile bond strength when the zirconia surface was sandblasted by alumina. The use of the Nd:YAG laser did not enhance the bond strength between the zirconia and both types of resin cements. In addition, silica coating of the zirconia surfaces plus silane application significantly improved the bond strength regardless of the type of resin cement utilized. PMID:26690357

  20. Degree of conversion of two dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kim, Young-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cements light-irradiated through zirconia ceramic disks with different thicknesses using various light-curing methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia ceramic disks (KT12) with three different thicknesses (1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 mm) were prepared. The light transmittance of the disks was measured using ultraviolet visible near-infrared spectroscopy. Four different light-curing protocols were used by combining two curing light modes (Elipar TriLight (standard mode) and bluephase G2 (high power mode)) with light-exposure times of 40 and 120 seconds. The DCs of the two dual-cured resin cements (Duo-Link and Panavia F2.0) light-irradiated through the disks was analyzed at three time intervals (3, 7, and 10 minutes) by FTIR spectroscopy. The data was analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (α=.05).Two-way ANOVA and Tukey post hoc test were used to analyze the 10 minute DC results. RESULTS The 1.0 mm thick disk exhibited low light transmittance (<25%), and the transmittance decreased considerably with increasing disk thickness. All groups exhibited significantly higher 10 minute DC values than the 3 or 7 minute values (P<.05), but some exceptions were observed in Duo-Link. Two-way ANOVA revealed that the influence of the zirconia disk thickness on the 10 minute DC was dependent on the light-curing methods (P<.001). This finding was still valid even at 4.0 mm thickness, where substantial light attenuation took place. CONCLUSION The curing of the dual-cured resin cements was affected significantly by the light-curing technique, even though the additional chemical polymerization mechanism worked effectively. PMID:24353887

  1. Influence of glass particle size of resin cements on bonding to glass ceramic: SEM and bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Fernanda; Moraes, Rafael R; Pereira-Cenci, Tatiana; Boscato, Noéli

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of the filler particle size (micron or submicron) of experimental resin cements on the microtensile bond strength to a glass-ceramic pretreated with hydrofluoric acid (HFA) etching or alumina airborne-particle abrasion (AA). Cements were obtained from a Bis-GMA/TEGDMA mixture filled with 60 mass% micron-sized (1 ± 0.2 µm) or submicron-sized (180 ± 30 µm) Ba-Si-Al glass particles. Ceramic blocks (PM9; VITA) were treated with 10% HFA for 60 s or AA for 15 s. Silane and adhesive were applied. Ceramic blocks were bonded to resin composite blocks (Z250; 3M ESPE) using one of the cements. Bonded specimens were sectioned into beams (n = 20/group) and subjected to microtensile bond strength tests. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' tests (5%). Failure modes were classified under magnification. Morphologies of the treated ceramic surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy. The HFA-submicron group had lower bond strengths than the other groups. All AA-submicron specimens debonded prematurely. Mixed failures were predominant for HFA groups, whereas interfacial failures predominated for AA groups. SEM revealed a honeycomb-like aspect in the HFA-treated ceramic, whereas the AA-treated groups showed an irregular retentive pattern. Continuity of cement infiltration along the bonded interface was more uniform for HFA-treated compared to AA-treated specimens. Cracks toward the bulk of the ceramic were observed in AA-treated specimens. Particle size significantly influenced the ceramic bond strength, whereas surface treatment had a minor effect. PMID:24610793

  2. An effect of immediate dentin sealing on the shear bond strength of resin cement to porcelain restoration

    PubMed Central

    Cho, In-Ho

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to determine differences in shear bond strength to human dentin using immediate dentin sealing (IDS) technique compared to delayed dentin sealing (DDS). MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty extracted human molars were divided into 4 groups with 10 teeth each. The control group was light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) and cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. IDS/SE (immediate dentin sealing, Clearfil™ SE Bond) and IDS/SB (immediate dentin sealing, AdapterTM Single Bond 2) were light-cured after application of dentin bonding agent (Clearfil™ SE Bond and Adapter™ Sing Bond 2, respectively), whereas DDS specimens were not treated with any dentin bonding agent. Specimens were cemented with Variolink® II resin cement. Dentin bonding agent (Excite® DSC) was left unpolymerized until the application of porcelain restoration. Shear strength was measured using a universal testing machine at a speed of 5 mm/min and evaluated of fracture using an optical microscope. RESULTS The mean shear bond strengths of control group and IDS/SE group were not statistically different from another at 14.86 and 11.18 MPa. Bond strength of IDS/SE group had a significantly higher mean than DDS group (3.14 MPa) (P < .05). There were no significance in the mean shear bond strength between IDS/SB (4.11 MPa) and DDS group. Evaluation of failure patterns indicates that most failures in the control group and IDS/SE groups were mixed, whereas failures in the DDS were interfacial. CONCLUSION When preparing teeth for indirect ceramic restoration, IDS with Clearfil™ SE Bond results in improved shear bond strength compared with DDS. PMID:21165186

  3. Microleakage of all-ceramic crowns using self-etching resin luting agents.

    PubMed

    Trajtenberg, Cynthia Paulina; Caram, Santiago J; Kiat-amnuay, Sudarat

    2008-01-01

    Self-etching adhesive systems are a new generation of materials that possess acidic methacrylates that can generate self-adhesion. There is limited data reported on the marginal leakage of ceramic restorations bonded with self-etching adhesive materials. This study assessed and compared the amount of microleakage of bonded ceramic crowns using three different types of self-etching adhesive systems with and without a die spacer. Eighteen human molars were prepared for all-ceramic IPS Empress crowns and the teeth were randomly assigned to each experimental group. The buccal side had the preparation finish line 1.5 mm below the CEJ, and the lingual finish line was 1.5 mm above the CEJ, creating margins in enamel and dentin. Two die-spacing techniques were used (three layers or no layer of die spacer). Each crown restoration was cemented with one of three self-etching resin luting agents (Panavia F 2.0, Multilink and RelyX Unicem). The specimens were thermally cycled for 1000 cycles, then immersed in a 5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours. The teeth were then rinsed, embedded in clear epoxy resin and sectioned. A total of 60 sections were evaluated for each type of resin luting agent using digital image analysis at 70x magnification. A novel formula, using mean percentage of microleakage, was developed by dividing the extent of dye penetration along the tooth/resin luting cement interphase and the total perimeter of the tooth crown surface. The data were analyzed using three-way analysis of variance at the 0.05 level of significance. Fisher's PLSD intervals were calculated for comparing significant means. Panavia F 2.0 showed a lower degree of microleakage than RelyX Unicem and Multilink at both the enamel and dentin margins. Interactions of the main effects (cement, margin and die spacer technique) were all highly significant (p< or =0.004). The degree of microleakage was higher on the dentin margins than on the enamel margins (p<0.0001). The degree of microleakage for the die spacer group was not significantly different from the group with no die spacer technique (p>0.1). Overall, Panavia F 2.0 showed the least microleakage, followed by RelyX Unicem and Multilink, respectively. PMID:18666496

  4. Evaluation of the Bond Strength of Resin Cements Used to Lute Ceramics on Laser-Etched Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Duzdar, Lale; Oksuz, Mustafa; Tanboga, Ilknur

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of two different adhesive resin cements used to lute ceramics on laser-etched dentin. Background data: Erbium, chromium: yttrium, scandium, gallium, garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser irradiation has been claimed to improve the adhesive properties of dentin, but results to date have been controversial, and its compatibility with existing adhesive resin cements has not been conclusively determined. Materials and methods: Two adhesive cements, one “etch-and-rinse” [Variolink II (V)] and one “self-etch” [Clearfil Esthetic Cement (C)] luting cement, were used to lute ceramic blocks (Vita Celay Blanks, Vita) onto dentin surfaces. In total, 80 dentin specimens were distributed randomly into eight experimental groups according to the dentin surface-etching technique used Er,Cr:YSGG laser and Er:YAG laser: (1) 37% orthophosphoric acid+V (control group), (2) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V, (3) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+acid+V, (4) Er:YAG laser+V, (5) Er:YAG laser+acid+V, (6) C, (7) Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C, and (8) Er:YAG laser+C. Following these applications, the ceramic discs were bonded to prepared surfaces and were shear loaded in a universal testing machine until fracture. SBS was recorded for each group in MPa. Shear test values were evaluated statistically using the Mann–Whitney U test. Results: No statistically significant differences were evident between the control group and the other groups (p>0.05). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+A+V group demonstrated significantly higher SBS than did the Er,Cr:YSGG laser+V group (p=0.034). The Er,Cr:YSGG laser+C and Er:YAG laser+C groups demonstrated significantly lower SBS than did the C group (p<0.05). Conclusions: Dentin surfaces prepared with lasers may provide comparable ceramic bond strengths, depending upon the adhesive cement used. PMID:24992276

  5. Effect of Light Intensity on the Degree of Conversion of Dual-cured Resin Cement at Different Depths with the use of Translucent Fiber Posts

    PubMed Central

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Saati Khosroshahi, Elmira

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effect of different light intensities on the degree of conversion (DC) of dual-cured resin cement at different depths of translucent fiber posts. Materials and Methods: Thirty translucent fiber posts were randomly assigned into three (n=10) groups. They were cemented in the simulated canal spaces using Duo-Link dual-cured resin cement. The cement was light-cured under 600, 800 and 1100 mW/cm2 light intensities for 40 seconds. DC of the resin cement was calculated at cervical, middle and apical thirds using the spectra of FT-Raman spectrometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measurement ANOVA and Tukeys post hoc tests (?=0.05). Results: In all the groups, the least DC was obtained at the apical region. There were no significant differences in the DC with different light intensities between the cervical and middle regions (p>0.05). However, in the apical region, the DC in both 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 was similar (p>0.05), but greater with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity (p=0.02 and p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion: In comparison with the light intensity of 600 mW/cm2, the light intensity of 800 mW/cm2 significantly increased the DC of dual-cured resin cement in the apical region. However, DC was not significantly different between 800 and 1100 mw/cm2 light intensities. If the resin cement, especially in the apical areas is not sufficiently cured, microleakage might increase and post retention might be jeopardized. In comparison with 600 mW/cm2 light intensity, 800 mW/cm2 significantly increases DC at the apical third that might be clinically beneficial. PMID:25628659

  6. Acrylic resin guide for locating the abutment screw access channel of cement-retained implant prostheses.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ayman; Maroulakos, Georgios; Garaicoa, Jorge

    2016-05-01

    Abutment screw loosening represents a common and challenging technical complication of cement-retained implant prostheses. This article describes the fabrication of a simple and accurate poly(methyl methacrylate) guide for identifying the location and angulation of the abutment screw access channel of a cement-retained implant prosthesis with a loosened abutment screw. PMID:26794698

  7. Effect of curing method and storage condition on fluoride ion release from a fluoride-releasing resin cement.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Akira; Nikaido, Toru; Ikeda, Masaomi; Sonoda, Hidekazu; Foxton, Richard M; Tagami, Junji

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate fluoride ion release from a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji IILC improved, FLC) and a fluoridated resin cement (Panavia F, PF) following different curing methods and storage conditions. The specimens, which were either light-cured (LC) or chemical-cured (CC), were stored in either distilled water (DW) or demineralizing solution (DS; pH 4.5) for 1, 3, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. Fluoride ion release was measured using a fluoride ion-specific electrode. Data (n = 5) were statistically analyzed using one- and three-way ANOVA (p = 0.05). A "burst effect" was observed in the first week from both materials. However, fluoride ion release from FLC was seven times higher than that from PF. Storage in demineralizing solution accelerated the amount of fluoride release from both materials. In addition, LC yielded a lower amount of fluoride ion release from both materials, as compared to CC. It was concluded that both curing mode and storage medium influenced the amount of fluoride release from the tested materials. PMID:16916227

  8. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  9. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

    1992-08-01

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

  10. The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.

    PubMed

    Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

  11. Microtensile strength of resin cement bond to indirect composite treated by different output powers of Er:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Garshasbzadeh, Nazanin Zeinab; Mirzaie, Mansoreh; Yassini, Esmaeil; Shahabi, Sima; Benedicenti, Stefano; Angiero, Francesca; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2016-04-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effect of different output powers of Er:YAG laser on microtensile bonding strength of indirect composite to resin cements.36 indirect composite blocks (GC Gradia DA2, Japan) size 15 × 10 × 10 mm(3) were constructed, and divided into 12 groups, as follows:G1: control group (no treatment); Groups G2 to G6: treated with Er:YAG laser (2,940 nm) in noncontact mode, frequency 20 Hz, pulse duration 470 µs, with output power ranging from 2W to 6W; Groups G7 sandblasting, Groups 8 to G12: as Groups G2 to G 6 with preparatory sandblasting. One specimen from each group was analyzed by SEM; each specimen was fixed to a specialized metal jig using cyanoacrylate (Mitreapel, Beta Kimya San. Ve TIC, Iran) and debonded under tension with a universal testing machine (Zwick, Germany) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1) . Sandblasting and laser can improve bond strength above an energy level of 150 mJ. SEM evaluation of laser-treated specimens showed irregularities and deep undercuts. T test analysis showed no significant difference between sandblasted and non-sandblasted group, with laser output power of 0, 100, or 150 mJ (P = 0.666, P = 0.875, and P = 0.069); in the specimens irradiated with energy output of 200, 250, or 300 mJ, sandblasted specimens showed higher bond strength than non-sandblasted ones. The results demonstrate that, in composite resin irradiated with laser at energy output of 200-300 mJ, sandblasting might be a suitable procedure to enhance bond strength of resin cement. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:328-333, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26873266

  12. Effect of Resin Cement Porosity on Retention of Glass-Fiber Posts to Root Dentin: An Experimental and Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Natércia Rezende da; Aguiar, Grazielle Crystine Rodrigues; Rodrigues, Monise de Paula; Bicalho, Aline Aredes; Soares, Priscilla Barbosa Ferreira; Veríssimo, Crisnicaw; Soares, Carlos José

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of porosity of self-adhesive resin on the stress distribution, post retention and failure mode of fiber post cemented to human root dentin. Ten human central upper incisors with circular root canal were selected. They were sectioned with 15 mm and were endodontically filled. The roots were scanned using micro-CT after post space preparation for root filling remaining evaluation. Fiber posts were cemented using self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X U200, 3M-ESPE). Two 1-mm-thick slices from the cervical, medium and apical thirds were scanned for resin cement bubbles volume measurements and submitted to a push-out test (PBS). Three operators using stereomicroscopy and confocal laser microscopy classified the failure mode. Stress distributions during the push-out test were analyzed using 3D finite element analysis. PBS values (MPa) were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests and the failure modes using the Kappa coefficient to assess inter-operator agreement. Chi-square test was used to determine significant differences between the methods ( = 0.05). Push-out bond strength was significantly affected by the bubbles presence in all root depth (p<0.05). The stress concentration was higher when the bubbles were present. Adhesive dentin/resin cement interface failure was the most frequent type of failure. Confocal microscopy was better than stereomicroscopy for failure analysis. Bubbles generated during resin cement insertion into the root canal negatively affect the stress distribution and the bond strength. The use of confocal microscopy is recommended for failure analysis. PMID:26963208

  13. Evaluation of the resin cement thicknesses and push-out bond strengths of circular and oval fiber posts in oval-shapes canals

    PubMed Central

    Er, Özgür; Kılıç, Kerem; Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Sağsen, Burak

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the push-out bond strength varies between oval and circular fiber posts, and to examine the effect on the resin cement thicknesses around the posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS Eighteen mandibular premolar roots were separated into two groups for oval and circular fiber posts systems. Post spaces were prepared and fiber posts were luted to the post spaces. Roots were cut horizontally to produce 1-mm-thick specimens. Resin cement thicknesses were determined with a metallographic optical microscope and push-out tests were done. RESULTS No significant differences were observed in terms of push-out bond strength between the oval and circular fiber posts (P>.05) The resin cement thicknesses of the oval posts were greater than those of the circular posts group in the coronal, middle and apical specimens (P<.05). CONCLUSION In the light of these results, it can be stated that resin cement thickness does not affect the push-out bond strength. PMID:25722832

  14. Effect of adding spherical silica filler on physico-mechanical properties of resin modified glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, Rosalina; Irie, Masao; Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2004-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of spherical silica fillers on the physical and mechanical properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC). Specimens were fabricated by mixing untreated (UF) or silanized (SF) spherical silica filler into the powder of a commercially prepared RMGIC. The original RMGIC and a preparation containing 20 wt% spherical silica filler were also examined with regard to their fractured surface and fluoride release. The fillers increased the compressive strength remarkably: up to 17% in the case of SF and 9% in the case of UF. Both UF and SF increased the flexural strength by up to 17%. The addition of SF increased the DTS up to 38%, but UF decreased the DTS. The addition of SF improved the workability and the mechanical properties of the RMGIC. PMID:15287560

  15. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: I. Chemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the first part of a theoretical and experimental work aiming at modeling the chemo-mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Because of ion exchange processes, the volume change of the IER may cause internal pressures leading to the degradation of the material. In this study, a predictive modeling is developed for describing the chemical behavior of such material. It is based on thermodynamic equilibria to determine the evolution of the ion exchange processes, and the potential precipitation of portlandite in the composite. In parallel, a phenomenological study has been set up to understand chemical phenomena related to the swelling mechanisms. The model created has been finally implemented in a finite elements software; the simulation of a laboratory test has been performed and the results compared to experimental data.

  16. Swelling behavior of ion exchange resins incorporated in tri-calcium silicate cement matrix: II. Mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neji, M.; Bary, B.; Le Bescop, P.; Burlion, N.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the second part of a study aiming at modelling the mechanical behavior of composites made up of ion exchange resins (IER) solidified in a tri-calcium silicate cement paste (C3S). Such composites may be subjected to internal pressures due to ion exchange processes between ionic species which are in IER and interstitial solution of the cement paste. The reactive transport model developed in the companion paper is coupled in this study to a multi-scale approach describing the mechanical behavior of the material. It is based on an analogy with thermomechanics for taking in account the IER internal pressures, and on Eshelby-based homogenization techniques to estimate both mechanical and coupling parameters. A laboratory test has been set up to measure the macroscopic strain caused by the swelling phenomenon. The model has been finally implemented in a finite elements software. The simulation of the laboratory tests has been performed and the results have been analyzed and compared to experimental data.

  17. Effects of Surface Treatments on the Bond Strength Between Resin Cement and a New Zirconia-reinforced Lithium Silicate Ceramic.

    PubMed

    Sato, T P; Anami, L C; Melo, R M; Valandro, L F; Bottino, M A

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of surface treatments on the bond strength between the new zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate ceramic (ZLS) and resin cement. VITA Suprinity blocks were crystallized according to the manufacturer's instructions and randomly assigned to six groups (N=36; n=6), according to the surface treatment to be performed and aging conditions: HF20, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, baseline (control); HF20tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 20 seconds, aging; HF40, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, baseline; HF40tc, 10% hydrofluoric acid for 40 seconds, aging; CJ, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), baseline; and CJtc, CoJet sandblasting (25 seconds, 2.5 bar, 15-mm distance), aging. All specimens were silanized (Monobond S) and cemented with Panavia F to newly polymerized Z250 resin blocks. After specimens were immersed for 24 hours in distilled water at 37° C, 1-mm(2) cross-section microbars were obtained by means of a cutting machine under constant cooling. Baseline groups were immediately tested, whereas "tc" groups were used to analyze the effect of aging on bond strength (10,000 thermal cycles, 5/55°C, 30-second bath). The microtensile bond strength test was performed with a universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min), and bond strength (MPa) was calculated when the load-to-failure (N) was divided by the adhesive area (mm(2)). We also evaluated the surface roughness (Sa, average roughness; Str, texture aspect ratio; Sdr, developed interfacial area ratio) and the contact angle resulting from the treatments. Data were statistically analyzed by one- or two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (all α=5%). The failure mode of each specimen was evaluated by stereomicroscopy, and representative specimens were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. The microtensile bond strength was affected by the surface conditioning (p<0.0001), storage condition (p<0.0001), and the interaction between them (p=0.0012). The adhesion for HF etching was stable, whereas for CJ, aging significantly damaged the adhesion. Most failures were predominantly adhesive between ceramic and cement (52.6%). The roughness of the treated samples was higher compared with that of polished specimens for the three evaluated parameters (Sa, Str, and Sdr; all p<0.0001). Contact angle was also influenced by treatments (p<0.0001), with the CJ group showing values similar to those of control specimens. It can be concluded that the three surface treatment techniques present favorable immediate results, but silica coating was not effective in maintaining the bond strength over the long term. PMID:26652019

  18. Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led

    PubMed Central

    ERGUN, Gulfem; EGILMEZ, Ferhan; YILMAZ, Sukran

    2011-01-01

    Objective Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED) light-curing units (LCUs) have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs) polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. Material and Methods Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time) and 40 s (100% exposure time). After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x104 per well) and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. Results Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion) reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples) followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively). For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical performance. PMID:21625748

  19. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods . In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  20. Effect of Resin Cement Pre-heating on the Push-out Bond Strength of Fiber Post to Root Canal Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Oskoee, Parnian; Nooroloyouni, Ahmad; Pornaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Sajjadi Oskoee, Jafar; Pirzadeh Ashraf, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Various factors influence the interfacial bond between the fiber posts and root canal dentin. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of pre-warming of resin cement on the push-out bond strength of fiber posts to various segments of root canal dentin. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 40 single-rooted human premolars were decoronated and underwent root canal treatment along with post space preparation. The samples were randomly divided into two groups: In group 1, Panavia F 2.0 cement was used at room temperature; in group 2, the same cement was warmed to 55‒60°C before mixing. After fiber posts were placed and cemented in the root canals, 3 dentin/post sections (coronal, middle and apical) with a thickness of 3 mm were prepared. A universal testing machine was used to measure push-out bond strength in MPa. Data was analyzed using two-factor ANOVA and a post hoc Tukey test at α=0.05. Results. The mean value of push-out bond strength was high at room temperature, and the differences in the means of push-out bond strength values between the resin cement temperatures and between different root segments in each temperature were significant (P<0.05). Conclusion. Pre-warming of Panavia F 2.0 resin cement up to 55-60°C reduced push-out bond strength to root canal dentin. In addition, in each temperature group bond strengths decreased from coronal to apical segments. PMID:26889360

  1. Analysis of marginal adaptation and sealing to enamel and dentin of four self-adhesive resin cements.

    PubMed

    Aschenbrenner, Carina Maria; Lang, Reinhold; Handel, Gerhard; Behr, Michael

    2012-02-01

    This in vitro study compared the marginal adaptation of all-ceramic MOD-inlays luted to human molars with four self-adhesive resin cements. Thirty-two human third molars were randomly assigned to four test groups (n = 8 per group). MOD cavities were prepared with approximal finishing lines in dentin and enamel. All-ceramic Empress 2 inlays were luted with four self-adhesive cements (Clearfil SA, iCEM, Bifix SE, seT). Oral stress was simulated by 90 day storage in water as well as by thermal and mechanical loading (TCML, 1.2 × 10(6) × 50 N, 6,000 × 5°/55°, 1.6 Hz). The marginal fit was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and dye penetration. Data were analyzed with the ANOVA/Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The SEM investigation of the gingival cement margins (cement-tooth interface) showed values of perfect margin [percent] (means ± SD) after simulated aging between 84 ± 9% and 95 ± 5% for enamel and 80 ± 9% and 92 ± 3% for dentin. In enamel, seT showed significantly higher marginal integrity than iCEM after water storage and TCML (post hoc; p = 0.011). Furthermore, the marginal adaptation of iCEM in enamel deteriorated by simulated aging (p = 0.014, ANOVA). Mean values of dye penetration (percentage of dye entry into dentin) at the investigated restorations margins ranged between 3% and 8% for enamel and 12% and 22% for dentin. Clearfil SA, iCEM, and seT showed lower dye penetration in enamel than in dentin (Clearfil SA: p = 0.013, iCEM: p = 0.044, seT: p = 0.003). The results suggest that the four self-adhesive luting agents investigated seem to successfully bond to dentin-restricted as well as to enamel-restricted cavities, predicting good clinical performance. PMID:21327799

  2. TRANSMISSION OF COMPOSITE POLYMERIZATION CONTRACTION FORCE THROUGH A FLOWABLE COMPOSITE AND A RESIN-MODIFIED GLASS IONOMER CEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Pereira, Rosana Aparecida; Cavalcanti, Ana Paula; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the individual contraction force during polymerization of a composite resin (Z-250), a flowable composite (Filtek Flow, FF) and a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitrebond, VB), and the transmission of Z-250 composite resin polymerization contraction force through different thicknesses of FF and VB. The experiment setup consisted of two identical parallel steel plates connected to a universal testing machine. One was fixed to a transversal base and the other to the equipment's cross head. The evaluated materials were inserted into a 1-mm space between the steel plates or between the inferior steel plate and a previously polymerized layer of an intermediate material (either FF or VB) adhered to the upper steel plate. The composite resin was light-cured with a halogen lamp with light intensity of 500 mW/cm2 for 60 s. A force/time graph was obtained for each sample for up to 120 s. Seven groups of 10 specimens each were evaluated: G1: Z-250; G2: FF; G3: VB; G4: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm layer of FF; G5: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of FF; G6: Z-250 through a 0.5-mm of VB; G7: Z-250 through a 1-mm layer of VB. They were averaged and compared using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test at a = 0.05. The obtained contraction forces were: G1: 6.3N ± 0.2N; G2: 9.8 ± 0.2N; G3: 1.8 ± 0.2N; G4: 6.8N ± 0.2N; G5: 6.9N ± 0.3N; G6: 4.0N ± 0.4N and G7: 2.8N ± 0.4N. The use of VB as an intermediate layer promoted a significant decrease in polymerization contraction force values of the restorative system, regardless of material thickness. The use of FF as an intermediate layer promoted an increase in polymerization contraction force values with both material thicknesses. PMID:19089187

  3. The effect of glass ionomer cement or composite resin bases on restoration of cuspal stiffness of endodontically treated premolars in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, N; Just, N; Haller, B; Hugo, B; Klaiber, B

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to decide whether composite resin or conventional glass ionomer cement should be preferred as a base material in endodontically treated premolars. Twelve extracted human maxillary premolars were mounted in a universal testing machine at a 35 degrees angle. Cuspal stiffness was determined by applying a load of 75 N to the buccal cusp and recording the displacement of the cusp using inductive displacement transducers. In the same teeth, different cavity preparations and restorations were performed sequentially. Standard MOD cavities were enlarged to allow endodontic access. In addition, the cusps were undermined. Half of the teeth were restored to the level of the previous shallow cavities using conventional glass ionomer cement (Ketac Fil), in the rest of the teeth dentine bonding agent (Syntac) and composite resin (Tetric) were used instead. Finally, composite resin fillings (Tetric) were placed. All restorations were removed and the experiments were repeated twice. For each replication, the assignment of the base materials to the experimental groups was reversed, and ceramic inlays (Empress) were used as final restorations for the last replication. Improvement of cuspal stiffness achieved by conventional glass ionomer bases was very small, whereas composite resin bases increased cuspal stability by more than a factor of two. After placement of the final restorations, however, there was no longer a difference between teeth with different base materials. Nevertheless, composite resin bases might be preferred for two reasons. Firstly, deterioration of adhesive restorations will probably start at the cavosurface margins. The incidence of margin gaps, however, will not only compromise marginal seal but also the stabilizing effect of the restoration. In this situation, the resin base may still stabilize the tooth. Moreover, resin bases may reduce the risk of cusp fracture during the time between cavity preparation and the insertion of adhesive inlays. PMID:15490780

  4. Effects of metal primers on bonding of adhesive resin cement to noble alloys for porcelain fusing.

    PubMed

    Okuya, Nobuhiro; Minami, Hiroyuki; Kurashige, Hisanori; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2010-03-01

    This study evaluated the effects of metal primers on the bonding of adhesive resin to four pure metals (Au, Pd, Ag, Cu) and two noble alloys for porcelain fusing (high-gold and high-palladium content alloys). Bonding surface was polished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and primed with one of the three metal primers (V-Primer, Metaltite, and M.L. Primer). Bonded specimens were fabricated by applying adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B) on the primed surface. Shear bond strength (SBS) was determined both before and after thermocycling (4-60 degrees C for 2,000 cycles). The highest SBS values to each pure metal after thermocycling were 33.5 MPa for Au by M.L. Primer, 35.0 MPa for Ag by V-Primer, and 34.4 MPa for Cu by Metaltite. SBS to high-gold content alloy after thermocycling was 33.3 MPa by M.L. Primer. None of the primers was effective for pure Pd and high-palladium content alloy after thermocycling. PMID:20379028

  5. Shear Bond Strength of MDP-Containing Self-Adhesive Resin Cement and Y-TZP Ceramics: Effect of Phosphate Monomer-Containing Primers

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jin-Soo; Yi, Young-Ah; Lee, Yoon; Seo, Deog-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of different phosphate monomer-containing primers on the shear bond strength between yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement. Materials and Methods. Y-TZP ceramic surfaces were ground flat with #600-grit SiC paper and divided into six groups (n = 10). They were treated as follows: untreated (control), Metal/Zirconia Primer, Z-PRIME Plus, air abrasion, Metal/Zirconia Primer with air abrasion, and Z-PRIME Plus with air abrasion. MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cement was applied to the surface-treated Y-TZP specimens. After thermocycling, a shear bond strength test was performed. The surfaces of the Y-TZP specimens were analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength values were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and the Student–Newman–Keuls multiple comparison test (P < 0.05). Results. The Z-PRIME Plus treatment combined with air abrasion produced the highest bond strength, followed by Z-PRIME Plus application, Metal/Zirconia Primer combined with air abrasion, air abrasion alone, and, lastly, Metal/Zirconia Primer application. The control group yielded the lowest results (P < 0.05). Conclusion. The application of MDP-containing primer resulted in increased bond strength between Y-TZP ceramics and MDP-containing self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:26539485

  6. Shear bond strength evaluation of resin composite bonded to three different liners: TheraCal LC, Biodentine, and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using universal adhesive: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Deepa, Velagala L; Dhamaraju, Bhargavi; Bollu, Indira Priyadharsini; Balaji, Tandri S

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To compare and evaluate the bonding ability of resin composite (RC) to three different liners: TheraCal LC™ (TLC), a novel resin-modified (RM) calcium silicate cement, Biodentine™ (BD), and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) using an universal silane-containing adhesive and characterizing their failure modes. Materials and Methods: Thirty extracted intact human molars with occlusal cavity (6-mm diameter and 2-mm height) were mounted in acrylic blocks and divided into three groups of 10 samples each based on the liner used as Group A (TLC), Group B (BD), and Group C (RMGIC). Composite post of 3 mm diameter and 3 mm height was then bonded to each sample using universal adhesive. Shear bond strength (SBS) analysis was performed at a cross-head speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical Analysis Used: Statistical analysis was performed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc test using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Results: No significant difference was observed between group A and group C (P = 0.573) while group B showed the least bond strength values with a highly significant difference (P = 0.000). The modes of failure were predominantly cohesive in Groups A and B (TLC and BD) while RMGIC showed mixed and adhesive failures. Conclusions: Hence, this present study concludes that the bond strength of composite resin to TLC and RMGIC was similar and significantly higher than that of BD following application of universal adhesive. PMID:27099425

  7. Comparative Evaluation of Push Out Bond Strength of a Fiber Post System using Four Different Resin Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anshuraj Kopal Ashok Kumar; Muddugangadhar, B C; Amarnath, G S; Garg, Ashu; Kumar, Ullash; Rao, T R Poonam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Debonding is one of the frequent causes of failure experienced in fiber-reinforced composite posts, and establish along post space-dentin adhesive interface. The purpose of this study was to assess push-out bond strength of a fiber-reinforced post system using four different resin cements. Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study 40 mandibular premolars were decoronated, and roots were treated endodontically. Following the post space preparation, the roots were grouped into four groups of 10 specimens each. Fiber-reinforced composite posts were cemented with four resin cement systems: (a) Multilink Speed, (b) Rely X Unicem, (c) Calibra, and (d) Permaflo DC. Three sections of each root, with a thickness of 3 mm, were prepared. The push-out test was with a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min, and bond strength values were evaluated. The data were analyzed with using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and post-hoc Scheffe test. Result: The mean push-out bond strength was highest for Rely X Unicem (18.0 ± 1.81), followed by Multilink Speed (13.1 ± 0.75) and Permaflo DC (12.8 ± 0.95). The lowest mean push-out bond strength was seen with Calibra (11.8 ± 0.69). There were statistically significant differences seen in the push-out bond strength of resin cement in different root canal regions using MANOVA and post-hoc Scheffe test. Conclusion: Mean push-out bond strength was highest for Rely X Unicem, followed by Multilink Speed and Permaflo DC. Lowest mean push-out bond strength was seen with respect to Calibra. PMID:26225108

  8. Effect of ultraviolet light irradiation on bond strength of fiber post: Evaluation of surface characteristic and bonded area of fiber post with resin cement

