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1

Evaluation of polymerization shrinkage of resin cements through in vitro and in situ experiments  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of two types of resin cements , conventional dual and dual self adhesive, through in vitro and in situ experiments. For the in vitro assay were selected two resin cements that were handled and dispensed over a mylar strip supported by a glass plate. The Bragg grating sensors were positioned and another portion of cement. was placed, covered by another mylar strip. For the in situ experiment 16 single-rooted teeth were selected who were divided into 2 groups: group 1 - conventional dual resin cement Relyx ARC and group 2 - dual self adhesive resin cement Relyx U200 ( 3M/ESPE ). The teeth were treated and prepared to receive the intracanal posts. Two Bragg grating sensors were recorded and introduced into the root canal at different apical and coronal positions. The results showed that the in vitro experiment presented similar values of polymerization shrinkage that the in situ experiment made in cervical position; whereas Relyx ARC resulted lower values compared to Relyx U200; and cervical position showed higher shrinkage than the apical.

Franco, A. P. G. O.; Karam, L. Z.; Pulido, C. A.; Gomes, O. M. M.; Kalinowski, H. J.

2014-08-01

2

Dynamic and static mechanical analysis of resin luting cements.  

PubMed

Various types of indirect restorations are available for dental treatment and resin cements are commonly used as a luting medium. The aim of this study was to evaluate the mechanical properties of contemporary resin luting agents under different testing conditions and temperatures. The materials tested were Choice 2 (CH), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (EC), Resicem (RC) and RelyX Unicem (RX). Each material was examined after 24 h of storage at 21 °C dry and wet at 21, 37 and 50 °C under dynamic and static testing and parameters such as shear and flexural modulus, loss tangent, dynamic viscosity and Poisson's ratio were calculated. The resin cements were also subjected to creep testing under different constant loads for 3 h and a recovery time of 50 h. The material with the highest modulus was CH, while RX had the lowest. All resin cements were affected by the presence of water with RX being the least affected and by the increase of temperature, with RC being the least susceptible. None of the materials exhibited full recovery after creep testing and permanent deformation ranged from 0.43% to 5.53%. The resin cements tested in this study showed no major transitions under the different testing conditions. Their behavior was satisfactory for restorations that do not require increased mechanical properties. However, in the case of stress-bearing restorations the conditions in the oral cavity may affect the performance of these materials. PMID:22301168

Tolidis, K; Papadogiannis, D; Papadogiannis, Y; Gerasimou, P

2012-02-01

3

Effect of temporary cements on the microtensile bond strength of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-etching and self-adhesive resin cement systems to dentin affected by the presence of remnants of either eugenol-containing or eugenol-free temporary cements. Materials and methods. Thirty extracted teeth were obtained and a flat dentin surface was exposed on each tooth. Acrylic blocks were fabricated and cemented either with one of two temporary cements, one zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE) and one eugenol free (ZOE-free), or without cement (control). After cementation, specimens were stored in water at 37°C for 1 week. The restorations and remnants of temporary cements were removed and dentin surfaces were cleaned with pumice. Resin composite blocks were cemented to the bonded dentin surfaces with one of two resin cements, either self-etching (Panavia F 2.0) or self-adhesive (RelyX U-100). After 24 h, the specimens were sectioned to obtain beams for submission to µTBS. The fracture mode was evaluated under a stereoscopic loupe and a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data from µTBS were submitted to two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and the Tukey test (alpha = 0.05). Results. The cross-product interaction was statistically significant (p < 0.0003). The presence of temporary cements reduced the bond strength to Panavia self-etching resin cements only (p < 0.05). Fracture occurred predominantly at the dentin-adhesive interface. Conclusions. The presence of eugenol-containing temporary cements did not interfere in the bond strength to dentin of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:24837710

Carvalho, Edilausson Moreno; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Lima, Darlon Martins; Bauer, José

2014-11-01

4

Influence of matrix metalloproteinase synthetic inhibitors on dentin microtensile bond strength of resin cements.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effect of dentin pretreatment with 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) or 24% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid gel (EDTA) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (?TBS) of resin cements. Composite blocks were luted to superficial noncarious human dentin (n=10) using two resin cements (RelyX ARC [ARC] and RelyX U100 [U100]) and three dentin pretreatments (without pretreatment-control, CHX, and EDTA). CHX was applied for 60 seconds on the acid-etched dentin in the ARC/CHX group, and for the same time on smear layer-covered dentin in the U100/CHX group. EDTA was applied for 45 seconds on smear-covered dentin in the U100/EDTA group, and it replaced phosphoric acid conditioning in the ARC/EDTA group for 60 seconds. After storage in water for 24 hours, specimens were prepared for microtensile bond strength testing. The results were submitted to two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test. ARC produced significantly higher ?TBS (p<0.05) compared to the U100, except when EDTA was used. For ARC, no pretreatment and CHX produced higher ?TBS than EDTA. For U100, EDTA produced higher ?TBS; no statistical difference occurred between CHX pretreatment and when no pretreatment was performed. While CHX did not affect immediate dentin bond strength of both cements, EDTA improved bond strength of U100, but it reduced dentin bond strength of ARC. PMID:22335305

Stape, T H S; Menezes, M S; Barreto, B C F; Aguiar, F H B; Martins, L R; Quagliatto, P S

2012-01-01

5

Effect of silane type and air-drying temperature on bonding fiber post to composite core and resin cement.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the influence of silane type and temperature of silane application on push-out bond strength between fiberglass posts with composite resin core and resin cement. One hundred and sixty fiberglass posts (Exacto, Angelus) had the surface treated with hydrogen peroxide 24%. Posts were divided in 8 groups according to two study factors: air-drying temperature after silane application (room temperature and 60 ºC) and silane type: three pre-hydrolyzed--Silano (Angelus), Prosil (FGM), RelyX Ceramic Primer (3M ESPE) and one two-component silane--Silane Coupling Agent (Dentsply). The posts (n=10) for testing the bond strength between post and composite core were centered on a cylindrical plastic matrix and composite resin (Filtek Z250 XT, 3M ESPE) that was incrementally inserted and photoactivated. Eighty bovine incisor roots (n=10) were prepared for testing the bond strength between post and resin cement (RelyX U100, 3M ESPE) and received the fiberglass posts. Push-out test was used to measure the bond strength. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's test (?=0.05). ANOVA revealed that temperature and silane had no influence on bond strength between composite core and post. However, for bond strength between post and resin cement, the temperature increase resulted in a better performance for Silane Coupling Agent, Silano and RelyX Ceramic Primer. At room temperature Silane Coupling Agent showed the lowest bond strength. Effect of the warm air-drying is dependent on the silane composition. In conclusion, the use of silane is influenced by wettability of resinous materials and pre-hydrolyzed silanes are more stable compared with the two-bottle silane. PMID:25252257

de Rosatto, Camila Maria Peres; Roscoe, Marina Guimarães; Novais, Veridiana Resende; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Soares, Carlos José

2014-01-01

6

Bonding of self-adhesive resin cements to enamel using different surface treatments: bond strength and etching pattern evaluations.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the shear bond strengths and etching patterns of seven self-adhesive resin cements to human enamel specimens which were subjected to one of the following surface treatments: (1) Polishing with #600 polishing paper; (2) Phosphoric acid; (3) G-Bond one-step adhesive; or (4) Phosphoric acid and G-Bond. After surface treatment, the human incisor specimens were bonded to a resin composite using a self-adhesive resin cement [Maxcem (MA), RelyX Unicem (UN), Breeze (BR), BisCem (BI), seT (SE), Clearfil SA Luting (CL)] or a conventional resin cement [ResiCem (RE)]. Representative morphology formed with self-adhesive resin cements showed areas of etched enamel intermingled with areas of featureless enamel. In conclusion, etching efficacy influenced the bonding effectiveness of self-adhesive resin cements to unground enamel, and that a combined use of phosphoric acid and G-Bond for pretreatment of human enamel surfaces improved the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements. PMID:20668359

Lin, Jie; Shinya, Akikazu; Gomi, Harunori; Shinya, Akiyoshi

2010-08-01

7

Shear bond strength of self-adhesive resins compared to resin cements with etch and rinse adhesives to enamel and dentin in vitro.  

PubMed

Self-adhesive resin cements should ease the placement of dental restorations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate their shear bond strength to enamel and dentin. Sixty molars were randomly assigned to 12 test groups (each n = 10), and the approximal surfaces were ground flat to get an enamel and dentin surface with a diameter of at least 4 mm. Ceramic specimens were bonded to the surfaces with either Variolink/Syntac Classic (VSC), Panavia F2.0 (PAF), RelyX Unicem (RLX), Maxcem Elite (MCE), iCem (IC), or an experimental self-adhesive resin cement (EXP). The shear bond strength (crosshead speed: 1 mm/min) was measured after 24-h storage in NaCl (37 degrees C). The fracture modes were determined with a stereomicroscope (magnification, 8-50-fold). VSC had the highest shear bond strength within the enamel groups (42.9 +/- 9 MPa) and IC the lowest (10.5 +/- 4.2 MPa, p < 0.001). The highest dentin shear bond strength was determined for VSC (39.2 +/- 8.9 MPa, p < 0.001) and the lowest for EXP (7.8 +/- 3.9 MPa, p < 0.001). Self-adhesive resin cements fractured mainly between resin and enamel or dentin. The shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements was inferior compared to conventional composite resin cements. PMID:19430821

Lührs, A-K; Guhr, S; Günay, H; Geurtsen, W

2010-04-01

8

Effect of different surface treatments on shear bond strength of zirconia to three resin cements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Statement of problem: There are no standard guidelines for material selection to obtain acceptable bonding to high-strength zirconium oxide ceramic. Studies suggest resin cements in combination with MDP-containing primer is a reasonable choice, however, the other cements cannot be rejected and need further investigation. Objective: The purpose of this in vitro study was the evaluation of the shear bond strength of three composite resin cements to zirconia ceramic after using different surface conditioning methods. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty sintered Y-TZP ceramic (IPS e.max ZirCAD) squares (8 x 8 x 4 mm) were embedded in acrylic molds, then divided into three groups (n=40) based on the type of cement used. Within each group, the specimens were divided into four subgroups (n=10) and treated as follows: (1) Air abrasion with 50microm aluminum oxide (Al2O 3) particles (ALO); (2) Air abrasion + Scotchbond Universal adhesive (SBU); (3) Air abrasion + Monobond Plus (MBP); (4) Air abrasion + Z-Prime Plus (ZPP). Composite cylinders were used as carriers to bond to conditioned ceramic using (1) RelyX Ultimate adhesive resin cement (RX); (2) Panavia SA self-adhesive resin cement (PSA); (3) Calibra esthetic cement (CAL). The bonded specimens were submerged in distilled water and subjected to 24-hour incubation period at 37°C. All specimens were stressed in shear at a constant crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA. The bond strength values (MPa), means and standard deviations were calculated and data were analyzed using analysis of variance with Fisher's PLSD multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The nature of failure was recorded. Results: The two-way ANOVA showed Panavia SA to have the highest strength at 44.3 +/- 16.9 MPa (p<0.05). The combination of Scotchbond Universal surface treatment with Panavia SA cement showed statistically higher bond strength (p=0.0054). The highest bond strengths for all three cements were observed with Scotchbond Universal surface treatment (p=0.0041). Calibra in combination with aluminum oxide air abrasion resulted in statistically lowest bond strength at 12.0 +/- 3.9 MPa. The predominant mode of failure was cohesive with cement remaining principally on the zirconium oxide samples in 57.5% of the specimens, followed by cement found on both the zirconium oxide samples and composite rods (mixed) in 32.5% of the samples. Only 10% of the specimens were found with cement on the composite rods (adhesive failure). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, the MDP-containing resin cement, Panavia SA, yielded the strongest bond to Y-TZP ceramic when compared to adhesive (RelyX Ultimate) or esthetic (Calibra) resin cements. Air abrasion particle + Scotchbond Universal surface treatment demonstrated the highest bond strength regardless of the cement. Significance: The variation of surface conditioning methods yielded different results in accordance with the cement types. Overall, Scotchbond Universal adhesive + air abrasion yielded the highest bond strengths among all three surface treatments. The phosphate monomer-containing luting system, Panavia SA, is acceptable for bonding to zirconia ceramics.

Dadjoo, Nisa

9

Push-out strength of fiber posts depending on the type of root canal filling and resin cement.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to analyze the push-out strength of two fiber post systems/resin cements (RelyX Unicem/RelyX Fiber Post (RLX) and Variolink II/DT Light SL (VL)) depending on the root canal filling (RF). One hundred sixty extracted human teeth were divided into four groups: gutta-percha/AH Plus (GP), gutta-percha/Guttaflow (GF), pre-existing root canal filling (PRF), and without root canal filling (WRF). After root canal treatment, fiber posts were inserted using either RelyX® or Variolink II®/Excite DSC®. Half of the specimens were thermocycled (TC, 5,000 cycles, 5-55°C). All specimens were subjected to the push-out test (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Three-way ANOVA showed a significant influence of either the RF or the resin cement/post system (p < 0.001). The highest bond strength was measured for VL-WRF without TC (16.5 ± 6.4 MPa). TC had no significant influence within the RLX groups. For groups PRF and WRF, significant differences were documented between VL and RLX (PRF 16.3 ± 6.0 vs 7.0 ± 2.4 MPa, p = 0.001; WRF 16.5 ± 6.4 vs 8.0 ± 5.0, p = 0.004) before TC. No differences were found after TC. The fracture mode analysis for VL showed mainly adhesive fractures between post and cement. For RLX, mixed fractures between post and tooth and between tooth and cement were predominantly determined. The adhesion of resin cements/post systems could be dependent on the type of RF. Higher bond strength values were found for the conventional ("etch and rinse") adhesive than for the "self-adhesive resin cement." PMID:20094743

Dimitrouli, Maria; Günay, Hüsamettin; Geurtsen, Werner; Lührs, Anne-Katrin

2011-04-01

10

Push-out bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin using glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cements  

PubMed Central

Objective The purpose of this study was to assess the push-out bond strength of glass fiber posts to root dentin after cementation with glass ionomer (GICs) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (RMGICs). Material and Methods Fifty human maxillary canines were transversally sectioned at 15 mm from the apex. Canals were prepared with a step back technique until the application of a #55 K-file and filled. Post spaces were prepared and specimens were divided into five groups according to the cement used for post cementation: Luting & Lining Cement; Fuji II LC Improved; RelyX Luting; Ketac Cem; and Ionoseal. After cementation of the glass fiber posts, all roots were stored at 100% humidity until testing. For push-out test, 1-mm thick slices were produced. The push-out test was performed in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute and the values (MPa) were analyzed by Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Levene's tests and by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5%. Results Fiber posts cemented using Luting & Lining Cement, Fuji II LC Improved, and Ketac Cem presented the highest bond strength to root dentin, followed by RelyX Luting. Ionoseal presented the lowest bond strength values (P>0.05). The post level did not influence the bond strength of fiber posts to root dentin (P=0.148). The major cause of failure was cohesive at the cement for all GICs and RMGICs. Conclusions Except for Ionoseal, all cements provided satisfactory bond strength values.

PEREIRA, Jefferson Ricardo; da ROSA, Ricardo Abreu; SÓ, Marcus Vinícius Reis; AFONSO, Daniele; KUGA, Milton Carlos; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; do VALLE, Accácio Lins; VIDOTTI, Hugo Alberto

2014-01-01

11

Conventional dual-cure versus self-adhesive resin cements in dentin bond integrity  

PubMed Central

During post preparation, the root canal is exposed to the oral cavity, and endodontic treatment may fail because of coronal leakage, bacterial infection and sealing inability of the luting cement. Objective this study quantified the interfacial continuity produced with conventional dual-cure and self-adhesive resin cements in the cervical (C), medium (M) and apical (A) thirds of the root. Material and methods Forty single-rooted human teeth were restored using Reforpost # 01 conical glass-fiber posts and different materials (N=10 per group): group AC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + AllCem; group ARC=Adper™ ScotchBond™ Multi-purpose Plus + RelyX ARC; group U100=RelyX U100; and group MXC=Maxcem Elite. After being kept in 100% humidity at 37ºC for 72 hours, the samples were sectioned parallel to their longitudinal axis and positive epoxy resin replicas were made. The scanning electron micrographs of each third section of the teeth were combined using Image Analyst software and measured with AutoCAD-2002. We obtained percentage values of the interfacial continuity. Results Interfacial continuity was similar in the apical, medium and cervical thirds of the roots within the groups (Friedman test, p>0.05). Comparison of the different cements in a same root third showed that interfacial continuity was lower in MXC (C=45.5%; M=48.5%; A=47.3%) than in AC (C=85.9%, M=81.8% and A=76.0%), ARC (C=83.8%, M=82.4% and A=75.0%) and U100 (C=84.1%, M=82.4% and A=77.3%) (Kruskal-Wallis test, p<0.05). Conclusions Allcem, Rely X ARC and U100 provide the best cementation; cementation was similar among root portions; in practical terms, U100 is the best resin because it combines good cementation and easy application and none of the cements provides complete interfacial continuity. PMID:21710099

da SILVA, Renata Andreza Talaveira; COUTINHO, Margareth; CARDOZO, Pedro Igor; da SILVA, Larissa Alves; ZORZATTO, Jose Roberto

2011-01-01

12

Effects of dentin moisture on the push-out bond strength of a fiber post luted with different self-adhesive resin cements  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study evaluated the effects of intraradicular moisture on the pushout bond strength of a fibre post luted with several self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Endodontically treated root canals were treated with one of three luting cements: (1) RelyX U100, (2) Clearfil SA, and (3) G-Cem. Roots were then divided into four subgroups according to the moisture condition tested: (I) dry: excess water removed with paper points followed by dehydration with 95% ethanol, (II) normal moisture: canals blot-dried with paper points until appearing dry, (III) moist: canals dried by low vacuum using a Luer adapter, and (IV) wet: canals remained totally flooded. Two 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each root sample and bond strength was measured using a push-out test setup. The data were analysed using a two-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni post hoc test with p = 0.05. Results Statistical analysis demonstrated that moisture levels had a significant effect on the bond strength of luting cements (p < 0.05), with the exception of G-Cem. RelyX U100 displayed the highest bond strength under moist conditions (III). Clearfil SA had the highest bond strength under normal moisture conditions (II). Statistical ranking of bond strength values was as follows: RelyX U100 > Clearfil SA > G-Cem. Conclusions The degree of residual moisture significantly affected the adhesion of luting cements to radicular dentine. PMID:24303359

Uzunoglu, Emel; Y?lmaz, Zeliha

2013-01-01

13

Tensile bond strength of indirect composites luted with three new self-adhesive resin cements to dentin  

PubMed Central

Objective The aims of this study were to evaluate the tensile bond strengths between indirect composites and dentin of 3 recently developed self-adhesive resin cements and to determine mode of failure by SEM. Material and Methods Exposed dentin surfaces of 70 mandibular third molars were used. Teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups: Group 1 (control group): direct composite resin restoration (Alert) with etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Bond 1 primer/adhesive), Group 2: indirect composite restoration (Estenia) luted with a resin cement (Cement-It) combined with the same etch-and-rinse adhesive, Group 3: direct composite resin restoration with self-etch adhesive system (Nano-Bond), Group 4: indirect composite restoration luted with the resin cement combined with the same self-etch adhesive, Groups 5-7: indirect composite restoration luted with self-adhesive resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Maxcem, and Embrace WetBond, respectively) onto the non-pretreated dentin surfaces. Tensile bond strengths of groups were tested with a universal testing machine at a constant speed of 1 mm/min using a 50 kgf load cell. Results were statistically analyzed by the Student's t-test. The failure modes of all groups were also evaluated. Results The indirect composite restorations luted with the self-adhesive resin cements (groups 5-7) showed better results compared to the other groups (p<0.05). Group 4 showed the weakest bond strength (p>0.05). The surfaces of all debonded specimens showed evidence of both adhesive and cohesive failure. Conclusion The new universal self-adhesive resins may be considered an alternative for luting indirect composite restorations onto non-pretreated dentin surfaces. PMID:21710095

TURKMEN, Cafer; DURKAN, Meral; CIMILLI, Hale; OKSUZ, Mustafa

2011-01-01

14

Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures  

PubMed Central

Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C). Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Varioloink II (Ivoclar), Maxcem (Kerr), Nexus2 (Kerr) and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs); GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation), and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE). The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15) was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements produced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm. Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature. PMID:24724120

Bagheri, R

2013-01-01

15

Intra-radicular dentin treatments and retention of fiber posts with self-adhesive resin cements.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of treating intraradicular dentin with irrigating solutions on the retention of glass-fiber posts luted with self-adhesive resin cement. Bovine incisors were endodontically treated, and 9-mm-deep postholes were prepared. Before inserting the cement, the root canals were irrigated with various solutions: 11.5% polyacrylic acid for 30 s, 17% EDTA for 60 s, or 5% NaOCl for 60 s, respectively. Irrigation with distilled water was used in the control group. After all specimens had been rinsed with distilled water, the excess moisture was removed and the posts were luted using either BisCem (Bisco) or RelyX Unicem clicker (3M ESPE). Seven days after luting, the specimens were sectioned transversally into 1-mm-thick slices, which were submitted to push-out testing on a mechanical testing machine. Bond strength data (n = 6 per group) were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls' test (? = 0.05). For Unicem, EDTA showed lower bond strength than the other solutions, which had similar results. For BisCem, EDTA showed higher bond strength than the other treatments, while application of NaOCl yielded higher bond strength than polyacrylic acid whereas the control group had intermediate results. In conclusion, irrigating root canals before insertion of self-adhesive resin cements, especially EDTA, might interfere with retention of the fiber posts. PMID:23306622

Faria-e-Silva, André Luis; Menezes, Murilo de Sousa; Silva, Fernanda Pereira; Reis, Giselle Rodrigues dos; Moraes, Rafael Ratto de

2013-01-01

16

Influence of different drying methods on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements to dentin.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. This study investigated the effect of different drying methods of dentin surface on the bonding efficacy of self-adhesive resin cements (SRCs). Materials and methods. Three SRCs (RelyX U200, RU; Maxcem Elite, ME; and BisCem, BC) and one resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RelyX Luting 2, RL) were used. The characteristics of the materials were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis and surface roughness and contact angle measurements. Human dentin surfaces were finished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper and assigned to three groups according to these drying methods: ethanol dehydration, drying by waiting for 10 s after blot-drying and blot-drying. The four cements were used for luting composite overlays to the dried dentin. After 24 h storage at 37°C and 100% relative humidity, stick-shaped specimens with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm(2) were prepared and stressed to failure in tension at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (n = 27). Failure modes of fractured specimens were assessed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Results. RL was the most hydrophilic, followed by BC and ME and then RU. All the luting cements luted to ethanol-dehydrated dentin showed zero bond strengths. For the three SRCs, drying by waiting produced higher microtensile bond strengths than blot-drying. RU showed the best bonding performance in the above two dentin conditions. RL showed significantly higher bond strength in blot-drying condition than in drying-by-waiting (p < 0.001). Conclusions. This study suggests that dentin surface moisture has a crucial effect on the bond strength of SRCs. PMID:24922092

Kim, Young Kyung; Min, Bong Ki; Son, Jun Sik; Kim, Kyo-Han; Kwon, Tae-Yub

2014-11-01

17

Influence of surface treatments and resin cement selection on bonding to zirconia.  

PubMed

This study aimed to evaluate the surface changes caused in zirconia by different surface treatments and the influence of the surface treatment and cement selection on bonding to zirconia under aging. Sintered zirconia specimens were divided into five groups (n = 31) based on the surface treatment, namely, control, air abrasion, silica coating, laser and air abrasion + laser. After surface treatment, surface roughness and microscope analyses were performed on one specimen of each group. Composite cylinders were then bonded to conditioned ceramics using RelyX U100 (RXU), Clearfil Esthetic Cement (CEC) and Panavia F (PF) (n = 10). After 24 h, the bonded specimens were subjected to thermal cycling (6,000 times), and then, a shear bond strength test was conducted. The roughness values were analysed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests, and the bond strengths were analysed by two-way analysis of variance and Duncan's test. The relationship between the roughness and the bond strength was determined by Spearman's correlation analysis. Specimens subjected to surface treatments were rougher than the control specimen (p < 0.000). However, there were no significant differences between the air abrasion and air abrasion + laser groups and the silica coating and laser groups. Specimens treated with laser showed lower bond strengths irrespective of the resin cement used. CEC and/or PF showed higher bond strengths than RXU for each surface treatment group. No significant relationship was observed between the roughness and the bond strength. The results of this study showed that all the surface treatments, except for laser irradiation, were suitable for treating zirconia ceramics. Cement selection was found to be more important than surface treatment, and phosphate monomer-containing cements were suitable for cementing zirconia. PMID:23139070

Suba??, Meryem Gülce; Inan, Özgür

2014-01-01

18

Effect of different light curing methods on mechanical and physical properties of resin-cements polymerized through ceramic discs  

PubMed Central

Objective The aim of this study was to compare the polimerization ability of three different light-curing units (quartz tungsten halogen, light-emitting diodes and plasma arc) and their exposure modes (high-intensity and soft-start) by determination of microhardness, water sorption and solubility, and diametral tensile strength of 5 dual-curing resin cements. Material and methods A total of 720 disc-shaped samples (1 mm height and 5 mm diameter) were prepared from different dual-curing resin cements (Duolink, Nexus, Bifix-QM, Panavia F and RelyX Unicem). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen (high-power and soft-up modes), light-emitting diode (standard and exponential modes) and plasma arc (normal and ramp-curing modes) curing units through ceramic discs. Then the samples (n=8/per group) were stored dry in the dark at 37ºC for 24 h. The Vickers hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester (Shimadzu HMV). For sorption and solubility tests; the samples were stored in a desiccator at 37ºC and weighed to a constant mass. The samples were weighed both before and after being immersed in deionized water for different periods of time (24 h and 7 days) and being desiccated. The diametral tensile strength of the samples was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by nonparametric Kruskal Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at 5% significance level. Results Resin cement and light-curing unit had significant effects (p<0.05) on microhardness, diametral tensile strength, water solubility and sorption. However, no significant differences (p>0.05) were obtained with different modes of LCUs. Conclusion The study indicates that polymerization of resin cements with different light-curing units may result in various polymer structures, and consequently different mechanical and physical properties. PMID:21710093

CEKIC-NAGAS, Isil; ERGUN, Gulfem

2011-01-01

19

The effects of tooth preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin luting cement to contaminated dentin.  

PubMed

This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of a self-adhesive luting cement after using four different techniques to remove surface contamination on dentin. Extracted human molars were flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for full crown preparation. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at room temperature with 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were randomly divided into four groups, and excess provisional cement was removed with (1) a hand instrument (excavator), (2) prophy with a mixture of flour pumice and water (3) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 microm at 40 psi and (4) aluminous oxide abrasion with a particle size of 50 microm at 40 psi. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated and residual materials were detected using SEM and EDS analysis of randomly selected specimens. The ceramics were treated with 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized to the prepared dentin prior to cementing with self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem, 3M ESPE). The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results were analyzed with one-way ANOVA, followed by Tukey's test. Particle abrasion treatment of dentin with an aluminous oxide particle provided the highest values of bond strength, while hand instrument excavation was the lowest (p < 0.05). Aluminous oxide particle size did not significantly influence the bond strength at 40 psi. The use of low pressure and small particle abrasion treated dentin as a mechanical cleansing protocol prior to definitive cementation increased the bond strength of self-adhesive resin-luting cement to dentin following eugenol-containing temporary cement. PMID:18833862

Chaiyabutr, Yada; Kois, John C

2008-01-01

20

Bonding Effectiveness of Two Adhesive Luting Cements to Glass Fiber Posts: Pull-Out Evaluation of Three Different Post Surface Conditioning Methods  

PubMed Central

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bond strength at the post/resin-cement interface with 3 different surface treatments of glass fiber posts and with 2 different luting resin cements. Sixty glass fiber posts (RelyX Fiber Post) were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) and were luted with a dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and with a dual-polymerizing resin cement (RelyX ARC). This was carried out in association with a dual-polymerizing adhesive (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus) in simulated plexiglass root canals after receiving three different pretreatment procedures. A pull-out test was performed on each sample to measure bond strengths. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA. Two samples from each group were processed for SEM observations in order to investigate the morphologic aspect of the post/cement interface. Both resin cements demonstrated significant different bond strength values (P < 0.0001). The surface treatment result was also statistically significant (P = 0.0465). SEM examination showed a modification of the post surface after pretreatment with methyl methacrylate. The dual-polymerizing self-adhesive universal resin cement achieved higher MPa bond strength values. The use of methyl methacrylate as a surface treatment of glass fiber posts provided a significant increase in bond strengths between the posts and both luting materials. PMID:24987418

Calabrese, Marco

2014-01-01

21

Progress in Solidification of Radioactive Waste Resins Using Specific Cement  

SciTech Connect

A kind of special cement (Named as ASC) was used in radioactive spent resins solidification in China. A prescription of X ASC cement + 0.5 X waste resins (50% water hold) + 0.35 X water was obtained first. In order to control the temperature rise caused by hydration of cement in 200 L solidification matrix, various supplementary materials were tried. Based on compressive strength tests and center temperature rise, super powered zeolite was selected. In addition, more resins were added to reduce the center temperature rise. A superior combination was obtained as ASC 35 wt.%, zeolite 7 wt.% to mix 42 wt.% of resins (50% water hold) with 16 wt.% of water. The microstructures of hydrated OPC, ASC and ASC with different zeolite addition were compared by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). From the SEM pictures, the structures of the needles or spines can be seen in ASC matrices and the needles structure of ASC change into flake structure gradually with more zeolite added. The simulated leaching tests showed that inclusion of zeolite in ASC reduced the leaching rates of radionuclides significantly. From 200 L matrix test, the centre temperature curve was measured, and the highest temperature was lower than 90 deg. C. No thermal cracks were found in the final solidified products. (authors)

Li, J.F.; Ye, Y.C.; Wang, J.L. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology - INET, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2006-07-01

22

The effect of dentin desensitizers and Nd:YAG laser pre-treatment on microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The purpose of this study is to evaluate if pre-treatment with desensitizers have a negative effect on microtensile bond strength before cementing a restoration using recently introduced self-adhesive resin cement to dentin. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-five human molars' occlusal surfaces were ground to expose dentin; and were randomly grouped as (n=5); 1) Gluma-(Glutaraldehyde/HEMA) 2) Aqua-Prep F-(Fluoride), 3) Bisblock-(Oxalate), 4) Cervitec Plus-(Clorhexidine), 5) Smart protect-(Triclosan), 6) Nd:YAG laser, 7) No treatment (control). After applying the selected agent, RelyX U200 self-adhesive resin cement was used to bond composite resin blocks to dentin. All groups were subjected to thermocycling for 1000 cycles between 5-55?. Each bonded specimen was sectioned to microbars (6 mm × 1 mm × 1 mm) (n=20). Specimens were submitted to microtensile bond strength test at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Levene's test, Kruskal-Wallis One-way Analysis of Variance, and Conover's nonparametric statistical analysis were used (P<.05). RESULTS Gluma, Smart Protect and Nd:YAG laser treatments showed comparable microtensile bond strengths compared with the control group (P>.05). The microtensile bond strengths of Aqua-Prep F, and Cervitec Plus were similar to each other but significantly lower than the control group (P<.05). Bisblock showed the lowest microtensile bond strength among all groups (P<.001). Most groups showed adhesive failure. CONCLUSION Within the limitation of this study, it is not recommended to use Aqua-prep F, Cervitec Plus and Bisblock on dentin when used with a self-adhesive resin cement due to the decrease they cause in bond strength. Beside, pre-treatment of dentin with Gluma, Smart protect, and Nd:YAG laser do not have a negative effect. PMID:24843392

Tuncer, Duygu; Yuzugullu, Bulem; Celik, Cigdem

2014-01-01

23

The influence of ultrasound on removal of prefabricated metal post cemented with different resin cements  

PubMed Central

Background: Ultrasonic vibrations are used to remove a cemented post from a root canal requiring endodontic retreatment. Various results have been reported from the studies that evaluated the effect of ultrasonic instruments in removing the posts cemented with resin cements. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of ultrasonic energy on the retention of prefabricated metal post cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, forty eight extracted single root premolars were decoronated with a diamond disc leaving a 13 mm long root and endodontically treated. The root canals were obturated by gutta-percha up to 5 mm with vertical condensation method and the 8 mm post-space was prepared to receive a no. 2 long Dentorama post. The roots were placed in an incubator for 48 h in 37°C and 100% humidity. After mounting the teeth in acrylic blocks, posts were cemented in the root canals using Panavia F2.0 in 24 specimens and Maxcem Elite in 24 others. For half of the specimens in each subgroup, an ultrasonic device was applied for 4 min. Universal testing machine was used to measure the force needed to remove the posts with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min until the post came out of the canal. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis at 5% level of significance. Results: The removal force was not significantly different among the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Ultrasonic energy did not decrease the retention of posts cemented with Panavia or Maxcem Elite cements. Furthermore, it seems that there is no significant difference between removal force of self-etch (Panavia) and the self-etch self-adhesive (Maxcem Elite) resin cements. PMID:24379864

Feiz, Atiyeh; Barekatain, Behnaz; Naseri, Roohollah; Zarezadeh, Hossein; Askari, Navid; Nasiri, Saman

2013-01-01

24

Adhesive permeability affects coupling of resin cements that utilise self-etching primers to dentine  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. To examine the effects of an experimental bonding technique that reduces the permeability of the adhesive layer on the coupling of resin cements to dentine.Methods. Extracted human third molars had their mid to deep dentin surface exposed flat by transversally sectioning the crowns. Resin composite overlays were constructed and cemented to the surfaces using either Panavia F (Kuraray) or

R. M. Carvalho; T. A. Pegoraro; F. R. Tay; L. F. Pegoraro; N. R. F. A. Silva; D. H. Pashley

2004-01-01

25

Microleakage of a self-adhesive resin cement after post cementation.  

PubMed

The aim of this study is to evaluate the microleakage a self-adhesive cement recently marketed Rely X U100 (3M ESPE). Thirty roots of bovine teeth with 14 mm long were restored with self-adhesive cement and Glassix fiber post DC3 (FGM). Roots were randomly divided into three groups (n=10) according to the technique of placement of the cementing agent: G1 - Centrix syringe; G2 - Lentulo drill and G3 - Manual technical. After cementation, provisional restorations were fabricated with composite resin (Opallis/FGM) without the use adhesive system. After they were finished, polished and thermo cycled by 1000 cycles, in water at temperature of 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C, 30 seconds in each bath. For microleakage test each group of roots was immersed in recipients with Rodhamine B dye solution buffered at 2%, during 24 hours. After this time, the samples were washed in tap water, sectioned and evaluation of dye leakage. The values of infiltration were obtained by the qualitative method (scoring) and statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis test and also by the quantitative method (Image Tool) and statistical analysis using ANOVA one way. For both tests, no significant difference between the techniques of placement of the self-adhesive cement. Based on these findings, micro-infiltration was present in all groups, and the placement technique did not influence the degree of micro-leakage, both for the qualitative analysis as to the quantitative. PMID:22010415

Camilotti, Veridiana; Consalter, Admilton Fritsche; Dobrovolsk, Max; Bosquirolli, Virginia; Busato, Priscila R D; Mendonça, Marcio J

2011-01-01

26

Marginal adaptation of three self-adhesive resin cements vs. a well-tried adhesive luting agent  

Microsoft Academic Search

This in vitro study compared the marginal adaptation of three self-adhesive composite cements with the clinically well-tried\\u000a dentin adhesive system Panavia F 2.0. A total of 32 Empress 2 all-ceramic MOD-inlays (eight in each group) were luted using\\u000a the self-adhesive composite cements Maxcem, Multilink Sprint, and RelyX Unicem Clicker; Panavia F 2.0 served as a clinically\\u000a well-tried control. Each luted

M. Behr; M. Hansmann; M. Rosentritt; G. Handel

2009-01-01

27

Evaluation of the flexural strength of dual-cure composite resin cements.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate of flexural strength of some adhesive resin cements. Three dual-cure composite resin cements (Nexus 3; Variolink II, Panavia F) were prepared. The manufacturer's mixing directions for the cements were followed. Adhesive resin cement was mixed, placed in the rectangular portion of the mold. Fifteen specimens were prepared for each cements. The cements were light-activated with light lamp for 40 s on both and top and bottom surfaces. The each cement specimens were divided into three groups according to time of storage and stored in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days. Total 45 specimens were stored at 37°C (98.6 0F) in distilled water for 24 h, 15, and 30 days prior to tests. The flexural strength was tested w?th a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min (0.02 in.) The maximum load was recorded as MPa. The results were analyzed by Analysis of Variance and Duncan test. The Panavia F resin cements content Bisphenol A was showed the highest flexural strength (80.80 MPa) (11.71 ksi) for 24 h. The lowest flexural strength was observed in Nexus 3 (51.00 MPa) (7.39 ksi). It was found significant interaction of material and time (p < 0.05). The types of cement and time of storage was statistically significant on the flexural strengths (p < 0.001). PMID:23359518

Duymus, Zeynep Yesil; Yaniko?lu, Nuran Dinckal; Alkurt, Murat

2013-07-01

28

Sandblasting and tin-plating-surface treatments to improve bonding with resin cements.  

PubMed

The superior cementation strengths of the adhesive resin cements can now be used in the dental surgery for posts, crowns and bridges and for intra-oral repairs to fractured porcelain fused to metal crowns or bridges, thanks to the availability of miniature sandblasters and portable tin-platers. The author describes the techniques involved. PMID:8405615

McCaughey, A D

1993-05-01

29

Sulfonated Petroleum Polymeric Resins as Plasticizers for Cement Mortars  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sulfonation of petroleum polymeric resins based on the C9 fraction with various suilfonatic agents was studied, and procedure was developed for preparing sulfonated resins. The possibility of using sulfo resins as effective plasticizers for concrete was examined.

V. P. Lesnyak; L. V. Gaponik; V. P. Mardykin; F. N. Kaputskii

2003-01-01

30

Orthodontic bracket bonding with a plasma-arc light and resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement.  

PubMed

Developments in light-curing technology have led to the introduction of a plasma-arc light-curing unit that delivers high-intensity output for faster curing. The purposes of this study were to determine the shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with a plasma-arc light-curing unit and to evaluate the durability of the resultant bond strength with thermal cycling. Comparisons were made between light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. Two light-curing units were used in this study: a plasma-arc light-curing unit and a conventional light-curing unit. The mean shear bond strengths of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement with the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units were 20.3 MPa and 26.0 MPa, respectively. An analysis of variance showed no statistically significant differences between the plasma-arc and the conventional light-curing units. Light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin demonstrated similar bond strengths and exhibited no statistical differences. There was no statistical difference in bond strength between the teeth that were thermal cycled and those that were not. Failure sites for the brackets bonded with light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement appeared to be predominantly at the bracket-adhesive interface. The SDs of light-cured composite resin were high for both light-curing units. Whereas the coefficients of variation for light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement ranged from 20% to 30%, those of light-cured composite resin ranged from 40% to 60%. The bond strength of light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement cured with either a conventional light-curing unit or a plasma-arc light-curing unit surpassed the clinically required threshold. The plasma-arc light-curing unit may be an advantageous alternative to the conventional light-curing unit for orthodontic bracket bonding with both light-cured resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement and light-cured composite resin. PMID:11455379

Ishikawa, H; Komori, A; Kojima, I; Ando, F

2001-07-01

31

The effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocol on the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with a hemostatic agent.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the effect of tooth-preparation cleansing protocols on the bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to dentin contaminated with two different types of hemostatic agents. The occlusal surface of extracted third molars was flattened to expose the dentin surface and prepared for a full crown. Acrylic temporary crowns were fabricated and placed using temporary cement. The specimens were stored at 100% relative humidity for seven days. Following removal of the temporary crowns, the specimens were surface debrided using aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 ?m at 40 psi. The specimens were randomly assigned to three groups, according to the hemostatic agents: Group I–an agent containing aluminum chloride was applied to the tooth surface; Group II–an agent containing ferric sulfate was applied to the tooth surface and Group III–uncontaminated (control). The contaminated specimens were then further subdivided into three subgroups (A–C; n=12): Group A–tooth surface cleansing with water spray; Group B–tooth surface cleansing with phosphoric acid etch and Group C–tooth surface cleansing with aluminum oxide abrasion with a particle size of 27 ?m at 40 psi. Ceramic blocks were treated with a 9.5% hydrofluoric acid-etch and silanized prior to being cemented with self-adhesive resin luting agent (RelyX Unicem) to the prepared dentin. The shear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA, followed by the Duncan multiple range test, to determine any significant differences between the testing groups. The microstructure morphology of the tooth surface was evaluated using SEM analysis. The results revealed that there was a significant difference between the bond strength of the control and the contaminated testing groups (p<0.05). A tooth preparation cleansing protocol using particle abrasion with low-pressure aluminum oxide particles provided a significant improvement in bond strength to contaminated dentin, while rinsing with water spray resulted in the lowest mean bond strength of the self-adhesive resin cement to dentin (p<0.05). PMID:21488725

Chaiyabutr, Y; Kois, J C

2011-01-01

32

An in vitro study to compare the effect of two etching techniques on the tensile bond strength of resin cement bonded to base metal alloy and enamel.  

PubMed

Resin-bonded retainers are being preferred for anterior restorations. To increase the retentive strength of the metal fixed to the tooth, the retainer surface has to be etched. Different etching techniques are described in the literature with different researchers expressing the superiority of one technique over the other. This study was conducted to compare electro chemical and chemical etching techniques and the mode of bond failure. Twenty human maxillary premolars with the crown portion separated from root were embedded in resin block such that mesial or distal portion of it was exposed on the top of the block. 4 × 5 mm area was marked on the tooth, and wax pattern was prepared to cover the exact area, with the opposite end having a hook like structure which was later attached to universal testing machine. Wiron99 Ni-Cr alloy was used for casting. Once the casting and etching procedures were finished, wax patterns were invested, casted and half the samples were etched chemically using Aqua-regia and the other half samples were etched electrochemically. The castings were cleaned and cemented to tooth structure using Rely-X ARC (3 M ESPE, USA) resin cement. Specimens were fixed to universal testing machine and de-bonded. The load required to de-bond and mode of de-bonding was noted. Results were subjected to five different statistical tests, each test specific to the variable being tested. The mean failure load was calculated as 5.95 kg for electrochemically etched samples and that of chemically etched samples was calculated as 11.15 kg. The standard deviation of the force required to debond the specimens (Kgf) was calculated and found to be 0.65 for electrochemically etched samples and 1.11 for chemically etched samples. The following conclusions have been drawn from the study. 1. Chemical etching of the samples created better retentive surfaces than electrochemical etching. 2. The results of mode of de-bonding show that in case of chemical etching maximum debonding occurred at resin-enamel interface and in electrochemical type it occurred at resin-metal interface. PMID:24431780

Sudheer, Arunachalam; Shetty, Gautam

2013-12-01

33

Effects of layering technique on the shade of resin overlays and the microhardness of dual cure resin cement.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to assess the color of layered resin overlays and to test the early microhardness of dual cure resin cement (DCRC) light cured through the layered resin overlays. Resin overlays of 1.5 mm thickness were fabricated with the A3 shade of Z350 (Group 1L), the A3B and A3E shades of Supreme XT (Group 2L), and the A3, E3, and T1 shades of Sinfony (Group 3L) using one, two, and three layers, respectively (n=7). Each layer of the resin overlays was set in equal thickness. The color of the resin overlays was measured with a colorimeter and compared with an A3 shade resin denture tooth. DCRC was light cured through the resin overlays, and the early microhardness of the DCRC was measured. The ?E value between the denture tooth and the resin overlays and the Vickers hardness number (VHN) of the DCRC were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. The color differences were 8.9±0.5, 5.3±1.0, and 7.3±0.5 and the VHNs were 19.4±1.1, 21.1±0.9, and 29.3±0.6 for Groups 1L, 2L, and 3L, respectively. Therefore, to match the designated tooth color of resin inlays and to increase the early microhardness of DCRC, layered resin inlays are more appropriate than single-dentin-layer resin inlays. However, the translucent layer should be used cautiously because the color difference of resin inlays with a translucent layer was affected more than those without a translucent layer. PMID:24918368

Chang, Hoon-Sang; Hong, Sung-Ok

2014-01-01

34

Colour matching of composite resin cements with their corresponding try-in pastes.  

