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Sample records for resin-based dental materials

  1. Dental fiber-post resin base material: a review

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chun; Zhang, Fu-qiang

    2014-01-01

    Teeth that have short clinical crown, which are not alone enough to support the definitive restoration can be best treated using the post and core system. The advantages of fiber post over conventional metallic post materials have led to its wide acceptance. In addition to that the combination of aesthetic and mechanical benefits of fiber post has provided it with a rise in the field of dentistry. Also the results obtained from some clinical trials have encouraged the clinicians to use the fiber posts confidently. Fiber posts are manufactured from pre-stretched fibers impregnated within a resin matrix. The fibers could that be of carbon, glass/silica, and quartz, whereas Epoxy and bis-GMA are the most widely used resin bases. But recently studies are also found to be going on for polyimide as possible material for the fiber post resin base as a substitute for the conventional materials. PMID:24605208

  2. [Current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties].

    PubMed

    Shi, X; Lu, H B; Mao, J; Gong, S Q

    2016-09-01

    The mode of dental antibacterial resin-based materials can be divided into two types, namely, single and combined antibacterial mode. With regard to single antibacterial mode, only one kind of antibacterial agent is added into the resin, which can be released or act as contacting antibacterial agent. The single mode resin has limitation in sterilization methods and effect. As for combined antibacterial mode, it is a combination of different types of biocides and thus maximizes the sterilizing effect, including the releasing antibacterial agent incorporated with the contacting antibacterial agent or antibacterial agents combined with calcium compound possessing biological mineralization function. In this paper, current status and further prospects of dental resin-based materials with antibacterial properties are reviewed from the perspectives of single and combined antibacterial modes to provide guidance for dental antibacterial resin material research. PMID:27596349

  3. Dental repair material: a resin-modified glass-ionomer bioactive ionic resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Croll, Theodore P; Berg, Joel H; Donly, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    This report documents treatment and repair of three carious teeth that were restored with a new dental repair material that features the characteristics of both resin-modified glass-ionomer restorative cement (RMGI) and resin-based composite (RBC). The restorative products presented are reported by the manufacturer to be the first bioactive dental materials with an ionic resin matrix, a shock-absorbing resin component, and bioactive fillers that mimic the physical and chemical properties of natural teeth. The restorative material and base/liner, which feature three hardening mechanisms, could prove to be a notable advancement in the adhesive dentistry restorative materials continuum. PMID:25822408

  4. Quantification of organic eluates from polymerized resin-based dental restorative materials by use of GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Vibeke Barman; Moe, Grete; Skålevik, Rita; Jensen, Einar; Lygre, Henning

    2007-05-01

    Residual monomers, additives and degradation products from resin-based dental restorative materials eluted into the oral cavity may influence the biocompatibility of these materials. Emphasis has been placed on studies addressing cytotoxic, genotoxic and estrogenic potential of these substances. A prerequisite for analyzing the potential of exposure to eluted compounds from dental materials is reliable quantification methods, both real time and accelerated measurements. The purpose of the present study was to quantify nine eluates; 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), hydroquinone monomethyl ether (MEHQ), camphorquinone (CQ), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), ethyl 4-(dimethylamino)benzoate (DMABEE), triethylene glycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA), oxybenzone (HMBP) and drometrizole (TIN P) leaching from specimens of four commonly used resin-based dental materials in ethanol and an aqueous solution. All analyses were performed by use of GC/MS, each component was quantified separately and the results presented in microg mm(-2). This study has shown that elution from various materials differs significantly, not only in the types of eluates, but also regarding amounts of total and of single components. A high amount of HMBP, a UV stabilizer with potential estrogenic activity, was detected from one material in both solutions. PMID:17127109

  5. Effects of Light Curing Method and Exposure Time on Mechanical Properties of Resin Based Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Alpöz, A. Riza; Ertuḡrul, Fahinur; Cogulu, Dilsah; Ak, Asli Topaloḡlu; Tanoḡlu, Metin; Kaya, Elçin

    2008-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate microhardness and compressive strength of composite resin (Tetric-Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent), compomer (Compoglass, Ivoclar, Vivadent), and resin modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC, GC Corp) polymerized using halogen light (Optilux 501, Demetron, Kerr) and LED (Bluephase C5, Ivoclar Vivadent) for different curing times. Methods Samples were placed in disc shaped plastic molds with uniform size of 5 mm diameter and 2 mm in thickness for surface microhardness test and placed in a diameter of 4 mm and a length of 2 mm teflon cylinders for compressive strength test. For each subgroup, 20 samples for microhardness (n=180) and 5 samples for compressive strength were prepared (n=45). In group 1, samples were polymerized using halogen light source for 40 seconds; in group 2 and 3 samples were polymerized using LED light source for 20 seconds and 40 seconds respectively. All data were analyzed by two way analysis of ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results Same exposure time of 40 seconds with a low intensity LED was found similar or more efficient than a high intensity halogen light unit (P>.05), however application of LED for 20 seconds was found less efficient than 40 seconds curing time (P=.03). Conclusions It is important to increase the light curing time and use appropriate light curing devices to polymerize resin composite in deep cavities to maximize the hardness and compressive strength of restorative materials. PMID:19212507

  6. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-01

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  7. Modeling the Residual Stresses in Reactive Resins-Based Materials: a Case Study of Photo-Sensitive Composites for Dental Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2010-06-02

    Residual stresses in reactive resins-based composites are associated to the net volumetric contraction (shrinkage) arising during the cross-linking reactions. Depending on the restoration geometry (the ratio of the free surface area to the volume of the cavity) the frozen-in stresses can be as high as the strength of the dental composites. This is the main reason why the effectiveness and then the durability of restorations with composites remains quite lower than those realized with metal alloys based materials. In this paper we first explore the possibility to circumvent the mathematical complexity arising from the determination of residual stresses in reactive systems three-dimensionally constrained. Then, the results of our modeling approach are applied to a series of commercially available composites showing that almost all samples develop residual stresses such that the restoration undergoes failure as soon as it is realized.

  8. Dynamic measurement of local displacements within curing resin-based dental composite using optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Rahman, Mohammed Wahidur; Donnan, Robert S.

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to determine the feasibility of using optical coherence elastography to measure internal displacements during the curing phase of a light-activated, resin-based composite material. Displacement vectors were spatially mapped over time within a commercial dental composite. Measurements revealed that the orientation of cure-induced displacement vectors varied spatially in a complex manner; however, each vector showed a systematic evolution with time. Precision of individual displacements was estimated to be ˜1 to 2 μm, enabling submicrometer time-varying displacements to be detected.

  9. Determination of surface roughness and topography of dental resin-based nanocomposites using AFM analysis.

    PubMed

    Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Kakaš, Damir; Marković, Dubravka; Ivanišević, Aljoša

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine surface roughness and topography of polished dental resin-based nanocomposites. Four representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were tested in the study: two nanohybrids (Filtek Z550 and Tetric EvoCeram) and two nanofilled (Filtek Ultimate Body and Filtek Ultimate Translucent); and two reference materials: one microfilled (Gradia Direct) and one microhybrid (Filtek Z250). Polymerized cylindrical specimens (4 mm x 2 mm) were polished with multi-step polishing system- Super Snap. Immediately after the polishing, topography of each specimen was examined by Veeco di CP-II Atomic Force Microscope. Specimen's surface has been scanned in 6 points in contact mode with CONT20A-CP tips. 1 Hz scan rate and 256 × 256 resolution were used to obtain topography on a 90 µm × 90 µm scanning area. Measured topography data were processed by Image Processing and Data Analysis v2.1.15 software. Following parameters were compared among specimens: average roughness and maximum peak-to-valley distance. All of the tested materials had similar average surface roughness after finishing and polishing procedure. The lowest values occurred in the material Filtek Ultimate Body, and the highest in the Filtek Z550. When interpreting maximum peak-to-valley distance the larger differences in values (up to 100%) occurred in Filtek Z550, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Ultimate Body, which is a result of the deep polishing channels and tracks. Type, size, distribution of fillers and filler loading in tested materials, didn't influence average roughness values, but had an impact on maximum peak-to-valley distance values. PMID:23448609

  10. Quantitative determination of TEGDMA, BHT, and DMABEE in eluates from polymerized resin-based dental restorative materials by use of GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Seiss, Mario; Langer, Christopher; Hickel, Reinhard; Reichl, Franz-Xaver

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the leaching of ingredients from several commercial dental composite resins cured with LED, and immersed in methanol or water for 24 h, respectively. The composites used were: Admira Dentin (VOCO), Artemis Schmelz (Enamel) (Ivoclar Vivadent), Els extra low shrinkage (Saremco Dental), Filtek Supreme XT Dentin (3 M ESPE), Gradia Direct (GC), Venus & Venus flow (Heraeus Kulzer), and XRV Herculite Prodigy Enamel (Kerr). From each dental composite four specimens with defined structure and 100-mg net weight were made. After the polymerization process, according to manufacturer's instructions, the specimens were immersed in either 1 ml water or 1 ml methanol and incubated at 37 degrees C for 24 h. Eluted ingredients triethyleneglycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA), 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT), and 4-N,N-dimethylaminobenzoicacidethylester (DMABEE) were detected and quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The amounts of the detected analytes from 100 mg polymerized composites ranged between the following values: TEGDMA: 0-0.5 mg (water), 0-1.6 mg (methanol); BHT: 0-0.03 μg (water), 0-0.11 mg (methanol); and DMABEE: 0-0.11 mg (water), 0-1.4 mg (methanol). We conclude from the results that the elution rates into methanol and water differ significantly. Furthermore, it is concluded that all the determined amounts eluting from the composites are far below toxic-relevant concentrations. PMID:19771414

  11. Fracture toughness determination of ceramic and resin-based dental composites.

    PubMed

    Kvam, K

    1992-01-01

    A new method has been developed for Klc determinations of brittle materials with precracks introduced by indentations. A reference glass, five ceramic materials, and one resin-based composite were tested. Knoop hardness indentations were made with a load of 49 N in a line from edge to edge vertical to the long axis on one surface of four-point flexure bars, to make a continuous crack under the indentations. Five specimens of each material were fractured in a four-point bend test with the line of indentations placed in the zone of constant and maximum tensile stress. Separate unfractured specimens were ground and polished to expose and measure the preformed continuous crack. The mean of six crack-depth measurements was used together with the fracture load and the dimensions of the bend specimens to calculate the fracture toughness, Klc of each material. The determined Klc value (x +/- SD) for the reference glass was 0.81 +/- .24 MPa m1/2 and corresponds to previous studies. The resin-based composite material, Silux Plus, had a value of 1.04 +/- 0.14 MPa m1/2. The Klc values (MPa m1/2) were 0.94 +/- 0.31 for Dicor, 1.41 +/- 0.18 for Cerestore, 1.50 +/- 0.29 for NBK-1000, 1.60 +/- 0.17 for Vitadur-N and 2.14 +/- 0.14 for Hi-Ceram. Hi-Ceram had significantly higher Klc values than the other materials. The new method seemed to be of value in determining the fracture toughness of non-metallic dental materials. PMID:1550892

  12. Mathematical modeling of cross-linking monomer elution from resin-based dental composites.

    PubMed

    Manojlovic, Dragica; Radisic, Marina; Lausevic, Mila; Zivkovic, Slavoljub; Miletic, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Elution of potentially toxic substances, including monomers, from resin-based dental composites may affect the biocompatibility of these materials in clinical conditions. In addition to the amounts of eluted monomers, mathematical modeling of elution kinetics reveals composite restorations as potential chronic sources of leachable monomers. The aim of this work was to experimentally quantify elution of main cross-linking monomers from four commercial composites and offer a mathematical model of elution kinetics. Composite samples (n = 7 per group) of Filtek Supreme XT (3M ESPE), Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Admira (Voco), and Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) were prepared in 2-mm thick Teflon moulds and cured with halogen or light-emitting diode light. Monomer elution in ethanol and water was analyzed using high-performance liquid chromatography up to 28 days postimmersion. The mathematical model was expressed as a sum of two exponential regression functions representing the first-order kinetics law. Elution kinetics in all cases followed the same mathematical model though differences in rate constants as well as the extent of monomer elution were material-, LCU-, medium-dependent. The proposed mechanisms of elution indicate fast elution from surface and subsurface layers and up to 100 times slower monomer extraction from the bulk polymer. PMID:22997145

  13. Inconsistency in the strength testing of dental resin-based composites among researchers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naresh

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this paper were to review the current strength testing methods of the dental resin-based composites (RBCs) and to explore the inconsistencies with regard to strength testing among researchers. Data selection/extraction: An outline of the most relevant aspects of RBCs was created, and a subsequent literature search for articles published during last four decades (1970-2010) was conducted using the databases, namely PubMed, Science Direct and ISI Web of Knowledge. Conclusion: The literature review highlighted a lack of consensus among researchers regarding the reliability of ISO recommended three-point flexure strength testing method. Several investigators have used Weibull statistics for the analysis of RBCs strength data, however their applicability might be questioned as many RBCs contain greater resin content and may exhibit sufficient viscous deformation prior to brittle failure. In addition, variability in the selection of cross-head speed and mould material for strength testing was evident which may lead to variation in the strength data and render the interpretation difficult among researchers. PMID:24353541

  14. Radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gurel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different shades of resin-based restorative materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disk specimens 6 mm in diameter and 1 mm thick (N = 220, n = 10) were prepared from the following restorative materials: · eight shades of nanofilled composite (Aelite Aesthetic Enamel), · seven shades of nanohybrid composite (Grandio Universal), · six shades of photopolymerized polyacid modified compomer (Glasiosite), and · one shade of hybrid composite (X-tra fil U). Human canine dentin (n = 10), bovine enamel (n = 10), and an aluminum (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted, and equivalent Al thickness (eq Al) values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The data were analyzed using a non-parametric one-way ANOVA (Kruskal-Wallis), and multiple comparisons were made with a Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc test (a = 0.05). Different shades of resin-based restorative materials tested did not reveal statistically significant differences within each material group (p > 0.05). Radiopacity values of the resin-based restorative materials investigated varied depending on their types; however, within different shades of one material type, radiopacity values were comparable. Every shade of nanocomposite material other than Aelite Aesthetic Enamel Incisal LT Gray showed comparable radiopacity to human dentin. Other materials tested demonstrated higher radiopacity compared to human dentin and bovine enamel. PMID:22782058

  15. Dental resins based on dimer acid dimethacrylates: a route to high conversion with low polymerization shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hui; Trujillo-Lemon, Marianela; Ge, Junhao; Stansbury, Jeffrey W