    PubMed Central

    Reza, Fazal; Ibrahim, Nur Sukainah

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Fiber post is cemented to a root canal to restore coronal tooth structure. This research aims to evaluate the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on bond strength of fiber post with resin cement. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 of the two types of fiber posts, namely, FRC Prostec (FRC) and Fiber KOR (KOR), were used for the experiment. UV irradiation was applied on top of the fiber post surface for 0, 15, 20, and 30 min. The irradiated surface of the fiber posts (n = 5) were immediately bonded with resin cement (Rely X U200) after UV irradiation. Shear bond strength (SBS) MPa was measured, and the dislodged area of post surfaces was examined with scanning electron microscopes. Changes in surface roughness (Ra) of the FRC group after UV irradiation were observed (n = 3) using atomic force microscopy. Data of SBS were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance, followed by multiple comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: SBS was significantly higher for 20 min of UV irradiation of the FRC group while significantly higher SBS was observed with 15 min of UV irradiation of the KOR group. Resin cement was more evident (cohesive failure) on the dislodged post surface of the UV treated groups compared with the control. The surface roughness of the FRC post was Ra = 175.1 nm and Ra = 929.2 nm for the control and the 20 min group, respectively. Conclusions: Higher surface roughness of the UV irradiated group indicated formation of mechanical retention on the fiber post surface. Evidence of cohesive failure was observed which indicated higher SBS of fiber post with the UV irradiated group. PMID:25713488

  9. Effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on surface characteristics of CAD/CAM composite materials and the bond strength of resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Nobuaki, ARAO; Keiichi, YOSHIDA; Takashi, SAWASE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective The study aimed to evaluate effects of air abrasion with alumina or glass beads on bond strengths of resin cements to CAD/CAM composite materials. Material and Methods CAD/CAM composite block materials [Cerasmart (CS) and Block HC (BHC)] were pretreated as follows: (a) no treatment (None), (b) application of a ceramic primer (CP), (c) alumina-blasting at 0.2 MPa (AB), (d) AB followed by CP (AB+CP), and (e) glass-beads blasting at 0.4 MPa (GBB) followed by CP (GBB+CP). The composite specimens were bonded to resin composite disks using resin cements [G-CEM Cerasmart (GCCS) and ResiCem (RC)]. The bond strengths after 24 h (TC 0) and after thermal cycling (TC 10,000 at 4–60°C) were measured by shear tests. Three-way ANOVA and the Tukey compromise post hoc tests were used to analyze statistically significant differences between groups (α=0.05). Results For both CAD/CAM composite materials, the None group exhibited a significant decrease in bond strength after TC 10,000 (p<0.05). AB showed significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than the None group, while CP did not (p<0.05). GBB exhibited smaller surface defects than did AB; however, their surface roughnesses were not significantly different (p>0.05). The AB+CP group showed a significantly higher bond strength after TC 10,000 than did the AB group for RC (p<0.05), but not for GCCS. The GBB+CP group showed the highest bond strength for both thermal cyclings (p<0.05). Conclusions Air abrasion with glass beads was more effective in increasing bond durability between the resin cements and CAD/CAM composite materials than was using an alumina powder and a CP. PMID:26814465

  10. Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect

    McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

  11. The effect of moisture on the shear bond strength of gold alloy rods bonded to enamel with a self-adhesive and a hydrophobic resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Elisabeth; Wiechmann, Dirk; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the influence of enamel moisture on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a hydrophobic resin cement, Maximum Cure (MC), and a self-adhesive resin cement, Multilink Sprint (MLS), after etching of the enamel. Forty cylindrical gold alloy rods were used to simulate the Incognito lingual bracket system. They were bonded to the enamel of 40 human teeth embedded in self-cured acrylic resin. Twenty were bonded with MC (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel) and 20 with MLS (10 on dry and 10 on wet enamel). The SBS of MC and MLS was determined in a universal testing machine and the site of bond failure was defined by the adhesive remnant index (ARI). A Kruskal-Wallis test was performed followed by Games-Howell post hoc pairwise comparison tests on the SBS results (P < 0.05) and a chi-square test was used for the analysis of ARI scores (P < 0.05). On dry enamel, no significant differences between MC (58 +/- 5 MPa) and MLS (64 +/- 13 MPa) were noted. On wet enamel, the adherence of MC (6 +/- 8 MPa) and MLS (37 +/- 13 MPa) significantly decreased but to a lesser extent for MLS. The ARI scores corroborated these results. In conclusion, MC did not tolerate moisture. MLS was also affected but maintained sufficient adherence. PMID:19875744

  12. Characterization of the Mineral Trioxide Aggregate–Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement Interface in Different Setting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Ashraf A.; Komabayashi, Takashi; Watanabe, Etsuko; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) has been used successfully for perforation repair, vital pulpotomies, and direct pulp capping. However, little is known about the interactions between MTA and glass ionomer cement (GIC) in final restorations. In this study, 2 null hypotheses were tested: (1) GIC placement time does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness and (2) moisture does not affect the MTA-GIC structural interface and hardness. Methods Fifty cylinders were half filled with MTA and divided into 5 groups. The other half was filled with resin-modified GIC either immediately after MTA placement or after 1 or 7 days of temporization in the presence or absence of a wet cotton pellet. The specimens were then sectioned, carbon coated, and examined using a scanning electron microscope and an electron probe micro-analyzer (SEM-EPMA) for interfacial adaptation, gap formation, and elemental analysis. The Vickers hardness numbers of the interfacial MTA were recorded 24 hours after GIC placement and 8 days after MTA placement and analyzed using the analysis of variance test. Results Hardness testing 24 hours after GIC placement revealed a significant increase in hardness with an increase of temporization time but not with a change of moisture conditions (P < .05). Hardness testing 8 days after MTA placement indicated no significant differences among groups. SEM-EPMA showed interfacial adaptation to improve with temporization time and moisture. Observed changes were limited to the outermost layer of MTA. The 2 null hypotheses were not rejected. Conclusions GIC can be applied over freshly mixed MTA with minimal effects on the MTA, which seemed to decrease with time. PMID:22794220

  13. Comparison of Apical Microleakage of Dual-Curing Resin Cements with Fluid-Filtration and Dye Extraction Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Sadullah; Özer, Senem Yiğit; Adigüzel, Özkan; Oruçoğlu, Hasan; Değer, Yalçın; Tümen, Emin Caner; Uysal, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    Background Endodontically treated teeth with excessive loss of tooth structure are frequently restored using fiber posts. In this in vitro study, the apical leakage of self- and dual-activated curing modes for dual-curing resins cementing a translucent fiber post was evaluated using computerized fluid filtration meter and dye extraction method. Material/Methods One hundred and four extracted human maxillary incisors with single root and canal were used. Experimental samples embedded in a closed system were divided into 4 groups (n=20) according to 2 dual-curing luting systems, with 2 different curing modes (either with self- or light-activation): (1) Panavia F 2.0 with self-cure, (2) Panavia F 2.0 with light-activation, (3) Clearfill SA with self-cure, and (4) Clearfill SA with light activation. Twenty-four teeth served as negative and positive controls. Translucent fiber posts were luted in the roots except in the control groups. Results Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in leakage among groups (p>0.05) with 4.12×10−4 (Panavia self-cure), 4.55×10−4 (Clearfill SA self-cure), 5.17×10−4 (Panavia dual-cure), and 5.59×10−4 (Clearfill SA dual-cure) in fluid-filtration method. Absorbance values for dye-extraction method were 266 nanometer (nm) (Panavia self-cure), 268 nm (Clearfill SA self-cure), 270 nm (Panavia dual-cure), and 271 nm (Clearfill SA dual-cure), in which difference among the groups were not statistically significant (p>0.05). When comparing the leakage, assessment methods results showed no statistically significant difference between the tested evaluation techniques (p>0.05). Conclusions Light- and self-activation curing modes of Panavia F 2.0 and Clearfill SA perform similar to each other in a closed system. PMID:25824712

  14. Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (μTBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for μTBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel μTBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel μTBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel μTBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

  15. Evaluation of push-out bond strength of two fiber-reinforced composite posts systems using two luting cements in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kadam, Ajay; Pujar, Madhu; Patil, Chetan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The concept of using a “post” for the restoration of teeth has been practiced to restore the endodontically treated tooth. Metallic posts have been commonly used, but their delirious effects have led to the development of fiber-reinforced materials that have overcome the limitations of metallic posts. The use of glass and quartz fibers was proposed as an alternative to the dark color of carbon fiber posts as far as esthetics was concerned. “Debonding” is the most common failure in fiber-reinforced composite type of posts. This study was aimed to compare the push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive dual-cured luting agent (RelyX U100) with a total etch resin luting agent (Variolink II) used to cement two different FRC posts. Materials and Methods: Eighty human maxillary anterior single-rooted teeth were decoronated, endodontically treated, post space prepared and divided into four groups (n = 20); Group I: D.T. light post (RTD) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent), Group II: D.T. light post (RTD) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE), Group III: Glassix post (Nordin) and Variolink II (Ivoclare vivadent) and Group IV: Glassix post (Nordin) and RelyX U100 (3M ESPE). Each root was sectioned to get slices of 2 ± 0.05-mm thickness. Push-out tests were performed using a triaxial loading frame. To express bond strength in megapascals (Mpa), load value recorded in Newton (N) was divided by the area of the bonded interface. After testing the push-out strengths, the samples were analyzed under a stereomicroscope. Results: The mean values of the push-out bond strength show that Group I and Group III had significantly higher values than Group II and Group IV. The most common mode of failure observed was adhesive between dentin and luting material and between post and luting material. Conclusions: The mean push-out bond strengths were higher for Groups I and III where Variolink II resin cement was used for luting the fiber post, which is based on the total etch adhesive approach. In most of the samples, failure was observed between cement–dentine interface, followed by post–cement interface, which shows difficulty in bonding between post–cement–dentine interface. PMID:24082575

  16. Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kachuei, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5) with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence), 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma), and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem). Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A) were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh) in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37℃), the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016). The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin. PMID:24790921

  17. Effect of atmospheric plasma versus conventional surface treatments on the adhesion capability between self-adhesive resin cement and titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Kilicarslan, Mehmet Ali; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Mumcu, Emre; Ozkan, Pelin

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of atmospheric plasma (APL) versus conventional surface treatments on the adhesion of self-adhesive resin cement to Ti-6Al-4V alloy. MATERIALS AND METHODS Sixty plates of machined titanium (Ti) discs were divided into five groups (n=12): 1) Untreated (CNT); 2) Sandblasted (SAB); 3) Tribochemically treated (ROC); 4) Tungsten CarbideBur (TCB); 5) APL treated (APL). SEM analysis and surface roughness (Ra) measurements were performed. Self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the Ti surfaces and shear bond strength (SBS) tests, Ra and failure mode examinations were carried out. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and chi-squared test. RESULTS The lowest SBS value was obtained with CNT and was significantly different from all other groups except for APL. The ROC showed the highest SBS and Ra values of all the groups. CONCLUSION It was concluded that the effect of APL on SBS and Ra was not sufficient and it may not be a potential for promoting adhesion to titanium. PMID:26140177

  18. Effect of light-activation with different light-curing units and time intervals on resin cement bond strength to intraradicular dentin.

    PubMed

    Miguel-Almeida, Maria Eleonora; Azevedo, Mario Lucio da Costa; Rached-Jnior, Fuad Abi; Oliveira, Camila Favero; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Messias, Danielle Cristine

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of a resin cement to intraradicular dentin varying the light-curing unit and the moment at which the light was applied. Post spaces of endodontically treated canines were prepared. The roots were distributed into 6 groups (n=10) according to the light-curing unit and the moment of light exposure: I) Quartz tungsten halogen-600 mW/cm (QTH) + immediate light activation (t0); II) QTH + light activation after 10 min (t10); III) Light-emitting diodes (LED)-800 mW/cm (LED-800)+ t0; IV) LED-800 + t10; V) LED-1,500 mW/cm (LED-1500)+ t0; VI) LED-1500 + t10. After post cementation, slices from coronal, middle and apical post/root regions were submitted to the push-out test and failure evaluation. It was verified that LED-800 (4.40 3.00 MPa) and LED-1500 (4.67 3.04 MPa) provided bond strength statistically superior to QTH (3.13 1.76 MPa) (p<0.05), and did not differ from each other (p>0.05). There was no significant difference between t0 and t10 (p>0.05). Coronal post/root region (4.75 3.10 MPa) presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical (3.32 2.30 MPa) (p<0.05) and middle regions (4.14 2.99 MPa) showed intermediate values. Adhesive failures were predominant when using QTH. Adhesive and mixed failures occurred more frequently in the apical region. Higher adhesion of the resin cement to intraradicular dentin was observed in the coronal region with LED light-activation, regardless of the moment of light exposure. PMID:23207850

  19. Effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement lining and composite layering technique on the adhesive interface of lateral wall

    PubMed Central

    AZEVEDO, Larissa Marinho; CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Carol; VILLAVICENCIO ESPINOZA, Carlos Andres; WANG, Linda; NAVARRO, Maria Fidela de Lima; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Interface integrity can be maintained by setting the composite in a layering technique and using liners. Objective The aim of this in vitro study was to verify the effect of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) lining and composite layering technique on the bond strength of the dentin/resin adhesive interface of lateral walls of occlusal restorations. Material and Methods Occlusal cavities were prepared in 52 extracted sound human molars, randomly assigned into 4 groups: Group 2H (control) – no lining + two horizontal layers; Group 4O: no lining + four oblique layers; Group V-2H: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + two horizontal layers; and Group V-4O: RMGIC lining (Vitrebond) + four oblique layers. Resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) was placed after application of an adhesive system (Adper™ Single Bond 2, 3M ESPE) dyed with a fluorescent reagent (Rhodamine B) to allow confocal microscopy analysis. The teeth were stored in deionized water at 37oC for 24 hours before being sectioned into 0.8 mm slices. One slice of each tooth was randomly selected for Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) analysis. The other slices were sectioned into 0.8 mm x 0.8 mm sticks to microtensile bond strength test (MPa). Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Fisher’s test. Results There was no statistical difference on bond strength among groups (p>0.05). CLSM analysis showed no significant statistical difference regarding the presence of gap at the interface dentin/resin among groups. Conclusions RMGIC lining and composite layering techniques showed no effect on the microtensile bond strength and gap formation at the adhesive interface of lateral walls of high C-factor occlusal restorations. PMID:26221927

  20. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of a Novel Resin-Based Pulp Capping Material Containing the Quaternary Ammonium Salt MAE-DB and Portland Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. Methods The experimental material was prepared from a 2∶1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4∶3∶1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. Results S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. Conclusion The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution. Therefore, this material shows promise as a pulp capping material for vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries. PMID:25389975

  1. Influence of different power outputs of intraoral Nd:YAG laser on shear bond strength of a resin cement to nickel-chromium dental alloy.

    PubMed

    sadat Madani, Azam; Astaneh, Pedram Ansari; Shahabi, Sima; Nakhaei, Mohammad Reza; Bagheri, Hossein G; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2013-01-01

    Up to now, there is no any experience about the application of dental lasers to bond resin composites to metal surfaces in dentistry. The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate if the laser irradiation of ceramic-covered alloy surface would improve the bond strength of resin to metal, and if different parameters of laser output may influence the strength of this bond. Fifty three cylinders (thickness of 5 mm and diameter of 10 mm) were made up of a commercially available nickel-chromium alloy by lost-wax technique. Forty prepared specimens were divided into four groups. Five specimens in each group were covered by slurry of dental opaque porcelain and irradiated by Nd:YAG laser using different output parameters for each group. Other five specimens in each group were treated using the same laser parameters without porcelain covering. Five sandblasted specimen served as control group. Panavia F2.0 was bonded on the metal surfaces using polyethylene tubes. In ceramic-coated specimens, silane was applied to achieve chemical bond between silica particles and resin cement. All specimens were thermocycled and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test (50 kgf at 0.5 mm/min). Two specimens of each ceramic-coated laser-treated groups were studied using scanning electron microscopy and wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy which showed stabilization of silica particles on the metal surface. ANOVA procedure showed that although shear bond strength was significantly higher in porcelain-covered laser treated samples, but the effect of power output of laser irradiation was not significant (P = 0.917). There were no statistically significant difference between SBS in control samples and laser treated specimens without porcelain covering. It can be concluded that Nd:YAG laser surface treatment may improve the silica coating of alloy surface to achieve better resin-metal bond. PMID:22588684

  2. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements

    PubMed Central

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-01-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only. PMID:23988173

  3. In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Selimović-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasić-Branković, Lajla; Korać, Fehim; Đapo, Nermin; Huseinbegović, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Lekić, Meliha; Hatibović-Kofman, Šahza

    2013-08-01

    Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only. PMID:23988173

  4. The effect of CO2 laser irradiation plus fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement or composite resin restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, S. R.; Moraes, M.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Youssef, M. N.; Brugnera Junior, A.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2016-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on the root surface have been shown, there is scarce information regarding its effects on root secondary caries. The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of the association of CO2 laser and a fluoride dentifrice on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to composite-resin or glass-ionomer-cement restorations. Dental blocks of human roots were divided into two groups: composite resin (CR) or glass ionomer cement (GIC). Subsequently, the blocks were divided into four subgroups (n  =  10): C, non-fluoride dentifrice; FD, fluoride dentifrice; L, CO2 laser with an energy density of 6.0 J cm-2  +  non-fluoride dentifrice; and L  +  FD, CO2 laser  +  fluoride dentifrice. The blocks were subjected to pH cycling to simulate a high cariogenic challenge. Dental demineralization around the restorations was quantified by microhardness analysis. The results were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey-Kramer test (p  ⩽  0.05). As for mineral loss, it can be observed that all the groups that were treated with a fluoride dentifrice and laser, used alone or not, were statistically similar and superior to the RC-C group. It was concluded that CO2 laser irradiation and a fluoride dentifrice used alone or combined with each other are efficient surface treatments for preventing secondary root caries, regardless of the restorative material used.

  5. Effect of spherical silica filler addition on immediate interfacial gap-formation in Class V cavity and mechanical properties of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Kenji; Irie, Masao; Tjandrawinata, Rosalina; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate how the addition of silanized spherical silica filler (SF) would influence the formation of summed, immediate interfacial gaps in Class V tooth cavities. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) is usually used for Class V restorations. As such, the following aspects of RMGIC were examined in correlation with summed interfacial gaps in the tooth cavity: setting shrinkage of cement in the Teflon mold, as well as mechanical properties in terms of compressive strength, diametral tensile strength, and flexural strength. Spherical silica filler was added to the RMGIC powder (Fuji II LC EM). For comparison purpose, untreated spherical silica filler (UF) was added too. When compared with the control (i.e., original RMGIC mixed with manufacturer-recommended powder/liquid ratio), the addition of SF significantly decreased the formation of summed interfacial gaps in Class V cavities in the immediate condition. In particular, addition of 10 wt% SF increased the compressive strength by 56%, while diametral tensile strength was increased by 28% and flexural strength by 26%. PMID:17076309

  6. Marginal gap formation and fluoride release of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement: effect of silanized spherical silica filler addition.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, Rosalina; Irie, Masao; Suzuki, Kazuomi

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of silanized spherical silica fillers (SF) on the immediate and 24-hour marginal gaps of resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) in tooth cavities. In correlation with marginal gap formation in the tooth cavity, these influencing factors were also examined: marginal gap and setting shrinkage of cement in the Teflon mold, as well as the shear bond strength to tooth substrate. Moreover in correlation with caries prevention, fluoride release was examined too. In this investigation, the fillers were mixed into the RMGIC powder (Fuji II LC EM). Untreated spherical silica filler (UF)-added RMGIC was used as a comparison. When compared with the control (i.e., original RMGIC), the addition of SF significantly decreased immediate marginal gap in tooth cavities and setting shrinkage in Teflon mold up to 63% and 66% respectively. Fluoride release was significantly reduced too. Apart from these results, this study showed that addition of 5 wt% SF increased the shear bond strength to human enamel and dentin. PMID:15510858

  7. Residual HEMA and TEGDMA Release and Cytotoxicity Evaluation of Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement and Compomers Cured with Different Light Sources

    PubMed Central

    Botsali, Murat Selim; Kuşgöz, Adem; Altintaş, Subutay Han; Ülker, Hayriye Esra; Kiliç, Serdar; Başak, Feridun; Ülker, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was first to evaluate the elution of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers from resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and compomers cured with halogen and light-emitting diode (LED) light-curing units (LCUs). The effect of cured materials on the viability of L929 fibroblast cells was also evaluated. One RMGIC (Ketac N100) and two compomers (Dyract Extra and Twinkystar) were tested. Materials were prepared in teflon disks and light-cured with LED or halogen LCUs. The residual monomers of resin materials in solution were identified using high-performance liquid chromatography. The fibroblast cells' viability was analyzed using MTT assay. The type of LCU did not have a significant effect on the elution of HEMA and TEGDMA. A greater amount of HEMA than TEGMDA was eluted. The amount of TEGDMA eluted from Twinkystar was greater than Dyract Extra (P < 0.05) when cured with a halogen LCU. All material-LCU combinations decreased the fibroblast cells' viability more than the control group (P < 0.01), except for Dyract Extra cured with a halogen LCU (P > 0.05). Curing with the LED LCU decreased the cells' viability more than curing with the halogen LCU for compomers. For Ketac N100, the halogen LCU decreased the cells' viability more than the LED LCU. PMID:24592149

  8. Photocurable bioactive bone cement based on hydroxyethyl methacrylate-poly(acrylic/maleic) acid resin and mesoporous sol gel-derived bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Hesaraki, S

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports on strong and bioactive bone cement based on ternary bioactive SiO2-CaO-P2O5 glass particles and a photocurable resin comprising hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(acrylic/maleic) acid. The as-cured composite represented a compressive strength of about 95MPa but it weakened during soaking in simulated body fluid, SBF, qua its compressive strength reached to about 20MPa after immersing for 30days. Biodegradability of the composite was confirmed by reducing its initial weight (~32%) as well as decreasing the molecular weight of early cured resin during the soaking procedure. The composite exhibited in vitro calcium phosphate precipitation in the form of nanosized carbonated hydroxyapatite, which indicates its bone bonding ability. Proliferation of calvarium-derived newborn rat osteoblasts seeded on top of the composite was observed during incubation at 37°C, meanwhile, an adequate cell supporting ability was found. Consequently, it seems that the produced composite is an appropriate alternative for bone defect injuries, because of its good cell responses, high compressive strength and ongoing biodegradability, though more in vivo experiments are essential to confirm this assumption. PMID:27040248

  9. Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)

    PubMed Central

    CANTEKİN, Kenan; AVCİ, Serap

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

  10. The Effect of Hydrofluoric Acid Concentration on the Bond Strength and Morphology of the Surface and Interface of Glass Ceramics to a Resin Cement.

    PubMed

    Sundfeld Neto, D; Naves, L Z; Costa, A R; Correr, A B; Consani, S; Borges, G A; Correr-Sobrinho, L

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid (HF) on the surface/interface morphology and μ-shear bond strength (μSBS) between IPS Empress Esthetic (EST) (Ivoclar Vivadent) and IPS e.max Press (EMX) (Ivoclar Vivadent) ceramics and resin cement. Ceramic blocks were divided into 12 groups for each kind of ceramic. Six different HF concentrations were evaluated: 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15%. All groups were silanated after etching, and half of the specimens within each group received a thin layer of unfilled resin (UR). Three resin cement cylinders were prepared on each ceramic block for μSBS testing. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. The μSBS test was carried out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The data were submitted to three-way analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed using the Tukey post hoc test (p<0.05). The etched surfaces and bonded interfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy. μSBS means (MPa) for 1%, 2.5%, 5%, 7.5%, 10%, and 15% HF concentrations were, respectively, 25.2, 27.2, 30.1, 31.4, 33.3, and 31.8. μSBS means with or without UR application measured 32.24 and 27.4, respectively; EST and EMX measured 29.8 and 29.9, respectively. For the HF concentrations, 10% and 15% showed higher μSBS means than did 1% and 2.5% (p<0.05); 7.5% was higher than 1% (p<0.05); and no statistical differences were found among the other concentrations (p>0.05). When evaluating UR, μSBS mean was significantly higher and better infiltration was observed on the etched surfaces. No statistical difference was found between the ceramics. The HF concentration and UR influenced the bond strength and surface/interface morphology. PMID:25764043

  11. Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

  12. A comparative evaluation of the retention of metallic brackets bonded with resin-modified glass ionomer cement under different enamel preparations: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Padmaja; Valiathan, Ashima; Arora, Ankit; Agarwal, Sachin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: For orthodontists, the ideal bonding material should be less moisture-sensitive and should release fluoride, thereby reducing unfavorable iatrogenic decalcification. Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGICs), due to their ability to bond in the presence of saliva and blood can be a very good bonding agent for orthodontic attachments especially in the areas of mouth, which are difficult to access. Moreover, their fluoride releasing property makes them an ideal bonding agent for patients with poor oral hygiene. However, their immediate bond strength is said to be too low to immediately ligate the initial wire, which could increase the total number of appointments. The effect of sandblasting and the use of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCL) on the immediate bond failure of RMGIC clinically have not been reported in the literature until the date. This investigation intended to assess the effect of sandblasting (of the bracket base and enamel) and NaOCL on the rate of bond failure (with immediate ligation at 30 min) of Fuji Ortho LC and its comparison with that of conventional light cured composite resin over a period of 1 year. Materials and Methods: 400 sample teeth were further divided into 4 groups of 100 each and bonded as follows: (1) Group 1: Normal metallic brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (2) Group 2: Sandblasted bracket base and enamel surface, brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (3) Group 3: Deproteinized enamel surface using sodium hypochlorite and brackets bonded with Fuji Ortho LC. (4) Group 4: Normal metallic bracket bonded with Transbond XT after etching enamel with 37% phosphoric acid. This group served as control group. Results and Conclusion: Results showed that sandblasting the bracket base and enamel, can significantly reduce the bond failure rate of RMGIC. PMID:24014999

  13. In vitro comparison of orthodontic band cements.

    PubMed

    Millett, Declan T; Duff, Sheena; Morrison, Lynsey; Cummings, Alistair; Gilmour, W Harper

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the mean retentive strength of microetched orthodontic bands cemented to extracted human third molars with a modified composite, a resin-modified glass ionomer cement, and a conventional glass ionomer cement. The mode of band failure and amount of cement remaining on the tooth at deband were also assessed. Finally, survival time of bands with each cement was assessed with simulated mechanical stress in a ball mill. Ninety banded specimens were used to assess retentive strength, and another 30 banded specimens were used to assess survival time. The mean retentive strength of the modified composite (0.415 MPa) was significantly less than that of either the resin-modified (1.715 MPa) or the conventional glass ionomer cement (1.454 MPa; P <.001). Specimens failed predominantly at the cement-enamel interface. The amount of cement remaining on the tooth at deband differed significantly between bands cemented with the resin-modified cement and those cemented with the conventional glass ionomer cement (P <.05). Mean survival time of bands cemented with the resin-modified glass ionomer cement (14.3 hours) was significantly longer (P <.01) than for bands cemented with the conventional glass ionomer cement (9.9 hours) but did not differ significantly from that of bands cemented with the modified composite (11.1 hours; P >.05). Orthodontic bands cemented with the modified composite appear to have a significantly lower mean retentive strength than bands cemented with resin-modified or conventional glass ionomer cement, but mean survival time did not differ significantly for bands cemented with modified composite or resin-modified glass ionomer. PMID:12532057

  14. Effect of a CO2 Laser on the Inhibition of Root Surface Caries Adjacent to Restorations of Glass Ionomer Cement or Composite Resin: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, L. C.; Araújo, F. C.; Zancopé, B. R.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Nobre-dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.; Souza-Zaroni, W. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of CO2 laser irradiation on the inhibition of secondary caries on root surfaces adjacent to glass ionomer cement (GIC) or composite resin (CR) restorations. 40 dental blocks were divided into 4 groups: G1 (negative control): cavity preparation + adhesive restoration with CR; G2: (positive control) cavity preparation + GIC restoration; G3: equal to group 1 + CO2 laser with 6 J/cm2; G4: equal to group 2 + CO2 laser. The blocks were submitted to thermal and pH cycling. Dental demineralization around restorations was quantified using microhardness analyses and Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF). The groups showed no significant differences in mineral loss at depths between 20 μm and 40 μm. At 60 μm, G2 and G3 ≠ G1, but G4 = G1, G2 and G3. At 80 μm, G4 ≠ G1, and at 100 μm, G4 = G2 = G1. At 140 and 220 μm, G2, G3, and G4 = G1. The averages obtained using QFL in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 were 0.637, 0.162, 0.095, and 0.048, respectively. QLF and microhardness analyses showed that CO2 laser irradiation reduced mineral loss around the CR restorations but that it did not increase the anticariogenic effect of GIC restorations. PMID:26347900

  15. Long-term clinical evaluation of fracture and pulp injury following glass-ionomer cement or composite resin applied as a base filling in teeth restored with amalgam.

    PubMed

    De C Luz, M A; Ciaramicoli-Rodrigues, M T; Garone Netto, N; De Lima, A C

    2001-07-01

    The aim of this research was to analyse the long-term clinical behaviour of two dental materials applied as filling under silver amalgam restorations: glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and composite resin with adhesive system (CR). In this study, 117 posterior teeth (29 premolars and 88 molars) were selected with carious lesions which resulted in great loss of dentin and cusps with unsupported enamel. After caries removal, cavities were prepared and totally filled with GIC or with CR. In a following visit, new cavities were prepared, leaving the employed filling material as a base and support for the enamel, which were then restored with silver amalgam. Restorations were evaluated periodically after 6 months and up to 5 years. Both fracture and pulpal involvement rates were low. Although differences could be observed in the behaviour of the materials, statistical survival estimation showed that the performances of GIC and CR as filling material were similar. There was a significant association both between kind of tooth (molar or premolar) and long-term survival of the restorations; and between degree of unsupported enamel and the same long-term survival. Our results confirmed that the technique in which GIC or CR are used as filling under silver amalgam restorations is clinically acceptable. PMID:11422695

  16. Radiographic appearance of commonly used cements in implant dentistry.

    PubMed

    Pette, Gregory A; Ganeles, Jeffrey; Norkin, Frederic J

    2013-01-01

    Cement-retained restorations allow for a conventional fixed partial denture approach to restoring dental implants. However, inadequate removal of excess cement at the time of cementation may introduce a severe complication: cement-induced peri-implantitis. Radiopaque cements are more easily detected on radiographs and should improve the recognition of extravasated cement at the time of insertion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiopacity of commercially available cements in vitro. Eighteen different cements commonly used for luting restorations to implants were tested at both 0.5- and 1.0-mm thicknesses. The cements examined were zinc oxide eugenol, zinc oxide, zinc polycarboxylate, zinc phosphate, resin-reinforced glass ionomer, urethane resin, resin, and composite resin. Two samples of each cement thickness underwent standardized radiography next to an aluminum step wedge as a reference. The mean grayscale value of each of the nine 1-mm steps in the step wedge were used as reference values and compared to each of the cement samples. Temp Bond Clear (resin), IMProv (urethane resin), Premier Implant Cement (resin), and Temrex NE (resin) were not radiographically detectable at either sample thickness. Cements containing zinc were the most detectable upon radiographic analysis. There are significant differences in the radiopacity of many commonly used cements. Since cementinduced peri-implantitis can lead to late implant failure, cements that can be visualized radiographically may reduce the incidence of this problem. PMID:23342348

  17. Measurement of hydrostatic pressures during simulated post cementation.

    PubMed

    Morando, G; Leupold, R J; Meiers, J C

    1995-12-01

    Tooth sensitivity and fracture after cementation of posts for endodontically treated teeth have been a problem. This investigation developed an in vitro method of measuring intraradicular hydrostatic pressures created during simulated post cementation. The testing apparatus consisted of a pressure transducer and brush recorder connected to precision milled post spaces in a Plexiglas block. Cast post and cores were fabricated and cemented with three different luting agents: resinous cement, glass ionomer cement, and zinc phosphate cement. Mean hydrostatic pressures (psi) recorded during post cementation were zinc phosphate cement, 22.67; resinous cement, 19.77; and glass ionomer cement, 17.66. Zinc phosphate cement created substantially greater hydrostatic pressures than either the resinous or glass ionomer cements. This in vitro system was capable of discriminating intraradicular hydrostatic pressures among different classes of luting agents. PMID:8778381

  18. Thio-urethanes Improve Properties of Dual-cured Composite Cements

    PubMed Central

    Bacchi, A.; Dobson, A.; Ferracane, J.L.; Consani, R.; Pfeifer, C.S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm2 × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and bond strength to dentin while demonstrating reduced contraction stress. All of these benefits are derived without compromising the methacrylate conversion of the resin component. The modification does not require changing the operatory technique. PMID:25248610

  19. Thio-urethanes improve properties of dual-cured composite cements.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, A; Dobson, A; Ferracane, J L; Consani, R; Pfeifer, C S

    2014-12-01

    This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm(2) × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and bond strength to dentin while demonstrating reduced contraction stress. All of these benefits are derived without compromising the methacrylate conversion of the resin component. The modification does not require changing the operatory technique. PMID:25248610

  20. The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.

    PubMed

    Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

    2009-09-01

    In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g. PMID:19297180

  1. Effect of long-term simulated pulpal pressure on the bond strength and nanoleakage of resin-luting agents with different bonding strategies.