PubMed

Two shades of four resin cements (Calibra, Clearfil Esthetic, Insure, Variolink II), in light- and dual-curing modes, were tested for colour matching with their corresponding try-in pastes, immediately after photopolymerization and after 24-hour dry and dark storage. Colour measurements were performed for 0.8 mm-thick specimens through a 0.8mm-thick ceramic plate. For each resin cement, colour differences (deltaE) were calculated between the two curing modes, and between the corresponding try-in paste, at baseline and after 24h. deltaE>0 values were detected between all resin cements and their try-in pastes, which were brand/shade/curing mode depended. The try-in pastes of the Variolink II system demonstrated the best colour matching (deltaE<2). Try-in pastes of Calibra and Insure, at both curing modes, did not match at an acceptable value, the shade of their corresponding resin cements (deltaE>3.3). Calibra presented the highest colour differences. deltaE values of the Clearfil Esthetic system immediately after photo-activation ranged between 2 and 3 units. A ceramic restoration may fail aesthetically as a result of not acceptable colour match (deltaE>3.3) between the shade of certain resin cements and their relevant try-in pastes. PMID:25134367

Kampouropoulos, D; Gaintantzopoulou, M; Papazoglou, E; Kakaboura, A

2014-06-01

35

Comparison of shear test methods for evaluating the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. This study compared the sensitivity of three shear test methods for measuring the shear bond strength (SBS) of resin cement to zirconia ceramic and evaluated the effects of surface treatment methods on the bonding. Materials and methods. Polished zirconia ceramic (Cercon® base, DeguDent) discs were randomly divided into four surface treatment groups: no treatment (C), airborne-particle abrasion (A), conditioning with Alloy primer (Kuraray Medical Co.) (P) and conditioning with Alloy primer after airborne-particle abrasion (AP). The bond strengths of the resin cement (Multilink N, Ivoclar Vivadent) to the zirconia specimens of each surface treatment group were determined by three SBS test methods: the conventional SBS test with direct filling of the mold (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) with resin cement (Method 1), the conventional SBS test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 4 mm × 3 mm) using resin cement (Method 2) and the microshear bond strength (?SBS) test with cementation of composite cylinders (Ø 0.8 mm × 1 mm) using resin cement (Method 3). Results. Both the test method and the surface treatment significantly influenced the SBS values. In Method 3, as the SBS values increased, the coefficients of variation decreased and the Weibull parameters increased. The AP groups showed the highest SBS in all of the test methods. Only in Method 3 did the P group show a higher SBS than the A group. Conclusions. The ?SBS test was more sensitive to differentiating the effects of surface treatment methods than the conventional SBS tests. Primer conditioning was a stronger contributing factor for the resin bond to zirconia ceramic than was airborne-particle abrasion. PMID:24697713

Kim, Jae-Hoon; Chae, Soyeon; Lee, Yunhee; Han, Geum-Jun; Cho, Byeong-Hoon

2014-11-01

36

Long-term fluoride release from resin-reinforced orthodontic cements following recharge with fluoride solution.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that there is no difference in the fluoride release behavior of resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements before or after fluoride recharge. The materials were divided into 5 groups: 2 resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements used for attaching orthodontic bands, that is, group FOB (Fuji Ortho Band) and group MCB (Multi-Cure Glass Ionomer Orthodontic Band Cement); 2 resin-reinforced glass ionomer cements and a composite used for bonding orthodontic brackets, that is, group OGLC (Ortho Glass LC), group FOLC (Fuji Ortho LC), and group TXT (Transbond XT), respectively. Fluoride release was measured during a 60-day period by using selective ion electrodes connected to an ionic analyser. After 4 weeks, the samples were exposed to 0.221% sodium fluoride solution. The results showed that cements achieved a maximum fluoride release 24 h after initial setting. No statistically significant differences were observed between groups FOB and OGLC regarding the amount of released fluoride following fluoride recharge from day 31 to day 36 (p>0.05). In conclusion, FOB and OGLC cements showed a higher capacity of capturing and releasing fluoride compared to the other cements studied. PMID:20640354

dos Santos, Rogério Lacerda; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Vaitsman, Delmo Santiago; Araújo, Mônica Tirre de Souza; de Souza, Margareth Maria Gomes; Nojima, Matilde Gonçalves da Cunha

2010-01-01

37

Influence of cement type and thickness on polyfiber post adhesion  

PubMed Central

Introduction: To evaluate the effect of two different post space diameters and related resin cement film thicknesses on the bond strength of a polyfiber post. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 premolars were randomly divided into two according to the post space diameter: 1.1 mm and 1.5 mm. Then each group was divided into three sub-groups according to luting cement used: RelyX U100, Panavia F2.0/ED primer, Clearfil SA cement. Spirapost was then luted into the canal using luting cements. Two slices were obtained from each root specimen. Push-out tests were performed. Data was analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Connover post-hoc and Mann-Whitney U-test (P < 0.05). Results: Push-out bond strength was found to vary significantly according to type of adhesive system and post space diameter size (P < 0.05). The self-adhesive resin cement RelyX U100 had significantly higher bond strengths compared with the other adhesive system (P < 0.05). The self-etch adhesive system (Panavia F2.0) showed significantly lower bond strengths compared with the other systems (P < 0.05). There was a significant interaction between the luting systems and post space diameter (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The increases in post space diameter significantly reduced the bond strength of Spirapost to root dentine for both groups. PMID:24944450

Uzunoglu, Emel; Turker, Sevinc Aktemur; Yilmaz, Zeliha

2014-01-01

38

Effects of extraction media upon fluoride release from a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have shown that various factors such as ionic composition or pH of the extraction medium may significantly\\u000a influence leaching of components from restorative materials. Therefore, it was the aim of this investigation to determine\\u000a the release of fluoride from a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (GIC) following storage in various extraction media, including\\u000a an esterase buffer. Specimens of the resin-modified

W. Geurtsen; P. Bubeck; G. Leyhausen; F. Garcia-Godoy

1998-01-01

39

Effect of water on the physical properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: Resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GIC) are available for clinical use as restorative materials or as liners and bases. This work was conducted to study the effect of water sorption on the physical properties of several resin-modified GIC, by changing the samples’ storage conditions.Methods: The water sorption, the flexural strength, the flexural elastic modulus, the Vickers hardness and the dimensional

M.-A Cattani-Lorente; V Dupuis; J Payan; F Moya; J.-M Meyer

1999-01-01

40

Corrosion of steel drums containing cemented ion-exchange resins as intermediate level nuclear waste  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Exhausted ion-exchange resins used in nuclear reactors are immobilized by cementation before being stored. They are contained in steel drums that may undergo internal corrosion depending on the presence of certain contaminants. The objective of this work is to evaluate the corrosion susceptibility of steel drums in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins with different aggressive species. The corrosion potential and the corrosion rate of the steel, and the electrical resistivity of the matrix were monitored for 900 days. Results show that the cementation of ion-exchange resins seems not to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums. The corrosion rate of the steel in contact with cemented ion-exchange resins in the absence of contaminants or in the presence of 2.3 wt.% sulphate content remains low (less than 0.1 ?m/year) during the whole period of the study (900 days). The presence of chloride ions increases the corrosion rate of the steel at the beginning of the exposure but, after 1 year, the corrosion rate drops abruptly reaching a value close to 0.1 ?m/year. This is probably due to the lack of water to sustain the corrosion process. When applying the results obtained in the present work to estimate the corrosion depth of the steel drums containing the cemented radioactive waste after a period of 300 years, it is found that in the most unfavourable case (high chloride contamination), the corrosion penetration will be considerably lower than the thickness of the wall of the steel drums. Cementation of ion-exchange resins does not seem to pose special risks regarding the corrosion of the steel drums that contained them; even in the case the matrix is highly contaminated with chloride ions.

Duffó, G. S.; Farina, S. B.; Schulz, F. M.

2013-07-01

41

Bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic with different surface treatments.  

PubMed

Zirconia-based ceramics offer strong restorations in dentistry, but the adhesive bond strength of resin cements to such ceramics is not optimal. This study evaluated the influence of surface treatments on the bond strength of resin cement to yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (Y-TZP) ceramic. Seventy-five plates of Y-TZP ceramic were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 15) according to the surface treatments [airborne particle abrasion, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser irradiation (Fidelis Plus 3, Fotona; 2 W, 200 mJ, 10 Hz, with two different pulse durations 180 or 320 ?s), glaze applied, and then 9.5 % hydrofluoric acid gel conditioned, control]. One specimen from each group was randomly selected, and specimens were evaluated with x-ray diffraction and SEM analysis. The resin cement (Clearfil Esthetic Cement, Kuraray) was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces with its corresponding adhesive components. Shear bond strength of each sample was measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Bond strengths were analyzed through one-way ANOVA/Tukey tests. Surface treatments significantly modified the topography of the Y-TZP ceramic. The Nd:YAG laser-irradiated specimens resulted in both increased surface roughness and bond strength of the resin cement. The highest surface roughness and bond strength values were achieved with short pulse duration. Nd:YAG laser irradiation increased both surface roughness of Y-TZP surfaces and bond strength of resin cement to the zirconia surface. PMID:22718473

Usumez, Asl?han; Hamdemirci, Nermin; Koroglu, Bilge Yuksel; Simsek, Irfan; Parlar, Ozge; Sari, Tugrul

2013-01-01

42

Micro-shear bond strength of dual-cured resin cement to glass ceramics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sandblasting, etching, and a silane coupling agent on the ability of dual-cured resin cement to bond to glass ceramics designed for in indirect adhesive restoration.Methods: A cast glass ceramic (Olympas Castable Ceramics) with a crystalline phase consisting of mica and ?-spondumene was selected as the substrate material. The

Yasushi Shimada; Saori Yamaguchi; Junji Tagami

2002-01-01

43

Water sorption characteristics of resin-modified glass-ionomer cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

When restorative materials take up water, their dimensions and structural integrity may be affected. This study determined, using gravimetric measurements, the water sorption characteristics of four resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (RMGICs) immersed in either distilled water or artificial saliva. The dimensional changes on water storage were also determined. The RMGICs exhibited differing characteristics as they absorbed water. Percentage water uptake and

Widchaya Kanchanavasita; H. M. Anstice; Gavin J. Pearson

1997-01-01

44

Bond strength of two resin cements to titanium after different surface conditioning methods.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the bond strength of two resin cements (Panavia F and Super Bond) to titanium after various surface conditioning techniques. The cements were applied using polyethylene tubes. After thermocycling, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine for shear bond strength. Panavia F demonstrated significantly higher bond strength values than Super Bond. Of the conditioning techniques, Al2O3+Silane+Sinfony and Silano Pen+AP demonstrated significantly lower bond strength values than Al2O3+Cesead II Opaque Primer and 110 µm SiOx+Silane. The combination of Panavia and 110 µm SiOx+Silane, Al2O3+AP, or Al2O3+Cesead II, and the combination of Super Bond and 110 µm SiOx+Silane or Al2O3+Cesead II, can be recommended for improving the bond strength of resin cement to titanium. PMID:22313994

Ozcan, Mutlu; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

2012-01-01

45

A critical analysis of the degree of conversion of resin-based luting cements  

PubMed Central

Objective This study analyzed the degree of conversion (DC%) of four resin-based cements (All Ceram, Enforce, Rely X ARC and Variolink II) activated by two modes (chemical and dual), and evaluated the decrease of DC% in the dual mode promoted by the interposition of a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. Material and Methods In the chemical activation, the resin-based cements were prepared by mixing equal amounts of base and catalyst pastes. In the dual activation, after mixing, the cements were light-activated at 650 mW/cm2 for 40 s. In a third group, the cements were lightactivated through a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc. The DC% was evaluated in a FT-IR spectrometer equipped with an attenuated total reflectance crystal (ATR). The data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results For all resin-based cements, the DC% was significantly higher with dual activation, followed by dual activation through IPS Empress 2, and chemical activation (p<0.05). Irrespective of the activation mode, Rely X presented the highest DC% (p<0.05). Chemically activated Variolink and All Ceram showed the worst results (p<0.05). The DC% decreased significantly when activation was performed through a 2.0-mm-thick IPS Empress 2 disc (p<0.05). Conclusions The results of the present study suggest that resin-based cements could present low DC% when the materials are dually activated through 2.0 mm of reinforced ceramic materials with translucency equal to or less than that of IPS-Empress 2. PMID:21085798

NORONHA FILHO, Jaime Dutra; BRANDÃO, Natasha Lamego; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; GUIMARÃES, José Guilherme Antunes; da SILVA, Eduardo Moreira

2010-01-01

46

Influence of Curing Light Attenuation Caused by Aesthetic Indirect Restorative Materials on Resin Cement Polymerization  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To verify the effect of interposing different indirect restorative materials on degree of conversion (DC), hardness, and flexural strength of a dual-cure resin cement. Methods: Discs (2 mm-thick, n=5) of four indirect restorative materials were manufactured: a layered glass-ceramic (GC); a heat-pressed lithium disilicate-based glass-ceramic veneered with the layered glass-ceramic (LD); a micro-hybrid (MH); and a micro-filled (MF) indirect composite resin. The light transmittance of these materials was determined using a double-beam spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Bar-shaped specimens of a dual-cure resin cement (Nexus 2/SDS Kerr), with (dual-cure mode) and without the catalyst paste (light-cure mode), were photoactivated through the discs using either a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) or a light-emitting diode (LED) unit. As a control, specimens were photoactivated without the interposed discs. Specimens were stored at 37ºC for 24h before being submitted to FT-Raman spectrometry (n=3), Knoop microhardness (n=6) and three-point bending (n=6) tests. Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey’s test (?=0.05). Results: MH presented the highest transmittance. The DC was lower in light-cure mode than in dual-cure mode. All restorative materials reduced the cement microhardness in light-cure mode. GC and LD with QTH and GC with LED decreased the strength of the cement for both activation modes compared to the controls. Curing units did not affect DC or microhardness, except when the dual-cure cement was photoactivated through LD (LED>QTH). Flexural strength was higher with QTH compared to LED. Conclusions: Differences in transmittance among the restorative materials significantly influenced cement DC and flexural strength, regardless of the activation mode, as well as the microhardness of the resin cement tested in light-cure mode. Microhardness was not impaired by the interposed materials when the resin cement was used in dual-cure mode. PMID:20613921

Pick, Barbara; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Junior, Washington Steagall; Kawano, Yoshio; Braga, Roberto Ruggiero; Cardoso, Paulo Eduardo Capel

2010-01-01

47

A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement – An In Vitro Study  

PubMed Central

Aim: In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Materials and Methods: Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Results: Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10 specimens cemented with modified-resin cement. Conclusion: Resin sealer decreased casting retentive stress by 46% when it was used with Zinc phosphate. However, sealer use resulted in 60% increased retention when it was used with Glass ionomer cement. The modified-resin cement produced the highest mean dislodgement stress, which nearly always exceeded the strength of the tooth. PMID:24783150

Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J.R.; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

2014-01-01

48

Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials\\u000a can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse\\u000a the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing\\u000a them with two conventional, also

Nicoleta Ilie; Alexander Simon

49

Effects of etching and adhesive applications on the bond strength between composite resin and glass-ionomer cements  

PubMed Central

Objective This study determined the effects of various surface treatment modalities on the bond strength of composite resins to glass-ionomer cements. Material and Methods Conventional (KetacTM Molar Quick ApplicapTM) or resin-modified (PhotacTM Fil Quick AplicapTM) glass-ionomer cements were prepared. Two-step etch-rinse & bond adhesive (AdperTM Single Bond 2) or single-step self-etching adhesive (AdperTM PromptTM L-PopTM) was applied to the set cements. In the etch-rinse & bond group, the sample surfaces were pre-treated as follows: (1) no etching, (2) 15 s of etching with 35% phosphoric acid, (3) 30 s of etching, and (4) 60 s of etching. Following the placement of the composite resin (FiltekTM Z250), the bond strength was measured in a universal testing machine and the data obtained were analyzed with the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by the Tukey's HSD post hoc analysis (p=0.05). Then, the fractured surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results The bond strength of the composite resin to the conventional glass-ionomer cement was significantly lower than that to the resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (p<0.001). No significant differences were determined between the self-etching and etch-rinse & bond adhesives at any etching time (p>0.05). However, a greater bond strength was obtained with 30 s of phosphoric acid application. Conclusions The resin-modified glass-ionomer cement improved the bond strength of the composite resin to the glass-ionomer cement. Both etch-rinse & bond and self-etching adhesives may be used effectively in the lamination of glass-ionomer cements. However, an etching time of at least 30 s appears to be optimal. PMID:23329245

PAMIR, Tijen; SEN, Bilge Hakan; EVCIN, Ozgur

2012-01-01

50

Bond strength of selected composite resin-cements to zirconium-oxide ceramic  

PubMed Central

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strengths of zirconium-oxide (zirconia) ceramic and a selection of different composite resin cements. Study Design: 130 Lava TM cylinders were fabricated. The cylinders were sandblasted with 80 µm aluminium oxide or silica coated with CoJet Sand. Silane, and bonding agent and/or Clearfil Ceramic Primer were applied. One hundred thirty composite cement cylinders, comprising two dual-polymerizing (Variolink II and Panavia F) and two autopolymerizing (Rely X and Multilink) resins were bonded to the ceramic samples. A shear test was conducted, followed by an optical microscopy study to identify the location and type of failure, an electron microscopy study (SEM and TEM) and statistical analysis using the Kruskal-Wallis test for more than two independent samples and Mann-Whitney for two independent samples. Given the large number of combinations, Bonferroni correction was applied (?=0.001). Results: Dual-polymerizing cements provided better adhesion values (11.7 MPa) than the autopolymerizing (7.47 MPa) (p-value M-W<0.001). The worst techniques were Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Rely X; Lava TM + sandblasting + Silane + Multilink and Lava TM + CoJet + silane + Multilink. Adhesive failure (separation of cement and ceramic) was produced at a lesser force than cohesive failure (fracture of cement) (p-value M-W<0.001). Electron microscopy confirmed that the surface treatments modified the zirconium-oxide ceramic, creating a more rough and retentive surface, thus providing an improved micromechanical interlocking between the cement and the ceramic. Key words:Shear bond strength, silica coating, surface treatment, zirconia ceramics, phosphate monomer. PMID:22926485

Fons-Font, Antonio; Amigo-Borras, Vicente; Granell-Ruiz, Maria; Busquets-Mataix, David; Panadero, Ruben A.; Sola-Ruiz, Maria F.

2013-01-01

51

Comparing the effect of a resin based sealer on crown retention for three types of cements: an in vitro study.  

PubMed

To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One-Step-Resinomer, Bisco) was used to seal dentin after the tooth preparation. Sealer was not used on the control specimens except for the modified-resin cement (Resinomer, Bisco) specimens that required use of adhesive with cementation. Using ceramometal (Wirobond(®), BEGO), a casting was produced for each specimen and cemented with either zinc phosphate (Harvard), glass ionomer (Vivaglass) or modified resin cement (Resinomer) with single bottle adhesive. All the castings were cemented with a force of 20 kg. Castings were thermal cycled at 5 and 55 °C for 2,500 cycles and were then removed along the path of insertion using a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a = 0.05. The nature of failure was also recorded. The mean stress removal for non sealed zinc phosphate, sealed zinc phosphate, non sealed glass ionomer, sealed glass ionomer and modified resin cement was found to be 3.56, 1.92, 2.40, 4.26, 6.95 MPa respectively. Zinc phosphate cement remained principally on the castings when the tooth surface was treated with the sealer and was found on both the tooth and the casting when the sealer was not used. Fracture of root before dislodgement was seen in 9 of 11 specimens with modified resin cement. Resin sealer decreases the retention of the castings when used with zinc phosphate and increases it when used with glass ionomer cement. The highest mean dislodgement force was measured with modified resin cement. PMID:24431752

Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

2013-09-01

52

In vitro effects of different moisture level and curing method on microleakage of resin cements to pulp chamber dentine.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the microleakage of resin cements in the pulp chamber dentin. Fifty specimens of sound human molars were divided into five groups. Composite cores cemented using Clearfil SA Luting in the first group to a dried dentin and in the second group to a moistened dentin and then light-cured. In third and fourth groups, cement was placed on dried and moistened dentin and self-cured respectively. In fifth group, composite cores were cemented by Panavia F2.0. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated using fluid filtration technique. The highest microleakage mean value was observed in the group with light-cured to a dry dentin. The mode of curing in contrast to moisture value had significant effect on microleakage. The microleakage of self- adhesive resin cement used in this study was lower in case of self cured than in case of light-cured and was not related to the dentin surface moisture. PMID:24922999

Moosavi, H; Darvishzadeh, F; Sadr, A; Salary, S

2014-03-01

53

Shear bond of resin cement to post-cured hybrid composites.  

PubMed

Various surface treatments affected the shear bond strength of a dual-cured resin cement to a post-cured composite. Disks of post-cured composite inlay 2.0 mm thick by 10.0 mm in diameter, were mounted in acrylic cylinders. Various surface treatments were tested including: 1) smooth material; 2) treated by sandblasting (air abrasion); 3) sandblasting and etching with hydrofluoric acid (HF); 4) sandblasting and silane priming; 5) sandblasting, HF etching and silane priming; 6) HF etching alone; 7) HF etching and silane priming; and 8) silane priming alone. Specimens of dual-cured cement, 4.0 mm in diameter, were light-cured onto the prepared surfaces. The samples were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 7d before shear bond testing. The highest mean shear bond strengths were achieved for specimens with the following surface treatments: 1) by a combination of sandblasting, HF etching and silane priming; 2) sandblasting and HF etching; and 3) sandblasting and silane priming. Most bond failures in these groups were cohesive within the post-cured composite inlay disks. The bond strengths of the specimen in other groups were significantly lower and bond failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between the disk of post-cured composite and dual-cured resin cement. PMID:7988770

Stokes, A N; Tay, W M; Pereira, B P

1993-11-01

54

In-vitro evaluation of an experimental method for bonding of orthodontic brackets with self-adhesive resin cements  

PubMed Central

Background Self-adhesive resin cements do not require the surface treatment of teeth and are said to release fluoride, which makes them suitable candidates for bonding of orthodontic brackets. The objectives of this study was to investigate the shear bond strength (SBS) of self-adhesive resin cements on etched on non-etched surfaces in vitro and to assess their fluoride release features. Materials and Methods Four fluoride-releasing dual-cure self-adhesive resin cements were investigated. For SBS experiment, 135 freshly extracted human maxillary premolars were used and divided into nine groups of 15 teeth. In the control group, brackets were cemented by Transbond XT (3M Unitek, USA), in four groups self-adhesive resin cements were used without acid-etching and in four groups self-adhesive cements were applied on acid-etched surfaces and the brackets were then deboned in shear with a testing machine. Adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were also calculated. For fluoride release investigation, 6 discs were prepared for each self-adhesive cement. Transbond XT and Fuji Ortho LC (GC, Japan) served as negative and positive control groups, respectively. The fluoride release of each disc into 5 ml of deionized water was measured at days 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, 28, and 56 using a fluoride ion-selective electrode connected to an ion analyzer. To prevent cumulative measurements, the storage solutions were changed daily. Results The SBS of brackets cemented with Transbond XT were significantly higher compared to self-adhesives applied on non-etched surfaces (P<0.001). However, when the self-adhesive resin cements were used with enamel etching, no significant differences was found in the SBS compared to Transbond XT, except for Breeze. The comparisons of the ARI scores indicated that bracket failure modes were significantly different between the etched and non-etched groups. All self-adhesive cements released clinically sufficient amounts of fluoride for an extended period of time. Conclusion For the tested cements, the strongest bonds were obtained by enamel acid-etching prior to bracket bonding. All the self-adhesive resin cements had significant long-term fluoride release and could be recommended as suitable fluoride-releasing orthodontic bonding materials. PMID:24163808

Ramazanzadeh, Barat Ali; Merati, Mohsen; Shafaee, Hooman; Dogon, Leon; Sohrabi, Keyvan

2013-01-01

55

Surgical management of invasive cervical resorption using resin-modified glass ionomer cement.  

PubMed

Invasive cervical resorption is an external resorption that begins below the epithelial attachment. It is caused primarily by dental trauma, orthodontic treatment, or dental bleaching. This case report involved an invasive Class III cervical resorption resulting from trauma to the superior right central incisor. Root canal treatment was followed by surgical intervention. The resorptive defect was debrided, and part of the tooth was restored with resin-modified glass ionomer cement. Postoperative follow-up revealed complete healing and healthy gingival attachment. PMID:24192742

Tavares, Warley Luciano Fonseca; Lopes, Renata Carvalho Portes; Oliveira, Ricardo Reis; Souza, Rodrigo Goncalves de; Henriques, Luiz Carlos Feitosa; Ribeiro-Sobrinho, Antonio Paulino

2013-01-01

56

Bond strength of resin cement to CO2 and Er:YAG laser-treated zirconia ceramic  

PubMed Central

Objectives It is difficult to achieve adhesion between resin cement and zirconia ceramics using routine surface preparation methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CO2 and Er:YAG laser treatment on the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics. Materials and Methods In this in-vitro study 45 zirconia disks (6 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were assigned to 3 groups (n = 15). In control group (CNT) no laser treatment was used. In groups COL and EYL, CO2 and Er:YAG lasers were used for pretreatment of zirconia surface, respectively. Composite resin disks were cemented on zirconia disk using dual-curing resin cement. Shear bond strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min after 24 hr distilled water storage. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey's HSD tests. Results The means and standard deviations of shear bond strength values in the EYL, COL and CNT groups were 8.65 ± 1.75, 12.12 ± 3.02, and 5.97 ± 1.14 MPa, respectively. Data showed that application of CO2 and Er:YAG lasers resulted in a significant higher shear bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramics (p < 0.0001). The highest bond strength was recorded in the COL group (p < 0.0001). In the CNT group all the failures were adhesive. However, in the laser groups, 80% of the failures were of the adhesive type. Conclusions Pretreatment of zirconia ceramic via CO2 and Er:YAG laser improves the bond strength of resin cement to zirconia ceramic, with higher bond strength values in the CO2 laser treated samples. PMID:25383349

Kasraei, Shahin; Heidari, Bijan; Vafaee, Fariborz

2014-01-01

57

Push-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement used as endodontic sealer  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of the present study was to investigate the bond strength of RelyX Unicem (3M) to root canal dentin when used as an endodontic sealer. Materials and Methods Samples of 24 single-rooted teeth were prepared with Gates Glidden drills and K3 files. After that, the roots were randomly assigned to three experimental groups (n = 8) according to the filling material, (1) AH Plus (Dentsply De Trey GmbH)/Gutta-Percha cone; (2) Epiphany SE (Pentron)/Resilon cone; (3) RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha cone. All roots were filled using a single cone technique associated to vertical condensation. After the filling procedures, each tooth was prepared for a push-out bond strenght test by cutting 1 mm-thick root slices. Loading was performed on a universal testing machine at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. One-way analysis of variance and Tukey test for multiple comparisons were used to compare the results among the experimental groups. Results Epiphany SE/Resilon showed significantly lower push-out bond strength than both AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p < 0.05). There was no significant difference in bond strength between AH Plus/Gutta-Percha and RelyX Unicem/Gutta-Percha (p > 0.05). Conclusions Under the present in vitro conditions, bond strength to root dentin promoted by RelyX Unicem was similar to AH Plus. Epiphany SE/Resilon resulted in lower bond strength values when compared to both materials. PMID:25383347

Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; Lima, Felipe Coelho; Saboia, Vicente de Paula Aragão; Coutinho-Filho, Tauby de Souza; Neves, Aline de Almeida

2014-01-01

58

Antibacterial activity of resin adhesives, glass ionomer and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and a compomer in contact with dentin caries samples.  

PubMed

A total of 103 clinical samples of carious dentin were used to study the antibacterial action of different dental resin adhesive materials (Gluma 2000, Syntac, Prisma Universal Bond 3, Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and Prime&Bond 2.0) glass ionomer cements (Ketac-Cem, Ketac-Bond, Ketac-Silver, Ketac-Fil) resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji II LC, Vitremer and Vitrebond) and a compomer (Dyract). The agar plate diffusion method was used for the microbial cultures and a chlorhexidine control. The growth of the caries-producing microorganisms was effectively inhibited by the Vitremer and Vitrebond cements, and to a lesser extent by the Scotchbond Multi-Purpose adhesive system. Overall, there were statistically significant differences in the antibacterial activity of the products tested. PMID:11203829

Herrera, M; Castillo, A; Bravo, M; Liébana, J; Carrión, P

2000-01-01

59

Effect of artificial saliva and pH on shear bond strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramic.  

PubMed

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of media with different pH on shear and strength of resin cements to zirconia-based ceramics. Sixty rectangularly shaped specimens made of a zirconia based ceramic (Cercon, Dentsply) were prepared, air-blasted with 110 microm aluminum oxide particles (Al203) and randomly assigned into three groups (n = 30). A universal resin composite (Filtek Z250, 3M/ESPE) was bonded to each specimen using one of the following three cements: Calibra (Dentsply), Panavia F2 (kurary) and Unicem (3M/ESPE). Specimens were thermal cycled and stored in one of the following three media for two weeks: water at pH = 7, saliva at pH = 7 and saliva at pH = 3.5. The mean shear bond strength of each group was analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (alpha = 0.05). The modes of failure were recorded using a streomicroscope. All specimens in the Calibra groups showed premature debonding. No significant difference was found between the two other cements or different media. The failure modes in the two latter cements were predominantly adhesive. Despite the adverse effect of acidic media on the properties of restorative materials, the media did not significantly influence the bond strength of MDP-containing resin cement and a self-adhesive cement to a zirconia- based ceramic. PMID:23682503

Geramipanah, F; Majidpour, M; Sadighpour, L; Fard, M J Kharazi

2013-03-01

60

Addition of benzalkonium chloride to self-adhesive resin-cements: some clinically relevant properties.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. The clinical survival rates of the adhesive restorations are limited due to the deterioration of resin-dentin bonds over time, partly due to the endogenous enzymatic activity of dentin. Recently, benzalkonium chloride (BAC) has been shown to effectively inhibit endogenous protease activity of dentin. This study evaluated the effect of different concentrations of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on the degree of conversion (DC), vickers hardness (VH), setting time (ST) and biaxial flexural strength (FS) of two self-adhesive resin luting cements (RC). Methods. Two RC SpeedCEM (Ivoclar-Vivadent) and BisCem (Bisco) were modified by addition of 0.1, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2 wt% BAC. The luting cements without the addition of BAC served as control. The DC (FT-IR/ATR from the bottom of the resin disc), vickers hardness (from top and bottom of the light-cured specimen), setting time (ISO 4049) and biaxial flexural strength (0.6 × 6 mm discs) of the specimens were tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukeys HSD. Results. DC results were in the range of 70-80%, with some significant changes in BisCem (p < 0.05). VH values of both materials increased significantly compared to control, with no significant change as the BAC percentage increases. BAC addition influenced the ST differently for both materials. For BisCem, a gradual decrease (p < 0.05) was observed whereas, for SpeedCEM, a gradual increase was observed until 1% BAC (p < 0.05). For FS values, a gradual decrease was observed for both materials with increased amounts of BAC (p < 0.05), compared to the control group. Conclusions. BAC addition of up to 1% seems to be acceptable considering the properties tested. Clinical significance. Incorporation of benzalkonium chloride to self-adhesive resin luting cements during the mixing procedure does not significantly affect the degree of conversion or flexural strength of the luting agent and may be a good option to improve the durability of adhesive interface. PMID:24823935

Oguz Ahmet, Serra; Mutluay, M Murat; Seyfioglu Polat, Zelal; Seseogullari Dirihan, Roda; Bek, Bulent; Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu

2014-11-01

61

Adhesion of 10-MDP containing resin cements to dentin with and without the etch-and-rinse technique  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion of 10-MDP containing self-etch and self-adhesive resin cements to dentin with and without the use of etch-and-rinse technique. MATERIALS AND METHODS Human third molars (N=180) were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=30 per group). Conventional (Panavia F2.0, Kuraray-PAN) and self-adhesive resin cements (Clearfil SA, Kuraray-CSA) were bonded to dentin surfaces either after application of 3-step etch-and-rinse (35% H3PO4 + ED Primer) or two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond). Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength test using the universal testing machine (0.5 mm/min). The failure types were analyzed using a stereomicroscope and quality of hybrid layer was observed under a scanning electron microscope. The data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (?=.05). RESULTS Overall, PAN adhesive cement showed significantly higher mean bond strength (12.5 ± 2.3 - 14.1 ± 2.4 MPa) than CSA cement (9.3 ± 1.4 - 13.9 ± 1.9 MPa) (P<.001). Adhesive failures were more frequent in CSA cement groups when used in conjunction with two-step self-adhesive (68%) or no adhesive at all (66%). Hybrid layer quality was inferior in CSA compared to PAN cement in all conditions. CONCLUSION In clinical situations where bonding to dentin substrate is crucial, both conventional and self-adhesive resin cements based on 10-MDP can benefit from etch-and-rinse technique to achieve better quality of adhesion in the early clinical period. PMID:24049562

Sen, Deniz; Tuncelli, Betul; Ozcan, Mutlu

2013-01-01

62

Comparison of bracket debonding force between two conventional resin adhesives and a resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement: an in vitro and in vivo study.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare the debonding force of orthodontic brackets bonded with two conventional resin adhesives (Resilience L3 and Light Bond) and a resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji Ortho LC). For the in vitro part of the study, 80 extracted premolars were randomly divided into four groups. In groups A and B, brackets were bonded to unetched enamel using Fuji Ortho LC cement in wet and dry conditions, respectively. In groups C and D, brackets were bonded to etched enamel using Resilience L3 and Light Bond, respectively. Debonding force was determined using a servohydraulic testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data was analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison test at p<0.05. A significant difference was found in debonding force between unetched Fuji Ortho LC and the two conventional resins. There was no significant difference between the two conventional resins or between unetched resin-reinforced glass ionomer in the wet and dry conditions. For the in vivo part of the study, 30 patients were randomly assigned to one of the three bonding material groups. Bracket survival rates and distributions were obtained by following these patients for 1.2 years. Data was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier product-limit estimates of survivorship function. Bond failure interface was determined using a modified adhesive remnant index (ARI). These results showed no significant difference between survival rates and distributions among the three bonding materials with respect to the type of malocclusion, type of orthodontic treatment, or location of bracket. There were significant differences between survival distributions of males and females in the unetched Fuji Ortho LC group and among type of teeth in the conventional resin groups. The predominant mode of bracket failure for the unetched Fuji Ortho LC cement was at the enamel-adhesive interface, and for conventional resins, the enamel-adhesive interface and the bracket-adhesive interface. These results suggest that resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement can withstand occlusal and orthodontic forces despite having a bond strength lower than that of conventional resin adhesives. PMID:10515145

Shammaa, I; Ngan, P; Kim, H; Kao, E; Gladwin, M; Gunel, E; Brown, C

1999-10-01

63

Effect of silane activation on shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite post to resin cement  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Among the surface treatment methods suggested to enhance the adhesion of resin cement to fiber-reinforced composite posts, conflicting results have been obtained with silanization. In this study, the effects of silanization, heat activation after silanization, on the bond strength between fiber-reinforced composite post and resin cement were determined. MATERIALS AND METHODS Six groups (n=7) were established to evaluate two types of fiber post (FRC Postec Plus, D.T. Light Post) and three surface treatments (no treatment; air drying; drying at 38?). Every specimen were bonded with dual-curing resin cement (Variolink N) and stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37?. Shear-bond strength (MPa) between the fiber post and the resin cement were measured using universal testing device. The data were analyzed with 1-way ANOVA and by multiple comparisons according to Tukey's HSD (?=0.05). The effect of surface treatment, fiber post type, and the interactions between these two factors were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and independent sample T-tests. RESULTS Silanization of the FRC Postec Plus significantly increased bond strength compared with the respective non-treated control, whereas no effect was determined for the D.T. Light Post. Heat drying the silane coupling agent on to the fiber-reinforced post did not significantly improve bond strength compared to air-syringe drying. CONCLUSION The bond strength between the fiber-reinforced post and the resin cement was significantly increased with silanization in regards to the FRC Postec Plus post. Bond strength was not significantly improved by heat activation of the silane coupling agent. PMID:23755334

Kim, Hyun-Dong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Hee-Sun

2013-01-01

64

Lack of correlation between tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and leakage in roots filled with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin  

PubMed Central

Objective To analyze possible correlations among tubular dentine cement penetration, adhesiveness and apical leakage in fillings performed with gutta percha and an endodontic cement based on epoxy amine resin. Material and Methods Sixty similar, extracted human mandibular central incisors were irrigated, instrumented and filled following the same protocol. First, apical leakage was quantified by fluid filtration tests. Then, these same specimens were sectioned for analysis of tubular dentine cement penetration and the middle thirds were submitted to push-out tests to analyze the adhesiveness of the fillings. Results In brief, the means and standard deviations with a confidence interval of 95% were as follows: tubular dentine cement penetration (8.875±4.540), adhesiveness (4.441±2.683) and apical leakage (0.318±0.215). The data were confronted using the Pearson's test (P>0.05), and it was possible to prove that there was no correlation between (1) tubular dentine cement penetration and apical leakage (r2: 0.08276), (2) tubular dentine cement penetration and adhesiveness (r2: -0.2412) and (3) adhesiveness and apical leakage (r2: 0.1340). Conclusion After analysis of these data, it could be observed that there exists no correlation among the variables analyzed in this study. PMID:24626245

MACHADO, Ricardo; da SILVA NETO, Ulisses Xavier; CARNEIRO, Everdan; FARINIUK, Luiz Fernando; WESTPHALEN, Vania Portela Ditzel; CUNHA, Rodrigo Sanches

2014-01-01

65

Effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to test the effects of enamel deproteinization on bracket bonding with conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC). One hundred premolars, extracted for orthodontic reasons, were divided into five groups (n = 20). Group 1 (control): enamel was etched with 35 per cent phosphoric acid, a thin layer of adhesive was applied, and the brackets were bonded with Transbond XT. Group 2: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC). Group 3: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with conventional GIC. Group 4: enamel was etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. Group 5: enamel was treated with 5.25 per cent NaOCl, etched with 10 per cent polyacrylic acid, and the brackets were bonded with RMGIC. The teeth were stored in distilled water for 24 hours before they were submitted to shear testing. The results demonstrated that bond strength values of group 1 (17.08 ± 6.39 MPa) were significantly higher in comparison with the other groups. Groups 2 (3.43 ± 1.94 MPa) and 3 (3.92 ± 1.57 MPa) presented values below the average recommended in the literature. With regard to adhesive remnant index, the groups in which the enamel was treated with NaOCl showed a behaviour similar to that of the resin composite. It is conclude with enamel treatment with NaOCl increased bonding strength of brackets bonded with GIC and RMGIC, but increased bond strength was not statistically significant when compared to the untreated groups. PMID:22379131

Pereira, Tatiana Bahia Junqueira; Jansen, Wellington Corrêa; Pithon, Matheus Melo; Souki, Bernardo Quiroga; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro; Oliveira, Dauro Douglas

2013-08-01

66

Microleakage Evaluation of Class V Restorations with Conventional and Resin-modified Glass Ionomer Cements.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro the marginal microleakage of conventional Glass Ionomer Cements (GIC) and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements (RMGIC). The tested materials were grouped as follows: GIC category - G1 (Vidrion R - SSWhite); G2 (Vitro Fill - DFL); G3 (Vitro Molar - DFL); G4 (Bioglass R - Biodinâmica); and G5 (Ketac Fill - 3M/ESPE); and RMGIC category - G6 (Vitremer - 3M/ESPE); G7 (Vitro Fill LC - DFL); and G8 (Resiglass - Biodinâmica). Therefore, 80 class V cavities (2.0X2.0 mm) were prepared in bovine incisors, either in the buccal face. The samples were randomly divided into 8 groups and restored using each material tested according to the manufacturer. The root apices were then sealed with acrylic resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in 100% humidity at 37°C. After storage, the specimens were polished with extra-slim burs and silicon disc (Soft-lex - 3M/ESPE), then were isolated with cosmetic nail polish up to 1 mm around the restoration. Then, the samples were immersed in 50% AgNO3 solution for 12 h and in a developing solution for 30 min. They were rinsed and buccal-lingual sectioned. The evaluation of the microleakage followed scores from 0 to 3. The Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn method test were applied (a=0.05). The results showed that there was no difference between the enamel and dentin margins. However, GIC materials presented more microleakage than RMGIC. PMID:25284528

Pontes, Danielson Guedes; Guedes-Neto, Manoel Valcacio; Cabral, Maria Fernanda Costa; Cohen-Carneiro, Flávia

2014-09-01

67

Tensile bond strength of resin luting cement to a porcelain-fusing noble alloy.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the tensile bond strength of resin composites to a noble alloy for ceramic bonding after various surface treatments. The flat end of bars cast in the alloy were used as test specimens. Eighteen clinically relevant combinations of luting agent, airborne particle abrasion, and surface treatment were applied. After surface treatment, two bars were bonded together. Resin cement, either dual-polymerizing (Twinlook) or chemically polymerizing (Panavia EX, Panavia 21, or RBBC), was used as a luting agent. The specimens were subjected to 1,000 thermal cycles between 15 degrees C and 60 degrees C before tensile bond strength testing. The highest median bond strengths were obtained using the Silicoater MD method/Twinlook (20.6 to 26.1 MPa) or with tin-plating/ Panavia EX (24.0 MPa), but more low values were recorded among the latter specimens. Tin-plating/Panavia 21 gave median tensile bond strengths (18.1 MPa) similar to tin-plating/Panavia EX. The Silicoater MD method resulted in similar bond strengths with or without the addition of a layer of Opaquer. The traditional Silicoater method (8.0 to 12.4 MPa) gave significantly lower median tensile bond strength values, and the lost sugar crystals method resulted in a tensile bond strength of 15.4 MPa. PMID:8957870

Stoknorm, R; Isidor, F; Ravnholt, G

1996-01-01

68

The Effect of Simplified Adhesives on the Bond Strength to Dentin of Dual-cure Resin Cements.  