    2010-05-01

    Incomplete polymerization, volumetric shrinkage, and shrinkage stress are among the primary disadvantages of current resin-based dental composites. Generally, any attempt to increase final double bond conversion only exacerbates polymerization shrinkage and stress. The use of dimer acid-derived dimethacrylate (DADMA) monomers in novel dental resin formulations is examined in this article as a potential means to address these disparate goals. A series of high molecular weight DADMA monomers with different functional groups used to connect the C36 dimer acid core and the methacrylates were formulated with urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA) and/or ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) at various compositions to manipulate comonomer compatibility and polymeric mechanical properties. Along with reaction kinetics, dynamic polymerization shrinkage and shrinkage stress were assessed. Specific DADMA monomers demonstrated limited miscibility with either Bis-EMA or UDMA. Appropriate ternary resin formulations produced homogeneous monomeric mixtures capable of controlled polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) to yield heterogeneous final polymers. Reduced polymerization shrinkage and stress along with higher conversion was observed for DADMA ternary systems compared with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resin control. The PIPS process resulted in a modest volume recovery and stress relaxation in the later stages of polymerization. These results indicate that certain dimer acid-derived dimethacrylates possess the potential to replace TEGDMA as a reactive diluent in dental resins that display a favorable and unique combination of properties. PMID:20521567

  16. Radiopacity of resin-based materials measured in film radiographs and storage phosphor plate (Digora).

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Joseph; Vreven, José; Leloup, Gaetane

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the radiopacity of 41 resin-based materials using conventional dental x-ray film (Ultraspeed-D) and a digital system (Digora) based on storage phosphor plate technology. For the film-based technique, optical density measurements were carried out using an X-Rite densitometer. Al equivalents (mm) were calculated as described in the literature using a calibration curve of Optical Density versus the thickness of aluminum. Regarding the digital system after exposures of 0.16 and 0.32 seconds, the images were exported to an image processing software (NIH Image Engineering). An approach similar to that used for optical density was used to generate a calibration curve for gray pixel values. Linear correlations were found between the percentage of fillers by weight and x-ray film radiopacity and the Digora system, and the same coefficient of estimation was recorded (r=0.60; p< or = 0.05). A linear correlation was also observed between the conventional x-ray film technique and the Digora system (r=0.93;p< or = 0.05). Using two different exposure times did not affect the radiopacity. Considerable differences were found among materials of the same category. Flowable resin composites were more radiopaque than dentin, while microfine composites were "radiolucent." Most of the available resin-based materials were more radiopaque than enamel. The radiopacity of resin composites depended on their fillers (percentage and type). Using elements with low atomic numbers (Si) resulted in radiolucent materials, while adding elements with high molecular numbers (Ba, Y, Yb), resulted in radiopaque resin composites. Despite the numerous benefits offered by the digital imaging system (low irradiation dose, instant image, image manipulation), the conventional x-ray film technique seems to be more accurate for radiopacity measurements. PMID:15646224

  17. Teaching the placement of posterior resin-based composite restorations in Spanish dental schools

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher; McConnell, Robert; Wilson, Nairn

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: In an area of esthetic dentistry such as posterior composites, in which new materials and techniques are being devolved continuously, it is important to confirm that dental students have a clear understanding of the basic principles of clinical application of this knowledge. Considering that the preparation of dental graduates in Spain may be of interest to competent dental authorities and employers with whom they can work worldwide, this study investigated the teaching of posterior composite restorations in Spanish dental schools. Study design: In late 2009⁄ early 2010, a questionnaire seeking information on the teaching of posterior composites was emailed to the professor responsible for teaching operative dentistry in each of the fifteen dental schools having complete undergraduate dental degree programs in Spain. Results: The response rate was 100%. Most investigated topics did not show noteworthy differences depending on whether the schools were public or private. Variations were found among Spanish dental schools in both the amount and content of the teaching programs concerning posterior composite restorations. Differences were recorded in the teaching of cavity design, contraindications to composite placement, indications for liners and bases, matrix and wedging techniques, composite and bonding systems, light curing and finishing procedures for composite restorations. More consistency was observed in teaching methods of moisture-control, indirect composites and amalgam bonding. Conclusions: As recommended in previously surveyed countries, efforts must be made to promote harmonization of dental curricula to make it easier for graduates to work elsewhere, and to ensure they meet the needs of their patients on entering independent practice. Key words:Aesthetic dentistry, composite restoration, dental education, teaching program, undergraduate dental student. PMID:22322491

  18. Chairside resin-based provisional restorative materials for fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Strassler, Howard E; Lowe, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    Provisional restorations are vital to fixed prosthodontics treatment, providing an important diagnostic function while in place. In addition to protecting the prepared teeth, provisionalization enables clinicians to refine biologic and biomechanical issues before the final restoration is fabricated. Adjustments can be made in the provisional restoration to achieve both the clinician's and patient's desired results. The fabrication of temporary restorations requires that clinicians be proficient with a variety of materials and techniques that can be used to make well-adapted and functional provisionals. There are many material choices available to temporize a single crown as well as multi-unit fixed partial dentures, and the selection of provisional materials should be made based on a case-by-case evaluation. This article provides a review of polymeric resin provisional materials. PMID:22167927

  19. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  20. Penetration of resin-based materials into initial erosion lesion: A confocal microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Ionta, Franciny Querobim; Boteon, Ana Paula; Moretto, Marcelo Juliano; Júnior, Odair Bim; Honório, Heitor Marques; Silva, Thiago Cruvinel; Wang, Linda; Rios, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The application of resin-based materials is an alternative of treatment for eroded lesions. Nevertheless, there are no studies about the penetration of these materials into eroded lesion, which might affect its adhesion. Therefore, this study evaluated the penetration of four resin-based materials, with and without enamel etching. By using an in vitro protocol, types of treatment were studied at five levels (AdheSE(®) , Tetric N-Bond(®) , Single Bond 2(®) , Helioseal Clear(®) , Icon(®) ) and types of enamel etching in two levels (with and without). Materials were stained with 0.02 mg/mL ethanolic solution of tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate. Bovine enamel samples (4 × 4 mm) were immersed in 0.01 M HCl, pH 2.3, for 30 seconds to produce initial eroded lesions. Afterward, the materials were applied on half of sample enamel surface following the manufacturer's instructions. On the other half of sample, the materials were applied without etching the enamel. Materials penetration into the enamel was assessed by Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy on reflection and fluorescence modes. The penetration depth (PD) was measured using ImageJ software. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (P < 0.05). Regardless of the material, etched enamel resulted in higher PD than non-etched (P < 0.05). Icon(®) showed the highest PD in enamel followed by Helioseal Clear(®) (P < 0.05), with significant difference between them (P < 0.05) and no difference was found among AdheSE(®) , Tetric N-Bond(®) , and Single Bond 2(®) (P > 0.05). It can be concluded that prior enamel etching increased the materials penetration into eroded enamel and the Icon(®) -infiltrant presented highest penetration. PMID:26626706

  1. On-line mass spectrometric monitoring of the polymerization of a phenolic-resin-based material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aikens, D. A.; Wood, G. M.; Upchurch, B. T.

    1975-01-01

    Polymerization of phenolic-resin-based materials requires elevated temperatures. The low thermal conductivity of these materials has led to the use of dielectric heating techniques in lieu of standard convection oven heating to obtain a satisfactory cure. The curing rate and therefore the quality of the cured material depends on the heating rate and maximum temperature attained, parameters which are extremely difficult to measure in dielectric heating units. The dielectric curing of these materials was monitored by using a mass spectrometer to measure the partial pressure of phenol in the gas evolved during polymerization. The resulting plots of phenol partial pressure as a function of time have a characteristic shape, and these may be used to indicate the attainment of complete curing. The validity of the mass spectrometric technique was confirmed by chemical analysis of the polymerized samples.

  2. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part I.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-09-01

    There has been a continual advent of improved technologies in dentistry. Among these are the material sciences of resin-based composites (RBCs). Since the introduction of light-cured RBCs, the problem of polymerization shrinkage and the methods used to overcome this have concerned clinicians and researchers. Types of curing light and modes of curing have been shown to affect the degree of polymerization and related shrinkage of RBCs. This review, which is divided into two parts, discusses the contemporary light-curing units. Part I explores the evolution in light-curing units and different curing modes. Part II highlights the clinical considerations regarding light curing of RBCs that are important for achieving optimal curing and maximum polymerization of RBCs in a clinical setting. PMID:20879203

  3. Light-curing considerations for resin-based composite materials: a review. Part II.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2010-10-01

    As discussed in Part I, the type of curing light and curing mode impact the polymerization kinetics of resin-based composite (RBC) materials. Major changes in light-curing units and curing modes have occurred. The type of curing light and mode employed affects the polymerization shrinkage and associated stresses, microhardness, depth of cure, degree of conversion, and color change of RBCs. These factors also may influence the microleakage in an RBC restoration. Apart from the type of unit and mode used, the polymerization of RBCs is also affected by how a light-curing unit is used and handled, as well as the aspects associated with RBCs and the environment. Part II discusses the various clinical issues that should be considered while curing RBC restorations in order to achieve the best possible outcome. PMID:20960988

  4. Physicomechanical and antibacterial properties of experimental resin-based dental sealants modified with nylon-6 and chitosan nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, María F; Otte, Andrew D; Gregory, Richard L; Pinal, Rodolfo; Ferreira-Zandoná, Andrea; Bottino, Marco C

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to develop and evaluate resin-based experimental dental sealants containing electrospun nylon-6 (N6) and chitosan (CH) fibers in an attempt to improve the physicomechanical properties and provide an antibacterial protective effect, respectively. Electrospun N6 and CH mats were immersed into a resin mixture, light-cured, and then cryomilled to obtain micron-sized resin-modified fiber particles. Different levels of the novel cryomilled particles (i.e. 1, 2.5, and 5% relative to the resin mixture, % by weight) were used to prepare the N6- and CH-containing sealants. A commercial sealant and the experimental resin mixture (unfilled) were used as controls. Flexural strength (FS), Vickers microhardness (VH), and agar diffusion tests were performed. The data were analyzed at the 5% significance level. No significant difference in fiber diameter of N6 (503 ± 31 nm) and CH (595 ± 38 nm) was observed. Upon cryomilling, the resin-modified CH and N6 mats led to the formation of irregularly-shaped particles, with an average diameter of 14.24 µm and 15.87 µm, respectively. CH-5% had significantly higher FS (115.3 ± 1.3 MPa) than all the other groups. CH-1% had significantly higher hardness values (38.3 ± 0.3 VHN) than all the other groups. Collectively, the results indicated that CH-containing sealants presented the highest FS and hardness; however, none of the CH-containing sealants displayed antimicrobial properties. PMID:25532852

  5. Advances in dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vaderhobli, Ram M

    2011-07-01

    The use of materials to rehabilitate tooth structures is constantly changing. Over the past decade, newer material processing techniques and technologies have significantly improved the dependability and predictability of dental material for clinicians. The greatest obstacle, however, is in choosing the right combination for continued success. Finding predictable approaches for successful restorative procedures has been the goal of clinical and material scientists. This article provides a broad perspective on the advances made in various classes of dental restorative materials in terms of their functionality with respect to pit and fissure sealants, glass ionomers, and dental composites. PMID:21726695

  6. Fracture resistance of overtly flaring root canals filled with resin-based obturation material

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Salma B.; Eldarrat, Aziza H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reinforcement of root canals obturated with Resilon was reported by several investigators, but no studies reported the reinforcement of overtly flared root canals obturated with Resilon material. The aim of this study was to investigate the fracture resistance of overtly flared root canals filled with Resilon as compared to similar root canals filled with gutta-percha (GP). Materials and Methods: Sixty single-rooted premolars were divided randomly into six groups. Group 1 served as control group. The control group was sub-divided into two groups, a negative group and a positive group. The negative group consisted of root canals that were only cleaned from residual pulpal tissues, however, the positive group had prepared and overtly flared root canals without obturation. Groups 2 and 4 were shaped using 0.04 taper rotary files, while groups 3 and 5 were shaped using 0.06 taper rotary files. Before obturation, the last four groups were further flared coronally with a reverse cone diamond bur. Groups 2 and 3 were obturated with GP and a resin-based sealer, while groups 4 and 5 were obturated with Resilon and Epiphany self-etching primer and Epiphany sealer. Roots were then fixed into a universal testing machine and vertically loaded until fracture. SPSS software (Release 9.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, USA) was used to perform the statistical analysis. Results: Fracture resistance measurements showed that there were differences in resistance to fracture among the experimental groups (ANOVA, P < 0.0001). Mean values of the loading force applied to the negative control group were the highest at 1.81 KN, whereas the mean values for the Resilon groups (Groups 4 and 5) at 1.13 KN and 1.54 KN were found to be higher than the GP groups (Groups 2 and 3) at 0.45 KN and 0.88 KN, respectively. Tukey's post hoc test showed that there was no statistical difference between the mean values of the negative control group and Group 5 (P = 0.69). Conclusion: Obturation of

  7. Effect of LED-LCU light irradiance distribution on mechanical properties of resin based materials.

    PubMed

    Magalhães Filho, T R; Weig, K M; Costa, M F; Werneck, M M; Barthem, R B; Costa Neto, C A

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to analyze the light power distribution along the tip end of the light guide of three LED-LCUs (Light Curing Units) and to evaluate its effect on the mechanical properties of a polymer based dental composite. Firstly, the light power distribution over the whole area of LED-LCU light guide surface was analyzed by three methods: visual projection observation, spectral measurement and optical spectral analysis (OSA). The light power distribution and the total irradiance were different for the three LEDs used, but the wavelength was within the camphorquinone absorption spectrum. The use of a blank sheet was quite on hand to make a qualitative analysis of a beam, and it is costless. Secondly, specimens of a hybrid composite with approximately 8mm diameter and 2mm thickness were produced and polymerized by 20s exposition time to each LED-LCU. Thirdly, the elastic modulus (E) and hardness (HV) were measured throughout the irradiated area by instrumented micro-indentation test (IIT), allowing to correlate localized power and mechanical properties. Both E and HV showed to be very sensitive to local power and wavelength dependent, but they followed the beam power profile. It was also shown that the mechanical properties could be directly correlated to the curing process. Very steep differences in mechanical properties over very short distances may impair the material performance, since residual stresses can easily be built over it. PMID:27040223

  8. Dental impression materials.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    It is clear that many impression materials are available to the veterinary dentist. They each have different inherent properties, handling characteristics, and indications for use. A thorough understanding of these concepts is essential if the veterinarian and laboratory technician are to produce meaningful and accurate reproductions of oral structures. New products are constantly being introduced to the dental market, with fantastic claims for ease of use and reproduction of detail. The reader is urged to seek independent research findings when assessing such claims, and make decisions founded in the highest possible levels of evidence. PMID:24006720