    PubMed

    de Alexandre, R S; Santana, V B; Kasaz, A C; Arrais, C A G; Rodrigues, J A; Reis, A F

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of simulated hydrostatic pulpal pressure (SPP) on the microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to dentin and nanoleakage patterns produced by self-adhesive luting agents after 12 months. Three self-adhesive luting agents (RelyX Unicem [UN], RelyX U100 [UC], and Clearfil SA Luting [SA]) and three conventional luting agents (Rely X ARC [RX], Panavia F [PF], and a two-step self-etching adhesive system [Clearfil SE Bond] associated with Panavia F [PS]) were evaluated. One hundred twenty-three human molars were abraded to expose occlusal surfaces. Resin cements were used to lute cylindrical composite blocks to the teeth either subjected or not to SPP. Sixty specimens were subjected to 15 cm H2O of SPP for 24 hours before and 24 hours or 12 months after cementation procedures. Afterward, restored teeth were serially sectioned into beams with a cross-sectional area of 1 mm(2) at the bonded interface and were tested in tension (cross-head speed of 1 mm/min). Failure mode was determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data were statistically analyzed by three-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey test (p=0.05). Two additional teeth in each group were serially sectioned into 0.9-mm-thick slabs, which were submitted to a nanoleakage protocol with AgNO3 and analyzed with scanning and transmission electron microscopes. The μTBS values of the etch-and-rinse group (RX) were negatively influenced by SPP and long-term water storage with SPP. After 12 months, UC and SA presented premature failures in all specimens when submitted to SPP. SPP increased silver deposition in most groups in both evaluation times. The hydrostatic pulpal pressure effect was material dependent. The storage time without SPP did not affect bond strength. However, long-term SPP influenced the performance of the etch-and-rinse and self-adhesive cements regarding μTBS and nanoleakage pattern, except to UN. PMID:24502755

  2. The wettability of bonding resins used in the composite resin/glass ionomer 'sandwich technique'.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J

    1989-02-01

    There is some controversy about the significance of the wettability of the unfilled resin bonding agent that is generally recommended for prior application when placing a composite resin restoration. It has been suggested that the degree of viscosity does not matter. However, when investigating the union which is developed between composite resin and glass ionomer cement in the 'sandwich technique', it was noted that when using certain composite resins and their prescribed bonding resins the failure under tensile stress was adhesive at the union rather than cohesive in the cement. Further investigation showed that the bonding resins involved in these failures were more viscous than those bonding resins used in the more successful unions. In this investigation the contact angle of the bonding resin on the surface of glass ionomer cement was used as the measure of viscosity. It is suggested that the degree of viscosity of the bonding resin is significant in the success or otherwise of the 'sandwich technique'. PMID:2650669

  3. Phenolic Resin for Refractories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, Shunsuke; Rappolt, James

    Refractories are used in furnaces and boilers that process steel, cement, or glass as well as incinerators that operate at high temperatures. A variety of binders is used when refractories are manufactured. In this chapter, the use of phenolic resin as a binder for refractories is described. There are several factors that support the use of phenolic resins in comparison to other refractory binders. These include the following: 1. Both adhesion and green body strength are high.

  4. [Effects of different surface conditioning agents on the bond strength of resin-opaque porcelain composite].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjia; Fu, Jing; Liao, Shuang; Su, Naichuan; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the effects of different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between Ceramco3 opaque porcelain and indirect composite resin. Five groups of Co-Cr metal alloy substrates were fabricated according to manufacturer's instruction. The surface of metal alloy with a layer of dental opaque porcelain was heated by fire. After the surface of opaque porcelain was etched, five different surface treatments, i.e. RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP), Porcelain Bond Activator and SE Bond Primer (mixed with a proportion of 1:1) (PBA), Shofu Porcelain Primer (SPP), SE bond primer (SEP), and no primer treatment (as a control group), were used to combine P60 and opaque porcelain along with resin cement. Shear bond strength of specimens was tested in a universal testing machine. The failure modes of specimens in all groups were observed and classified into four types. Selected specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy to reveal the relief of the fracture surface and to confirm the failure mode of different types. The experimental results showed that the values of the tested items in all the tested groups were higher than that in the control group. Group PBA exhibited the highest value [(37.52 +/- 2.14) MPa] and this suggested a fact that all of the specimens in group PBA revealed combined failures (failure occurred in metal-porcelain combined surface and within opaque porcelain). Group SPP and RCP showed higher values than SEP (P < 0.05) and most specimens of SPP and RCP performed combined failures (failure occurred in bond surface and within opaque porcelain or composite resin) while all the specimens in group SEP and control group revealed adhesive failures. Conclusions could be drawn that silane coupling agents could reinforce the bond strength of dental composite resin to metal-opaque porcelain substrate. The bond strength between dental composite resin and dental opaque porcelain could meet the clinical requirements. PMID:25039143

  5. Retention of posts cemented with various dentinal bonding cements.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, D B; Eakle, W S

    1994-12-01

    This investigation evaluated the retention of preformed posts with four different cements: C & B Metabond, Panavia, All-Bond 2, and Ketac-Cem. Sixty intact maxillary canines were selected for the study. The clinical crowns were removed and endodontic therapy done on each root, which was then prepared to receive prefabricated posts. The 60 samples were divided into four groups of 15, and the posts in each group were cemented with one of the four cements. The roots were mounted in acrylic resin blocks and the posts were separated from the canals with an Instron testing machine. Analysis of the forces needed to dislodge the posts with analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls test disclosed that C & B Metabond cement was the most retentive (p < 0.05). No difference in retention was recorded between Ketac-Cem and Panavia cements. All-Bond 2 cement was the least retentive of cements. PMID:7853255

  6. Cemented implant restoration: A technique for minimizing adverse biologic consequences.

    PubMed

    Galván, Guillermo; Kois, John C; Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, Dean

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this technique was to eliminate excess cement from the implant restoration by using a 2-step cementation process. A custom acrylic resin abutment, a duplicate of the titanium abutment, is fabricated before the restoration is cemented. At cementation, cement is placed inside the restoration, which is placed onto the acrylic resin abutment outside the mouth. The majority of the excess cement from inside the restoration is expressed onto the acrylic resin abutment. The restoration is then placed on the titanium abutment inside the mouth. The result is a minimum amount of excess cement expressed intraorally. This technique minimizes the adverse biological consequences of leaving excess cement beneath implant-supported restorations. PMID:26119018

  7. Retentive strength, disintegration, and marginal quality of luting cements.

    PubMed

    Gorodovsky, S; Zidan, O

    1992-08-01

    This study evaluated the retention of complete crowns by using five different methods of cementation. Complete crowns were prepared with standardized dimensions on extracted human molars. Metal crowns were cast with a high noble gold ceramic alloy and were cemented with zinc phosphate cement, glass ionomer cement, composite resin cement, composite resin cement with a dentinal bonding agent, and adhesive resin cement. The retention was measured by subjecting the specimens to tensile load until fracture occurred. The disintegration was measured according to American Dental Association Specification No. 8, and the condition of the cements at the margins of crowns was analyzed by use of a scanning electron microscope. Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance revealed statistically significant differences between the mean retentive strengths. The retention of the zinc phosphate and the glass ionomer groups was significantly different from that of the adhesive resin group. The retention of the adhesive resin cement was 65% greater than the retention of the composite resin and the composite resin/dentinal bonding agent group, but the Mann-Whitney Wilcoxon rank sum test did not depict this difference as significant. The mean +/- SD of the disintegration for the zinc phosphate, the glass ionomer cement, and the composite resin cement was 0.025 +/- 0.013, 0.023 +/- 0.011, and 0.017 +/- 0.001, respectively. The scanning electron microscope analysis of the margins revealed that the composite resin cement was almost intact, the zinc phosphate was subjected to limited disintegration, and the glass ionomer displayed the worst marginal integrity. PMID:1501173

  8. Filler content and gap width after luting of ceramic inlays, using the ultrasonic insertion technique and composite resin cements. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, G; Hedlund, S O

    1997-12-01

    The effect of ultrasonic insertion on the filler content and the gap width for two brands of composite resin luting agents, intended for luting with the ultrasonic insertion technique, were studied after MOD ceramic inlays (Cerec) had been placed. In addition, the internal and marginal gap widths were determined after MOD ceramic inlays (Celay) bad been luted on extracted premolars with this technique. No statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed for either brand between the filler content obtained from the internal surfaces, from the excess luting agent, or from the luting agent as delivered. There were no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) between the final internal and marginal gap widths when the two brands of luting agent were compared with each other. Except for the final occlusal and internal gap widths obtained for the inlays luted with the Sono-Cem luting agent, no statistically significant differences (P > 0.05) were observed between the gap widths at the different locations determined. Thus, the ultrasonic insertion technique used did not significantly influence the filler ratio of the hybrid luting agents studied. Judged by the findings in this study, the properties of luting agents seem to greatly influence the final marginal and internal gap widths. PMID:9477035

  9. Bone cement

    PubMed Central

    Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc. PMID:26403875

  10. An assessment of fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in endodontically treated teeth: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Bhupinder; Pujari, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Endodontically treated teeth with excessive loss of tooth structure would require to be restored with post and core to enhance the strength and durability of the tooth and to achieve retention for the restoration. The non-metallic posts have a superior aesthetic quality. Various core build-up materials can be used to build-up cores on the posts placed in endodontically treated teeth. These materials would show variation in their bonding with the non-metallic posts thus affecting the strength and resistance to fracture of the remaining tooth structure. Aims. The aim of the study was to assess the fracture resistance of three composite resin core build-up materials on three prefabricated non-metallic posts, cemented in extracted endodontically treated teeth. Material and Methods. Forty-five freshly extracted maxillary central incisors of approximately of the same size and shape were selected for the study. They were divided randomly into 3 groups of 15 each, depending on the types of non-metallic posts used. Each group was further divided into 3 groups (A, B and C) of 5 samples each depending on three core build-up material used. Student’s unpaired ‘t’ test was also used to analyse and compare each group with the other groups individually, and decide whether their comparisons were statistically significant. Results. Luxacore showed the highest fracture resistance among the three core build-up materials with all the three posts systems. Ti-core had intermediate values of fracture resistance and Lumiglass had the least values of fracture resistance. PMID:25755926

  11. Fracture Resistance of Teeth Restored with Various Post Designs and Cemented with Different Cements: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Ajay; Pal, Kapil Singh; Ranganath, L M; Jain, Jayesh Kumar; Patil, Prashanth; Babar, Geetika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies have been carried out on endodontically treated teeth restored with and without ferrule, and influence of the cementing medium, to evaluate their effect on fracture resistance. This study was conducted on 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors. Specimens were restored with two types of post designs, and cemented with two different luting agents, and tested for fracture resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 28 freshly extracted maxillary central incisors were used. Specimens were restored with two types of post designs and cemented with two different luting agents and tested using Instron universal testing machine. The statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal–Wallis test (H) and Tukey honest significant test. Results: Ferrule helped in increasing the fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth. Resin cement showed better results than zinc phosphate cement. The combination of the post with ferrule and resin cement showed the greatest resistance. The combination of the post without ferrule and zinc phosphate cement showed the least resistance. Resin cement increased the resistance of even without ferrule. Conclusion: There was a positive effect of a ferrule in increasing the fracture resistance. Resin cement showed better resistance than zinc phosphate cement. PMID:26225102

  12. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review

    PubMed Central

    Lad, Pritam P; Kamath, Maya; Tarale, Kavita; Kusugal, Preethi B

    2014-01-01

    The longevity of fixed partial denture depends on the type of luting cement used with tooth preparation. The clinician’s understating of various cements, their advantages and disadvantages is of utmost importance. In recent years, many luting agents cements have been introduced claiming clinically better performance than existing materials due to improved characteristics. Both conventional and contemporary dental luting cements are discussed here. The various agents discussed are: Zinc phosphate, Zinc polycarboxylate, Zinc oxide-eugenol, Glass-ionomer, Resin modified GIC, Compomers and Resin cement. The purpose of this article is to provide a discussion that provides a clinical perspective of luting cements currently available to help the general practitioner make smarter and appropriate choices. How to cite the article: Lad PP, Kamath M, Tarale K, Kusugal PB. Practical clinical considerations of luting cements: A review. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):116-20. PMID:24653615

  13. Luting cement-metal surface physicochemical interactions on film thickness.

    PubMed

    Strutz, J M; White, S N; Yu, Z; Kane, C L

    1994-08-01

    Low film thickness is critical to the clinical success of cemented castings. This study investigated the effect of luting agent-metal physico-chemical surface interactions on film thicknesses of representative luting agents. Control group luting agents were placed between two glass plates, as described by American Dental Association specifications 8, 61, and 66, and test group luting agents were positioned between glass and metal plates. The materials selected were zinc phosphate cement, polycarboxylate cement, glass ionomer cement, glass ionomer-composite resin hybrid cement and a resinous cement, with a type III gold alloy, a noble metal ceramic alloy, and a base metal ceramic alloy. A two-way analysis of variance and follow-up tests were done. The effects of the type of metal surface, type of cement, and their statistical interaction significantly affected film thickness (p < 0.0001). The type of cement had a greater affect on film thickness than the type of metal. A glass ionomer cement produced lower overall film thicknesses than other cement types, and a noble metal ceramic alloy created lower overall film thicknesses than other types of metal. American Dental Association specifications for cement film thickness did not accurately reflect normal cement use. PMID:7932256

  14. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum. PMID:25822408

  15. Influence of the temperature on the cement disintegration in cement-retained implant restorations.

    PubMed

    Linkevicius, Tomas; Vindasiute, Egle; Puisys, Algirdas; Linkeviciene, Laura; Svediene, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the average disintegration temperature of three dental cements used for the cementation of the implant-supported prostheses. One hundred and twenty metal frameworks were fabricated and cemented on the prosthetic abutments with different dental cements. After heat treatment in the dental furnace, the samples were set for the separation to test the integration of the cement. Results have shown that resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RGIC) exhibited the lowest disintegration temperature (p<0.05), but there was no difference between zinc phosphate cement (ZPC) and dual cure resin cement (RC) (p>0.05). Average separation temperatures: RGIC - 306 ± 23 °C, RC - 363 ± 71 °C, it could not be calculated for the ZPC due to the eight unseparated specimens. Within the limitations of the study, it could be concluded that RGIC cement disintegrates at the lowest temperature and ZPC is not prone to break down after exposure to temperature. PMID:23455980

  16. Efficiency of protective sealants for glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Haddad, D; Mount, G J; Makinson, O F

    1992-10-01

    This study compared the efficiency of protective sealants for glass ionomer cements. Scotchbond 2, Visar Seal, an experimental light activated silicone and Ketac Glaze were evaluated using liquid scintillation spectrometry. The results showed that Ketac Glaze was a very effective sealant for the newly placed glass ionomer cement and the resin component of Scotchbond 2 is in the same range. PMID:1299260

  17. Immobilization of spent ion exchange resins in cementitious matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Ramallo, T.; Pahissa, M.H. de; Lavalle, M.; Varani, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the strategy used in the spent ion exchange resins conditioning towards its final disposal as well as the evaluation test results obtained in its immobilization into selected cementitious matrices. Cement formulations have been developed based on blends of Portland cement and ground granulated blast furnace slag with and without zeolite.

  18. Biomechanical three-dimensional finite element analysis of monolithic zirconia crown with different cement type

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of various cement types on the stress distribution in monolithic zirconia crowns under maximum bite force using the finite element analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS The models of the prepared #46 crown (deep chamfer margin) were scanned and solid models composed of the monolithic zirconia crown, cement layer, and prepared tooth were produced using the computer-aided design technology and were subsequently translated into 3-dimensional finite element models. Four models were prepared according to different cement types (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, and resin). A load of 700 N was applied vertically on the crowns (8 loading points). Maximum principal stress was determined. RESULTS Zinc phosphate cement had a greater stress concentration in the cement layer, while polycarboxylate cement had a greater stress concentration on the distal surface of the monolithic zirconia crown and abutment tooth. Resin cement and glass ionomer cement showed similar patterns, but resin cement showed a lower stress distribution on the lingual and mesial surface of the cement layer. CONCLUSION The test results indicate that the use of different luting agents that have various elastic moduli has an impact on the stress distribution of the monolithic zirconia crowns, cement layers, and abutment tooth. Resin cement is recommended for the luting agent of the monolithic zirconia crowns. PMID:26816578

  19. Hardness and in vitro wear of a novel ceramic restorative cement.

    PubMed

    Sunnegårdh-Grönberg, Karin; Peutzfeldt, Anne; van Dijken, Jan W V

    2002-04-01

    The aim of the present work was to compare a new ceramic restorative cement for posterior restorations, DoxaDent, with other types of tooth-colored materials for direct use as regards hardness and in vitro wear. Four hybrid resin composites, one polyacid-modified resin composite, one resin-modified glass ionomer cement, one conventional glass ionomer cement, one zinc phosphate cement, an experimental version as well as the marketed version of the ceramic restorative cement, were investigated. Hardness of the materials was tested with the Wallace indentation tester and wear was tested with the ACTA wear machine. All tests were carried out on 2-wk-old specimens. DoxaDent was as hard as the zinc phosphate cement and the hardest resin composite. The ceramic restorative cement wore significantly more than the resin composites, the same as the zinc phosphate cement, and less than the glass ionomer cements. No correlation between hardness and wear was found. It can be concluded that the ceramic restorative cement is a rather hard material but with a relatively low wear resistance. PMID:12013563

  20. Post retention: the effect of sequence of post-space preparation, cementation time, and different sealers.

    PubMed

    Boone, K J; Murchison, D F; Schindler, W G; Walker, W A

    2001-12-01

    Many endodontic sealers contain constituents that have been shown to inhibit the polymerization of resin cements. This may be important when prefabricated posts are cemented at the same appointment as root canal obturation. This study evaluated the effects of cementing posts with a resin cement immediately or at a delayed time period after obturation using Roth's 801 Elite Grade or AH26 sealer cements. The contribution of mechanical post-space preparation was also assessed as a critical variable. One hundred twenty extracted canines were randomly divided into eight experimental groups. The variables evaluated were the order of post preparation (either before or after obturation), the type of sealer used, and the time of post cementation. All teeth received a stainless steel #6 Parapost XP cemented with a resin cement, Panavia 21. Each experimental group underwent tensile testing for retention using an Instron universal testing machine. For both sealers posts cemented in teeth in which the canal was obturated before post-space preparation and thus had sealer-contaminated dentin removed by the space preparation procedure had significantly higher retentive values than those obturated after post-space preparation in which contaminated dentin might remain. Sealer used and time of cementation had no specific effect on retention. Achieving a clean, "freshened" dentinal surface during mechanical post-space preparation seems to be a critical variable for post retention when a resin cement is used. PMID:11771587

  1. Processing of Spent Ion Exchange Resins in a Rotary Calciner - 12212

    SciTech Connect

    Kascheev, Vladimir; Musatov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Processing Russian nuclear ion exchange resin KU-2 using a 'Rotary' calciner was conducted. The resulting product is a dry free flowing powder (moisture content 3 wt.%, Angle of repose of ≅ 20 deg.). Compared with the original exchange resin the volume of the final product is about 3 times less.. Rotary calciner product can be stored in metal drums or in special reinforced concrete cubicles. After thermal treatment in a rotary calciner, the spent resin product can be solidified in cement yielding the following attributes: - The cemented waste is only a 35% increase over the volume of powder product; - The volume of cement calciner product is almost 9 times less (8.7) than the volume of cement solidified resin; - The mechanical strength of cemented calciner product meets the radioactive waste regulations in Russia. (authors)

  2. Luting of ceramic crowns with a self-adhesive cement: Effect of contamination on marginal adaptation and fracture strength

    PubMed Central

    Slavcheva, Slavena; Krejci, Ivo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the percentages of continuous margins (%CM) and fracture strength (FS) of crowns made out from blocs of leucite-reinforced ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) and luted with a representative self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem) under four contaminating agents: saliva, water, blood, a haemostatic solution containing aluminium chloride (pH= 0.8) and a control group with no contamination. Study Design: %CM at both tooth-cement (TC) and cement-crown (CC) interfaces were determined before and after a fatigue test consisting of 600’000 chewing loads and 1’500 temperature cycles changing from 5º C to 50º C. Load to fracture was recorded on fatigued specimens. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare %CM and FS between the five groups with a level of confidence of 95%. Results: At the TC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation before loading could be detected between groups. After loading, a significant marginal degradation was observed in the group contaminated with aluminium chloride (52 ± 22 %CM) in respect to the other groups. No significant differences in %CM could be detected between the groups contaminated with saliva, water, blood and the control. At the CC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation were observed between the groups. The FS on loaded specimens was around 1637N, with no significant differences between groups as well. Conclusions: An adverse interaction of the highly acidic haemostatic agent with either dentin or the self-adhesive cement could explain the specimens’ marginal degradation. The self-adhesive cement tested in this study was no sensitive to moisture contamination either with saliva, water or blood. Key words:Marginal adaptation, RelyX Unicem, contamination, all-ceramic crowns. PMID:23722123

  3. Advanced cement solidification system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, T.; Kuribayashi, H.; Todo, F.

    1993-12-31

    In order to easily and economically store and transport radioactive waste generated at nuclear power stations, it is essential to reduce the waste volume to the maximum extent. It is also necessary to transform the waste into a stable form for final disposal which will maintain its chemical and physical stability over a long period of time. For this purpose, the Advanced Cement Solidification Process (AC-process) was developed. The AC-process, which utilizes portland cement, can be applied to several kinds of waste such as boric acid waste, laboratory drain waste, incineration ash and spent ion exchange resin. In this paper, the key point of the AC-process, the pretreatment concept for each waste, is described. The AC-process has been adopted for two Japanese PWR stations: the Genkai Nuclear Power Station (Kyushu Electric Power Co.) and the Ikata Nuclear Power Station (Shikoku Electric Power Co.). Construction work has almost finished and commissioning tests are under way at both power stations.

  4. Lunar cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agosto, William N.

    1992-01-01

    With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

  5. Cryogenics with cement microscopy redefines cement behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, S.; Jones, R. ); Caveny, B. )

    1994-10-03

    Cement microscopy (CM), cryogenics, environmental scanning microscopy (ESM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and other technologies are leading investigators to change their views on cement gelation, hydration, and retardation. Cement samples frozen in a nitrogen slush and viewed with an SEM present a more accurate picture of the setting process. Observations made through this technique have revolutionized ARCO Exploration and Production Technology's and Halliburton Energy Services' oil field cement procurement and slurry design. Findings from this joint study are expected to lead to: optimized waiting on cement (WOC) times; reduced planning and design time; optimized slurry retarder additions; optimized gel times to fit given situations; especially applicable to squeeze operations; improved cement selection (from vendors) for peak performance; and improved cement manufacture. The paper discusses the measuring methods and the findings on the following: cement voids, cement gelation, and retardation mechanisms. It also briefly discusses the impact these discoveries have on operations.

  6. Sculpting with Cement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    1983-01-01

    Cement offers many creative possibilities for school art programs. Instructions are given for sculpting with fiber-cement and sand-cement, as well as for finishing processes and the addition of color. Safety is stressed. (IS)

  7. Adhesive properties of modified glass-ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Rusz, J E; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F; Anderson, M H

    1992-01-01

    The incorporation of water-soluble polymers and/or vinyl monomers into glass-ionomer cements can yield toughened "hybrid cement-composites". This study compared a commercial water-hardening glass-ionomer cement and seven experimental hybrids in their bonding to both dentin and Silar composite. The cements were sanded and phosphoric-acid-etched or left with an unaltered matrix-formed surface when adhesion to composite was tested. The seven hybrids included: 15% 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) with appropriate initiators/activators, 29% HEMA, 27% HEMA + 0.5% polyacrylic acid (PAA), 0.5% PAA, 1.5% PAA, 2.5% polyvinyl alcohol, and 2.5% gelatin. Acceptable bond strengths to applied composite and to dentin were observed for most of the modified hybrid cements. There were higher bond strengths with composite when the hybrids were left unetched. Bonding of some unetched, HEMA-containing cements achieved bond strengths (29% HEMA, 10.09 MPa) significantly higher than those of the unmodified cement (4.92 MPa). Resin-modified cements may promote better bonding by improved interaction and compatibility with the resin component of the composite. PMID:1387853

  8. Reconsidering glass-ionomer cements for direct restorations.

    PubMed

    Pitel, Mark L

    2014-01-01

    Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) have been used in dentistry for a number of applications, primarily as a base or liner under other direct filling materials or indirect restorative materials, for crown buildup/foundation restorations, or as luting cements for indirect restorations. However, GICs have many unique attributes that make them useful for either a full-contour restoration or sandwich/hybrid restorations where they are synergistic with composite resins. This article, which includes two brief case reports, discusses the potential advantages of GIC for some direct applications where composite resin or other materials may not be the most ideal choice. PMID:24571524

  9. Microleakage through dentin after crown cementation.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Furuichi, R; Kyomen, S M

    1995-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between type of luting cement for artificial crowns and microleakage through dentinal tubules. Standardized preparations were made on intact human premolars, and crowns were made in a base metal alloy using conventional techniques. The castings were randomly assigned to the following luting agent groups: zinc phosphate (ZP), polycarboxylate (PC), glass ionomer (GI), phosphate ester composite resin (GMA/PE), and a composite resin with a NPG-GMA dentin bonding agent (GMA/NPG). Then they were cemented in a standardized manner. The specimens were artificially aged, stained, sectioned, and microleakage occurred through dentinal tubules toward the pulp measured. The rank in order from least to most (best to worst) leakage was GMA/NPG, GI, GMA/PE, PC, and ZP. Material GMA/NPG recorded significantly less leakage than all other materials. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that material GMA/NPG may reduce pulpal sensitivity and pathosis. PMID:7714436

  10. Cementing multilateral wells with latex cement

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A multilateral well is a well with one or more branches or lateral sections extending from its main wellbore. The laterals can be openhole or cased hole. When laterals are cased hole, the cement integrity for casing support and zonal isolation is very important. When cementing the lateral sections of multilateral wells, it is important to use a cement with high strength and durability to support the liner throughout the life of the well and to support the lateral section. The cement column is subjected to various stresses when the cemented inner stub is cut. High tensile strength, flexural strength, and crack resistance are required. These properties are necessary to make a clean cut through the cement sheath that does not induce cracks in the cement column. Latex cement is commonly used for its gas-migration-control property.

  11. Bond strength between fiber posts and composite resin core: influence of temperature on silane coupling agents.

    PubMed

    Novais, Veridiana Resende; Simamotos Júnior, Paulo Cézar; Rontani, Regina Maria Puppin; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Soares, Carlos José

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of air drying temperature and different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between glass fiber posts and composite resin core. The post surface was cleaned with alcohol and treated with different silane coupling agents, being three prehydrolyzed silanes [Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE)] and one two-component silane [Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply)]. Two post-silanization air drying temperatures, 23ºC and 60ºC, were applied. A cylindrical plastic matrix was placed around the silanized post and filled with composite resin. Each bonded post provided 7 slices for push-out testing. Each slice was loaded to failure under compression at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Scott-Knott tests (α=0.05). Dunnett's test was used to compare the mean of the control group with that of each experimental group. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the interface of the fractured slices. For the 23ºC air drying temperature, the use of RelyX Ceramic Primer resulted in significantly lower bond strength than the other silane coupling agents, while the bond strength with Silane Coupling Agent was the highest of all groups. Only with Silane Coupling Agent, the bond strength for the 23ºC air drying temperature was significantly higher than that for 60ºC air drying. In conclusion, the use of warm air drying after silane application produced no increase in the bond strength between the fiber-reinforced composite post and the composite core. The two-component silane produced higher bond strength than all prehydrolyzed silanes when it was used with air drying at room temperature. PMID:22460308

  12. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-07-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  13. Brushing abrasion of luting cements under neutral and acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Buchalla, W; Attin, T; Hellwig, E

    2000-01-01

    Four resin based materials (Compolute Aplicap, ESPE; Variolink Ultra, Vivadent; C&B Metabond, Parkell and Panavia 21, Kuraray), two carboxylate cements (Poly-F Plus, Dentsply DeTrey and Durelon Maxicap, ESPE), two glass-ionomer cements (Fuji I, GC and Ketac-Cem Aplicap, ESPE), one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer, 3M) one polyacid-modified resin composite (Dyract Cem, Dentsply DeTrey) and one zinc phosphate cement (Harvard, Richter & Hoffmann) were investigated according to their brushing resistance after storage in neutral and acidic buffer solutions. For this purpose 24 cylindrical acrylic molds were each filled with the materials. After hardening, the samples were stored for seven days in 100% relative humidity and at 37 degrees C. Subsequently, they were ground flat and polished. Then each specimen was covered with an adhesive tape leaving a 4 mm wide window on the cement surface. Twelve samples of each material were stored for 24 hours in a buffer solution with a pH of 6.8. The remaining 12 samples were placed in a buffer with a pH of 3.0. All specimens were then subjected to a three media brushing abrasion (2,000 strokes) in an automatic brushing machine. Storage and brushing were performed three times. After 6,000 brushing strokes per specimen, the tape was removed. Brushing abrasion was measured with a computerized laser profilometer and statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's Standardized Range Test (p < or = 0.05). The highest brushing abrasion was found for the two carboxylate cements. The lowest brushing abrasion was found for one resin based material, Compolute Aplicap. With the exception of three resin-based materials, a lower pH led to a higher brushing abrasion. PMID:11203860

  14. Resin hybrid composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatnagar, A.

    1986-01-01

    Hybrid composites are generally referred to as the materials that combine two or more fibers in a suitable binding resin. Resin hybrid composites described in this paper utilize two or more resins with a suitable reinforcement. The resins are rigid resin and flexible resins. The elongation of the rigid resin is less than 2% and elongation of the flexible resins are varied between 25% to 100% by blending a very flexible resin with the rigid resin. Test laminates are fabricated by using either glass, carbon or aramid reinforcement in a layered sequence. This produces rigid-flexible-rigid and flexible-rigid-flexible laminates. These laminates are tested for impact, compression, flexural and inter-laminar strengths. Results show that the resin hybriding provides a wide choice of mechanical properties to the composite industry.