PubMed

SUMMARY The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strengths to dentin of two dual-cure resin cements, one with a unique initiator, NX3 (Kerr Corp), and the other with a traditional redox-initiator system, Calibra (Dentsply), when used in combination with simplified or nonsimplified adhesive agents. The two dual-cure resin cements, in either self- or dual-cure activation modes, were bonded to human dentin with four dental adhesives to create 16 subgroups of 10 specimens each. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water at 37°C, the specimens were tested in shear in a universal testing machine. With both NX3 and Calibra, bond strengths significantly increased when the specimens were dual cured. In addition, with either cement in either mode, the nonsimplified adhesives performed significantly better than did the simplified adhesive bonding agents. When used specifically with simplified adhesives in either cure mode, NX3 did not produce significantly higher bond strengths than did Calibra. In general, lower dentin bond strengths were found with simplified adhesives or self-cure activation with either resin cement. PMID:24807814

Shade, Am; Wajdowicz, Mn; Bailey, Cw; Vandewalle, Ks

2014-01-01

69

Long-term degradation of resin-based cements in substances present in the oral environment: influence of activation mode  

PubMed Central

Indirect restorations in contact with free gingival margins or principally within the gingival sulcus, where the presence of organic acids produced by oral biofilm is higher, may present faster degradation of the resin-based cement pellicle. Objectives: To investigate the degradation of four resin-based cements: Rely X ARC (R), Variolink II (V), enforce (E) and All Cem (A), after immersion in distilled water (DW), lactic acid (LA) and artificial saliva (AS) and to analyze the influence of the activation mode on this response. Material and Methods: Two activation modes were evaluated: chemical (Ch) and dual (D). In the dual activation, a two-millimeter thick ceramic disk (IPS empress System) was interposed between the specimen and light-curing unit tip. Specimens were desiccated, immersed in distilled water, artificial saliva and lactic acid 0.1 M at 37ºC for 180 days, weighed daily for the first 7 days, and after 14, 21, 28, 90 and 180 days and were desiccated again. Sorption and solubility (µg/mm3) were calculated based on ISO 4049. The data were submitted to multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test for media comparisons (?=0.05). Results: Sorption was higher after immersion in LA (p<0.05) and increased significantly with time (p<0.05). Sorption was influenced by the activation mode: Ch>D (p<0.05). The lowest solubility was presented by R (p<0.05). Conclusions: Lactic acid increased the degradation of resin-based cements. Moreover, the physical component of activation, i.e., light-activation, contributed to a low degradation of resin-based cements. PMID:23857651

da SILVA, Eduardo Moreira; NORONHA-FILHO, Jaime Dutra; AMARAL, Cristiane Mariote; POSKUS, Laiza Tatiana; GUIMARAES, Jose Guilherme Antunes

2013-01-01

70

Ceramic primer heat-treatment effect on resin cement/Y-TZP bond strength.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different heat-treatment strategies for a ceramic primer on the shear bond strength of a 10-methacryloyloxydecyl-dihydrogen-phosphate (MDP)-based resin cement to a yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) ceramic. Specimens measuring 4.5 × 3.5 × 4.5 mm(3) were produced from Y-TZP presintered cubes and embedded in polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Following finishing, the specimens were cleaned using an ultrasound device and distilled water and randomly divided into 10 experimental groups (n=14) according to the heat treatment of the ceramic primer and aging condition. The strategies used for the experimental groups were: GC (control), without primer; G20, primer application at ambient temperature (20°C); G45, primer application + heat treatment at 45°C; G79, primer application + heat treatment at 79°C; and G100, primer application + heat treatment at 100°C. The specimens from the aging groups were submitted to thermal cycling (6000 cycles, 5°C/55°C, 30 seconds per bath) after 24 hours. A cylinder of MDP-based resin cement (2.4 mm in diameter) was constructed on the ceramic surface of the specimens of each experimental group and stored for 24 hours at 37°C. The specimens were submitted to a shear bond strength test (n=14). Thermal gravimetric analysis was performed on the ceramic primer. The data obtained were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test (?=0.05). The experimental group G79 without aging (7.23 ± 2.87 MPa) presented a significantly higher mean than the other experimental groups without aging (GC: 2.81 ± 1.5 MPa; G20: 3.38 ± 2.21 MPa; G100: 3.96 ± 1.57 MPa), showing no difference from G45 only (G45: 6 ± 3.63 MPa). All specimens of the aging groups debonded during thermocycling and were considered to present zero bond strength for the statistical analyses. In conclusion, heat treatment of the metal/zirconia primer improved bond strength under the initial condition but did not promote stable bonding under the aging condition. PMID:22621166

Silva, L H; Costa, A K F; Queiroz, J R C; Bottino, M A; Valandro, L F

2012-01-01

71

The influence of water sorption on the development of setting shrinkage stress in traditional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. The aim of this study was to determine the setting stress development for some traditional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements and to assess the effect of early water exposure to this stress. Methods. The development of the setting stress of the glass ionomer cements was determined in a tensilometer set-up as described earlier by Feilzer et al. (1987). Results.

Albert J. Feilzer; Afrodite I. Kakaboura; Anton J. de Gee; Carel L. Davidson

1995-01-01

72

Evaluation of the sealing ability of resin cement used as a root canal sealer: An in vitro study  

PubMed Central

Aim: This study was designed to evaluate the apical seal of root canals obturated with resin cement as a root canal sealer and compare with that of the glass ionomer and zinc oxide eugenol sealers using a cold lateral condensation gutta-percha technique. Background: Successful root canal treatment requires three-dimensional obturation of the root canal system with nonirritating biomaterials. None of the available materials are capable of providing a fluid tight seal. Materials and Methods: The prepared teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 15 each to be obturated using three different sealers. Group I: zinc oxide eugenol (Tubliseal), Group II: Glass ionomer (Ketac Endo), and Group III: resin cement (C & B Superbond). All the specimens were stored in 100% relative humidity at 37° for 24 h. The specimens were placed in 2% methylene blue dye for 48 h and sectioned. The dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope. Results: The “Kruskal” Wallis test was carried out to test the equality of mean. All the specimens showed dye leakage, and there was a statistically significant difference (P < 0.0001) among the groups. The specimens in Group III showed a minimal leakage and the specimens in Group I showed a maximum leakage. Conclusion: Resin cement sealed the root canals significantly better when compared with zinc oxide eugenol and glass ionomer sealers. PMID:22876018

Kumar, R Vinod; Shruthi, CS

2012-01-01

73

Effect of antioxidants on push-out bond strength of hydrogen peroxide treated glass fiber posts bonded with two types of resin cement  

PubMed Central

Objectives Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) surface treatment of fiber posts has been reported to increase bond strength of fiber posts to resin cements. However, residual oxygen radicals might jeopardize the bonding procedure. This study examined the effect of three antioxidant agents on the bond strength of fiber posts to conventional and self-adhesive resin cements. Materials and Methods Post spaces were prepared in forty human maxillary second premolars. Posts were divided into five groups of 8 each: G1 (control), no pre-treatment; G2, 10% H2O2 pre-treatment; G3, G4 and G5. After H2O2 application, Hesperidin (HES), Sodium Ascorbate (SA) or Rosmarinic acid (RA) was applied on each group respectively. In each group four posts were cemented with Duo-Link conventional resin cement and the others with self-adhesive BisCem cement. Push-out test was performed and data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA and tukey's post-hoc test (? = 0.05). Results There was a statistically significant interaction between the cement type and post surface treatment on push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p < 0.001, F = 16). Also it was shown that different posts' surface treatments significantly affect the push-out bond strength of fiber posts (p = 0.001). H2O2 treated posts (G2) and control posts (G1) cemented with Duo-link showed the highest (15.96 ± 5.07MPa) and lowest bond strengths (6.79 ± 3.94) respectively. Conclusions It was concluded that H2O2 surface treatment might enhance the bond strength of fiber posts cemented with conventional resin cements. The effect of antioxidants as post's surface treatment agents depends on the characteristics of resin cements used for bonding procedure. PMID:25383350

Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Tarighi, Pardis; Samimi, Pouran

2014-01-01

74

Tensile fatigue of 4-META cement bonding three base metal alloys to enamel and comparison to other resin cements.  

PubMed

The tensile median fatigue limits and fracture mode of 4-META cement were evaluated after bonding Ni-Cr, Ni-Cr-Be, and Co-Cr alloys to enamel. Alloy surfaces, 6 mm in diameter, were grit blasted with 50 microns Al2O3 and cemented to etched bovine enamel under a 2 kg load. Samples were cycled in tension to failure or 10(6) cycles at 5 Hz in Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C. Two-point strategy was used to determine median fatigue limits (S50). Fracture modes were evaluated by SEM on samples failing before 10(6) cycles. Results indicated differences between all sample groups where S50 (Ni-Cr-Be) > S50 (Co-Cr) > S50 (Ni-Cr). Failure analysis revealed mixed cohesive fractures near both interfaces with small areas of delamination within the cement. Comparison to reported median fatigue limits of two commercially available cements were discussed. PMID:7783018

Givan, D A; Fitchie, J G; Anderson, L; Zardiackas, L D

1995-04-01

75

A long term study of fluoride release from metal-containing conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer cements.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to determine long term release of fluoride from a resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) (Fuji II LC (FLC)) compared with that from two conventional acid-base setting cements (HiDense (HD) and KetacSilver (KS)) marketed for similar restorative purposes. Fluoride release from discs of cement immersed in water or artificial saliva was measured for 2.7 years using an ion selective electrode technique. The RMGIC was affected by water if immersed immediately after setting. This is similar to conventional acid-base cements and the experimental method was designed to allow for this. Over the 2.7-year period, the RMGIC and HD released similar amounts of fluoride into both water and artificial saliva. In water, the RMGIC released the most fluoride, while in artificial saliva the highest release was from HD. KS released the least amount of fluoride in both immersing liquids. In artificial saliva, release was reduced to 17-25% of that found in water, with the RMGIC showing the greatest reduction. Both acid-base cured cements showed changes in colour over the 2.7-year span, while the colour of the RMGIC was stable. It was concluded that the RMGIC released equivalent or greater amounts of fluoride than the two acid-base cure glass-ionomers over a period of 2.7 years. PMID:11298908

Williams, J A; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

2001-01-01

76

Influence of alloy microstructure on the microshear bond strength of basic alloys to a resin luting cement.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of microstructure and composition of basic alloys on their microshear bond strength (µSBS) to resin luting cement. The alloys used were: Supreme Cast-V (SC), Tilite Star (TS), Wiron 99 (W9), VeraBond II (VBII), VeraBond (VB), Remanium (RM) and IPS d.SIGN 30 (IPS). Five wax patterns (13 mm in diameter and 4mm height) were invested, and cast in a centrifugal casting machine for each basic alloy. The specimens were embedded in resin, polished with a SiC paper and sandblasted. After cleaning the metal surfaces, six tygon tubes (0.5 mm height and 0.75 mm in diameter) were placed on each alloy surface, the resin cement (Panavia F) was inserted, and the excess was removed before light-curing. After storage (24 h/37°C), the specimens were subjected to µSBS testing (0.5 mm/min). The data were subjected to a one-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Turkey's test (?=0.05). After polishing, their microstructures were revealed with specific conditioners. The highest µSBS (mean/standard deviation in MPa) were observed in the alloys with dendritic structure, eutectic formation or precipitation: VB (30.6/1.7), TS (29.8/0.9), SC (30.6/1.7), with the exception of IPS (31.1/0.9) which showed high µSBS but no eutectic formation. The W9 (28.1/1.5), VBII (25.9/2.0) and RM (25.9/0.9) showed the lowest µSBS and no eutectic formation. It seems that alloys with eutectic formation provide the highest µSBS values when bonded to a light-cured resin luting cement. PMID:23306223

Bauer, José; Costa, José Ferreira; Carvalho, Ceci Nunes; Souza, Douglas Nesadal de; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

2012-01-01

77

Influence of Nd:YAG or Er:YAG laser surface treatment on microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composites to resin cement. Lasers surface treatment of indirect resin composites.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the influence of the surface pretreatment of indirect resin composite (Signum, Admira Lab and Sinfony) on the microtensile bond strength of a resin cement. Sixty samples made of each brand were divided into 6 groups, according to surface treatment: (1) control; (2) controlled-air abrasion with Al2O3; (3) Er:YAG Laser 200 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10s; (4) Er: YAG Laser 300 mJ, 10 Hz, for 10 s; (5) Nd:YAG 80 mJ, S15Hz for 1 min; (6) Nd:YAG 120mJ, 15 Hz for 1 min. After treatments, all the groups received an application of 37% phosphoric acid and adhesive. The pair of blocks of the same brand were cemented to each other with dual resin cement. The blocks were sectioned to obtain resin-resin sticks (1 x1 mm) and analyzed by microtensile bond testing. The bond strength values were statistically different, irrespective of the surface treatment performed, with highest values for Sinfony (43.81 MPa) and lowest values for Signum (32.33 MPA). The groups treated with the Nd:YAG laser showed the lowest bond strength values and power did not interfere in the results, both for Nd:YAG laser and Er:YAG. Controlled-air abrasion with Al203 is an efficient surface treatment method and the use of the Nd:YAG and Er:YAG lasers reduced bond strength, irrespective of the intensity of energy used. PMID:23101180

Caneppele, T M F; de Souza, A C Oliveira; Batista, G R; Borges, A B; Torres, C R G

2012-09-01

78

Improvement of enamel bond strengths for conventional and resin-modified glass ionomers: acid-etching vs. conditioning*  

PubMed Central

Objective: This study deals with the effect of phosphoric acid etching and conditioning on enamel micro-tensile bond strengths (?TBSs) of conventional and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (GICs/RMGICs). Methods: Forty-eight bovine incisors were prepared into rectangular blocks. Highly-polished labial enamel surfaces were either acid-etched, conditioned with liquids of cements, or not further treated (control). Subsequently, two matching pre-treated enamel surfaces were cemented together with one of four cements [two GICs: Fuji I (GC), Ketac Cem Easymix (3M ESPE); two RMGICs: Fuji Plus (GC), RelyX Luting (3M ESPE)] in preparation for ?TBS tests. Pre-treated enamel surfaces and cement-enamel interfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel ?TBS of GICs/RMGICs. Conditioning with the liquids of the cements produced significantly weaker or equivalent enamel ?TBS compared to the control. Regardless of etching, RMGICs yielded stronger enamel ?TBS than GICs. A visible hybrid layer was found at certain enamel-cement interfaces of the etched enamels. Conclusions: Phosphoric acid etching significantly increased the enamel ?TBSs of GICs/RMGICs. Phosphoric acid etching should be recommended to etch the enamel margins before the cementation of the prostheses such as inlays and onlays, using GICs/RMGICs to improve the bond strengths. RMGICs provided stronger enamel bond strength than GICs and conditioning did not increase enamel bond strength. PMID:24190447

Zhang, Ling; Tang, Tian; Zhang, Zhen-liang; Liang, Bing; Wang, Xiao-miao; Fu, Bai-ping

2013-01-01

79

The effect of resin cements and primer on retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of resin cements and primer on the retentive force of zirconia copings bonded to zirconia abutments with insufficient retention. MATERIALS AND METHODS Zirconia blocks (Lava, 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were obtained and forty sets of zirconia abutments and copings were fabricated using CAD/CAM technology. They were grouped into 4 categories as follows, depending on the types of resin cements used, and whether the primer is applied or not:Panavia F2.0 (P), Panavia F2.0 using Primer (PRIME Plus, Bisco Inc, Schaumburg, IL, USA) (PZ), Superbond C&B (S), and Superbond C&B using Primer (SZ). For each of the groups, the cementation was conducted. The specimens were kept in sterilized water (37?) for 24 hours. Retentive forces were tested and measured, and a statistical analysis was carried out. The nature of failure was recorded. RESULTS The means and standard deviations of retentive force in Newton for each group were 265.15 ± 35.04 N (P), 318.21 ± 22.24 N (PZ), 445.13 ± 78.54 N (S) and 508.21 ± 79.48 N (SZ). Superbond C&B groups (S & SZ) showed significantly higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0 groups (P & PZ). In Panavia F2.0 groups, the use of primer was found to contribute to the increase of retentive force. On the other hand, in Superbond C&B groups, the use of primer did not influence the retention forces. Adhesive failure was observed in all groups. CONCLUSION This study suggests that cementation of the zirconia abutments and zirconia copings with Superbond C&B have a higher retentive force than Panavia F2.0. When using Panavia F2.0, the use of primer increases the retentive force. PMID:23755347

Kim, Seung-Mi; Yoon, Ji-Young; Lee, Myung-Hyun

2013-01-01

80

The erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions.  

PubMed

This study investigated the erosion kinetics of conventional and resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements in acidic buffer solutions as a function of time. Disc shaped specimens were prepared from conventional (Ketac-Cem: KTC) and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Fuji Plus: FP) and immersed in three acidic buffer solutions (0.01 M) namely, acetic acid/sodium acetate (AA(B)), lactic acid/sodium lactate (LA(B)) and citric acid/sodium citrate (CA(B)) with a constant pH of 4.1 and stored for 1, 8, 24, 48, 80, 120 and 168 h. F concentration was determined using ion-specific electrode. Si, Ca and Al concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. Ca, Al, Si and F solubility rates in both FP and KTC were the highest in CA(B) solution. The erosion rates of both FP and KTC in all buffer solutions increased as a function of immersion time. The amount of F eluted from FP was more than that of KTC. The total amount of elements released from FP was less than KTC in all solutions. PMID:23207217

Hazar-Yoruc, Binnaz; Bavbek, Andac Barkin; Özcan, Mutlu

2012-01-01

81

Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ``Technical Position on Waste Form`` (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

1992-08-01

82

Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity.

McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W.; Morcos, N.

1992-01-01

83

Optical X-ray density of composite resin luting agents.  

PubMed

This study verified the optical density of four composite resin luting agents - RelyX ARC (RY), Enforce (E), C&B Cement (CB) and Flow it (FI), at thicknesses of 2, 3, and 4 mm. The optical density of the luting agents was compared with that of enamel and dentin at the same thicknesses. Fifteen tooth crowns were embedded in PVC cylinders with self-cured acrylic resin. In addition, acrylic resin was poured into 5 PVC cylinders and four equidistant 5 mm diameter holes were prepared, with one luting material inserted in each. A laboratory cutting machine was used to prepare 4-, 3- and 2-mm thick slices of the tooth crowns and materials. Digital images were obtained with a Digora system. Three radiographs of each thickness were obtained, totalizing 135 radiographs of the crowns and 45 of the materials. Three readings were carried out on each radiograph: three in enamel, three in dentin and three in each material, totalizing 1350. According to Students t-test (presin luting agents E and FI can be distinguished from dental structures, while the CB and RY are not easily distinguished. PMID:22165313

Carracho, Helena G; da Silveira, Ivori D; Soares, Clarissa G; Paranhos, Maria Paula G; Júnior, Luiz Henrique Burnett; Spohr, Ana Maria

2011-01-01

84

Mechanical properties of a resin-modified glass ionomer cement for luting: effect of adding spherical silica filler.  

PubMed

This study investigated the effects of spherical silica filler (SSF) on the workability and mechanical properties of resin-modified glass ionomer cements for luting (RMGICL). Varying powder/liquid ratios (P/L=2.0, 2.2, 2.4, and 2.6) of a commercially available glass ionomer cement (Fuji Lute, GC Corp.) were mixed with SSF at different weight percentages (5, 7.5, and 10%). On film thickness, statistically significant effects of SSF addition were noted at 2.5 minutes after mixing started, notably at P/L=2.4 and 2.6 when 7.5 and 10 wt% of SSF were added. The same result was also obtained for consistency evaluation. On mechanical and bonding strengths to the tooth substrate, no statistically significant differences were observed among all the SSF weight percentages within each P/L ratio. SSF-added RMGICL at a higher powder/liquid ratio exhibited increased mechanical and bonding strengths when compared to a control without SSF addition, but nonetheless maintained the film thickness with no further increase. PMID:20484829

E, Lihua; Irie, Masao; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Yamashiro, Takashi; Suzuki, Kazuomi

2010-05-01

85

Microtensile Bond Strength of Self-Adhesive Resin-Based Dental Cement to Bleached Enamel  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study investigated the effectiveness of bleaching agents on the micro tensile bond strength (µTBS) of self-adhesive luting cement and enamel. A total of 126 samples were prepared from the labial surfaces of permanent human maxillary central incisors and assigned into three groups with 42 samples each as: control, enamel bleached with 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP), and enamel bleached with

Ev?en Tamam; Selda Keskin; Mine Betül Üçta?l?

2010-01-01

86

Evaluation of light transmission through different esthetic posts and its influence on the degree of polymerization of a dual cure resin cement  

PubMed Central

Aim: To measure the light transmission through different esthetic posts and to evaluate the degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement cured through these posts. Materials and Methods: The posts were divided into two experimental groups i.e. Group A (D.T. Light post); Group B (D.T. White post) and control i.e. Group C (metal post), each group having 10 samples. Posts of each group were illuminated with curing light and photographs were taken keeping the parameters standardized to evaluate the intensity of light transmission at different levels. The degree of polymerization of dual cure resin cement was evaluated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis. Results: D.T. Light post showed highest light transmission and degree of polymerization. The light intensity decreased from cervical to apical for both esthetic post but the decrease from middle to apical third was insignificant for D.T. White post group. No light transmission was detected in metal post but the degree of polymerization decreased significantly from cervical to middle third. Conclusion: Cementation of fibre post with superior light transmitting ability using dual cured resin cement resulted in increased degree of polymerization. PMID:23349573

Taneja, Sonali; Kumari, Manju; Gupta, Anupama

2013-01-01

87

Effect of reduced exposure times on the cytotoxicity of resin luting cements cured by high-power led  

PubMed Central

Objective Applications of resin luting agents and high-power light-emitting diodes (LED) light-curing units (LCUs) have increased considerably over the last few years. However, it is not clear whether the effect of reduced exposure time on cytotoxicity of such products have adequate biocompatibility to meet clinical success. This study aimed at assessing the effect of reduced curing time of five resin luting cements (RLCs) polymerized by high-power LED curing unit on the viability of a cell of L-929 fibroblast cells. Material and Methods Disc-shaped samples were prepared in polytetrafluoroethylene moulds with cylindrical cavities. The samples were irradiated from the top through the ceramic discs and acetate strips using LED LCU for 20 s (50% of the manufacturer's recommended exposure time) and 40 s (100% exposure time). After curing, the samples were transferred into a culture medium for 24 h. The eluates were obtained and pipetted onto L-929 fibroblast cultures (3x104 per well) and incubated for evaluating after 24 h. Measurements were performed by dimethylthiazol diphenyltetrazolium assay. Statistical significance was determined by two-way ANOVA and two independent samples were compared by t-test. Results Results showed that eluates of most of the materials polymerized for 20 s (except Rely X Unicem and Illusion) reduced to a higher extent cell viability compared to samples of the same materials polymerized for 40 s. Illusion exhibited the least cytotoxicity for 20 s exposure time compared to the control (culture without samples) followed by Rely X Unicem and Rely X ARC (90.81%, 88.90%, and 83.11%, respectively). For Rely X ARC, Duolink and Lute-It 40 s exposure time was better (t=-1.262 p=0,276; t=-9.399 p=0.001; and t=-20.418 p<0.001, respectively). Conclusion The results of this study suggest that reduction of curing time significantly enhances the cytotoxicity of the studied resin cement materials, therefore compromising their clinical performance. PMID:21625748

ERGUN, Gulfem; EGILMEZ, Ferhan; YILMAZ, Sukran

2011-01-01

88

An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy  

PubMed Central

Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the micro tensile bond strength of two metal bonding resin cements to sandblasted cobalt chromium alloy. Materials & Methods: Eight, Cobalt chromium alloy blocks of dimensions 10x5x5 mm were cast, finished and polished. One of the faces of each alloy block measuring 5x5mm was sandblasted with 50 ?m grit alumina particles. The alloy blocks were then cleaned in an ultrasonic cleaner for 1 min and then air dried with an air stream. The Sandblasted surfaces of the two alloy blocks were bonded together with 2 different metal bonding resin systems (Panavia F Kuraray and DTK Kleber – Bredent). The samples were divided into 2 groups (n=4). Group 1- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with Panavia cement. Group 2- Two Co-Cr blocks were luted with DTK Kleber-Bredent cement. The bonded samples were cut with a diamond saw to prepare Microtensile bars of approximately 1mm x 1mm x 6mm. Thirty bars from each group were randomly separated into 2 subgroups (n=15) and left for 3hrs (baseline) as per manufacturer's instructions while the other group was aged for 24hrs in 370C water, prior to loading to failure under tension at a cross head speed of 1mm/min. Failure modes were determined by means of stereomicroscopy (sm). Statistical analysis was performed through one way – ANOVA. Results: Significant variation in micro-tensile bond strength was observed between the two metal bonding resin systems. Conclusion: DTK showed higher mean bond strength values than Panavia F cement both at baseline and after aging. How to cite this article: Musani S, Musani I, Dugal R, Habbu N, Madanshetty P, Virani D. An in vitro Comparative Evaluation of Micro Tensile Bond Strength of Two metal bonding Resin Cements bonded to Cobalt Chromium alloy. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(5):73-8. PMID:24324308

Musani, Smita; Musani, Iqbal; Dugal, Ramandeep; Habbu, Nitin; Madanshetty, Pallavi; Virani, Danish

2013-01-01

89

Synthesis, formulation and evaluation of novel zinc-calcium phosphate-based adhesive resin composite cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three novel adhesive oligomers having carboxylic acid and methacrylate groups were synthesized, characterized and used to formulate composite bone cements with newly synthesized zinc-calcium-silicate phosphate. The optimal formulation was determined based on types of oligomer, oligomer\\/diluent ratio, initiator concentration, and filler level using compressive strength (CS) and curing time (CT) as screening tools. Shrinkage, exotherm and aging of the formed

Dong Xie; IL-Doo Chung; Guigui Wang; Dingsong Feng; Jimmy Mays

2004-01-01

90

STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF TWO BPO\\/AMINE INITIATION SYSTEMS ON THE FREE-RADICAL POLYMERIZATION OF MMA USED IN DENTAL RESINS AND BONE CEMENTS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The kinetics of the free radical bulk polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) was studied by DSC, using the benzoyl peroxide (BPO)\\/amine initiation system. N,N dimethyl-4-aminophenethyl alcohol (DMPOH), which is a newly synthesized and used amine in the preparation of acrylic dental resins and bone cements was examined, and the results compared to the most commonly used in these applications amine,

Dimitris S. Achilias; Irini Sideridou

2002-01-01

91

Influence of Immediate Dentin Sealing on the Shear Bond Strength of Pressed Ceramic Luted to Dentin with Self-Etch Resin Cement  

PubMed Central

Objectives. To examine the effect of immediate dentin sealing (IDS), with dentin bonding agents (DBAs) applied to freshly cut dentin, on the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RelyX Unicem (RXU) cement. Method. Eighty extracted noncarious third molars were ground flat to expose the occlusal dentin surfaces. The teeth were randomly allocated to five groups (A to E) of sixteen teeth each. Groups A to D were allocated a dentin bonding agent (Optibond FL, One Coat Bond, Single Bond, or Go!) that was applied to the dentin surface to mimic the clinical procedure of IDS. These specimen groups then had etched glass ceramic discs (Authentic) luted to the sealed dentin surface using RXU. Group E (control) had etched glass ceramic discs luted to the dentin surface (without a dentin bonding agent) using RXU following the manufacturer's instructions. All specimens were stored for one week in distilled water at room temperature and then shear stressed at a constant cross-head speed of 1?mm per minute until failure. Statistical analysis was performed by ANOVA followed by post hoc Tukey HSD method (P < 0.05) applied for multiple paired comparisons. Results. The shear bond strength results for group A to E ranged from 6.94 ± 1.53 to 10.03 ± 3.50?MPa. One-way ANOVA demonstrated a difference (P < 0.05) between the groups tested and the Tukey HSD demonstrated a significant (P < 0.05) difference between the shear bond strength (SBS) of Optibond FL (Group A) and Go! (Group D). There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) in the SBS between the test groups (A–D) or the control (group E). Conclusion. IDS using the dentin bonding agents tested does not statistically (P > 0.05) affect the shear bond strength of etched pressed ceramic luted to dentin with RXU when compared to the control. PMID:22287963

Dalby, Robert; Ellakwa, Ayman; Millar, Brian; Martin, F. Elizabeth

2012-01-01

92

The processing, properties, and applications of calcium aluminate–phenol resin composite 1 1 This paper was originally submitted to Advanced Cement Based Materials on 15 October 1997 and accepted on 22 March 1998. The paper was received at the Editorial Office of Cement and Concrete Research on 20 August 1998 and accepted in final form on 14 September 1998  

Microsoft Academic Search

The processing, properties, and a few applications of calcium aluminate–phenol resin composite with very high flexural strength are discussed. This composite contains a very large amount of cement (70 vol%) but shows unusual engineering properties, which have not yet been achieved by traditional cement-based materials. The flexural strength of the composite is found to be 120 to 220 MPa; in

G. K. Dinilprem Pushpalal; Tadashi Kobayashi; Toshio Kawano; Naomi Maeda

1999-01-01

93

Effect of pH on the release of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resins collected from operating nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small-scale waste--form specimens collected during solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station were leach-tested and subjected to compressive strength testing in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1). Samples of untreated resin waste collected from each solidification vessel before the solidification process were analyzed for concentrations of radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to determine the quantities of these chemicals in the waste-form specimens. The chelating agents included oxalic, citric, and picolinic acids. In order to determine the effect of leachant chemical composition and pH on the stability and leachability of the waste forms, waste-form specimens were leached in various leachants. Results of this study indicate that differences in pH do not affect releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms, but that differences in leachant chemistry and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. Also, this study indicates that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents are similar for waste- form specimens that decomposed and those that retained their general physical form. 36 refs., 60 figs., 28 tabs.

McIsaac, C.V.; Akers, D.W.; McConnell, J.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1991-06-01

94

Microleakage after Thermocycling of Three Self-Etch Adhesives under Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement Restorations  

PubMed Central

This study was designed to evaluate microleakage that appeared on Resin-Modified Glass-Ionomer Cement (RMGIC) restorations. Sixty class V cavities (h × w × l = 2?mm × 2?mm × 3?mm) were cut on thirty extracted third molars, which were randomly allocated to three experimental groups. All the buccal cavities were pretreated with polyacrylic acid, whereas the lingual cavities were treated with three one-step Self-Etch adhesives, respectively, Xeno III (Dentsply Detrey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany), iBond exp (Heraeus Kulzer gmbH & Co. KG, Hanau, Germany), and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (3M ESPE AG, Dental products Seefeld, Germany). All cavities were completely filled with RMGIC, teeth were thermocycled for 800 cycles, and leakage was evaluated. Results were expressed as means ± standard deviations (SDs). Microleakage scores were analysed by means of generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs) assuming an ordinal logistic link function. All results were considered to be significant at the 5% critical level (P < .05). The results showed that bonding RMGIC to dentin with a Self-Etch adhesive rather than using polyacrylic acid did not influence microleakage scores (P = .091), except for one tested Self-Etch adhesive, namely, Xeno III (P < .0001). Nevertheless, our results did not show any significant difference between the three tested Self-Etch adhesive systems. In conclusion, the pretreatment of dentin with Self-Etch adhesive system, before RMGIC filling, seems to be an alternative to the conventional Dentin Conditioner for the clinicians as suggested by our results (thermocycling) and others (microtensile tests). PMID:20628510

Geerts, Sabine O.; Seidel, Laurence; Albert, Adelin I.; Gueders, Audrey M.

2010-01-01

95

Pull-out bond strength of a self-adhesive resin cement to NaOCl-treated root dentin: effect of antioxidizing agents  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study evaluated the effect of three antioxidizing agents on pull-out bond strengths of dentin treated with sodium hypochlorite. Materials and Methods Root canals of 75 single-rooted human teeth were prepared. Fifteen teeth were irrigated with normal saline for a negative control group, and the remaining 60 teeth (groups 2 - 5) with 2.5% NaOCl. The teeth in group 2 served as a positive control. Prior to post cementation, the root canals in groups 3 - 5 were irrigated with three antioxidizing agents including 10% rosmarinic acid (RA, Baridge essence), 10% hesperidin (HPN, Sigma), and 10% sodium ascorbate hydrogel (SA, AppliChem). Seventy-five spreaders (#55, taper .02, Produits Dentaires S.A) were coated with silica and silanized with the Rocatec system and ceramic bond. All the prepared spreaders were cemented with a self-adhesive resin cement (Bifix SE, Voco Gmbh) in the prepared canals. After storage in distilled water (24 h/37?), the spreaders were pulled out in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Pull-out strength values were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test (? = 0.05). Results There were significant differences between study groups (p = 0.016). The highest pull-out strength was related to the SA group. The lowest strength was obtained in the positive control group. Conclusions Irrigation with NaOCl during canal preparation decreased bond strength of resin cement to root dentin. Amongst the antioxidants tested, SA had superior results in reversing the diminishing effect of NaOCl irrigation on the bond strength to root dentin. PMID:24790921

Kachuei, Marzieh

2014-01-01

96

Making periclase cement waterproof  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions Waterproofing of pure periclase cement with 1.5% petroleum resin is due to its lower capillary and sorption water absorption; the treatment also prevents caking. The activity of periclase cement that has been waterproofed with petroleum resin remains practically unaltered during storage.

L. B. Khoroshavin; T. A. Drozdova; P. N. D'yachov

1967-01-01

97

Effect of light-activation with different light-curing units and time intervals on resin cement bond strength to intraradicular dentin.  

PubMed

The aim of this study was to assess the bond strength of a resin cement to intraradicular dentin varying the light-curing unit and the moment at which the light was applied. Post spaces of endodontically treated canines were prepared. The roots were distributed into 6 groups (n=10) according to the light-curing unit and the moment of light exposure: I) Quartz tungsten halogen-600 mW/cm² (QTH) + immediate light activation (t0); II) QTH + light activation after 10 min (t10); III) Light-emitting diodes (LED)-800 mW/cm² (LED-800)+ t0; IV) LED-800 + t10; V) LED-1,500 mW/cm² (LED-1500)+ t0; VI) LED-1500 + t10. After post cementation, slices from coronal, middle and apical post/root regions were submitted to the push-out test and failure evaluation. It was verified that LED-800 (4.40 ± 3.00 MPa) and LED-1500 (4.67 ± 3.04 MPa) provided bond strength statistically superior to QTH (3.13 ± 1.76 MPa) (p<0.05), and did not differ from each other (p>0.05). There was no significant difference between t0 and t10 (p>0.05). Coronal post/root region (4.75 ± 3.10 MPa) presented significantly higher bond strength than the apical (3.32 ± 2.30 MPa) (p<0.05) and middle regions (4.14 ± 2.99 MPa) showed intermediate values. Adhesive failures were predominant when using QTH. Adhesive and mixed failures occurred more frequently in the apical region. Higher adhesion of the resin cement to intraradicular dentin was observed in the coronal region with LED light-activation, regardless of the moment of light exposure. PMID:23207850

Miguel-Almeida, Maria Eleonora; Azevedo, Mario Lucio da Costa; Rached-Júnior, Fuad Abi; Oliveira, Camila Favero; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Messias, Danielle Cristine

2012-01-01

98

Effect of Four Surface Treatment Methods on the Shear Bond Strength of Resin Cement to Zirconia Ceramics- A Comparative in Vitro Study  

PubMed Central

Background: Improving the retention of zirconia-based ceramics is desirable in order to avoid the failure of crowns and fixed partial dentures .This can be achieved by creating micromechanical retention using surface treatments. Therefore, it becomes necessary to constantly compare and re-evaluate the influence of different surface treatment methods on the bond strength . Aim: To evaluate the effect of four different surface treatments on shear bond strength between zirconia surface and resin cements. Settings and Design: Observational study. Materials and Methods: Twenty five zirconia plate samples were prepared based on ISO standards and were divided into five groups and each group was subjected to following five different surface treatments : no treatment, sandblasting with 110 ?m alumina, sandblasting with 250 ?m alumina, acid etching with 9.6% hydrofluoric acid and laser radiation on the surface. All the samples were surface disinfected and were embedded in blocks of autopolymerising resin to check shear bond strength on the universal testing machine. Statistical analysis used-data was analyzed using one-way ANOVA and a Post Hoc Bonferroni test. Results: Analysis of the data showed that the highest shear bond strength values were obtained with laser treatment (18.120 ± 0.8159 Mpa). The lowest values were obtained with control group (9.166 ± 0.569 Mpa). Laser treatment increased the shear bond strength values significantly (p<0.05). Conclusion: Surface treatments increased the bond strength between zirconia and resin cement and carbon dioxide laser could be an effective surface treatment for increasing bond strength. PMID:25386526

Manoharan; Balaji; Livingstone, David

2014-01-01

99

The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of 129I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The 129I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using

S. D. Park; J. S. Kim; S. H. Han; Y. K. Ha; K. S. Song; K. Y. Jee

2009-01-01

100

In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of a Novel Resin-Based Pulp Capping Material Containing the Quaternary Ammonium Salt MAE-DB and Portland Cement  

PubMed Central

Background Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. Methods The experimental material was prepared from a 2?1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4?3?1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. Results S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. Conclusion The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution. Therefore, this material shows promise as a pulp capping material for vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries. PMID:25389975

Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

2014-01-01

101

In vitro fluoride release from a different kind of conventional and resin modified glass-ionomer cements.  

PubMed

Fluoride release is important characteristic of glass-ionomer cements. Quantity of fluoride ions released from the glass-ionomer cements has major importance in definition of their biological activity. The objectives of this study were to define the quantity of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements and to define the effect of fluoride ions released from the experimental glass-ionomer cements on their cytotoxicity. Concentrations of the fluoride ions released in the evaluated glass-ionomer cements were measured indirectly, by the fluoride-selective WTW, F500 electrode potential, combined with reference R503/D electrode. Statistical analyses of F-ion concentrations released by all glass-ionomers evaluated at two time points, after 8 and after 24 hours, show statistically higher fluoride releases from RMGICs: Vitrebond, Fuji II LC and Fuji Plus, when compared to conventional glass-ionomer cements: Fuji Triage, Fuji IX GP Fast and Ketac Silver, both after 8 and after 24 hours. Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released by evaluated glass-ionomer cements and cytotoxic response of UMR-106 osteoblast cell-line are relatively high, but do not reach levels of biological significance. Correlation between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cell line after 8 hours is high, positive and statistically significant for conventional GICs, Fuji Triage and Fuji IX GP Fast, and RMGIC, Fuji II LC. Statistically significant Correlation coefficient between concentrations of fluoride ion released and cytotoxic response of NIH3T3 cell line after 24 hours is defined for RMGIC Fuji II LC only. PMID:23988173

Selimovi?-Dragaš, Mediha; Hasi?-Brankovi?, Lajla; Kora?, Fehim; ?apo, Nermin; Huseinbegovi?, Amina; Kobašlija, Sedin; Leki?, Meliha; Hatibovi?-Kofman, Šahza

2013-08-01

102

In vitro quantitative evaluation of marginal microleakage in Class II restorations confected with a glass ionomer cement and two composite resins.  

PubMed

This study evaluated, in vitro, marginal microleakage in class II restorations confected with the glass ionomer cement Vitremer and with the composite resins Ariston pHc and P-60. The aims of the study were to assess the effect of thermocycling on those materials and to evaluate two methods utilized in the analysis of dye penetration. Sixty premolars divided in three groups were utilized; the teeth had proximal cavities whose cervical walls were located 1 mm below the cementoenamel junction. Half of the test specimens from each group underwent thermocycling; the other half remained in deionized water, at 37 degrees C. The specimens were immersed, for 24 hours, in a basic 0.5% fuchsin solution at 37 degrees C. For the analysis of microleakage, the specimens were sectioned in a mesio-distal direction, and the observation was carried out with the software Imagetools. The results were evaluated through the 2-way ANOVA and through the Tukey's test. All groups presented marginal microleakage. The smallest values were obtained with Vitremer, followed by those obtained with the composite resins P-60 and Ariston pHc. There was no statistically significant difference caused by thermocycling, and the method of maximum infiltration was the best for detecting the extension of microleakage. PMID:11787314

Bijella, M F; Bijella, M F; da Silva, S M

2001-01-01

103

Solidification of ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect

Solidification media investigated included portland type I, portland type III and high alumina cements, a proprietary gypsum-based polymer modified cement, and a vinyl ester-styrene thermosetting plastic. Samples formulated with hydraulic cement were analyzed to investigate the effects of resin type, resin loading, waste-to-cement ratio, and water-to-cement ratio. The solidification of cation resin wastes with portland cement was characterized by excessive swelling and cracking of waste forms, both after curing and during immersion testing. Mixed bed resin waste formulations were limited by their cation component. Additives to improve the mechanical properties of portland cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were evaluated. High alumina cement formulations dislayed a resistance to deterioration of mechanical integrity during immersion testing, thus providing a significant advantage over portland cements for the solidification of resin wastes. Properties of cement-ion exchange resin waste forms were examined. An experiment was conducted to study the leachability of /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co from resins modified in portland type III and high alumina cements. The cumulative /sup 137/Cs fraction release was at least an order of magnitude greater than that of either /sup 85/Sr or /sup 60/Co. Release rates of /sup 137/Cs in high alumina cement were greater than those in portland III cement by a factor of two.Compressive strength and leach testing were conducted for resin wastes solidified with polymer-modified gypsum based cement. /sup 137/Cs, /sup 85/Sr, and /sup 60/Co fraction releases were about one, two and three orders of magnitude higher, respectively, than in equivalent portland type III cement formulations. As much as 28.6 wt % dry ion exchange resin was successfully solidified using vinyl ester-styrene compared with a maximum of 25 wt % in both portland and gypsum-based cement.

Not Available

1982-08-01

104

Evaluation of shear bond strength of two resin-based composites and glass ionomer cement to pure tricalcium silicate-based cement (Biodentine®)  

PubMed Central

Objectives Tricalcium silicate is the major constituent phase in mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). It is thus postulated that pure tricalcium silicate can replace the Portland cement component of MTA. The aim of this study was to evaluate bond strength of methacrylate-based (MB) composites, silorane-based (SB) composites, and glass ionomer cement (GIC) to Biodentine® and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Material and Methods Acrylic blocks (n=90, 2 mm high, 5 mm diameter central hole) were prepared. In 45 of the samples, the holes were fully filled with Biodentine® and in the other 45 samples, the holes were fully filled with MTA. The Biodentine® and the MTA samples were randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 15 specimens each: Group-1: MB composite; Group-2: SB composite; and Group-3: GIC. For the shear bond strength (SBS) test, each block was secured in a universal testing machine. Results The highest (17.7±6.2 MPa) and the lowest (5.8±3.2 MPa) bond strength values were recorded for the MB composite-Biodentine® and the GIC-MTA, respectively. Although the MB composite showed significantly higher bond strength to Biodentine (17.7±6.2) than it did to MTA (8.9±5.7) (p<0.001), the SB composite (SB and MTA=7.4±3.3; SB and Biodentine®=8.0±3,6) and GIC (GIC and MTA=5.8±3.2; GIC and Biodentine=6.7±2.6) showed similar bond strength performance with MTA compared with Biodentine (p=0.73 and p=0.38, respectively). Conclusions The new pure tricalcium-based pulp capping, repair, and endodontic material showed higher shear bond scores compared to MTA when used with the MB composite. PMID:25141202

CANTEKIN, Kenan; AVCI, Serap

2014-01-01

105

Crown and bridge cements: clinical applications.  