  9. Effects of Protective Resin Coating on the Surface Roughness and Color Stability of Resin-Based Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Tüzüner, Tamer; Korkmaz, Fatih Mehmet; Baygın, Özgül; Bağış, Yıldırım Hakan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of nanofilled protective resin coating (RC) on the surface roughness (Ra) and color stability (ΔE) of resin-based restorative materials (RM) (compomer (C), nanofilled composite (NF), and microhybrid composite (MH)) after being submitted to the ultraviolet aging (UV) method. Thirty-six specimens were prepared (n = 6 for each group). The Ra and (ΔE) values and SEM images were obtained before and after UV. Significant interactions were found among the RM-RC-UV procedures for Ra (P < 0.001). After the specimens were submitted to UV, the Ra values were significantly increased, regardless of the RC procedure (with RC; P < 0.01 for all, without RC; C (P < 0.01), NF (P < 0.001), and MH (P < 0.001)) for each RM. Significant interactions were found between the RM-RC (P < 0.001) procedures for the ΔE values. The ΔE values were increased in each group after applying the RC procedures (P < 0.001). Protective RC usage for RM could result in material-related differences in Ra and ΔE as with used UV method. PMID:25162066

  10. Bisphenol A and Related Compounds in Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Fleisch, Abby F.; Sheffield, Perry E.; Chinn, Courtney; Edelstein, Burton L.; Landrigan, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT Dental sealants and composite filling materials containing bisphenol A (BPA) derivatives are increasingly used in childhood dentistry. Evidence is accumulating that BPA and some BPA derivatives can pose health risks attributable to their endocrine-disrupting, estrogenic properties. OBJECTIVES To systematically compile and critically evaluate the literature characterizing BPA content of dental materials; to assess BPA exposures from dental materials and potential health risks; and to develop evidence-based guidance for reducing BPA exposures while promoting oral health. METHODS The extant toxicological literature and material safety data sheets were used as data sources. RESULTS BPA is released from dental resins through salivary enzymatic hydrolysis of BPA derivatives, and BPA is detectable in saliva for up to 3 hours after resin placement. The quantity and duration of systemic BPA absorption is not clear from the available data. Dental products containing the bisphenol A derivative glycidyl dimethacrylate (bis-GMA) are less likely to be hydrolyzed to BPA and have less estrogenicity than those containing bisphenol A dimethacrylate (bis-DMA). Most other BPA derivatives used in dental materials have not been evaluated for estrogenicity. BPA exposure can be reduced by cleaning and rinsing surfaces of sealants and composites immediately after placement. CONCLUSIONS On the basis of the proven benefits of resin-based dental materials and the brevity of BPA exposure, we recommend continued use with strict adherence to precautionary application techniques. Use of these materials should be minimized during pregnancy whenever possible. Manufacturers should be required to report complete information on the chemical composition of dental products and encouraged to develop materials with less estrogenic potential. PMID:20819896

  11. Temperature changes under demineralized dentin during polymerization of three resin-based restorative materials using QTH and LED units

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Sayed-Mostafa; Moharreri, Mohammadreza; Atai, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Light-curing of resin-based materials (RBMs) increases the pulp chamber temperature, with detrimental effects on the vital pulp. This in vitro study compared the temperature rise under demineralized human tooth dentin during light-curing and the degrees of conversion (DCs) of three different RBMs using quartz tungsten halogen (QTH) and light-emitting diode (LED) units (LCUs). Materials and Methods Demineralized and non-demineralized dentin disks were prepared from 120 extracted human mandibular molars. The temperature rise under the dentin disks (n = 12) during the light-curing of three RBMs, i.e. an Ormocer-based composite resin (Ceram. X, Dentsply DeTrey), a low-shrinkage silorane-based composite (Filtek P90, 3M ESPE), and a giomer (Beautifil II, Shofu GmbH), was measured with a K-type thermocouple wire. The DCs of the materials were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results The temperature rise under the demineralized dentin disks was higher than that under the non-demineralized dentin disks during the polymerization of all restorative materials (p < 0.05). Filtek P90 induced higher temperature rise during polymerization than Ceram.X and Beautifil II under demineralized dentin (p < 0.05). The temperature rise under demineralized dentin during Filtek P90 polymerization exceeded the threshold value (5.5℃), with no significant differences between the DCs of the test materials (p > 0.05). Conclusions Although there were no significant differences in the DCs, the temperature rise under demineralized dentin disks for the silorane-based composite was higher than that for dimethacrylate-based restorative materials, particularly with QTH LCU. PMID:25110638

  12. Compressive fatigue limit of four types of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Song; Öhman, Caroline; Jefferies, Steven R; Gray, Holly; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quasi-static compressive strength and the compressive fatigue limit of four different dental restorative materials, before and after aging in distilled water for 30 days. A conventional glass ionomer cement (Fuji IX GP; IG), a zinc-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Chemfil rock; CF), a light curable resin-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC; LC) and a resin-based composite (Quixfil; QF) were investigated. Cylindrical specimens (4mm in diameter and 6mm in height) were prepared according to the manufacturer׳s instructions. The compressive fatigue limit was obtained using the staircase method. Samples were tested in distilled water at 37°C, at a frequency of 10Hz with 10(5) cycles set as run-out. 17 fatigue samples were tested for each group. Two-way ANOVA and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey׳s post-hoc test were used to analyze the results. Among the four types of materials, the resin-based composite exhibited the highest compressive strength (244±13.0MPa) and compressive fatigue limit (134±7.8MPa), followed by the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement (168±8.5MPa and 92±6.6MPa, respectively) after one day of storage in distilled water. After being stored for 30 days, all specimens showed an increase in compressive strength. Aging showed no effect on the compressive fatigue limit of the resin-based composite and the light-cured resin reinforced glass ionomer cement, however, the conventional glass ionomer cements showed a drastic decrease (37% for IG, 31% for CF) in compressive fatigue limit. In conclusion, in the present study, resin modified GIC and resin-based composite were found to have superior mechanical properties to conventional GIC. PMID:27085845

  13. Molecular Toxicology of Substances Released from Resin–Based Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Bakopoulou, Athina; Papadopoulos, Triantafillos; Garefis, Pavlos

    2009-01-01

    Resin-based dental restorative materials are extensively used today in dentistry. However, significant concerns still remain regarding their biocompatibility. For this reason, significant scientific effort has been focused on the determination of the molecular toxicology of substances released by these biomaterials, using several tools for risk assessment, including exposure assessment, hazard identification and dose-response analysis. These studies have shown that substances released by these materials can cause significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects, leading to irreversible disturbance of basic cellular functions. The aim of this article is to review current knowledge related to dental composites’ molecular toxicology and to give implications for possible improvements concerning their biocompatibility. PMID:19865523

  14. Comparison of ProTaper and Mtwo retreatment systems in the removal of resin-based root canal obturation materials during retreatment.

    PubMed

    Iriboz, Emre; Sazak Öveçoğlu, Hesna

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the ProTaper and Mtwo retreatment systems for removal of resin-based obturation techniques during retreatment. A total of 160 maxillary anterior teeth were enlarged to size 30 using ProTaper and Mtwo rotary instruments. Teeth were randomly divided into eight groups. Resilon + Epiphany, gutta-percha + Epiphany, gutta-percha + AH Plus and gutta-percha + Kerr Pulp Canal Sealer (PCS) combinations were used for obturation. ProTaper and Mtwo retreatment files were used for removal of root canal treatments. After clearing the roots, the teeth were split vertically into halves, and the cleanliness of the canal walls was determined by scanning electron microscopy. Specimens obturated with gutta-percha and Kerr PCS displayed significantly more remnant obturation material than did specimens filled with resin-based obturation materials. Teeth prepared with Mtwo instruments contained significantly more remnant filling material than did teeth prepared with ProTaper. ProTaper files were significantly faster than Mtwo instruments in terms of the mean time of retreatment and time required to reach working length. The Resilon + Epiphany and AH Plus + gutta-percha obturation materials were removed more easily than were the Epiphany + gutta-percha and Kerr PCS + gutta-percha obturation materials. Although ProTaper retreatment files worked faster than did Mtwo retreatment files in terms of removing root canal obturation materials, both retreatment systems are effective, reliable and fast. PMID:24697958

  15. Preheating of resin-based flowable materials in a microwave device: a promising approach to increasing hardness and softening resistance under cariogenic challenge.

    PubMed

    Borges, Boniek Castillo; Barreto, Adrielle Silva; Gomes, Cláudia Lobelli; Silva, Talles Rodrigo; Alves-Júnior, Clodomiro; Pinheiro, Isauremi Vieira; Braz, Rodivan; Montes, Marcos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether preheated resin-based flowable restoratives would show increased hardness and softening susceptibility after an early cariogenic challenge. Fluroshield- Yellowed, Bioseal, Wave, Master Flow, Fluroshield-White, Conseal F, Filtek Z350 Flow, and Opallis Flow were tested. Preheating was performed using a microwave device. Five specimens of each preheated or room temperature material (n = 5) were fabricated. Hardness was assessed before and after a cariogenic challenge. The analysis was done by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures (cariogenic challenge) and Tukey's test for multiple comparisons ( PMID:24624378

  16. Chelating resin-based extraction of DNA from dental pulp and sex determination from incinerated teeth with Y-chromosomal alphoid repeat and short tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Tsukasa; Iwasa, Mineo; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Isobe, Ichiro; Matoba, Ryoji; Yokoi, Motoo; Nagao, Masataka

    2002-09-01

    A procedure utilizing Chelex 100, chelating resin, was adapted to extract DNA from dental pulp. The procedure was simple and rapid, involved no organic solvents, and did not require multiple tube transfers. The extraction of DNA from dental pulp using this method was as efficient, or more so, than using proteinase K and phenol-chloroform extraction. In this study, the Chelex method was used with amplification and typing at Y-chromosomal loci to determine the effects of temperature on the sex determination of the teeth. The extracted teeth were incinerated in a dental furnace for 2 minutes at 100 degrees C, 200 degrees C, 300 degrees C, 400 degrees C, and 500 degrees C. After the isolation of DNA from the dental pulp by the Chelex method, alphoid repeats, and short tandem repeats, the human Y chromosome (DYZ3), DYS19, SYS389, DYS390, and DYS393 could be amplified and typed in all samples incinerated at up to 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. The DYS389 locus in some samples could not be amplified at 300 degrees C for 2 minutes. An autopsy case is described in which genotypings of DYS19, DYS390, and DYS393 from dental pulp obtained from a burned body were needed. The data presented in this report suggest that Chelex 100-based DNA extraction, amplification, and typing are possible in burned teeth in forensic autopsy cases. PMID:12198355

  17. [Biocompatibility of dental materials: Part 2. Materials with mucosal contact].

    PubMed

    Klötzer, W T; Reuling, N

    1990-08-01

    Dental materials which are supposed to contact the oral, mucous membranes during their intended dental use may affect our patients health in different ways. Their local and systemic toxicity, and their allergenic and tumorigenic potential are reviewed and methods of biocompatibility testing discussed. Special emphasis is placed on impression materials, denture base resins and dental alloys. PMID:2269166

  18. In situ reaction kinetic analysis of dental restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younas, Basma; Samad Khan, Abdul; Muzaffar, Danish; Hussain, Ijaz; Chaudhry, Aqif Anwar; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate in situ structural and thermal changes of dental restorative materials at periodical time intervals. The commercial materials included zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), zinc phosphate type I (ZnPO4), glass ionomer cement type II (GIC) and resin-based nano-omposite (Filtek Z350 XT). These materials were processed according to manufacturer's instructions. For the structural analysis Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used at high resolution. TGA was used to evaluate thermal weight-loss. The FTIR spectra were collected at periodic time intervals. FTIR spectra showed that with time passing all materials exhibited an increase in peak intensities and a new appearance of shoulders and shifting of peaks for example, ZnPO4 (P-O), ZOE (C═O, C═N, C-O-C), GIC (COO-, C-H, Si-OH), composites (C═O, C═C, C═N, C-N-H). The peaks were replaced by bands and these bands became broader with time interval. Composites showed a degree of conversion and new peaks corresponded to the cross-linking of polymer composites. TGA analysis showed that significant changes in weight loss of set materials were observed after 24 h, where ZOE showed continuous changes in thermal degradation. The spectral changes and thermal degradation with time interval elucidated in situ setting behaviour and understanding of their bonding compatibility with tooth structure and change in relation to time.

  19. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-01-01

    Discusses materials used by dentists to restore teeth after decay has been removed. Shows how dental-material science is an interdisciplinary field in which chemistry plays a major part. Reviews the many developments polymer chemistry has contributed to the field of dental fillings. (CCM)

  20. Ethical sourcing of dental instruments and materials.

    PubMed

    Kelly, P T; Bhutta, M

    2010-10-23

    There is evidence that dental instruments and materials are being manufactured in the developing world under poor labour conditions. It is suggested that the level of awareness of the dental team with regard to this is raised and that a culture of greater inquiry into the sourcing of instruments and materials is developed. PMID:20966996

  1. Designing Multiagent Dental Materials for Enhanced Resistance to Biofilm Damage at the Bonded Interface.

    PubMed

    Melo, Mary Anne; Orrego, Santiago; Weir, Michael D; Xu, Huakun H K; Arola, Dwayne D

    2016-05-11

    The oral environment is considered to be an asperous environment for restored tooth structure. Recurrent dental caries is a common cause of failure of tooth-colored restorations. Bacterial acids, microleakage, and cyclic stresses can lead to deterioration of the polymeric resin-tooth bonded interface. Research on the incorporation of cutting-edge anticaries agents for the design of new, long-lasting, bioactive resin-based dental materials is demanding and provoking work. Released antibacterial agents such as silver nanoparticles (NAg), nonreleased antibacterial macromolecules (DMAHDM, dimethylaminohexadecyl methacrylate), and released acid neutralizer amorphous calcium phosphate nanoparticles (NACP) have shown potential as individual and dual anticaries approaches. In this study, these agents were synthesized, and a prospective combination was incorporated into all the dental materials required to perform a composite restoration: dental primer, adhesive, and composite. We focused on combining different dental materials loaded with multiagents to improve the durability of the complex dental bonding interface. A combined effect of bacterial acid attack and fatigue on the bonding interface simulated the harsh oral environment. Human saliva-derived oral biofilm was grown on each sample prior to the cyclic loading. The oral biofilm viability during the fatigue performance was monitored by the live-dead assay. Damage of the samples that developed during the test was quantified from the fatigue life distributions. Results indicate that the resultant multiagent dental composite materials were able to reduce the acidic impact of the oral biofilm, thereby improving the strength and resistance to fatigue failure of the dentin-resin bonded interface. In summary, this study shows that dental restorative materials containing multiple therapeutic agents of different chemical characteristics can be beneficial toward improving resistance to mechanical and acidic challenges in oral

  2. Penetration of a resin-based filling material into lateral root canals and quality of obturation by different techniques.