  15. Orthodontic Cements and Demineralization: An In Vitro Comparative Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabhavathi, V; Jacob, Josy; Kiran, M Shashi; Ramakrishnan, Murugesan; Sethi, Esha; Krishnan, C S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Comparison of the demineralization potential of four luting cements, i.e. zinc phosphate, conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC), resin-modified GIC and acid modified composite resin. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 75 extracted premolar teeth, which were grouped into five, each group containing 15 teeth. Groups were non-banded control, teeth cemented with the above-mentioned cements. These were incubated at 37°C for 30 days in sealable plastic containers, after which the teeth were debanded, cleaned and placed in acid gelatin solution at 37°C for 4 weeks to simulate the cariogenic solution. Then, the teeth were sectioned and examined under scanning electron microscope. The depth of the carious lesions was measured using image analysis with Digimizer software. Results: The depth of the carious lesions was maximum with non-banded group, followed by zinc phosphate, acid modified composite resin, resin-modified GIC and conventional GIC. Conclusions: Among the four orthodontic banding cements compared, the enamel demineralization potential is least with conventional GIC, followed by resin-modified GIC, acid modified composite resin and zinc phosphate. PMID:25859103

  16. A novel injectable bioactive bone cement for spinal surgery: a developmental and preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Li, Y W; Leong, J C; Lu, W W; Luk, K D; Cheung, K M; Chiu, K Y; Chow, S P

    2000-10-01

    The injection of bone cement by minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of vertebral body fractures or for stabilization of an osteoporotic vertebral body is regarded as promising in spinal surgery. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel injectable bioactive bone cement to address such concerns. The cement was composed mainly of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) filler and Bisphenol A Diglycidylether Dimethacrylate (D-GMA) resin. The Sr-HA filler was prepared by precipitation and calcination, then analyzed with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns. Samples of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite cement (SrHAC) were formed by a combination of powder filler and resin matrix, with the setting time and peak temperature recorded. Cell relative growth rate (RGR), Tetrazolium bromide (MTT), and haemolysis tests were used to detect initial in vitro biocompatibility of the new cement. In vitro spinal biomechanical testing and morphological observation after bone cement injection were performed on pig spines. Results indicate that the setting time and peak temperature of the cement was 15 min and 55 degrees C, respectively. Cytotoxicity of the cement was class 1 (no cytotoxicity) and haemolysis was 1% (no haemolysis). Stiffness after cement injection and fatigue loading were 112% and 95% of the intact bone, respectively, which is similar to that of natural bone. Radiopacity of SrHAC allowed easy radiographic imaging. The use of SrHAC cement is, thus, promising in spinal surgery. PMID:10906688

  17. Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions

    PubMed Central

    van de SANDE, Françoise Hélène; da SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; MICHELON, Douver; PIVA, Evandro; CENCI, Maximiliano Sérgio; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. Material and Methods eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP), compomer (C), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC). Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0) or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200) before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions) or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period) at 5% significance level. Results The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (p<0.001) among cements at both baseline and after storage. The roughness values of cements in a decreasing order were ZP>RMGIC>C>R (p<0.001). After 15 days, immersion in lactic acid solution resulted in the highest surface roughness for all cements (p<0.05), except for the RC group (p>0.05). Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm) related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. Conclusions Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions. PMID:21625737

  18. The Biocompatibility of Porous vs Non-Porous Bone Cements: A New Methodological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dall’Oca, C.; Maluta, T.; Cavani, F.; Morbioli, G.P.; Bernardi, P.; Sbarbati, A.; Degl’Innocenti, D.; Magnan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Composite cements have been shown to be biocompatible, bioactive, with good mechanical properties and capability to bind to the bone. Despite these interesting characteristic, in vivo studies on animal models are still incomplete and ultrastructural data are lacking. The acquisition of new ultrastructural data is hampered by uncertainties in the methods of preparation of histological samples due to the use of resins that melt methacrylate present in bone cement composition. A new porous acrylic cement composed of polymethyl-metacrylate (PMMA) and β-tricalcium-phosphate (p-TCP) was developed and tested on an animal model. The cement was implanted in femurs of 8 New Zealand White rabbits, which were observed for 8 weeks before their sacrifice. Histological samples were prepared with an infiltration process of LR white resin and then the specimens were studied by X-rays, histology and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). As a control, an acrylic standard cement, commonly used in clinical procedures, was chosen. Radiographic ultrastructural and histological exams have allowed finding an excellent biocompatibility of the new porous cement. The high degree of osteointegration was demonstrated by growth of neo-created bone tissue inside the cement sample. Local or systemic toxicity signs were not detected. The present work shows that the proposed procedure for the evaluation of biocompatibility, based on the use of LR white resin allows to make a thorough and objective assessment of the biocompatibility of porous and non-porous bone cements. PMID:24998920

  19. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  20. Westinghouse Modular Grinding Process - Enhancement of Volume Reduction for Hot Resin Supercompaction - 13491

    SciTech Connect

    Fehrmann, Henning; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    In nuclear power plants (NPP) ion exchange (IX) resins are used in several systems for water treatment. Spent resins can contain a significant amount of contaminates which makes treatment for disposal of spent resins mandatory. Several treatment processes are available such as direct immobilization with technologies like cementation, bitumisation, polymer solidification or usage of a high integrity container (HIC). These technologies usually come with a significant increase in final waste volume. The Hot Resin Supercompaction (HRSC) is a thermal treatment process which reduces the resin waste volume significantly. For a mixture of powdered and bead resins the HRSC process has demonstrated a volume reduction of up to 75 % [1]. For bead resins only the HRSC process is challenging because the bead resins compaction properties are unfavorable. The bead resin material does not form a solid block after compaction and shows a high spring back effect. The volume reduction of bead resins is not as good as for the mixture described in [1]. The compaction properties of bead resin waste can be significantly improved by grinding the beads to powder. The grinding also eliminates the need for a powder additive.Westinghouse has developed a modular grinding process to grind the bead resin to powder. The developed process requires no circulation of resins and enables a selective adjustment of particle size and distribution to achieve optimal results in the HRSC or in any other following process. A special grinding tool setup is use to minimize maintenance and radiation exposure to personnel. (authors)

  1. [Augmentation with PMMA cement].

    PubMed

    Kühn, K-D; Höntzsch, D

    2015-09-01

    Cements based on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) can be used without any problem in a variety of clinical augmentations. Cement-related complications in surgical procedures involving PMMA cements, such as embolism, thermal necrosis, toxicity and hypersensitivity, are often due to other causes. Knowledge about the properties of the cement helps the user to safely employ PMMA cements in augmentations. High radio-opacity is required in vertebral body augmentations and this is provided in particular by zirconium dioxide. In vertebral body augmentations, a low benzoyl peroxide (BPO) content can considerably prolong the liquid dough phase. In augmentations with cement fillings in the region of a tumor, a high BPO content can specifically increase the peak temperature of the PMMA cement. In osteosynthetic augmentations with PMMA, necrosis is rare because heat development in the presence of metallic implants is low due to heat conduction via the implant. Larger cement fillings where there is no heat conduction via metal implants can exhibit substantially higher peak temperatures. The flow properties of PMMA cements are of particular importance for the user to allow optimum handling of PMMA cements. In patients with hypersensitivity to antibiotics, there is no need to avoid the use of PMMA as there are sufficient PMMA-based alternatives. The PMMA cements are local drug delivery systems and antibiotics, antiseptics, antimycotics and also cytostatics can be mixed with the cement. Attention must be paid to antagonistic and synergistic effects. PMID:26315391

  2. Radiopacity of conventional, resin-modified glass ionomer, and resin-based luting materials.

    PubMed

    Tsuge, Takuma

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the radiopacity of currently available dental luting materials. Five conventional cements, six resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs), two methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based acrylic resins (eight shades), and nine composite luting materials were evaluated. Radiographs of the specimens were taken together with tooth slices and aluminum step wedges. The density of the specimens was determined with a densitometer and was expressed in terms of the equivalent thickness of aluminum per 2.0-mm unit thickness of specimen. The radiopacity values for human enamel and dentin were 4.3 and 2.3 mm Al/2.0 mm specimen, respectively. The values for materials ranged from 5.1 to 12.9 for conventional luting materials, from 3.4 to 6.3 for RMGIs, from less than 0.5 to 7.3 for MMA resins, and from 2.3 to 9.9 for the composite luting materials. A zinc phosphate cement showed the highest value (12.9), whereas five shades of MMA resin resulted in the lowest value (less than 0.5). Two RMGIs and three composite luting materials exhibited radiopacity values between those of enamel (4.3) and dentin (2.3). It can be concluded that the radiopacity value of luting materials varies considerably, and that care must be taken when selecting luting materials, considering the material composition of restorations. PMID:19550090

  3. Effect of cement washout on loosening of abutment screws and vice versa in screw- and cement- retained implant-supported dental prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seok-Gyu; Son, Mee-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the abutment screw stability of screw- and cement-retained implant-supported dental prosthesis (SCP) after simulated cement washout as well as the stability of SCP cements after complete loosening of abutment screws. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-six titanium CAD/CAM-made implant prostheses were fabricated on two implants placed in the resin models. Each prosthesis is a two-unit SCP: one screw-retained and the other cemented. After evaluating the passive fit of each prosthesis, all implant prostheses were randomly divided into 3 groups: screwed and cemented SCP (Control), screwed and noncemented SCP (Group 1), unscrewed and cemented SCP (Group 2). Each prosthesis in Control and Group 1 was screwed and/or cemented, and the preloading reverse torque value (RTV) was evaluated. SCP in Group 2 was screwed and cemented, and then unscrewed (RTV=0) after the cement was set. After cyclic loading was applied, the postloading RTV was measured. RTV loss and decementation ratios were calculated for statistical analysis. RESULTS There was no significant difference in RTV loss ratio between Control and Group 1 (P=.16). No decemented prosthesis was found among Control and Group 2. CONCLUSION Within the limits of this in vitro study, the stabilities of SCP abutment screws and cement were not significantly changed after simulated cement washout or screw loosening. PMID:26140172

  4. Fracture load of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns luted with various cements.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yoo, Jeong-Min; Park, Sang-Won; Yang, Hong-So

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the fracture load and failure types of implant-supported zirconia all-ceramic crowns cemented with various luting agents. The ceramic frameworks were fabricated from a presintered yttria-stabilized zirconium dioxide block using computer-aided design/computer-assisted manufacturing technology, and were then veneered with feldspathic porcelain. Three luting agents were used. Composite resin cement (1,560.78 +/- 39.43 N) showed the highest mean fracture load, followed by acrylic/urethane cement (1,116.20 +/- 77.32 N) and zinc oxide eugenol cement (741.21 +/- 41.95 N) (P < .05). The types of failure varied between groups. PMID:20617227

  5. The three-dimensional effects of adjustment and cementation on crown seating.

    PubMed

    White, S N; Kipnis, V

    1993-01-01

    This study investigated the three-dimensional nature of crown fit and the effects of adjustment and luting. Standardized preparations were made on extracted premolars and impressions and dies made. Complete-coverage castings were fabricated using base metal alloy. The castings were placed on their respective teeth and measurements made. The castings were then adjusted using a silicone disclosing medium and remeasured. They were then assigned to one of five luting agent groups and cemented. A relative term describing tilting was defined. Casting adjustment decreased tilting and cementation increased tilting. Resin cements tilted castings significantly more than did zinc phosphate, glass-ionomer, or polycarboxylate cements. PMID:8397692

  6. Influence of different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing resin nanoceramic material to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Poggio, Claudio; Pigozzo, Marco; Ceci, Matteo; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of three different luting protocols on shear bond strength of computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin nanoceramic (RNC) material to dentin. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, 30 disks were milled from RNC blocks (Lava Ultimate/3M ESPE) with CAD/CAM technology. The disks were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 recently extracted bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were randomly assigned into 3 groups of 10 teeth each. In Group 1, disks were cemented using a total-etch protocol (Scotchbond™ Universal Etchant phosphoric acid + Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 2, disks were cemented using a self-etch protocol (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive + RelyX™ Ultimate conventional resin cement); in Group 3, disks were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol (RelyX™ Unicem 2 Automix self-adhesive resin cement). All cemented specimens were placed in a universal testing machine (Instron Universal Testing Machine 3343) and submitted to a shear bond strength test to check the strength of adhesion between the two substrates, dentin, and RNC disks. Specimens were stressed at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test at a level of significance of 0.05. Results: Post-hoc Tukey testing showed that the highest shear strength values (P < 0.001) were reported in Group 2. The lowest data (P < 0.001) were recorded in Group 3. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, conventional resin cements (coupled with etch and rinse or self-etch adhesives) showed better shear strength values compared to self-adhesive resin cements. Furthermore, conventional resin cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values of adhesion. PMID:27076822

  7. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-04-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary of Halliburton Energy Services (HES) and BJ Services historical performance data for lightweight cement applications. These data are analyzed and compared to ULHS cement and foamed cement performances. Similar data is expected from Schlumberger, and an analysis of this data will be completed in the following phases of the project. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was completed to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS and foamed cement. This protocol is presented and discussed. Results of further testing of ULHS cements are presented along with an analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project. Finally, a list of relevant literature on lightweight cement performance is compiled for review during the next quarter.

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-10-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-04-29

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, and shear bond. Testing to determine the effect of temperature cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. In addition, the stress-strain behavior of the cement types was studied. This report discusses a software program that is being developed to help design ULHS cements and foamed cements.

  10. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-07-18

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

  11. Silicoating: evaluation of a new method of bonding composite resin to metal.

    PubMed

    Peutzfeldt, A; Asmussen, E

    1988-04-01

    Silicoating is a new type of pretreatment of the metal in the resin-bonded bridge technique. The size of bond strength between resin cement and silicoated metal was investigated. Different resin cements, types of metal, and grain sizes of sand used for roughening the metal surface were tested. Furthermore, the effect on the bond strength of contamination with saliva and of thermocycling was measured. There was no difference of importance between the two resin cements tested. Bond strengths obtained with Wirobond were the highest and insensible to changes in resin cement, grain size of sand, and to thermocycling. It was found that sand of the smallest grain size used brought about the highest bond strengths. Contamination with saliva did not significantly reduce the size of the bond strengths. Rinsing the metal surfaces with water or ethanol after contamination restored the bond strengths to their original magnitude. By silicoating, a greater resistance to thermocycling was obtained. Nevertheless, except for Wirobond, a fall in bond strength was measured after thermocycling. Bond strengths of the size of those between etched enamel and composite resin were measured, and the Silicoater method seems a reliable pretreatment of the metal. PMID:3281245

  12. Testing and evaluation of polyethylene and sulfur cement waste forms

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

    1985-01-01

    This paper discusses the results of recent studies related to the use of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as new binder materials for the improved solidification of low-level wastes. Waste streams selected for this study include those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those that remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion-exchange resins). Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported for polyethylene. For sulfur cement the recommended waste loadings of 40 wt % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt % incinerator ash are reported. However, incorporation of ion-exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended due to poor waste form performance. The work presented in this paper will, in part, present data that can be used to assess the acceptability of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement waste forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61. 8 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Repair of porcelain/metal restoration with resin bonded overcasting.

    PubMed

    Wood, M; Litkowski, L J; Thompson, V P; Church, T

    1992-01-01

    Porcelain occasionally fractures from ceramometal fixed partial dentures following final cementation. Repair of these porcelain fractures can be a challenging task. When the problem occurs on anterior teeth, it is especially difficult because the repair must not only be durable, but esthetically pleasing as well. Although composite resins can be used for some repairs, it is often difficult to match the color and texture to the surrounding intact porcelain. In addition, the bonding between the resin and porcelain is susceptible to margin leakage, which may ultimately cause an esthetic failure. Techniques involving a cemented porcelain-fused-to-metal overcasting have often been successful in restoring the fixed partial denture to form and function. Although the esthetic result of a porcelain/metal overcasting can be quite successful, retention of the overcasting is sometimes poor. The compromised retention and resistance form is due to lack of interproximal walls on the underlying fractured unit. To improve the retention of the overcasting, the following technique of tin plating the overcasting and fractured unit prior to cementing with a composite resin cement is presented. PMID:1389357

  14. Fluoride release from a new glass-ionomer cement.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, P; John, S; Anand, S; Sureshbabu, N; Subbarao, C

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the amount and pattern of fluoride release from a new glass-ionomer-based material (nano-ionomer) with other restorative materials and correlated the surface area to volume of nano-sized filler with its capacity to release fluoride in the powder, more quickly increasing the fluoride. The materials evaluated were a nano-ionomer (Ketac N 100), a conventional glass-ionomer cement (GC Fuji II), a resin-modified glass ionomer cement (GC Fuji II LC), a compomer (Dyract F) and a fluoride-releasing resin composite (Tetric N Flow). A resin composite (Synergy Flow) served as the control. Ten specimens were fabricated from each of these materials using a customized metal mold. The fluoride release was measured every 24 hours for the first seven days, and on days 14, 21 and 28, a combination fluoride ion—selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (p=0.05). An initial fluoride “burst effect” was seen with all of the materials, except for the control and compomer. The conventional glass-ionomer cement showed the highest fluoride release on the first three days. The nano-ionomer showed the maximum release of fluoride for the remaining days. A low constant level of fluoride release was seen from the compomer and fluoride-releasing resin composite throughout the study period. PMID:21488733

  15. Glass ionomer restorative cement systems: an update.

    PubMed

    Berg, Joel H; Croll, Theodore P

    2015-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for more than two decades. Their usefulness in clinical dentistry is preferential to other materials because of fluoride release from the glass component, biocompatibility, chemical adhesion to dentin and enamel, coefficient of thermal expansion similar to that of tooth structure, and versatility. The purpose of this paper was to review the uses of glass ionomer materials in pediatric dentistry, specifically as pit and fissure sealants, dentin and enamel replacement repair materials, and luting cements, and for use in glass ionomer/resin-based composite stratification tooth restoration (the sandwich technique). This article can also be used as a guide to research and clinical references regarding specific aspects of the glass ionomer systems and how they are used for young patients. PMID:25905652

  16. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-01-15

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

  17. Interfacial fracture toughness between bovine cortical bone and cements.

    PubMed

    Lucksanasombool, P; Higgs, W A J; Higgs, R J E D; Swain, M V

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the bonding strength of the interfaces within the cemented arthroplasty system, various mechanical tests have been used. Conventional push-out and pull-out tests cannot reveal the actual bonding property of the interface because of the significant influence of surface roughness on the measured adhesion and the failure to account for the mismatch of elastic modulus across the interface. An alternative fracture mechanics approach, which considers the mix of opening and shear modes of the crack tip loading associated with the testing system and the elastic mismatch of materials across the interface, was used to evaluate the bonding ability of various cements. The four-point bend interfacial delamination test by Charalambides et al. (J. Appl. Mech. 56 (1989) 77; Mech. Mater. 8 (1990) 269) was used to quantify the bonding ability of cements. This method is arguably more suitable since the applied loading mode is comparable to the nature of loading within the prosthetic system, which is primarily bending. The bovine bone specimens were polished to mirror finish to eliminate bonding by mechanical interlocking. The results revealed minimal bonding for the conventional bone cement (PMMA) whereas substantial bonding was evident for the glass-ionomer cements tested. However, only the conventional glass-ionomer cements showed evidence of bonding on testing, while the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (poly-HEMA) did not. The latter appeared to debond before testing because of excessive expansion stresses associated with swelling in water. PMID:12527256

  18. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). Material/Methods This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. Results Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. Conclusions The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  19. In Vitro Evaluation of Planktonic Growth on Experimental Cement-Retained Titanium Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balci, Nur; Cakan, Umut; Aksu, Burak; Akgul, Oncu; Ulger, Nurver

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of selected cements, or their combination with titanium, on the growth of two periodontopathic bacteria: Prevotella intermedia (Pi) and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). MATERIAL AND METHODS This study was comprised of several experimental groups: 1) Dental luting cements (glass ionomer cement, methacrylate-based resin cement, zinc-oxide eugenol cement, eugenol-free zinc oxide cement; 2) titanium discs; and 3) titanium combination cement discs. The disks were submerged in bacterial suspensions of either Fn or Pi. Planktonic bacterial growth within the test media was measured by determining the optical density of the cultures (OD600). Mean and standard deviations were calculated for planktonic growth from three separate experiments. RESULTS Intergroup comparison of all experimental groups revealed increased growth of Pi associated with cement-titanium specimens in comparison with cement specimens. Regarding the comparison of all groups for Fn, there was an increased amount of bacterial growth in cement-titanium specimens although the increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS The combination of cement with titanium may exacerbate the bacterial growth capacity of Pi and Fn in contrast to their sole effect. PMID:27058704

  20. Characterisation of cement pastes by inverse gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Victor; Mrabet, Béchir; Baeta Neves, Maria Inês; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Benzarti, Karim

    2002-09-01

    Two cement pastes, commonly used in concrete formulations, were characterised by IGC at 35-80 degrees C before and after coating with an epoxy resin and a hardener. The cements are mixtures of hydrates in various proportions, such as calcium silicate hydrate (CaO-SiO2-H2O) and calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2. Apolar and polar probes were used to determine the dispersive and acid-base characteristics of the cement pastes. These materials have high surface energy as judged from the dispersive contribution to the surface free energy (gamma(s)d) values lying in the 50-70 mJ/m2 range at 60-80 degrees C. Examination of the specific interactions permitted to show that the cement pastes are strongly amphoteric species with a substantial predominant Lewis basicity that is in line with the basic pH of their aqueous suspensions. Following coating with an epoxy resin (DGEBA) and a hardener (triethylene tetramine), the surface energy of the cements decreases substantially with the mass loading of the organic material. The surface thermodynamic properties were also correlated with the surface chemical composition as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. PMID:12385397

  1. Solidification of radioactive waste in a cement/lime mixture

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.; Colombo, P.

    1984-01-01

    The suitability of a cement/lime mixture for use as a solidification agent for different types of wastes was investigated. This work includes studies directed towards determining the wasted/binder compositional field over which successful solidification occurs with various wastes and the measurement of some of the waste from properties relevant to evaluating the potential for the release of radionuclides to the environment. In this study, four types of low-level radioactive wastes were simulated for incorporation into a cement/lime mixture. These were boric acid waste, sodium sulfate wastes, aion exchange resins and incinerator ash. 7 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  2. 3D FEA of cemented glass fiber and cast posts with various dental cements in a maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Madfa, Ahmed A; Al-Hamzi, Mohsen A; Al-Sanabani, Fadhel A; Al-Qudaimi, Nasr H; Yue, Xiao-Guang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to analyse and compare the stability of two dental posts cemented with four different luting agents by examining their shear stress transfer through the FEM. Eight three-dimensional finite element models of a maxillary central incisor restored with glass fiber and Ni-Cr alloy cast dental posts. Each dental post was luted with zinc phosphate, Panavia resin, super bond C&B resin and glass ionomer materials. Finite element models were constructed and oblique loading of 100 N was applied. The distribution of shear stress was investigated at posts and cement/dentine interfaces using ABAQUS/CAE software. The peak shear stress for glass fiber post models minimized approximately three to four times of those for Ni-Cr alloy cast post models. There was negligible difference in peak of shear stress when various cements were compared, irrespective of post materials. The shear stress had same trend for all cement materials. This study found that the glass fiber dental post reduced the shear stress concentration at interfacial of post and cement/dentine compared to Ni-Cr alloy cast dental post. PMID:26543733

  3. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-01-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. DOE joined the Materials Management Service (MMS)-sponsored joint industry project ''Long-Term Integrity of Deepwater Cement under Stress/Compaction Conditions.'' Results of the project contained in two progress reports are also presented in this report.

  4. In Vitro Fit and Cementation Resistance of Provisional Crowns for Single Implant-Supported Restorations.

    PubMed

    Moris, Izabela Cristina Maurício; Oliveira, Juliana Elias de; Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to verify marginal fit and the effect of cement film thickness standardization on retention of provisional crowns made with prefabricated acrylic cylinders on abutments, using two temporary luting agents subjected or not to mechanical cycling. Provisional crowns were made from bis-acryl (Luxatemp Fluorescence) or methyl methacrylate (Duralay) resins on acrylic cylinders and marginal fit and cement film thickness were evaluated. For retention evaluation, crowns were cemented with two temporary luting agents: non-eugenol zinc oxide (Tempbond NE) or calcium hydroxide-based (Hydcal) cements and subjected to tensile strength in a universal testing machine. After cleaning, debonded crowns were cemented again, subjected to mechanical cycling and retention was reassessed. The results of marginal fit and cement film thickness were analyzed by Student's t-test while retention of cements before and after mechanical cycling was analyzed using a mixed linear model. Methyl methacrylate crowns presented greater marginal misfit (p=0.001) and occlusal cement film thickness (p=0.003) than the bis-acryl ones. No difference was observed at axial cement film thickness (p=0.606). Resins (p=0.281) did not affect crown retention, but luting agents (p=0.029) and mechanical cycling (p=0.027) showed significant effects. The only significant interaction was mechanical cycling*luting agents, which means that luting agents were differently affected by mechanical cycling (p=0.002). In conclusion, the results showed that bis-acryl resin associated to calcium-hydroxide luting agent provided the best retention and lower cement thickness. PMID:26647930

  5. Cements from nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Barralet, J E; Lilley, K J; Grover, L M; Farrar, D F; Ansell, C; Gbureck, U

    2004-04-01

    Calcium phosphate cements are used as bone substitute materials because they may be moulded to fill a void or defect in bone and are osteoconductive. Although apatite cements are stronger than brushite cements, they are potentially less resorbable in vivo. Brushite cements are three-component systems whereby phosphate ions and water react with a soluble calcium phosphate to form brushite (CaHPO4 x 2H2O). Previously reported brushite cement formulations set following the mixture of a calcium phosphate, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), with an acidic component such as H3PO4 or monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM). Due to its low solubility, hydroxyapatite (HA) is yet to be reported as a reactive component in calcium phosphate cement systems. Here we report a new cement system setting to form a matrix consisting predominantly of brushite following the mixture of phosphoric acid with nanocrystalline HA. As a result of the relative ease with which ionic substitutions may be made in apatite this route may offer a novel way to control cement composition or setting characteristics. Since kinetic solubility is dependent on particle size and precipitation temperature is known to affect precipitated HA crystal size, the phase composition and mechanical properties of cements made from HA precipitated at temperatures between 4 and 60 degrees C were investigated. PMID:15332608

  6. The influence of different cementation modes on the fracture resistance of feldspathic ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Groten, M; Pröbster, L

    1997-01-01

    One hundred twenty pressed feldspathic ceramic crowns were luted to 20 steel dies using six different cementation modes. Fracture resistance was tested under an angle of 45 degrees and was determined as the maximal fracture load. Crowns were tested with luting agent only (groups A and C) and after etching with hydrofluoric acid, silanating, and the application of a bonding agent (groups B, D, E, and F). The resulting means were: phosphate cement 294.3 (A) and 282.2 (B); glass-ionomer cement 217.2 (C) and 255.4 (D); resin composite 382.2 (E) and 687.6 (F). Statistical analysis revealed significantly greater fracture resistance (P < .01) of resin luted crowns. Bonding to the die almost doubled the fracture resistance. Conditioning of the inner surfaces of the crowns did not improve the fracture resistance of crowns luted using zinc phosphate or glass-ionomer cements. PMID:9206458

  7. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    SciTech Connect

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.; McDaniel, K.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. We cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e., compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion.

  8. Nanoleakage of fiber posts luted with different adhesive strategies and the effect of chlorhexidine on the interface of dentin and self-adhesive cements.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Araujo, Cintia Tereza Pimenta; Prieto, Lucia Trazzi; de Oliveira, Dayane Carvalho Ramos Salles; Coppini, Erick Kamiya; Dias, Carlos Tadeu Santos; Paulillo, Luis Alexandre Maffei Sartini

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the nanoleakage of fiber posts luted using different adhesive strategies and to investigate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) on nanoleakage at the resin-dentin interfaces of self-adhesive cements. The self-adhesive and etch-and-rinse adhesive groups tested demonstrated similar results with regard to nanoleakage. Pretreatment with CHX promoted an adequate seal at the resin-dentin interface for self-adhesive cements. PMID:25945761

  9. Polyester Resin Hazards

    PubMed Central

    Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

    1963-01-01

    Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

  10. Effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength of a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ceci, Matteo; Pigozzo, Marco; Scribante, Andrea; Beltrami, Riccardo; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of glycine pretreatment on the shear bond strength between dentin and a CAD/CAM resin nano ceramic material (LavaTM Ultimate Restorative), bonded together with adhesive cements using three different luting protocols (total-etch; self-etch; self-adhesive). Material and Methods Thirty cylinders were milled from resin nano ceramic blocks with CAD/CAM technology. The cylinders were subsequently cemented to the exposed dentin of 30 bovine permanent mandibular incisors. The specimens were assigned into six groups of five teeth each according to luting procedure and dentin pretreatment. In the first two groups (A1, A2) 10 cylinders were cemented using a total-etch protocol; in groups B1 and B2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-etch protocol; in groups C1 and C2, 10 cylinders were cemented using a self-adhesive protocol; in groups A1, B1 and C1 the dentinal surface was also treated with glycine powder. All cemented specimens were submitted to a shear bond strength test. Statistical analysis was performed with Stata 9.0 software. Results ANOVA showed the presence of significant differences among the various groups (P <0.0001). Conclusions Glycine did not change the different bond strength demonstrated by the various luting protocols tested. Conventional resin composite cements used together with a self-etch adhesive reported the highest values. However the use of glycine seems to increase the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. Key words:Adhesive cements, CAD/CAM, glycine, luting system, resin nano ceramic, shear bond strength. PMID:27034754

  11. Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

  12. EFFECT OF EUGENOL-BASED ENDODONTIC SEALER ON THE ADHESION OF INTRARADICULAR POSTS CEMENTED AFTER DIFFERENT PERIODS

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Larissa Lustosa Lima; Giovani, Alessandro Rogério; Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa Silva; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal; Alfredo, Edson; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião; Paulino, Silvana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated in vitro the influence of an eugenol-based sealer (EndoFill) on the retention of stainless steel prefabricated posts cemented with zinc phosphate and resin-based (Panavia F) cements after different periods of root canal obturation, using the pull-out test. Material and methods: Sixty upper canines were decoronated and the roots were embedded in resin blocks. The specimens were distributed into 3 groups, according to the period elapsed between canal obturation and post cementation: Group I - immediately; Group II - 72 h and Group III - 4 months. The groups were subdivided according to the type of cement used for post cementation: A - zinc phosphate and B - Panavia F. Following the experimental periods, specimens were subjected to pull- out test in an Instron machine with application of tensile force at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until post dislodgement. The maximum forces required for post removal were recorded (kN) and means were subjected to statistical analysis by 2-way ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.001) Results: There were statistically significant differences (p<0.01) between the posts cemented with zinc phosphate cement (0.2112 kN) and Panavia F (0.0501 kN). However, no statistically significant differences (p>0.05) were found between the three post cementation periods, regardless of the cement. Conclusions: It was concluded that the eugenol-based sealer influenced the tensile strength of the posts cemented with the resin cement, but had no influence on the time waited between root canal obturation and post space preparation/post cementation. PMID:20027430

  13. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2004-01-30

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

  14. Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

    2003-02-26

    Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

  15. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2002-01-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

  16. Matrix control cementing slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Arpenter, R.B.

    1986-02-11

    This patent describes a method of cementing a well bore. The method consists of 1.) mixing together at ambient temperatures at the well surface a hydraulic cement, water, in an effective amount to produce a pumpable slurry, and a polyvinyl acetate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer, which is insoluble in the slurry at ambient temperatures. The polymer has a greater than about 95 percent acetate groups converted to hydroxyl groups. The polymer is heated to actuable solubilization in the cement slurry at temperatures above about 120/sup 0/F. The solubilizing of the polyvinyl acetate-polyvinyl alcohol polymer in the slurry prior to the setting of the slurry by pumping the cement slurry to a desired location in the well bore. This action increases the temperature of the slurry; and 2.) allows the cement slurry to harden to a solid mass.

  17. Marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of 2 zirconia crown systems luted with glass ionomer and MDP-based cements.

    PubMed

    Sener, Isil; Turker, Begum; Valandro, Luiz Felipe; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2014-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the marginal gap, cement thickness, and microleakage of glass-ionomer cement (GIC) and phosphate monomer-containing resin cement (MDP-RC) under 2 zirconia crown systems (Cercon and DC-Zirkon). Forty human premolars were prepared for all-ceramic zirconia crowns with a 1 mm circumferential finish line and a 1.5 mm occlusal reduction. The crowns (n = 10 per group) from each zirconia system were randomly divided into 2 groups and cemented either with GIC (Vivaglass CEM) or MDP-RC (Panavia F 2.0) cement. The cemented crowns were thermocycled 5000 times (5°-55°C). The crowns were immersed in 0.5% basic fuchsine dye solution for 24 hours and sectioned buccolingually and mesiodistally. Specimens were examined under optical microscope (100X). Data were analyzed using Student t-test and chi-square tests (α = 0.05). Mean marginal gap values for Cercon (85 ± 11.4 μm) were significantly higher than for DC-Zircon (75.3 ± 13.2 μm) (P = 0.018). The mean cement thickness values of GIC (81.7 ± 13.9 μm) and MDP-RC (78.5 ± 12.5 μm) were not significantly different (P = 0.447). Microleakage scores did not demonstrate significant difference between GIC (P = 0.385) and MDP-RC (P = 0.631) under Cercon or DC-Zircon. Considering the cement thickness values and microleakage scores obtained, both zirconia crown systems could be cemented in combination with either GIC or MDP-RC. PMID:24598500

  18. Influence of endodontic sealer composition and time of fiber post cementation on sealer adhesiveness to bovine root dentin.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Ricardo Abreu da; Barreto, Mirela Sangoi; Moraes, Rafael do Amaral; Broch, Juliana; Bier, Carlos Alexandre Souza; Só, Marcus Vinícius Reis; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the influence of the type of endodontic sealer (salicylate resin-based sealer vs. two endodontic sealers) and the time of fiber post cementation after root filling on the post adhesion to bovine root dentin. Sixty bovine roots were assigned to six groups (n=10), considering an experimental design with two factors (factorial 3x2): endodontic sealer factor in three levels [epoxy resin-based sealer (AH Plus), eugenol-based sealer (Endofill), and salicylate resin-based sealer plus mineral trioxide aggregate - MTA (MTA Fillapex)] and time for post cementation factor in two levels (immediate post cementation or 15 days after root canal filling). After post cementation, 2-mm-thick slices were produced and submitted to push-out test. The failure modes were analyzed under a 40× stereomicroscope and scored as: adhesive at cement/dentin interface; adhesive at cement/post interface; cement cohesive; post cohesive; dentin cohesive; or mixed. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc tests (α=0.05). When the fiber posts were cemented immediately after the root canal filling, the bond strengths were similar, independent of the endodontic sealer type. However, after 15 days, the epoxy resin-based sealer presented higher bond strength than the other sealers (p<0.05). Comparison between each sealer in different experimental times did not reveal any differences. The main failure type was adhesive at dentin/cement interface (89.4%). The time elapsed between the root canal filling and post cementation has no influence on post/root dentin adhesion. On the contrary, the type of endodontic sealer can influence the adhesion between fiber posts and root dentin. PMID:23969913

  19. Resin systems for producing polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1988-09-01

    When plastics are combined with mixtures of inorganic materials, high-strength, durable, fast-setting composites are produced. These materials are used in structural engineering and other applications, and as a result of the many commercial successes that have been achieved, considerable research and development work is in progress throughout the world. One family of polymer-based composites receiving considerable attention is called polymer concrete. Work in this area is directed toward developing new high-strength durable materials by combining cement and concrete technology with that of polymer chemistry. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the types of resins that can be used to form polymer concretes. Resin selection is normally based upon the desired properties for the composite and cost. However, the physical and chemical properties of the resins before and during curing are also important, particularly for field-applied materials. Currently, for normal temperature (0/degree/ to 30/degree/C) applications, epoxy resins, vinyl monomers such as polyester-styrene, methylmethacrylate, furfuryl alcohol, furan derivatives, urethane, and styrene, are being used. Styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) mixtures and styrene-acrylamide-TMPTMA mixtures yield composites with excellent hydrothermal stability at temperatures up to 150/degree/ and 250/degree/C, respectively, and organosiloxane resins have been successfully tested at 300/degree/C. Of equal importance is the selection of the composition of the inorganic phase of the composite, since chemical interactions between the two phases can significantly enhance the final properties. Further work to elucidate the mechanisms of these interactions is needed. 6 refs.