PubMed

Cement selection can be confusing because factors such as substrate, the type of restoration, and patient needs must be considered. Some substrates require additional treatment before cementation. This article describes the most commonly used traditional crown and bridge cements (GI and RMGI) used for metal and metal-ceramic restorations, and resin cements used for all-ceramic restorations. Advantages, disadvantages, indications, and contraindications of cements have been reviewed. Recommended uses of cements for metal, ceramic, and laboratory composite restorations have been presented. General guidelines for surface treatment ot silica- and zirconia-based restorations when using resin cements have been discussed. PMID:23350265

Bunek, Sabiha S; Powers, John M

2012-12-01

106

Thio-urethanes Improve Properties of Dual-cured Composite Cements.  

PubMed

This study aims at modifying dual-cure composite cements by adding thio-urethane oligomers to improve mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, and reduce polymerization stress. Thiol-functionalized oligomers were synthesized by combining 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)benzene with trimethylol-tris-3-mercaptopropionate, at 1:2 isocyanate:thiol. Oligomer was added at 0, 10 or 20 wt% to BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA (5:3:2, with 25 wt% silanated inorganic fillers) or to one commercial composite cement (Relyx Ultimate, 3M Espe). Near-IR was used to measure methacrylate conversion after photoactivation (700 mW/cm(2) × 60s) and after 72 h. Flexural strength and modulus, toughness, and fracture toughness were evaluated in three-point bending. Polymerization stress was measured with the Bioman. The microtensile bond strength of an indirect composite and a glass ceramic to dentin was also evaluated. Results were analyzed with analysis of variance and Tukey's test (? = 0.05). For BisGMA-UDMA-TEGDMA cements, conversion values were not affected by the addition of thio-urethanes. Flexural strength/modulus increased significantly for both oligomer concentrations, with a 3-fold increase in toughness at 20 wt%. Fracture toughness increased over 2-fold for the thio-urethane modified groups. Contraction stress was reduced by 40% to 50% with the addition of thio-urethanes. The addition of thio-urethane to the commercial cement led to similar flexural strength, toughness, and conversion at 72h compared to the control. Flexural modulus decreased for the 20 wt% group, due to the dilution of the overall filler volume, which also led to decreased stress. However, fracture toughness increased by up to 50%. The microtensile bond strength increased for the experimental composite cement with 20 wt% thio-urethane bonding for both an indirect composite and a glass ceramic. Novel dual-cured composite cements containing thio-urethanes showed increased toughness, fracture toughness and bond strength to dentin while demonstrating reduced contraction stress. All of these benefits are derived without compromising the methacrylate conversion of the resin component. The modification does not require changing the operatory technique. PMID:25248610

Bacchi, A; Dobson, A; Ferracane, J L; Consani, R; Pfeifer, C S

2014-12-01

107

Effect of different surface treatments on the shear and microtensile bond strength of resin-modified glass ionomer cement to dentin.  

PubMed

Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the microtensile bond strength (?TBS) and shear bond strength (SBS) of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) to dentin. Materials and methods. Fifty-two extracted human molars were flattened to obtain dentin surfaces. For SBS assessment 40 teeth were divided into four groups according to their surface treatments (acid etching, Er:YAG laser QSP mode, Er:YAG laser MSP mode and control-SiC) (n = 10). A plastic cylinder was placed over the differently treated dentin surfaces and RMGIC was placed into the rings and polymerized. Twelve teeth were used for the ?TBS test. The treated dentin surfaces described above were restored with 4 mm high RMGIC and light cured; then, the specimens were sectioned into serial sticks (n = 15) and ?TBS and SBS were tested for failure in a testing machine with a 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (? = 0.05). Results. Acid etching showed significantly higher SBS than the other groups (p < 0.05). Er:YAG QSP and MSP-treated groups showed higher SBS values than the control group, but the difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Er:YAG MSP showed the highest ?TBS value followed by acid etching, whereas the control group exhibited the lowest value (p < 0.05) and the differences between the control group and Er:YAG QSP were not significant (p > 0.05). Conclusions. The application of Er:YAG MSP mode and acid etching to dentin can be used for improving the bond strength of RMGIC. PMID:24844786

Altunsoy, Mustafa; Botsali, Murat Selim; Korkut, Emre; Kucukyilmaz, Ebru; Sener, Yagmur

2014-11-01

108

Light-activation through indirect ceramic restorations: does the overexposure compensate for the attenuation in light intensity during resin cement polymerization?  

PubMed Central

Objectives This study evaluated the effects of light exposure through simulated indirect ceramic restorations (SICR) on hardness (KHN) of dual-cured resin cements (RCs), immediately after light-activation and 24 h later. Material and Methods Three dual-cured RCs were evaluated: eco-Link (Ivoclar Vivadent), Rely X ARC (3M eSPe), and Panavia F (Kuraray Medical Inc.). The RCs were manipulated in accordance to the manufacturers’ instructions and were placed into cylindrical acrylic matrixes (1-mm-thick and 4-mm diameter). The RC light-activation (Optilux 501; Demetron Kerr) was performed through a glass slide for 120 s (control group), or through 2-mm or 4-mm thick SICRs (IPS empress II; Ivoclar Vivadent). The specimens were submitted to KHN analysis immediately and 24 h after light-activation. The data obtained at the 2 evaluation intervals were submitted to 2-way ANOVA repeated measures and post-hoc Tukey’s test (pre-set alpha of 5%). Results Lower KHN was observed when light-activation was performed through SICRs for eco-Link at all evaluation intervals and for Rely X ARC 24 h later. For Panavia F, no significant difference in KHN was observed between control and experimental groups, regardless of evaluation interval. Most groups exhibited higher KHN after 24 h than immediately after light-activation, with the exception of Rely X ARC light-activated through SICR, as no significant difference in KHN was found between evaluation intervals. Conclusion Light overexposure did not compensate for light intensity attenuation due to the presence of SICR when Rely X and eco-Link were used. Although hardness of such RCs increased over a 24-h interval, the RCs subjected to light overexposure did not reach the hardness values exhibited after direct light exposure. PMID:21437465

BUENO, Albano Luis Novaes; ARRAIS, Cesar Augusto Galvão; JORGE, Ana Carolina Tedesco; REIS, Andre Figueiredo; AMARAL, Cristiane Mariote

2011-01-01

109

The measurement of 129I for the cement and the paraffin solidified low and intermediate level wastes (LILWs), spent resin or evaporated bottom from the pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plants.  

PubMed

In this paper a relatively simple and low cost analysis procedure to apply to a routine analysis of (129)I in low and intermediate level radioactive wastes (LILWs), cement and paraffin solidified evaporated bottom and spent resin, which are produced from nuclear power plants (NPPs), pressurized water reactors (PWR), is presented. The (129)I is separated from other nuclides in LILWs using an anion exchange adsorption and solvent extraction by controlling the oxidation and reduction state and is then precipitated as silver iodide for counting the beta activity with a low background gas proportional counter (GPC). The counting efficiency of GPC was varied from 4% to 8% and it was reversely proportional to the weight of AgI by a self absorption of the beta activity. Compared to a higher pH, the chemical recovery of iodide as AgI was lowered at pH 4. It was found that the chemical recovery of iodide for the cement powder showed a lower trend by increasing the cement powder weight, but it was not affected for the paraffin sample. In this experiment, the overall chemical recovery yield of the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples and the average weight of them were 67+/-3% and 5.43+/-0.53 g, 70+/-7% and 10.40+/-1.60 g, respectively. And the minimum detectable activity (MDA) of (129)I for the cement and paraffin solidified LILW samples was calculated as 0.070 and 0.036 Bq/g, respectively. Among the analyzed cement solidified LILW samples, (129)I activity concentration of four samples was slightly higher than the MDA and their ranges were 0.076-0.114 Bq/g. Also of the analyzed paraffin solidified LILW samples, five samples contained a little higher (129)I activity concentration than the MDA and their ranges were 0.036-0.107 Bq/g. PMID:19297180

Park, S D; Kim, J S; Han, S H; Ha, Y K; Song, K S; Jee, K Y

2009-09-01

110

Effect of adhesive system on retention in posts comprising fiber post and core resin.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to compare the retention of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) posts luted with either conventional or self-adhesive resin cement. The FRC posts and core resin were built up in bovine teeth. The posts were luted with standard etch-andrinse cement, self-etch cement, or one of two self-adhesive cements. The samples were stored in water for 1 or 14 days or subjected to thermal cycling (TC). Retention value was measured with the pull-out test using a universal testing machine. Conventional adhesive resin cement yielded significantly greater retention than self-adhesive resin cement at 1 day. No significant difference was observed in retention among the adhesive systems tested at 14 days or after TC. During the early luting stage, self-adhesive resin cement yielded lower retention value than conventional resin cement. After 14 days storage or TC, retention was comparable to that with conventional resin cement. PMID:23903651

Soejima, Hirotaka; Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

2013-01-01

111

Mechanical properties of dental luting cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statement of problem. Dental luting cements fail by microcrack formation and bacterial ingress or by gross failure and crown dislodgment. Both of these failure modes are related to mechanical properties and deformation. Purpose. This study evaluated those mechanical properties of cements. Methods and material. Elastic modulus for 8 representative cements (zinc phosphate, polycarboxylate, glass ionomer, encapsulated glass ionomer, resin-modified glass

Zhen Chun Li; Shane N. White

1999-01-01

112

[Effects of different surface conditioning agents on the bond strength of resin-opaque porcelain composite].  

PubMed

The objective of this research is to evaluate the effects of different silane coupling agents on the bond strength between Ceramco3 opaque porcelain and indirect composite resin. Five groups of Co-Cr metal alloy substrates were fabricated according to manufacturer's instruction. The surface of metal alloy with a layer of dental opaque porcelain was heated by fire. After the surface of opaque porcelain was etched, five different surface treatments, i.e. RelyX Ceramic Primer (RCP), Porcelain Bond Activator and SE Bond Primer (mixed with a proportion of 1:1) (PBA), Shofu Porcelain Primer (SPP), SE bond primer (SEP), and no primer treatment (as a control group), were used to combine P60 and opaque porcelain along with resin cement. Shear bond strength of specimens was tested in a universal testing machine. The failure modes of specimens in all groups were observed and classified into four types. Selected specimens were subjected to scanning electron microscope and energy disperse spectroscopy to reveal the relief of the fracture surface and to confirm the failure mode of different types. The experimental results showed that the values of the tested items in all the tested groups were higher than that in the control group. Group PBA exhibited the highest value [(37.52 +/- 2.14) MPa] and this suggested a fact that all of the specimens in group PBA revealed combined failures (failure occurred in metal-porcelain combined surface and within opaque porcelain). Group SPP and RCP showed higher values than SEP (P < 0.05) and most specimens of SPP and RCP performed combined failures (failure occurred in bond surface and within opaque porcelain or composite resin) while all the specimens in group SEP and control group revealed adhesive failures. Conclusions could be drawn that silane coupling agents could reinforce the bond strength of dental composite resin to metal-opaque porcelain substrate. The bond strength between dental composite resin and dental opaque porcelain could meet the clinical requirements. PMID:25039143

Liu, Wenjia; Fu, Jing; Liao, Shuang; Su, Naichuan; Wang, Hang; Liao, Yunmao

2014-04-01

113

Bone cement  

PubMed Central

The knowledge about the bone cement is of paramount importance to all Orthopaedic surgeons. Although the bone cement had been the gold standard in the field of joint replacement surgery, its use has somewhat decreased because of the advent of press-fit implants which encourages bone in growth. The shortcomings, side effects and toxicity of the bone cement are being addressed recently. More research is needed and continues in the field of nanoparticle additives, enhanced bone–cement interface etc.

Vaishya, Raju; Chauhan, Mayank; Vaish, Abhishek

2013-01-01

114

Incidence of flare-ups and evaluation of quality after retreatment of resorcinol-formaldehyde resin ("Russian Red Cement") endodontic therapy.  

PubMed

The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the quality of treatment and incidence of flare-ups when teeth with resorcinol-formaldehyde resin are retreated in a postgraduate endodontic clinic. Fifty-eight cases were included in this study. Obturated and unfilled canal space was measured on radiographs. Forty-eight percent of the total canal space was filled before retreatment; 90% was filled after retreatment. After retreatment, obturations were rated as optimal in 59%, improved in 33%, unchanged in 6%, and worse in 2%. Seven patients (12%) had postretreatment flare-ups. Data were statistically analyzed using the Cochran-Armitage Test for Discrete Variables. No statistical difference in the incidence of flare-ups was found in teeth that before treatment had more than half the canal space filled compared to teeth with less than half, cases with pre-existing periradicular radiolucencies compared to cases with normal periradicular appearance, symptomatic cases compared to asymptomatic cases, or cases with optimal fillings after retreatment compared to less than optimal cases. It was concluded that teeth with resorcinol-formaldehyde fillings might be retreated with a good prognosis for improving the radiographic quality, but a higher than normal incidence of flare-ups may occur. PMID:14606781

Gound, Tom G; Marx, David; Schwandt, Nathan A

2003-10-01

115

EP-toxicity test of saturated GT-73 resin and resin in grout  

SciTech Connect

The results of EP-toxicity tests on mercury saturated Duolite{reg sign} GT-73 cation exchange resin clarify options for the ultimate disposal of spent resin. Samples of GT-73 saturated with mercury passed the EP-toxicity test, indicating that fully spent resin may be classifed as solid''-not hazardous''-waste and stored or disposed-of as such. Samples of GT-73 resin saturated with mercury and then incorporated into Portland Type 1 cement did not pass the EP-toxicity test and fall into the hazardous waste'' category. Samples of GT-73 resin less-than-saturated with mercury which were in corporated in Portland Type 1 cement passed the EP-toxicity test and may be classified as solid waste.'' Other commercially available materials are being investigated for incorporating fully spent GT-73 resin in a solid waste form.

Bibler, J.P.

1985-04-24

116

Luting of ceramic crowns with a self-adhesive cement: Effect of contamination on marginal adaptation and fracture strength  

PubMed Central

Objectives: This study evaluated the percentages of continuous margins (%CM) and fracture strength (FS) of crowns made out from blocs of leucite-reinforced ceramic (IPS Empress CAD) and luted with a representative self-adhesive cement (RelyX Unicem) under four contaminating agents: saliva, water, blood, a haemostatic solution containing aluminium chloride (pH= 0.8) and a control group with no contamination. Study Design: %CM at both tooth-cement (TC) and cement-crown (CC) interfaces were determined before and after a fatigue test consisting of 600’000 chewing loads and 1’500 temperature cycles changing from 5º C to 50º C. Load to fracture was recorded on fatigued specimens. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare %CM and FS between the five groups with a level of confidence of 95%. Results: At the TC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation before loading could be detected between groups. After loading, a significant marginal degradation was observed in the group contaminated with aluminium chloride (52 ± 22 %CM) in respect to the other groups. No significant differences in %CM could be detected between the groups contaminated with saliva, water, blood and the control. At the CC interface, no significant differences in marginal adaptation were observed between the groups. The FS on loaded specimens was around 1637N, with no significant differences between groups as well. Conclusions: An adverse interaction of the highly acidic haemostatic agent with either dentin or the self-adhesive cement could explain the specimens’ marginal degradation. The self-adhesive cement tested in this study was no sensitive to moisture contamination either with saliva, water or blood. Key words:Marginal adaptation, RelyX Unicem, contamination, all-ceramic crowns. PMID:23722123

Slavcheva, Slavena; Krejci, Ivo

2013-01-01

117

Cement-based thermocouples  

Microsoft Academic Search

A cement-based thermocouple in the form of a junction between dissimilar cement pastes and exhibiting thermocouple sensitivity 70±7 ?V\\/°C is provided. The dissimilar cement pastes are steel fiber cement paste (n-type) and carbon-fiber silica-fume cement paste (p-type). The junction is made by pouring the cement pastes side by side.

Sihai Wen; D. D. L. Chung

2001-01-01

118

Influence of no-ferrule and no-post buildup design on the fatigue resistance of endodontically treated molars restored with resin nanoceramic CAD/CAM crowns.  

PubMed

SUMMARY Objectives : To evaluate the influence of adhesive core buildup designs-4-mm buildup, 2-mm buildup, and no buildup (endocrown)-on the fatigue resistance and failure mode of endodontically treated molar teeth restored with resin nanoceramic (RNC) CAD/CAM complete crowns placed with self-adhesive resin cement. Methods and Materials : Forty-five extracted molars were decoronated at the level of the cementoenamel junction, and the roots were endodontically treated. Specimens received different Filtek Z100 adhesive core buildups (4-mm buildup, 2-mm buildup, and no buildup, endocrown preparation) and were restored with Cerec 3 CAD/CAM RNC crowns (Lava Ultimate). Restorations (n=15) and prepared teeth were treated with airborne-particle abrasion, followed by cementation with RelyX Unicem 2 Automix. Specimens were then subjected to cyclic isometric loading at 10 Hz, beginning with a load of 200 N (for 5000 cycles), followed by stages of 400, 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 N at a maximum of 30,000 cycles each. Specimens were loaded until failure or to a maximum of 185,000 cycles (10-mm-diameter composite resin sphere antagonist). The failure mode was assessed: "catastrophic" (tooth/root fracture that would require tooth extraction), "possibly reparable" (cohesive/adhesive failure with fragment and minor damage, chip or crack, of underlying tooth structure), or "reparable" fracture (cohesive or cohesive/adhesive fracture of restoration only). Groups were compared using the life table survival analysis. Intact specimens were loaded to failure and compared with one-way analysis of variance. Results : All specimens survived the fatigue test until the 800 N-step. The survival rates for 4-mm, 2-mm, and no buildup (endocrown) were 53%, 87%, and 87%, respectively, and were not statistically different even though crowns with 2-mm buildups only started to fail at 1200 N. Minor cohesive chips were detected in many samples despite having survived all 185,000 cycles. Postfatigue load-to-failure ranged from 2969 N with 4-mm buildup (eight specimens), 2794 N for 2-mm buildup (13 specimens), and 2606 N for endocrowns (13 specimens) and were also not statistically different. There were only two catastrophic failures during the fatigue test and small subgingival delamination fractures and cracks (only with 4-mm buildup). All specimens in the load-to-failure test exhibited nonrestorable catastrophic fractures. Conclusions : There was no influence of the buildup design on the performance of endodontically treated molars restored with RNC CAD/CAM complete crowns placed with self-adhesive cement. All restoration designs survived the normal range of masticatory forces. Failure mode tended to be more favorable with the 2-mm buildup or no buildup (endocrown). PMID:25084102

Magne, P; Carvalho, Ao; Bruzi, G; Anderson, Re; Maia, Hp; Giannini, M

2014-01-01

119

Maximum bond strength of dental luting cement to amalgam alloy.  

PubMed

Although dental amalgam is used frequently under artificial crowns for restoration of severely damaged teeth, there is little information available on the bond between luting cements and this alloy. This study was designed for determination of the strength of the bond between a dental amalgam alloy and three crown-luting cements. Cylinders of dental amalgam were joined in pairs, with use of a zinc-phosphate, a glass-ionomer, and an acrylic-adhesive resin cement. The tensile-fracture stress of 45 samples of each cement was measured with a universal testing machine, and subjected to a Weibull analysis. The fractured surfaces were examined under low magnification with use of a light microscope, and at low and high magnifications with use of a scanning electron microscope, for evaluation of the appearance of the fractured joints. The Weibull analysis demonstrated that the adhesive resin cement provided a stronger and more predictable bond than either the zinc-phosphate or the glass-ionomer cement. The appearance of the fractured surfaces gave no indication of the strength of the joints, a feature that is common to brittle materials. The results suggest that crowns placed on teeth offering a large amalgam-alloy surface could be retained more predictably with an adhesive resin cement. PMID:2685070

Mojon, P; Hawbolt, E B; MacEntee, M I; Belser, U C

1989-11-01

120

Rheology of foamed cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Foams are being used in a number of petroleum industry applications that exploit their high viscosity and low density. Foamed cement slurries can have superior displacement properties relative to non-foamed cement slurries. This article presents results of an experimental study of foamed cement rheology. Viscosity curves of foamed cements were obtained using a flow-through rotational viscometer. Foamed cements with different

R. M. Ahmed; N. E. Takach; U. M. Khan; S. Taoutaou; S. James; A. Saasen; R. Godøy

2009-01-01

121

Lunar cement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With the exception of water, the major oxide constituents of terrestrial cements are present at all nine lunar sites from which samples have been returned. However, with the exception of relatively rare cristobalite, the lunar oxides are not present as individual phases but are combined in silicates and in mixed oxides. Lime (CaO) is most abundant on the Moon in the plagioclase (CaAl2Si2O8) of highland anorthosites. It may be possible to enrich the lime content of anorthite to levels like those of Portland cement by pyrolyzing it with lunar-derived phosphate. The phosphate consumed in such a reaction can be regenerated by reacting the phosphorus product with lunar augite pyroxenes at elevated temperatures. Other possible sources of lunar phosphate and other oxides are discussed.

Agosto, William N.

1992-01-01

122

Reconsidering glass-ionomer cements for direct restorations.  

PubMed

Glass-ionomer cements (GICs) have been used in dentistry for a number of applications, primarily as a base or liner under other direct filling materials or indirect restorative materials, for crown buildup/foundation restorations, or as luting cements for indirect restorations. However, GICs have many unique attributes that make them useful for either a full-contour restoration or sandwich/hybrid restorations where they are synergistic with composite resins. This article, which includes two brief case reports, discusses the potential advantages of GIC for some direct applications where composite resin or other materials may not be the most ideal choice. PMID:24571524

Pitel, Mark L

2014-01-01

123

Conventional and Contemporary Luting Cements: An Overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term clinical success of fixed prosthodontic restorations is influenced by many factors, one important factor being the\\u000a selection of an appropriate luting agent. No single luting agent is capable of meeting all the stringent requirements, which\\u000a is one reason why there is such a wide choice of luting agents currently available from conventional water-based to contemporary\\u000a adhesive resin cements. Introduction

Komal Ladha; Mahesh Verma

2010-01-01

124

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that was performed to analyze the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

Fred Sabins

2002-07-30

125

Optimisation of a two-liquid component pre-filled acrylic bone cement system: a design of experiments approach to optimise cement final properties.  

PubMed

The initial composition of acrylic bone cement along with the mixing and delivery technique used can influence its final properties and therefore its clinical success in vivo. The polymerisation of acrylic bone cement is complex with a number of processes happening simultaneously. Acrylic bone cement mixing and delivery systems have undergone several design changes in their advancement, although the cement constituents themselves have remained unchanged since they were first used. This study was conducted to determine the factors that had the greatest effect on the final properties of acrylic bone cement using a pre-filled bone cement mixing and delivery system. A design of experiments (DoE) approach was used to determine the impact of the factors associated with this mixing and delivery method on the final properties of the cement produced. The DoE illustrated that all factors present within this study had a significant impact on the final properties of the cement. An optimum cement composition was hypothesised and tested. This optimum recipe produced cement with final mechanical and thermal properties within the clinical guidelines and stated by ISO 5833 (International Standard Organisation (ISO), International standard 5833: implants for surgery-acrylic resin cements, 2002), however the low setting times observed would not be clinically viable and could result in complications during the surgical technique. As a result further development would be required to improve the setting time of the cement in order for it to be deemed suitable for use in total joint replacement surgery. PMID:25005558

Clements, James; Walker, Gavin; Pentlavalli, Sreekanth; Dunne, Nicholas

2014-10-01

126

Resin hybrid composite laminates  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid composites are generally referred to as the materials that combine two or more fibers in a suitable binding resin. Resin hybrid composites described in this paper utilize two or more resins with a suitable reinforcement. The resins are rigid resin and flexible resins. The elongation of the rigid resin is less than 2% and elongation of the flexible resins are varied between 25% to 100% by blending a very flexible resin with the rigid resin. Test laminates are fabricated by using either glass, carbon or aramid reinforcement in a layered sequence. This produces rigid-flexible-rigid and flexible-rigid-flexible laminates. These laminates are tested for impact, compression, flexural and inter-laminar strengths. Results show that the resin hybriding provides a wide choice of mechanical properties to the composite industry.

Bhatnagar, A.

1986-01-01

127

A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (?=.05). RESULTS Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. CONCLUSION A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement. PMID:24049563

Keum, Eun-Cheol

2013-01-01

128

Thermocycling Effects on Resin Bond to Silicatized and Silanized Zirconia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Various techniques have been introduced to create a durable resin composite bond to sintered zirconia (Y-TZP). Shear bond strength values achieved through tribochemical treatment have been investigated in numerous studies, but less is reported about long-term durability. The objective here was to evaluate the effects of thermocycling and silane on shear bond strength of a composite luting cement to silicatized

Timo T. Heikkinen; Lippo V. J. Lassila; Jukka P. Matinlinna; Pekka K. Vallittu

2009-01-01

129

Surface roughness of orthodontic band cements with different compositions  

PubMed Central

Objectives The present study evaluated comparatively the surface roughness of four orthodontic band cements after storage in various solutions. Material and Methods eight standardized cylinders were made from 4 materials: zinc phosphate cement (ZP), compomer (C), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) and resin cement (RC). Specimens were stored for 24 h in deionized water and immersed in saline (pH 7.0) or 0.1 M lactic acid solution (pH 4.0) for 15 days. Surface roughness readings were taken with a profilometer (Surfcorder SE1200) before and after the storage period. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (comparison among cements and storage solutions) or paired t-test (comparison before and after the storage period) at 5% significance level. Results The values for average surface roughness were statistically different (p<0.001) among cements at both baseline and after storage. The roughness values of cements in a decreasing order were ZP>RMGIC>C>R (p<0.001). After 15 days, immersion in lactic acid solution resulted in the highest surface roughness for all cements (p<0.05), except for the RC group (p>0.05). Compared to the current threshold (0.2 µm) related to biofilm accumulation, both RC and C remained below the threshold, even after acidic challenge by immersion in lactic acid solution. Conclusions Storage time and immersion in lactic acid solution increased the surface roughness of the majority of the tested cements. RC presented the smoothest surface and it was not influenced by storage conditions. PMID:21625737

van de SANDE, Françoise Hélène; da SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; MICHELON, Douver; PIVA, Evandro; CENCI, Maximiliano Sérgio; DEMARCO, Flávio Fernando

2011-01-01

130

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra- lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report discusses testing that was performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries.

Fred Sabins

2003-10-31

131

The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite  

PubMed Central

Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental) specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were prepared, sandblasted with 50 ?m alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10). Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE), AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical), and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE) and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa) were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (? = 0.05). Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD) value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa) and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different. PMID:24347881

Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Larpboonphol, Narongrit; Sae-Yib, Taewalit; Jampa, Thibet; Manoppan, Satawat

2013-01-01

132

Alex Benson Cement Plants  

E-print Network

Alex Benson ATOC 3500 Cement Plants 4 Step Production Line: o Mine the Limestone: Cement plants of generating electricity by coal. o From Kiln Combustion CO2 ­ 2nd largest CO2 emitter behind electricity health effects Relative News; o "EPA Clamps down on Cement Plant Pollution" http

Toohey, Darin W.

133

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Issues, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements, and Task 8: Develop Field ULHS Cement Blending and Mixing Techniques. Results reported this quarter include: preliminary findings from a literature review focusing on problems associated with ultra-lightweight cements; summary of pertinent information from Russian ultra-lightweight cement literature review; laboratory tests comparing ULHS slurries to foamed slurries and sodium silicate slurries for two different applications; and initial laboratory studies with ULHS in preparation for a field job.

Fred Sabins

2001-07-18

134

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems, including foamed and sodium silicate slurries. During this project quarter, a comparison study of the three cement systems examined the effect that cement drillout has on the three cement systems. Testing to determine the effect of pressure cycling on the shear bond properties of the cement systems was also conducted. This report discusses testing that will be performed for analyzing the alkali-silica reactivity of ULHS in cement slurries, as well as the results of Field Tests 1 and 2.

Fred Sabins

2002-10-31

135

Comparative study of nanomechanical properties of cements used in teeth restoration  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The discipline of dental science includes the diagnosis of disease in the mouth and teeth, its manifestations and the procedures involved in the restoration of their integrity and function. Restoration of lost tooth structure with suitable materials plays an integral part in the successful rehabilitation of oral tissues. Several factors influence the performance of dental restorations. These factors include the type of cement used to bond crown restoration to prepared teeth. The nanoindentation method was used to explore the mechanical properties of different types of resin cement polymerized using different techniques. A Nano Indenter XP (from MTS Nano Instruments, USA) was used for the experimental tests. A sample of 40 extracted human teeth were restored using two different resin cements: Variolink II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Liechtenstein) and Venus A2 (Heraeus Kulzer, Germany). Both resin cements are light-cured and one of them is self-cured so that the degree of polymerization would be higher. The data obtained for nanohardness and the Young's modulus were analysed using ANOVA to evaluate the influence of different factors (the resin cement and polymerization technique used, the position on the tooth-restoration interface) and to determine the best performance for restoration. The results obtained could give a useful indication of the choice of cementation technique and of the materials used for the restoration of lost tooth structure in different clinical cases.

Peluccio, M. S.; Bignardi, C.; Lombardo, S.; Montevecchi, F. M.; Carossa, S.

2007-10-01

136

Mineral of the month: cement  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hydraulic cement is a virtually ubiquitous construction material that, when mixed with water, serves as the binder in concrete and most mortars. Only about 13 percent of concrete by weight is cement (the rest being water and aggregates), but the cement contributes all of the concrete’s compressional strength. The term “hydraulic” refers to the cement’s ability to set and harden underwater through the hydration of the cement’s components.

van Oss, Hendrik G.

2006-01-01

137

Testing and evaluation of polyethylene and sulfur cement waste forms  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the results of recent studies related to the use of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement as new binder materials for the improved solidification of low-level wastes. Waste streams selected for this study include those which result from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those that remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion-exchange resins). Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type. Recommended waste loadings of 70 wt % sodium sulfate, 50 wt % boric acid, 40 wt % incinerator ash and 30 wt % ion exchange resins, which are based on process control and waste form performance considerations are reported for polyethylene. For sulfur cement the recommended waste loadings of 40 wt % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt % incinerator ash are reported. However, incorporation of ion-exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended due to poor waste form performance. The work presented in this paper will, in part, present data that can be used to assess the acceptability of polyethylene and modified sulfur cement waste forms to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 61. 8 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Franz, E.M.; Kalb, P.D.; Colombo, P.

1985-01-01

138

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweigh cement using ultralight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). Work reported herein addresses Task 1: Assess Ultra-Lightweight Cementing Problems, Task 2: Review Russian Ultra-Lightweight Cement Literature, and Task 3: Test Ultra-Lightweight Cements. Results reported this quarter include a review and summary surface pipe and intermediate casing cementing conditions historically encountered in the US and establishment of average design conditions for ULHS cements. Russian literature concerning development and use of ultra-lightweight cements employing either nitrogen or ULHS was reviewed, and a summary is presented. Quality control testing of materials used to formulate ULHS cements in the laboratory was conducted to establish baseline material performance standards. A testing protocol was developed employing standard procedures as well as procedures tailored to evaluate ULHS. This protocol is presented and discussed. finally, results of initial testing of ULHS cements is presented along with analysis to establish cement performance design criteria to be used during the remainder of the project.

Fred Sabins

2001-01-15

139

Repair of porcelain/metal restoration with resin bonded overcasting.  

PubMed

Porcelain occasionally fractures from ceramometal fixed partial dentures following final cementation. Repair of these porcelain fractures can be a challenging task. When the problem occurs on anterior teeth, it is especially difficult because the repair must not only be durable, but esthetically pleasing as well. Although composite resins can be used for some repairs, it is often difficult to match the color and texture to the surrounding intact porcelain. In addition, the bonding between the resin and porcelain is susceptible to margin leakage, which may ultimately cause an esthetic failure. Techniques involving a cemented porcelain-fused-to-metal overcasting have often been successful in restoring the fixed partial denture to form and function. Although the esthetic result of a porcelain/metal overcasting can be quite successful, retention of the overcasting is sometimes poor. The compromised retention and resistance form is due to lack of interproximal walls on the underlying fractured unit. To improve the retention of the overcasting, the following technique of tin plating the overcasting and fractured unit prior to cementing with a composite resin cement is presented. PMID:1389357

Wood, M; Litkowski, L J; Thompson, V P; Church, T

1992-01-01

140

Resin processing system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a resin processing system for use in chemical decontamination of nuclear reactor primary systems. It comprises a fresh resin supply tank; a batching tank; a fresh resin pump connected to the fresh resin supply tank and the batching tank; a plurality of demineralizers wherein process fluids are demineralized; a resin feed pump connected to the batching tank capable of transporting fresh resin from the batching tank; a movable connection means connecting the resin feed pump to one of the plurality of demineralizers; a sluice water supply tank; a sluice water pump connected to the sluice water supply tank and the plurality of demineralizers; a spent resin storage tank connected to each of the plurality of demineralizers; a recycle pump connected to an outlet of the spent resin storage tank and having a pump outlet connected to the sluice water supply tank; and a screen at the outlet of the spent resin storage tank to retain spent resin within the spent resin storage tank while allowing sluice water to be recycled.

Corpora, G.J.; Schlonski, J.S.; Miller, P.E.; Bauer, F.I.

1992-08-18

141

Method of adhering bone to a rigid substrate using a graphite fiber reinforced bone cement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A method is described for adhering bone to the surface of a rigid substrate such as a metal or resin prosthesis using an improved surgical bone cement. The bone cement has mechanical properties more nearly matched to those of animal bone and thermal curing characteristics which result in less traumatization of body tissues and comprises a dispersion of short high modulus graphite fibers within a bonder composition including polymer dissolved in reactive monomer such as polymethylmethacrylate dissolved in methylmethacrylate monomer.

Knoell, A. C.; Maxwell, H. G. (inventors)

1977-01-01

142

Corrosion resistant cemented carbide  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive,

Hong

1990-01-01

143

ULTRA-LIGHTWEIGHT CEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop an improved ultra-lightweight cement using ultra-lightweight hollow glass spheres (ULHS). This report includes results from laboratory testing of ULHS systems along with other lightweight cement systems: foamed and sodium silicate slurries. Comparison studies of the three cement systems examined several properties: tensile strength, Young's modulus, water permeability, and shear bond. Testing was also done to determine the effect that temperature cycling has on the shear bond properties of the cement systems. In addition, analysis was carried out to examine alkali silica reactivity of slurries containing ULHS. Data is also presented from a study investigating the effects of mixing and pump circulation on breakage of ULHS. Information is also presented about the field application of ULHS in cementing a 7-in. intermediate casing in south Texas.

Fred Sabins

2002-01-23

144

Microtensile bond strength testing of luting cements to prefabricated CAD\\/CAM ceramic and composite blocks  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives. To investigate the Microtensile bond strength (?TBS) and failure mode of resin cements bonded to composite and ceramic CAD\\/CAM blocks following various surface treatments.Methods. Paradigm composite blocks and Cerec Vitablocs received three surface treatments following the control treatment of surface grinding with 600 SiC grit. (1) Application of adhesive resin (Adh), (2) etching with hydrofluoric acid and silanization (HF+S)

Ahmed A El Zohairy; Anton J De Gee; Mohamed M Mohsen; Albert J Feilzer

2003-01-01

145

Clinical Evaluation of Resin Composite and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer in Class III Restorations of Primary Maxillary Incisors: A Comparative In Vivo Study  

PubMed Central

Restoration of primary teeth continues to be an important facet of restorative dentistry. In comparison to restorations in permanent dentition, the longevity of those in primary teeth is significantly different for all materials. This makes the assessment of these fillings as a separate group meaningful. As there is lack of supporting clinical data with regard to the restoration of primary incisors, it would be judicious to consider why this is so and determine if studies can be designed to gain new information. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate and compare the clinical efficacy of composite resins and resin-modified glass ionomer cement restorations of primary incisors, over a period of one year. Methods: The study group consisted of 40 patients (3½- 5 ½ years of age) with at least one pair of similar sized lesions in the middle1/3 of the same proximal surface of contralateral primary maxillary incisors. Composite resin and resinmodified glass ionomer cement restorations were placed in primary maxillary incisors using split-mouth design. The restorations were evaluated at different intervals of 3,6,9, months and 1 year using Ryge’s criteria. Data obtained was analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. Results: The results revealed no statistical significance in the difference of clinical characteristics between the two restorative materials. Interpretation and conclusion: (1) Resin-modified glass ionomer cement and composite resin restorative materials showed acceptable clinical performance after 1 year in primary teeth. (2) Resin-modified glass ionomer cement and composite resin restorative materials functioned well as class III restorative materials in primary teeth.

Mohan Das, Usha; Viswanath, Deepak; Azher, Umme

2009-01-01

146

In vitro and in vivo studies on the toxicity of dental resin components: a review  

Microsoft Academic Search

In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that some components of restorative composite resins, adhesives, and\\u000a resin-modified glass ionomer cements are toxic. The mechanisms of cytotoxicity are related firstly to the short-term release\\u000a of free monomers occurring during the monomer–polymer conversion. Secondly, long-term release of leachable substances is generated\\u000a by erosion and degradation over time. In addition, ion

Michel Goldberg

2008-01-01

147

Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional

C. Srinivas; S. Sugilal; P. K. Wattal

2003-01-01

148

Cement penetration after patella venting  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement–bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration.Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or

Christopher W. Jones; Li-On Lam; Adam Butler; David J. Wood; William R. Walsh

2009-01-01

149

Modified sulfur cement solidification of low-level wastes  

SciTech Connect

This topical report describes the results of an investigation on the solidification of low-level radioactive wastes in modified sulfur cement. The work was performed as part of the Waste Form Evaluation Program, sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Low-Level Waste Management Program. Modified sulfur cement is a thermoplastic material developed by the US Bureau of Mines. Processing of waste and binder was accomplished by means of both a single-screw extruder and a dual-action mixing vessel. Waste types selected for this study included those resulting from advanced volume reduction technologies (dry evaporator concentrate salts and incinerator ash) and those which remain problematic for solidification using contemporary agents (ion exchange resins). Process development studies were conducted to ascertain optimal process control parameters for successful solidification. Maximum waste loadings were determined for each waste type and method of processing. Property evaluation testing was carried out on laboratory scale specimens in order to compare with waste form performance for other potential matrix materials. Waste form property testing included compressive strength, water immersion, thermal cycling and radionuclide leachability. Recommended waste loadings of 40 wt. % sodium sulfate and boric acid salts and 43 wt. % incinerator ash, which are based on processing and performance considerations, are reported. Solidification efficiencies for these waste types represent significant improvements over those of hydraulic cements. Due to poor waste form performance, incorporation of ion exchange resin waste in modified sulfur cement is not recommended.

Not Available

1985-10-01

150

Management of Spent Organic Ion-Exchange Resins by Photochemical Oxidation  

SciTech Connect

Management of spent ion-exchange resin waste arising from nuclear reactor operations by traditional practice of encapsulation in cement is associated with problems such as swelling and disintegration. Complete oxidation (mineralization) is an attractive alternative option. This paper reports the development of photochemical mineralization process for organic ion-exchange resins of poly (styrene-divinyl benzene) type with sulfonic acid and quaternary ammonium functional groups. It is a two-step process consisting of dissolution (conversion of solid resin into water-soluble reaction products) and photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin. Cation and anion resin dissolution was effected by reaction of the resin with H2O2 at 50-60 C in the presence of ferrous/copper sulphate catalyst. Direct dissolution of mixed resin was not efficient. However, the cation resin portion in the mixed resin could be selectively dissolved without affecting the anion portion. The solid anion resin after separation from the cation resin solution could be dissolved. About 0.5 liters of 50% H2O2 was required for dissolution of one kg of wet resin. The reaction time was 4-5 hours. Dissolution experiments were conducted on up to 8 liters of wet resin. The second step, viz., photo-Fenton mineralization of the dissolved resin was effected at ambient temperature(25-35 C). Kinetic results of laboratory scale experiments in immersion type photo-reactor and pilot scale experiments in tubular flow photo-reactor were presented. These results clearly demonstrated the photo-Fenton mineralization of dissolved resin at ambient temperature with stoichiometric quantity of H2O2 as against 70-200% excess H2O2 requirement in chemical mineralization experiments under Fenton oxidation conditions at 90-95 C. Based on these studies, a treatment scheme was developed and presented in this paper.

Srinivas, C.; Sugilal, S.; Wattal, P. K.

2003-02-26

151

Polyester Resin Hazards  

PubMed Central

Polyester resins are being increasingly used in industry. These resins require the addition of catalysts and accelerators. The handling of polyester resin system materials may give rise to skin irritations, allergic reactions, and burns. The burns are probably due to styrene and organic peroxides. Atmospheric pollution from styrene and explosion and fire risks from organic peroxides must be prevented. Where dimethylaniline is used scrupulous cleanliness and no-touch technique must be enforced. Handling precautions are suggested. Images PMID:14014495

Bourne, L. B.; Milner, F. J. M.

1963-01-01

152

Cement for passive damping  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multifunctional concretes capable of both structural and non- structural functions are made possible by appropriate admixtures. The use of acid treated silica fume (15% by weight of cement), latex (20 - 30% by weight of cement) or methylcellulose (0.4 - 0.8% by weight of cement) as an admixture gave the vibration damping function (with loss tangent up to 0.18, i.e., up to 390% increase, and loss modulus up to 2.2 GPa, i.e., up to 2200% increase, at 0.2 - 2 Hz loading).

Fu, Xuli; Li, Xiaohui; Chung, Deborah D. L.

1998-06-01

153

The effect of etching on a number of glass ionomer cements.  

PubMed

In view of the continuing interest in the use of glass ionomer cements as a dentine substitute or base under composite resins, further investigations were carried out on the effects of the length of time of etching of the surface of the cement prior to the placement of the resin. A number of cements are available on the Australian market which are advocated for use in this technique. Each of them was subjected to etching for periods of 15, 30, 45, or 60 seconds and then stored in water for one week. Examination under a dissecting microscope and a scanning electron microscope revealed some variation in results between the different cements. It would appear that not all those materials presently marketed for this purpose are entirely suitable. Whilst 15 seconds is the preferred time for most cements, some require times up to 60 seconds to achieve the best result. Also, some of the cements showed signs of cracking, expansion and distortion after they had been stored in water for one week to allow for maturation before being prepared for viewing under the SEM. It is suggested that this group of cements is not suitable for the 'sandwich' technique. PMID:2275652

Fuss, J; Mount, G J; Makinson, O F

1990-08-01

154

Thermodynamics and cement science  

SciTech Connect

Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

Damidot, D., E-mail: damidot@ensm-douai.fr [Universite Lille Nord de France (France); EM Douai, LGCgE-MPE-GCE, Douai (France); Lothenbach, B. [Empa, Lab. Concrete and Construction Chemistry, Duebendorf (Switzerland); Herfort, D. [Cementir Holding (Denmark); Glasser, F.P. [Chemistry Department, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

2011-07-15

155

[Allergy towards bone cement].  