    PubMed

    Michelotto, André Luiz da Costa; Moura-Netto, Cacio; Araki, Angela Toshie; Akisue, Eduardo; Sydney, Gilson Blitzkow

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the penetration of a resin/polyester polymer-based material (Resilon Real Seal; SybronEndo Corp., Orange, USA) into simulated lateral canals, and the quality of obturations by different techniques. A total of 30 standardized simulated canals were divided into three groups according to the technique of obturation used: MS (McSpadden), SB (SystemB/Obtura II), and LC (Lateral Condensation). To analyze the penetration of the filling material, the simulated canals were digitalized and the images were analyzed using the Leica QWIN Pro v2.3 software. The data of the middle and apical thirds were separately submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by the Tukey's test for the comparison of the techniques. Results showed a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB) in the middle third, and a significant difference (p < 0.05) between groups (LC < SB and MS < SB) in the apical third. To analyze the quality of the obturations, the canals were radiographed and evaluated by three examiners. The Kappa test on interexaminer agreement and the nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis test indicated no significant difference between filling techniques. It was concluded that Resilon achieves greater levels of penetration when associated with thermoplastic obturation techniques. PMID:25466332

  3. Radiopacity of different resin-based and conventional luting cements compared to human and bovine teeth.

    PubMed

    Pekkan, Gürel; Ozcan, Mutlu

    2012-02-01

    This study evaluated the radiopacity of different resin-based luting materials and compared the results to human and bovine dental hard tissues. Disc specimens (N=130, n=10 per group) (diameter: 6 mm, thickness: 1 mm) were prepared from 10 resin-based and 3 conventional luting cements. Human canine dentin (n=10), bovine enamel (n=10), bovine dentin (n=10) and Aluminium (Al) step wedge were used as references. The optical density values of each material were measured from radiographic images using a transmission densitometer. Al step wedge thickness and optical density values were plotted and equivalent Al thickness values were determined for radiopacity measurements of each material. The radiopacity values of conventional cements and two resin luting materials (Rely X Unicem and Variolink II), were significantly higher than that of bovine enamel that could be preferred for restorations cemented on enamel. Since all examined resin-based luting materials showed radiopacity values equivalent to or greater than that of human and bovine dentin, they could be considered suitable for the restorations cemented on dentin. PMID:22277608

  4. Roughness Measurement of Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shulev, Assen; Roussev, Ilia; Karpuzov, Simeon; Stoilov, Georgi; Ignatova, Detelina; See, Constantin von; Mitov, Gergo

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a roughness measurement of zirconia ceramics, widely used for dental applications. Surface roughness variations caused by the most commonly used dental instruments for intraoral grinding and polishing are estimated. The applied technique is simple and utilizes the speckle properties of the scattered laser light. It could be easily implemented even in dental clinic environment. The main criteria for roughness estimation is the average speckle size, which varies with the roughness of zirconia. The algorithm used for the speckle size estimation is based on the normalized autocorrelation approach.

  5. Tissue mimicking materials for dental ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Brown, Elliott R; White, Shane N

    2008-04-01

    While acoustic tissue mimicking materials have been explored for a variety of soft and hard biological tissues, no dental hard tissue mimicking materials have been characterized. Tooth phantoms are necessary to better understand acoustic phenomenology within the tooth environment and to accelerate the advancement of dental ultrasound imaging systems. In this study, soda lime glass and dental composite were explored as surrogates for human enamel and dentin, respectively, in terms of compressional velocity, attenuation, and acoustic impedance. The results suggest that a tooth phantom consisting of glass and composite can effectively mimic the acoustic behavior of a natural human tooth. PMID:18396919

  6. Hardness and modulus of elasticity of primary and permanent teeth after wear against different dental materials

    PubMed Central

    Galo, Rodrigo; Contente, Marta Maria Martins Giamatei; Galafassi, Daniel; Borsatto, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the Young's modulus and the hardness of deciduous and permanent teeth following wear challenges using different dental materials. Materials and Methods: Wear challenges were performed against four dental materials: A resin-based fissure sealant (Fluoroshield®), a glass ionomer based fissure sealant (Vitremer®), and two microhybrid composite resins (Filtek Z250 and P90®). Using the pin-on-plate design, a deciduous or a permanent tooth was made into a pin (4 mm × 4 mm × 2 mm) working at a 3 N vertical load, 1 Hz frequency, and 900 cycles (15 min) with Fusayama artificial saliva as a lubricant. Before and after the tribological tests, the hardness and elasticity modulus of the tooth samples were measured by creating a nanoindentation at load forces up to 50 mN and 150 mN. All of the results were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and post-hoc Duncan's tests (P < 0.05). Results: No difference in hardness was encountered between deciduous and permanent teeth (P < 0.05) or modulus of elasticity (P < 0.05) before or after the wear challenges for all of the dental materials tested. Conclusions: Wear challenges against the studied dental materials did not alter the properties of permanent or deciduous teeth after the application of a 3 N load. PMID:26929700

  7. Adhesion of Dental Materials to Tooth Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sumita B.

    2000-03-01

    The understanding and proper application of the principles of adhesion has brought forth a new paradigm in the realm of esthetic dentistry. Modern restorative tooth procedures can now conserve the remaining tooth-structure and also provide for the strengthening of the tooth. Adhesive restorative techniques call for the application and curing of the dental adhesive at the interface between the tooth tissue and the filling material. Hence the success of the restoration depends largely on the integrity of this interface. The mechanism of adhesion of the bonding materials to the dental hard tissue will be discussed in this paper. There are four main steps that occur during the application of the dental adhesive to the oral hard tissues: 1) The first step is the creation of a microstructure in the tooth enamel or dentin by means of an acidic material. This can be through the application of a separate etchant or can be accomplished in situ by the adhesive/primer. This agent has to be effective in removing or modifying the proteinaceous “smear” layer, which would otherwise act as a weak boundary layer on the surface to be bonded. 2) The primer/adhesive must then be able to wet and penetrate the microstructure created in the tooth. Since the surface energies of etched enamel and that of etched dentin are different finding one material to prime both types of dental tissues can be quite challenging. 3) The ionomer types of materials, particularly those that are carboxylate ion-containing, can chemically bond with the calcium ions of the hydroxyapatite mineral. 4) Polymerization in situ allows for micromechanical interlocking of the adhesive. The importance of having the right mechanical properties of the cured adhesive layer and its role in absorbing and dissipating stresses encountered by a restored tooth will also be discussed.

  8. Fifty years of Brazilian Dental Materials Group: scientific contributions of dental materials field evaluated by systematic review

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Wellington Luiz de Oliveira; SILVA, Tiago Machado; LIMA, Giana da Silveira; SILVA, Adriana Fernandes; PIVA, Evandro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective A systematic review was conducted to analyze Brazilian scientific and technological production related to the dental materials field over the past 50 years. Material and Methods This study followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (Prisma) statement. Searches were performed until December 2014 in six databases: MedLine (PubMed), Scopus, LILACS, IBECS, BBO, and the Cochrane Library. Additionally, the Brazilian patent database (INPI - Instituto Nacional de Propriedade Industrial) was screened in order to get an overview of Brazilian technological development in the dental materials field. Two reviewers independently analyzed the documents. Only studies and patents related to dental materials were included in this review. Data regarding the material category, dental specialty, number of documents and patents, filiation countries, and the number of citations were tabulated and analyzed in Microsoft Office Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, Washington, United States). Results A total of 115,806 studies and 53 patents were related to dental materials and were included in this review. Brazil had 8% affiliation in studies related to dental materials, and the majority of the papers published were related to dental implants (1,137 papers), synthetic resins (681 papers), dental cements (440 papers), dental alloys (392 papers) and dental adhesives (361 papers). The Brazilian technological development with patented dental materials was smaller than the scientific production. The most patented type of material was dental alloys (11 patents), followed by dental implants (8 patents) and composite resins (7 patents). Conclusions Dental materials science has had a substantial number of records, demonstrating an important presence in scientific and technological development of dentistry. In addition, it is important to approximate the relationship between academia and industry to expand the technological development in

  9. Development of remineralizing, antibacterial dental materials.

    PubMed

    Mehdawi, Idris; Neel, Ensanya A Abou; Valappil, Sabeel P; Palmer, Graham; Salih, Vehid; Pratten, Jonathan; Spratt, Dave A; Young, Anne M

    2009-09-01

    Light curable methacrylate dental monomers containing reactive calcium phosphate filler (monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) with particle diameter of 29 or 90microm) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP) at 1:1 weight ratio in a powder:liquid ratio (PLR) of 1:1 or 3:1 and chlorhexidine diacetate (0 or 5 wt.%), were investigated. Upon light exposure, approximately 90% monomer conversion was gained irrespective of the formulation. Increasing the PLR promoted water sorption by the set material, induced expansion and enhanced calcium, phosphate and chlorhexidine release. Concomitantly, a decline in compressive and biaxial flexural strengths occurred. With a reduction in MCPM particle diameter, however, calcium and phosphate release was reduced and less deterioration in strength observed. After 24h, the remaining MCPM had reacted with water and beta-TCP, forming, within the set materials, brushite of lower solubility. This provided a novel means to control water sorption, component release and strength properties. Measurable chlorhexidine release was observed for 6weeks. Both diffusion rate and total percentage of chlorhexidine release decreased with lowering PLR or by adding buffer to the storage solutions. Higher chlorhexidine release was associated with reduced bacterial growth on agar plates and in a biofilm fermenter. In cell growth media, brushite and hydroxyapatite crystals precipitated on the composite material surfaces. Cells spread on both these crystals and the exposed polymer composite surfaces, indicating their cell compatibility. These formulations could be suitable antibacterial, biocompatible and remineralizing dental adhesives/liners. PMID:19410530

  10. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    PubMed

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. PMID:27524015

  11. The Chemistry of Modern Dental Filling Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, John W.; Anstice, H. Mary

    1999-11-01

    The chemistry underpinning modern tooth-colored dental fillings is described. Two broad groups of material are covered, the so-called composite resins and the glass-ionomer cements. Composite resins consist of bulky difunctional monomers together with high loadings of powdered inorganic fillers, and they set by addition polymerization. Glass-ionomers consist of aqueous polymeric acids, such as polyacrylic acid, plus basic glass powders. They set by a neutralization reaction, but leave a substantial amount of the glass unreacted, to act as reinforcing filler. Various attempts have been made to combine the attractive properties of these materials, and the different types of hybrids of them are described. The importance of chemistry to this important branch of health care is emphasized.

  12. Dental Assisting Course. Bilingual Vocational Instructional Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Cox, Guadalupe

    This course in dental assisting, one of a series of bilingual English-Spanish vocational education courses, is designed to prepare the student to assist the dentist at the chairside in the dental operatory, to perform reception and clerical functions, and to carry out selected dental laboratory work. The course covers an introduction to the…

  13. Nanotechnology-based restorative materials for dental caries management

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Mary A.S.; Guedes, Sarah F.F.; Xu, Hockin H.K.; Rodrigues, Lidiany K.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to dental materials as an innovative concept for the development of materials with better properties and anticaries potential. In this review we discuss the current progress and future applications of functional nanoparticles incorporated in dental restorative materials as useful strategies to dental caries management. We also overview proposed antimicrobial and remineralizing mechanisms. Nanomaterials have great potential to decrease biofilm accumulation, inhibit the demineralization process, to be used for remineralizing tooth structure, and to combat caries-related bacteria. These results are encouraging and open the doors to future clinical studies that will allow the therapeutic value of nanotechnology-based restorative materials to be established. PMID:23810638

  14. Infrared Spectroscopic Identification of Chosen Dental Materials and Natural Teeth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hędzelek, W.; Marcinkowska, A.; Domka, L.; Wachowiak, R.

    2008-08-01

    Studies using solid phase infrared spectroscopy in the range of 400 to 4000 wave numbers were conducted in order to quickly identify solid tooth fragments and differentiate them from dental materials used in the dental practice. The frequently employed dental materials were evaluated. Natural chemical structure of permanent teeth obtained from donors of various ages provided the reference material. The infrared vibrations detected in infrared transmission spectra depended on the chemical structure of examined compound. Comparable distinctive peaks in infrared spectra of natural teeth and inorganic dental materials (porcelain) were exhibited. Analogous infrared spectra of dental materials consisting of organic matrix with inorganic fillers were found. In the case of acrylic materials specific organic groups were enhanced. The prepared database of infrared transmission spectra included 23 dental materials, facilitating their appropriate identification. Application of infrared spectroscopy allowed for a quick differential identification of typical dental materials produced from organic compounds for inorganic restorations (porcelain) and of tooth structure-resembling hydroxyapatite and its contaminate forms with fluoride and carbonate ions.

  15. In Vitro Antibacterial Activity of a Novel Resin-Based Pulp Capping Material Containing the Quaternary Ammonium Salt MAE-DB and Portland Cement

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongchen; Zhou, Wei; Ban, Jinghao; Wei, Jingjing; Liu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Background Vital pulp preservation in the treatment of deep caries is challenging due to bacterial infection. The objectives of this study were to synthesize a novel, light-cured composite material containing bioactive calcium-silicate (Portland cement, PC) and the antimicrobial quaternary ammonium salt monomer 2-methacryloxylethyl dodecyl methyl ammonium bromide (MAE-DB) and to evaluate its effects on Streptococcus mutans growth in vitro. Methods The experimental material was prepared from a 2∶1 ratio of PC mixed with a resin of 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate, bisphenol glycerolate dimethacrylate, and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (4∶3∶1) containing 5 wt% MAE-DB. Cured resin containing 5% MAE-DB without PC served as the positive control material, and resin without MAE-DB or PC served as the negative control material. Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and calcium hydroxide (Dycal) served as commercial controls. S. mutans biofilm formation on material surfaces and growth in the culture medium were tested according to colony-forming units (CFUs) and metabolic activity after 24 h incubation over freshly prepared samples or samples aged in water for 6 months. Biofilm formation was also assessed by Live/Dead staining and scanning electron microscopy. Results S. mutans biofilm formation on the experimental material was significantly inhibited, with CFU counts, metabolic activity, viability staining, and morphology similar to those of biofilms on the positive control material. None of the materials affected bacterial growth in solution. Contact-inhibition of biofilm formation was retained by the aged experimental material. Significant biofilm formation was observed on MTA and Dycal. Conclusion The synthesized material containing HEMA-BisGMA-TEGDMA resin with MAE-DB as the antimicrobial agent and PC to support mineralized tissue formation inhibited S. mutans biofilm formation even after aging in water for 6 months, but had no inhibitory effect on bacteria in solution

  16. International distribution of dental materials publications and patents.

    PubMed

    Garrison, H H; Herman, S S; Lipton, J A

    1992-01-01

    International patterns of research and development in the field of restorative dental materials were examined with data on publications (1981-85) and patents (1979-88). It was found that United States-based authors produced approximately one-half of all dental materials journal articles published worldwide, while US inventors had nearly the same share of the US dental materials patents. During the periods studied, the share of US patents in dental materials awarded to US inventors declined, while the share of US patents awarded to Japanese inventors rose. The role of the United States in research (as measured by journal articles) remained stable. Nations differed in the degree to which their researchers specialized in particular research areas. US-based authors and inventors were relatively over-represented in prosthetic materials and under-represented in dental cements, an area in which the British and the Japanese concentrated more of their activity. There was some, but not complete, agreement in the patterns of national specialization as indexed by patent and publication data. When dental materials data were compared with data for broader fields of science and technology, important differences were found. For publications, US-based authors displayed greater dominance in dental materials than in the fields of dentistry, chemistry, and materials science. US-based inventors' share of US dental materials patents was smaller than their share of all US patents. These analyses demonstrated that it was possible to use indicators derived from publication and patent data files to conduct insightful studies of a discrete specialty of science and technology. PMID:1521683

  17. Iatrogenic Damage to the Periodontium by Chemicals and Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Biju; Sirajuddin, Syed; Gundapaneni, Veenadharini; Biswas, Shriparna; MN, Kumuda; MP, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity and tissue reactions to dental materials are receiving more attention as a wide variety of materials are used and as federal agencies demonstrate more concern in this area. A further indication of the importance of the interaction of materials and tissues is the development of recommended standard practices and tests for the biological interaction of materials. PMID:26312092

  18. Ablation by-products of dental materials from the Er:YAG laser and the dental handpiece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigdor, Harvey A.; Visuri, Steven R.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    1995-05-01

    Recently there has been much interest in lasers and their potential use to replace the dental drill. The research has been directed towards vital dental tissues. It must be understood that any laser to be used in dentistry which will replace the dental drill must also ablate and remove existing dental materials. Some concern exists about the ablation products when the Er:YAG laser is used to ablate dental materials. It is incumbent on the professionals using these lasers to understand the materials being produced by these lasers and protect themselves and their patients from possible toxic products. It is the intent of this paper to evaluate the products produced by the ablation of both dental amalgam and composite dental restorative materials and compare them with those produced by the traditional dental handpiece (drill).