  20. Incombustible resin composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akima, T.

    1982-01-01

    Incombustible resin compositions composed of aromatic compounds were obtained through (1) combustion polymer material and (2) bisphenol A or halogenated bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidl ether or halogenated bisphenol A diglycidyl ether. The aromatic compound is an adduct of bifunctional phenols and bifunctional epoxy resins.

  1. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    DOEpatents

    Not Available

    1982-08-12

    Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

  2. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-07-31

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the eleventh quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in unacceptable erosion of the test specimens. In subsequent tests, a different expansion procedure was implemented and an alternate curing method for cements formulated with TXI Lightweight cement was employed to prevent sample failure caused by thermal shock. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but data for some compositions were still questionable. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement were implemented and testing is ongoing.

  3. Timing of syntaxial cement

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.D.

    1985-02-01

    Echinodermal fragments are commonly overgrown in ancient limestones, with large single crystals growing in optical continuity over their skeletal hosts (i.e., syntaxial overgrowths). Such syntaxial cements are usually considered to have precipitated from meteoric pore waters associated with a later stage of subaerial exposure. Although several examples have been reported from ancient carbonates where petrographic relationships may indicate an early submarine formation of syntaxial cement, no occurrences have been noted in Holocene submarine-cemented rocks. Syntaxial cements of submarine origin have been found in Bermuda beachrock where isopachous high-magnesian calcite cements merge with large optically continuous crystals growing on echinodermal debris. Examination of other Holocene sediments cemented by magnesian calcite indicates that echinodermal fragments are not always overgrown syntaxially, but may be rimmed by microcrystalline calcite. The reason for this difference is not clear, although it may be a function of the spacing of nucleation sites and rates of crystal growth. A review of syntaxial cements from several localities in ancient carbonate sequences reveals that many are best interpreted as having formed in the submarine setting, whereas it is more clear that others formed from meteoric precipitation. These occurrences suggest that care should be exercised in inferring meteoric diagenesis from syntaxial overgrowths and that the possibility of submarine formation should be considered.

  4. Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

  5. EP-toxicity testing of mercury removal resin grout

    SciTech Connect

    Mersman, K.E.

    1984-07-18

    To determine which category a waste will fit into, the EPA requires a classification test. The test, EP-toxicity, consists of a physical integrity test followed by an extraction. For the case of the mercury removal resin grout, the mercury concentration in the extract cannot exceed 0.2 mg/L if the waste is to be classified as ``solid waste.`` Otherwise, the waste is classified as ``hazardous.`` Simulated process solutions were used to load the mercury removal resin. The resin was solidified with the addition of cement and water using a formulation based on grout formulations typically used to solidify power reactor ion exchange resins. Envirodyne Engineers of St. Louis, Missouri, an EPA sanctioned laboratory, performed the EP-toxicity test for the two samples. One sample was a blank which was made with unloaded resin. For the formulation tested, the EP-toxicity test results showed that the mercury removal resin grout does not fit into the ``hazardous waste`` category.

  6. Thermal diffusivity of glass ionomer cement systems.

    PubMed

    Brantley, W A; Kerby, R E

    1993-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity has been measured for 10 glass ionomer and resin-based materials: three conventional (water-hardened) glass ionomer cements, two silver-reinforced glass ionomers, an experimental stainless steel-reinforced glass ionomer, three visible light-cured (VLC) glass ionomer-resin hybrid materials, and a VLC resin-based product developed for the same clinical uses as the hybrid materials. Cube-shaped specimens, c. 10 x 10 x 10 mm, initially at room temperature were immersed in mercury surrounded by an ice-water bath. From the experimental cooling curve a semi-log plot of relative temperature decrease vs. time yielded a straight line whose slope is proportional to the thermal diffusivity. The values ranged from 1.74-5.16 x 10(-3) cm2 s-1, and all of the materials tested would have adequate insulating properties provided normal clinical thickness levels for lining materials are maintained. It was found that the thermal diffusivities for the three metal-reinforced glass ionomers, where composition information is available, do not follow a rule of mixtures applied to the individual components. PMID:8429424

  7. Cement and concrete

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corley, Gene; Haskin, Larry A.

    1992-01-01

    To produce lunar cement, high-temperature processing will be required. It may be possible to make calcium-rich silicate and aluminate for cement by solar heating of lunar pyroxene and feldspar, or chemical treatment may be required to enrich the calcium and aluminum in lunar soil. The effects of magnesium and ferrous iron present in the starting materials and products would need to be evaluated. So would the problems of grinding to produce cement, mixing, forming in vacuo and low gravity, and minimizing water loss.

  8. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate.

    PubMed

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  9. The Retentive Strength of Cemented Zirconium Oxide Crowns after Dentin Pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste Containing 8% Arginine and Calcium Carbonate

    PubMed Central

    Pilo, Raphael; Harel, Noga; Nissan, Joseph; Levartovsky, Shifra

    2016-01-01

    The effect of dentin pretreatment with Desensitizing Paste containing 8% arginine and calcium carbonate on the retention of zirconium oxide (Y-TZP) crowns was tested. Forty molar teeth were mounted and prepared using a standardized protocol. Y-TZP crowns were produced using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD-CAM) technology. The 40 prepared teeth were either pretreated with Desensitizing Paste or not pretreated. After two weeks, each group was subdivided into two groups, cemented with either Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) or Self Adhesive Resin Cement (SARC)). Prior to cementation, the surface areas of the prepared teeth were measured. After aging, the cemented crown-tooth assemblies were tested for retentive strength using a universal testing machine. The debonded surfaces of the teeth and crowns were examined microscopically at 10× magnification. Pretreating the dentin surfaces with Desensitizing Paste prior to cementation did not affect the retention of the Y-TZP crowns. The retentive values for RMGIC (3.04 ± 0.77 MPa) were significantly higher than those for SARC (2.28 ± 0.58 MPa). The predominant failure modes for the RMGIC and SARC were adhesive cement-dentin and adhesive cement-crown, respectively. An 8.0% arginine and calcium carbonate in-office desensitizing paste can be safely used to reduce post-cementation sensitivity without reducing the retentive strength of Y-TZP crowns. PMID:27023532

  10. Resin bonding of metal brackets to glazed zirconia with a porcelain primer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Milim; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to compare the shear bond strength between orthodontic metal brackets and glazed zirconia using different types of primer before applying resin cement and to determine which primer was more effective. Methods Zirconia blocks were milled and embedded in acrylic resin and randomly assigned to one of four groups: nonglazed zirconia with sandblasting and zirconia primer (NZ); glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, and zirconia primer (GZ); glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, and porcelain primer (GP); and glazed zirconia with sandblasting, etching, zirconia primer, and porcelain primer (GZP). A stainless steel metal bracket was bonded to each target surface with resin cement, and all specimens underwent thermal cycling. The shear bond strength of the specimens was measured by a universal testing machine. A scanning electron microscope, three-dimensional optical surface-profiler, and stereoscopic microscope were used to image the zirconia surfaces. The data were analyzed with one-way analyses of variance and the Fisher exact test. Results Group GZ showed significantly lower shear bond strength than did the other groups. No statistically significant differences were found among groups NZ, GP, and GZP. All specimens in group GZ showed adhesive failure between the zirconia and resin cement. In groups NZ and GP, bonding failed at the interface between the resin cement and bracket base or showed complex adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusions Porcelain primer is the more appropriate choice for bonding a metal bracket to the surface of a full-contour glazed zirconia crown with resin cement. PMID:26629476

  11. The effect of etching on a number of glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Fuss, J; Mount, G J; Makinson, O F

    1990-08-01

    In view of the continuing interest in the use of glass ionomer cements as a dentine substitute or base under composite resins, further investigations were carried out on the effects of the length of time of etching of the surface of the cement prior to the placement of the resin. A number of cements are available on the Australian market which are advocated for use in this technique. Each of them was subjected to etching for periods of 15, 30, 45, or 60 seconds and then stored in water for one week. Examination under a dissecting microscope and a scanning electron microscope revealed some variation in results between the different cements. It would appear that not all those materials presently marketed for this purpose are entirely suitable. Whilst 15 seconds is the preferred time for most cements, some require times up to 60 seconds to achieve the best result. Also, some of the cements showed signs of cracking, expansion and distortion after they had been stored in water for one week to allow for maturation before being prepared for viewing under the SEM. It is suggested that this group of cements is not suitable for the 'sandwich' technique. PMID:2275652

  12. Development of resins for composites by resin transfer molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Edmund P.; Puckett, Paul M.; Maynard, Shawn J.

    1991-01-01

    Designed to cover a wide range of resin technology and to meet the near-term and long-term needs of the aircraft industry, this research has three objectives: to produce resin transfer molding (RES) resins with improved processability, to produce prepreg systems with high toughness and service temperature, and to produce new resin systems. Progress on reaching the objectives is reported.

  13. Interfacial interactions of structural adhesive components with cement pastes - Studies by inverse gas chromatography (IGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baeta Neves, Inês; Chabut, Maud; Perruchot, Christian; Chehimi, Mohamed M.; Benzarti, Karim

    2004-11-01

    The surface energy of hardened cement pastes, before and after treatment by organic coating, and two individual cement paste components (CSH and ettringite) have been characterized by inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at 35 °C, using n-alkanes, 1-alkenes, benzene, chloroform and CCl4 molecular probes. The cement pastes were prepared by mixing an ordinary Portland cement (OPC) with water at a water/cement ratio (W/C) equal to 0.3 and 0.5. They were further coated with an epoxy resin (R) and triethylenetetramine hardener (H), separately, at a mass loading of 1 and 10 wt.%, respectively. Changes in the dispersive contribution to the surface energy (γsd) and Lewis acid-base interaction energies were found to be significantly dependent on the W/C parameter on the one hand, and the adsorption of H and R, on the other hand.

  14. Distribution Coefficients (Kd Values) for Waste Resins Generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2002-12-02

    The objective of this study was to measure 14C, 129I, and 99Tc Kd values of spent resin generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities. The scope of the work was to conduct Kd measurements of resins combined in the ratio that they are disposed, 42:58 cation:anion. Because it was not known how these spent resins would be buried, it was necessary to measure the Kd values in such a manner as to simulate both trench and vault disposal. This was accomplished by using an acid-rain simulant (a standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol) and a cement leachate simulant .

  15. Environmentally compatible spray cement

    SciTech Connect

    Loeschnig, P.

    1995-12-31

    Within the framework of a European research project, Heidelberger Zement developed a quickly setting and hardening binder for shotcrete, called Chronolith S, which avoids the application of setting accelerators. Density and strength of the shotcrete produced with this spray cement correspond to those of an unaccelerated shotcrete. An increased hazard for the heading team and for the environment, which may occur when applying setting accelerators, can be excluded here. Owing to the special setting properties of a spray cement, the process engineering for its manufacturing is of great importance. The treatment of a spray cement as a dry concrete with kiln-dried aggregates is possible without any problems. The use of a naturally damp pre-batched mixture is possible with Chronolith S but requires special process engineering; spray cement and damp aggregate are mixed with one another immediately before entering the spraying machinery.

  16. [Allergy towards bone cement].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Summer, B; Mazoochian, F; Thomsen, M

    2006-09-01

    Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate are typically used for fixation of artificial joints. Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses not explained by infection or mechanical failure may lead to allergological diagnostics, which mostly focuses on metal allergy. However, also bone cement components may provoke hypersensitivity reactions leading to eczema, implant loosening, or fistula formation. Elicitors of such reactions encompass acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, or antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). Upon repeated contact with bone cement components, e.g., acrylate monomers, also in medical personnel occasionally hand eczema or even asthma may develop. Therefore, in the case of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty, the allergological diagnostics should include bone cement components. PMID:16865384

  17. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  18. Failure load of teeth restored by use of alumina copings: Influence of residual tooth structure and cementation.

    PubMed

    Schmitter, Marc; Posavec, Tomislav; Mueller, Denise; Mussotter, Katrin; Rammelsberg, Peter; Rues, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate failure loads of teeth restored by use of alumina-coping, and to assess the effects of different amounts of residual tooth structure and different cements, standardized artificial alumina copings were fabricated on seventy-two molars. 24 of the copings were cemented by use of an adhesive resin cement (P-group), n=24 by use of glass-ionomer cement (K-group), and n=24 by use of a self-adhesive modified composite resin-cement (R-group). After artificial ageing (10,000 thermal-cycles between 6.5 and 60°C; 1,200,000 chewing cycles with Fmax=64 N), the specimens were loaded until failure (cross-head-speed: 0.5 mm/min). In the K-group 83% of the specimens failed during chewing simulation. Statistical analysis included chi-squared-test, unpaired-to-sample-t-test, and ANOVA. For severely damaged teeth, loads to failure in the P-group (384 N) were significantly (p=0.03) higher than in the R-group (295 N). For severely damaged teeth, use of composite resin cement resulted in higher loads to failure than use of other cements. PMID:23903633

  19. Biocompatibility of composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

    2011-01-01

    Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

  20. Biocidal quaternary ammonium resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janauer, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Activated carbon (charcoal) and polymeric resin sorbents are widely used in the filtration and treatment of drinking water, mainly to remove dissolved organic and inorganic impurities and to improve the taste. Earlier hopes that activated carbon might "disinfect' water proved to be unfounded. The feasibility of protecting against microbial infestation in charcoal and resin beds such as those to be incorporated into total water reuse systems in spacecraft was investigated. The biocidal effect of IPCD (insoluable polymeric contact disinfectants) in combination with a representative charcoal was assessed. The ion exchange resins (IPCD) were shown to adequately protect charcoal and ion exchange beds.

  1. Flexural strength and modulus of a novel ceramic restorative cement intended for posterior restorations as determined by a three-point bending test.

    PubMed

    Sunnegårdh-Grönberg, Karin; Peutzfeldt, Anne; van Dijken, Jan W V

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a new restorative cement intended for posterior restorations, Doxadent, with other types of tooth-colored materials as regards flexural strength and flexural modulus. The new restorative material consists mainly of calcium aluminate. Four hybrid resin composites, one polyacid-modified resin composite, one resin-modified glass ionomer cement, one conventional glass ionomer cement, one zinc phosphate cement, and an experimental version as well as the marketed version of Doxadent were investigated. Flexural strength and flexural modulus were tested according to ISO standard 4049 and determined after 1 d, 1 week, and 2 weeks. Together with the zinc phosphate cement, Doxadent had the lowest flexural strengths (13-22 MPa). The strongest materials were the resin composites and the polyacid-modified resin composite (83-136 MPa). The highest flexural modulus was found for Doxadent (17-19 GPa). The flexural strength of Doxadent decreased significantly from 1 week to 2 weeks, while flexural modulus remained unchanged. The other materials reacted in different ways to prolonged water storage. It can be concluded that the restorative cement Doxadent had significantly lower flexural strength and significantly higher flexural modulus than today's materials used for direct posterior restorations. PMID:12790505

  2. Prosthodontic self-treatment with acrylic resin super glue: a case report.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sheldon; Wood, Robert; Facchiano, Anne M; Boberick, Kenneth G; Patel, Amita R

    2006-01-01

    A case history is presented of a patient who fabricated 3 prostheses from autopolymerizing acrylic resin intended for fingernail augmentation and then cemented them into her mouth with super glue. Patients must be warned not to attempt self-treatment for esthetics with self-fabricated prostheses because severe adverse and irreversible hard and soft tissue reactions may occur. PMID:16836177

  3. The effect of varnishes and other surface treatments on water movement across the glass ionomer cement surface. II.

    PubMed

    Earl, M S; Mount, G J; Hume, W R

    1989-08-01

    The aesthetic restorative glass ionomer cements undergo a rather prolonged setting reaction during which time they are susceptible to water uptake and water loss. If they can be maintained in isolation long enough in the oral cavity then the clinical result will be superior. A further series of surface treatments has been tested and it has been shown that immediate covering of the immature glass ionomer cement surface with light-activated bonding resin is the most effective method of limiting water movement across the surface. This restriction of water movement is not effective for all light-activated bonding resins suggesting that there may be a physico-chemical interaction occurring on the glass ionomer cement surface with certain of the resins. PMID:2775020

  4. Thermally stable laminating resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.; Burns, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    Improved thermally stable laminating resins were developed based on the addition-type pyrolytic polymerization. Detailed monomer and polymer synthesis and characterization studies identified formulations which facilitate press molding processing and autoclave fabrication of glass and graphite fiber reinforced composites. A specific resin formulation, termed P10P was utilized to prepare a Courtaulds HMS reinforced simulated airfoil demonstration part by an autoclave molding process.

  5. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  6. Comparative Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Luting Cements to Different Core Buildup Materials in Lactic Acid Buffer Solution

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Siddharam M.; Desai, Raviraj G.; Arabbi, Kashinath C.; Prakash, Ved

    2015-01-01

    Aim and Objectives The core buildup material is used to restore badly broken down tooth to provide better retention for fixed restorations. The shear bond strength of a luting agent to core buildup is one of the crucial factors in the success of the cast restoration. The aim of this invitro study was to evaluate and compare the shear bond strength of luting cements with different core buildup materials in lactic acid buffer solution. Materials and Methods Two luting cements {Traditional Glass Ionomer luting cement (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer luting cement (RMGIC)} and five core buildup materials {Silver Amalgam, Glass ionomer (GI), Glass Ionomer Silver Reinforced (GI Silver reinforced), Composite Resin and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer(RMGIC)} were selected for this study. Total 100 specimens were prepared with 20 specimens for each core buildup material using a stainless steel split metal die. Out of these 20 specimens, 10 specimens were bonded with each luting cement. All the bonded specimens were stored at 370c in a 0.01M lactic acid buffer solution at a pH of 4 for 7days. Shear bond strength was determined using a Universal Testing Machine at a cross head speed of 0.5mm/min. The peak load at fracture was recorded and shear bond strength was calculated. The data was statistically analysed using Two-way ANOVA followed by HOLM-SIDAK method for pair wise comparison at significance level of p<0.05. Results Two-Way ANOVA showed significant differences in bond strength of the luting cements (p<0.05) and core materials (p<0.05) and the interactions (p<0.05). Pairwise comparison of luting cements by HOLM-SIDAK test, showed that the RMGIC luting cement had higher shear bond strength values than Traditional GIC luting cement for all the core buildup materials. RMGIC core material showed higher bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI silver reinforced, GI and silver amalgam core materials for both the luting agents. Conclusion Shear bond strength of RMGIC luting cement was significantly higher than traditional GIC luting cement for all core buildup materials except, for silver amalgam core buildup material. RMGIC core material showed highest shear bond strength values followed by Composite resin, GI Silver Reinforced, GI and Silver Amalgam core materials irrespective of luting cements. PMID:26436055

  7. Polyacrylic cements in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J

    1990-04-01

    The polyacrylic cements were first introduced to dentistry in the middle 1960's when Smith showed the value of the polyacids, in developing adhesion to enamel and dentine. Within 10 years, Wilson had advanced the concept by changing the powder from a zinc oxide to glass and at the same time varying the poly-acid used. Both cements depend on the development of complex polyacrylate chains which can be linked with metal ions and in turn can form dynamic linkages with both enamel and dentine. The original polycarboxylate cement has many desirable characteristics and is still a useful cement for luting crowns and bridges and for lining cavities. However it is no longer widely used because it has been somewhat overshadowed by the glass ionomer cements which are even more versatile and have superior physical properties. By varying the type of glass, the fluoride content of the glass and the powder/liquid ratio as well as adding inclusions of other metals such as silver they can fulfil a variety of roles in restorative dentistry. However, as with any restorative material, it is essential that the operator fully understand the requirements for successful placement. The basic rules are reviewed for each of the types currently available and the steps for clinical success are detailed. PMID:2076229

  8. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2001-10-23

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses tasks performed in the fourth quarter as well as the other three quarters of the past year. The subjects that were covered in previous reports and that are also discussed in this report include: Analysis of field laboratory data of active cement applications from three oil-well service companies; Preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; Summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; and Comparison of compressive strengths of ULHS systems using ultrasonic and crush methods Results reported from the fourth quarter include laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems--foamed and sodium silicate slurries. These comparison studies were completed for two different densities (10.0 and 11.5 lb/gal) and three different field application scenarios. Additional testing included the mechanical properties of ULHS systems and other lightweight systems. Studies were also performed to examine the effect that circulation by centrifugal pump during mixing has on breakage of ULHS.

  9. ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Sabins

    2003-06-16

    The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries. Laboratory testing during the tenth quarter focused on evaluation of the alkali-silica reaction of eight different cement compositions, four of which contain ULHS. The original laboratory procedure for measuring set cement expansion resulted in test specimen erosion that was unacceptable. A different expansion procedure is being evaluated. This report provides a progress summary of ASR testing. The testing program initiated in November produced questionable initial results so the procedure was modified slightly and the testing was reinitiated. The results obtained with the modified procedure showed improvement over data obtained with the original procedure, but questionable data were obtained from several of the compositions. Additional modification of test procedures for compositions containing TXI Lightweight cement are being implemented and testing is ongoing.

  10. Treatment technology for transuranic waste streams: Cementation, vitrification, and incineration testing for the treatment of spent ion exchange media

    SciTech Connect

    Place, B.G.

    1992-04-01

    This document reports the results of testing of spent ion exchange media pretreatment technologies. Emphasis of the testing activities has been on screening pretreatment technologies, such as drying and emulsification, which are compatible with vitrification, cementation, and incineration. Ion exchange media tested for cementation and incineration pretreatment technologies were typical organic ion exchange resins and inorganic zeolites. The ion exchange medium tested for vitrification pretreatment technologies was inorganic zeolite. The results of testing activities are discussed in detail in this report.

  11. Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241

    SciTech Connect

    Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio; Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio

    2013-07-01

    The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation process. It was possible to correlate it with the final amount of non-degraded resins. These results show that these conditions were favorable to destroy the resins, indicating to be the AOP an effective technique to reduce the volume of the waste. (authors)

  12. System for radioactive waste cementation

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriev, S.A.; Barinov, A.S.; Varlakov, A.P.; Volkov, A.S.; Karlin, S.V.

    1995-12-31

    NPP, research reactors and radiochemical enterprises produce a great amount of liquid radioactive waste (LRW). One of the methods of LRW solidification is cementation. The recent investigations demonstrated possible inclusion of sufficient amount of waste in the cement matrix (up to 20--30 mass% on dry residue). In this case the cementation process becomes competitive with bituminization process, where the matrix can include 40--50 mass% and the solidified product volume is equal to the volume, obtained by cementation. Additionally, the cement matrix in contrast with the bituminous one is unburnable. Many countries are investigating the cementation process. The main idea governing technological process is the waste and cement mixing method and type of mixer. In world practice some principal types of cementation systems are used. The paper describes the SIA Radon industrial plant in Moscow.

  13. Recycled rubber in cement composites

    SciTech Connect

    Raghavan, D.; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P.

    1994-12-31

    Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

  14. Haemostatic agents on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin

    PubMed Central

    Anil, Akansha; Sekhar, Anand; Ginjupalli, Kishor

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentin surface contaminated with haemostatic agents can interfere with the bonding of self-adhesive resin cement. Therefore the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of various haemostatic agents such as Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate and Tannic acid on the shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting agent. Material and Methods The buccal surfaces of extracted premolars were flattened to expose the dentine. The teeth were then randomly divided into four groups. In Group I Aluminium Chloride was applied on the flattened dentinal surface, in Group II Ferric Sulphate was applied to exposed dentin surface, in Group III tannic acid was applied on to the dentinal surface, and the control group, i.e. Group IV was rinsed with saline. After the surface treatment, all the teeth were air dried. Then a predetermined dimension of RelyX™ U200 self-adhesive resin cement was bonded to the pretreated dentin surfaces. The samples were then stored under 370C in distilled water for 24 hours under 100 % humidity. Following this each sample was tested for shear bond strength with an Instron testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Results There was significant difference in the shear bond strength of control and tannic acid contaminated group (p<0.05), whereas there was no significant differences between the shear bond strength between control and aluminium chloride and ferric sulphate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions The usage of haemostatic agent can negatively affect the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement (Rely X) on to the dentin surface. As per the study Tannic acid significantly weakened the bond between the self-adhesive resin and dentin. Key words:Aluminium chloride, Ferric sulphate, haemostatic agent, self-adhesive resin cement, shear bond strength, Tannic acid. PMID:26330930

  15. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

  16. Small-particle-size cement

    SciTech Connect

    Ewert, D.P.; Almond, S.W.; Blerhaus, W.M. II )

    1991-05-01

    Successful remedial cementing has historically been difficult in wells with large-interval, multizone, gravel-packed completions. The reason is the inability of conventional oilfield cements to penetrate gravel packs adequately. Small-particle-size cement (SPSC) was developed to penetrate gravel packs and to provide the zonal isolation required. This paper details the laboratory work, job design, and field implementation of this new cement.

  17. Effect of curing mode on the hardness of dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials.

    PubMed

    Arrais, César Augusto Galvão; Kasaz, Aline de Cerqueira; Albino, Luís Gustavo Barrote; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Reis, Andre Figueiredo

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the Knoop Hardness (KHN) values of two dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials and one resin cement exposed to different curing conditions. Two dual-cured core build-up composite resins (LuxaCore-Dual, DMG; and FluoroCore2, Dentsply Caulk), and one dual-cured resin cement (Rely X ARC, 3M ESPE) were used in the present study. The composite materials were placed into a cylindrical matrix (2 mm in height and 3 mm in diameter), and the specimens thus produced were either light-activated for 40 s (Optilux 501, Demetron Kerr) or were allowed to self-cure for 10 min in the dark (n = 5). All specimens were then stored in humidity at 37 degrees C for 24 h in the dark and were subjected to KHN analysis. The results were submitted to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test at a pre-set alpha of 5%. All the light-activated groups exhibited higher KHN values than the self-cured ones (p = 0.00001), regardless of product. Among the self-cured groups, both composite resin core build-up materials showed higher KHN values than the dual-cured resin cement (p = 0.00001). LuxaCore-Dual exhibited higher KHN values than FluoroCore2 (p = 0.00001) when they were allowed to self-cure, while no significant differences in KHN values were observed among the light-activated products. The results suggest that dual-cured composite resin core build-up materials may be more reliable than dual-cured resin cements when curing light is not available. PMID:20658046

  18. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying

  19. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi.

    1989-10-03

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

  20. High temperature lightweight foamed cements

    DOEpatents

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1989-01-01

    Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

  1. Reducing cement's CO2 footprint

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2011-01-01

    The manufacturing process for Portland cement causes high levels of greenhouse gas emissions. However, environmental impacts can be reduced by using more energy-efficient kilns and replacing fossil energy with alternative fuels. Although carbon capture and new cements with less CO2 emission are still in the experimental phase, all these innovations can help develop a cleaner cement industry.

  2. Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

    To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

  3. Set retarded cement compositions and methods for well cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; Lindsey, D.W.; Terry, D.T.

    1990-07-17

    This patent describes a method of cementing a zone in a subterranean formation penetrated by a wellbore; It comprises: forming a pumpable set retarded cement slurry comprising hydraulic cement, fresh water, particulate silica having a particle size in the range of from about 0.02 to about 0.5 micron and a set retarder comprising a copolymer consisting essentially of 2-acrylamido, 2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) and acrylic acid having an average molecular weight below about 5000 and comprising from about 40 to about 60 mole percent AMPS; pumping the cement slurry into the zone by way of the wellbore, and allowing the cement slurry to set therein.

  4. Comparative Evaluation of Enhancing Retention of Dislodged Crowns Using Preparation Modifications and Luting Cements: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Amarnath, G S; Pandey, Apurva; Prasad, Hari Ananth; Hilal, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Complete cast crowns are good alternatives and have best longevity for the restoration of damaged posterior teeth. Occasionally, a crown with clinically acceptable margins, preparation design, and occlusion becomes loose. Providers often debate whether such a crown can be successfully recemented with any degree of confidence that it will not be dislodged under normal masticatory function. It has been documented that resistance form increases by placing grooves opposing each other in a crown and tooth; cements also have a role to play in retention of crowns. To determine whether the addition of horizontal groove in the internal surface of the crown and/or tooth preparation will increase retention of the crowns, without remaking them and achieving better retention with cements. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 extracted human mandibular molars were taken and standard preparation was done. After the crowns were ready, the groove was made in the internal surface of the crown and on the tooth, which were cemented with glass ionomer cement and resin cement. The tensile force needed to dislodge the crowns and teeth after cementation was found out. Result: The mean tensile force needed to dislodge the crown and tooth combination was highest for the group in which crown had a groove without any groove on the tooth and cemented using resin cement (252.60N). Conclusion: It can be concluded from the study that it is best to recement a crown and tooth combination using resin cement where the crown has a groove, and the tooth has no groove. PMID:26464539

  5. Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2008-12-09

    A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  6. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1995-09-12

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  7. Phosphonic acid based exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1995-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  8. Temperature rise during polymerization of different cavity liners and composite resins

    PubMed Central

    Karatas, Ozcan; Turel, Verda; Bayindir, Yusuf Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the thermal insulating properties of different light curing cavity liners and composite resins during light emitting diode (LED) curing. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four dentin discs, 1 mm thick and 8 mm in diameter, were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups. Calcium hydroxide (Ca[OH]2), resin-modified glass ionomer cement, flowable composite and adhesive systems were applied to dentin discs according to the manufacturers’ instructions. The rise in temperature during polymerization with a LED curing unit (LCU) was measured using a K-type thermocouple connected to a data logger. Subsequently, all specimens were randomly divided into one of two groups. A silorane-based composite resin and a methacrylate-based composite resin were applied to the specimens. Temperature rise during polymerization of composite resins with LCU were then measured again. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey analyses. Results: There were significant differences in temperature rise among the liners, adhesives, and composite resins (P < 0.05). Silorane-based composite resin exhibited significantly greater temperature rises than methacrylate-based resin (P < 0.05). The smallest temperature rises were observed in Ca(OH)2 specimens. Conclusion: Thermal insulating properties of different restorative materials are important factors in pulp health. Bonding agents alone are not sufficient to protect pulp from thermal stimuli throughout curing. PMID:26751112

  9. Growth hormone in polymethylmethacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Downes, S; Wood, D J; Malcolm, A J; Ali, S Y

    1990-03-01

    The in vitro release of human growth hormone (hGH) from polymethylmethacrylate bone cement was measured for up to 40 days using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In rabbits, hGH-loaded bone cement was inserted into one distal femur and plain cement was inserted into the contralateral distal femur as a control. The rabbits were killed at time intervals of one, two, and four months after surgery and the distal femurs embedded whole for histology. Quantitative histomorphometry indicated there was a greater percentage of osteoid present at the hGH-loaded cement surface than at the plain cement surface one month after implantation. The hGH released from bone cement may stimulate osteogenesis and new bone formation, thus improving the strength of the bone-cement interface. PMID:2302894

  10. Cement composition and sulfate attack

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, Natalya; Zayed, Abla . E-mail: zayed@eng.usf.edu

    2007-04-15

    Four cements were used to address the effect of tricalcium silicate content of cement on external sulfate attack in sodium sulfate solution. The selected cements had similar fineness and Bogue-calculated tricalcium aluminate content but variable tricalcium silicates. Durability was assessed using linear expansion and compressive strength. Phases associated with deterioration were examined using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Mineralogical phase content of the as-received cements was studied by X-ray diffraction using two methods: internal standard and Rietveld analysis. The results indicate that phase content of cements determined by X-ray mineralogical analysis correlates better with the mortar performance in sulfate environment than Bogue content. Additionally, it was found that in cements containing triclacium aluminate only in the cubic form, the observed deterioration is affected by tricalcium silicate content. Morphological similarities between hydration products of high tricalcium aluminate and high tricalcium silicate cements exposed to sodium sulfate environment were also observed.