PubMed

Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate are typically used for fixation of artificial joints. Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses not explained by infection or mechanical failure may lead to allergological diagnostics, which mostly focuses on metal allergy. However, also bone cement components may provoke hypersensitivity reactions leading to eczema, implant loosening, or fistula formation. Elicitors of such reactions encompass acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide, N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, or antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). Upon repeated contact with bone cement components, e.g., acrylate monomers, also in medical personnel occasionally hand eczema or even asthma may develop. Therefore, in the case of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty, the allergological diagnostics should include bone cement components. PMID:16865384

Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Summer, B; Mazoochian, F; Thomsen, M

2006-09-01

156

Biomimetic Remineralization of Resin-bonded Acid-etched Dentin  

PubMed Central

Degradation of denuded collagen within adhesive resin-infiltrated dentin is a pertinent problem in dentin bonding. A biomimetic remineralization scheme that incorporates non-classic crystallization pathways of fluidic amorphous nanoprecursors and mesoscopic transformation has been successful in remineralizing resin-free, acid-etched dentin, with evidence of intrafibrillar and interfibrillar remineralization. This study tested the hypothesis that biomimetic remineralization provides a means for remineralizing incompletely infiltrated resin-dentin interfaces created by etch-and-rinse adhesives. The remineralization medium consists of a Portland cement/simulated body fluid that includes polyacrylic acid and polyvinylphosphonic acid biomimetic analogs for amorphous calcium phosphate dimension regulation and collagen targeting. Both interfibrillar and intrafibrillar apatites became readily discernible within the hybrid layers after 2-4 months. In addition, intra-resin apatite clusters were deposited within the porosities of the adhesive resin matrices. The biomimetic remineralization scheme provides a proof-of-concept for the adoption of nanotechnology as an alternative strategy to extend the longevity of resin-dentin bonds. PMID:19734458

Tay, F.R.; Pashley, D.H.

2009-01-01

157

Delayed cure bismaleimide resins  

DOEpatents

Prior art polybismaleimides begin to polymerize at or just above the melting point of the monomer. This patent describes new bismaleimide resins which have an increased pot life and provide longer time periods in which the monomer remains fluid. The resins can be polymerized into molded articles with a high uniformity of properties. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-08-12

158

IRRADIATED PETROLEUM RESINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method for improving the properties of polymeric material produced by ; the Friedel-Crafts polymerization of light, cracked petroleum fractions is ; presented. The petroleum resins are mixed with a divinyl aromatic and irradiated ; at a dose rate of at least 0.1 equivalent Mr\\/hr until at least 1\\/2 equivalent Mr ; is absorbed. Resinous solids are obtained that have

J. E. Shewmaker; J. F. Nelson

1963-01-01

159

Distribution Coefficients (Kd Values) for Waste Resins Generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to measure 14C, 129I, and 99Tc Kd values of spent resin generated from the K and L Disassembly Basin Facilities. The scope of the work was to conduct Kd measurements of resins combined in the ratio that they are disposed, 42:58 cation:anion. Because it was not known how these spent resins would be buried, it was necessary to measure the Kd values in such a manner as to simulate both trench and vault disposal. This was accomplished by using an acid-rain simulant (a standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency protocol) and a cement leachate simulant .

Kaplan, D.I.

2002-12-02

160

Low level waste data base development - EPICOR-II resin/liner investigation. Program review  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results is also included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used in the cleanup of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (1) develop a low level waste data base and (2) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of this investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 18 refs., 8 figs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.

1985-09-10

161

Low-level waste data base development - EPICOR II resin/liner investigation - a program review  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the titled program and gives the status of the work on resin degradation, resin solidification, and field testing of solidified samples. A brief discussion of some recent results also is included. Resin materials from EPICOR-II prefilters used during cleanup of Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station are being examined to (a) develop a data base for low-level waste and (b) obtain information on survivability of waste forms composed of ion exchange media loaded with radionuclides and solidified in matrices of cement and Dow polymer. An unusual aspect of the investigation is the use of commercial grade resins which have been loaded with over five times the radioactivity normally seen in a commercial application. That dramatically increases the total radiation dose to the resins. 21 refs., 8 figs.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Reno, H.W.; Schmitt, R.C.; Ayers, A.L. Jr.

1986-01-01

162

Biocompatibility of composite resins  

PubMed Central

Dental materials that are used in dentistry should be harmless to oral tissues, so they should not contain any leachable toxic and diffusible substances that can cause some side effects. Reports about probable biologic hazards, in relation to dental resins, have increased interest to this topic in dentists. The present paper reviews the articles published about biocompatibility of resin-restorative materials specially resin composites and monomers which are mainly based on Bis-GMA and concerns about their degradation and substances which may be segregated into oral cavity. PMID:23372592

Mousavinasab, Sayed Mostafa

2011-01-01

163

Recycled rubber in cement composites  

SciTech Connect

Disposal of 200 million waste tires in the US each year has become a major problem. An environmentally sound innovative technology of recycling rubber in cement matrix was examined. Using silane coupling agent the rubber was bonded to the hydrating cement making a lighter composite, which absorbed more energy than ordinary Portland cement. The bonding information was obtained by peel strength analysis. SEM was used to understand the mode of fracture in pure cement paste, cement bonded rubber composite and rubber filled cement paste. It was found that cracks propagate through the rubber particle in rubber bonded cement composite while in unbonded rubber cement mix, the cracks propagate around the interface. The density and shrinkage measurements are also discussed.

Raghavan, D. [Howard Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Tratt, K.; Wool, R.P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Material Science and Engineering

1994-12-31

164

Guayule resin separation and purification  

E-print Network

to investigate economic viability. The composition of the resin is only partially known. A substantial portion, about 44%, of the resin remains uncharacterized. This uncharacterized portion is of low volatility (5). The characterized portion consists... resin chromatography most of the mass elutes in the 2nd fraction. This is possibly so because of the difference in composition of the two resins. 30 Table 2. Column chromatography of xylene resins over basic alumina Fraction Eluting solvent hexane...

Bajwa, Mohinder P.S.

2012-06-07

165

Cement Mason's Curriculum. Instructional Units.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To assist cement mason instructors in providing comprehensive instruction to their students, this curriculum guide treats both the skills and information necessary for cement masons in commercial and industrial construction. Ten sections are included, as follow: related information, covering orientation, safety, the history of cement, and applying…

Hendirx, Laborn J.; Patton, Bob

166

Communication Cement-based thermocouples  

E-print Network

Communication Cement-based thermocouples Sihai Wen, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Received 31 May 2000; accepted 4 August 2000 Abstract A cement-based thermocouple in the form of a junction between dissimilar cement pastes and exhibiting thermocouple sensitivity 70 7 mV/°C is provided

Chung, Deborah D.L.

167

Performance Cements Focus on Sustainability  

E-print Network

.5%, reductions of: Raw materials use, 1.6 million tons Energy use, 11.8 trillion BTUs CO2 emissions, 2.7 million the beneficial re-use of byproducts Maximize use of materials with low associated CO2 emissions Blended cements with low associated CO2 emissions Blended cements versus separate components Limestone in cement #12;3 High

168

Comparison of effect of desensitizing agents on the retention of crowns cemented with luting agents: an in vitro study  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Many dentists use desensitizing agents to prevent hypersensitivity. This study compared and evaluated the effect of two desensitizing agents on the retention of cast crowns when cemented with various luting agents. MATERIALS AND METHODS Ninety freshly extracted human molars were prepared with flat occlusal surface, 6 degree taper and approximately 4 mm axial length. The prepared specimens were divided into 3 groups and each group is further divided into 3 subgroups. Desensitizing agents used were GC Tooth Mousse and GLUMA® desensitizer. Cementing agents used were zinc phosphate, glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement. Individual crowns with loop were made from base metal alloy. Desensitizing agents were applied before cementation of crowns except for control group. Under tensional force the crowns were removed using an automated universal testing machine. Statistical analysis included one-way ANOVA followed by Turkey-Kramer post hoc test at a preset alpha of 0.05. RESULTS Resin modified glass ionomer cement exhibited the highest retentive strength and all dentin treatments resulted in significantly different retentive values (In Kg.): GLUMA (49.02 ± 3.32) > Control (48.61 ± 3.54) > Tooth mousse (48.34 ± 2.94). Retentive strength for glass ionomer cement were GLUMA (41.14 ± 2.42) > Tooth mousse (40.32 ± 3.89) > Control (39.09 ± 2.80). For zinc phosphate cement the retentive strength were lowest GLUMA (27.92 ± 3.20) > Control (27.69 ± 3.39) > Tooth mousse (25.27 ± 4.60). CONCLUSION The use of GLUMA® desensitizer has no effect on crown retention. GC Tooth Mousse does not affect the retentive ability of glass ionomer and resin modified glass ionomer cement, but it decreases the retentive ability of zinc phosphate cement. PMID:22977719

Pandharinath, Dange Shankar; Arun, Khalikar; Smita, Vaidya

2012-01-01

169

Evaluation of Resin Dissolution Using an Advanced Oxidation Process - 13241  

SciTech Connect

The ion-exchange resin is widely used in nuclear reactors, in cooling water purification and removing radioactive elements. Because of the long periods of time inside the reactor system, the resin becomes radioactive. When the useful life of them is over, its re-utilization becomes inappropriate, and for this reason, the resin is considered radioactive waste. The most common method of treatment is the immobilization of spent ion exchange resin in cement in order to form a solid monolithic matrix, which reduces the radionuclides release into the environment. However, the characteristic of contraction and expansion of the resin limits its incorporation in 10%, resulting in high cost in its direct immobilization. Therefore, it is recommended the utilization of a pre-treatment, capable of reducing the volume and degrading the resin, which would increase the load capacity in the immobilization. This work aims to develop a method of degradation of ion spent resins from the nuclear research reactor of Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Brazil, using the Advanced Oxidative Process (AOP) with Fenton's reagent (hydrogen peroxide and ferrous sulphate as catalyst). The resin evaluated was a mixture of cationic (IR 120P) and anionic (IRA 410) resins. The reactions were conducted by varying the concentration of the catalyst (25, 50, 100 e 150 mM) and the volume of the hydrogen peroxide, at three different temperatures, 50, 60 and 70 deg. C. The time of reaction was three hours. Total organic carbon content was determined periodically in order to evaluate the degradation as a function of time. The concentration of 50 mM of catalyst was the most effective in degrading approximately 99%, using up to 330 mL of hydrogen peroxide. The most effective temperature was about 60 deg. C, because of the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in higher temperatures. TOC content was influenced by the concentration of the catalyst, interfering in the beginning of the degradation process. It was possible to correlate it with the final amount of non-degraded resins. These results show that these conditions were favorable to destroy the resins, indicating to be the AOP an effective technique to reduce the volume of the waste. (authors)

Goulart de Araujo, Leandro; Vicente de Padua Ferreira, Rafael; Takehiro Marumo, Julio [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil)] [Nuclear and Energy Research Institute, Av. Lineu Prestes, 2242., Sao Paulo, SP. (Brazil); Passos Piveli, Roque; Campos, Fabio [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)] [The Polytechnic School of the University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Almeida Prado, 83, trav.2. Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2013-07-01

170

Glass ionomer cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glass ionomer cements have been used in pediatric restorative dentistry for 20 years. Their usefulness in pediatric restorative dentistry is preferential relative to other materi- als because of their fluoride release, chemical adhesion to tooth structure, and availability to use in a variety of clinical scenarios. This paper reviews the use of glass ionomer ma- terials in pediatric restorative dentistry.

Joel H. Berg

2002-01-01

171

40 CFR 414.50 - Applicability; description of the thermosetting resins subcategory.  

...Ketone-Formaldehyde Resins *Melamine Resins *Phenolic Resins *Polyacetal Resins Polyacrylamide *Polyurethane Prepolymers *Polyurethane Resins *Urea Formaldehyde Resins *Urea Resins [52 FR 42568, Nov. 5, 1987, as amended...

2014-07-01

172

Performance testing of grout-based waste forms for the solidification of anion exchange resins  

SciTech Connect

The solidification of spent ion exchanges resins in a grout matrix as a means of disposing of spent organic resins produced in the nuclear fuel cycle has many advantages in terms of process simplicity and economy, but associated with the process is the potential for water/cement/resins to interact and degrade the integrity of the waste form solidified. Described in this paper is one possible solution to preserving the integrity of these solidified waste forms: the encapsulation of beaded anion exchange resins in grout formulations containing ground granulated blast furnace slag, Type I-II (mixed) portland cement, and additives (clays, amorphous silica, silica fume, and fly ash). The results of the study reported herein show the cured waste form tested has a low leach rate for nitrate ion from the resin (and a low leach rate is inferred for Tc-99) and acceptable durability as assessed by the water immersion and freezing/thawing test protocols. The results also suggest a tested surrogate waste form prepared in vinyl ester styrene binder performs satisfactorily against the wetting/drying criterion, and it should offer additional insight into future work on the solidification of spent organic resins. 26 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Morgan, I.L.; Bostick, W.D.

1990-10-01

173

Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mechanical properties of neat resin samples and graphite fiber reinforced samples of thermoplastic resins were characterized with particular emphasis directed to the effects of environmental exposure (humidity, temperature and ultraviolet radiation). Tensile, flexural, interlaminar shear, creep and impact strengths were measured for polysulfone, polyarylsulfone and a state-of-the-art epoxy resin samples. In general, the thermoplastic resins exhibited environmental degradation resistance equal to or superior to the reference epoxy resin. Demonstration of the utility and quality of a graphite/thermoplastic resin system was accomplished by successfully thermoforming a simulated compressor blade and a fan exit guide vane.

Novak, R. C.

1975-01-01

174

Novel experimental cements for use on the dentin-pulp complex.  

PubMed

This aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical and biological properties of novel experimental cements (Hybrid, Paste and Resin) based on synergistic combinations of existing materials, including pH, diametral tensile strength (DTS) and cytotoxicity comparing them with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA - Angelus®) and a glass ionomer cement (GIC) developed at our laboratory. For the physicochemical and biological tests, specimens with standard dimensions were produced. pH measurements were performed with digital pH meter at the following time intervals: 3, 24, 48 and 72 h. For the DTS test, cylindrical specimens were subjected to compressive load until fracture. The MTT assay was performed for cytotoxicity evaluation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (?=0.05). Paste group showed pH values similar to MTA, and Hybrid group presented pH values similar to GIC (p>0.05). The tested materials showed pH values ranging from alkaline to near neutrality at the evaluated times. MTA and GIC showed similar DTS values. The lowest and highest DTS values were seen in the Paste and Resin groups, respectively (p<0.05). Cell viability for MTA and experimental Hybrid, Paste and Resin groups was 49%, 93%, 90% and 86%, respectively, when compared with the control group. The photo-cured experimental resin cement showed similar or superior performance compared with the current commercial or other tested experimental materials. PMID:23207847

Dantas, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes; Conde, Marcus Cristian Muniz; Sarmento, Hugo Ramalho; Zanchi, Cesar Henrique; Tarquinio, Sandra Beatriz Chaves; Ogliari, Fabrício Aulo; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

2012-01-01

175

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cement’s resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01

176

Biodegradation of dental composites/glass-ionomer cements.  

PubMed

Studies of the degradation processes, types of tests, and measurements and analyses of substances leaching out from resin-based composite materials and glass-ionomer cements are reviewed. For both types of materials, the initial release rate rapidly decreases to a low, but nearly constant, level. For composites, various types of degradation processes have been demonstrated. Elements from filler particles and degradation products from the resin (e.g., formaldehyde) leak out. Many substances are not properly identified. It is, however, difficult for in vitro and in vivo degradation to be compared. For glass ionomers, a total disintegration of a surface layer is observed, together with a slow release of elements from the bulk. Of the elements released, fluoride is the most interesting. Marked differences have been shown between in vitro and in vivo solubility tests. PMID:1292463

Oilo, G

1992-09-01

177

Method for removing contaminants from plastic resin  

DOEpatents

A resin recycling method that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material in an environmentally safe and economical manner. The method includes receiving the resin in container form. The containers are then ground into resin particles. The particles are exposed to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles and substantially removing contaminants on the resin particles. After separating the particles and the resin, a solvent removing agent is used to remove any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation.

Bohnert, George W. (Harrisonville, MO); Hand, Thomas E. (Lee's Summit, MO); DeLaurentiis, Gary M. (Jamestown, CA)

2008-12-09

178

Retrofit for Plastic Resin Driers  

E-print Network

RETROFIT FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have... FOR PLASTIC RESIN DRIERS BABU JOSEPH PH.D. Supervising Engineer Southern California Edison Company, Irwindale, California GEORGE THURO Thuro, & Associates, Costa Mesa, California Plastic resins used in injection molding have to be dried to specified levels...

Joseph, B.; Thuro, G.

179

Production of petroleum polymer resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

In other countries, petroleum polymer resins are being used successfully in large volumes. In the U.S. in 1982, for example, 128,000 tonnes of petroleum polymer resins were produced [2], much of which was used in the paint and varnish industry. In commercial production in the USSR are a dark-colored styrene-lndene resin and light-colored petroleum polymer resins of two types --

Yu. V. Dumskii; M. E. Belyakov; A. K. Suroto; G. F. Cherednikova; L. B. Grin'ko

1988-01-01

180

Well cementing in permafrost  

SciTech Connect

A process for cementing a string of pipe in the permafrost region of a borehole of a well wherein aqueous drilling fluid actually used in drilling the wellbore in the permafrost region of a wellbore is employed. The drilling fluid contains or is adjusted to contain from about 2 to about 16 volume percent solids. Mixing with the drilling fluid (1) an additive selected from the group consisting of ligno-sulfonate, lignite, tannin, and mixtures thereof, (2) sufficient base to raise the pH of the drilling fluid into the range of from about 9 to about 12, and (3) cementitious material which will harden in from about 30 to about 40 hours at 40/sup 0/F. The resulting mixture is pumped into the permafrost region of a wellbore to be cemented and allowed to harden in the wellbore. There is also provided a process for treating an aqueous drilling fluid after it has been used in drilling the wellbore in permafrost, and a cementitious composition for cementing in a permafrost region of a wellbore.

Wilson, W.N.

1980-01-01

181

Powdered resin for condensate polishing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Powdered resin systems have a lot to offer in the deionization of low TDS waters, as can be seen in the wide use of this process for the treatment of condensate in the electric power industry. I believe that as new ion-exchange resins are developed, we will see the powdered ion-exchange resin process adopted in other industries. At this time,

Richard Hetherington

1997-01-01

182

Polymer reinforcement of cement systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the last couple of decades several cement- and concrete-based composites have come into prominence. Of these, cement-polymer composites, like cement-fibre composites, have been recognised as very promising, and considerable research and development on their properties, fabrication methods and application are in progress. Of the three types of concrete materials which incorporate polymers to form composites, polymer impregnated concrete forms

R. Narayan Swamy

1979-01-01

183

Cement penetration after patella venting.  

PubMed

There is a high rate of patellofemoral complications following total knee arthroplasty. Optimization of the cement-bone interface by venting and suction of the tibial plateau has been shown to improve cement penetration. Our study was designed to investigate if venting the patella prior to cementing improved cement penetration. Ten paired cadaver patellae were allocated prior to resurfacing to be vented or non-vented. Bone mineral density (BMD) was measured by DEXA scanning. In vented specimens, a 1.6 mm Kirschner wire was used to breach the anterior cortex at the center. Specimens were resurfaced with standard Profix instrumentation and Versabond bone cement (Smith and Nephew PLC, UK). Cement penetration was assessed from Faxitron and sectioned images by a digital image software package (ImageJ V1.38, NIH, USA). Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to assess the difference in cement penetration between groups. The relationship between BMD and cement penetration was analyzed by Pearson correlation coefficient. There was a strong negative correlation between peak BMD and cement penetration when analyzed independent of experimental grouping (r(2)=-0.812, p=0.004). Wilcoxon rank sum testing demonstrated no significant difference (rank sum statistic W=27, p=0.579) in cement penetration between vented (10.53%+/-4.66; mean+/-std dev) and non-vented patellae (11.51%+/-6.23; mean+/-std dev). Venting the patella using a Kirschner wire does not have a significant effect on the amount of cement penetration achieved in vitro using Profix instrumentation and Versabond cement. PMID:19010682

Jones, Christopher W; Lam, Li-On; Butler, Adam; Wood, David J; Walsh, William R

2009-01-01

184

Natural cement and monumental restoration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Natural cement, called “Roman” cement, was invented at the end of the 19th century and played an important role in the development\\u000a of civil engineering works until the 1860s. More surprisingly, it was also used to restore historic buildings, such as gothic\\u000a cathedrals. This paper deals with the mineralogy and the durability of natural cement in the particular case of

C. Gosselin; V. Verges-Belmin; A. Royer; G. Martinet

2009-01-01

185

Abrasive wear of cemented carbides  

SciTech Connect

Cemented carbides are used for a wide variety of applications where wear is a problem. Usually the wear of the cemented carbides is a combination of metal-to-metal and abrasion. Wear can occur at room or elevated temperatures. This research summarizes initial research to understand the abrasive wear of various cemented carbides (various grain sizes, carbide types, carbide grain sizes and binder compositions) in terms of absolute material removal rates and material removal mechanisms.

Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

2003-10-01

186

[Allergy to bone cement components].  

PubMed

Intolerance reactions to endoprostheses may lead to allergological diagnostics, which focus mainly on metal allergy. However, bone cement may also contain potential allergens, e.g. acrylates and additives such as benzoyl peroxide (BPO), N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine, hydroquinone, and antibiotics (particularly gentamicin). In the Munich implant allergy clinic, we found that 28 of 113 patients (24.8%) with cemented prostheses had contact allergies to bone cement components, mostly to gentamicin (16.8%) and BPO (8.0%). The clinical significance of test results cannot always be shown, but we still recommend including bone cement components in the allergological diagnostics of suspected hypersensitivity reactions to arthroplasty. PMID:18227996

Thomas, P; Schuh, A; Eben, R; Thomsen, M

2008-02-01

187

Resin impregnation process for producing a resin-fiber composite  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Process for vacuum impregnation of a dry fiber reinforcement with a curable resin to produce a resin-fiber composite, by drawing a vacuum to permit flow of curable liquid resin into and through a fiber reinforcement to impregnate same and curing the resin-impregnated fiber reinforcement at a sufficient temperature and pressure to effect final curing. Both vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are applied to the dry fiber reinforcement prior to application of heat and prior to any resin flow to compact the dry fiber reinforcement, and produce a resin-fiber composite of reduced weight, thickness and resin content, and improved mechanical properties. Preferably both a vacuum and positive pressure, e.g. autoclave pressure, are also applied during final curing.

Palmer, Raymond J. (Inventor); Moore, William E. (Inventor)

1994-01-01

188

Production of petroleum polymer resins  

SciTech Connect

A dark-colored styrene-indene resin and light-colored petroleum polymer resins of two types- SPP and Piroplast-2 are in commercial production in the Soviet Union. The raw material for the production of the dark-colored styrene-indene resin is heavy pyrolysis tar which is a residue from the distillation of liquid byproducts obtained in pyrolysis. The flow plans for the continuous production of SPP resin and Piroplast-2 are described. These resins are low cost materials as the original raw material is inexpensive and the production costs are low.

Dumskii, Yu.V.; Belyakov, M.E.; Suroto, A.K.; Cherednikova, G.F.; Grin'ko, L.B.

1988-09-01

189

The effect of different adhesive system applications on push-out bond strengths of glass fiber posts  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE Over the past years, the adhesion of fiber posts luted with simplified adhesive systems has been a matter of great interest. The aim of this study was to assess the post retentive potential of a self-adhesive resin cement using different adhesive systems to compare the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS The post spaces of 56 mandibular premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups and further divided into 2 subgroups according to testing time (n=7). The fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and one of the following adhesive systems: no adhesive, a total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond), a two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond) and a one-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil S3 Bond). Each root was cut horizontally, and 1.5 mm thick six root segments were prepared. Push-out tests were performed after one week or three months (0.5 mm/min). Statistical analysis were performed with three-way ANOVA (?=.05). RESULTS Cervical root segments showed higher bond strength values than middle segments. Adhesive application increased the bond strength. For one week group, the total-etch adhesive resin Single Bond showed higher bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem applied without adhesive resin at middle region. For 3 months group, the two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond showed the highest bond strength for both regions. Regarding the time considered, Clearfil SE Bond 3 months group showed higher bond strength values than one week group. CONCLUSION Using the adhesive resins in combination with the self-adhesive resin cement improves the bond strengths. The bond strength values of two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond improved as time passes. PMID:24049572

Deniz Ar?su, Hacer; Uctasl?, Mine Betul; Okay, Tufan Can

2013-01-01

190

Flame Retardant Epoxy Resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of a program to develop fire resistant exterior composite structures for future subsonic commercial aircraft, flame retardant epoxy resins are under investigation. Epoxies and their curing agents (aromatic diamines) containing phosphorus were synthesized and used to prepare epoxy formulations. Phosphorus was incorporated within the backbone of the epoxy resin and not used as an additive. The resulting cured epoxies were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, propane torch test, elemental analysis and microscale combustion calorimetry. Several formulations showed excellent flame retardation with phosphorous contents as low as 1.5% by weight. The fracture toughness of plaques of several cured formulations was determined on single-edge notched bend specimens. The chemistry and properties of these new epoxy formulations are discussed.

Thompson, C. M.; Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Lyon, R. E.

2004-01-01

191

Microtensile bond strength of composite resin to glass-infiltrated alumina composite conditioned with Er,Cr:YSGG laser.  

PubMed

Tribochemical silica-coating is the recommended conditioning method for improving glass-infiltrated alumina composite adhesion to resin cement. High-intensity lasers have been considered as an alternative for this purpose. This study evaluated the morphological effects of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on aluminous ceramic, and verified the microtensile bond strength of composite resin to ceramic following silica coating or laser irradiation. In-Ceram Alumina ceramic blocks were polished, submitted to airborne particle abrasion (110 ?m Al(2)O(3)), and conditioned with: (CG) tribochemical silica coating (110 ?m SiO(2)) + silanization (control group); (L1-L10) Er,Cr:YSGG laser (2.78 ?m, 20 Hz, 0.5 to 5.0 W) + silanization. Composite resin blocks were cemented to the ceramic blocks with resin cement. These sets were stored in 37°C distilled water (24 h), embedded in acrylic resin, and sectioned to produce bar specimens that were submitted to microtensile testing. Bond strength values (MPa) were statistically analyzed (? ?0.05), and failure modes were determined. Additional ceramic blocks were conditioned for qualitative analysis of the topography under SEM. There were no significant differences among silicatization and laser treatments (p > 0.05). Microtensile bond strength ranged from 19.2 to 27.9 MPa, and coefficients of variation ranged from 30 to 55%. Mixed failure of adhesive interface was predominant in all groups (75-96%). No chromatic alteration, cracks or melting were observed after laser irradiation with all parameters tested. Surface conditioning of glass-infiltrated alumina composite with Er,Cr:YSGG laser should be considered an innovative alternative for promoting adhesion of ceramics to resin cement, since it resulted in similar bond strength values compared to the tribochemical treatment. PMID:20737182

Eduardo, Carlos de Paula; Bello-Silva, Marina Stella; Moretto, Simone Gonçalves; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; de Freitas, Patricia Moreira

2012-01-01

192

Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups and cured resins therefrom  

SciTech Connect

Phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups, the process for preparing the same, and the cured resin products obtained therefrom, are discussed. Upon the application of heat, the ethynyl groups react to provide branching and crosslinking. The cure temperature can be lowered by using a catalyst, but this step is not required. The cured phenoxy resins containing pendent ethynyl groups have improved solvent resistance and higher use temperature than linear uncrosslinked phenoxy resins. These improved thermoplastics are applicable for use as coatings, films, adhesives, composited matrices, and molding compounds.

Hergenrother, P.M.

1984-05-01

193

Functional polycyclopentadiene resins via hydroboration process  

Microsoft Academic Search

This patent describes a process for preparing a functionalized petroleum resin. It comprises dissolving a petroleum resin in a solvent to form a solution, the resin being formed by polymerizing feeds containing cyclopentadiene, dicyclopentadiene and alkyl derivatives thereof, the resin having a norbornene moiety with a double bond; adding to the solution a borane, reacting the petroleum resin with the

T. C. Chung; E. Berluche; J. Bock; R. V. Kastrup

1992-01-01

194

[Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate].  

PubMed

Bone cements based on polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) remain an important material for anchorage of artificial joints. Polymers based on PMMA originally developed for dental surgery have been successfully used in bone surgery for more than 40 years. At first sight the cold-curing PMMA bone cement seems to be a rather simple material consisting of a powder and a liquid. But in fact it is a complex material fulfilling various functions at its application site after the implantation. Its properties vary according to the composition of its basic elements. They already play a decisive role for the working behavior during mixing of both components. The differences in the working behavior considerably affect the cementing technique and the accurate application in vivo. These influence the mechanical performance of the cured cement mantle and the long-term results of the implantation. Standardized test methods are used to characterize bone cements,whereas the clinical relevance of the test methods has to be evaluated critically.Additionally,PMMA bone cements act as a drug delivery system as a local carrier of antibiotics. This paper gives a review of the composition and properties of PMMA bone cements and their influence on practical application. PMID:12557085

Breusch, S J; Kühn, K-D

2003-01-01

195

The use of resin-based composite restorations in pulpotomized primary molars.  

PubMed

The purpose of this retrospective clinical study was to report a 12- to 54-month follow-up, in which a resin-based composite filling material was used in direct contact with a fast-setting zinc oxide eugenol cement to restore the function and anatomy of 51 pulpotomized primary molars in 2- to 11-year-old children who needed a Class I or II restoration. Formocresol pulpotomy using Temrex cement was performed in all cases. The total-etch technique was used with: (1) 35% phosphoric acid; (2) OptiBond Solo Plus bonding agent; and (3) Filtek P60/shade B2 resin-based composite material. The restored teeth were sealed with Embrace pit and fissure sealant, monitored, and evaluated with periodic radiographs and clinical exams at 6-month recall visits. The results revealed that none of the 51 pulpotomized primary molars had evidence of periapical or furcation pathosis, recurrent decay, open margins, or broken restorations. In conclusion, this clinical study demonstrated that resin-based composite restorations--combined with the total-etch technique and a fifth-generation bonding agent and in direct contact with a fast-setting zinc oxide eugenol cement were long-lasting, quality clinical alternatives to restore the anatomy and function of pulpotomized primary molars. PMID:18477438

Caceda, Jorge H

2007-01-01

196

Al-organic matter associations as cementing substances of ochreous brown soil aggregates: Preliminary examination  

SciTech Connect

The resistance of soil structural units to breakdown in water, Na resin, or H resin suspension was determined kinetically for a very water-stable organic soil. Aggregate stability to Na or H resin was mainly a function of the more or less hydrophobic nature of Al-organic matter associations. Soil organic matter dissolution was a good tracer of the wetting process, and this study shows that two kinds of Al-organic matter associations act as cementing substances in such very water-stable, temperate, organic soils. The first association was organic matter similar to fulvic acids but richer in polysaccharides and peptides, weakly associated with exchangeable Al. The second association was organic matter also similar to fulvic acids but much richer in oxygenated functional groups and in nitrogenous compounds, probably strongly associated with porrly-ordered hydrous Al oxides. They were disrupted by Na and H resin, respectively. In both kinetic treatments, correlations among soil disaggregation, exchanged or/and dissolved Al, and dissolved organic matter were observed and interpreted as follows: breakup of soil aggregates into smaller units could have been caused by the pressure of entrapped air which increased as a function of the soil wettability state from water treatment to Na resin treatment and finally to H resin treatment.

Bartoli, F.; Philippy, R. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Nancy (France))

1990-10-01

197

Reduction of load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic crowns due to cement aging.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to investigate how water aging of the resin cement influences the stress distribution in all-ceramic crowns and if there is an increase in the propensity for crown failure. The failure of all-ceramic crowns attributed to cement degradation was explored using a combination of experimental and numerical methods. Sectioned all-ceramic crown specimens were fabricated of IPS e.max Ceram/e.max Press (CP) and Vita VM9/Cercon zirconia (VZ), and then stored in either air or distilled water for 30 days. Monotonic contact loads were applied to fracture near the buccal cusp ridge of each sample. Deformation within the crown layers during loading was analyzed by means of Digital Image Correlation (DIC). A 3D finite element model of the restoration including veneer, core, cement and tooth substrate was developed to evaluate the stress distribution in the crowns before and after cement degradation. There was a significant decrease (p<0.001) in the critical fracture load and a change in the fracture mode after cement water absorption in the CP crowns. In contrast, there was no significant influence of cement aging on fracture modes and fracture loads (p>0.05) in the VZ crowns. Finite element analysis showed that regardless of the crown types, the stress distribution is identical by degradation in Young's modulus of the cement. However, core/substrate debonding results in a change of the stress distribution and a significant increase in the magnitude. Water aging causes reduction of stiffness and bonding strength of cement agents. Degradation in bonding strength and stiffness could potentially lead to stress redistribution in the restored crown and reduce the load-bearing capacity of all-ceramic restorations after years of service. PMID:23127630

Lu, Chenglin; Wang, Raorao; Mao, Shuangshuang; Arola, Dwayne; Zhang, Dongsheng

2013-01-01

198

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

... Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may...

2012-04-01

199

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

... Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may...

2013-04-01

200

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

... Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may...

2014-04-01

201

21 CFR 178.3930 - Terpene resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

... Terpene resins. The terpene resins identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely used as components of polypropylene film intended for use in contact with food, and the terpene resins identified in paragraph (b) of this section may...

2011-04-01

202

21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888.3027 Section 888.3027...3027 Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device intended to...

2010-04-01

203

21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888.3027 Section 888.3027...3027 Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device intended to...

2013-04-01

204

21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.  

...false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888.3027 Section 888.3027...3027 Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device intended to...

2014-04-01

205

21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888.3027 Section 888.3027...3027 Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device intended to...

2012-04-01

206

21 CFR 888.3027 - Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...false Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. 888.3027 Section 888.3027...3027 Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. (a) Identification. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement is a device intended to...

2011-04-01

207

Influence of temporary cement remnant and surface cleaning method on bond strength to dentin of a composite luting system.  

PubMed

The aim of the current study was to evaluate the influence of polycarboxylate temporary cement remaining on the dentin surface on the bond strength of a composite luting system. An acrylic resin plate was luted to bovine dentin with a polycarboxylate temporary cement (HY-Bond Temporary Cement Hard, HYB). The temporary cement was not used for the control groups. After removing the temporary cement with an excavator, dentin specimens were divided into five groups; 1) no subsequent treatment, 2) cleaning with a rotational brush (RTB), 3) cleaning with a rotational brush and non-fluoridated flour of pumice, 4) sweeping with an air scaler, and 5) treated with a sonic toothbrush. A silane-treated ceramic disk (IPS Empress) was bonded to each dentin specimen with a composite luting system (Panavia F). Shear testing results showed that the RTB groups exhibited the highest bond strength regardless of the use of temporary cement (P < 0.05). The use of a rotational brush with water coolant is recommended to achieve ideal bond strength between the Panavia F luting system and dentin to which HYB temporary cement was primarily applied. PMID:15881223

Kanakuri, Katsuhito; Kawamoto, Yoshikazu; Matsumura, Hideo

2005-03-01

208

Imide modified epoxy matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High char yield epoxy using novel bisimide amines (BIA's) as curing agents with a state of the art epoxy resin was developed. Stoichiometric quantities of the epoxy resin and the BIA's were studied to determine the cure cycle required for preparation of resin specimens. The bisimide cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). The physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these novel resins were determined. The levels of moisture absorption exhibited by the bisimide amine cured expoxies (IME's) were considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies. The strain-to-failure of the control resin system was improved 25% by replacement of DDS with 6F-DDS. Each BIA containing resin exhibited twice the char yield of the control resin MY 720/DDS. Graphite fiber reinforced control (C) and IME resins were fabricated and characterized. Two of the composite systems showed superior properties compared to the other Celion 6000/IME composite systems and state of the art graphite epoxy systems. The two systems exhibited excellent wet shear and flexural strengths and moduli at 300 and 350 F.

Scola, D. A.; Pater, R. H.

1981-01-01

209

Processable High Temperature Laminating Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

P13N Polyimide Resin was modified to provide autoclave moldability for boron monofilament and graphite fiber prepregs and to improve the thermo-oxidative stability of composites. It was shown that a modified P13N resin provided autoclave molded boron and ...

R. W. Vaughan, R. J. Jones

1971-01-01

210

Portland cement-blast furnace slag blends in oilwell cementing applications  

SciTech Connect

Recent investigations of blast furnace slag cementing technologies. have been expanded to include Portland cement/blast furnace slag blends. Mixtures of Portland cement and blast furnace slag, while having a long history of use in the construction industry, have not been used extensively in oilwell cementing applications. Test results indicate that blending blast furnace slag with Portland cement produces a high quality well cementing material. Presented are the design guidelines and laboratory test data relative to mixtures of blast furnace slag and Portland cements. Case histories delineating the use of blast furnace slag - Portland cement blends infield applications are also included.

Mueller, D.T.; DiLullo, G.; Hibbeler, J. [and others

1995-12-31

211

Moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant: A boon  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives: Pit and fissure sealants are highly effective in preventing occlusal caries. The present study clinically evaluated and compared the retention and development of caries when sealed with moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant, conventional resin-based sealant with and without a bonding agent, and Glass Ionomer Cement Sealant in young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 healthy cooperative children aged 6-9 years who were at high caries risk with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were included in the study. Teeth were divided into 4 groups using a full-factorial design, and each of the molars was sealed with the four different sealant material. Evaluation of sealant retention and development of caries was performed at 6 and 12 months using Modified Simonsen's criteria. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test. Result and Conclusion: The result from the present study indicated that moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant could be successfully used as a pit and fissure sealant because its hydrophilic chemistry makes it less technique sensitive and simplifies the sealant application procedure. PMID:24124301

Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Konde, Sapna; Raj, Sunil N.; Kumar, Narayan Chandra

2013-01-01

212

Development of high-performance blended cements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This thesis presents the development of high-performance blended cements from industrial by-products. To overcome the low-early strength of blended cements, several chemicals were studied as the activators for cement hydration. Sodium sulfate was discovered as the best activator. The blending proportions were optimized by Taguchi experimental design. The optimized blended cements containing up to 80% fly ash performed better than Type I cement in strength development and durability. Maintaining a constant cement content, concrete produced from the optimized blended cements had equal or higher strength and higher durability than that produced from Type I cement alone. The key for the activation mechanism was the reaction between added SO4 2- and Ca2+ dissolved from cement hydration products.

Wu, Zichao

2000-10-01

213

Effects of abutment and screw access channel modification on dislodgement of cement-retained implant-supported restorations.  

PubMed

This study investigated the influence of implant abutment and screw access channel modification on the retention of copings. Titanium abutment access openings were either left open or modified by placing two vent holes 3 mm from the occlusal edge and 180 degrees apart. Access openings sealed with a resin material were used as controls. Metal copings were cemented and subjected to tensile testing until failure. Access openings with two vent holes resulted in significantly higher mean retention values compared to the opened or sealed screw access groups (P < .05). Cement flow was affected by the internal vent, which increased the area of cementabutment contact. PMID:23342335

Wadhwani, Chandur; Hess, Timothy; Pineyro, Alfonso; Chung, Kwok-Hung

2013-01-01

214

New low-cost permafrost cementing system  

SciTech Connect

Extensive research has resulted in the development and subsequent field application of a new extended cement system for use in permafrost cementing projects. The use of this extended system instead of more expensive specialized cement systems leds to a reduction in overall permafrost cementing costs. This paper reviews the design requirements for permafrost cementing. It also provides laboratory data and reviews the methods which have met those requirements. Results of actual field application of the newly designed cement system and comparison with another specialized extended system are also presented. 6 refs.

Benge, O.G.; Jones, R.R.; Dresher, T.D.; Dolan, R.T.

1982-01-01

215

Injectable bone cement based on mineralized collagen.  

PubMed

A novel injectable bone cement based on mineralized collagen was reported in this paper. The cement was fabricated by introducing calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CaSO(4).1/2H(2)O, CSH) into nano-hydroxyapatite/collagen (nHAC). The workability, in vitro degradation, in vitro and in vivo biocompatibility of the cement (nHAC/CSH) were studied. The comparative tests via in vitro and in vivo showed that the nHAC/CSH composite cement processed better biocompatibiltiy than that of pure CSH cement. The results implied that this new injectable cement should be very promising for bone repair. PMID:20336741

Liu, Xi; Wang, Xiu-Mei; Chen, Zonggang; Cui, Fu-Zhai; Liu, Huan-Ye; Mao, Keya; Wang, Yan

2010-07-01

216

Evaluation of fit of cement-retained implant-supported 3-unit structures fabricated with direct metal laser sintering and vacuum casting techniques.  

PubMed

This study evaluated the vertical discrepancy of implant-fixed 3-unit structures. Frameworks were constructed with laser-sintered Co-Cr, and vacuum-cast Co-Cr, Ni-Cr-Ti, and Pd-Au. Samples of each alloy group were randomly luted in standard fashion using resin-modified glass-ionomer, self-adhesive, and acrylic/urethane-based cements (n = 12 each). Discrepancies were SEM analyzed. Three-way ANOVA and Student-Newman-Keuls tests were run (P < 0.05). Laser-sintered structures achieved the best fit per cement tested. Within each alloy group, resin-modified glass-ionomer and acrylic/urethane-based cements produced comparably lower discrepancies than the self-adhesive agent. The abutment position did not yield significant differences. All misfit values could be considered clinically acceptable. PMID:22075754

Oyagüe, Raquel Castillo; Sánchez-Turrión, Andrés; López-Lozano, José Francisco; Montero, Javier; Albaladejo, Alberto; Suárez-García, María Jesús

2012-07-01

217

Chromatography resin support  

DOEpatents

An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

Dobos, James G. (North Augusta, SC)

2002-01-01

218

Resin reinforced expansion anchor system  

SciTech Connect

An expansion anchor assembly is described in combination with a dual compartment resin and cartridge inserted into a mine roof opening, the anchor assembly including: (a) an elongated bolt having a head at one end and threaded for a portion of its length at the other end; (b) an expansion member engaged with the threaded end of the bolt; (c) the expansion member including an expansion shell having a plurality of leaf segments; (d) a first means for engaging the expansion shell with the elongated bolt; (e) a wedge threaded on the elongated bolt for engagement with the expansion shell to urge the latter into gripping engagement with the mine roof; (f) a first resin passageway means on the outer surface of the wedge for permitting resin to gravitate therethrough; (g) the leaf segments of the expansion shell being separated to form a second resin passageway means aligned with the first resin passageway means, whereby resin may gravitate downwardly through substantially the entire length of the assembly, and (h) a second means within the first passageway and engageable with one of the leaf segments to prevent relative rotation of the wedge member with respect to the expansion shell; (i) the resin being mixed upon rotation of the bolt and expansion member and gravitating downwardly through the first and second passageway means into engagement with that portion of the mine roof defining the mine roof opening.

Clark, C.A.; Wright, R.L.

1988-08-16

219

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange-resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxville, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1998-01-27

220

Grafted methylenediphosphonate ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is disclosed that is comprised of an insoluble copolymer onto which are grafted pendent groups that provide 1.0 to about 10 mmol/g dry weight phosphorous. The pendent groups have the formula ##STR1## wherein R is hydrogen, a cation or mixtures thereof; and R.sup.1 is hydrogen or an C.sub.1 -C.sub.2 alkyl group. The resin also contains zero to about 5 mmol/g dry weight of pendent aromatic sulfonate groups. Processes for making and using an ion exchange resin are also disclosed.

Trochimcznk, Andrzej W. (Knoxbille, TN); Gatrone, Ralph C. (Plymouth, PA); Alexandratos, Spiro (Knoxville, TN); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

1997-01-01

221

Resin/graphite fiber composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High temperature resin matrices suitable for use in advanced graphite fiber composites for jet engine applications were evaluated. A series of planned, sequential screening experiments with resin systems in composite form were performed to reduce the number of candidates to a single A-type polyimide resin that repetitively produced void-free, high strength and modulus composites acceptable for use in the 550 F range for 1000 hours. An optimized processing procedure was established for this system. Extensive mechanical property studies characterized this single system, at room temperature, 500 F, 550 F and 600 F, for various exposure times.