  19. Moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant: A boon

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Prasanna Kumar; Konde, Sapna; Raj, Sunil N.; Kumar, Narayan Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pit and fissure sealants are highly effective in preventing occlusal caries. The present study clinically evaluated and compared the retention and development of caries when sealed with moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant, conventional resin-based sealant with and without a bonding agent, and Glass Ionomer Cement Sealant in young permanent teeth. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 healthy cooperative children aged 6-9 years who were at high caries risk with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were included in the study. Teeth were divided into 4 groups using a full-factorial design, and each of the molars was sealed with the four different sealant material. Evaluation of sealant retention and development of caries was performed at 6 and 12 months using Modified Simonsen's criteria. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Kruskal-Wallis Test and Mann-Whitney Test. Result and Conclusion: The result from the present study indicated that moisture-tolerant resin-based sealant could be successfully used as a pit and fissure sealant because its hydrophilic chemistry makes it less technique sensitive and simplifies the sealant application procedure. PMID:24124301

  20. Finite element calculation of residual stress in dental restorative material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassia, Luigi; D'Amore, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    A finite element methodology for residual stresses calculation in dental restorative materials is proposed. The material under concern is a multifunctional methacrylate-based composite for dental restorations, activated by visible light. Reaction kinetics, curing shrinkage, and viscoelastic relaxation functions were required as input data on a structural finite element solver. Post cure effects were considered in order to quantify the residual stresses coming out from natural contraction with respect to those debited to the chemical shrinkage. The analysis showed for a given test case that residual stresses frozen in the dental restoration at uniform temperature of 37°C are of the same order of magnitude of the strength of the dental composite material per se.

  1. Allergic Reactions to Dental Materials-A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Radhika; Sachdev, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Utility of various dental materials ranging from diagnosis to rehabilitation for the management of oral diseases are not devoid of posing a potential risk of inducing allergic reactions to the patient, technician and dentist. This review aims to develop a systematic approach for the selection and monitoring of dental materials available in the market thereby giving an insight to predict their risk of inducing allergic reactions. Materials and Methods Our data included 71 relevant articles which included 60 case reports, 8 prospective studies and 3 retrospective studies. The source of these articles was Pub Med search done with the following terms: allergies to impression materials, sodium hypochlorite, Ledermix paste, zinc oxide eugenol, formaldehyde, Latex gloves, Methyl methacrylate, fissure sealant, composites, mercury, Nickel-chromium, Titanium, polishing paste and local anaesthesia. All the relevant articles and their references were analysed. The clinical manifestations of allergy to different dental materials based on different case reports were reviewed. Results After reviewing the literature, we found that the dental material reported to cause most adverse reactions in patients is amalgam and the incidence of oral lichenoid reactions adjacent to amalgam restorations occur more often than other dental materials. Conclusion The most common allergic reactions in dental staff are allergies to latex, acrylates and formaldehyde. While polymethylmethacrylates and latex trigger delayed hypersensitivity reactions, sodium metabisulphite and nickel cause immediate reactions. Over the last few years, due to the rise in number of patients with allergies from different materials, the practicing dentists should have knowledge about documented allergies to known materials and thus avoid such allergic manifestations in the dental clinic. PMID:26557634

  2. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  3. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads.

    PubMed

    Chun, Keyoung Jin; Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130-135, 86.6-124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  4. Comparative study of mechanical properties of dental restorative materials and dental hard tissues in compressive loads

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Yeop

    2014-01-01

    There are two objectives. One is to show the differences in the mechanical properties of various dental restorative materials compared to those of enamel and dentin. The other is to ascertain which dental restorative materials are more suitable for clinical treatments. Amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy were processed as dental restorative material specimens. The specimens (width, height, and length of 1.2, 1.2, and 3.0 mm, respectively) were compressed at a constant loading speed of 0.1 mm/min. The maximum stress (115.0 ± 40.6, 55.0 ± 24.8, 291.2 ± 45.3, 274.6 ± 52.2, 2206.0 ± 522.9, and 953.4 ± 132.1 MPa), maximum strain (7.8% ± 0.5%, 4.0% ± 0.1%, 12.7% ± 0.8%, 32.8% ± 0.5%, 63.5% ± 14.0%, and 45.3% ± 7.4%), and elastic modulus (1437.5 ± 507.2, 1548.4 ± 583.5, 2323.4 ± 322.4, 833.1 ± 92.4, 3895.2 ± 202.9, and 2222.7 ± 277.6 MPa) were evident for amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy, respectively. The reference hardness value of amalgam, dental ceramic, gold alloy, dental resin, zirconia, and titanium alloy was 90, 420, 130–135, 86.6–124.2, 1250, and 349, respectively. Since enamel grinds food, its abrasion resistance is important. Therefore, hardness value should be prioritized for enamel. Since dentin absorbs bite forces, mechanical properties should be prioritized for dentin. The results suggest that gold alloy simultaneously has a hardness value lower than enamel (74.8 ± 18.1), which is important in the wear of the opposing natural teeth, and higher maximum stress, maximum strain, and elastic modulus than dentin (193.7 ± 30.6 MPa, 11.9% ± 0.1%, 1653.7 ± 277.9 MPa, respectively), which are important considering the rigidity to absorb bite forces. PMID:25352921

  5. Various Effects of Sandblasting of Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Nishigawa, Goro; Maruo, Yukinori; Irie, Masao; Maeda, Naoto; Yoshihara, Kumiko; Nagaoka, Noriyuki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Minagi, Shogo

    2016-01-01

    Background Sandblasting particles which remain on the surfaces of dental restorations are removed prior to cementation. It is probable that adhesive strength between luting material and sandblasting particle remnants might exceed that with restorative material. If that being the case, blasting particles adhere to sandblasted material surface could be instrumental to increasing adhesive strength like underlying bonding mechanism between luting material and silanized particles of tribochemical silica coating-treated surface. We hypothesize that ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces, which were pretreated with sandblasting, may affect adhesive strength of a resin luting material to dental restorative materials. Methods We therefore observed adhesive strength of resin luting material to aluminum oxide was greater than those to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy beforehand. To measure the shear bond strengths of resin luting material to zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, forty specimens of each restorative material were prepared. Bonding surfaces were polished with silicon abrasive paper and then treated with sandblasting. For each restorative material, 40 sandblasted specimens were equally divided into two groups: ultrasonic cleaning (USC) group and non-ultrasonic cleaning (NUSC) group. After resin luting material was polymerized on bonding surface, shear test was performed to evaluate effect of ultrasonic cleaning of bonding surfaces pretreated with sandblasting on bond strength. Results For both zirconia ceramic and cobalt-chromium alloy, NUSC group showed significantly higher shear bond strength than USC group. Conclusions Ultrasonic cleaning of dental restorations after sandblasting should be avoided to retain improved bonding between these materials. PMID:26764913

  6. Evidence-based dentistry as it relates to dental materials.

    PubMed

    Bayne, Stephen C; Fitzgerald, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based dentistry (EBD) is reviewed in depth to underscore the limitations for evidence-based dental materials information that exist at this time. Anecdotal estimates of evidence for dental practice are in the range of 8 percent to 10 percent. While the process of evaluating the literature base for dental evidence began 20 years ago, it was not practical to implement it until high-speed wireless connections, open access to journals, and omnipresent connections via smart phones became a reality. EBD includes five stages of information collection and analysis, starting with a careful definition of a clinical question using the PICO(T) approach. Clinical evidence in randomized control trials is considered the best. Clinical trial perspectives (prospective, cross-sectional, retrospective) and outcome designs (RCTs, SCTs, CCTs, cohort studies, case-control studies) are quite varied. Aggregation techniques (including meta-analyses) allow meaningful combinations of clinical data from trials with similar designs but with fewer rigors. Appraisals attempt to assess the entire evidence base without bias and answer clinical questions. Varying intensities to these approaches, Cochrane Collaboration, ADA-EBD Library, UTHSCSA CATs Library, are used to answer questions. Dental materials evidence from clinical trials is infrequent, short-term, and often not compliant with current guidelines (registration, CONSORT, PRISMA). Reports in current evidence libraries indicate less than 5 percent of evidence is related to restorative dental materials. PMID:24571523

  7. New developments in jewellery and dental materials.

    PubMed

    Vilaplana, J; Romaguera, C

    1998-08-01

    This communication reviews the latest alloys introduced in the fields of jewellery and dental prostheses. For this we have scanned current patents and others to which we have access, and it is evident that, although not always correctly used, the words "antiallergic", "hypoallergic", "non-allergic", "to avoid allergies", etc., now appear frequently, indicating manufacturers' awareness of the problems that nickel can cause. On the other hand, the problems that may be associated with other sensitizing metals, such as cobalt and palladium, are not yet addressed. PMID:9746182

  8. A Reproducible Oral Microcosm Biofilm Model for Testing Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Rudney, J.D.; Chen, R.; Lenton, P.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Jones, R.S.; Reilly, C.; Fok, A.S.; Aparicio, C.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Most studies of biofilm effects on dental materials use single-species biofilms, or consortia. Microcosm biofilms grown directly from saliva or plaque are much more diverse, but difficult to characterize. We used the Human Oral Microbial Identification Microarray (HOMIM) to validate a reproducible oral microcosm model. Methods and Results Saliva and dental plaque were collected from adults and children. Hydroxyapatite and dental composite disks were inoculated with either saliva or plaque, and microcosm biofilms were grown in a CDC biofilm reactor. In later experiments, the reactor was pulsed with sucrose. DNA from inoculums and microcosms were analyzed by HOMIM for 272 species. Microcosms included about 60% of species from the original inoculum. Biofilms grown on hydroxyapatite and composites were extremely similar. Sucrose-pulsing decreased diversity and pH, but increased the abundance of Streptococcus and Veilonella. Biofilms from the same donor, grown at different times, clustered together. Conclusions This model produced reproducible microcosm biofilms that were representative of the oral microbiota. Sucrose induced changes associated with dental caries. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first use of HOMIM to validate an oral microcosm model that can be used to study the effects of complex biofilms on dental materials. PMID:22925110

  9. [Comparative analysis of conventional dental floss and alternative materials].

    PubMed

    Campos Júnior, A; Passanezi, E; Serizawa, T C; Barros, A S; Navarro, M F; Lopes, E S

    1990-01-01

    The interproximal plaque-removing effect of three different materials (classic dental floss, rafia floss and indian floss) was tested in a group of 80 males (18 years-old). After two weeks all the materials had the same efficacy in removing the bacterial plaque, with significant reduction in interproximal plaque index. According to an opinion inquiry the rafia floss was the most comfortable material to use and has the lowest cost as well. PMID:2135334

  10. Practitioner, patient, and caries lesion characteristics associated with type of material used to restore carious teeth: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Makhija, Sonia K; Gordan, Valeria V.; Gilbert, Gregg H.; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Pihlstrom, Daniel J.; Qvist, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Background The authors conducted a study to identify factors associated with material use by dentists in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN) when placing the first restoration on permanent tooth surfaces. Methods A total of 182 DPBRN practitioner-investigators provided data on 5,599 posterior teeth with caries. Practitioner-investigators completed an enrollment questionnaire that included the dentist’s age, gender, practice workload, practice type, and years since graduation. When a consented patient presented with a previously un-restored carious surface, practitioner-investigators recorded patient and tooth characteristics. Results Amalgam was used more often than direct resin-based composite (RBC) for posterior carious lesions. Practitioner/practice characteristics (years since graduation and type of practice); patient characteristics (gender, race, age, and dental insurance); and lesion characteristics (tooth location and surface, pre-and post-operative depth) were associated with the type of restorative material used. Conclusions There are several practitioner/practice, patient, and lesion characteristics significantly associated with use of amalgam and RBC: region, years since graduation, dental insurance, tooth location and surface, and pre-and post-operative depth. Clinical implications Amalgam remains a material commonly used by United States dentists to restore posterior caries lesions. PMID:21628683

  11. Backscattering from dental restorations and splint materials during therapeutic radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Farman, A.G.; Sharma, S.; George, D.I.; Wilson, D.; Dodd, D.; Figa, R.; Haskell, B.

    1985-08-01

    Models were constructed to simulate as closely as possible the human oral cavity. Radiation absorbed doses were determined for controls and various test situations involving the presence of dental restorative and splint materials during cobalt-60 irradiation of the models. Adjacent gold full crowns and adjacent solid dental silver amalgam cores both increased the dose to the interproximal gingivae by 20%. Use of orthodontic full bands for splinting the jaws increased the dose to the buccal tissues by an average of 10%. Augmentation of dose through backscatter radiation was determined to be only slight for intracoronal amalgam fillings and stainless steel or plastic bracket splints.