  11. Cement distribution and bond strength in cemented posts.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; DeVitre, R; Tenca, J

    1984-12-01

    Rods of lucite were drilled to receive a No. 5 parapost to a depth of 4 mm and 7 mm. Posts were fitted and cemented either by coating the post with cement or by placing the cement in the prepared hole with a lentulo spiral in a low-speed hand-piece and then inserting the pre-coated post. Photographs were taken to determine the distribution of the cement. The lentulo spiral distributed the cement along the entire length of the preparation, but coating alone did not distribute the cement evenly. The tensile strength with these two methods of post cementation was also compared in four groups of extracted teeth. In Groups IA and IIA, the post preparation was rinsed with 2 ml of 5.25% NaOCl and dried with paper points and blasts of air. In Group IA, the post was coated with zinc phosphate cement and seated. In Group IIA, the cement was placed into the post space with a lentulo spiral in a slowly rotating hand-piece; the post was then coated and seated. In Groups IB and IIB, the post preparation was rinsed with 1 ml of 17% Na2 EDTA followed by 1 ml of 5.25% NaOCl to remove the smeared layer at the dentin-cement interface. The posts were then cemented as in IA and IIA. Under the conditions of this experiment, the following conclusions can be drawn: Placing cement into the preparation with a lentulo spiral increased the tensile strength and the overall cement distribution.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:6439766

  12. Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

  13. Adhesive Cementation of Indirect Composite Inlays and Onlays: A Literature Review.

    PubMed

    D'Arcangelo, Camillo; Vanini, Lorenzo; Casinelli, Matteo; Frascaria, Massimo; De Angelis, Francesco; Vadini, Mirco; D'Amario, Maurizio

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a literature review focused on materials and techniques used in adhesive cementation for indirect composite resin restorations. It was based on English language sources and involved a search of online databases in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, Google Scholar, and Scopus using related topic keywords in different combinations; it was supplemented by a traditional search of peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. The purpose of most research on adhesive systems has been to learn more about increased bond strength and simplified application methods. Adherent surface treatments before cementation are necessary to obtain high survival and success rates of indirect composite resin. Each step of the clinical and laboratory procedures can have an impact on longevity and the esthetic results of indirect restorations. Cementation seems to be the most critical step, and its long-term success relies on adherence to the clinical protocols. The authors concluded that in terms of survival rate and esthetic long-term outcomes, indirect composite resin techniques have proven to be clinically acceptable. However, the correct management of adhesive cementation protocols requires knowledge of adhesive principles and adherence to the clinical protocol in order to obtain durable bonding between tooth structure and restorative materials. PMID:26355440

  14. Initial Sliding Wear Kinetics of Two Types of Glass Ionomer Cement: A Tribological Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponthiaux, Pierre; Pradelle-Plasse, Nelly; Grosgogeat, Brigitte; Colon, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize the initial wear kinetics of two different types of glass ionomer cement used in dentistry (the conventional glass ionomer cement and the resin-modified glass ionomer cement) under sliding friction after 28-day storing in distilled water or Ringer's solution. Sliding friction was applied through a pin-on-disk tribometer, in sphere-on-plane contact conditions, under 5 N normal load and 120 rotations per minute. The test lasted 7500 cycles and replicas were performed at 2500, 5000 and 7500 cycles. A profilometer was used to evaluate the wear volume. Data were analysed using Student's t-test at a significant level of 5%. There is no statistical significant difference between the results obtained for a given material with the maturation media (P > 0.05). However, for a given maturation medium, there are significant statistical differences between the data obtained for the two materials at each measurement (P < 0.0001). The wear rates of both materials decrease continuously during the running-in period between 0 and 2500 cycles. After 2500 cycles, the wear rate becomes constant and equal for both materials. The resin matrix contained in the resin-modified glass ionomer cement weakens the tribological behaviour of this material. PMID:25093185

  15. Novel experimental cements for use on the dentin-pulp complex.

    PubMed

    Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Conde, Marcus Cristian Muniz; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Zanchi, Cesar Henrique; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2012-01-01

    This aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical and biological properties of novel experimental cements (Hybrid, Paste and Resin) based on synergistic combinations of existing materials, including pH, diametral tensile strength (DTS) and cytotoxicity comparing them with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA - Angelus®) and a glass ionomer cement (GIC) developed at our laboratory. For the physicochemical and biological tests, specimens with standard dimensions were produced. pH measurements were performed with digital pH meter at the following time intervals: 3, 24, 48 and 72 h. For the DTS test, cylindrical specimens were subjected to compressive load until fracture. The MTT assay was performed for cytotoxicity evaluation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Paste group showed pH values similar to MTA, and Hybrid group presented pH values similar to GIC (p>0.05). The tested materials showed pH values ranging from alkaline to near neutrality at the evaluated times. MTA and GIC showed similar DTS values. The lowest and highest DTS values were seen in the Paste and Resin groups, respectively (p<0.05). Cell viability for MTA and experimental Hybrid, Paste and Resin groups was 49%, 93%, 90% and 86%, respectively, when compared with the control group. The photo-cured experimental resin cement showed similar or superior performance compared with the current commercial or other tested experimental materials. PMID:23207847

  16. Dental composite resins: measuring the polymerization shrinkage using optical fiber Bragg grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ottevaere, H.; Tabak, M.; Chah, K.; Mégret, P.; Thienpont, H.

    2012-04-01

    Polymerization shrinkage of dental composite materials is recognized as one of the main reasons for the development of marginal leakage between a tooth and filling material. As an alternative to conventional measurement methods, we propose optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) based sensors to perform real-time strain and shrinkage measurements during the curing process of dental resin cements. We introduce a fully automated set-up to measure the Bragg wavelength shift of the FBG strain sensors and to accurately monitor the linear strain and shrinkage of dental resins during curing. Three different dental resin materials were studied in this work: matrix-filled BisGMA-based resins, glass ionomers and organic modified ceramics.

  17. Development of Volume-Reduction System for Ion Exchange Resin Using Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujisawa, Morio; Katagiri, Genichi

    The spent ion exchange resin generated as radioactive waste in water purifying system at nuclear power stations or related facilities of nuclear power has been stored in the site, and its volume has been increasing year by year. We had developed a full-scale system of IC plasma volume-reduction system for the spent resin, and have performed basic performance test using some samples imitating the spent resin. As the results, the imitation of the resin can be reduced in volume by more than 90% so that the processing performance in actual scale was proved to be effective. In addition, it was clarified that the residuum after volume-reduction process is easy to mix with cement, and solidity containing 30wt% residuum provides high strength of 68MPa. Therefore, we evaluate the application of this process to stabilization of the disposal to be very effective.

  18. Nontoxic Resins Advance Aerospace Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year, PETI-330, is a polyimide matrix resin that performs well at high temperatures and is easily processed into composites in a simple, short curing cycle. Invented by scientists at Langley Research Center, PETI-330 is now licensed to Ube Industries, based in Japan with its American headquarters in New York. In addition to being durable and lightweight, the resin is also nontoxic, which makes it safe for workers to handle. PETI-330 was created specifically for heat-resistant composites formed with resin transfer molding and resin infusion, which formerly could only be used with low temperature resin systems.

  19. Westinghouse Cementation Facility of Solid Waste Treatment System - 13503

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Torsten; Aign, Joerg

    2013-07-01

    During NPP operation, several waste streams are generated, caused by different technical and physical processes. Besides others, liquid waste represents one of the major types of waste. Depending on national regulation for storage and disposal of radioactive waste, solidification can be one specific requirement. To accommodate the global request for waste treatment systems Westinghouse developed several specific treatment processes for the different types of waste. In the period of 2006 to 2008 Westinghouse awarded several contracts for the design and delivery of waste treatment systems related to the latest CPR-1000 nuclear power plants. One of these contracts contains the delivery of four Cementation Facilities for waste treatment, s.c. 'Follow on Cementations' dedicated to three locations, HongYanHe, NingDe and YangJiang, of new CPR-1000 nuclear power stations in the People's Republic of China. Previously, Westinghouse delivered a similar cementation facility to the CPR-1000 plant LingAo II, in Daya Bay, PR China. This plant already passed the hot functioning tests successfully in June 2012 and is now ready and released for regular operation. The 'Follow on plants' are designed to package three 'typical' kind of radioactive waste: evaporator concentrates, spent resins and filter cartridges. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview on the Westinghouse experience to design and execution of cementation facilities. (authors)

  20. Quality improvement of photopolimerizable-cement root canal obturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupato Conrado, Luis A.; Frois, Iris M.; Amaro Zangaro, Renato; Munin, Egberto; Kuranaga, Carlos; Dias da Silva, Marcos; do Carmo de Andrade Nono, Maria; Cerquiera Rezende, Mirabel

    2003-06-01

    The sealing cements commonly used for endodontic applications are of the type cured through chemical reactions. During the polymerization process, mechanical contractions are not uncommon, leading to a non-perfect sealing. Photopolymerizable cements usually presents superior performance as compared to those chemically activated. However, difficulties in carrying the light to difficult-to-reach regions like the dental apex preclude those material of being accepted in the dental office routine. This work reports on a novel technique which allow the light curing of photopolymerizable cements in endodontic applications. A special light guide had been developed to allow the curing light to reach and polymerize the sealing cement in the apex region. The technique was tested by using single-root human teeth with normal canal morphology. The Ultradent EndoREZ root canal sealer and a resin-based photopolymerizable filler specially developed for the current application had been used. The cone-shaped light guide was introduced into treated canals filled with the photopolymerizable material, up to the apical region. Light from an argon laser was launched onto the light guide for polymerization. All test samples were immersed in methylene-blue solution for microleakage testing. All samples treated with the self-polymerizable material presented dye penetration to some extent. No sample within the group which had the filling material polymerized by using the light guide presented dye penetration through the canal wall.

  1. Cation immobilization in pyrolyzed simulated spent ion exchange resins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luca, Vittorio; Bianchi, Hugo L.; Manzini, Alberto C.

    2012-05-01

    Significant quantities of spent ion exchange resins that are contaminated by an assortment of radioactive elements are produced by the nuclear industry each year. The baseline technology for the conditioning of these spent resins is encapsulation in ordinary Portland cement which has various shortcomings none the least of which is the relatively low loading of resin in the cement and the poor immobilization of highly mobile elements such as cesium. The present study was conducted with cationic resin samples (Lewatit S100) loaded with Cs+, Sr2+, Co2+, Ni2+ in roughly equimolar proportions at levels at or below 30% of the total cation exchange capacity. Low temperature thermal treatment of the resins was conducted in inert (Ar), or reducing (CH4) gas atmospheres, or supercritical ethanol to convert the hydrated polymeric resin beads into carbonaceous materials that contained no water. This pyrolytic treatment resulted in at least a 50% volume reduction to give mechanically robust spherical materials. Scanning electron microscope investigations of cross-sections of the beads combined with energy dispersive analysis showed that initially all elements were uniformly distributed through the resin matrix but that at higher temperatures the distribution of Cs became inhomogeneous. Although Cs was found in the entire cross-section, a significant proportion of the Cs occurred within internal rings while a proportion migrated toward the outer surfaces to form a crustal deposit. Leaching experiments conducted in water at 25 °C showed that the divalent contaminant elements were very difficult to leach from the beads heated in inert atmospheres in the range 200-600 °C. Cumulative fractional loses of the order of 0.001 were observed for these divalent elements for temperatures below 500 °C. Regardless of the processing temperature, the cumulative fractional loss of Cs in water at 25 °C reached a plateau or steady-state within the first 24 h increasing only marginally up 120 h. For unheated beads, a steady-state was reached at a cumulative fractional Cs loss of about 0.0045 while for beads heated to 400 °C the steady-state was reached at a value of 0.1. Under comparable conditions leaching of Sr, Co and Ni were close to the detection limits. It is concluded that the fraction of the Cs inventory that was more readily leached derived mainly from Cs phases in the crustal deposit.

  2. Cement from magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Lilley, K J; Gbureck, U; Knowles, J C; Farrar, D F; Barralet, J E

    2005-05-01

    Brushite cement may be used as a bone graft material and is more soluble than apatite in physiological conditions. Consequently it is considerably more resorbable in vivo than apatite forming cements. Brushite cement formation has previously been reported by our group following the mixture of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and phosphoric acid. In this study, brushite cement was formed from the reaction of nanocrystalline magnesium-substituted hydroxyapatite with phosphoric acid in an attempt to produce a magnesium substituted brushite cement. The presence of magnesium was shown to have a strong effect on cement composition and strength. Additionally the presence of magnesium in brushite cement was found to reduce the extent of brushite hydrolysis resulting in the formation of HA. By incorporating magnesium ions in the apatite reactant structure the concentration of magnesium ions in the liquid phase of the cement was controlled by the dissolution rate of the apatite. This approach may be used to supply other ions to cement systems during setting as a means to manipulate the clinical performance and characteristics of brushite cements. PMID:15875256

  3. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa; Arsati, Ynara Bosco de Oliveira Lima; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; França, Fabiana Mantovani Gomes

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP) cement or resin cement (RC), the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10) according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control), 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min) until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement) and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05) showed significantly higher (P < 0.05) tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation. PMID:22291705

  4. Microleakage of Four Dental Cements in Metal Ceramic Restorations With Open Margins

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar Ashtiani, Reza; Farzaneh, Babak; Azarsina, Mohadese; Aghdashi, Farzad; Dehghani, Nima; Afshari, Aisooda; Mahshid, Minu

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fixed prosthodontics is a routine dental treatment and microleakage is a major cause of its failure. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the marginal microleakage of four cements in metal ceramic restorations with adapted and open margins. Materials and Methods: Sixty sound human premolars were selected for this experimental study performed in Tehran, Iran and prepared for full-crown restorations. Wax patterns were formed leaving a 300 µm gap on one of the proximal margins. The crowns were cast and the samples were randomly divided into four groups based on the cement used. Copings were cemented using zinc phosphate cement (Fleck), Fuji Plus resin-modified glass ionomer, Panavia F2.0 resin cement, or G-Cem resin cement, according to the manufacturers’ instructions. Samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue solution. After 24 hours, dye penetration was assessed under a stereomicroscope and analyzed using the respective software. Data were analyzed using ANOVA, paired t-tests, and Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The least microleakage occurred in the Panavia F2.0 group (closed margin, 0.18 mm; open margin, 0.64 mm) and the maximum was observed in the Fleck group (closed margin, 1.92 mm; open margin, 3.32 mm). The Fleck group displayed significantly more microleakage compared to the Fuji Plus and Panavia F2.0 groups (P < 0.001) in both closed and open margins. In open margins, differences in microleakage between the Fuji Plus and G-Cem as well as between the G-Cem and Panavia F2.0 groups were significant (P < 0.001). In closed margins, only the G-Cem group displayed significantly more microleakage as compared to the Panavia F2.0 group (P < 0.05). Paired t-test results showed significantly more microleakage in open margins compared to closed margins, except in the Fuji Plus group (P = 0.539). Conclusions: Fuji Plus cement exhibited better sealing ability in closed and open margins compared to G-Cem and Fleck cements. When using G-Cem and Fleck cements for full metal ceramic restorations, clinicians should try to minimize marginal gaps in order to reduce restoration failure. In situations where there are doubts about perfect marginal adaptation, the use of Fuji Plus cement may be helpful. PMID:26730349

  5. Mineral resource of the month: hydraulic cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2012-01-01

    Hydraulic cements are the binders in concrete and most mortars and stuccos. Concrete, particularly the reinforced variety, is the most versatile of all construction materials, and most of the hydraulic cement produced worldwide is portland cement or similar cements that have portland cement as a basis, such as blended cements and masonry cements. Cement typically makes up less than 15 percent of the concrete mix; most of the rest is aggregates. Not counting the weight of reinforcing media, 1 ton of cement will typically yield about 8 tons of concrete.

  6. Glycerol Salicylate-based Pulp-Capping Material Containing Portland Cement.

    PubMed

    Portella, Fernando Freitas; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo; Santos, Paula Dapper; Sartori, Cláudia; Wegner, Everton; Leitune, Vicente Castelo Branco; Samuel, Susana Maria Werner

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the water sorption, solubility, pH and ability to diffuse into dentin of a glycerol salicylate-based, pulp-capping cement in comparison to a conventional calcium hydroxide-based pulp capping material (Hydcal). An experimental cement was developed containing 60% glycerol salicylate resin, 10% methyl salicylate, 25% calcium hydroxide and 5% Portland cement. Water sorption and solubility were determined based on mass changes in the samples before and after the immersion in distilled water for 7 days. Material discs were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 days and 28 days, and a digital pHmeter was used to measure the pH of water. The cement's ability to diffuse into bovine dentin was assessed by Raman spectroscopy. The glycerol salicylate-based cement presented higher water sorption and lower solubility than Hydcal. The pH of water used to store the samples increased for both cements, reaching 12.59 ± 0.06 and 12.54 ± 0.05 after 7 days, for Hydcal and glycerol salicylate-based cements, respectively. Both cements were able to turn alkaline the medium at 24 h and sustain its alkalinity after 28 days. Hydcal exhibited an intense diffusion into dentin up to 40 µm deep, and the glycerol salicylate-based cement penetrated 20 µm. The experimental glycerol salicylate-based cement presents good sorption, solubility, ability to alkalize the surrounding tissues and diffusion into dentin to be used as pulp capping material. PMID:26312972

  7. Effect of resin content and substrate on the emission of BTEX and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ping; Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Chi-Chi; Cheng, Yu-Lin

    2016-02-01

    The primary aim of this work is to explore the effect of resin content and the effect of substrate on the emission of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) and carbonyls from low-VOC water-based wall paint. Four low-volatile organic compound (VOC) paints include paints A (20 % acrylic), B (30 % acrylic), C (20 % polyvinyl acetate), and D (30 % polyvinyl acetate) were painted on stainless steel specimen for the study of resin effect. Green calcium silicate, green cement, and stainless steel were painted with paints A and C for the study of substrate effect. Concentrations of the VOCs in the chamber decreased with the elapsed time. Both resin type and resin quantity in paint had effects on VOC emissions. Paints with acrylic resin emitted less BTEX and carbonyls than paints with polyvinyl acetate resin. However, the effects of resin quantity varied with VOCs. Porous substrates were observed to interact more strongly with paints than inert substrates. Both green calcium silicate and green cement substrates have strong power of adsorption of VOCs from wall paints, namely toluene, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, 2-butanone, methacrolein, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde. Some compounds like toluene, formaldehyde, and butyaldehyde were desorbed very slowly from green calcium silicate and green cement substrates. PMID:26498819

  8. Well cementing in permafrost

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, W.N.

    1980-01-01

    A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

  9. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with effective coupling agents and higher filler loading, viscous flow can be greatly decreased due to the attenuation of mobility of polymer chains. Complementary studies indicate that our resin composites are promising for the proposed applications as a stiff support to all-ceramic crowns.

  10. Leaching from glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Bapna, M S; Mueller, H J

    1994-09-01

    This study compared the electrical conductivities, pH and leached ion (F-, Ca, Al, Si) concentrations in supernatant liquids obtained from four glassionomer cements, a buffered ionomer cement, a polycarboxylate cement and a zinc phosphate cement, at three different levels of settings. The result indicated that the measured parameters are highest for the unset condition of cements and decreases as the set condition is approached, except for pH, which shows the opposite trend. Two pulp sensitive glassionomer cements, Chem Bond and Ketac Cem showed high Ca:F ratios as well as high Ca and F concentrations. Further, it is suggested that the cytotoxicity of leached F-, Si, Al and Zn at high concentration and at low pH may induce sensitivity in tooth structure. PMID:7996341

  11. Alkali burns from wet cement.

    PubMed Central

    Peters, W. J.

    1984-01-01

    When water is added to the dry materials of Portland cement calcium hydroxide is formed; the wet cement is caustic (with a pH as high as 12.9) and can produce third-degree alkali burns after 2 hours of contact. Unlike professional cement workers, amateurs are usually not aware of any danger and may stand or kneel in the cement for long periods. As illustrated in a case report, general physicians may recognize neither the seriousness of the injury in its early stages nor the significance of a history of prolonged contact with wet cement. All people working with cement should be warned about its dangers and advised to immediately wash and dry the skin if contact does occur. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6561052

  12. Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

    2004-01-01

    As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

  13. Cement penetration after patella venting.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

    2009-01-01

    There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

  14. Mineral of the month: cement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Oss, Hendrik G.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

  15. [Allergy to bone cement components].

    PubMed

    Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

    2008-02-01

    Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

  16. Use of epoxy portland cement mortars to repair reinforced concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Rincon, O. de; Rincon, A.; Moron, O.; Villasmil, M.; Fernandez, R.

    1996-10-01

    The use of mortars based on portland cement and epoxy resins to repair corroded reinforced concrete structures was evaluated by electrochemical techniques. The effect of surface preparation also was studied. Steel potentials were measured daily. Additionally, the degree of steel corrosion by linear polarization was measured at different stages of the process. When indications of corrosion were detected, the surface was repaired. The blocks were subjected once more to the aggressive medium to evaluate the repair method. The results indicate that contaminated concrete must be removed for optimum performance. It also was found that the behavior of blocks repaired with mortars based on epoxy resins depend on exposure to sunlight.

  17. 40 CFR 414.40 - Applicability; description of the thermoplastic resins subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-Maleic Anhydride Resins *Unsaturated Polyester Resins *Vinyl Toluene Resins *Vinyl Toluene-Acrylate... *Polycarbonates *Polyester Resins *Polyester Resins, Polybutylene Terephthalate *Polyester Resins,...

  18. System for removing contaminants from plastic resin

    DOEpatents

    Bohnert, George W.; Hand, Thomas E.; DeLaurentiis, Gary M.

    2010-11-23

    A resin recycling system that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The system includes receiving the resin in container form. A grinder grinds the containers into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent in one or more solvent wash vessels, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is used to separate the resin particles and the solvent. The resin particles are then placed in solvent removing element where they are exposed to a solvent removing agent which removes any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

  19. Color stability of composite resins.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y G; Swartz, M L; Moore, B K; Cochran, M A; Lund, M R

    1990-10-01

    The color stability of seven visible light-cured and three chemically-cured composite resins was investigated while being subjected to UV light irradiation and storage in an aqueous environment at elevated temperatures. Color shift was evaluated visually and by colorimetric measurements. Significant correlation was found between visual scoring and colorimetric readings. When subjected to UV light, a wide deviation in color change existed from brand to brand in photocured composite resins. The color shift of chemically-cured composite resins was less than but fell within the range of photocured composite resins. When stored in water at elevated temperatures, photocured resins exhibited better color stability than the chemically-cured composite resins. PMID:2243370

  20. Advanced thermoplastic resins, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. L.; Hill, S. G.; Falcone, A.; Gerken, N. T.

    1991-01-01

    Eight thermoplastic polyimide resin systems were evaluated as composite matrix materials. Two resins were selected for more extensive mechanical testing and both were versions of LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center - Thermoplastic Polyimide). One resin was made with LaRC-TPI and contained 2 weight percent of a di(amic acid) dopant as a melt flow aid. The second system was a 1:1 slurry of semicrystalline LaRC-TPI powder in a polyimidesulfone resin diglyme solution. The LaRC-TPI powder melts during processing and increases the melt flow of the resin. Testing included dynamic mechanical analysis, tension and compression testing, and compression-after-impact testing. The test results demonstrated that the LaRC-TPI resins have very good properties compared to other thermoplastics, and that they are promising matrix materials for advanced composite structures.

  1. Thermal Shock-resistant Cement

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

    2012-02-01

    We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

  2. Study of two MTA cements

    PubMed Central

    Valmaseda-Castellón, Eduard; Faus, Vicente; Ballester, María-Luisa; Berini-Aytés, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To determine and compare the pH, conductivity and calcium release of an experimental Portland cement (PE) consisting of trioxid mineral aggregate and a comercially available modified Portland cement (C.P.M.) after 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 15 and 30 days. Material and Methods: Cements were mixed following the manufacturer’s instructions, with a powder: liquid ratio of 3:1. Each cement was placed in 12 PVC tubes 1 mm in diameter and 10 mm in length and allowed to set. Four empty tubes were used as negative controls. Tubes were submerged in plastic flasks containing 10 ml deionized water and stored at 37ºC and 100% humidity. After 1, 2, 3, 4, 8, 10, 15 and 30 days tubes were removed from the flasks and these were refilled with deionized water. We measured pH, conductivity and calcium content of the recovered solution. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results: pH was 0.3 units more alkaline with PE cement (p=0.023). pH experienced a slight decrease with time (p<0.001), independently of the cement type (p>0.05). Conductivity of PE and CPM cements diminished at 4 days and almost recovered at 30 days (p<0.001). PE cement had a higher conductivity (p<0.001). Calcium release diminished from the first day and recovered at 30 days (p<0.001) similarly for both cements (p>0.05). Conclusions: PE cement raised pH slightly more and had higher conductivity than CPM. Calcium release diminished after the first day and recovered at 30 days, similarly for both cements. Key words:Mineral trioxide aggregate, pH, electrical conductivity, periapical surgery. PMID:25350596

  3. Phosphate based oil well cements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  4. Silorane resin supports proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of MLO-A5 bone cells in vitro and bone formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eick, J David; Barragan-Adjemian, Cielo; Rosser, Jennifer; Melander, Jennifer R; Dusevich, Vladimir; Weiler, Rachel A; Miller, Bradley D; Kilway, Kathleen V; Dallas, Mark R; Bi, Lianxing; Nalvarte, Elisabet L; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2012-04-01

    Methyl methacrylate used in bone cements has drawbacks of toxicity, high exotherm, and considerable shrinkage. A new resin, based on silorane/oxirane chemistry, has been shown to have little toxicity, low exotherm, and low shrinkage. We hypothesized that silorane-based resins may also be useful as components of bone cements as well as other bone applications and began testing on bone cell function in vitro and in vivo. MLO-A5, late osteoblast cells, were exposed to polymerized silorane (SilMix) resin (and a standard polymerized bisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylate (BT) resin and compared to culture wells without resins as control. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed with the BT resin resulting in no cell growth, whereas in contrast, SilMix resin had no toxic effects on MLO-A5 cell proliferation, differentiation, nor mineralization. The cells cultured with SilMix produced increasing amounts of alkaline phosphatase (1.8-fold) compared to control cultures. Compared to control cultures, an actual enhancement of mineralization was observed in the silorane resin-containing cultures at days 10 and 11 as determined by von Kossa (1.8-2.0 fold increase) and Alizarin red staining (1.8-fold increase). A normal bone calcium/phosphate atomic ratio was observed by elemental analysis along with normal collagen formation. When used in vivo to stabilize osteotomies, no inflammatory response was observed, and the bone continued to heal. In conclusion, the silorane resin, SilMix, was shown to not only be non cytototoxic, but actually supported bone cell function. Therefore, this resin has significant potential for the development of a nontoxic bone cement or bone stabilizer. PMID:22278990

  5. Silorane resin supports proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of MLO-A5 bone cells in vitro and bone formation in vivo.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Eick JD; Barragan-Adjemian C; Rosser J; Melander JR; Dusevich V; Weiler RA; Miller BD; Kilway KV; Dallas MR; Bi L; Nalvarte EL; Bonewald LF

    2012-04-01

    Methyl methacrylate used in bone cements has drawbacks of toxicity, high exotherm, and considerable shrinkage. A new resin, based on silorane/oxirane chemistry, has been shown to have little toxicity, low exotherm, and low shrinkage. We hypothesized that silorane-based resins may also be useful as components of bone cements as well as other bone applications and began testing on bone cell function in vitro and in vivo. MLO-A5, late osteoblast cells, were exposed to polymerized silorane (SilMix) resin (and a standard polymerized bisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylate (BT) resin and compared to culture wells without resins as control. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed with the BT resin resulting in no cell growth, whereas in contrast, SilMix resin had no toxic effects on MLO-A5 cell proliferation, differentiation, nor mineralization. The cells cultured with SilMix produced increasing amounts of alkaline phosphatase (1.8-fold) compared to control cultures. Compared to control cultures, an actual enhancement of mineralization was observed in the silorane resin-containing cultures at days 10 and 11 as determined by von Kossa (1.8-2.0 fold increase) and Alizarin red staining (1.8-fold increase). A normal bone calcium/phosphate atomic ratio was observed by elemental analysis along with normal collagen formation. When used in vivo to stabilize osteotomies, no inflammatory response was observed, and the bone continued to heal. In conclusion, the silorane resin, SilMix, was shown to not only be non cytototoxic, but actually supported bone cell function. Therefore, this resin has significant potential for the development of a nontoxic bone cement or bone stabilizer.

  6. Silorane resin supports proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of MLO-A5 bone cells in vitro and bone formation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eick, J. David; Barragan-Adjemian, Cielo; Rosser, Jennifer; Melander, Jennifer R.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Weiler, Rachel A.; Miller, Bradley D.; Kilway, Kathleen V.; Dallas, Mark R.; Bi, Lianxing; Nalvarte, Elisabet L.; Bonewald, Lynda F.

    2015-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate used in bone cements has drawbacks of toxicity, high exotherm, and considerable shrinkage. A new resin, based on silorane/oxirane chemistry, has been shown to have little toxicity, low exotherm, and low shrinkage. We hypothesized that silorane-based resins may also be useful as components of bone cements as well as other bone applications and began testing on bone cell function in vitro and in vivo. MLO-A5, late osteoblast cells, were exposed to polymerized silorane (SilMix) resin (and a standard polymerized bisGMA/TEGDMA methacrylate (BT) resin and compared to culture wells without resins as control. A significant cytotoxic effect was observed with the BT resin resulting in no cell growth, whereas in contrast, SilMix resin had no toxic effects on MLO-A5 cell proliferation, differentiation, nor mineralization. The cells cultured with SilMix produced increasing amounts of alkaline phosphatase (1.8-fold) compared to control cultures. Compared to control cultures, an actual enhancement of mineralization was observed in the silorane resin-containing cultures at days 10 and 11 as determined by von Kossa (1.8–2.0 fold increase) and Alizarin red staining (1.8-fold increase). A normal bone calcium/phosphate atomic ratio was observed by elemental analysis along with normal collagen formation. When used in vivo to stabilize osteotomies, no inflammatory response was observed, and the bone continued to heal. In conclusion, the silorane resin, SilMix, was shown to not only be non cytototoxic, but actually supported bone cell function. Therefore, this resin has significant potential for the development of a nontoxic bone cement or bone stabilizer. PMID:22278990

  7. Vitrification of ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Cicero-Herman, Connie A.; Workman, Rhonda Jackson

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to vitrification of ion exchange resins that have become loaded with hazardous or radioactive wastes, in a way that produces a homogenous and durable waste form and reduces the disposal volume of the resin. The methods of the present invention involve directly adding borosilicate glass formers and an oxidizer to the ion exchange resin and heating the mixture at sufficient temperature to produce homogeneous glass.

  8. Phosphorus-containing bisimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varma, I. K.; Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    The production of fire-resistant resins particularly useful for making laminates with inorganic fibers such as graphite fibers is discussed. The resins are by (1) condensation of an ethylenically unsaturated cyclic anhydride with a bis(diaminophenyl) phosphine oxide, and (2) by addition polymerization of the bisimide so obtained. Up to about 50%, on a molar basis, of benzophenonetetracarboxylic acid anhydride can be substituted for some of the cyclic anhydride to alter the properties of the products. Graphite cloth laminates made with these resins show 800 C char yields greater than 70% by weight in nitrogen. Limiting oxygen indexes of more than 100% are determined for these resins.

  9. Antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing Galla chinensis extract

    PubMed Central

    WANG, LU-FEI; LUO, FENG; XUE, CHAO-RAN; DENG, MENG; CHEN, CHEN; WU, HAO

    2016-01-01

    Galla chinensis extract (GCE), a naturally-derived agent, has a significant inhibitory effect on cariogenic bacteria. The present study aims to evaluate the antibacterial effect and shear bond strength of an orthodontic adhesive cement containing GCE. A resin-modified glass ionomer cement incorporated GCE at five mass fractions (0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.8%) to prepare GCE-containing cement for analysis. For the agar diffusion test, cement specimens were placed on agar disk inoculated with Streptococcus mutans (strain ATCC 25175). Following 48 h incubation, the inhibition halo diameter was measured. To assess bacteria colonization susceptibility, S. mutans adhesion to cement specimens was detected by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following 48 h incubation. To evaluate bond strength, a total of 50 metal brackets were bonded on premolar surfaces by using cement (10 teeth/group). Following immersion in an artificial saliva for 3 days, shear bond strength (SBS) was measured. The results demonstrated that GCE-containing samples exhibited a larger bacterial inhibition halo than control, and the inhibition zone increased as the GCE mass fraction increased. SEM analysis demonstrated that S. mutans presented a weaker adherent capacity to all GCE-containing cements compared with control, but the difference between each GCE-containing group was not significant. SBS values of each GCE-containing group exhibited no difference compared with the control. In conclusion, GCE-containing adhesive cement exhibits a promising inhibitory effect on S. mutans growth and adhesion. Without compromising bond strength, adding GCE in adhesive cement may be an attractive option for preventing white spot lesions during orthodontic treatment. PMID:27073642

  10. Design guidelines for steel-reinforced polymer concrete using resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studies, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to recommend simple, yet effective design guidelines in shear and flexure for steel-reinforced PC. The recommended design procedures are mostly based on test results performed on PC beams using resins based on recycled poly(ethyleneterephthalate), PET, plastic waste (the PET waste is mainly recovered from used beverage bottles). Previous studies have shown that polyester resins based on recycled PET can produce very good quality PC at a potentially lower cost.