Cavano, P. J.; Jones, R. J.; Vaughan, R. W.

1972-01-01

222

A MODIFIED PMMA CEMENT (SUB-CEMENT) FOR ACCELERATED FATIGUE TESTING OF CEMENTED IMPLANT CONSTRUCTS USING CADAVERIC BONE  

PubMed Central

Pre-clinical screening of cemented implant systems could be improved by modeling the longer-term response of the implant/cement/bone construct to cyclic loading. We formulated bone cement with degraded fatigue fracture properties (Sub-cement) such that long-term fatigue could be simulated in short-term cadaver tests. Sub-cement was made by adding a chain-transfer agent to standard polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement. This reduced the molecular weight of the inter-bead matrix without changing reaction-rate or handling characteristics. Static mechanical properties were approximately equivalent to normal cement. Over a physiologically reasonable range of stress intensity factor, fatigue crack propagation rates for sub-cement were higher by a factor of 25 ± 19. When tested in a simplified 2 1/2D physical model of a stem-cement-bone system, crack growth from the stem was accelerated by a factor of 100. Sub-cement accelerated both crack initiation and growth rate. Sub-cement is now being evaluated in full stem/cement/femur models. PMID:18774136

Race, Amos; Miller, Mark A.; Mann, Kenneth A.

2008-01-01

223

Kinetics of Cement Strength Development Using Different Types of Cement and Aggregates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The object of the present study is the kinetics of cement strength development using different cement and aggregate types. The model that has been developed uses the following data: (1) Composition of cement. (2) Mineral composition of clinker. (3) Cement fineness. (4) Early, standard and long-term strength data. (5) Aggregates nature. The parameters of the model are constituted by: (1)

TSAMATSOULIS DIMITRIS

224

Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global

Irvin Allen Chen

2009-01-01

225

76 FR 24519 - Gray Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan; Institution of a Five-Year Review Concerning...Portland Cement and Cement Clinker From Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade...portland cement and cement clinker from Japan would be likely to lead to...

2011-05-02

226

Neutron Scattering Studies of Cement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite more than a century of research, basic questions remain regarding both the internal structure and the role of water in Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) concrete, the world's most widely used manufactured material. Most such questions concern the primary hydration product and strength-building phase of OPC paste, the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) gel. When cement and water are mixed, this phase precipitates as clusters of nanoscale (nearly amorphous) colloidal particles with an associated water-filled inter-particle pore system. Most attempts to characterize the C-S-H gel and the behavior of the associated water involve drying or other processes that, themselves, change the bound water content within and around the gel. Neutron scattering methods do not suffer from this disadvantage. Furthermore, the neutron isotope effect and the neutron's sensitivity to molecular motion have enabled considerable progress to be made in recent years by: (i) determining the C-S-H composition, density and gel structure in small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) H/D contrast variation studies; (ii) elucidating the changing state of water within cement as hydration progresses using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS); and (iii) measuring the production and consumption of nanoscale calcium hydroxide (CH), a by-product of cement hydration that co-exists with the C-S-H gel, using inelastic neutron scattering (INS). These experiments have provided new insights into the physics and chemistry of cement hydration, and have implications for the design of new concretes with pozzolanic cement additions that are intended to address environmental concerns and sustainability issues.

Allen, Andrew

2010-03-01

227

Phase equilibria of hydrated Portland cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model is described for predicting the equilibrium phase assemblage in hydrated Portland cement and for calculating the relative contents and composition of phases present in the assemblage, from the chemical composition of the cement and the water\\/cement ratio. The method is also used to calculate the content of capillary pores using the best available data for the densities for

Erik P. Nielsen; Duncan Herfort; Mette R. Geiker

2005-01-01

228

Cusp Fracture Resistance of Maxillary Premolars Restored with the Bonded Amalgam Technique Using Various Luting Agents  

PubMed Central

Objective. This in vitro study uses measurements of fracture resistance to compare maxillary premolars restored with the bonded amalgam technique using a new resin luting cement, glass ionomer, and resin-modified glass ionomer as the bonding agents. Materials. Eighty-five sound maxillary premolars were selected and randomly assigned to one of five test groups of 17 teeth each. One group of intact teeth served as the control. The remaining groups were prepared to a standard cavity form relative to the dimensions of the overall tooth and restored with amalgam alone or a bonded amalgam using one of three luting agents: RelyX Arc (a new resin luting cement), RelyX luting (a resin-modified glass ionomer), or Ketac-Cem ? (a glass ionomer) as the bonding agents. Each tooth was then subjected to compressive testing until catastrophic failure occurred. The mean loads at failure of each group were statistically compared using ANOVA with a post hoc Bonferroni test. Results. It was found that regardless of the luting cement used for the amalgam bonding technique, there was little effect on the fracture resistance of teeth. Conclusion. Cusp fracture resistance of premolars prepared with conservative MOD cavity preparations is not improved by using an amalgam-bonding technique compared to similar cavities restored with amalgam alone. PMID:20339450

Marchan, Shivaughn M.; Coldero, Larry; White, Daniel; Smith, William A. J.; Rafeek, Reisha N.

2009-01-01

229

ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

SUGAMA,T.

2007-01-01

230

Petroleum resins and their production  

Microsoft Academic Search

A process is described for the production of petroleum resins compatible with base polymers in hot melt formulations and having a softening point of from about 60°C. to about 120°C. and Gardner color of about 4 or less, comprising copolymerizing using a Friedel-Crafts catalyst. The mixture is substantially free form cyclopentadiene and dicyclopentadiene. This patent also describes a resin consisting

Luvinh

1989-01-01

231

Effect of three radicular dentine treatments and two luting cements on the regional bond strength of quartz fibre posts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose was to investigate by push-out tests and scanning electron microscopy (SEM)\\/energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS)\\u000a the effect, after first acid etching the post space walls, of three radicular dentine treatments on the regional bond strength\\u000a of quartz fibre posts placed using two heavily filled resin luting cements. The crowns of 39 extracted maxillary central incisors\\u000a were sectioned transversely 2 mm coronal

Haiyan Mao; Yaming Chen; Kevin H. K. Yip; Roger J. Smales

232

Maleimide Functionalized Siloxane Resins  

SciTech Connect

Polyorganosiloxanes are a commercially important class of compounds. They exhibit many important properties, including very low glass transition temperatures, making them useful over a wide temperature range. In practice, the polysiloxane polymer is often mixed with a filler material to help improve its mechanical properties. An alternative method for increasing polymer mechanical strength is through the incorporation of certain substituents on the polymer backbone. Hard substituents such as carbonates and imides generally result in improved mechanical properties of polysiloxanes. In this paper, we present the preparation of novel polysiloxane resins modified with hard maleimide substituents. Protected ethoxysilyl-substituted propyl-maleimides were prepared. The maleimide substituent was protected with a furanyl group and the monomer polymerized under aqueous acidic conditions. At elevated temperatures (>120 C), the polymer undergoes retro Diels-Alder reaction with release of foran (Equation 1). The deprotected polymer can then be selectively crosslinked by a forward Diels-Alder reaction (in the presence of a co-reactant having two or more dime functionalities).

Loy, D.A.; Shaltout, R.M.

1999-04-01

233

How to avoid myths of squeeze cementing  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a method of hydraulic fracturing using cement. Squeeze cementing is usually accompanied by elevated pressure caused by pumping into a crack, channel, or other severe restriction to high velocity flow. It is recommended that the total pressure inside the well bore at any depth should be about 500-1,000 psi higher than the reservoir pressure of any zone exposed to the cement, but lower than formation fracturing pressure of any exposed zone. The objective is to keep the cement and all well fluids static and in place until the cement sets and reaches at least 500 psi CS.

Crenshaw, P.L.

1985-04-23

234

Functional polycyclopentadiene resins via hydroboration process  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for preparing a functionalized petroleum resin. It comprises dissolving a petroleum resin in a solvent to form a solution, the resin being formed by polymerizing feeds containing cyclopentadiene, dicyclopentadiene and alkyl derivatives thereof, the resin having a norbornene moiety with a double bond; adding to the solution a borane, reacting the petroleum resin with the borane compound at about room temperature for a sufficient period of time to form a derivative of the petroleum resin containing a borane group; and reacting the derivative of the petroleum resin with a chemical agent capable of replacing the borane group of the petroleum resin derivative with a functional group, thereby converting the derivative into the functionalized petroleum resin.

Chung, T.C.; Berluche, E.; Bock, J.; Kastrup, R.V.

1992-03-03

235

Process for cementing geothermal wells  

DOEpatents

A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

1985-01-01

236

Catalytic effect of a Portland cement filler on the cure of water-compatible resorcinol phenol-formaldehyde polymer concrete  

SciTech Connect

Aggregate with a water content < 1 wt % is normally needed for the production of polymer concrete (PC). This increases the cost and complexity of the process. In this study, PC with a compressive strength of > 2000 psi (> 13.78 MPa) at age of 1 h at 24/sup 0/C was produced by mixing resorcinol phenol-formaldehyde (RPF) resin with portland cement and aggregate containing 1 to 10% water. The addition of approx. 14.7 to 17.5% type III portland cement to the PC formulation produced an acceleration in the rate of the condensation-type polymerization reaction and improved the properties of the composite. The cause of the accelerative effect was found to be the electropositive bivalent metallic ions of calcium and magnesium released from the cement grains in an aqueous medium. Conversely, the trivalent metallic ions from cement such as Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ have no effect on the rate of polymerization of RPF resin.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.

1981-05-01

237

Finite element analysis of the effect of cementing concepts on implant stability and cement fatigue failure  

PubMed Central

Background and purpose Two contradictory cementing techniques (using an undersized stem versus a canal-filling stem) can both lead to excellent survival rates, a phenomenon known as the “French paradox”. Furthermore, previous studies have indicated that the type of bone supporting the cement mantle may affect implant survival. To further evaluate the mechanical consequences of variations in cementing technique, we studied the effect of implant size and type of bone supporting the cement mantle on the mechanical performance of cemented total hip arthroplasty, using finite element analysis. Methods In a generic 2-dimensional plane-strain finite element model of a transverse section of a cemented total hip arthroplasty with a Charnley-Kerboull stem, we varied implant size and type of bone supporting the cement mantle. The models were subjected to 2 × 106 cycles of an alternating loading pattern of torque and a transverse load. During this loading history, we simulated cement fatigue crack formation and tracked rotational stability of the implant. Results Canal-filling stems produced fewer cement cracks and less rotation than undersized stems. Cement mantles surrounded by trabecular bone produced more cement cracks and implant rotation than cement mantles surrounded by cortical bone. Interpretation Our investigation provides a possible explanation for the good clinical results obtained with canal-filling Charnley-Kerboull implants. Our findings also indicate that inferior mechanical properties are obtained with these implants if the cement is supported by trabecular bone, which may be minimized by an optimal cementing technique. PMID:19421913

van Aken, Jantien; Scheerlinck, Thierry; Verdonschot, Nico

2009-01-01

238

FB-Line resin testing final report  

SciTech Connect

The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer's specified ionic type and form, and the Dowex 50W resins have characteristic water retention capacities. These tests conclude that the ion exchange resins in use in FB-Line meet the approved safety document criteria for cross-linking, ionic form, and resin type.

Bannochie, C.J.

1992-01-23

239

Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes  

SciTech Connect

Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means.

Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

1985-12-17

240

Synthesis of Portland cement and calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement for sustainable development and performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Portland cement concrete, the most widely used manufactured material in the world, is made primarily from water, mineral aggregates, and portland cement. The production of portland cement is energy intensive, accounting for 2% of primary energy consumption and 5% of industrial energy consumption globally. Moreover, portland cement manufacturing contributes significantly to greenhouse gases and accounts for 5% of the global CO2 emissions resulting from human activity. The primary objective of this research was to explore methods of reducing the environmental impact of cement production while maintaining or improving current performance standards. Two approaches were taken, (1) incorporation of waste materials in portland cement synthesis, and (2) optimization of an alternative environmental friendly binder, calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement. These approaches can lead to less energy consumption, less emission of CO2, and more reuse of industrial waste materials for cement manufacturing. In the portland cement part of the research, portland cement clinkers conforming to the compositional specifications in ASTM C 150 for Type I cement were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals with 0% to 40% fly ash and 0% to 60% slag incorporation (with 10% intervals), 72.5% limestone with 27.5% fly ash, and 65% limestone with 35% slag. The synthesized portland cements had similar early-age hydration behavior to commercial portland cement. However, waste materials significantly affected cement phase formation. The C3S--C2S ratio decreased with increasing amounts of waste materials incorporated. These differences could have implications on proportioning of raw materials for cement production when using waste materials. In the calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement part of the research, three calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers with a range of phase compositions were successfully synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. The synthesized calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement that contained medium C4A3 S¯ and C2S contents showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development and was considered the optimum phase composition for calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement in terms of comparable performance characteristics to portland cement. Furthermore, two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement clinkers were successfully synthesized from natural and waste materials such as limestone, bauxite, flue gas desulfurization sludge, Class C fly ash, and fluidized bed ash proportioned to the optimum calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cement synthesized from reagent-grade chemicals. Waste materials composed 30% and 41% of the raw ingredients. The two calcium sulfoaluminate-belite cements synthesized from natural and waste materials showed good dimensional stability, sulfate resistance, and compressive strength development, comparable to commercial portland cement.

Chen, Irvin Allen

241

Research of magnesium phosphosilicate cement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Magnesium phosphosilicate cement (MPSC) is a novel phosphate bonded cement, which consists mainly of magnesia, phosphate and silicate minerals. The traditional magnesium phosphate cements (MPCs) usually composed by ammonium phosphate, and gaseous ammonia will emit during mixing and in service. There is no noxious ammonia released from MPSC, furthermore, it can recycle a large volume of the non-hazardous waste. The goal of this research is to investigate the composition, reaction products, reaction mechanism, microstructure, properties, durability and applications of the MPSC. MPSC sets rapidly and has high early strength. It reacts better with solid industrial waste when compared to Portland cement. Many solid industrial wastes, such as fly ash, steel slag, coal gangue, red coal gangue, red mud, barium-bearing slag, copper slag, silica fume, and ground granulated blast furnace slag, have been used as the main component (40% by weight) in MPSC. The research has found that these aluminosilicate (or ironsilicate, or calciumsilicate) minerals with an amorphous or glass structure can enhance the performance of MPSC. The disorganized internal structure of amorphous materials may make it possess higher reactivity compared to the crystalline phases. Chemical reaction between phosphate and these minerals may form an amorphous gel, which is favorable to the cementing. Borax, boric acid and sodium tripolyphosphate have been used as retardants in the MPSC system. It is found that boric acid has a higher retarding effect on the setting of cement, than borax does. However, sodium polyphosphate accelerates the reaction of MPSC. The hydration of MPSC is exothermic reaction. The heat evolution may prompt hydrates formation, and shorten the setting process. Modern materials characterization techniques, XRD, DSC, TG-DTA FTIR, XPS, MAS-NMR, SEM, TEM, MIP, etc. were used to analyze the phase composition, micro morphology, and microstructure of hardened MPSC. The main hydration product in MPSC is MgKPO4·6H2O (MKP), which has both crystalline and amorphous phases. There are many unreacted magnesia grains in the hardened MPSC paste. They act as nucleus of the hardened framework. The hydrates grow around the magnesia grains rims, fill in the voids among the magnesia grains and bond unreacted magnesia part into a solid continuum. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

Ding, Zhu

242

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOEpatents

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 10 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1996-07-23

243

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...following specifications: (i) The solution intrinsic viscosity of the polyestercarbonate resins shall be a minimum of 0...per gram, as determined by a method entitled “Intrinsic Viscosity (IV) of Lexan ® Polyestercarbonate Resin by...

2011-04-01

244

21 CFR 175.380 - Xylene-formaldehyde resins condensed with 4,4?-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin epoxy resins. The resins identified in paragraph...conditions. (a) The resins are produced by the condensation of xylene-formaldehyde resin and 4,4?-isopropylidenediphenol-epichlorohydrin...di-, or trimethylol phenol and capryl alcohol...

2010-04-01

245

Successful Cementing of Shallow Steamflood wells in California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Successful cementing of shallow casing strings (150 to 400 ft) for steamflood operations in Kern County, CA, has been difficult to achieve. Lost-circulation problems accompanied by cement fallback are common. Ultrasonic cement evaluation logs commonly show the cement sheath to be severely cut with gas (air) and show numerous cases of large gaps in the cement column. Extensive remedial work

K. J. Goodwin; D. G. Calvert; R. L. Root; V. S. Henderson

1992-01-01

246

NON-PORTLAND CEMENT ACTIVATION OF BLAST FURNACE SLAG  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this project was to produce a “greener” cement from granulated ground blast furnace slag (GGBS) using non-Portland cement activation. By eventually developing “greener” cement, the ultimate goal of this research project would be to reduce the amount of Portland cement used in concrete, therefore reducing the amount of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere during cement production.

Anne Elizabeth Oberlink

2010-01-01

247

Application of HS-SPME in the determination of potentially toxic organic compounds emitted from resin-based dental materials.  

PubMed

Leaching of volatile substances from resin-based dental materials may have a potential impact on the biocompatibility as well as safety of these materials. Information from manufacturers on ingredients in the materials is very often incomplete. Patients and dentists may be in contact with components emitted from cured dental fillings or from substrates applied in their preparation. Therefore, determination of the components of these materials is necessary for better prevention from possible harmful effects caused by dental fillings. The aim of this work was the isolation and identification of organic compounds evolved from four commercial resin-modified glass-ionomer cements (resin-based dental materials applied in dentistry) by using an alternative method of volatile compounds analysis-HS-SPME (headspace-solid phase microextraction). Dental materials were heated in closed vial at various temperatures and volatile substances released into the headspace phase above the sample were isolated on a thin polymeric fibre placed in SPME syringe. Identification was performed by using the GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry) technique. Almost 50 RMGIC (resin-modified glass-ionomer cement) components (monomers and additives) were identified. The main identified leachables were: iodobenzene (DPICls-diphenyliodonium chloride degradation product), camphorquinone (photo-initiator), tert-butyl-p-hydroxyanisole (inhibitor), 4-(dimethylamino)ethyl benzoate (co-initiator), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (monomer). PMID:16528422

Rogalewicz, Rafal; Voelkel, Adam; Kownacki, Ireneusz

2006-03-01

248

The density of cement phases  

SciTech Connect

The densities of principal crystalline phases occurring in Portland cement are critically assessed and tabulated, in some cases with addition of new data. A reliable and self-consistent density set for crystalline phases was obtained by calculating densities from crystallographic data and unit cell contents. Independent laboratory work was undertaken to synthesize major AFm and AFt cement phases, determine their unit cell parameters and compare the results with those recorded in the literature. Parameters were refined from powder diffraction patterns using CELREF 2 software. A density value is presented for each phase, showing literature sources, in some cases describing limitations on the data, and the weighting attached to numerical values where an averaging process was used for accepted data. A brief discussion is made of the consequences of the packing of water to density changes in AFm and AFt structures.

Balonis, M. [Department of Chemistry, Meston Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)], E-mail: m.balonis@abdn.ac.uk; Glasser, F.P. [Department of Chemistry, Meston Building, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, AB24 3UE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

2009-09-15

249

Bagasse-reinforced cement composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bagasse is abundantly available in many countries as a by-product from sugar mills and is being mostly used as fuel or disposed of by incineration. An attempt has been made to convert this byproduct into useful eco-friendly cement-bonded composites, which can be used for various internal and external applications in buildings. The investigations include optimization of parameters such as bagasse

L. K. Aggarwal

1995-01-01

250

Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials  

SciTech Connect

The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary porosity percolation, diffusivity, chemical shrinkage, autogenous shrinkage, internal relative humidity evolution, and interfacial transition zone microstructure. The effects of flocculation and dispersion of the cement particles in the starting microstructures on resultant properties are also briefly evaluated. The computer simulations are conducted using two cement particle size distributions that bound those commonly in use today and three different water-to-cement ratios: 0.5, 0.3, and 0.246. For lower water-to-cement ratio systems, the use of coarser cements may offer equivalent or superior performance, as well as reducing production costs for the manufacturer.

Bentz, D.P.; Garboczi, E.J.; Haecker, C.J.; Jensen, O.M.

1999-10-01

251

Improved Fire-Resistant Resins for Laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fire-resistant resins for fabricating laminates with inorganic fibers, especially graphite fibers, are formed from bisimides containing main-chain phosphorus and olefinic end groups. Bisimides are thermally polymerized to form resins and laminates virtually imcombustible in pure oxygen at 300 degrees C. New resins are suitable for many applications requiring good adhesion and excellent resistance to heat, fire, solvents and chemicals.

Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J. A.; Varma, I. K.

1982-01-01

252

The leachability of heavy metals in hardened fly ash cement and cement-solidified fly ash  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of mix proportion, leachant pH, curing age, carbonation and specimen making method etc. on the leaching of heavy metals and Cr(VI) in fly ash cement mortars and cement-solidified fly ashes has been investigated. In addition, a method for reducing the leaching of Cr(VI) from cement-solidified fly ashes is proposed. The results mainly indicate that: (1) either Portland cement

Qijun Yu; S. Nagataki; Jinmei Lin; T. Saeki; M. Hisada

2005-01-01

253

Cement industry: sustainability, challenges and perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cement-based materials, such as concrete and mortars, are used in extremely large amounts. For instance, in 2009 concrete\\u000a production was superior to 10 billion tons. Cement plays an important role in terms of economic and social relevance since\\u000a it is fundamental to build and improve infrastructure. On the other hand, this industry is also a heavy polluter. Cement production\\u000a releases

F. A. Rodrigues; I. Joekes

2011-01-01

254

Glycoprotein Enrichment Resin User Manual  

E-print Network

buffer containing either Tris or sorbitol. Specific Enrichment of Glycoproteins Glycoprotein Enrichment Enrichment Resin· Other User Manual (PT4050-1)· Visit our Protein Expression and Purification product pages at www.clontech.com for a current list of products available for protein research. #12;Glycoprotein

Lebendiker, Mario

255

Color Improvement of Petroleum Resin \\  

Microsoft Academic Search

A reaction of thermal-cracked higher fractions obtained from petroleum naptha with maleic anhydride gives a raw material affording a lighter color petroleum resin of 6 G than ordinarily produced one of 11 to 12 G, measured by Gardner scale. Then, some color components which were not yet reported, removed by the reaction, have been identified from the reaction products to

Yoshiyuki Iwase

1979-01-01

256

SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF PETROLEUM RESINS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resin fractions containing heteroatoms obtained from deasphaltened oils of petroleum residues (500C+) of Bombay High 7lpar;BH) and Gujrat Crude Mix (GCM) have been separated into acidic, basic and neutral Lewis base (NLB) types employing chromatographic methods. Ultimate compositions of these fractions have been determined for deducing the average molecular formulae. Infrared spectroscopy has been employed for assigning various heteroatomic functional

S. L. S. Sarowha; I. D. Singh

1988-01-01

257

Effects of cement particle size distribution on performance properties of Portland cement-based materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The original size, spatial distribution, and composition of Portland cement particles have a large influence on hydration kinetics, microstructure development, and ultimate properties of cement-based materials. In this paper, the effects of cement particle size distribution on a variety of performance properties are explored via computer simulation and a few experimental studies. Properties examined include setting time, heat release, capillary

Dale P. Bentz; Edward J. Garboczi; Claus J. Haecker; Ole M. Jensen

1999-01-01

258

General hydration model for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper focusses on the evolution of the heat of hydration of hardening concrete or cement based materials. Based on isothermal and adiabatic hydration tests a new general hydration model is developed, valid both for portland cement and blast furnace slag cement. This hydration model enables the calculation of the heat production rate as a function of the actual temperature

L. Taerwe

1995-01-01

259

EFFECT OF PORTLAND CEMENT ON STRENGTH DEVELOPMENT OF PHOSPHOANHYDRITE-POZZOLANA CEMENT  

Microsoft Academic Search

The paper is a part of the research on a complex alternative technology of apatite phosphogypsum (PG) obtained during the production of phosphoric acid from Kola apatite, on rare earth concentrate and phosphoanhydrite cement with the recovery of phosphate compounds. The effect of Portland cement on mechanical properties of phosphoanhydrite-pozzolana cement has been determined. The samples of binder were prepared

Andrzej JAROSIÑSKI

1997-01-01

260

The effect of low dose teicoplanin-loaded acrylic bone cement on biocompatibility of bone cement.  

PubMed

Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cement (polymethylmethacrylate, PMMA) is used to prevent or treat infection in total joint replacement surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate biocompatibility and cytotoxicity of the teicoplanin-loaded acrylic bone cement. Cytotoxicity examination of acrylic bone cement balls and 400 mg teicoplanin added acrylic bone cement balls conducted by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay. SEM (Scanning electron microscopy) was used to observe adhesion and spreading of cells on surface of the balls. Cytotoxicity examination conducted by MTT assay on acrylic bone cement balls and teicoplanin-added acrylic bone cement balls revealed no cytotoxicity. SEM analysis put forward that cells started to proliferate and adhere on surface of the samples in both groups as a result of 48-hour incubation and that the cell proliferation over acrylic bone cement and teicoplanin-added acrylic bone cement was similar. As a consequence, there was no cytotoxicity in acrylic bone cement and teicoplanin-added acrylic bone cement groups according to results of MTT assay. On the other hand, results of SEM showed that biocompatibility of both groups was similar. In conclusion, teicoplanin-loaded bone cement did not change biocompatibility of bone cement in studied dose. PMID:23827744

Öztemür, Zekeriya; Sümer, Zeynep; Tunç, Tutku; Pazarcé, Özhan; Bulut, Okay

2013-06-01

261

Supply chain management in the cement industry .  

E-print Network

??Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management… (more)

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01

262

Comparison of the fit of Procera crowns made from stone with those made from polyurethane resin.  

PubMed

This study compared the average marginal gap of Procera crowns fabricated from a definitive cast made from polyurethane resin with those made from type IV stone. A metallic maxillary central incisor and first premolar were prepared according to the Procera guidelines and incorporated into a U-shaped definitive cast. From this definitive cast, 20 primary casts were made in polyurethane resin. Two sets of impressions (10 with type IV stone and 10 with polyurethane resin) were made and poured onto these casts. Forty pure aluminum oxide substructures for Procera crowns were made for these groups, with 10 incisors and 10 premolars in each group. Each substructure was cemented on the respective primary die and sectioned. Using an optical microscope and special software, sections were measured and compared for marginal adaptation. Based on the findings, both materials were equally adequate for producing a Procera crown. However, the mean margin gap was consistently larger for type IV stone dies than for polyurethane resin dies. PMID:19552368

Rahme, Habib Y; Adib, Salim M; Zebouni, Elie A; Bechara, Boulos B; Rifai, Khaldoun T

2009-01-01

263

Liquid antibiotics in bone cement  

PubMed Central

Objectives The objective of this study was to compare the elution characteristics, antimicrobial activity and mechanical properties of antibiotic-loaded bone cement (ALBC) loaded with powdered antibiotic, powdered antibiotic with inert filler (xylitol), or liquid antibiotic, particularly focusing on vancomycin and amphotericin B. Methods Cement specimens loaded with 2 g of vancomycin or amphotericin B powder (powder group), 2 g of antibiotic powder and 2 g of xylitol (xylitol group) or 12 ml of antibiotic solution containing 2 g of antibiotic (liquid group) were tested. Results Vancomycin elution was enhanced by 234% in the liquid group and by 12% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Amphotericin B elution was enhanced by 265% in the liquid group and by 65% in the xylitol group compared with the powder group. Based on the disk-diffusion assay, the eluate samples of vancomycin-loaded ALBC of the liquid group exhibited a significantly larger inhibitory zone than samples of the powder or the xylitol group. Regarding the ALBCs loaded with amphotericin B, only the eluate samples of the liquid group exhibited a clear inhibitory zone, which was not observed in either the xylitol or the powder groups. The ultimate compressive strength was significantly reduced in specimens containing liquid antibiotics. Conclusions Adding vancomycin or amphotericin B antibiotic powder in distilled water before mixing with bone cement can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release than can loading ALBC with the same dose of antibiotic powder. This simple and effective method for preparation of ALBCs can significantly improve the efficiency of antibiotic release in ALBCs. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2014;3:246–51. PMID:25104836

Chang, Y. H.; Tai, C. L.; Hsu, H. Y.; Hsieh, P. H.; Lee, M. S.; Ueng, S. W. N.

2014-01-01

264

In-vitro Comparison of the Antimicrobial Properties of Glass Ionomer Cements with Zinc Phosphate Cements  

PubMed Central

White spot lesions are observed in nearly 50% of patients undergoing orthodontic treatment. Long-lasting antibacterial properties of orthodontic cements can reduce this phenomenon. The aim of this research was to compare antimicrobial activity of three commercial glass ionomer cements with three commercial zinc phosphate cements, over time, against streptococcus mutans and candida albicans. Direct contact test (DCT) was used to evaluate the antibacterial and antifungal activity of products after 48 h and 7 days of incubation. The results demonstrated that all the cements presented antibacterial activity but the antibacterial activity of glass ionomer cements was more than that of zinc phosphate cements. Counts of C. albicans after 48 h were lower and statistically different in the GIC group in relation to the control groups. But no differences were observed between GIC and control groups at 7 days. Based on the results of this study, the antimicrobial and mainly antifungal effects of all the cements were so short.

Vahid Dastjerdie, Elaheh; Oskoui, Mahvash; Sayanjali, Elham; Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat

2012-01-01

265

Stem compatibility for cement-in-cement femoral revision: an in vitro study.  

PubMed

Cement-in-cement femoral component revision is a useful and commonly practised technique. Onerous and hazardous re-shaping of the original cement mantle is required if the new stem does not seat easily. Furthermore, without removing the entirety of the original cement mantle, the freedom to alter anteversion or leg length is difficult to predict preoperatively. We present data from in vitro experiments testing the compatibility of the top cemented stems according to UK registry figures (NJR 2013). This data augments preoperative planning by indicating which revision stems require minimal or no cement reshaping when being inserted into another stem's mantle. We also present the maximum shortening and anteversion that can be achieved without reshaping the original cement mantle. PMID:25044270

Berstock, James R; Torrie, Peter A G; Smith, James R A; Webb, Jason C; Baker, Richard P

2014-01-01

266

Fracture model for cemented aggregates  

A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

2013-01-01

267

CO 2 emissions from Polish cement industry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cement industry is one of the most significant sources of anthropogenic emissions of CO2. It is connected with the specific character of the production processes, during which great quantities of CO2 are produced. Basic actions to reduce CO2 emissions recommended by the European Union's, Reference Document on Best Available Techniques in the Cement and Lime Manufacturing Industries, include: reduction

Jan Deja; Alicja Uliasz-Bochenczyk; Eugeniusz Mokrzycki

2010-01-01

268

Acrylic bone cement: current concept review.  

PubMed

Acrylic bone cement has had for years an important role in orthopedic surgery. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) has been extended from the ophthalmological and dental fields to orthopedics, as acrylic cement used for fixation of prosthetic implants, for remodeling osteoporotic, neoplastic and vertebral fractures repair. The PMMA bone cement is a good carrier for sustained antibiotic release in the site of infection. Joint prostheses chronic infection requires surgical removal of the implant, in order to eradicate the infection process. This can be performed in the same surgical time (one-stage procedure) or in two separate steps (two-stage procedure, which involves the use of an antibiotic-loaded cement spacer). The mechanical and functional characteristics of the spacers allow a good joint range of motion, weight-bearing in selected cases and a sustained release of antibiotic at the site of infection. The improvement of fixation devices in recent years was not accompanied by the improvement of elderly bone quality. Some studies have tested the use of PMMA bone cement or calcium phosphate as augmentation support of internal fixation of these fractures. Over the past 20 years, experimental study of acrylic biomaterials (bone cement, bioglass ceramic, cement additives, absorbable cement, antibiotic spacers) has been of particular importance, offering numerous models and projects. PMID:23893506

Magnan, B; Bondi, M; Maluta, T; Samaila, E; Schirru, L; Dall'Oca, C

2013-08-01

269

MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF CEMENTED PASTE BACKFILL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cemented paste backfill is a method increasingly used by modern mines throughout the world due to increasingly stringent environmental regulations on sulfur -rich tailings. This paper studies the mechanical behavior of cemented paste backf ill with mid term (up to 91 days) and long term (more than 91 days) curing times. Two Canadian sulfur mine tailings samples were used for

Tikou BELEM; Mostafa BENZAAZOUA; Bruno BUSSIÈRE

270

Developme nt strategies for foamed cement paste  

Microsoft Academic Search

For several decades numerous research projects dealt with foamed concret e. Although foamed cement-bound materials have very useful properties, for example low density and low thermal conductivity, they are not often used as construction material, because predefined properties are difficult to attain accu- rately. Therefore the intention of this research work is the unerring production of cement-bound foams. Based on

J. U. Pott

2002-01-01

271

Petroleum resins and their production  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for the production of petroleum resins compatible with base polymers in hot melt formulations and having a softening point of from about 60/sup 0/C. to about 120/sup 0/C. and Gardner color of about 4 or less, comprising copolymerizing using a Friedel-Crafts catalyst. The mixture is substantially free form cyclopentadiene and dicyclopentadiene. This patent also describes a resin consisting essentially of a copolymer containing from 5 to 80 wt. % of units derived from an olefinically unsaturated aromatic compound form 5 to 80 wt. % of units derived from C/sub 5/ olefines or diolefines or C/sub 6/ olefines diolefines or a mixture of C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ olefines or diolefines and from 7 to 45 wt. % of units derived from a terpene.

Luvinh, Q.

1989-04-25

272

Pharmaceutical Applications of Ion-Exchange Resins  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The historical uses of ion-exchange resins and a summary of the basic chemical principles involved in the ion-exchange process are discussed. Specific applications of ion-exchange resins are provided. The utility of these agents to stabilize drugs are evaluated. Commonly occurring chemical and physical incompatibilities are reviewed. Ion-exchange resins have found applicability as inactive pharmaceutical constituents, particularly as disintegrants (inactive tablet ingredient whose function is to rapidly disrupt the tablet matrix on contact with gastric fluid). One of the more elegant approaches to improving palatability of ionizable drugs is the use of ion-exchange resins as taste-masking agents. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a review of scaleup of typical manufacturing processes for taste-masked products are provided. Ion-exchange resins have been extensively utilized in oral sustained-release products. The selection, optimization of drug:resin ratio and particle size, together with a summary of commonly occurring commercial sustained-release products are discussed. Ion-exchange resins have also been used in topical products for local application to the skin, including those where drug flux is controlled by a differential electrical current (ionotophoretic delivery). General applicability of ion-exchange resins, including ophthalmic delivery, nasal delivery, use as drugs in their own right (e.g., colestyramine, formerly referred to as cholestyramine), as well as measuring gastrointestinal transit times, are discussed. Finally, pharmaceutical monographs for ion-exchange resins are reviewed.

Elder, David P.

2005-04-01

273

Synthesis of improved polyester resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Eighteen aromatic unsaturated polyester prepolymers prepared by a modified interfacial condensation technique were investigated for their solubility in vinyl monomers and ability to provide high char yield forming unsaturated polyester resins. The best resin system contained a polyester prepolymer of phthalic, fumaric and diphenic acids reacted with 2,7-naphthalene diol and 9,9-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)fluorene. This prepolymer is very soluble in styrene, divinyl benzene, triallyl cyanurate, diallyl isophthalate and methylvinylpyridine. It provided anaerobic char yields as high as 41 percent at 800 C. The combination of good solubility and char yield represents a significant improvement over state-of-the-art unsaturated polyester resins. The majority of the other prepolymers had only low or no solubility in vinyl monomers. Graphite composites from this prepolymer with styrene were investigated. The cause for the observed low shear strengths of the composites was not determined, however 12-week aging of the composites at 82 C showed that essentially no changes in the composites had occurred.

Mcleod, A. H.; Delano, C. B.

1979-01-01

274

Hydrothermal cement/metal interfaces  

SciTech Connect

The authors investigated the adherence of two cementitious materials, calcium phosphate cement (CPC) and silica flour-filled class G cement (CGC), to metal substrates, such as cold-rolled steel (CRS), stainless steel (SS), electroplated zinc-coated steel (EZS), and zinc phosphate-coated steel (ZPS) after autoclaving at 200 C. In CPC/metal joints, the {gamma}-AlOOH phase, which segregated from the hydroxyapatite phase of the CPC matrix, was preferentially precipitated on the CRS and SS surfaces and also mixed with the reaction products formed at the interfaces between CPC and EZS or ZPS. Precipitation of {gamma}-AlOOH caused the formation of a weak boundary layer at the interfacial transition zones, thereby resulting in a low shear-bond strength. Although CGC accelerated the rate of corrosion of CRS and SS surfaces, the growth of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} clusters, formed as the corrosion products of metals at interfaces, aided the anchoring effect of xonotlite crystals as the major phase of CGC matrix, thereby conferring a high shear-bond strength. The EZS and ZPS surfaces were susceptible to alkali dissolution caused by the attack of the high-pH interstitial fluid of CGC pastes to the Zn and zinc phosphate coatings. Thus, the bond strengths of the CGC/EZS and /ZPS joints were lower than those of the joints made with CRS and SS.

Sugama, Toshifumi [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Baldwin, S. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-01-01

275

Potential problems associated with ion-exchange resins used in the decontamination of light-water reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

During a typical decontamination event, ion-exchange resin beds are used to remove corrosion products (radioactive and nonradioactive) and excess decontamination reagents from waste streams. The spent resins may be solidified in a binder, such as cement, or sealed in a high-integrity container (HIC) in order to meet waste stability requirements specified by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Lack of stability of low-level waste in a shallow land burial trench may lead to trench subsidence, enhanced water infiltration and waste leaching, which would result in accelerated transport of radionuclides and the complexing agents used for decontamination. The current program is directed at investigating safety problems associated with the handling, solidification and containerization of decontamination resin wastes. The three tasks currently underway include freeze-thaw cycling of cementitious and vinyl ester-styrene forms to determine if mechanical integrity is compromised, a study of the corrosion of container materials by spent decontamination waste resins, and investigations of resin degradation mechanisms.

Soo, P.; Adams, J.W.; Kempf, C.R.

1987-01-01

276

Cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained tripolar component.  

PubMed

Dislocation of a total hip replacement (THR) is common following total hip arthroplasty (THA). When nonoperative management fails to maintain reduction, revision surgery is considered. The use of constrained acetabular liners has been extensively described. Complete removal of the old cement mantle during revision THA can be challenging and is associated with significant complications. Cement-in-cement revision is an established technique. However, the available clinical and experimental studies focus on femoral stem revision. The purpose of this study was to present a case of cement-in-cement acetabular revision with a constrained component for recurrent dislocations and to investigate the current best evidence for this technique. This article describes the case of a 74-year-old woman who underwent revision of a Charnley THR for recurrent low-energy dislocations. A tripolar constrained acetabular component was cemented over the primary cement mantle following removal of the original liner by reaming, roughening the surface, and thoroughly irrigating and drying the primary cement. Clinical and radiological results were good, with the Oxford Hip Score improving from 11 preoperatively to 24 at 6 months postoperatively. The good short-term results of this case and the current clinical and biomechanical data encourage the use of the cement-in-cement technique for acetabular revision. Careful irrigation, drying, and roughening of the primary surface are necessary. PMID:22310415

Leonidou, Andreas; Pagkalos, Joseph; Luscombe, Jonathan

2012-02-01

277

Assessment of Natural Radioactivity Levels of Cements and Cement Composites in the Slovak Republic  

PubMed Central

The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58–19.1 Bq·kg?1, 9.78–26.3 Bq·kg?1 and 156.5–489.4 Bq·kg?1 for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Raeq = 67.87 Bq·kg?1, gamma index I? = 0.256, alpha index I? = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h?1, external hazard index Hex = 0.182 and internal hazard index Hin was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84–10.8 Bq·kg?1 for 226Ra, 13.1–20.5 Bq·kg?1 for 232Th and 250.4–494.4 Bq·kg?1 for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites. PMID:24351739

Estokova, Adriana; Palascakova, Lenka

2013-01-01

278

In vitro cyclic testing of the Exeter stem after cement within cement revision.  

PubMed

Cement-within-cement (C-C) revision arthroplasty minimizes the complications associated with removal of secure polymethylmethacrylate. Failure at the interfacial region between new and old cement mantles remains a theoretical concern. This article assesses the cyclic fatigue properties of bilaminar cement mantles after C-C revision in vitro with the Exeter stem. Seven Exeter stems were cemented into Sawbone femurs and removed, and new undersized stems were cemented into the preserved mantle. The new constructs were loaded for 1,000,000 cycles at body temperature. Cement mantles were inspected postcycling. In no case was there delamination or failure of the cement mantle. The findings support the hypothesis that use of a thin revision cement mantle in conjunction with a polished double-tapered stem is not detrimental to the overall success of the implant. In the presence of a secure cement-bone interface in suitable patients, we recommend C-C revision techniques using double-tapered polished femoral stems. PMID:18534400

Wilson, Lance Jon; Bell, Cameron Gordon Roodveldt; Weinrauch, Patrick; Crawford, Ross

2009-08-01

279

Assessment of natural radioactivity levels of cements and cement composites in the Slovak Republic.  

PubMed

The radionuclide activities of 226Ra, 232Th and 40K and radiological parameters (radium equivalent activity, gamma and alpha indices, the absorbed gamma dose rate and external and internal hazard indices) of cements and cement composites commonly used in the Slovak Republic have been studied in this paper. The cement samples of 8 types of cements from Slovak cement plants and five types of composites made from cement type CEM I were analyzed in the experiment. The radionuclide activities in the cements ranged from 8.58-19.1 Bq·kg(-1), 9.78-26.3 Bq·kg(-1) and 156.5-489.4 Bq·kg(-1) for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K, respectively. The radiological parameters in cement samples were calculated as follows: mean radium equivalent activity Ra(eq) = 67.87 Bq·kg(-1), gamma index I? = 0.256, alpha index I? = 0.067, the absorbed gamma dose rate D = 60.76 nGy·h(-1), external hazard index H(ex) = 0.182 and internal hazard index H(in) was 0.218. The radionuclide activity in composites ranged from 6.84-10.8 Bq·kg(-1) for 226Ra, 13.1-20.5 Bq·kg(-1) for 232Th and 250.4-494.4 Bq·kg(-1) for 40K. The calculated radiological parameters of cements were lower than calculated radiological parameters of cement composites. PMID:24351739

Eštoková, Adriana; Palaš?áková, Lenka

2013-12-01

280

Scintillating 99Tc Selective Ion Exchange Resins  

SciTech Connect

Scintillating technetium (99Tc) selective ion exchange resins have been developed and evaluated for equilibrium capacities and detection efficiencies. These resins can be utilized for the in-situ concentration and detection of low levels of pertechnetate anions (99TcO4-) in natural waters. Three different polystyrene type resin support materials were impregnated with varying amounts of tricaprylmethylammonium chloride (Aliquat 336) extractant, several different scintillating fluors and wavelength shifters. The prepared resins were contacted batch-wise to equilibrium over a wide range of 99TcO4- concentrations in natural water. The measured capacities were used to develop Langmuir adsorption isotherms for each resin. 99Tc detection efficiencies were determined and up to 71.4 ± 2.6% was achieved with some resins. The results demonstrate that a low level detection limit for 99TcO4- in natural waters can be realized.