  12. Photo-acoustic analysis of dental materials and tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeleva, Pavlina Jetchkova

    2005-11-01

    The goal of the presented study is the investigation of the feasibility of using optically generated acoustic waves for analysis of dental material below laser-ablation threshold. The temperature rise of dental material and tissue has been modeled analytically and numerically, and measured experimentally. Following interactions with nano- and femto-second laser radiation the temperature rises at a rate of typically 1°C per J/cm 2, along with the generation of an acoustical wave. The results from the models agree with the experiment. The acoustic measurements show differences in the acoustic signal strength and the frequency spectrum when the canal in the porcelain phantom is empty or filled with intralipid solution. The photo-acoustic technique is found to be suitable for detection of liquids under a layer of dental porcelain material, consequently it can be the basis for building an imaging tool for dental diagnostic applications. By generating sound waves in the pulp, one would be able to evaluate it's state and the overall health of the tooth. This is of vital importance for diagnosing initial-stage inflammation.

  13. Dental health: testing the readability of educational materials.

    PubMed

    Blinkhorn, A S

    1982-01-01

    Dental practitioners have an important role in the dissemination of information to their patients and their advice is often reinforced with written health education literature. Unfortunately, this material is often of limited value because of its level of readability. This study covered two aspects of the problem: first, a group of 140 secondary school children were asked to explain the meaning of a selection of words commonly used in dental education and second, the readability of some health education literature was assessed and compared with that of texts in magazines and newspapers. Many of the words were not understood by the children: for instance, over 80% were unsure of the meaning of fluoride tablets, gum disease, gingivitis and oral hygiene. As for readability, the test showed that the material reflects the reading capacity of the designers rather than the ability of the potential target group. These findings pinpoint the need to ensure that dental health education literature is not unduly complex and, for dentists, to take more time explaining the dental vocabulary in lay terminology. The methods used in the study can easily be extrapolated to other areas of health. PMID:7090580

  14. [Fluorescence of dental porcelain: material and methods].

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Porte, C; Naud, C

    1990-06-01

    Dental porcelain emits some fluorescence under the action of ultra-violet rays. This emission may be at the origin of errors in the choice of the colour of a crown. In order to study this fluorescence phenomenon, the following experimental protocol has been developed: 363.8 nm exciting radiation isolated from the emission by an Argon laser; Fluorescence emitted by the sample and dispersed via a spectrometer, protected by a stop-U.V. filter; Influx collected by a photomultiplier, then directed, after passage in a picoamperemeter, toward a mini-computer programmed to print the spectra; Correction of the spectra by a tungsten lamp used at the 2,600 K colour temperature; Use of reference spectra. On the same graph, the sample spectra are represented in solid lines, while the spectrum of the enamel used as a reference is shown as a dotted line. The results show that: Enamel has a fluorescence spectrum which has the shape of a wide band, with a maximum of 450 nm (characteristic of a blue-green shade) and a slow decrease up to 680 nm. The enamel fluorescence does not depend on the colour of the tooth; Dentine has a distribution spectrum which is similar to that of enamel but is three times fuller; The spectra of the ceramic samples reveal: a wide band due to transition metals, fine lines due to rare earth (terbium and europium). When the saturation degree of the ceramic increases, its fluorescence colour varies due to the relative increase in the amplitude of the lines in relation to the bands. Thus, when the sample colour progresses from B1 to B4, its fluorescence colour becomes greener.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2207845

  15. Degradation, Fatigue, and Failure of Resin Dental Composite Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.

    2008-11-03

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle- or fiber-filler-containing indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on the effects of degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed-mode loading on flexure strength and fracture toughness. Several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading, and 3D tomography with multi-axial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and/or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection); after that time period, failure most often results from secondary decay.

  16. Degradation, fatigue and failure of resin dental composite materials

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James L.

    2008-01-01

    The intent of this article is to review the numerous factors that affect the mechanical properties of particle or fiber filler containing, indirect dental resin composite materials. The focus will be on degradation due to aging in different media, mainly water and water and ethanol, cyclic loading, and mixed mode loading on the flexure strength and fracture toughness. Next several selected papers will be examined in detail with respect to mixed and cyclic loading and then an examination of 3D tomography using multiaxial compression specimens. The main cause of failure, for most dental resin composites, is the breakdown of the resin matrix and or the interface between the filler and the resin matrix. In clinical studies, it appears that failure in the first 5 years is a restoration issue (technique or material selection) and after that time period from secondary decay. PMID:18650540

  17. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    PubMed Central

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  18. Advances in dental veneers: materials, applications, and techniques

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Núbia Pavesi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite; Lovadino, José Roberto; Terada, Raquel Sano Suga; Pascotto, Renata Corrêa

    2012-01-01

    Laminate veneers are a conservative treatment of unaesthetic anterior teeth. The continued development of dental ceramics offers clinicians many options for creating highly aesthetic and functional porcelain veneers. This evolution of materials, ceramics, and adhesive systems permits improvement of the aesthetic of the smile and the self-esteem of the patient. Clinicians should understand the latest ceramic materials in order to be able to recommend them and their applications and techniques, and to ensure the success of the clinical case. The current literature was reviewed to search for the most important parameters determining the long-term success, correct application, and clinical limitations of porcelain veneers. PMID:23674920

  19. Special cluster issue on tribocorrosion of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Mathew T.; Stack, Margaret M.

    2013-10-01

    Tribocorrosion affects all walks of life from oil and gas conversion to biomedical materials. Wear can interact with corrosion to enhance it or impede it; conversely, corrosion can enhance or impede wear. The understanding of the interactions between physical and chemical phenomena has been greatly assisted by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. In dentistry, it is well recognized that erosion due to dissolution (a term physicists use to denote wear) of enamel can result in tooth decay; however, the effects of the oral environment, i.e. pH levels, electrochemical potential and any interactions due to the forces involved in chewing are not well understood. This special cluster issue includes investigations on the fundamentals of wear-corrosion interactions involved in simulated oral environments, including candidate dental implant and veneer materials. The issue commences with a fundamental study of titanium implants and this is followed by an analysis of the behaviour of commonly used temporomandibular devices in a synovial fluid-like environment. The analysis of tribocorrosion mechanisms of Ti6Al4V biomedical alloys in artificial saliva with different pHs is addressed and is followed by a paper on fretting wear, on hydroxyapatite-titanium composites in simulated body fluid, supplemented with protein (bovine serum albumin). The effects of acid treatments on tooth enamel, and as a surface engineering technique for dental implants, are investigated in two further contributions. An analysis of the physiological parameters of intraoral wear is addressed; this is followed by a study of candidate dental materials in common beverages such as tea and coffee with varying acidity and viscosity and the use of wear maps to identify the safety zones for prediction of material degradation in such conditions. Hence, the special cluster issue consists of a range of tribocorrosion contributions involving many aspects of dental tribocorrosion, from analysis of physiological

  20. Tribological behaviour of unveneered and veneered lithium disilicate dental material.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo-Pina, C G; Patas, N; Canhoto, J; Cláudio, R; Olhero, S M; Serro, A P; Ferro, A C; Guedes, M

    2016-01-01

    The friction and wear behaviour of a lithium disilicate dental ceramic against natural dental enamel is studied, including the effect of the presence of a fluorapatite veneering upon the tribological properties of the material. The tribological behaviour was assessed using reciprocating pin-on-plate test configuration, at pH 3 and pH 7. The surface energy of the plates was determined, as well as the zeta potential of fluorapatite, lithium disilicate and enamel particles in artificial saliva. It was found that the friction and wear behaviour of the tested enamel/plate material tribocouples is less severe in unveneered plates. Initial surface roughness of the plate does not affect wear results. However the topography of the resulting wear track affects the corresponding wear loss: a smoother final wear track is associated with lower wear. The surface topography of the wear track, and thus the tribological performance of the tested materials, is very sensitive to the pH of the sliding solution. This is because the dissolution trend, wettability and surface charge of the used materials are pH dependent. Overall friction and wear are higher under basic pH conditions, especially when plates are veneered. A wear model is proposed that correlates the effect of the described parameters with the observed tribological behaviour at pH 7. Attained results show that fluorapatite coating of lithium disilicate dental crowns affects tooth/crown wear behaviour, resulting in increased wear of both the artificial crown and the opposing natural teeth. Coating should therefore be avoided in occlusal crown surfaces. PMID:26342288

  1. Structural use of polymer concrete made with resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1995-08-01

    Recycled poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, plastic waste can be used to produce unsaturated polyester resins. The PET waste is typically found in used beverage bottles that are collected after use in many localities. This research investigated the use of suitable unsaturated polyester resins based on recycled PET for the production of polymer concrete (PC) materials. The properties and structural behavior of unreinforced and steel-reinforced PC materials using resins based on recycled PET were found to be comparable to those obtained with PC materials using virgin resins. Resins based on recycled PET can also relatively easily be altered to achieve a wide variety of properties and performances in the PC. An experimental design also showed that the effect of the level of PET in the resin did not adversely affect the neat resin and the PC mechanical properties. Resins based on recycled PET help in decreasing the cost of PC products, saving energy, and alleviating an environmental problem posed by plastics waste.

  2. Antibacterial dental restorative materials: a state-of-the-art review.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang; Shen, Hong; Suh, Byoung In

    2012-12-01

    This review presents an updated knowledge on the antibacterial dental restorative materials and their performance clinically and in the laboratory. A search of English peer-reviewed dental literature over the last 30 years from PubMed and MEDLINE databases was conducted, and the key words included antibacterial, antimicrobial, dental, primer, adhesive, bonding agent, cement, and composite. Titles and abstracts of the articles listed from search results were reviewed and evaluated for relevancy. In summary, the incorporation of an appropriate amount of antibacterial agent provided dental restorative materials (dental bonding agents, resin composites, resin cements, glass-ionomer cements) antibacterial activity without significantly influencing mechanical properties. PMID:23409624

  3. Interactions between magnetic resonance imaging and dental material

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Chalakuzhiyl Abraham; Maller, Sudhakara; Maheshwaran

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become a common and important life-saving diagnostic tool in recent times, for diseases of the head and neck region. Dentists should be aware of the interactions of various restorative dental materials and different technical factors put to use by an MRI scanning machine. Specific knowledge about these impacts, at the dentist level and at the level of the personnel at the MRI centers can save valuable time for the patient and prevent errors in MRI images. Artifacts from metal restorations are a major hindrance at such times, as they result in disappearance or distortion of the image and loss of important information. PMID:23946562

  4. Recent Advances and Developments in Composite Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, N.B.; Stansbury, J.W.; Bowman, C.N.

    2011-01-01

    Composite dental restorations represent a unique class of biomaterials with severe restrictions on biocompatibility, curing behavior, esthetics, and ultimate material properties. These materials are presently limited by shrinkage and polymerization-induced shrinkage stress, limited toughness, the presence of unreacted monomer that remains following the polymerization, and several other factors. Fortunately, these materials have been the focus of a great deal of research in recent years with the goal of improving restoration performance by changing the initiation system, monomers, and fillers and their coupling agents, and by developing novel polymerization strategies. Here, we review the general characteristics of the polymerization reaction and recent approaches that have been taken to improve composite restorative performance. PMID:20924063

  5. Properties evaluation of silorane, low-shrinkage, non-flowable and flowable resin-based composites in dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Rodrigo S.; Moro, André F.V.; Perez, Cesar R.; Pessôa, Bárbara M.; Dias, Katia R.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study tested the null hypothesis that different classes of direct restorative dental materials: silorane-based resin, low-shrinkage and conventional (non-flowable and flowable) resin-based composite (RBC) do not differ from each other with regard to polymerization shrinkage, depth of cure or microhardness. Methods. 140 RBC samples were fabricated and tested by one calibrated operator. Polymerization shrinkage was measured using a gas pycnometer both before and immediately after curing with 36 J/cm2 light energy density. Depth of cure was determined, using a penetrometer and the Knoop microhardness was tested from the top surface to a depth of 5 mm. Results. Considering polymerization shrinkage, the authors found significant differences (p < 0.05) between different materials: non-flowable RBCs showed lower values compared to flowable RBCs, with the silorane-based resin presenting the smallest shrinkage. The low shrinkage flowable composite performed similarly to non-flowable with significant statistical differences compared to the two other flowable RBCs. Regarding to depth of cure, low-shrinkage flowable RBC, were most effective compared to other groups. Microhardness was generally higher for the non-flowable vs. flowable RBCs (p < 0.05). However, the values for low-shrinkage flowable did not differ significantly from those of non-flowable, but were significantly higher than those of the other flowable RBCs. Clinical Significance. RBCs have undergone many modifications as they have evolved and represent the most relevant restorative materials in today’s dental practice. This study of low-shrinkage RBCs, conventional RBCs (non-flowable and flowable) and silorane-based composite—by in vitro evaluation of volumetric shrinkage, depth of cure and microhardness—reveals that although filler content is an important determinant of polymerization shrinkage, it is not the only variable that affects properties of materials that were tested in this study

  6. Influence of light-curing mode on the cytotoxicity of resin-based surface sealants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Surface sealants have been successfully used in the prevention of erosive tooth wear. However, when multiple tooth surfaces should be sealed, the light-curing procedure is very time-consuming. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether reduced light-curing time (while maintaining similar energy density) has an influence on resin-based surface sealant cytotoxicity. Methods Bovine dentine discs were treated as follows: group 1: untreated, groups 2–5: Seal&Protect and groups 6–9: experimental sealer. Groups 2 and 6 were light-cured (VALO LED light-curing device) for 40 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 3 and 7 for 10 s (1000 mW/cm2), groups 4 and 8 for 7 s (1400 mW/cm2) and groups 5 and 9 for 3 s (3200 mW/cm2). Later, materials were extracted in culture medium for 24 h, and released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity as a measure of cytotoxicity was determined photometrically after cells (dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts) were exposed to the extracts for 24 h. Three independent experiments, for both sample preparation and cytotoxicity testing, were performed. Results Overall, lowest cytotoxicity was observed for the unsealed control group. No significant influence of light-curing settings on the cytotoxicity was observed (p = 0.537 and 0.838 for pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts, respectively). No significant difference in the cytotoxicity of the two sealants was observed after light-curing with same light-curing settings (group 2 vs. 6, 3 vs. 7, 4 vs. 8 and 5 vs. 9: p > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions Shortening the light-curing time, while maintaining constant energy density, resulted in no higher cytotoxicity of the investigated sealants. PMID:24885810

  7. Japanese research and development on metallic biomedical, dental, and healthcare materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niinomi, Mitsuo; Hanawa, Takao; Narushima, Takayuki

    2005-04-01

    There is considerable demand for metallic materials for use in medical and dental devices. Metals and alloys are widely used as biomedical materials and are indispensable in the medical field. In dentistry, metal is used for restorations, orthodontic wires, and dental implants. This article describes R&D on metallic biomaterials primarily conducted by the members of the Japan Institute of Metals.