  11. [Thermal diffusivity of dental cements].

    PubMed

    Paroussis, D; Kakaboura, A; Chrysafidis, C; Mauroyiannakis, E

    1990-08-01

    Thermal insulative efficiency, is one of the desirable properties of the dental cements. In this study, the thermal diffusivity of three types of dental cements, were measured. Thermal diffusivity was determined by the following method. Two thermo-couples were used and connected to a chart record, the first was embedded in the cylindrical block of the cement specimen and the other in a mixing of ice and water (reference thermocouple). All them were set in a apparatus consisting of a double cooling bath. Calculation of thermal diffusivity were based on the curve provided of the record during cooling of the cement and a theoretical mathematic model. Values were ranged from 2,985 to 3,934 cm2.sec-1. ZOE cement exhibited the highest value, the glass-ionomers the lowest and the poly-carboxylates were average. The results showed that the thermal diffusivity of the cements is dependent from the type of the cement but the differences between them were not statistically significant. Additionally, the values obtained were about the same as the dentin, so the dental cements may consider as good thermal insulators. PMID:2130338

  12. Cement brand and preparation effects cement-in-cement mantle shear strength.

    PubMed

    Holsgrove, Timothy P; Pentlow, Alanna; Spencer, Robert F; Miles, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    Creating bi-laminar cement mantles as part of revision hip arthroplasty is well-documented but there is a lack of data concerning the effect of cement brand on the procedure. The aim of this study was to compare the shear strength of bi-laminar cement mantles using various combinations of two leading bone cement brands.Bi-laminar cement mantles were created using Simplex P with Tobramycin, and Palacos R+G: Simplex-Simplex (SS); Simplex-Palacos (SP); Palacos-Simplex (PS); and Palacos-Palacos (PP). Additionally, specimens were produced by rasping (R) the surface of the original mantle, or leaving it unrasped (U), leading to a total of eight groups (n = 10). Specimens were loaded in shear, at 0.1 mm/min, until failure, and the maximum shear strength calculated.The highest mean shear strength was found in the PSU and PSR groups (23.69 and 23.89 MPa respectively), and the lowest in the PPU group (14.70 MPa), which was significantly lower than all but two groups. Unrasped groups generally demonstrated greater standard error than rasped groups.In a further comparison to assess the effect of the new cement mantle brand, irrespective of the brand of the original mantle, Simplex significantly increased the shear strength compared to Palacos with equivalent preparation.It is recommended that the original mantle is rasped prior to injection of new cement, and that Simplex P with Tobramycin be used in preference to Palacos R+G irrespective of the existing cement type. Further research is needed to investigate more cement brands, and understand the underlying mechanisms relating to cement-in-cement procedures. PMID:25044271

  13. Fiber reinforced calcium phosphate cement.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, L A; de Oliveira, L C; da Silva Rigo, E C; Carrodéguas, R G; Boschi, A O; Fonseca de Arruda, A C

    2000-03-01

    The term calcium phosphate cement was introduced by Gruninger et al. (1). This type of cement can be prepared by reacting a calcium phosphate salt with an aqueous solution, which causes it to set by the crossing of the precipitated crystals. These cements offer a series of advantages that allow their use as grafts and substitutes of damaged parts of the bone system. However, these cements have low mechanical strength compared to human bones. This work studied the influence of the use of polyamide fibers in the mechanical properties of a calcium phosphate cement based on alpha-tricalcium phosphate as well as the mechanisms involved in the increase of mechanical strength. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the use of polymeric fibers to increase mechanical strength and the need for coupling agents for the effective performance of the fibers as reinforcement in these materials. PMID:10759644

  14. Corrosion susceptibility of steel drums containing cemented intermediate level nuclear wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, Gustavo S.; Farina, Silvia B.; Schulz, Fátima M.; Marotta, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Cementation processes are used as immobilization techniques for low or intermediate level radioactive waste for economical and safety reasons and for being a simple operation. In particular, ion-exchange resins commonly used for purification of radioactive liquid waste from nuclear reactors are immobilized before being stored to improve the leach resistance of the waste matrix and to maintain mechanical stability. Combustible solid radioactive waste can be incinerated and the resulting ashes can also be immobilized before storage. The immobilized resins and ashes are then contained in steel drums that may undergo corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The work described in this paper was aimed at evaluating the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins and incineration ashes containing different concentrations of aggressive species (mostly chloride and sulphate ions). A special type of specimen was designed to simulate the cemented waste in the drum. The evolution of the corrosion potential and the corrosion current density of the steel, as well as the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored over a time period of 1 year. The results show the deleterious effect of chloride on the expected lifespan of the waste containers.

  15. Improving adhesion between luting cement and zirconia-based ceramic with an alternative surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Martins, Aurealice Rosa Maria; Gotti, Valéria Bisinoto; Shimano, Marcos Massao; Borges, Gilberto Antônio; Gonçalves, Luciano de Souza

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of an alternative surface treatment on the microshear bond strength (μsbs) of zirconia-based ceramic. Thirty-five zirconia disks were assigned to five groups according to the following treatments: Control (CO), glass and silane were not applied to the zirconia surface; G1, air blasted with 100μm glass beads + glaze + silane; G2, a gel containing 15% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; G3, a gel containing 25% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane; and G4, a gel containing 50% (by weight) glass beads applied to the ceramic surface + glaze + silane. The specimens were built up using RelyX ARC®, according to the manufacturer's recommendations, and inserted in an elastomeric mold with an inner diameter of 0.8 mm. The μsbs test was performed using a testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05) were applied to the bond strength values (in MPa). CO (15.6 ± 4.1) showed the lowest μsbs value. There were no statistical differences between the G1 (24.9 ± 7.4), G2 (24.9 ± 2.3), G3 (35.0 ± 10.3) and G4 (35.3 ± 6.0) experimental groups. Those groups submitted to surface treatments with higher concentrations of glass showed a lower frequency of adhesive failures. In conclusion, the glass application improved the interaction between the ceramic and the luting cement. PMID:25859635

  16. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

  17. Cytotoxicity of glass ionomer cements containing silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Ana-Paula-Rodrigues; Pires, Wanessa-Carvalho; Pereira, Flávia-Castro; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela-Paula; Carrião, Marcus-Santos; Bakuzis, Andris-Figueiroa; Souza-Costa, Carlos-Alberto; Lopes, Lawrence-Gonzaga; Estrela, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Background Some studies have investigated the possibility of incorporating silver nanoparticles (NAg) into dental materials to improve their antibacterial properties. However, the potential toxic effect of this material on pulp cells should be investigated in order to avoid additional damage to the pulp tissue. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC) with and without addition of NAg. Material and Methods NAg were added to the materials at two different concentrations by weight: 0.1% and 0.2%. Specimens with standardized dimensions were prepared, immersed in 400 µL of culture medium and incubated at 37°C and 5% CO2 for 48 h to prepare GIC liquid extracts, which were then incubated in contact with cells for 48 h. Culture medium and 0.78% NAg solution were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Cell viability was determined by MTT and Trypan Blue assays. ANOVA and the Tukey test (α=0.05) were used for statistical analyses. Results Both tests revealed a significant decrease in cell viability in all groups of resin modified cements (p<0.001). There were no statistically significant differences between groups with and without NAg (p>0.05). The differences in cell viability between any group of conventional GIC and the negative control were not statistically significant (p>0.05). Conclusions NAg did not affect the cytotoxicity of the GIC under evaluation. Key words:Glass ionomer cements, totoxicity, cell culture techniques, nanotechnology, metal nanoparticles. PMID:26644839

  18. Amalgam vs. composite resin: 1998.

    PubMed

    Christensen, G J

    1998-12-01

    Class II resin restorations have been evolving in American dentistry for 30 years, but the concept has had significant difficulty being accepted because of stigma attached to early generations of composites. Currently available composite resins for posterior tooth restorations have physical characteristics justifying their use. Techniques for Class II resin placement have improved significantly, and mastery of them is within the ability of both dentists and dental students. Although composite resin materials and techniques present clinical challenges, so do amalgam materials and techniques. It is time to accept Class II resin restorations, improve dentist and student education about their use, increase acceptance by third-party organizations and various approving groups, and bring this concept into the mainstream of U.S. dentistry. PMID:9854929

  19. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  20. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  1. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  2. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  3. 21 CFR 888.4200 - Cement dispenser.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cement dispenser. 888.4200 Section 888.4200 Food... DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 888.4200 Cement dispenser. (a) Identification. A cement dispenser is a nonpowered syringe-like device intended for use in placing bone cement (§ 888.3027)...

  4. Spot-welded wire hooks as seating guides for resin-bonded castings.

    PubMed

    Millar, B; Nesbit, M

    1991-10-01

    A technique is described to assist in accurate positioning of cast metal, resin-bonded prostheses. The method is particularly useful for the recementation of castings but can also be used with new restorations. A piece of rectangular chrome alloy arch wire is annealed and spot-welded to the retainer. The wire is then adapted to lie over the incisal edge of the abutment tooth and forms a locating device during trying in and cementing of the restoration. The wire hook assists in the handling of the casting at chairside and is easily snapped off after cementation, leaving little finishing to be completed. The technique permits access to all of the marginal surfaces at cementation and offers certain advantages over existing alternative techniques. PMID:1686465

  5. Evaluation of Adhesive Bonding of Lithium Disilicate Ceramic Material with Duel Cured Resin Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Gundawar, Sham M.; Radke, Usha M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this vitro study was to comparatively evaluate the adhesive bonding of dual cured resin luting agents with lithium disilicate ceramic material. Materials and Methods: Porcelain laminate veneers were prepared with lithium disilicate ceramic material i.e. IPS Empress II( E-Max Press). These laminates were bonded with RelyX ARC, Panavia F 2.0, Variolink II, Duolink and Nexus NX3.The porcelain laminates were etched with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid (Pulpdent Corporation) for one minute, washed for 15 sec with three way syringe and dried for 15 sec with air syringe. The silane (Ultradent) was applied with the help of applicator tip in a single coat and kept undisturbed for one minute. The prepared surfaces of the premolars were treated with 37% phosphoric acid (Prime dent) for 15 sec, thoroughly rinsed and dried as per manufactures instructions. The shear bond test was carried out on all samples with the Universal testing machine (Instron U.S.A.) The scanning electron microscopic study was performed at the fractured interface of representative samples from each group of luting agents. Result: In this study, the highest value of shear bond strength was obtained for NEXUS NX3 and the lowest for VARIOLINK II. Conclusion: The difference in bond strength can be interpreted as the difference in fracture resistance of luting agents, to which shearing load was applied during the shear bond strength test. It is inferred from this study that the composition of the luting agent determines the adhesive characteristics in addition to surface treatment and bonding surface area. PMID:25859514

  6. Moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant: A boon

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Konde, Sapna; Raj, Sunil N.; Kumar, Narayan Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pit and fissure sealants are highly effective in preventing occlusal caries. The present study clinically evaluated and compared the retention and development of caries when sealed with moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant, conventional resin-based sealant with and without a bonding agent, and Glass Ionomer Cement Sealant in young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 healthy cooperative children aged 6-9 years who were at high caries risk with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were included in the study. Teeth were divided into 4 groups using a full-factorial design, and each of the molars was sealed with the four different sealant material. Evaluation of sealant retention and development of caries was performed at 6 and 12 months using Modified Simonsen's criteria. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test. Result and Conclusion: The result from the present study indicated that moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant could be successfully used as a pit and fissure sealant because its hydrophilic chemistry makes it less technique sensitive and simplifies the sealant application procedure. PMID:24124301

  7. An in vitro evaluation of bond strength of three glass ionomer cements.

    PubMed

    Fajen, V B; Duncanson, M G; Nanda, R S; Currier, G F; Angolkar, P V

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the bond strength of three commercially available glass ionomer cements when used to bond mesh-backed medium twin (0.130 inch) brackets to enamel surface. Three different enamel surface conditions, which included use of pumice, pumice and polyacrylic acid, and pumice followed by acidulated phosphate fluoride, were also tested to determine their effect on the bond strength. In addition, bond strength of one composite resin was compared with those of glass ionomer cements. The teeth were bonded with all the materials according to manufacturers' instructions. Each specimen was embedded in Super-Die with the bonded facial surface exposed. A surveyor was used to align the teeth in the stone uniformly for all specimens. A special bracket holder was used to hold the brackets precisely under the wings during debonding. An Instron universal testing machine was used to measure the force required for bond failure. To stimulate oral conditions, the direction of pull was so designed that it included an element of torsional stress along with tensile force. The findings indicate that a large variation existed between the bond strengths of all materials tested. The bond strength of glass ionomer cements was significantly less than that composite resin. However, the bond strength of at least one glass ionomer cement appears to be adequate for clinical use. The different surface preparation before bonding did not significantly affect the bond strengths of glass ionomer cements. Further investigation is required to test the bond strengths of glass ionomer cements clinically. PMID:2181867

  8. Resin composite repair: Quantitative microleakage evaluation of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces with different surface treatments

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Cigdem; Cehreli, Sevi Burcak; Arhun, Neslihan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effect of different adhesive systems and surface treatments on the integrity of resin-resin and resin-tooth interfaces after partial removal of preexisting resin composites using quantitative image analysis for microleakage testing protocol. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 human molar teeth were restored with either of the resin composites (Filtek Z250/GrandioSO) occlusally. The teeth were thermocycled (1000×). Mesial and distal 1/3 parts of the restorations were removed out leaving only middle part. One side of the cavity was finished with course diamond bur and the other was air-abraded with 50 μm Al2O3. They were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10) to receive: Group 1: Adper Single Bond 2; Group 2: All Bond 3; Group 3: ClearfilSE; Group 4: BeautiBond, before being repaired with the same resin composite (Filtek Z250). The specimens were re-thermocycled (1000×), sealed with nail varnish, stained with 0.5% basic fuchsin, sectioned mesiodistally and photographed digitally. The extent of dye penetration was measured by image analysis software (ImageJ) for both bur-finished and air-abraded surfaces at resin-tooth and resin-resin interfaces. The data were analyzed statistically. Results: BeautiBond exhibited the most microleakage at every site. Irrespective of adhesive and initial composite type, air-abrasion showed less microleakage except for BeautiBond. The type of initial repaired restorative material did not affect the microleakage. BeautiBond adhesive may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. Conclusions: Surface treatment with air-abrasion produced the lowest microleakage scores, independent of the adhesive systems and the pre-existing resin composite type. Pre-existing composite type does not affect the microleakage issue. All-in-one adhesive resin (BeautiBond) may not be preferred in resin composite repair in terms of microleakage prevention. PMID:25713491

  9. Reduction of load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic crowns due to cement aging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chenglin; Wang, Raorao; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how water aging of the resin cement influences the stress distribution in all-ceramic crowns and if there is an increase in the propensity for crown failure. The failure of all-ceramic crowns attributed to cement degradation was explored using a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Sectioned all-ceramic crown specimens were fabricated of IPS e.max Ceram/e.max Press (CP) and Vita VM9/Cercon zirconia (VZ), and then stored in either air or distilled water for 30 days. Monotonic contact loads were applied to fracture near the buccal cusp ridge of each sample. Deformation within the crown layers during loading was analyzed by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A 3D finite element model of the restoration including veneer, core, cement and tooth substrate was developed to evaluate the stress distribution in the crowns before and after cement degradation. There was a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the critical fracture load and a change in the fracture mode after cement water absorption in the CP crowns. In contrast, there was no significant influence of cement aging on fracture modes and fracture loads (p>0.05) in the VZ crowns. Finite element analysis showed that regardless of the crown types, the stress distribution is identical by degradation in Young's modulus of the cement. However, core/substrate debonding results in a change of the stress distribution and a significant increase in the magnitude. Water aging causes reduction of stiffness and bonding strength of cement agents. Degradation in bonding strength and stiffness could potentially lead to stress redistribution in the restored crown and reduce the load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic restorations after years of service. PMID:23127630

  10. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  11. Clinical performance of resin-bonded bridges: a 5-year prospective study. Part III: Failure characteristics and survival after rebonding.

    PubMed

    Creugers, N H; Snoek, P A; Van 't Hof, M A; Käyser, A F

    1990-03-01

    A total of 203 resin-bonded bridges were inserted under controlled clinical conditions and evaluated over a period of 5 years. During the evaluation period there were 47 dislodgements and 30 pontic fractures. The majority of the failures were retreated successfully. Dislodgement was in most cases due to fracture at the resin/retainer interface. The small number of fractures at the resin/tooth interface indicate that the clinical procedures, as used in this study, were satisfactory. Dislodged and rebonded resin-bonded bridges had a lower retention than original bonded bridges, indicating that patients with a dislodged bridge are a risk group for the retention of rebonded bridges. However, possible factors that may be responsible for this higher risk could not be demonstrated. The bridges which were removed for repair of the pontics and rebonded showed an acceptable retention. There was no relationship between the failure characteristic and the retainer type or the cementation material used. PMID:2187972

  12. Graphite-reinforced bone cement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1976-01-01

    Chopped graphite fibers added to surgical bone cement form bonding agent with mechanical properties closely matched to those of bone. Curing reaction produces less heat, resulting in reduced traumatization of body tissues. Stiffness is increased without affecting flexural strength.

  13. Magnesium substitution in brushite cements.

    PubMed

    Alkhraisat, Mohammad Hamdan; Cabrejos-Azama, Jatsue; Rodríguez, Carmen Rueda; Jerez, Luis Blanco; Cabarcos, Enrique López

    2013-01-01

    The use of magnesium-doped ceramics has been described to modify brushite cements and improve their biological behavior. However, few studies have analyzed the efficiency of this approach to induce magnesium substitution in brushite crystals. Mg-doped ceramics composed of Mg-substituted β-TCP, stanfieldite and/or farringtonite were reacted with primary monocalcium phosphate (MCP) in the presence of water. The cement setting reaction has resulted in the formation of brushite and newberyite within the cement matrix. Interestingly, the combination of SAED and EDX analyses of single crystal has indicated the occurrence of magnesium substitution within brushite crystals. Moreover, the effect of magnesium ions on the structure, and mechanical and setting properties of the new cements was characterized as well as the release of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) ions. Further research would enhance the efficiency of the system to incorporate larger amounts of magnesium ions within brushite crystals. PMID:25428098

  14. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect

    Eilers, L. H.

    1985-12-03

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight monoor copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  15. Resin polymerization problems--are they caused by resin curing lights, resin formulations, or both?

    PubMed

    Christensen, R P; Palmer, T M; Ploeger, B J; Yost, M P

    1999-01-01

    Negative effects of rapid, high-intensity resin curing have been predicted for both argon lasers and plasma-arc curing lights. To address these questions, six different resin restorative materials were cured with 14 different resin curing lights representing differences in intensities ranging from 400 mW/cm2 to 1,900 mW/cm2; delivery modes using constant, ramped, and stepped methods; cure times ranging from 1 second to 40 seconds; and spot sizes of 6.7 mm to 10.9 mm. Two lasers, five plasma-arc lights, and seven halogen lights were used. Shrinkage, modulus, heat generation, strain, and physical changes on the teeth and resins during strain testing were documented. Results showed effects associated with lights were not statistically significant, but resin formulation was highly significant. Microfill resins had the least shrinkage and the lowest modulus. An autocure resin had shrinkage and modulus as high as or higher than the light-cured hybrid resins. Lasers and plasma-arc lights produced the highest heat increases on the surface (up to 21 degrees C) and within the resin restorations (up to 14 degrees C), and the halogen lights produced the most heat within the pulp chamber (up to 2 degrees C). Strain within the tooth was least with Heliomolar and greatest with Z100 Restorative and BISFIL II autocure resin. Clinical effects of strain relief were evident as white lines at the tooth-resin interface and cracks in enamel adjacent to the margins. This work implicates resin formulation, rather than light type or curing mode, as the important factor in polymerization problems. Lower light intensity and use of ramped and stepped curing modes did not provide significant lowering of shrinkage, modulus, or strain, and did not prevent enamel cracking adjacent to margins and formation of "white line" defects at the margins. Until materials with lower shrinkage and modulus are available, use of low-viscosity surface sealants as a final step in resin placement is suggested to seal defects. PMID:11908396

  16. Fatigue in cemented acetabular replacements

    PubMed Central

    Tong, J.; Zant, N.P.; Wang, J.-Y.; Heaton-Adegbile, P.; Hussell, J.G.

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability of cemented total hip replacements critically depends on the lasting integrity of the bond between the cement and the bone, often referred to as fixation. In vitro assessment of fatigue behaviour of cemented acetabular, as opposed to femoral, replacements is of particular interest due to the more aggressive nature of late “loosening” found in acetabular replacements, reported to be three times that in femoral cases. Quantitative assessment of fatigue behaviour of cement fixation on acetabular side has been difficult due to the complexity of the pelvic bone geometry and the associated loading conditions. The purpose of this work was to develop a framework for in vitro assessment of fatigue integrity of cement fixation in acetabular replacements. To this end, a newly developed hip simulator was utilised, where the direction and the magnitude of the hip contact force (Bergmann et al., 2001) under typical physiological loading conditions including normal walking and stair climbing were simulated for the first time. Preliminary hip simulator experimental results seem to be consistent with those from constant amplitude fatigue tests, in that debonding at the bone–cement interface is identified as the main failure mechanism, although the numbers of cycles to failure are significantly reduced in samples tested in the hip simulator. Finite element analysis of implanted bone samples was carried out, where the effects of loading mode on the stress distribution in the cement mantle and at the bone–cement interface were evaluated. The effects of model geometry on the stress state and failure modes were also examined and discussed based on the results of the present and previously published work. PMID:19325936

  17. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1997-01-01

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  18. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, Andrzej W.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Alexandratos, Spiro; Horwitz, E. Philip

    1998-01-27

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

  19. Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Trochimcznk, A.W.; Gatrone, R.C.; Alexandratos, S.; Horwitz, E.P.

    1997-04-08

    An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorus. The pendent groups have the formula as shown in the patent wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R{sup 1} is hydrogen or an C{sub 1}-C{sub 2} alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

  20. Resin/graphite fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

  1. Flammability screening tests of resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arhart, R. W.; Farrar, D. G.; Hughes, B. M.

    1979-01-01

    Selected flammability characteristics of glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins are evaluated. A protocol for the evaluation of the flammability hazards presented by glass cloth laminates of thermosetting resins and the usefulness of that protocol with two laminates are presented. The glass laminates of an epoxy resin, M-751 are evaluated for: (1) determination of smoke generation from the laminates; (2) analysis of products of oxidative degradation of the laminates; (3) determination of minimum oxygen necessary to maintain flaming oxidation; (4) evaluation of toxicological hazards.

  2. 21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyurethane resins. 177.1680 Section 177.1680... Contact Surfaces § 177.1680 Polyurethane resins. The polyurethane resins identified in paragraph (a) of..., polyurethane resins are those produced when one or more of the isocyanates listed in paragraph (a)(1) of...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Terpene resins. 178.3930 Section 178.3930 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3930 Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this... the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may be safely used as components...

  4. 21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polycarbonate resins. 177.1580 Section 177.1580... Contact Surfaces § 177.1580 Polycarbonate resins. Polycarbonate resins may be safely used as articles or...) Polycarbonate resins are polyesters produced by: (1) The condensation of 4,4′-iso-propylidenediphenol...

  5. Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Pulp Capping Biomaterials after Application of Three Different Bonding Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi-Ansari, Zahra; Mahdilou, Maryam; Ahmadyar, Maryam; Asgary, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims. Bonding of composite resin filling materials to pulp protecting agents produces an adhesive joint which is important for the quality of filling as well as success of restoration. We aimed to assess the bond strength of composite resin to three pulp capping biomaterials: Pro Root mineral trioxide aggregate (PMTA), Root MTA (RMTA) and calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement, using three bonding systems [a total-etch (Single Bond) and two self-etch systems (Protect bond and SE Bond)]. Materials and methods. Ninety acrylic molds, each containing a 6×2-mm hole, were divided into 3 groups and filled with PMTA, RMTA and CEM cements. The samples in each experimental group were then randomly divided into 3 sub-groups; Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond bonding systems were applied to the tested materials. Cylindrical forms of composite resin (Z100, 2×2 mm) were placed onto the samples and cured. Shear bond strength values were measured for 9 subgroups using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. Results. The average shear bond strengths of Z100 composite resin after application of Single Bond, Protect Bond and SE Bond systems were as follows; PMTA: 5.1±2.42, 4.56±1.96 and 4.52±1.7; RMTA: 4.71±1.77, 4.31±0.56 and 4.79±1.88; and CEM cement: 4.75±1.1, 4.54±1.59 and 4.64±1.78 MPa, respectively. The type of pulp capping material, bonding system and their interacting effects did not have a significant effect on the bond strengths of composite resin to pulp capping biomaterials. Conclusion. Within the limitations of this in vitrostudy, bond strength of composite resin to two types of MTA as well as CEM cement were similar following application of the total-etch or self-etch bonding systems. PMID:24082986

  6. Shear bond strength between nickel-chromium and human dentine using a dual-cure, self-adhesive universal resin luting agent.

    PubMed

    Chai, John; Chu, Frederick C S; Chow, Tak W; Liang, Bernard M H

    2008-06-01

    The adhesive property of a dual-cure, self-adhesive universal resin luting agent (Rely X Unicem, 3M ESPE) between nickel-chromium (Ni-Cr) and human dentine was compared with three conventional resin luting agents (Calibra, Dentsply; Panavia-F, Kuraray; All-bond 2 C & B cement, Bisco). Ten Ni-Cr rods were bonded to human dentine with each of the four luting agents, and were subjected to shear bond test. Results showed that there was no significant difference in shear bond strengths among the luting agents. A dual-cure, self-adhesive universal resin luting agent was shown to have comparable adhesive property between Ni-Cr and human dentine as three other conventional resin luting agents. Given the simplicity of use of the dual-cure, self-adhesive universal resin luting agent, it appears to be promising in clinical applications. PMID:18637385

  7. Cemented femoral fixation: the North Atlantic divide.

    PubMed

    Murray, David W

    2011-09-01

    In the United Kingdom, more cemented than cementless stems are implanted, whereas in North America, few cemented stems are implanted. This is primarily because cemented stems have not performed well in North America, whereas they have in the United Kingdom, as different designs have been used. The majority of cemented stems used in the United Kingdom are polished, collarless, and tapered. These are forgiving, as they subside within the cement mantle and compress the cement and stabilize the interface. They perform well in both young and active patients and elderly patients. They also do well in osteoporotic bone, with deformity, or with suboptimal cementing techniques. As the position of the stem can be varied, it is simple to achieve appropriate leg length, offset, and version. Cement can be used to deliver antibiotics locally. If revision is necessary, it is relatively straightforward. Cement has numerous advantages that outweigh the main disadvantage of an extended operating time. PMID:21902131

  8. Manufacture and properties of fluoride cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malata-Chirwa, Charles David

    This research work aimed at characterising composition, hydration and physical properties of fluoride cement, by studying samples of the cement obtained from Malawi, and comparing them to ordinary Portland cement. By confirming the suitable characteristics of fluoride cement through this work, the results of the research work provide a good basis for the wider adoption of fluoride cement as an alternative to ordinary Portland cement, especially in developing economies. Numerous accounts have been cited regarding the production and use of fluoride cement. Since there have not been conclusive agreement as to its properties, this study was limited to the theories of successful incorporation of fluoride compounds in the manufacture of fluoride cement. Hence, the properties and characteristics reported in this study relate to the cement currently manufactured in Malawi, and, on a comparative basis only, to that manufactured in other parts of the world. Samples of the fluoride cement used in the study were obtained by synthetic manufacture of the cement using common raw materials for the manufacture of fluoride cement that is limestone, silica sand, and fluorspar. These samples were subjected to several comparative tests used to characterise cements including examination under x-ray diffractometer, scanning electron microscopy and tests for setting time and compressive strength. Under similar laboratory conditions, it was possible to prove that fluoride cement hardens more rapidly than ordinary Portland cement. Also observed during the experimental work is that fluoride cement develops higher compressive strengths than ordinary Portland cement. The hardening and setting times are significantly different between the two cements. Also the nature of the hydration products, that is the microstructural development is significantly different in the two cements. The differences brought about between the two cements are because of the presence of fluorine during the clinkering process. It was observed in the laboratory simulated production of fluoride cement, that the clinkering temperature is much lower (around 1 170 °C) compared to that for the production of ordinary Portland cement. The other observed differences were attributed to the different mineralogical composition as a result of fluoride incorporation into the cement. While fluorine content is very minimal in fluoride cement, not more than 2 %, the resulting cementitious products are altered significantly as was observed from the study. Part of the experimental results has been used as reference material in the preparation of a draft Malawi Standard on fluoride cement. This draft standard will be submitted to the Malawi Bureau of Standards for further processing before it can be officially endorsed as a Malawi Standard.

  9. Epoxy hydantoins as matrix resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, J.

    1983-01-01

    Tensile strength and fracture toughness of castings of the hydantoin resins cured with methylenedianiline are significantly higher than MY 720 control castings. Water absorption of an ethyl, amyl hydantoin formulation is 2.1 percent at equilibrium and Tg's are about 160 C, approximately 15 deg below the final cure temperature. Two series of urethane and ester-extended hydantoin epoxy resins were synthesized to determine the effect of crosslink density and functional groups on properties. Castings cured with methylenedianiline or with hexahydrophthalic anhydride were made from these compounds and evaluated. The glass transition temperatures, tensile strengths and moduli, and fracture toughness values were all much lower than that of the simple hydantoin epoxy resins. Using a methylene bishydantoin epoxy with a more rigid structure gave brittle, low-energy fractures, while a more flexible, ethoxy-extended hydantoin epoxy resin gave a very low Tg.

  10. Regenerating Water-Sterilizing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G. V.; Putnam, D. F.

    1982-01-01

    Iodine-dispensing resin can be regenerated after iodine content has been depleted, without being removed from water system. Resin is used to make water potable by killing bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Regeneration technique may be come basis of water purifier for very long space missions. Enough crystalline iodine for multiple regenerations during mission can be stored in one small cartridge. Cartridge could be inserted in waterline as necessary on signal from iodine monitor or timer.

  11. Liquid monobenzoxazine based resin system

    SciTech Connect

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan; Bryant, Mark

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides a liquid resin system including a liquid monobenzoxazine monomer and a non-glycidyl epoxy compound, wherein the weight ratio of the monobenzoxazine monomer to the non-glycidyl epoxy compound is in a range of about 25:75 to about 60:40. The liquid resin system exhibits a low viscosity and exceptional stability over an extended period of time making its use in a variety of composite manufacturing methods highly advantageous.

  12. The effect of glass-ionomer cement on carious dentine: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Weerheijm, K L; de Soet, J J; van Amerongen, W E; de Graaff, J

    1993-01-01

    The effect of a glass-ionomer cement sealant on carious dentine was investigated clinically and bacteriologically. The study group consisted of 24 molar teeth, with small clinical visible occlusal dentine lesions, in 13 children (aged 7-18 years). Twenty of these molars were filled and sealed with a glass-ionomer cement (Fuji Ionomer Type III) and 4 with a resin sealant (Delton). From each molar, two dentine samples were collected aseptically with a time interval of 7 months. The first sample was taken after opening the lesion just beneath the dentino-enamel junction before application of the filling material (sample A), and the second beneath the removed filling material (sample B) 7 months later. Before collecting sample B the sealant was clinically evaluated and impressions were prepared in order to (re)evaluate the sealants later by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After taking the second sample, the remaining fissures were opened to a standard depth, the caries which was still present was removed, and a composite resin restoration was applied. In all teeth, more glass-ionomer cement material was found by SEM compared to the clinical evaluation. In both the glass-ionomer- and the resin sealant-treated group, the median value of the total number of microorganisms (CFU) on blood agar was 100 times smaller in the B sample. Microorganisms were found in 90% of the B samples in the group treated with glass-ionomer cement; hard dentine was also found in 45% of the B samples from this group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8242680

  13. Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

    1999-04-01

    Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

  14. Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.