Mitchell Greenhalgh; Richard D. Tillotson

2012-07-01

281

Development of tough, moisture resistant laminating resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Tough, moisture resistant laminating resins for employment with graphite fibers were developed. The new laminating resins exhibited cost, handleability and processing characteristics equivalent to 394K (250 F) curing epoxies. The laminating resins were based on bisphenol A dicyanate and monofunctional cyanates with hydrophobic substituents. These resins sorb only small quantities of moisture at equilibrium (0.5% or less) with minimal glass transition temperature depression and represent an improvement over epoxies which sorb around 2% moisture at equilibrium. Toughening was accomplished by the precipitation of small diameter particles of butadiene nitrile rubber throughout the resin matrix. The rubber domains act as microcrack termini and energy dissipation sites, allowing increased stress accommodation prior to catastrophic failure. A unique blend of amine terminated butadiene nitrile elastomer (MW 2,000) and a high nitrile content butadiene nitrile rubber yielded the desired resin morphology.

Brand, R. A.; Harrison, E. S.

1982-01-01

282

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98{degrees} C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene resin with a softening point of 105{degrees} C. The resin performs as well as the modified terpene in SIS-, SB-, and EVA-based adhesives. The new hydrocarbon resin is especially well suited for hot-melt adhesives. It exhibits low volatility, good color stability, and excellent melt viscosity stability. Since the new resin is based on petroleum hydrocarbon feedstocks, it should be available at moderate, stable prices. The other hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 85{degrees} C, produced comparable results.

Carper, J.D. (Hercules Inc., Wilmington, DE (US))

1990-06-01

283

FB-Line resin testing final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer`s specified ionic type and form,

Bannochie

1992-01-01

284

FB-Line resin testing final report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Dowex 50W-X8 and 50W-Xl2 resin samples are both strong acid cation materials in the hydrogen form. Each material has a water retention capacity characteristic of its respective marketed degree of cross-linking. Dowex 21K gives confirmatory responses to tests for a strong anion exchange resin in the nitrate form. All three resins have the manufacturer's specified ionic type and form,

Bannochie

1992-01-01

285

Porous Ceramic Spheres from Ion Exchange Resin  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A commercial cation ion exchange resin, cross-linked polystyrene, has been successfully used as a template to fabricate 20 to 50 micron porous ceramic spheres. Ion exchange resins have dual template capabilities. Pore architecture of the ceramic spheres can be altered by changing the template pattern. Templating can be achieved by utilizing the internal porous structure or the external surface of the resin beads. Synthesis methods and chemical/physical characteristics of the ceramic spheres will be reported.

Dynys, Fred

2005-01-01

286

The marginal leakage of some dental cements in humans: a PIXE-microbeam approach  

SciTech Connect

The marginal leakage and water absorption of dental cements and restorative materials has been investigated by many authors with several techniques, some of which led to valid results. However, no technique could give, by itself, information both on leakage and water absorption, as these measurements usually need different investigations. PIXE micro beam offers the possibility of investigating these two aspects at the same time, since it is possible to map a proper marker element. In the present study, cavities were made on 50 extracted human molars, then filled with five different temporary cements (IRM, Cavit W, Kalsogen, Fermit N, SuperEBA). The filled teeth were placed into a 5% silver nitrate solution, and after three days, one, two, three and four weeks were examined. The samples for microPIXE were prepared after embedding the teeth in epoxy resin, and sectioning and grinding them down to a thickness of about 1 mm. The sections were placed on metal holders, and examined with a scanning proton {mu}beam, in Legnaro (Italy) at the AN2000 LAB of INFN National Laboratories. The beam consisted of 2.4 MeV protons, it had a cross section of 1.5 micron in diameter and typical currents of the order of some {mu}A were used. The maps were obtained by an 'ad hoc' software with a McIntosh personal computer. Mapping of silver allowed to evaluate both the marginal leakage and the water absorption for each cement. The samples filled with Cavit W showed a great infiltration, as the tracing element was found in the cement bulk, along the margins and inside the cavity, while those filled with IRM and Kalsogen presented only a deposition of the tracing solution on the cement surface. SuperEBA showed a poor resistance against microleakage, because the marker element was only detected along the cavity margins. Fermit N showed the best marginal integrity, and on its surface no traces of siver were found. In this case the better resistance may be due to the resin present in the composition of the material.

Zadro, A.; Passi, P. [Dental School, Department of Dental Materials, University of Padua (Italy); Cavalleri, G. [Dental School, Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Verona (Italy); Galassini, S.; Moschini, G.; Rossi, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy)

1999-06-10

287

Computer simulation of the diffusivity of cement-based materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

A digital image-based model of the microstructure of cement paste, coupled with exact transport algorithms, is used to study the diffusivity of Portland cement paste. The principal variables considered are water:cement ratio, degree of cement hydration and capillary porosity. Computational methods are described and diffusivity results are presented, which are found to agree with the available experimental measurements within experimental

E. J. Garboczi; D. P. Bentz

1992-01-01

288

CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING  

E-print Network

1 CONSTRUCTION-GRADE CEMENT PRODUCTION FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS USING CEMENT-LOCKTM TECHNOLOGY A developed the Cement-LockTM Technology a versatile, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly manufacturing technology for producing construction-grade cements from a wide variety of contaminated waste

Brookhaven National Laboratory

289

Micromechanical Modeling of Filament Wound Cement-Based Composites  

E-print Network

Micromechanical Modeling of Filament Wound Cement-Based Composites B. Mobasher, M.ASCE1 Abstract. The micromechanical model simulates the mechanical response of a multilayer cement-based composite laminate under: Micromechanics; Cements; Composite materials. Introduction Response of cement-based composites to load

Mobasher, Barzin

290

The effect of foam polystyrene granules on cement composite properties  

Microsoft Academic Search

Crumbled recycled foam polystyrene waste as well as spherical large and fine blown polystyrene waste is used to produce the filler for a light thermo-insulating composite, the matrix of which is light foam cement. For better cohesion, fillers are hydrophilizated with foam cement surfactant solution.Polystyrene granules and foam cement concrete interaction schemes are discussed. The investigation of foam cement concrete

A. Laukaitis; R. Žurauskas

2005-01-01

291

Early bond strength to low-pressure sandblasted zirconia: evaluation of a self-adhesive cement.  

PubMed

The debonding of a densely sintered zirconia prosthesis is a clinically reported, and undesirable event. A standardized, affordable adhesive cementation protocol for zirconia-based restorations is not yet available. The aim of this investigation was to assess the influence of several surface treatments on the initial shear bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to densely sintered zirconia ceramic. Thirty densely sintered zirconia cylinders were divided into three groups (n = 10). Each of them received a different surface treatment: control (No_T), with the zirconia surface unconditioned; low pressure air abrasion (Sand_S) (50 µm, 1 bar); and standardized air abrasion (Sand_H) (50 µm, 2.8 bar). Three more surface-treated only specimens were addressed to scanning electron microscope (SEM) for qualitative observations. After specimen fabrication, self-adhesive cementceramic interface was analyzed using SBS (shear bond strength) test. Mean shear bond strengths (MPa) obtained for Sand_H and Sand_S were 16.24 ± 2.95 and 16.01 ± 2.68, respectively; no statistically significant difference (P = 0.8580) was found between sandblasted groups. Low-pressure air abrasion positively affected the initial self-adhesive cement adhesion to zirconia with respect to the No_T control group; however it did not prevent scratches and the formation of microcracks on the ceramic surfaces. PMID:22645731

Re, Dino; Augusti, Davide; Augusti, Gabriele; Giovannetti, Agostino

2012-01-01

292

Comparison of the Effect of Three Cements on Prevention of Enamel Demineralization Adjacent to Orthodontic Bands  

PubMed Central

Background and aims This in vitro study was designed to compare enamel demineralization depths adjacent to bands cemented with zinc polycarboxylate, glass ionomer (GI) and resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI), in order to achieve minimal enamel demineralization during orthodontic treatment. Materials and methods Sixty fully developed extracted third molars were randomly divided into three testgroups each containing 20 samples, used to cement orthodontic bands with zinc polycarboxylate, GI and RMGI. All samples were demineralized using White method using hydroxyapatite, latic acid and Carbapol for in vitro caries simulation, and then, immersed in 10% solution of methylene blue. The mean depth of dye penetration was assessed up to 0.1 millimeter, reflect-ing the depth of enamel demineralization. One way ANOVA and LSD statistical tests were employed to evaluate significant differences among groups. Results The highest dye penetration depth was seen in zinc polycarboxylate group, followed by GI, and RMGI groups, respectively, with significant differences among each two groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion The use of RMGI cement seems to present significantly better prevention of enamel demineralization adja-cent to orthodontics bands. PMID:22991644

Kashani, Mehdi; Farhadi, Sareh; Rastegarfard, Neda

2012-01-01

293

Correlating cement characteristics with rheology of paste  

SciTech Connect

The influence of cement characteristics such as cement fineness and clinker composition on the 'flow resistance' measured as the area under the shear stress-shear rate flow curve has been investigated. Three different types of plasticizers namely naphthalene sulphonate-formaldehyde condensate, polyether grafted polyacrylate, and lignosulphonate have been tested in this context on 6 different cements. The flow resistance correlated well with the cement characteristic (Blaine.{l_brace}d.cC{sub 3}A + [1 - d].C{sub 3}S{r_brace}) where the factor d represents relative reactivity of cubic C{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S while cC{sub 3}A and C{sub 3}S represent the content of these minerals. It was found to be either a linear or exponential function of the combined cement characteristic depending on plasticizer type and dosage. The correlation was valid for a mix of pure cement and cement with fly ash, limestone filler (4%), as well as pastes with constant silica fume dosage, when the mineral contents were determined by Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffractograms.

Vikan, H. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Concrete, 7465 Trondheim (Norway)], E-mail: hedda.vikan@sintef.no; Justnes, H. [SINTEF Building and Infrastructure, Concrete, 7465 Trondheim (Norway); Winnefeld, F.; Figi, R. [EMPA Swiss Federal Laboratories of Materials Testing and Research, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

2007-11-15

294

Premixed calcium silicate cement for endodontic applications  

PubMed Central

Calcium silicate-based materials (also called MTA) are increasingly being used in endodontic applications. However, the handling properties of MTA are not optimal when it comes to injectability and cohesion. Premixing the cements using glycerol avoids these issues. However, there is a lack of data on the effect of common cement variables on important properties of premixed cements for endodontic applications. In this study, the effects of liquid-to-powder ratio, amount of radiopacifier and amount of calcium sulfate (added to control the setting time) were screened using a statistical model. In the second part of the study, the liquid-to-powder ratio was optimized for cements containing three different amounts of radiopacifier. Finally, the effect of using glycerol rather than water was evaluated in terms of radiopacity. The setting time was found to increase with the amount of radiopacifier when the liquid-to-powder ratio was fixed. This was likely due to the higher density of the radiopacifier in comparison to the calcium silicate, which gave a higher liquid-to-powder ratio in terms of volume. Using glycerol rather than water to mix the cements led to a decrease in radiopacity of the cement. In conclusion, we were able to produce premixed calcium silicate cements with acceptable properties for use in endodontic applications. PMID:23507729

Persson, Cecilia; Engqvist, Hakan

2011-01-01

295

Interferometric study of epoxy resin gelation  

SciTech Connect

The transition of epoxy resins from a mobile liquid to a rubbery gel is a complex process depending on chemical reaction kinetics and both heat and mass transfer. The purpose of this study is to determine the locus of initial gelation in an epoxy resin, and the course of gelatin through both neat resins and glass fiber/epxoy resin composites. This was accomplished by monitoring the local changes in refractive index in transparent epoxy castings using laser interferometry, supplemented by temperature profiles obtained from thermocouple arrays. These experiments were carried out on pure DGEBA epoxy (DOW DER-332) cured with a variety of primary amine, secondary amine, and anhydride curing agents.

Hirschbuehler, K.R.

1981-01-01

296

Characterization of PMR polyimide resin and prepreg  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Procedures for the chemical characterization of PMR-15 resin solutions and graphite-reinforced prepregs were developed, and a chemical data base was established. In addition, a basic understanding of PMR-15 resin chemistry was gained; this was translated into effective processing procedures for the production of high quality graphite composites. During the program the PMR monomers and selected model compounds representative of postulated PMR-15 solution chemistry were acquired and characterized. Based on these data, a baseline PMR-15 resin was formulated and evaluated for processing characteristics and composite properties. Commercially available PMR-15 resins were then obtained and chemically characterized. Composite panels were fabricated and evaluated.

Lindenmeyer, P. H.; Sheppard, C. H.

1984-01-01

297

Graphite composites with advanced resin matrices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effect of processing variables on the flammability and mechanical properties for state-of-the-art and advanced resin matrices for graphite composites were studied. Resin matrices which were evaluated included state-of-the-art epoxy, phenolic-novolac, phenolic-xylok, two types of bismaleimides, benzyl, polyethersulfone, and poly(p-phenylene sulfone). Comparable flammability and thermochemical data on graphite-reinforced laminates prepared with these resin matrices are presented, and the relationship of some of these properties to the anaerobic char yield of the resins is described.

Kourtides, D. A.

1980-01-01

298

Novolak resin analogs for resist applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Novolak resins, used to make typical g or i-line resists, are commonly made by condensing phenolic monomers with aldehydes. In the strictest definition of novolaks the aldehyde of choice is always formaldehyde. Under the acid catalyzed conditions generally used to make novolak the resins the carbocations formed by the protonation of the aldehydic carbonyl react with the phenolic reactant(s) to form the resins with elimination of water. Other aldehydes or low molecular weight ketones have been used on occasion to make useful analog for resist applications. Competing aldol condensations may interfere with isolation of pure polymeric resins especially in the case of ketones. Unique novolak resin analogs have been made by condensing `masked' bifunctional electrophiles with phenolic reactants under acidic conditions similar to standard novolak resin techniques. These resins were used as replacements for novolak resins and showed increased image contrast and thermal resistance. They were also used as photoactive compound backbones. Low molecular weight resins made with polyhydroxy aromatic phenolic monomers were especially useful as speed enhancing additives in thick film applications.

Wanat, Stan F.; Jensen, Kathryn H.; Lu, Ping-Hung; McKenzie, Douglas S.

1998-06-01

299

Sand control with resin and explosive  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method for treating a well having perforated casing to prevent solids movement through the perforations and into the wellbore. It comprises positioning a quantity of liquid resin solution such that the solution occupies the interval of the casing having perforations; positioning an explosive in proximity with the liquid resin solution; detonating the explosive; displacing the liquid resin solution remaining in the wellbore after step (c) through the perforations with a displacing fluid; and injecting a chemical solution through the perforations to cause the resin to polymerize to form a consolidated permeable matrix.

Dees, J.M.; Begnaud, W.J.; Sahr, N.L.

1992-09-08

300

Resin flow analysis with fiber preform deformation in through thickness direction during Compression Resin Transfer Molding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resin flow during Compression Resin Transfer Molding (CRTM) can be best described and analyzed in three phases. In the first phase, a gap is created by holding the upper mold platen parallel to the preform surface at a fixed distance from it. The desired amount of resin injected into the gap quickly flows primarily over the preform. The second phase

Justin Merotte; Pavel Simacek; Suresh G. Advani

2010-01-01

301

Failure load of acrylic resin denture teeth bonded to high impact acrylic resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

Statement of problem. Techniques for bonding denture teeth to an acrylic resin denture base remain empirical, with little consensus from the literature, among clinicians, or among dental laboratories. Purpose. This study evaluated the failure load of acrylic resin teeth bonded to 2 high impact acrylic resins. Methods and material. The ridge lap portion on 120 identical denture teeth were modified

Donna Barpal; Donald A. Curtis; Frederick Finzen; Jovin Perry; Stuart A. Gansky

1998-01-01

302

Coulomb frictional interfaces in modeling cemented total hip replacements: A more realistic model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Loosening of cemented femoral hip stems could be initiated by failure of the cement mantle due to high cement stresses. The goals of this study were to determine if realistic stem-cement interface characteristics could result in high cement stresses when compared to a bonded stem-cement interface and to determine if stem design parameters could be chosen to reduce peak cement

K. A. Mann; D. L. Bartel; T. M. Wright; A. H. Burstein

1995-01-01

303

Influence of cement layer thickness on the adhesive bond strength of polyalkenoate cements.  

PubMed

The fracture toughness and yield stress values of model zinc polycarboxylate and glass polyalkenoate cements have been used to calculate plastic zone sizes. The size of the plastic zone at the crack tip in these materials has been used to predict whether cement layer thickness is likely to influence the adhesive bond strength. In the model zinc polycarboxylate cement studied, the plastic zone size was comparable to the cement layer thickness and had a pronounced influence on the shear bond strengths obtained. In contrast, the plastic zone sizes obtained for the glass polyalkenoate cements were much smaller and the shear bond strengths were found to be much less dependent on cement layer thickness. PMID:1477262

Akinmade, A O; Hill, R G

1992-01-01

304

Phosphate-bonded calcium aluminate cements  

DOEpatents

A method is described for making a rapid-setting phosphate-bonded cementitious material. A powdered aluminous cement is mixed with an aqueous solution of ammonium phosphate. The mixture is allowed to set to form an amorphous cementitious material which also may be hydrothermally treated at a temperature of from about 120 C to about 300 C to form a crystal-containing phosphate-bonded material. Also described are the cementitious products of this method and the cement composition which includes aluminous cement and ammonium polyphosphate. 10 figures.

Sugama, T.

1993-09-21

305

Influence of Cement Particle-Size Distribution on Early Age Autogenous Strains and Stresses in Cement-Based Materials  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of cement particle-size distribution on autoge- nous strains and stresses in cement pastes of identical water- to-cement ratios is examined for cement powders of four different finenesses. Experimental measurements include chemical shrinkage, to quantify degree of hydration; internal relative humidity development; autogenous deformation; and eigenstress development, using a novel embedded spherical stress sensor. Because the latter three measurements

Dale P. Bentz; Ole Mejlhede Jensen; Kurt Kielsgaard Hansen; John F. Olesen; Henrik Stang; Claus-Jochen Haecker

2001-01-01

306

Effect of temperature on the hydration of the main clinker phases in portland cements: part ii, blended cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The hydration of three blended cements, i.e., Portland cement blended with GGBFS, PFA, and volcanic ash, based on two neat cements investigated previously, has been followed at five temperatures ranging from 10°C to 60°C. The cements were cured under water and tested at various time intervals over a period of one year. The hydration products were characterised by means of

J. I. Escalante-Garc??a; J. H. Sharp

1998-01-01

307

75 FR 67105 - Granular Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Polytetrafluoroethylene Resin From Italy and Japan AGENCY: United States International Trade...polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan...polytetrafluoroethylene resin from Italy and Japan would be likely to lead to...

2010-11-01

308

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721...Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

2012-07-01

309

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721...Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

2011-07-01

310

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721...Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

2013-07-01

311

40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380 Section 721...Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance...identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

2010-07-01

312

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510...Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles...

2012-04-01

313

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510...Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles...

2013-04-01

314

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510...Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles...

2011-04-01

315

21 CFR 177.2510 - Polyvinylidene fluoride resins.  

...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. 177.2510 Section 177.2510...Repeated Use § 177.2510 Polyvinylidene fluoride resins. Polyvinylidene fluoride resins may be safely used as articles...

2014-04-01

316

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...2013-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2013-04-01

317

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2010-04-01

318

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

...2014-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2014-04-01

319

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2012-04-01

320

21 CFR 872.3770 - Temporary crown and bridge resin.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 false Temporary crown and bridge resin. 872.3770 Section 872.3770...Devices § 872.3770 Temporary crown and bridge resin. (a) Identification. A temporary crown and bridge resin is a device composed of a...

2011-04-01

321

Cement mantle defects in total hip arthroplasty: influence of stem size and cementing technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cause of isolated osteolysis in the femoral shaft around stem implants in patients with cemented THR has so far not been\\u000a established. A number of factors have been considered such as torsional stability of the femoral stem implant, the time of\\u000a reduction intraoperatively after cementing and iatrogenic and load-induced defects in the cement mantle. The aim of this in

A. Katzer; A. Ince; M. Hahn; M. M. Morlock; W. Steens

2007-01-01

322

Imide modified epoxy matrix resins  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy (IME) resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are presented. State of the art epoxy resin, MY720, was used. Three aromatic bisimide amines and one aromatic aliphatic BIA were evaluated. BIA's derived from 6F anhydride (3,3 prime 4,4 prime-(hexafluoro isopropyl idene) bis (phthalic anhydride) and diamines, 3,3 prime-diam nodiphenyl sulfone (3,3 prime-DDS), 4,4 prime-diamino diphenyl sulfone (4,4 prime-DDS), 1.12-dodecane diamine (1,12-DDA) were used. BIA's were abbreviated 6F-3,3 prime-DDS, 6F-4,4 prime-DDS, 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime DDS, and 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA corresponding to 6F anhydride and diamines mentioned. Epoxy resin and BIA's (MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA and a 50:50 mixture of a BIA and parent diamine, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-4,4 prime-DDS/3,3 prime-DDS, MY720/6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA/3,3 prime-DDS were studied to determine effect of structure and composition. Effect of the addition of two commercial epoxies, glyamine 200 and glyamine 100 on the properties of several formulations was evaluated. Bisimide amine cured epoxies were designated IME's (imide modified epoxy). Physical, thermal and mechanical properties of these resins were determined. Moisture absorption in boiling water exhibited by several of the IME's was considerably lower than the state of the art epoxies (from 3.2% for the control and state of the art to 2.0 wt% moisture absorption). Char yields are increased from 20% for control and state of the art epoxies to 40% for IME resins. Relative toughness characteristics of IME resins were measured by 10 deg off axis tensile tests of Celion 6000/IME composites. Results show that IME's containing 6F-3,3 prime-DDS or 6F-3,3 prime-DDS-1,12-DDA improved the "toughness" characteristics of composites by about 35% (tensile strength), about 35% (intralaminar shear strength), and about 78% (shear strain to failure) relative to the control composite.

Scola, D. A.

1982-01-01

323

Polyimide Resins Resist Extreme Temperatures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Spacecraft and aerospace engines share a common threat: high temperature. The temperatures experienced during atmospheric reentry can reach over 2,000 F, and the temperatures in rocket engines can reach well over 5,000 F. To combat the high temperatures in aerospace applications, Dr. Ruth Pater of Langley Research Center developed RP-46, a polyimide resin capable of withstanding the most brutal temperatures. The composite material can push the service temperature to the limits of organic materials. Designed as an environmentally friendly alternative to other high-temperature resins, the RP-46 polyimide resin system was awarded a 1992 "R&D 100" award, named a "2001 NASA Technology of the Year," and later, due to its success as a spinoff technology, "2004 NASA Commercial Invention of the Year." The technology s commercial success also led to its winning the Langley s "Paul F. Holloway Technology Transfer Award" as well as "Richard T. Whitcom Aerospace Technology Transfer Award" both for 2004. RP-46 is relatively inexpensive and it can be readily processed for use as an adhesive, composite, resin molding, coating, foam, or film. Its composite materials can be used in temperatures ranging from minus 150 F to 2,300 F. No other organic materials are known to be capable of such wide range and extreme high-temperature applications. In addition to answering the call for environmentally conscious high-temperature materials, RP-46 provides a slew of additional advantages: It is extremely lightweight (less than half the weight of aluminum), chemical and moisture resistant, strong, and flexible. Pater also developed a similar technology, RP-50, using many of the same methods she used with RP-46, and very similar in composition to RP-46 in terms of its thermal capacity and chemical construction, but it has different applications, as this material is a coating as opposed to a buildable composite. A NASA license for use of this material outside of the Space Agency as well as additional government-funded testing proved that RP-46 is even more exceptional than originally thought.

2009-01-01

324

21 CFR 888.3790 - Wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. 888.3790 Section 888...joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint metal constrained cemented prosthesis is a device intended...

2010-04-01

325

A modified technique for extraoral cementation of implant retained restorations for preventing excess cement around the margins  

PubMed Central

The major drawback of cement-retained restorations is the extrusion of the excess cement into the peri-implant sulcus, with subsequent complications. Insufficient removal of the excess cement may initiate a local inflammatory process, which may lead to implant failure. This article presents a method of controlling cement flow on implant abutments, minimizing the excess cement around implant-retained restorations. PMID:24843401

2014-01-01

326

Effects of pre-cooling and pre-heating procedures on cement polymerization and thermal osteonecrosis in cemented hip replacements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Numerical studies were performed to investigate bone cement polymerization, temperature history and thermal osteonecrosis in cemented hip replacements with finite element methods. In this paper, the effects of pre-cooling and pre-heating of the prosthesis and\\/or the cement prior to implantation were simulated. It was found that the cement polymerization initiated near the bone–cement interface and progressed toward the prosthesis when

Chaodi Li; Steven Schmid; James Mason

2003-01-01

327

Supply chain management in the cement industry  

E-print Network

Traditionally supply chain management has played an operational role within cement and mineral extraction commodity companies. Recently, cost reduction projects have brought supply chain management into the limelight. In ...

Agudelo, Isabel

2009-01-01

328

PCC (Portland Cement Concrete) Mix Design.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Properties of portland cement concrete (PCC) mixes, including workability, strength, durability, and abrasion resistance, are discussed along with the specific mix factors that affect each property. The mix design process is then discussed and the effect ...

D. Janssen

1989-01-01

329

Well cement fluid loss additive and method  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of cementing a casing in a wellbore. It comprises pumping a cement slurry into the annulus between the casing and the wellbore, the cement slurry containing from 0.2 to 2.0 percent by weight, based on the weight of cement solids in the slurry, of an additive consisting essentially of from 30 to 80 percent by weight of partially hydrolyzed high molecular weight vinyl acetate polymer, calcium sulfate in an amount equivalent to from 10 to 60 percent by weight of calcium sulfate hemihydrate, up to 5 percent by weight of a cross-linking compound for the polyvinyl acetate, and from 0 to 5 percent by weight of defoamer.

Moran, L.K.; Murray, T.R.

1991-04-23

330

A nanochemomechanical investigation of carbonated cement paste  

E-print Network

Concrete, and in particular its principal component, cement paste, has an interesting relation with carbon dioxide. Concrete is a carbon dioxide generator-- it is estimated that 5-10% of atmospheric CO? comes from this ...

Vanzo, James (James F.)

2009-01-01

331

21 CFR 177.1500 - Nylon resins.  

...ibr_locations.html. (ii) The viscosity number (VN) for Nylon 6/69 and Nylon PA-6-3-T resins in a 99 percent cresol solution (5 milligrams resin per milliliter) shall be determined at 25 °C (77 °F) by method ISO...

2014-04-01

332

Ethynyl-Containing Aromatic Polyamide Resins.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In accordance with the present invention there is provided a novel aromatic polyamide resin having repeating units, each containing at least one o-ethynyl amido subunits. The resins of this invention which contain the above subunit can be thermally treate...

R. C. Evers

1985-01-01

333

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01

334

Fluorinated diamond bonded in fluorocarbon resin  

SciTech Connect

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1982-08-10

335

Gold recovery with ion exchange used resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper one strong acidic, one strong basic and one weak basic ion-exchange resins, considered as exhausted in an industrial demineralizing plant, are screened for gold recovery from cyanide solutions. Based on the observed ability for the recovery and on the ease of regeneration, the weak base anion exchanger Purolite A-100 is selected. This spent resin is stable until

Carmen P. Gomes; Manuel F. Almeida; José M. Loureiro

2001-01-01

336

Novel process of isolating novolac resin fractions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Typical phenol/formaldehyde resin syntheses generate a broad distribution of molecular weight fragments with a wide polydispersity. A process was developed to isolate novolak resin fractions of narrow polydispersity from phenol- formaldehyde condensation products in ethyl lactate without any high temperature distillation. The characterization and the performance of these fractions in i-line photoresist composition are discussed.

Rahman, M. D.; Lu, Ping-Hung; Cook, Michelle M.

1997-07-01

337

Simulation of silica fume blended cement hydration  

Microsoft Academic Search

A model is proposed in this paper to simulate silica fume (SF) blended cement hydration based on the kinetics, stoichiometry\\u000a and physical chemistry of cement hydration and pozzolanic reaction. The pozzolanic reaction degree, volume fraction of hydration\\u000a products, capillary porosity and gel porosity can be obtained from model simulation. By using proper amount of silica fume\\u000a replacement, the microstructure of

J. Yajun; J. H. Cahyadi

2004-01-01

338

Resin/graphite fiber composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Techniques were developed that provided thermo-oxidatively stable A-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites using the approach of in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on reinforcing fibers, rather than employing separately prepared prepolymer varnish. This was accomplished by simply mixing methylene dianiline and two ester-acids and applying this solution to the fibers for subsequent molding. Five different formulated molecular weight resins were examined, and an optimized die molding procedure established for the 1500 formulated molecular weight system. Extensive ultrasonic inspection of composites was successfully utilized as a technique for monitoring laminate quality. Composite mechanical property studies were conducted with this polyimide resin at room temperature and after various time exposures in a thermo-oxidative environment at 561 K (550 F), 589 K (600 F) and 617 K (650 F). It was determined that such composites have a long term life in the temperature range of 561 K to 589 K. The final phase involved the fabrication and evaluation of a series of demonstration airfoil specimens.

Cavano, P. J.

1974-01-01

339

Case Study of the California Cement Industry  

SciTech Connect

California is the largest cement producing state in theU.S., accounting for between 10 percent and 15 percent of U.S. cementproduction and cement industry employment. The cement industry inCalifornia consists of 31 sites that consume large amounts of energy,annually: 1,600 GWh of electricity, 22 million therms of natural gas, 2.3million tons of coal, 0.25 tons of coke, and smaller amounts of wastematerials, including tires. The case study summarized in this paperfocused on providing background information, an assessment ofenergy-efficiency opportunities and barriers, and program recommendationsthat can be used by program planners to better target products to thecement industry. The primary approach to this case study involvedwalk-through surveys of customer facilities and in depth interviews withcustomer decision makers and subsequent analysis of collected data. Inaddition, a basic review of the cement production process was developed,and summary cement industry energy and economic data were collected, andanalyzed. The analysis of secondary data provides background informationon the cement industry and identification of potential energy-efficiencyopportunities. The interviews provide some understanding of the customerperspective about implementation of energy-efficiencyprojects.

Coito, Fred; Powell, Frank; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn; Friedmann, Rafael

2005-05-01

340

Release and toxicity of dental resin composite  

PubMed Central

Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

2012-01-01

341

An Octacalcium Phosphate Forming Cement  

PubMed Central

The osteoconductive and possibly osteoinductive characteristics of OCP increased the interest in preparation of bone graft materials that contain OCP in its composition. Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were prepared using a mixture of ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP) and dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA), with ?-TCP / DCPA molar ratio of 1/1 and distilled water or 0.5 mol / L phosphate aqueous solution (pH = 6.1 ± 0.1) as the cement liquid. Hardening time was (30 ± 1) min for the CPC mixed with water and (5 ± 1) min for the CPC mixed with phosphate solution. Diametral tensile strength (DTS), porosity (P), and phase composition (powder x-ray diffraction) were determined after the hardened specimens had been immersed in a physiological-like solution (PLS) for 1 d, 3 d, and 7 d. In CPC specimens prepared with water, calcium hydroxyapatite (HA) was formed and DTS and P were (9.03 ± 0.48) MPa and (37.05 ± 0.20) vol % after 1 d, respectively, and (9.15 ± 0.45) MPa and (37.24 ± 0.63) vol % after 3 d, respectively. In CPC specimens prepared with phosphate solution OCP and HA were formed and DTS and P were (4.38 ± 0.49) MPa and (41.44 ± 1.25) vol % after 1 d, respectively,(4.38 ± 0.29) MPa and (42.52 ± 2.15) vol % after 3 d, respectively, and (4.30 ± 0.60) MPa and (41.38 ± 1.65) vol % after 7 d, respectively. For each group DTS and P did not change with PLS immersion time. DTS was significantly higher and P was significantly lower for CPCs prepared with water. HA formation slightly increased with immersion time from 40 mass % after 1 d to 50 mass % after 3 d in CPCs prepared with water. OCP + HA formation increased with immersion time from 30 mass % after 1 d to 35 mass % after 3 d and to 45 mass % after 7 d in CPCs prepared with 0.5 mol / L phosphate solution. PMID:20976025

Markovic, M.; Chow, L. C.

2010-01-01

342

Setting Reaction of Polyacid Modified Composite Resins or Compomers  

PubMed Central

The hardening of modified polyacid composite resins (compomers) and glass-ionomers have been studied using infrared spectroscopy. The acid-base reaction in Ketac-fil, a glass ionomer, was followed by the ratio between the COOH band located around 1715 cm-1 and that corresponding to COO- located around 1570 cm-1. The combination of infrared analysis and band narrowing treatments enable us to propose in the glass-ionomer two maturation steps. First, a very rapid equilibrium acid-base related, and second the cross-linking of polycarboxylate with the metal ions present in the cement. In compomers, a new reaction has been described involving polymerization induced by free radicals besides the two steps associated with the acid-base reaction. Using infrared spectroscopy and band narrowing techniques, it is shown that water is essential to complete the hardening process but no acid-base reaction is produced since the COO- band does not appear. The reaction associated with free radicals could be described as a polymerization of methacrylate monomers together with an aqueous dilution of the filling particles releasing different metal cations that would chelate with the polymer molecules to form a macromolecular structure. PMID:19834564

Arrondo, J.L.R; Collado, M.I; I, Soler; Triana, R; Ellacuria, J

2009-01-01

343

Setting reaction of polyacid modified composite resins or compomers.  

PubMed

The hardening of modified polyacid composite resins (compomers) and glass-ionomers have been studied using infrared spectroscopy. The acid-base reaction in Ketac-fil, a glass ionomer, was followed by the ratio between the COOH band located around 1715 cm?¹ and that corresponding to COO? located around 1570 cm?¹. The combination of infrared analysis and band narrowing treatments enable us to propose in the glass-ionomer two maturation steps. First, a very rapid equilibrium acid-base related, and second the cross-linking of polycarboxylate with the metal ions present in the cement. In compomers, a new reaction has been described involving polymerization induced by free radicals besides the two steps associated with the acid-base reaction. Using infrared spectroscopy and band narrowing techniques, it is shown that water is essential to complete the hardening process but no acid-base reaction is produced since the COO? band does not appear. The reaction associated with free radicals could be described as a polymerization of methacrylate monomers together with an aqueous dilution of the filling particles releasing different metal cations that would chelate with the polymer molecules to form a macromolecular structure. PMID:19834564

Arrondo, J L R; Collado, M I; I, Soler; Triana, R; Ellacuria, J

2009-01-01

344

Hydration and properties of novel blended cements based on cement kiln dust and blast furnace slag  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of the present paper is to address the key technical issues pertaining to the utilization of cement kiln dust (CKD) as an activator for ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) to create nonconventional cementitious binders for concrete. The relatively high alkaline content of CKD is the predominant factor preventing its recycling in cement manufacture. However, it was observed

Maria S. Konsta-Gdoutos; Surendra P. Shah

2003-01-01

345

EVALUATION OF HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION IN CEMENT KILNS AT SAN JUAN CEMENT COMPANY  

EPA Science Inventory

Cement kiln incineration of chlorinated liquid organic wastes was investigated in a 5-month demonstration program at San Juan Cement Company in Puerto Rico. Chlorinated monocarbon compounds (POHC's) were monitored in the waste and emissions, and the fate of added chlorine in ceme...

346

Reactions in glass ionomer cements: V. Effect of incorporating tartaric acid in the cement liquid.  

PubMed

A description is give of the effect on the ASPA cement reaction of tartaric acid incorporated in the cement liquid. Tartaric acid acts as an accelerator that aids in the extraction of ions from the aluminosilicate glass and facilitates their binding to the polyanion chains. Postgelation hardening is significantly increased. Working time is unaffected possibly because cations are initially present as complexes. PMID:187629

Crisp, S; Wilson, A D

1976-01-01

347

Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: impact of water type and resin use.  

PubMed

Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study of consecutive resin uses showed that the NOM in the hydrophobic water had high affinity for the resin shown by DOC removal of 65% after the first use of the resin. This dropped to 25% DOC removal after 15 consecutive resin uses. For the more hydrophilic waters, NOM removal remained consistent after each resin use. The hydrophobic sample contained higher MW NOM that was capable of blocking resin sites that prevented continual adsorption of organics on to the resin. The hydrophilic NOM containing a large proportion of hydrophilic acids was consistently removed to around 60%. The water containing algogenic-derived NOM was poorly removed by magnetic resin. Subsequent coagulation showed higher removal with increasing hydrophobicity. PMID:18155745

Mergen, Max R D; Jefferson, Bruce; Parsons, Simon A; Jarvis, Peter

2008-04-01

348

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30

349

Resin/graphite fiber composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Processing techniques were developed for the fabrication of both polyphenylquinoxaline and polyimide composites by the in situ polymerization of monomeric reactants directly on the graphite reinforcing fibers, rather than using previously prepared prepolymer varnishes. Void-free polyphenylquinoxaline composites were fabricated and evaluated for room and elevated flexure and shear properties. The technology of the polyimide system was advanced to the point where the material is ready for commercial exploitation. A reproducible processing cycle free of operator judgment factors was developed for fabrication of void-free composites exhibiting excellent mechanical properties and a long time isothermal life in the range of 288 C to 316 C. The effects of monomer reactant stoichiometry and process modification on resin flow were investigated. Demonstration of the utility and quality of this polyimide system was provided through the successful fabrication and evaluation of four complex high tip speed fan blades.

Cavano, P. J.

1974-01-01

350

Tc-99 Ion Exchange Resin Testing  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted by CHPRC to evaluate the release of 99Tc from spent resin used to treat water from well 299-W15-765 and stored for several years. The key questions to be answered are: 1) does 99Tc readily release from the spent ion exchange resin after being in storage for several years; 2) if hot water stripping is used to remove the co-contaminant carbon tetrachloride, will 99Tc that has been sequestered by the resin be released; and 3) can spent resin be encapsulated into a cementitious waste form; if so, how much 99Tc would be released from the weathering of the monolith waste form? The results from the long term stability leach test results confirm that the resin is not releasing a significant amount of the sequestered 99Tc, evident by the less than 0.02% of the total 99Tc loaded being identified in the solution. Furthermore, it is possible that the measured 99Tc concentration is the result of 99Tc contained in the pore spaces of the resin. In addition to these results, analyses conducted to examine the impact of hot water on the release of 99Tc suggest that only a small percentage of the total is being released. This suggest that hot water stripping to remove carbon tetrachloride will not have a significant affect on the resin’s ability to hold-on to sequestered 99Tc. Finally, encapsulation of spent resin in a cementitious material may be a viable disposal option, but additional tests are needed to examine the extent of physical degradation caused by moisture loss and the effect this degradation process can have on the release of 99Tc.

Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.; Pierce, Eric M.

2010-08-01

351

Removing Aquatic Organic Substances by Anion Exchange Resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

The focus of this study was verification of the mechanisms of removal of aquatic organic substances by anion exchange resins, influence of resin properties and clarification processes on removal, and Chromatographie behavior of organic substances in anion exchange columns. Depending on the type of resin and the nature of the organic matter, anion exchange resins removed up to 80 percent

Paul L. K. Fu; James M. Symons

1990-01-01

352

Microleakage at the resin-alloy interface of chemically retained composite resins for cast restorations.  

PubMed

New retentive mechanisms between veneering resins and casting alloys are claimed to have a chemical bond that results in a high bond strength combined with low microleakage between the veneering resin and cast restoration. This study compared the microleakage of four chemical bonding mechanisms when three veneering resins were bonded to two dental casting alloys. Resin-veneered alloy disks were immersed in red India ink and kept at 37 degrees C for 72 hours. The disks were then bench dried for 24 hours. The resin veneer was sectioned into eight sectors in an engineering milling machine and these resin sectors were removed to display the microleakage pattern. It was concluded that (1) no microleakage was found in two combinations, and (2) the highest microleakage was with Sr-Isosit-N/Panavia EX/Firmilay combinations. PMID:1712849

Strygler, H; Nicholls, J I; Townsend, J D

1991-06-01

353

New technology improves cement-slurry design  

SciTech Connect

A promising geothermal concession is located in a tea plantation on the island of Java. A drilling project was undertaken to evaluate and harness this resource for geothermal electricity generation. The program used two slimhole rigs to drill appraisal wells to establish the potential of the field. Geothermal wells present the most severe conditions to which cements are exposed. As a result, their performance requirements are among the most stringent. Geothermal cements are usually designed to provide at least 1,000 psi compressive strength and no more than 1.0-md water permeability. While casings with tight annular clearances require that good cementing practices be observed, they also create conditions that demand much greater care and control in slurry and procedure design than regular casing cementation. Free-water and thickening-time requirements are similar for geothermal and slimhole conditions, but the use of perlite and silica flour complicate the rheology required for geothermal wells. The paper describes liquid-cement premix, applications, laboratory testing, field pilot testing, and field operations.

NONE

1997-08-01

354

Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

Merati, A. A.