  8. Pressure behavior of different PEEK materials for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Schwitalla, Andreas Dominik; Spintig, Tobias; Kallage, Ilona; Müller, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-02-01

    Due to its mechanical properties, the biocompatible high-performance material PEEK (polyetheretherketone) and PEEK-based compounds may represent viable alternatives to titanium in the field of dental implantology. Therefore we performed static pressure tests with 11 PEEK materials (two unfilled grades, two grades filled with titanium-dioxide-powder, two grades filled with barium-sulfate-powder, two grades reinforced with short carbon fibers, one grade reinforced with glass fibers and two grades reinforced with continuous carbon fibers) in the form of cylindrical specimens with a diameter of 4, 5 and 6mm. The specimens had a height to diameter ratio of 2:1 and were therefore 8, 10 and 12mm high. The parameters elastic modulus, elastic limit and pressure strength were evaluated. The elastic moduli ranged between 2.65±0.03GPa for specimens of a titanium-dioxide-filled grade and 106.71±14.83GPa for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The elastic limits ranged between 808.1±42.44N for specimens of a barium-sulfate-filled grade and 7256.4±519.86N for specimens reinforced with continuous carbon fibers. The lowest pressure strength of 122.77MPa was observed for specimens of an unfilled grade, whereas the highest pressure strength of 712.67±66.02MPa could be evaluated for specimens containing continuous carbon fibers. Regarding the maximum bite force of a first molar, all tested materials seem to be suitable for the use as dental implants. PMID:26492595

  9. Diamond coated dental bur machining of natural and synthetic dental materials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W

    2004-12-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) burs has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co burs containing 6% Co and 94% WC with an average grain size 1-3 micron were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and the bur it is necessary to etch away the surface Co to prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (H.F.C.V.D.) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterised using scanning electron microscopy (S.E.M.) and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co burs, uncoated WC-Co burs, and diamond embedded (sintered) burs have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, and model tooth materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the burs when machining natural and synthetic dental materials such as those described above. PMID:15747185

  10. Caries-Preventive Effect of High-Viscosity Glass Ionomer and Resin-Based Fissure Sealants on Permanent Teeth: A Systematic Review of Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Mickenautsch, Steffen; Yengopal, Veerasamy

    2016-01-01

    Background Glass-ionomers are traditionally regarded to be inferior to resin as fissure sealants in protecting teeth from dental caries, due to their comparatively lower retention rate. Unlike low-viscosity glass-ionomers, high-viscosity glass-ionomer cements (HVGIC) are placed as sealants by pressing the material into pits and fissures with a petroleum-jelly-coated index finger. Hence, HVGIC sealants are assumed to penetrate pits and fissures deeper, resulting in a higher material retention rate, which may increase its caries-preventive effect. Methods The aim of this review was to answer the question as to whether, in patients with fully erupted permanent molar teeth, HVGIC based fissure sealants are less effective to protect against dental carious lesions in occlusal pits and fissures than resin-based fissure sealants? A systematic literature search in eight databases was conducted. Heterogeneity of accepted trials and imprecision of the established evidence were assessed. Extracted sufficiently homogenous datasets were pooled by use of a random-effects meta-analysis. Internal trial validity was evaluated. The protocol of this systematic review was registered with the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews (PROSPERO / Nr.: CRD42015016007). Results Seven clinical trials were provisionally included for further review. Of these, one was excluded. Seven trial reports reporting on six trials were accepted. From these, 11 datasets were extracted and pooled in four meta-analyses. The results suggest no statistically significant differences after up to 48 months and borderline significant differences in favour of HVGIC sealants after 60 months (RR 0.29; 95% CI: 0.09–0.95; p = 0.04 / RD -0.07; 95% CI: -0.14, -0.01). The point estimates and upper confidence levels after 24, 36, 48 and 60 months of RR 1.36; RR 0.90; RR 0.62; RR 0.29 and 2.78; 1.67; 1.21; 0.95, respectively, further suggest a chronological trend in favour of HVGIC above resin-based

  11. Laser equipment for investigation of light distribution in dental tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisimov, Vladimir N.; Smirmov, Alexander V.; Stafeev, Sergey C.

    1997-04-01

    The description of experimental set-up for investigation of light scattering in dental tissue and dental restorative material is presented. The set-up includes the light source (He-Ne laser), beam shaping light polarization control unit and registration device. The latter represents the computer interfaced CCD-camera. The experimental results of side light scattering in enamel/dentin and in double-layer porcelain are represented. The results of this research may be useful for aesthetic dental restorations.

  12. Multi-material laser densification (MMLD) of dental restorations: Process optimization and properties evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoxuan

    This Ph.D. thesis proposes to investigate the feasibility of laser-assisted dental restoration and to develop a fundamental understanding of the interaction between laser beam and dental materials. Traditional dental restorations are produced by the porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) process, in which a dental restoration is cast from a metallic alloy and then coated with dental porcelains by multiple furnace-firing processes. PFM method is labor-intensive and hence very expensive. In order to fabricate dental restoration units faster and more cost-effectively, the Solid Freeform Fabrication (SFF) technique has been employed in this study. In particular, a Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process has been investigated for its potential to fabricate artificial teeth automatically from 3-D computer dental tooth files. Based on the principle of SFF, the MMLD process utilizes a micro-extruder system to deliver commercial dental alloy and porcelain slurry in a computer-controlled pattern line by line and layer by layer. Instead of firing the artificial tooth/teeth in a furnace, the extruded dental materials are laser scanned to convert the loose powder to a fully dense body. Different laser densification parameters including the densification temperature, laser output power, laser beam size, line dimension, ratio of the beam size to line width, beam scanning rate, processing atmosphere and pressure, dental powder state (powder bed or slurry), powder particle size, etc. have been used to evaluate their effects on the microstructures and properties of the laser densified dental body, and hence to optimize MMLD conditions. Furthermore, laser-scanning induced phase transformations in dental porcelains have been studied because the transformations have great impact on coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of dental porcelains, which should match that of dental alloy substrate. Since a single dental material line delivered by the MMLD system functions as a "construction

  13. Effect of power density on shrinkage of dental resin materials.

    PubMed

    Oberholzer, Theunis G; Pameijer, Cornelis H; Grobler, Sias R; Rossouw, Roelof J

    2003-01-01

    This study compares volumetric changes and rates of shrinkage during different stages of polymerization of dental resin composites and compomers exposed to the same total energy by using two different combinations of power density and exposure duration. A hybrid composite and its equivalent flowable and a compomer and its equivalent flowable were exposed using a halogen curing unit set at 400 mW/cm2 for 40 seconds and 800 mW/cm2 for 20 seconds: delivering 16 J/cm2 in both cases. Volumetric changes were recorded every 0.5 seconds using a mercury dilatometer. Ten replications per test condition were performed and the data were subjected to ANOVA. Statistically significant differences in shrinkage values and rates among different power densities were determined by means of paired t-tests at a 95% confidence level. Significantly more shrinkage (p<0.05) was found for the higher filled materials, Z250 and Dyract AP, when higher power density was used. However, no significant differences were found between their flowable counterparts when exposed to various power densities. Of the four materials, only Dyract AP exhibited no significant difference in shrinkage rate when various power densities were used. All the other materials exhibited significantly higher rates (p<0.05) at the higher power density. PMID:14531610

  14. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Strevel, S.D.

    1991-01-01

    Under the current grant (FG22-90PC90309), the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) will carry out the necessary bench scale experiments to further develop it anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. In particular, it is planned to screen commercially available resins and then carry out process optimization work with three selected resins. Further optimization of the resin regeneration step as well as evaluation of the effect of various performance enhancers will then be carried out with one selected resin. A process schematic, to be developed based on the bench scale results, will be used to estimate the related economics. Some limited scope testing will also be carried out using the spent-seed and sorbent materials obtained from both the coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) and the in-duct sorbent injection pilot scale facilities. During this reporting period, 90% of the planned batch mode screening experiments for the eleven samples of candidate resins were completed. Preliminary evaluation of the resulting data is continuing in order to select a smaller number (3--4) of samples for screening in the fixed-bed setup. The installation of the semi-automated fixed-bed setup is about 70% complete and shakedown experiments will be started in 3--4 weeks. Progress made in relation to these activities is presented below. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of dental material series from patients with dental prostheses and suspicion of delayed hypersensitivity*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Fernanda Cortinhas; Cunha, Victor do Espirito Santo; Hahnstadt, Ruppert Ludwig; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with oral sensitivity are common in our practice. Allergic contact dermatitis is one of the most frequent etiologies. OBJECTIVES Evaluate oral contact dermatitis using the Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series in patients using dental prostheses, with or without oral complaints. Determine specific dental Brazilian series. METHODS Patients using dental prostheses with or without oral complaints realized patch tests. Brazilian standard series and complementary dental series were used according to ICDRG recommendations. The results were analysed according to age, sex, race, atopic conditions and symptoms associated. RESULTS From 54 patients tested, 34 (63%) were positive at least to one substance. Nineteen had oral complaints, such as burning mouth, itch or oral erythema. There was no association between atopic condition and tests results. Without the oral series, just 23(42,6%) patients had a positive result. Using the Brazilian standard series with the complementary dental series we improved the positivity of the patch test to 47%. CONCLUSION In patients using prostheses and with oral complaints, patch tests with Brazilian standard series with complementary dental series improve the tests positivity. PMID:27192511

  16. HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Drake W.; Wu, Hongkun; Oh, Ju-Eun; Fakhar, Camron; Kang, Mo K.; Shin, Ki-Hyuk; Park, No-Hee; Kim, Reuben H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cell migration is an important step in pulpal wound healing. Although components in the resin-based dental materials are known to have adverse effects on pulp wound healing including proliferation and mineralization, their effects on cell migration have been scarcely examined. Here, we investigated effects of 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) on migration of dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) in vitro. Methods Cell viability was assessed using MTT assay, and cell migration was evaluated using wound scratch assay and transwell migration assay at non-cytotoxic doses. Western blotting was used to examine pathways associated with migration such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3). Results There were no drastic changes in the cell viability below 3mM HEMA. When DPSC were treated with HEMA at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.5mM, cell migration was diminished. HEMA-treated DPSC exhibited the loss of phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in a dose-dependent manner. The HEMA-mediated inhibition of cell migration was associated with phosphorylation of p38 but not GSK3, ERK or JNK pathways. When we inhibited the p38 signaling pathway using a p38 inhibitor, migration of DPSC was suppressed. Conclusion HEMA inhibits migration of dental pulp cells in vitro, suggesting that poor pulpal wound healing under resin-based dental materials may be due, in part, to inhibition of cell migration by HEMA. PMID:23953290

  17. Validation of X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for determining osseous or dental origin of unknown material.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Angi M; Smith, Michael A; Thomas, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Forensic anthropological examinations typically involve the analysis of human skeletal remains, but in cases where samples are very small and/or physically compromised, it may first be necessary to determine whether the material is even osseous or dental in origin. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) is a technique that reveals the elemental composition of materials and is hypothesized to have utility in such cases. XRF analysis was conducted on a variety of tissues and materials in unaltered and altered (damaged) states. With few exceptions, osseous and dental tissues in unaltered and altered conditions contained characteristic levels of calcium and phosphorus, while other materials did not. Materials could be accurately identified as osseous or dental in origin based on the calcium and phosphorus levels identified by XRF, and we therefore conclude that XRF analysis is a valid and effective means of determining osseous or dental origin of unknown material. PMID:22040159

  18. Fracture resistance of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-generated composite resin-based molar crowns.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akio; Nakamura, Keisuke; Kanno, Taro; Inagaki, Ryoichi; Örtengren, Ulf; Niwano, Yoshimi; Sasaki, Keiichi; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether different fabrication processes, such as the computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system or the manual build-up technique, affect the fracture resistance of composite resin-based crowns. Lava Ultimate (LU), Estenia C&B (EC&B), and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic IPS e.max press (EMP) were used. Four types of molar crowns were fabricated: CAD/CAM-generated composite resin-based crowns (LU crowns); manually built-up monolayer composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-monolayer crowns); manually built-up layered composite resin-based crowns (EC&B-layered crowns); and EMP crowns. Each type of crown was cemented to dies and the fracture resistance was tested. EC&B-layered crowns showed significantly lower fracture resistance compared with LU and EMP crowns, although there was no significant difference in flexural strength or fracture toughness between LU and EC&B materials. Micro-computed tomography and fractographic analysis showed that decreased strength probably resulted from internal voids in the EC&B-layered crowns introduced by the layering process. There was no significant difference in fracture resistance among LU, EC&B-monolayer, and EMP crowns. Both types of composite resin-based crowns showed fracture loads of >2000 N, which is higher than the molar bite force. Therefore, CAD/CAM-generated crowns, without internal defects, may be applied to molar regions with sufficient fracture resistance. PMID:25683749

  19. Evaluation of the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers in rat periapical tissue.

    PubMed

    Mutoh, Noriko; Satoh, Takenori; Watabe, Hirotaka; Tani-Ishii, Nobuyuki

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the biocompatibility of resin-based root canal sealers (RCSs) in the periapical tissues of rats. Wistar rats underwent tooth replantation for reproducing the response of periapical tissue with RCSs. The resin-based Epipany SE, AH Plus Jet, the eugenol-based sealer (Canals) and a control group were employed. The upper right first molar was extracted and applied with RCSs on apices, and then the tooth was repositioned. Histological evaluation demonstrated that mild inflammation occurred in the periapical tissue with Epiphany and AH Plus Jet sealers on day 7, whereas Canals induced severe-to-moderate inflammation. The statistical analyses demonstrated that the significant differences were observed between Canals and the other groups on day 7 regarding inflammatory response. On day 14, the lesions induced by all sealers were healed and replaced predominantly by fibrous connective tissue. Our results suggest that Epiphany SE and AH Plus Jet are good biocompatible materials. PMID:23719002

  20. Focused ion beam in dental research.

    PubMed

    Ngo, H; Cairney, J; Munroe, P; Vargas, M; Mount, G

    2000-11-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) has been available for over 10 yrs but until recently its usage has been confined to the semiconductor industry. It has been developed as an important tool in defect analysis, circuit modification and recently transmission electron microscope sample preparation. This paper introduces FIB and demonstrates its application in dental research. Its ion and electron imaging modes complement the SEM while its ability to prepare TEM samples from a wide range of material will allow the study of new types of adhesive interface. As an example, its use is described in the characterization of the interface of resin to a tribochemically treated surface of an experimental fiber-reinforced resin-based composite. As with all new techniques, the initial learning curve was difficult to manage. This new instrument offers opportunities to expand research in dental materials to areas not possible before. PMID:11763915

  1. Machinable glass-ceramics forming as a restorative dental material.

    PubMed

    Chaysuwan, Duangrudee; Sirinukunwattana, Krongkarn; Kanchanatawewat, Kanchana; Heness, Greg; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2011-01-01

    MgO, SiO(2), Al(2)O(3), MgF(2), CaF(2), CaCO(3), SrCO(3), and P(2)O(5) were used to prepare glass-ceramics for restorative dental materials. Thermal properties, phases, microstructures and hardness were characterized by DTA, XRD, SEM and Vickers microhardness. Three-point bending strength and fracture toughness were applied by UTM according to ISO 6872: 1997(E). XRD showed that the glass crystallized at 892°C (second crystallization temperature+20°C) for 3 hrs consisted mainly of calcium-mica and fluorapatite crystalline phases. Average hardness (3.70 GPa) closely matched human enamel (3.20 GPa). The higher fracture toughness (2.04 MPa√m) combined with the hardness to give a lower brittleness index (1.81 µm(-1/2)) which indicates that they have exceptional machinability. Bending strength results (176.61 MPa) were analyzed by Weibull analysis to determine modulus value (m=17.80). Machinability of the calcium mica-fluorapatite glass-ceramic was demonstrated by fabricating with CAD/CAM. PMID:21597218

  2. Dental devices; reclassification of tricalcium phosphate granules and classification of other bone grafting material for dental bone repair. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-04-28

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is reclassifying tricalcium phosphate (TCP) granules for dental bone repair from class III to class II (special controls), classifying into class II (special controls) other bone grafting material for dental indications, and revising the classification name and identification of the device type. Bone grafting materials that contain a drug that is a therapeutic biologic will remain in class III and continue to require a premarket approval application. The classification identification includes materials such as hydroxyapatite, tricalcium phosphate, polylactic and polyglycolic acids, or collagen. This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls that will provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the class II devices. PMID:15858911

  3. A useful and non-invasive microanalysis method for dental restoration materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoki, M.; Satsuma, T.; Nishigawa, K.; Takeuchi, H.; Asaoka, K.