    PubMed

    Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable. PMID:22075754

  15. Bi-axial flexural strength of dual-polymerizing agents cemented to human dentin after photo-activation with different light-curing systems

    PubMed Central

    Taher, Nadia Malek A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to assess the bi-axial flexural strength of two dual-polymerizing resin luting agents cemented to human dentin when photo-activated with different light-curing units. Materials and methods Two dual-cured resin cements: choice (CH) and Variolink II (VL) were tested. Hybrid composite resin (Z-250) discs (12נ1.5mm) were fabricated. Three types of light-curing units were used halogen-curing unit (QTH), light-emitting diode (LED) and plasma arc (PAC). Sixty dentin discs of 0.5mm thickness were prepared from extracted human teeth. A circular mold (2.5mm in height and 12mm diameter) was utilized to create supporting structure for dentin, resin cement complex. The resin luting cement (0.5mm) was placed on the previously prepared dentin discs and covered with the prefabricated composite discs. Photo-activation of cements was performed for 40s with QTH and LED units and for 3s with PAC. The specimens were divided into 12 groups (20 specimens for each light source). Six groups were kept in distilled water for 24h and the rest were stored for 6weeks. Bi-axial flexural strength was determined using Instron machine. The data was analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test for comparison. Results The findings indicated that the bi-axial flexural strength values for both cements CH and VL were higher for 24h over 6weeks but not statistically significant when cured with QTH. Meanwhile, when LED light was used for photo-activation the cements, the flexural strength values reported were statistically higher of 24h over 6weeks storage at P=0.4E?6 However, PAC light did not record any statistically significant difference between two duration for the CH cement although when used for polymerization of VL the reported value for 6weeks were statistically significantly higher value than 24h duration at P=0.002. Conclusion When high immediate flexural strength is preferred in clinical situation photo-activation the cements with LED reported the greatest value. PMID:23960484

  16. Set retarded cement compositions and methods for well cementing

    SciTech Connect

    Brothers, L.E.; Lindsey, D.W.; Terry, D.T.

    1991-09-17

    This patent describes a retarded cement composition consisting essentially of hydraulic cement, water, a set retarder and a borate compound. It comprises the set retarder, a copolymer consisting of acrylic acid and 2-acrylamido, 2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) present in the copolymer in the range of from about 40 to about 60 mole percent, the copolymer having an average molecular weight below about 5,000 such that a 10 percent aqueous solution of the copolymer has a Brookfield viscosity reading at 20 rpm of the UL Adapter Spindle in the range of from about 2 to less than 5 centipoises, the amount in the range of from about 0.3 percent to about 5.0 percent by weight of the hydraulic cement; and further wherein the borate compound is capable of providing a borate ion species in the composition.

  17. Acrylic cement stabilized joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Urist, M R

    1975-11-01

    Surgical management of osteoarthritis, aseptic necrosis and rheumatoid arthritis has been revolutionized by the introduction of acrylic cement-stabilized joint surface replacement. Although single joint surface replacements have been employed extensively for more than half a century, total surface replacement operations with a wear-resistant high-density polyethylene and noncorrosive stainless steel stabilized by acrylic cement were introduced only a little more than 12 years ago. This evolved with Charnley's discovery of the high level of bone tolerance for acrylic cement. Acrylic cement made it possible mechanically to bond artificial joint surfaces to the bone ends and produce an insensitive Charcot-like functioning joint. A barium sulfate additive makes the cement radiopaque for visualizing the bone-cement interface. Barium sulfate additive also lowers the polymerization temperature and opens the polymer for influx of interstitial fluids. Antibiotics have also been added to the cement for prevention and treatment of infection of the surrounding tissues. In aged individuals with cardiovascular disease, the absorption of the acrylic monomer depresses cardiac output and produces hypotension for 2-5 minutes after impaction of acrylic cement into spongy bone. The hypotension has been minimized by cautious fluid replacement and maintenance of adequate blood volume before, during and after the operation. Approximately 30,000 total hip arthroplasties are performed in the United States annually in patients older than 50 years of age with fractured femoral head replacements, bilateral rheumatoid arthritis, old neglected congenital dislocations of the hip or osteonecrosis with and without osteoarthritis. The pain relief is more complete and the functional improvement more predictable than in any other previously recommended surgical operation for the purpose. For this reason, total hip arthroplasty has almost completely supplanted mold-arthroplasty, osteotomy, capsulotomy (hanging hip) and resection of the femoral head. Hemiarthroplasty in the form of femoral head replacement still is the procedure of choice in patients with fractures of the neck of the femur and a normal acetabular articular cartilage, irrespective of age. As a countermeasure against loosening of the prosthesis in patients with osteoporosis and a hollow proximal end of the femur, the stem can be stabilized with acrylic cement. A standard replaceable femoral head for subsequent conversion of femoral head replacement to total hip arthroplasty is an important consideration and presently is under investigation in several medical centers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:803182

  18. Cement applicator use for hip resurfacing arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Sebastian; Rieger, Johannes S; Obermeyer, Beate; Klotz, Matthias C; Kretzer, J Philippe; Bitsch, Rudi G

    2015-05-01

    We compared the manufacturer recommended cementing technique for a femoral hip resurfacing implant (BHR, S&N) to a newly designed cement applicator on 20 porous carbon foam specimens. Substantial design changes and improvements of the cement applicator were necessary: The diameter and number of the cement escaping holes at the top of the applicator were optimized for medium viscosity cement. It was necessary to add four separate air inlet holes with large diameters. The inner shape of the applicator had to be adapted to the BHR design with a circular extending chamfer in the proximal region, a parallel inner wall and a second chamfer distally. The interface temperatures showed no risk for heat necrosis using both techniques. The cement penetration depth was more uniform and significantly reduced for the applicator cementing technique (4.341.42mm, 6.420.43 mm, p=0.001). The cement-applicator showed no cement defects compared to a large defect length (0.00.0 mm, 10.361.10 mm, p<0.001) with the manufacturer recommended cementing technique. The cement applicator technique appears to be effective for a homogenous cement distribution without cement defects and safe with a lower risk of polar over-penetration. PMID:25772262

  19. Degradable borate glass polyalkenoate cements.

    PubMed

    Shen, L; Coughlan, A; Towler, M; Hall, M

    2014-04-01

    Glass polyalkenoate cements (GPCs) containing aluminum-free borate glasses having the general composition Ag2O-Na2O-CaO-SrO-ZnO-TiO2-B2O3 were evaluated in this work. An initial screening study of sixteen compositions was used to identify regions of glass formation and cement compositions with promising rheological properties. The results of the screening study were used to develop four model borate glass compositions for further study. A second round of rheological experiments was used to identify a preferred GPC formulation for each model glass composition. The model borate glasses containing higher levels of TiO2 (7.5 mol %) tended to have longer working times and shorter setting times. Dissolution behavior of the four model GPC formulations was evaluated by measuring ion release profiles as a function of time. All four GPC formulations showed evidence of incongruent dissolution behavior when considering the relative release profiles of sodium and boron, although the exact dissolution profile of the glass was presumably obscured by the polymeric cement matrix. Compression testing was undertaken to evaluate cement strength over time during immersion in water. The cements containing the borate glass with 7.5 mol % TiO2 had the highest initial compressive strength, ranging between 20 and 30 MPa. No beneficial aging effect was observed-instead, the strength of all four model GPC formulations was found to degrade with time. PMID:24435528

  20. Heterogeneous Glasses and Sustainable Cement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Gado, Emanuela

    2015-03-01

    Calcium-silicate hydrate (C-S-H) is the main binding agent in cement and concrete. It forms at the beginning of cement hydration, it progressively densifies as cement hardens and is ultimately responsible for the performances of concrete. This hydration product is a cohesive nano-scale heterogeneous glass, whose structure and mechanics are still poorly understood, in spite of its practical importance. I will review some of the open questions for this fascinating material and discuss a statistical physics approach recently developed, which allows us to investigate the structural arrest and solidification under the out-of-equilibrium conditions typical of cement hydration and the role of the nano-scale structure in C-S-H mechanics upon hardening. Our approach unveils how some distinctive features of the kinetics of cement hydration can be related to changes in the morphology of this glassy material and elucidates the role of nano-scale mechanical heterogeneities in the hardened C-S-H.

  1. Buonocore Memorial Lecture. Glass-ionomer cements: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Mount, G J

    1994-01-01

    It was Michael Buonocore who focused the attention of the profession on adhesion in the oral cavity. He expanded the concept of adhesion of resins to enamel and investigated adhesion to dentin. The problem has been solved through the glass-ionomer cements rather than with resins, but sadly, he did not live to see them achieve maturity. The glass-ionomer cements were introduced to the profession in 1976, and they provide adhesion to both enamel and dentin through an ion exchange with the additional benefit of a continuing fluoride release throughout the life of the restoration. Solubility is low, abrasion resistance is high, and biocompatability is excellent. As a water-based material, they have an excellent chance of survival in the hostile environment of the oral cavity. Acceptance of the early versions was slow because of perceived problems with water exchange, a poor color range, and a lack of translucency. Considerable research has been carried out over the last 20 years by members of the profession and the manufacturers; at this point, the glass-ionomer cements make a very valuable contribution to everyday practice. They are now available as both an autocure and a dual-cure cement, and the color range and translucency are excellent. Problems of clinical placement have been overcome, and it is now a simple matter to take advantage of the adhesion and the fluoride release and place a restoration that is esthetic, resistant to microleakage, long lasting, and a deterent to recurrent caries. Their only limitation lies in the fact that they lack the fracture strength to rebuild marginal ridges and incisal corners. In spite of this limitation, they have opened the way for the introduction of a new range of microcavity designs that allow for conservation of remaining tooth structure to an extent never before available. In the near future physical properties will be improved still further, and the use of these cements will expand considerably. PMID:9028245

  2. A technique using resin composite with orthodontic wire to replace a missing tooth rapidly.

    PubMed

    Kitasako, Yuichi; Ikeda, Masaomi; Burrow, Michael F; Tagami, Junji

    2008-02-01

    A missing incisor or premolar tooth that requires a quick functional and esthetic repair, such as the case of tooth loss caused by trauma needs quick conservative treatment to maintain sound abutment teeth. The use of resin composite for direct fixed partial denture (FPD) can reduce problems associated with metal substructures, such as esthetic limitations and preparation of abutment teeth. However, mechanical failure of direct FPD often occurs because of design limitations and poor fabrication. This case report describes a direct resin composite FPD combined with an orthodontic wire framework. A small enamel dimple was prepared below the contact area, and a U-shaped wire was formed and positioned in the prepared enamel dimples and bonded with resin cements. An alloy primer was applied to the surface of the wire, which was coated with adhesive resin and veneered with resin composite. The finishing of the margins and final polishing were completed a week after insertion. The FPD was contoured using fine composite diamond finishing burs and polished with silicone points. The combination of the U-shaped wire and an enamel dimple below the contact area has shown good results over a period of more than 12 months in these two cases. PMID:18173684

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF WET-OXIDATION TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR FILTER BACKWASH SLUDGE AND ION EXCHANGE RESINS

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, T.; Motoyama, M.; Shibuya, M.; Wada, H.; Yamazaki, K.

    2003-02-27

    Decomposition of organic compounds contained in filter backwash sludge and spent ion exchange resins is considered effective in reducing the waste volume. A system using the wet-oxidation process has been studied for the treatment of the sludge and resins stored at Tsuruga Power Station Unit 1, 357MWe BWR, owned by The Japan Atomic Power Company. Compared with various processes for treating sludge and resin, the wet-oxidation system is rather simple and the process conditions are mild. Waste samples collected from storage tanks were processed by wet-oxidation and appropriate decomposition of the organic compounds was verified. After the decomposition the residue can be solidified with cement or bitumen for final disposal. When compared with direct solidification without decomposition, the number of waste packages can be reduced by a factor of a few dozens for the sludge and three for the resin. Additional measures for conditioning secondary waste products have also been studied, and their applicability to the Tsuruga Power Station was verified. Some of the conditions studied were specific to the Tsuruga Power Station, but it is expected that the system will provide an effective solution for sludge and resin treatment at other NPPs.

  4. [Antimicrobial activity of orthodontic band cements].

    PubMed

    Pavic, J; Arriagada, M; Elgueta, J; García, C

    1990-01-01

    The prevalence of enamel decalcification and caries beneath orthodontic bands, has indicated the need for a new enamel binding adhesive orthodontic cement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antimicrobial activity, in vitro, on Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus, acidophillus, of three materials used to cements the orthodontic bands. The cements studied were: Zinc phosphate cement, Glass-ionomer cement, and Policarboxylate cement. Thirty petri plates were seeded with S. mutans, and thirty with L. acidophillus; on each plate three pellet were placed, one of each cement studied. Petri plates were incubated under microaerophilic conditions at 37 C, and checked at 72 hrs. for Streptococcus, mutans, and four days for Lactobacillus acidophillus to evaluate the inhibition zone. The results were tabulated for each material. It was demonstrated that exists important variations in the antimicrobial properties of the materials studied, as in the microbial sensitivity to these cements. PMID:2135908

  5. Structural weakening of layered acrylic bone cement.

    PubMed

    Black, J D; Greenwald, A S

    1982-01-01

    Occasionally during arthroplasty procedures, additional cement is required to supplement an initial polymerizing mass. In vitro studies demonstrate that this practice significantly weakens the integrity of the added cement, as determined in mechanical shear. This is accompanied by a marked increase in cement porosity, with the voids acting as sites of stress concentration. This caveat has important consequences in clinical use of acrylic bone cement. PMID:7140095

  6. High temperature well bore cement slurry

    SciTech Connect

    Nahm, J.J.W.; Vinegar, H.J.; Karanikas, J.M.; Wyant, R.E.

    1993-07-13

    A low density well bore cement slurry composition is described suitable for cementing well bores with high reservoir temperatures comprising: (a) a high alumina cement in an amount of about 40 pounds per barrel of slurry or greater: (b) graphite in an amount greater than about one quarter, by volume, of the solids in the cement slurry; and (c) and a carrier fluid comprising drilling mud.

  7. Low Melt Viscosity Resins for Resin Transfer Molding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Frank W.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, resin transfer molding (RTM) has become one of the methods of choice for high performance composites. Its cost effectiveness and ease of fabrication are major advantages of RTM. RTM process usually requires resins with very low melt viscosity (less than 10 Poise). The optimum RTM resins also need to display high thennal-oxidative stability, high glass transition temperature (T(sub g)), and good toughness. The traditional PMR-type polyimides (e.g. PMR-15) do not fit this requirement, because the viscosities are too high and the nadic endcap cures too fast. High T(sub g), low-melt viscosity resins are highly desirable for aerospace applications and NASA s Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) program. The objective of this work is to prepare low-melt viscosity polyimide resins for RTM or resin film infusion (RFI) processes. The approach involves the synthesis of phenylethynyl-terminated imide oligomers. These materials have been designed to minimize their melt viscosity so that they can be readily processed. During the cure, the oligomers undergo both chain extension and crosslinking via the thermal polymerization of the phenylethynyl groups. The Phenylethynyl endcap is preferred over the nadic group due to its high curing temperature, which provides broader processing windows. This work involved the synthesis and polymerization of oligomers containing zig-zag backbones and twisted biphenyl structures. Some A-B type precursors which possessed both nitro and anhydride functionality, or both nitro and amine functionality, were also synthesized in order to obtain the well defined oligomers. The resulting zig-zag structured oligomers were then end-capped with 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride (PEPA) for further cure. The properties of these novel imide oligomers are evaluated.

  8. Assessing the tooth-restoration interface wear resistance of two cementation techniques: effect of a surface sealant.

    PubMed

    Prakki, Anuradha; Ribeiro, Ingrid Webb Josephson; Cilli, Renato; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2005-01-01

    This study compared (1) the tooth-restoration interface width of conventional and "resin coating" cementation techniques, (2) the toothbrushing wear resistance of the two interfaces and (3) this study evaluated the influence of a restoration surface sealing on toothbrush wear resistance on both cementation technique interfaces. Mid-coronal buccal surfaces of 40 bovine teeth were ground to obtain a flat enamel surface. For each specimen, a 3 mm x 4 mm x 3 mm dimension rectangular cavity was prepared. The teeth were divided into four groups. Two groups (RC) received a "resin coating" (ED Primer + Tetric Flow) prior to cementation. The remaining two groups (NC) served as non-coated groups. All teeth were restored with composite inlays (Z250) fabricated by the indirect method and were cemented with dual cure resin cement (Panavia F). After finishing the margins, one group from each of the cementation techniques (RC+S and NC+S) had the tooth-restoration interface protected with a restoration surface sealant (Biscover). The specimens were subjected to 100,000 brushing abrasion cycles. The tooth-restoration width was obtained using a Hommel Tester T 1000-basic profilometer and Turbo Datawin NT 1.34 Software (microm). The interface wear (vertical loss/microm and area/microm2) was calculated with Image Tool 3.0 Software. Data were analyzed with Student t-test, one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (alpha=0.05). Mean interface width for the NC group was 67 microm and 72 microm for the RC group. The student t-test showed no significant differences between groups (p=0.53). ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.01) in vertical loss among groups (NC: 49.30 microm; NC+S: 7.90 microm; RC: 27.15 microm; RC+S: 4.74 microm). Also, ANOVA showed significant differences (p<0.01) in worn areas among groups (NC: 2,008 microm2; NC+S: 128 microm2; RC: 1,580 microm2 and RC+S: 88 microm2). No differences were found in tooth-restoration interface width and worn area between conventional and "resin coating" techniques. "Resin coating" interface presented reduced vertical loss. Restoration surface sealing provided reduced wear in tooth-restoration interface for both techniques. PMID:16382597

  9. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-01-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  10. Skin ulceration due to cement.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S M; Tachakra, S S

    1992-09-01

    Despite legislation that requires manufacturers to inform the public about the dangers of contact with cement, severe ulceration from cement contact still occurs. We present a retrospective study of seven patients presenting to this department over a 2-year period. All were male and employed in the building trade, their injuries being sustained whilst at work. The injuries were to the lower limb, often multiple and required a median of seven visits before healing was complete. One required hospital admission and skin grafting. PMID:1449582

  11. [Pulp toxicity of luting cements].

    PubMed

    Grund, P; Raab, W H

    1990-11-01

    With the aid of laser-Doppler-flowmetry we are able to determine changes in the microcirculation of the tooth pulp. This method can also be used for testing the histocompatibility of dental materials. The zinkoxiphosphate cement Tenet and the glass ionomer cement Ketac-Cem are examined for tissue tolerance. This is done by determining the incisal and apical changes in pulpal microcirculation. Tenet has almost no discernible effect on pulpal microcirculation. Ketac-Cem causes a longlasting hyperaemia in half of the cases which seems to depend on the depth of cavity preparation. PMID:2269096

  12. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

  13. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1) Identification... filling or as a base cement to affix a temporary tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...

  17. Ferricrete Formation at Base of Cement Creek

    Ferricrete (surficial deposits cemented by iron oxides) formation at the base of Cement Creek north of Silverton, Colorado. Red color is due to iron oxides. Ferricrete forms when pyrite and other sulfide minerals weather to form acidic iron-rich water that cements surficial mater...

  18. Radioactive spent resins conditioning by the hot super-compaction process

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, Andreas; Centner, Baudouin; Lemmens, Alain

    2007-07-01

    Spent ion exchanger media are considered to be problematic waste that, in many cases, requires special approaches and precautions during its immobilization to meet the acceptance criteria for disposal. The waste acceptance criteria define, among others, the quality of waste forms for disposal, and therefore will sometimes define appropriate treatment options. The selection of treatment options for spent ion exchange materials must consider their physical and chemical characteristics. Basically, the main methods for the treatment of spent organic ion exchange materials, following to pretreatment methods are: - Direct immobilization, producing a stable end product by using Cement, Bitumen, Polymer or High Integrity Containers, - The destruction of the organic compounds by using Thermochemical processes or Oxidation to produce an inorganic intermediate product that may or may not be further conditioned for storage and/or disposal, - The complete removal of the resin inner structural water by a thermal process. After a thorough technical economical analysis, Tractebel Engineering selected the Resin Hot Compaction Process to be installed at Tihange Nuclear Power Plant. The Resin Hot Compaction Process is used to make dense homogenous organic blocks from a wide range of particulate waste. In this process spent resins are first dewatered and dried to remove the inner structural water content. The drying takes place in a drying vessel that holds the contents of two 200 L drums (Figure). In the oil heated drying and mixing unit, the resins are heated to the necessary process temperature for the hot pressing step and then placed into special metal drums, which are automatically lidded and immediately transferred to a high force compactor. After high force compaction the pellets are transferred to a measuring unit, where the dose rate, height and weight are automatically measured and recorded. A volume reduction factor of approximately up to four (depending on the type of resins) is achievable using hot compaction techniques. This paper will describe the application of the Resin Hot Compaction Process,at Tihange NPP. (authors)

  19. Effect of Zirconia and Alumina Fillers on the Microstructure and Mechanical Strength of Dental Glass Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Júlio C. M.; Silva, Joel B.; Aladim, Andrea; Carvalho, Oscar; Nascimento, Rubens M.; Silva, Filipe S.; Martinelli, Antonio E.; Henriques, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glass-ionomer cements perform a protective effect on the dentin-pulp complex considering the F ions release and chemical bonding to the dental structures. On the other hand, those materials have poor physic-mechanical properties in comparison with the restorative resin composite. The main aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of zirconia and/or alumina fillers on the microstructure and strength of a resin modified glass-ionomer cement after thermal cycling. Methods: An in vitro experimental study was carried out on 9 groups (n = 10) of cylindrical samples (6 x 4 mm) made from resin modified glass-ionomer (Vitremer, 3M, USA) with different contents of alumina and/or zirconia fillers. A nano-hybrid resin composite was tested as a control group. Samples were mechanically characterized by axial compressive tests and electron scanning microscopy (SEM) coupled to energy dispersive X-ray spectrophotometry (EDS), before and after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling procedures were performed at 3000, 6000 and 10000 cycles in Fusayama´s artificial saliva at 5 and 60 oC. Results: An improvement of compressive strength was noticed on glass-ionomer reinforced with alumina fillers in comparison with the commercial glass ionomer. SEM images revealed the morphology and distribution of alumina or zirconia in the microstructure of glass-ionomers. Also, defects such as cracks and pores were detected on the glass-ionomer cements. The materials tested were not affected by thermal cycling in artificial saliva. Conclusion: Addition of inorganic particles at nano-scale such as alumina can increase the mechanical properties of glass-ionomer cements. However, the presence of cracks and pores present in glass-ionomer can negatively affect the mechanical properties of the material because they are areas of stress concentration. PMID:27053969

  20. Cusp Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolars Restored with the Bonded Amalgam Technique Using Various Luting Agents

    PubMed Central

    Marchan, Shivaughn M.; Coldero, Larry; White, Daniel; Smith, William A. J.; Rafeek, Reisha N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. This in vitro study uses measurements of fracture resistance to compare maxillary premolars restored with the bonded amalgam technique using a new resin luting cement, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer as the bonding agents. Materials. Eighty-five sound maxillary premolars were selected and randomly assigned to one of five test groups of 17 teeth each. One group of intact teeth served as the control. The remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form relative to the dimensions of the overall tooth and restored with amalgam alone or a bonded amalgam using one of three luting agents: RelyX Arc (a new resin luting cement), RelyX luting (a resin-modified glass ionomer), or Ketac-Cem μ (a glass ionomer) as the bonding agents. Each tooth was then subjected to compressive testing until catastrophic failure occurred. The mean loads at failure of each group were statistically compared using ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. It was found that regardless of the luting cement used for the amalgam bonding technique, there was little effect on the fracture resistance of teeth. Conclusion. Cusp fracture resistance of premolars prepared with conservative MOD cavity preparations is not improved by using an amalgam-bonding technique compared to similar cavities restored with amalgam alone. PMID:20339450

  1. The effect of alumina and aluminium nitride coating by reactive magnetron sputtering on the resin bond strength to zirconia core

    PubMed Central

    Külünk, Şafak; Baba, Seniha; Öztürk, Özgür; Danişman, Şengül; Savaş, Soner

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Although several surface treatments have been recently investigated both under in vitro and in vivo conditions, controversy still exists regarding the selection of the most appropriate zirconia surface pre-treatment. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of alumina (Al) and aluminium nitride (AlN) coating on the shear bond strength of adhesive resin cement to zirconia core. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty zirconia core discs were divided into 5 groups; air particle abrasion with 50 µm aluminum oxide particles (Al2O3), polishing + Al coating, polishing + AlN coating, air particle abrasion with 50 µm Al2O3 + Al coating and air particle abrasion with 50 µm Al2O3 + AlN coating. Composite resin discs were cemented to each of specimens. Shear bond strength (MPa) was measured using a universal testing machine. The effects of the surface preparations on each specimen were examined with scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA (α=.05). RESULTS The highest bond strengths were obtained by air abrasion with 50 µm Al2O3, the lowest bond strengths were obtained in polishing + Al coating group (P<.05). CONCLUSION Al and AlN coatings using the reactive magnetron sputtering technique were found to be ineffective to increase the bond strength of adhesive resin cement to zirconia core. PMID:24353874

  2. Soluble high molecular weight polyimide resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Lubowitz, H. R.

    1970-01-01

    High molecular weight polyimide resins have greater than 20 percent /by weight/ solubility in polar organic solvents. They permit fabrication into films, fibers, coatings, reinforced composite, and adhesive product forms. Characterization properties for one typical polyimide resin are given.

  3. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1994-01-25

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

  4. Process for Molding Nonreinforced (Neat) Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Void free moldings obtained for neat, condensation, thermosetting resins. Thermally and mechanically treat resin prior to molding to reduce amount of volatiles. With volatiles reduced molding temperature and pressure are applied in way to drive out remaining volatiles during molding.

  5. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

    1996-07-23

    An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

  6. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1994-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene disphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  7. Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins

    DOEpatents

    Horwitz, E. Philip; Alexandratos, Spiro D.; Gatrone, Ralph C.; Chiarizia, Ronato

    1996-01-01

    An ion exchange resin for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene.

  8. Method for loading resin beds

    DOEpatents

    Notz, Karl J.; Rainey, Robert H.; Greene, Charles W.; Shockley, William E.

    1978-01-01

    An improved method of preparing nuclear reactor fuel by carbonizing a uranium loaded cation exchange resin provided by contacting a H.sup.+ loaded resin with a uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate, comprises providing the nitrate deficient solution by a method comprising the steps of reacting in a reaction zone maintained between about 145.degree.-200.degree. C, a first aqueous component comprising a uranyl nitrate solution having a boiling point of at least 145.degree. C with a second aqueous component to provide a gaseous phase containing HNO.sub.3 and a reaction product comprising an aqueous uranyl nitrate solution deficient in nitrate.

  9. Resin luting materials: Tissue response in dog's teeth.

    PubMed

    Bezzon, Osvaldo L; Rivera, Daniella S H; Silva, Raquel A B; Oliveira, Daniela S B; Silva-Herzog, Daniel; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Lucisano, Marília P; Silva, Léa A B

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographically and histologically the pulpal and periapical response to self-adhesive (Rely X™ Unicem) and self-etching and self-curing (Multilink(®)) resin-based luting materials in deep cavities in dogs' teeth. Deep class V cavities (0.5-mm-thick dentin) were prepared in 60 canine premolars and the following materials were applied on cavity floor: Groups I/V-RelyX™ Unicem; Groups II/VI-Multilink(®); Groups III/VII-zinc phosphate cement (control) and; Groups IV/VIII-gutta-percha (control). Cavities were restored with silver amalgam. Animals were euthanized after 10 days (groups I-IV) and 90 days (groups V-VIII). Tooth/bone blocks were radiographed and processed for histopathological evaluation of pulp and periapical tissue response to the materials. All materials presented similar histopathological features and radiographic findings at both periods. The pulp tissue was intact. The apical and periapical regions and periodontal ligament thickness were normal. No inflammatory cells, resorption of mineralized tissue (dentin, cementum, and alveolar bone) or bacteria were observed. The lamina dura was intact and no areas of periapical bone rarefaction or internal/external root resorption were observed radiographically. It can be concluded that Rely X™ Unicem and Multilink(®) caused no adverse tissue reactions and may be indicated for cementation of indirect restorations in deep dentin cavities without pulp exposure. PMID:26497153

  10. Automation design of cemented doublet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, Galina; Ivanova, Tatiana; Korotkova, Natalia

    2015-09-01

    Algorithm and software for cemented doublet synthesis by Slusarev's methodology are presented. Slusarev's methodology is based on lookup tables that allow calculating doublet radii by given value of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration by specific algorithm. This calculation is automated in this work. The input parameters for algorithm are desired values of third-order coma, spherical aberration and chromatic aberration of cemented doublet. The software looks up few pairs of optical glasses corresponding to specified value of chromatic aberration and then calculates radii of surfaces for each pair of glasses corresponding to specified third-order coma and spherical aberration. The resulted third-order aberrations and real aberrations on the edge of the pupil are calculated for obtained radiuses. Several doublets can be analyzed in result table and the chosen one can be imported into Zemax. The calculated cemented doublet parameters can be analyzed and optimized in optical system design software. The software allows to make the first step of optical system design fast and simple. It allows to design not only the system which is free of the third-order spherical aberration, coma and axial color, but obtain necessary value of aberration for compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system. Possibility to look up optical glasses automatically, what affects the chromatic aberration correction and aberration correction in general, is especially important. Examples of automatic calculation of cemented doublet and compensation of aberrations in another part of optical system are presented in the paper.

  11. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOEpatents

    Eilers, Louis H.

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  12. Cement Creek Following Storm Event

    Cement Creek following storm event in July, 2004. Note the orange discoloration of the stream derived from weathering of bedrocks and from mined areas. This type of event happens frequently in the Animas Watershed near Silverton, Colorado. View is to the south, with Kendall Mountain in the distance....

  13. Estimation of cesium-137 release from waste/cement composites using data from small-scale specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Dayal, R.; Arora, H.; Morcos, N.

    1983-07-01

    A study has been performed, correlating the leachability of Cs-137 from small-scale to large-scale waste/cement composites. In the study, simulants of two contrasting waste types were considered: cation-exchange resin and boric acid wastes incorporated in Portland Type cements. Test specimens were right cylinders of dimensions varying from 5 x 5 to 55 x 55 (diameter x height, cm). Using leach data representing diffusion-controlled release, effective diffusivities of approx. 2 x 10/sup -8/ cm/sup 2//s have been calculated for Cs-137 in both waste/cement matrices. A comparison of the observed and predicted cesium release values indicated that leach data derived from testing of small-scale specimens can be extrapolated, using a planar semi-infinite medium approximation, to estimate leachability of a full-scale specimen.

  14. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J.; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G.; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium–silicate–hydrates (C–S–H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C–S–H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C–S–H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C–S–H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C–S–H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C–S–H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  15. Mesoscale texture of cement hydrates.

    PubMed

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Krakowiak, Konrad J; Bauchy, Mathieu; Hoover, Christian G; Masoero, Enrico; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Levitz, Pierre; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Del Gado, Emanuela

    2016-02-23

    Strength and other mechanical properties of cement and concrete rely upon the formation of calcium-silicate-hydrates (C-S-H) during cement hydration. Controlling structure and properties of the C-S-H phase is a challenge, due to the complexity of this hydration product and of the mechanisms that drive its precipitation from the ionic solution upon dissolution of cement grains in water. Departing from traditional models mostly focused on length scales above the micrometer, recent research addressed the molecular structure of C-S-H. However, small-angle neutron scattering, electron-microscopy imaging, and nanoindentation experiments suggest that its mesoscale organization, extending over hundreds of nanometers, may be more important. Here we unveil the C-S-H mesoscale texture, a crucial step to connect the fundamental scales to the macroscale of engineering properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nanoscale building units of C-S-H and their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles. We compute small-angle scattering intensities, pore size distributions, specific surface area, local densities, indentation modulus, and hardness of the material, providing quantitative understanding of different experimental investigations. Our results provide insight into how the heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H and impact the mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. Unraveling such links in cement hydrates can be groundbreaking and controlling them can be the key to smarter mix designs of cementitious materials. PMID:26858450

  16. Catalytic effect of a Portland cement filler on the cure of water-compatible resorcinol phenol-formaldehyde polymer concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.

    1981-05-01

    Aggregate with a water content < 1 wt % is normally needed for the production of polymer concrete (PC). This increases the cost and complexity of the process. In this study, PC with a compressive strength of > 2000 psi (> 13.78 MPa) at age of 1 h at 24/sup 0/C was produced by mixing resorcinol phenol-formaldehyde (RPF) resin with portland cement and aggregate containing 1 to 10% water. The addition of approx. 14.7 to 17.5% type III portland cement to the PC formulation produced an acceleration in the rate of the condensation-type polymerization reaction and improved the properties of the composite. The cause of the accelerative effect was found to be the electropositive bivalent metallic ions of calcium and magnesium released from the cement grains in an aqueous medium. Conversely, the trivalent metallic ions from cement such as Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ have no effect on the rate of polymerization of RPF resin.

  17. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  19. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...

  20. 21 CFR 872.3140 - Resin applicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3140 Resin applicator. (a) Identification. A resin applicator is a brushlike device intended for use in spreading dental resin on a tooth during application of tooth shade material. (b) Classification. Class I (general controls). The device is exempt from...