2014-04-01

355

Corrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone  

E-print Network

A composite cement is a hydraulic cement composed of Portland cement and one or more inorganic materials products have any effects on the cement durability and phases formed in cement. Current work has involvedCorrosion of Aluminium in Composite Cements Anthony Setiadi* and Neil B. Milestone Immobilisation

Sheffield, University of

356

4META Opaque Resin — A New Resin Strongly Adhesive to Nickel-Chromium Alloy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opaque resins lacking adhesion and mechanical retention devices are required in positioning crowns; the average bond strength in such cases is 60-70 kg\\/cm2. An adhesive opaque resin containing 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride was prepared for use with acrylic veneer crowns, and its bond strength and durability of adhesion with an alloy were studied. Its bonding strength between cured resin and dental

T. Tanaka; K. Nagata; M. Takeyama; M. Atsuta; N. Nakabayashi; E. Masuhara

1981-01-01

357

New modified hydrocarbon resins; An alternative to styrenated terpene resins in hot melts  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on the development of two hydrocarbon-based resin formulations that could be used with different thermoplastic block copolymers to formulate pressure-sensitive adhesives. Results are examined with one of these resins in formulations with styrene-isoprene-styrene (SIS) and styrene-butadiene (SB) compounds. The new modified hydrocarbon resin, with a softening point of 98° C, matches the adhesive performance of a terpene

Carper

1990-01-01

358

Hydraulic Permeability of Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Resin  

SciTech Connect

An ion exchange process using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin is the baseline process for removing cesium from the dissolved salt solution in the high-level waste tanks at the Hanford Site, using large scale columns as part of the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP). The RF resin is also being evaluated for use in the proposed small column ion exchange (SCIX) system, which is an alternative treatment option at Hanford and at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A recirculating test loop with a small ion exchange column was used to measure the effect of oxygen uptake and radiation exposure on the permeability of a packed bed of the RF resin. The lab-scale column was designed to be prototypic of the proposed Hanford columns at the WTP. Although the test equipment was designed to model the Hanford ion exchange columns, the data on changes in the hydraulic permeability of the resin will also be valuable for determining potential pressure drops through the proposed SCIX system. The superficial fluid velocity in the lab-scale test (3.4-5.7 cm/s) was much higher than is planned for the full-scale Hanford columns to generate the maximum pressure drop expected in those columns (9.7 psig). The frictional drag from this high velocity produced forces on the resin in the lab-scale tests that matched the design basis of the full-scale Hanford column. Any changes in the resin caused by the radiation exposure and oxygen uptake were monitored by measuring the pressure drop through the lab-scale column and the physical properties of the resin. Three hydraulic test runs were completed, the first using fresh RF resin at 25 C, the second using irradiated resin at 25 C, and the third using irradiated resin at 45 C. A Hanford AP-101 simulant solution was recirculated through a test column containing 500 mL of Na-form RF resin. Known amounts of oxygen were introduced into the primary recirculation loop by saturating measured volumes of the simulant solution with oxygen and reintroducing the oxygenated simulant into the feed tank. The dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of the recirculating simulant was monitored, and the amount of oxygen that reacted with the resin was determined from the change in the DO concentration of the recirculating simulant solution. Prior to hydraulic testing the resin for runs 2 and 3 was covered with the simulant solution and irradiated in a spent fuel element at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Both batches of resin were irradiated to a total gamma dose of 177 Mrad, but the resin for run 2 reached a maximum temperature during irradiation of 51 C, while the resin for run 3 reached a temperature of 38 C. The different temperatures were the result of the operating status of HFIR at the time of the irradiation and were not part of the test plan; however, the results clearly show the impact of the higher-temperature exposure during irradiation. The flow rate and pressure drop data from the test loop runs show that irradiating the RF resin reduces both the void fraction and the permeability of the resin bed. The mechanism for the reduction in permeability is not clear because irradiation increases the particle size of the resin beads and makes them deform less under pressure. Microscopic examination of the resin beads shows that they are all smooth regular spheres and that irradiation or oxygen uptake did not change the shape of the beads. The resin reacts rapidly with DO in the simulant solution, and the reaction with oxygen reduces the permeability of a bed of new resin by about 10% but has less impact on the permeability of irradiated resin. Irradiation increases the toughness of the resin beads, probably by initiating cross-linking reactions in them. Oxygen uptake reduces the crush strength of both new and irradiated resin; however, the pressures that caused the beads to crush are much higher than would be expected during the operation of an ion exchange column. There was no visible evidence of broken beads in any of the resin samples taken from the test loop. Reaction with oxygen red

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

2010-01-01

359

Comparative study on stress distribution around internal tapered connection implants according to fit of cement- and screw-retained prostheses  

PubMed Central

PURPOSE The aim of this study was to compare the passivity of implant superstructures by assessing the strain development around the internal tapered connection implants with strain gauges. MATERIALS AND METHODS A polyurethane resin block in which two implants were embedded served as a measurement model. Two groups of implant restorations utilized cement-retained design and internal surface of the first group was adjusted until premature contact between the restoration and the abutment completely disappeared. In the second group, only nodules detectable to the naked eye were removed. The third group employed screw-retained design and specimens were generated by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing system (n=10). Four strain gauges were fixed on the measurement model mesially and distally to the implants. The strains developed in each strain gauge were recorded during fixation of specimens. To compare the difference among groups, repeated measures 2-factor analysis was performed at a level of significance of ?=.05. RESULTS The absolute strain values were measured to analyze the magnitude of strain. The mean absolute strain value ranged from 29.53 to 412.94 µm/m at the different strain gauge locations. According to the result of overall comparison, the cement-retained prosthesis groups exhibited significant difference. No significant difference was detected between milled screw-retained prostheses group and cement-retained prosthesis groups. CONCLUSION Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that the cement-retained designs do not always exhibit lower levels of stress than screw-retained designs. The internal adjustment of a cement-retained implant restoration is essential to achieve passive fit. PMID:24049573

Lee, Mi-Young; Heo, Seong-Joo; Park, Eun-Jin

2013-01-01

360

Curing kinetics of phenol formaldehyde resin and wood-resin interactions in the presence of wood substrates  

Microsoft Academic Search

The curing kinetics of resol PF resin and resin–wood interactions in the presence of wood substrates have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The activation energy of cure of PF resin generally increases when PF resin is mixed with wood, mainly due to the decrease of the pH values resulting from the presence

Guangbo He; Bernard Riedl

2004-01-01

361

Identification of Concrete Incompatibilities Using Cement Paste Rheology  

E-print Network

as well as heat evolution abnormalities. The objectives of the present study were to examine the applicability of the dynamic shear rheometer (DSR) to measure cement paste rheology, and to identify cement and mineral/chemical admixture incompatibilities...

Jang, Se Hoon

2010-07-14

362

Morphology of the osteonal cement line in human bone  

SciTech Connect

While current consensus suggests the absence of collagen in osteonal cement lines, the extent of cement line mineralization and the nature of the ground substance within the cement line are unclear. Samples of human radius were examined by using scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, and histochemical techniques. X-ray intensities were used to compare the amount of calcium, phosphorus, and sulfur in cement lines with amounts in surrounding lamellar bone. The results indicate that cement lines contain significantly less calcium and phosphorus, but significantly more sulfur, than surrounding bone matrix. The Ca/P ratio of cement lines was significantly greater than that of lamellar bone, suggesting that the mineral in cement lines may not be in the form of mature hydroxyapatite. No selective staining of the cement lines could be demonstrated by using periodic acid-Schiff, Sudan black B, or alcian blue critical electrolyte concentration techniques.

Schaffler, M.B.; Burr, D.B.; Frederickson, R.G.

1987-03-01

363

Cementation of Colloidal Particles on Electrodes in a Galvanic Microreactor  

E-print Network

processing, galvanic corrosion, cementation, reaction products INTRODUCTION Colloidal crystals have the galvanic corrosion of copper microelectrodes embedded in a gold substrate and immersed in an acidicCementation of Colloidal Particles on Electrodes in a Galvanic Microreactor Linda Jan, Christian

Aksay, Ilhan A.

364

Microemulsions for use as spaces in well cementation  

SciTech Connect

New application of microemulsions as buffers between the slurry and the cement in the cementation of oil wells. The microemulsions contain an amphoteric surfactant selected from the group of alkyl dimethyl betaines.

Carriay, J.; De Lautrec, J.

1980-09-23

365

Cementation of intermediate gas sands in Central Luconia Province  

SciTech Connect

This paper is a 'case study' of the techniques developed by Sarawak Shell Berhad (SSB) to successfully overcome problems encountered in primary cementing of shallow gas bearing intervals. During a recent gas development project, successful isolation from surface of three separate intermediate gas sands above the main reservoir was achieved by improved cement displacement efficiency and by improved pressure control of the gas sands during cement gellation. This was possible by drilling a smaller hole, minimising hole washouts, using fast setting cement, displacing the cement as fast as possible, reducing the length of cement columns by use of dual stage equipment and by applying backpressure above the cement columns immediately after displacement. The approach used can in principle be applied for the design of any cementation. The specific techniques developed will be applied in future gas developments to be undertaken by SSB, and may find applications with other operators facing similar problems.

Ratcliffe, S.H.

1984-02-01

366

Effect of aluminium phosphate as admixture on oxychloride cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of admixing of aluminium phosphate on oxychloride cement in the matrix has been investigated. It is shown that\\u000a aluminium phosphate retards the setting process of the cement and improves water-tightness.

M. P. S. Chandrawat; R. N. Yadav

2000-01-01

367

Influence of the activator in an acrylic bone cement on an array of cement properties.  

PubMed

In all but one of the acrylic bone cement brands used in cemented arthroplasties, N,N-dimethyl-4-toluidine (DMPT) serves as the activator of the polymerization reaction. However, many concerns have been raised about this activator, all related to its toxicity. Thus, various workers have assessed a number of alternative activators, with two examples being N,N-dimethylamino-4-benzyl laurate (DMAL) and N,N-dimethylamino-4-benzyl oleate (DMAO). The results of limited characterization of cements that contain DMAL or DMAO have been reported in the literature. The present work is a comprehensive comparison of cements that contain one of these three activators, in which the values of a large array of their properties were determined. These properties range from the setting time and maximum exotherm temperature of the curing cement to the variation of the loss elastic modulus of the cured cement with frequency of the applied indenting force in dynamic nanoindentation tests. The present results, taken in conjunction with those presented in previous reports by the present authors and co-workers on other properties of these cements, indicate that both DMAL and DMPT are suitable alternatives to DMPT. PMID:17133450

Lewis, Gladius; Xu, Jie; Deb, Sanjukta; Lasa, Blanca Vázquez; Román, Julio San

2007-06-01

368

Evaluation of ultrafiltration membranes in the purification of guayule resin  

E-print Network

. Extensive research on the utilization of guayule resin is being conducted (5) resulting in a need to fractionate certain constituents of the resin to suit specific purposes. Research on the composition of the resin is still going on and about, 44 wtFs of...' the resin remains uncharacterized. The characterized portion consists of glycolipids, phosphatidic acids, flavonoids (6), flavonoid glyco- sides, solubilized lignins and polyacetylenes (7). Analyses have also indicated tliat the resin composition changes...

Jeyaseelan, Ranjit S.

2012-06-07

369

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-07-29

370

Method for regenerating magnetic polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin  

DOEpatents

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately.

Kochen, Robert L. (Boulder, CO); Navratil, James D. (Simi Valley, CA)

1997-07-29

371

Removal of Trace Contaminants from Water Using New Chelating Resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

The modification of cross?linked polyacrylamide (CPAAm) and incorporation of methyl thiourea (MeTU) or phenyl thiourea (PhTU) group were utilized in the preparation of two new chelating resins CPAAm?EDA?MeTU (resin I) and CPAAM?EDA?PhTU (resin II), [EDA=ethylenediamine]. The prepared resins were characterized by elemental analysis and IR spectroscopy. The sorption behaviors of Cd(II), Pb(II), and Zn(II) ions on the prepared resins were

Mohammed A. Sharaf; Said A. Sayed; Ahmed A. Younis; A. B. Farag; Hassan A. Arida

2007-01-01

372

Nano/microstructured ion exchange resins and their applications.  

PubMed

Ion exchange resins, due to their specific nano/microstructures and applications, have attracted great attention in the past decades. This paper reviews the recent advances and applications of nano/microstructured ion exchange resins, with an introduction to the preparation and property of different ion exchange resins. The applications of different ion exchange resins in catalysts, medicine, metallurgical regeneration, metals, and chemicals removal are summarized and discussed. The perspectives for the future developments of ion exchange resins are also proposed. PMID:24749456

Yu, Bing; Cong, Hailin; Yuan, Hua; Liu, Xuesong; Jiao, Mingming; Wang, Dong

2014-02-01

373

21 CFR 177.1580 - Polycarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...transporting, or holding food, in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) Polycarbonate resins are polyesters produced by: (1) The condensation of 4,4?-iso-propylidenediphenol and carbonyl chloride to which may have...

2011-04-01

374

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...regulations/ibr_locations.html. (ii) A minimum weight-average molecular weight of 27,000, as determined by gel permeation chromatography using polystyrene standards. (2) Extractives limitations. The polyestercarbonate resins to be...

2013-04-01

375

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...regulations/ibr_locations.html. (ii) A minimum weight-average molecular weight of 27,000, as determined by gel permeation chromatography using polystyrene standards. (2) Extractives limitations. The polyestercarbonate resins to be...

2010-04-01

376

21 CFR 177.1585 - Polyestercarbonate resins.  

...regulations/ibr_locations.html. (ii) A minimum weight-average molecular weight of 27,000, as determined by gel permeation chromatography using polystyrene standards. (2) Extractives limitations. The polyestercarbonate resins to be...

2014-04-01

377

Silicone modified resins for graphite fiber laminates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The development of silicon modified resins for graphite fiber laminates which will prevent the dispersal of graphite fibers when the composites are burned is discussed. Eighty-five silicone modified resins were synthesized and evaluated including unsaturated polyesters, thermosetting methacrylates, epoxies, polyimides, and phenolics. Neat resins were judged in terms of Si content, homogeneity, hardness, Char formation, and thermal stability. Char formation was estimated by thermogravimetry to 1,000 C in air and in N2. Thermal stability was evaluated by isothermal weight loss measurements for 200 hrs in air at three temperatures. Four silicone modified epoxies were selected for evaluation in unidirectional filament wound graphite laminates. Neat samples of these resins had 1,000 C char residues of 25 to 50%. The highest flexural values measured for the laminates were a strength of 140 kpsi and a modulus of 10 Mpsi. The highest interlaminar shear strength was 5.3 kpsi.

Frost, L. W.; Bower, G. M.

1979-01-01

378

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...that the finished resins have a minimum weight average molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic...

2010-04-01

379

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...that the finished resins have a minimum weight average molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic...

2012-04-01

380

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

...that the finished resins have a minimum weight average molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic...

2014-04-01

381

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...that the finished resins have a minimum weight average molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic...

2013-04-01

382

21 CFR 177.1556 - Polyaryletherketone resins.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...that the finished resins have a minimum weight average molecular weight of 20,000 grams per mole, as determined by light scattering measurements in sulfuric acid at room temperature. (b) Optional adjuvant substances. The basic...

2011-04-01

383

21 CFR 177.1680 - Polyurethane resins.  

...3-Tetramethylbutyl) - phenyl]-omega- hydroxypoly(oxyethylene) (5 moles), average molecular weight 425. Trimethylol propane. (b) Optional adjuvant substances employed in the production of the polyurethane resins or added thereto to impart...

2014-04-01

384

Extension and replacement of aspalt cement with sulphur  

E-print Network

2 Asphalt Cement Selection 3 Physical Properties of Asphalt Cements 4 Roughness (Surface Texture) of Aggregate . 5 Physical Properties of Aggregates 6 Selected Asphalt, Binder and Sulphur Contents for Screening Tests 7 Sulphur and Asphalt... 2 Asphalt Cement Selection 3 Physical Properties of Asphalt Cements 4 Roughness (Surface Texture) of Aggregate . 5 Physical Properties of Aggregates 6 Selected Asphalt, Binder and Sulphur Contents for Screening Tests 7 Sulphur and Asphalt...

Pickett, Daniel Ernest

2012-06-07

385

Radiation testing of organic ion exchange resins  

SciTech Connect

A number of ion exchange materials are being evaluated as part of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) Pretreatment Project for the removal of {sup 137}Cs from aqueous tank wastes. Two of these materials are organic resins; a phenol-formaldehyde resin (Duolite CS-100) produced by Rohm and Haas Co. (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) and a resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) resin produced by Boulder Scientific Co. (Mead, Colorado). One of the key parameters in the assessment of the organic based ion exchange materials is its useful lifetime in the radioactive and chemical environment that will be encountered during waste processing. The focus of the work presented in this report is the radiation stability of the CS-100 and the RF resins. The scope of the testing included one test with a sample of the CS-100 resin and testing of two batches of the RF resin (BSC-187 and BSC-210). Samples of the exchangers were irradiated with a {sup 60}Co source to a total absorbed dose of 10{sup 9} R over a period of 5 months in a static (no flow) and a flowing configuration with neutralized current acid waste (NCAW) simulant as a feed. Based on a maximum concentration of {sup 137}Cs on the resin that would result from processing NCAW, this dose represents an operational period of at least 150 days for the RF resin and at least 1260 days for the CS-100 resin. Gas generation in the static experiment was continuously monitored and G values (molecules of gas per 100 eV) were determined for each species. Resin samples were obtained periodically and the equilibrium behavior of the resins was assessed by determining the distribution coefficients (K{sub d}s). Structural information was also obtained by {sup 13}C cross polarization magic angle (CPMAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy so that changes to the chemical structure could be correlated with changes in K{sub d}.

Carlson, C.D.; Bray, L.A.; Bryan, S.A. [and others

1995-09-01

386

Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin  

DOEpatents

A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio. 2 figs.

Bibler, J.P.; Wallace, R.M.

1995-08-15

387

Cesium-specific phenolic ion exchange resin  

DOEpatents

A phenolic, cesium-specific, cation exchange resin is prepared by neutralizing resorcinol with potassium hydroxide, condensing/polymerizing the resulting intermediate with formaldehyde, heat-curing the resulting polymer to effect cross-linking and grinding it to desired particle size for use. This resin will selectively and efficiently adsorb cesium ions in the presence of a high concentration of sodium ions with a low carbon to cesium ratio.

Bibler, Jane P. (Aiken, SC); Wallace, Richard M. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01

388

Properties of composite specimens of old and new bone cement.  

PubMed

The most common cause of failure of a total hip replacement is aseptic loosening of an implant. In a number of cases, the cement-bone interface of at least one component is not compromised. In cases of aseptic cup loosening, removal of a well-fixed femoral stem may be undertaken to facilitate exposure of the acetabulum for cup revision, and the surgeon may choose to leave the functional cement-bone interfaces in the femur undisturbed. After cup revision, new cement is pressurized within the old cement mantle and a stem is cemented into this 'old-new cement' composite. Retaining the old cement mantle is an attractive option as it reduces the duration of surgery, minimizes bleeding, and preserves the bone stock. Excellent results have been shown with this technique of 'in-cement femoral revision' using a double-tapered polished stem. While considerable literature is available on the short- and long-term properties of PMMA bone cement, very little is known about the mechanical properties of old-new composite cement specimens where the old cement is more than a few days old. This paper tests the properties of such old-new composite specimens where the 'old' cement is aged between 3.3 and 17.7 years, better reflecting clinical situations. PMID:21381491

Acharya, A; Timperley, A J; Lee, A J C

2011-01-01

389

Baghouse dust used in clinkerization of portland cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many industrial materials considered essential for supporting a better quality of life consume large amounts of energy for their production. Ordinary portland cement (OPC) is used widely as a building material, and its manufacture consumes much energy. In India, the cost of energy accounts for >40% of the total cost of cement manufacture. The cost to manufacture cement is expected

N. B. Singh; K. N. Bhattacharjee; A. K. Shukla

1995-01-01

390

Modelling of carbonation of PC and blended cement concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presented herein is a numerical model to predict the carbonation depth of Portland cement (PC) and blended cement concrete under a wide range of environmental conditions. The improved model for hydration of PC and activity of blended cement is proposed and used in this carbonation model. This carbonation model can be used for concrete made of silica fume, fly ash

Sabet Divsholi Bahador; Jong Herman Cahyadi

2009-01-01

391

Binding of chloride and alkalis in Portland cement systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

A thermodynamic model for describing the binding of chloride and alkalis in hydrated Portland cement pastes has been developed. The model is based on the phase rule, which for cement pastes in aggressive marine environment predicts multivariant conditions, even at constant temperature and pressure. The effect of the chloride and alkalis has been quantified by experiments on cement pastes prepared

Erik P. Nielsen; Duncan Herfort; Mette R. Geiker

2005-01-01

392

MODELLING OF Pb RELEASE DURING PORTLAND CEMENT ALTERATION Anne Bnarda  

E-print Network

1 MODELLING OF Pb RELEASE DURING PORTLAND CEMENT ALTERATION Anne Bénarda , Jérôme Roseb , Jean and models the molecular mechanisms of Pb release during Portland cement leaching. Since Pb release about Fe phases in cement, making the interpretation difficult. Can Fe-substituted hydrogranet (C3AH6

Boyer, Edmond

393

Influence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cements  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of the presence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cement was investigated. Blending of Portland cement with limestone was found to influence the hydrate assemblage of the hydrated cement. Thermodynamic calculations as well as experimental observations indicated that in the presence of limestone, monocarbonate instead of monosulfate was stable. Thermodynamic modelling showed that the stabilisation of monocarbonate

Barbara Lothenbach; Gwenn Le Saout; Emmanuel Gallucci; Karen Scrivener

2008-01-01

394

Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions  

E-print Network

Guide to Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions August 2011 #12;Cement-Based Integrated Pavement Solutions Heavy Industrial Airports Highways Country Roads Arterials Commercial Commercial Residential Recreation LAND USE CEMENT-BASED INTEGRATED PAVEMENT SOLUTIONS 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

395

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-print Network

limestone Silica fume BOS Quarry Crushing Clinkering Cooling Grinding Transport SCMs Common cements BOS aims to characterize the effect of BOS in cement and concrete. To this end, 4 Holcim cements were species. Bound water, ettringite, partly C-S-H Portlandite Carbonated species Concrete samples were

Dalang, Robert C.

396

The cement mantle in the exeter impaction allografting technique  

Microsoft Academic Search

The postoperative radiographs of 35 patients who underwent impaction allografting of the proximal femur were reviewed. Of Gruen zones that could be clearly visualized, 39.9% contained areas where cement was absent. Even when an adequate mantle was present, cement voids were commonly seen. These cement mantle deficiencies were confirmed in a series of cadaveric impaction allografting procedures. They appear to

Eric L. Masterson; Bassam A. Masri; Clive P. Duncan

1997-01-01

397

Control of in vivo mineral bone cement degradation.  

PubMed

The current study aimed to prevent the formation of hydroxyapatite reprecipitates in brushite-forming biocements by minimizing the availability of free Ca(2+) ions in the cement matrix. This was achieved by both maximizing the degree of cement setting to avoid unreacted, calcium-rich cement raw materials which can deliver Ca(2+) directly to the cement matrix after dissolution, and by a reduction in porosity to reduce Ca(2+) diffusion into the set cement matrix. In addition, a biocement based on the formation of the magnesium phosphate mineral struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O) was tested, which should prevent the formation of low-solubility hydroxyapatite reprecipitates due to the high magnesium content. Different porosity levels were fabricated by altering the powder-to-liquid ratio at which the cements were mixed and the materials were implanted into mechanically unloaded femoral defects in sheep for up to 10 months. While the higher-porosity brushite cement quantitatively transformed into crystalline octacalcium phosphate after 10 months, slowing down cement resorption, a lower-porosity brushite cement modification was found to be chemically stable with the absence of reprecipitate formation and minor cement resorption from the implant surface. In contrast, struvite-forming cements were much more degradable due to the absence of mineral reprecipitates and a nearly quantitative cement degradation was found after 10 months of implantation. PMID:24769112

Kanter, Britta; Geffers, Martha; Ignatius, Anita; Gbureck, Uwe

2014-07-01

398

ELIMINATION OF WATER POLLUTION BY RECYCLING CEMENT PLANT KILN DUST  

EPA Science Inventory

Excessive amounts of alkalies can have deleterious effects upon the process of cement manufacture and the product. Normally much of the alkali present in cement raw materials is volatilized in the cement kiln and condenses on the particles of kiln dust which are carried out of th...

399

Model for the developing microstructure in Portland cement pastes  

Microsoft Academic Search

A method is proposed for quantitatively predicting the volume of the major phases in hydrated cement pastes as a function of (1) the composition of the cement, (2) the degree of reaction, and (3) the initial water: cement ratio. This procedure is then used to develop a quantitative model for the surface area and volume of porosity that is accessible

Hamlin M. Jennings; Paul D. Tennis

1994-01-01

400

Stabilization of residual soil with rice husk ash and cement  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stabilization of residual soils is studied by chemically using cement and rice husk ash. Investigation includes the evaluation of such properties of the soil as compaction, strength, and X-ray diffraction. Test results show that both cement and rice husk ash reduce the plasticity of soils. In term of compactability, addition of rice husk ash and cement decreases the maximum dry

E. A. Basha; R. Hashim; H. B. Mahmud; A. S. Muntohar

2005-01-01

401

Ion Exchange Temperature Testing with SRF Resin  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange using the Spherical Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection for use in the Pretreatment Facility of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in an at-tank deployment for removing 137Cs. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues prior to reaching the ion exchange columns may be required. Therefore, it is important to understand the behavior of SRF resin performance under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes. This research examined the impact of elevated temperature on resin loading and resin degradation during extended solution flow using elevated temperature (45°, 50°, 55°, 60°, 65°, 75°C). Testing for extended times at elevated temperatures showed that the resin does degrade and loading capacity is reduced at and above 45°C. Above 60°C the resin appears to not load at all.

Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Brown, Garrett N.; Peterson, Reid A.

2012-03-01

402

[Resin-bonded fixed partial dentures].  

PubMed

A resin-bonded fixed partial denture is a prosthetic construction which can replace I or several teeth in an occlusal system and which comprises a pontic element which is adhesively attached to 1 or more abutment teeth. To compensate for the limited shear strength of the adhesive layer, the Jixed partial denture is occlusally supported by the abutment(s). A direct resin-bonded fixed partial denture is made of composite, reinforced or not by a frame of flexible metal or fiber material. For an indirect resin-bonded fixed partial denture, a metal, fibre-reinforced composite or ceramic substructure is fabricated in a dental laboratory. The basic principle of a resin-bonded fixed partial denture is minimal invasiveness. However, a restoration in an abutment tooth requires a certain occlusal space which is realized by tooth preparation. Resistance preparations may be performed to improve the longevity of resin-bonded fixed partial dentures. Both financially and biologically, a resin-bonded bridge is a cost-effective prosthetic construction. The longevity is limited, but when the construction fails the negative consequences for the abutments are generally limited, which leaves open several types of other treatments. PMID:23495569

Kreulen, C M; Creugers, N H J

2013-02-01

403

Durability of pulp fiber-cement composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wood pulp fibers are a unique reinforcing material as they are non-hazardous, renewable, and readily available at relatively low cost compared to other commercially available fibers. Today, pulp fiber-cement composites can be found in products such as extruded non-pressure pipes and non-structural building materials, mainly thin-sheet products. Although natural fibers have been used historically to reinforce various building materials, little scientific effort has been devoted to the examination of natural fibers to reinforce engineering materials until recently. The need for this type of fundamental research has been emphasized by widespread awareness of moisture-related failures of some engineered materials; these failures have led to the filing of national- and state-level class action lawsuits against several manufacturers. Thus, if pulp fiber-cement composites are to be used for exterior structural applications, the effects of cyclical wet/dry (rain/heat) exposure on performance must be known. Pulp fiber-cement composites have been tested in flexure to examine the progression of strength and toughness degradation. Based on scanning electron microscopy (SEM), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), a three-part model describing the mechanisms of progressive degradation has been proposed: (1) initial fiber-cement/fiber interlayer debonding, (2) reprecipitation of crystalline and amorphous ettringite within the void space at the former fiber-cement interface, and (3) fiber embrittlement due to reprecipitation of calcium hydroxide filling the spaces within the fiber cell wall structure. Finally, as a means to mitigate kraft pulp fiber-cement composite degradation, the effects of partial portland cement replacement with various supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) has been investigated for their effect on mitigating kraft pulp fiber-cement composite mechanical property degradation (i.e., strength and toughness losses) during wet/dry cycling. SCMs have been found to be effective in mitigating composite degradation through several processes, including a reduction in the calcium hydroxide content, stabilization of monosulfate by maintaining pore solution pH, and a decrease in ettringite reprecipitation accomplished by increased binding of aluminum in calcium aluminate phases and calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H) phase.

Mohr, Benjamin J.

404

Chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar  

SciTech Connect

In this paper chloride ingress in cement paste and mortar is followed by electron probe microanalysis. The influence of several paste and exposure parameters on chloride ingress are examined (e.g., water-cement ratio, silica fume addition, exposure time, and temperature). The measurements are modelled on Fick's law modified by a term for chloride binding. Inclusion of chloride binding significantly improves the profile shape of the modelled ingress profiles. The presence of fine aggregate and formation of interfacial transition zones at paste-aggregate boundaries does not significantly affect diffusion rates.

Jensen, O.M.; Hansen, P.F.; Coats, A.M.; Glasser, F.P.

1999-09-01

405

Effect of antibiotic loading on the shear strength at the stem–cement interface (Shear strength of antibiotic loaded cement)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of addition of antibiotics into cement powder on the shear properties\\u000a of the cement–metal interface. The approach involved adding 800 mg of teicoplanin to 40 g bone cement powder in the t-800\\u000a group, 1,600 mg teicoplanin in the t-1,600 group, and no antibiotic in the control group. Industrially prepared bone cement\\u000a containing 500 mg

Onder Kilicoglu; L. Ozgur Koyuncu; V. Emre Ozden; Ergun Bozdag; Emin Sunbuloglu; Onder Yazicioglu

2008-01-01

406

Glass powder blended cement hydration modelling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The use of waste materials in construction is among the most attractive options to consume these materials without affecting the environment. Glass is among these types of potential waste materials. In this research, waste glass in powder form, i.e. glass powder (GP) is examined for potential use in enhancing the characteristics of concrete on the basis that it is a pozzolanic material. The experimental and the theoretical components of the work are carried out primarily to prove that glass powder belongs to the "family" of the pozzolanic materials. The chemical and physical properties of the hydrated activated glass powder and the hydrated glass powder cement on the microstructure level have been studied experimentally and theoretically. The work presented in this thesis consists of two main phases. The first phase contains experimental investigations of the reaction of glass powder with calcium hydroxide (CH) and water. In addition, it includes experiments that are aimed at determining the consumption of water and CH with time. The reactivity, degree of hydration, and nature of the pore solution of the glass powder-blended cement pastes and the effect of adding different ratios of glass powder on cement hydration is also investigated. The experiments proved that glass powder has a pozzolanic effect on cement hydration; hence it enhances the chemical and physical properties of cement paste. Based on the experimental test results, it is recommended to use a glass powder-to-cement ratio (GP/C) of 10% as an optimum ratio to achieve the best hydration and best properties of the paste. Two different chemical formulas for the produced GP C-S-H gel due to the pure GP and GP-CH pozzolanic reaction hydration are proposed. For the pure GP hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a calcium-to-silica ratio (C/S) of 0.164, water-to-silica ratio (H/S) of 1.3 and sodium/silica ratio (N/S) of 0.18. However, for the GP-CH hydration, the produced GP C-S-H gel has a C/S ratio of 1.17, H/S ratio of 2.5 and N/S ratio of 0.18. In the second phase of this research, theoretical models are built using a modified version of an existing cement hydration modelling code, "CEMHYD3D", to simulate the chemical reaction of the activated glass powder hydration and glass powder in cement. The modified model, which is referred to as the "MOD-model" is further used to predict the types, compositions and quantities of reaction products. Furthermore, the glass powder hydration data, which is obtained experimentally, is incorporated into the MOD-model to determine the effect of adding glass powder to the paste on the process of cement hydration and resulting paste properties. Comparisons between theoretical and experimental results are made to evaluate the developed models. The MOD-model predictions have been validated using the experimental results, and were further used to investigate various properties of the hydrated glass powder cement paste. These properties include, for example, CH content of the paste, porosity, hydration degree of the glass powder and conventional C-S-H and GP CS-H contents. The results show that the MOD-model is capable of accurately simulating the hydration process of glass powder-blended cement paste and can be used to predict various properties of the hydrating paste.

Saeed, Huda

407

Epoxy resin system for in situ rehabilitation of pipes  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a process for in situ pipe rehabilitation. It comprises: impregnating a fibrous substrate with a liquid epoxy resin composition comprising at least one liquid epoxy resin having epoxide equivalent weight within the range of about 165 to about 195; a minor amount, relative to the liquid epoxy resin, of an epoxide functional reactive diluent; a minor amount, relative to the liquid epoxy resin, of a thixotroping agent; and an effective amount of a liquid curing agent comprising a polyamide resin, a polyoxalkylenediamine, and from about 35 to about 55 weight percent, based on the weight of component, of 2-ethyl-4-methyl imidazole or derivatives thereof; positioning the resin-impregnated fibrous substrate within a pipe to be rehabilitated so that a surface of the resin-impregnated fibrous substrate is in contact with the interior surface of the pipe; and subjecting the thus-positioned resin-impregnated fibrous substrate to conditions effective to cure the liquid epoxy resin.

Edwards, G.D.; Wilson, B.S.

1992-04-14

408

Switch to an advanced ion exchange resin cuts boiler costs  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses how a field study demonstrated how that one refinery could save $384,000/yr by changing boiler feedwater ion exchange resin. Constant deterioration of ion exchange resin, used to demineralize boiler feedwater, prompted Star Enterprise to conduct a side-by-side evaluation of two resins. The study compared the macroporous weak base anion (WBA) resin that the refinery had used for years with a new WBA resin that features a uniform particle size. The results of this field trial, which was conducted over an 18-month period, showed that the uniform particle size resin had a higher resistance to organic fouling and produced an average of 28 percent more treated water per cycle than the old resin. Replacement and regeneration costs with the new resin resulted in a $48,000 annual savings per bed of resin.

Kratzer, W.R.; Coker, S.D.

1994-10-01

409

Magnetic ion-exchange resin treatment: Impact of water type and resin use  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three raw waters of fundamentally different natural organic matter (NOM) character were treated by magnetic resin using a bench-scale method designed to mimic how the resin is used in continuous operation. Increasing water hydrophobicity resulted in reduced dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal with removal of 56%, 33% and 25% for waters containing 21%, 50% and 75% hydrophobic NOM, respectively. Study

Max R. D. Mergen; Bruce Jefferson; Simon A. Parsons; Peter Jarvis

2008-01-01

410

Resin flow monitoring in vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding using optical fiber distributed sensor  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this study, we implemented resin flow monitoring by using an optical fiber sensor during vacuum assisted resin transfer molding (VaRTM).We employed optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor for distributed sensing. Especially, long gauge FBGs (about 100mm) which are 10 times longer than an ordinary FBG were employed for more effective distributed sensing. A long

Soohyun Eum; Kazuro Kageyama; Hideaki Murayama; Isamu Ohsawa; Kiyoshi Uzawa; Makoto Kanai; Hirotaka Igawa

2007-01-01

411

Effect of resin hydrophilicity and temperature on water sorption of dental adhesive resins  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the effects of copolymer hydrophilicity and temperature on water sorption and solubility characteristics of five copolymer blends of increasing degree of hydrophilicity using gravimetric measurements. Six resin disks (15mm in diameter×1mm in thickness) were prepared from each copolymer blend and were stored in deionised water at 23, 37 and 55°C. Water sorption and solubility of the resin

Cynthia K. Y. Yiu; Nigel M. King; Marcela R. O. Carrilho; Salvatore Sauro; Frederick A. Rueggeberg; Carlo Prati; Ricardo M. Carvalho; David H. Pashley; Franklin R. Tay

2006-01-01

412

Emulsion Paint of Aromatic Petroleum Resin. I. Emulsification of Aromatic Petroleum Resin Solution in Water  

Microsoft Academic Search

Industrial emulsification of an aromatic petroleum resin solu tion in bodied linseed oil was investigated using an emulsion inversion process. It was found that the preferred surfactant had the best match in solubility parameter between olefinic group and resin solution A slight variation was found in optimum H LB for emulsification, depending on the chemical family of surfactants chosen, but

Yoshiyuki Iwase

1980-01-01

413

Investigation into the stabilization\\/solidification performance of Portland cement through cement clinker phases  

Microsoft Academic Search

This research studied the influence of individual heavy metal on the hydration reactions of major cement clinker phases in order to investigate the performance of cement based stabilization\\/solidification (S\\/S) system. Tricalcium silicate (C3S) and tricalcium aluminate (C3A) had been mixed with individual heavy metal hydroxide including Zn(OH)2, Pb(OH)2 and Cu(OH)2, respectively. The influences of these heavy metal hydroxides on the

X. C. Qiao; C. S. Poon; C. R. Cheeseman

2007-01-01

414

Micro-thermal stress analysis of cement based pavement composite  

SciTech Connect

A four-layer sphere model for microscopic thermal analysis was proposed based upon the structural form of cement based pavement composites. Using temperature induced stresses of pavement structure as the external field, the micro-thermal stresses of two types of cement based pavement composite were calculated. The results showed that, by introducing the low stiffness rubberized asphalt in the interphase of coarse aggregate phase and cement mortar phase of Portland cement concrete, the interfacial thermal stresses could be reduced significantly, thus improving crack resistance of the pavement material under low temperature environment. Factors affecting micro-thermal stress of cement based pavement composite were discussed.

Li, G.; Zhao, Y.; Pang, S.S. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Huang, W. [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Coll. of Transportation

1998-12-31

415

A unique experience with foamed cement  

SciTech Connect

An extensive laboratory program showed that foamed cement was the only technically feasible solution to prepare a floating cement plug for solving severe lost circulation problems in big caverns. The technique had, however, to be adapted to fit well conditions that are relatively unusual in the oil field: the cement slurry should not become diluted and destabilized upon exiting the drill pipe and entering the 60-plus inches wellbore and the huge caves, several feet in radius, both filled with sea water. Moreover, the foam had to remain stable, even when surrounded by large volume of water, until cement setting. Therefore a technique of using protective fluids was devised. In addition, logistics dictated the use of compressed air rather than nitrogen to prepare the foamed slurry. Therefore special gas metering and regulation devices were used for the first time in the oil field in order to automate the process and get a perfect control of the slurry density whatever the slurry mixing and pumping rates. Before field implementation, the metering and regulation device was successfully yard tested, the gas phase being supplied by nitrogen bottles. The successful field implementation with air compressors, together with the protective fluid technique to combat lost circulation in loose coral reef and in highly fractured dolomitic formation, is described.

Piot, B.; Ferriere, R.; Fraboulet, B.

1994-12-31

416

Neutron scattering studies of hydrating cement pastes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The progress of the hydration reactions of tricalcium silicate (C3S) has been followed using quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS) at an energy resolution of 60 ?eV and a momentum transfer of q=1 Å-1. The degree of reaction in the hydrating cement paste is inferred from the fraction of water that is chemically bound to the cement reaction products and the known stoichiometry of C3S hydration. Three different water-to-cement ratios were studied in this experiment: W/C=0.7, 0.5 and 0.3. The results of an Avrami-model analysis of the first 15 h of the reaction are consistent with three types of C3S-H2O reaction product morphology and growth mechanisms: (i) a plate-type product phase from either phase boundary growth with no nucleation; (ii) diffusion-limited growth with constant nucleation; or (iii) a needle-type product phase with phase boundary growth and constant nucleation. Analysis of the later-time diffusion-limited portion of the reaction provides apparent diffusion constants for the migration of water through the C3S hydration products. These data indicate that the diffusion constants vary approximately exponentially over the range of water-to-cement values studied.

Berliner, R.; Popovici, M.; Herwig, K.; Jennings, H. M.; Thomas, J.

1998-04-01

417

Economic analysis of the European cement industry  

E-print Network

for the scenarios 41 3.4 Additional assumptions for the sensitivity analysis 42 4. The profitability Economic analysis of the European cement industry Marcel Boyer1 and JeanPierre Ponssard2 December 2013 Abstract We present a methodology to assess the profitability of a capital intensive industry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

418

USE OF ASBESTOS-CEMENT PIPE  

EPA Science Inventory

Concerning the use of asbestos-cement (A/C) pipe for the distribution of drinking water, the status of the ingested asbestos health research underway in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is briefly described. At the present time there are no U.S. standards for asbestos in ...

419

Properties of ceramic fiber reinforced cement composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mechanical properties and preliminary durability of ceramic fiber reinforced Portland cement composites tested with wet-hot accelerating method were investigated. The results showed that the flexural strength of mortar could be increased obviously by adding ceramic fiber into it, but the effect of the flexural reinforcement was influenced by various factors, including fiber length, fiber content and kinds of matrices; the

Yiping Ma; Beirong Zhu; Muhua Tan

2005-01-01

420

21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...tooth to protect the tooth pulp. (2) Classification...to § 872.9. (b) Dental cement other than zinc...tooth filling, to affix dental devices such as crowns...tooth to protect the tooth pulp. (2)...

2010-04-01

421

The Kosmosdale expansion project [cement plant upgrade  

Microsoft Academic Search

Kosmos Cement Company, a partnership between Southdown (now CEMEX, responsible for operation) and Lonestar Industries (now Heidelberger) decided in 1998 to increase the clinker production of the Kosmosdale plant from 2500 stpd to 4700 stpd. To achieve this capacity increase of almost 90%, extensive additions and modifications had to be made in almost all manufacturing areas. These main areas were

A. Rowley; D. Babel

2002-01-01

422

Effect of moisture protective coatings on the strength of a modern metal-reinforced glass-ionomer cement.  

PubMed

The strength of a modern, low metal:glass ratio, metal-reinforced glass-ionomer cement was measured evaluating a number of protective barriers: one light-cured resin, two solvent-based dental varnishes and petroleum jelly. The cement was exposed to water at 10 and 60 min from start of mix. The results obtained with these protecting agents were compared with those obtained where no protection was applied. A comparison of uniaxial flexural strength and biaxial flexural strength showed the latter to be more discriminating. Proprietary dental varnishes were superior to petroleum jelly, producing similar strengths of 50 MPa. Petroleum jelly was, however, preferable to no protection. Moisture protection during the first 30 min was found to be beneficial, thereafter no further strength increase was found. A second material, a cement which has a high metal:glass ratio, was found to be more moisture resistant but weaker in strength than the modern material, with a biaxial strength of 39 MPa. PMID:9722100

Williams, J A; Billington, R W; Pearson, G J

1998-07-01

423

Nondestructive evaluation of bone cement and bone cement/metal interface failure.  

PubMed

To quantify the failure mechanisms related to the loosening of cemented hip joint replacements, novel techniques, capable of monitoring, nondestructively, the initiation and progression of failure during in vitro fatigue tests, were employed. Fatigue testing of model cement and cement-stem test pieces was monitored using acoustic emission (AE) sensors. Once damage was detected, an ultrasonic imaging system was used to obtain an image of the damage site and to measure the stiffness of the affected region. This method of examination provided a detailed insight into the internal crack propagation and delamination patterns. Initial work was conducted on bulk cement specimens subjected to bending and tension. The second stage of the work examined a model stem-cement interface under tensile opening loading conditions. A novel ultrasonic technique was used to measure the bond quality at the cement-metal interface. Progressive delamination was identified over time, and the AE technique was able to identify critical areas of delamination before they could be identified conclusively by ultrasonic imaging. The work has demonstrated the potential of the AE technique as a tool for the preclinical assessment of total hip replacements. PMID:19927335

Browne, M; Jeffers, J R T; Saffari, N

2010-02-01

424

Mechanical properties of a cemented porous implant interface  

PubMed Central

Background Revision arthroplasty often requires anchoring of prostheses to poor-quality or deficient bone stock. Recently, newer porous materials have been introduced onto the market as additional, and perhaps better, treatment options for revision arthroplasty. To date, there is no information on how these porous metals interface with bone cement. This is of clinical importance, since these components may require cementing to other prosthesis components and occasionally to bone. Methods We created porous metal and bone cylinders of the same size and geometry and cemented them in a well-established standardized setting. These were then placed under tensile loading and torsional loading until failure was achieved. This permitted comparison of the porous metal/cement interface (group A) with the well-studied bone/cement interface (group B). Results The group A interface was statistically significantly stronger than the group B interface, despite having significantly reduced depth of cement penetration: it showed a larger maximum tensile force (effect size 2.7), superior maximum tensile strength (effect size 2.6), greater maximum torsional force (effect size 2.2), and higher rotational stiffness (effect size 1.5). Interpretation The newer porous implants showed good interface properties when cemented using medium-viscosity bone cement. The axial and rotational mechanical strength of a porous metal/cement interface appeared to be greater than the strength of the standard bone/cement interface. These results indicate that cementing of porous implants can provide great stability in situations where it is needed. PMID:24798109

Beckmann, Nicholas A; Bitsch, Rudi G; Seeger, Joern B; Klotz, Matthias CM; Kretzer, Jan Philippe; Jaeger, Sebastian

2014-01-01

425

Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.  

PubMed

Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. PMID:25047352

Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

2014-10-01

426

Immobilization of radioactive waste by cementation with purified kaolin clay.  

PubMed

A study is undertaken to determine the waste immobilization performance of low-level wastes in cement-clay mixtures. Liquid low-level wastes are precipitated using chemical methods, followed by solidification in drums. Solidification is done using cementation processes. Long-term leaching rates of the radionuclides are used as indicators of immobilization performance of solidified waste forms. In addition