    2012-12-01

    The elemental analysis of intraoral dental restorations provides considerable information for the treatment of dental metal allergy. Elemental analyses require specific instruments and complicated procedures, so this examination is not commonly carried out in private dental clinics. We describe a novel, simple and useful micro-analytical method for dental metal restorations. Micro metal dust was obtained by polishing the surface of restorative metal material with an unused silicone point (SUPER-SNAP). The metal dust on the silicone point was then rubbed onto adhesive tape, and this tape was covered with polyethylene film. The amount of metal dust material was <20 μg. An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer was used to carry out the elementary analysis of the metal dust on the polyethylene film. Three types of dental metal alloy materials of known components were examined. The results of elementary analyses were compared with the specifications provided by the manufacturer. The same procedure was carried out for three dental metal restorations of an adult female volunteer in vivo. The results of elemental analyses for five alloy materials exactly matched the product specification. Three metal samples obtained from intraoral restoration were also available for elemental analyses. The distinct advantage of this method is that it enables sample extraction without an invasive effect for the restoration. The metal sample is in a polyethylene film, so it is easy to mail it for inspection at specialist institutes yet it can be also be used in general dental clinics.

  4. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Hickel, R; Roulet, J-F; Bayne, S; Heintze, S D; Mjör, I A; Peters, M; Rousson, V; Randall, R; Schmalz, G; Tyas, M; Vanherle, G

    2007-03-01

    designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the "Journal of Adhesive Dentistry" and the "Clinical Oral Investigations." Additionally an extended abstract will be published in the "International Dental Journal" giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community. PMID:17262225

  5. Retention of resin-based filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, V. Rajashekar; Chowdhary, Nagalakshmi; Mukunda, K. S.; Kiran, N. K.; Kavyarani, B. S.; Pradeep, M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The most caries-susceptible period of a permanent first molar tooth is the eruption phase, during which the enamel is not fully matured and it is usually difficult for the child to clean the erupting tooth surfaces. Sealing occlusal pits and fissures with resin-based pit and fissure sealants is a proven method to prevent occlusal caries. The difference in the viscosity of the sealants differs in the penetration into pit and fissures and abrasive wear resistance property due to the addition of filler particles. The present study was conducted to evaluate and compare the retention of the resin-based filled (Helioseal F, Ivoclar Vivadent) and unfilled (Clinpro, 3M ESPE) pit and fissure sealants, which is important for their effectiveness. Materials and Methods: Fifty-six children between the age group of 6 and 9 years, with all four newly erupted permanent first molars were selected. Sealants were applied randomly using split mouth design technique on permanent first molars. Evaluation of sealant retention was performed at regular intervals over 12 months, using Simonsen's criteria at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th and 12th month. The results were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: At the end of our study period (12th month), 53.57% showed complete retention, 37.50% showed partial retention, and 8.83% showed complete missing of resin-based filled (Helioseal F) pit and fissure sealant. And, 64.29% showed complete retention, 32.14% showed partial retention, and 3.57% showed complete missing of resin-based unfilled (Clinpro) pit and fissure sealant. This difference in retention rates between filled and unfilled pit and fissure sealants was not statistically significant. Conclusion: The difference in retention rates between Helioseal F and Clinpro was not statistically significant, but Clinpro (unfilled) sealant showed slightly higher retention rates and clinically better performance than Helioseal F (filled). PMID:25821368

  6. Comparison of the abrasive wear resistance between amalgams, hybrid composite material and different dental cements.

    PubMed

    Gil, F J; Espias, A; Sánchez, L A; Planell, J A

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports on the abrasion wear of various restorative dental materials (three amalgams and two dental cements and a hybrid composite material) commonly used in dentistry. The mechanical properties, surface roughness and the volume loss by abrasion were determined for the different materials studied. The results showed a better profile for the amalgams versus the composite materials due to the failure of the polymeric matrix of the latter materials. However, the amalgams exhibited corrosion observed by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy. PMID:10907431

  7. Performance of dental impression materials: Benchmarking of materials and techniques by three-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Heike; Graf, Michael R S; Kuhn, Katharina; Rupf-Köhler, Stephanie; Eirich, Alfred; Edelmann, Cornelia; Quaas, Sebastian; Luthardt, Ralph G

    2015-01-01

    Among other factors, the precision of dental impressions is an important and determining factor for the fit of dental restorations. The aim of this study was to examine the three-dimensional (3D) precision of gypsum dies made using a range of impression techniques and materials. Ten impressions of a steel canine were fabricated for each of the 24 material-method-combinations and poured with type 4 die stone. The dies were optically digitized, aligned to the CAD model of the steel canine, and 3D differences were calculated. The results were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance. Depending on material and impression technique, the mean values had a range between +10.9/-10.0 µm (SD 2.8/2.3) and +16.5/-23.5 µm (SD 11.8/18.8). Qualitative analysis using colorcoded graphs showed a characteristic location of deviations for different impression techniques. Three-dimensional analysis provided a comprehensive picture of the achievable precision. Processing aspects and impression technique were of significant influence. PMID:25948142

  8. Preservation-based approaches to restore posterior teeth with amalgam, resin or a combination of materials.

    PubMed

    Baghdadi, Ziad D

    2002-02-01

    This review is a systematic assessment, from the literature, of the status quo of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer restorations for carious lesions as it applies to new concepts, coupled with clinical research. Scientifically based and practical new materials and techniques are recommended to include in contemporary practice throughout the world. Clinical and laboratory studies which have been carried out in light of modern conservative principles, and in light of the current emphasis of treating dental caries as a disease process were reviewed and discussed. An approach to managing carious lesions based upon selected advantages of dental amalgam, resin-based composite and glass-ionomer technology applied to what is termed "preservation-based" approaches to restoring teeth has been synthesized. Researched evidence contradicts the notion of "extension for prevention" in favor of maintaining sound tooth structure which would translate into more patients with healthy dentitions for entire lifetimes. PMID:12074231

  9. Chemical Differentiation of Osseous, Dental, and Non-skeletal Materials in Forensic Anthropology using Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Heather A; Meizel-Lambert, Cayli J; Schultz, John J; Sigman, Michael E

    2015-03-01

    Forensic anthropologists are generally able to identify skeletal materials (bone and tooth) using gross anatomical features; however, highly fragmented or taphonomically altered materials may be problematic to identify. Several chemical analysis techniques have been shown to be reliable laboratory methods that can be used to determine if questionable fragments are osseous, dental, or non-skeletal in nature. The purpose of this review is to provide a detailed background of chemical analysis techniques focusing on elemental compositions that have been assessed for use in differentiating osseous, dental, and non-skeletal materials. More recently, chemical analysis studies have also focused on using the elemental composition of osseous/dental materials to evaluate species and provide individual discrimination, but have generally been successful only in small, closed groups, limiting their use forensically. Despite significant advances incorporating a variety of instruments, including handheld devices, further research is necessary to address issues in standardization, error rates, and sample size/diversity. PMID:25753999

  10. An update on glass fiber dental restorative composites: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Samad; Azam, Maria Tahir; Khan, Maria; Mian, Salman Aziz; Ur Rehman, Ihtesham

    2015-02-01

    Dentistry is a much developed field in the last few decades. New techniques have changed the conventional treatment methods as applications of new dental materials give better outcomes. The current century has suddenly forced on dentistry, a new paradigm regarding expected standards for state-of-the-art patient care. Within the field of restorative dentistry, the incredible advances in dental materials research have led to the current availability of esthetic adhesive restorations. The chemistry and structure of the resins and the nature of the glass fiber reinforced systems in dental composites are reviewed in relation to their influence and properties including mechanical, physical, thermal, biocompatibility, technique sensitivity, mode and rate of failure of restorations on clinical application. It is clear that a deeper understanding of the structure of the polymeric matrix and resin-based dental composite is required. As a result of ongoing research in the area of glass fiber reinforced composites and with the development and advancement of these composites, the future prospects of resin-based composite are encouraging. PMID:25492169

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Fracture Resistance of Endodontically Treated Teeth Obturated with Resin Based Adhesive Sealers with Conventional Obturation Technique: An In vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Langalia, Akshay K; Dave, Bela; Patel, Neeta; Thakkar, Viral; Sheth, Sona; Parekh, Vaishali

    2015-01-01

    Background: To compare fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth obturated with different resin-based adhesive sealers with a conventional obturation technique. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 Single canaled teeth were divided into five groups. The first group was taken as a negative control. The rest of the groups were shaped using ProFile rotary files (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland). The second group was obturated with gutta-percha and a ZOE-based sealer Endoflas FS (Sanlor Dental Products, USA). The third group was obturated with gutta-percha and an epoxy-based sealer AH Plus (Dentsply, DeTrey, Germany). The fourth group was obturated with Resilon (Pentron Clinical Technologies, Wallingford, CT) and RealSeal sealer (Pentron Clinical Technologies). The fifth group was obturated with EndoREZ points and EndoREZ sealer (both from Ultradent, South Jordan, UT). Roots were then embedded into acrylic blocks and were then fixed into a material testing system and loaded with a stainless steel pin with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min until fracture. The load at which the specimen fractured was recorded in Newtons. Results: It was found that forces at fracture were statistically significant for the newer resin systems, Resilon, and EndoREZ. Conclusion: It was concluded that roots obturated with newer resin systems (Resilon and EndoREZ) enhanced the root strength almost up to the level of the intact roots. PMID:25859099

  12. Replication techniques with new dental impression materials in combination with different negative impression materials.

    PubMed

    Pameijer, C H

    1979-01-01

    New materials and new techniques have enabled the fabrication of more reliable and more accurate replicas. Not only is the reproduction of detail of importance, but the expertise required from the operator and the time involved to produce a replica are considered key factors. For various reasons a reliable and reproducible replication technique for scanning electron microscopy offers many advantages. Recently a new dental precision impression material has been introduced, which in combination with low viscosity resins has produced superior results over other techniques. This combination processed by means of a centrifugal casting machine has produced replicas which could easily be compared to a standard test die at magnifications up to 3000 X. More in depth testing will have to be performed to establish whether these materials can be universally applied to a broad spectrum of replication problems. The combination Reprosil/Spurr low viscosity imbedding medium yielded replicas of high quality which can be made with simple equipment and without possessing special skills. Centrifugation of the positive replication material into the negative impression virtually eliminated the entrapment of airbubbles. PMID:392716

  13. Optimum gradient material for a functionally graded dental implant using metaheuristic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Sadollah, Ali; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-10-01

    Despite dental implantation being a great success, one of the key issues facing it is a mismatch of mechanical properties between engineered and native biomaterials, which makes osseointegration and bone remodeling problematical. Functionally graded material (FGM) has been proposed as a potential upgrade to some conventional implant materials such as titanium for selection in prosthetic dentistry. The idea of an FGM dental implant is that the property would vary in a certain pattern to match the biomechanical characteristics required at different regions in the hosting bone. However, matching the properties does not necessarily guarantee the best osseointegration and bone remodeling. Little existing research has been reported on developing an optimal design of an FGM dental implant for promoting long-term success. Based upon remodeling results, metaheuristic algorithms such as the genetic algorithms (GAs) and simulated annealing (SA) have been adopted to develop a multi-objective optimal design for FGM implantation design. The results are compared with those in literature. PMID:21783149

  14. [Adhesion of dental silicone rubber material to thermoplastic material for mouthguards].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kayoko

    2010-03-01

    A preliminary study revealed that an autopolymerization addition silicone resilient denture relining material (SI) had excellent shock absorption properties similar to those of thermoplastic materials commonly used for mouthguards (ethylene-vinyl acetate: EVA). The aim of the present study was to examine the bonding strength of SI and EVA using a newly-developed adhesive prototype. Delamination tests and tensile strength tests were performed to compare the bonding strengths of SI on EVA prepared under the following four conditions: 1) Control condition (no preparation; C), 2) Sandblasting (S), 3) Bonding with the adhesive prototype (M), and 4) Combination of sandblasting preparation and bonding with the adhesive prototype (SM). The mean bonding strength (S. D.) of the delamination tests under the C, S, M and SM conditions were 0.167 (0.003) N/mm, 0.273 (0.034) N/mm, 0.242 (0.027) N/mm and 0.506 (0.113) N/mm, respectively. The mean bonding strength (S. D.) of the tensile strength tests under the C, S, M and SM conditions were 0.006 (0.011) MPa, 0.081 (0.105) MPa, 0.231 (0.069) MPa and 0.590 (0.041) MPa, respectively. Two-way analysis of variances and Tukey's HSD test detected that the combination of sandblasting preparation and bonding with the adhesive prototype significantly improved the bonding strength between SI and EVA. The results indicate that the self-curing addition silicone resilient denture relining material may adhere to the thermoplastic material prepared by combined application of sandblasting and the adhesive prototype, suggesting the potential of the dental silicone rubber material as a material for repairing mouthguards in clinical practice. PMID:20415249

  15. Evaluation of simulation learning materials use to fill the gap in Japanese dental English education.

    PubMed

    Seki, Naoko; Moross, Janelle; Sunaga, Masayo; Hobo, Koki; Miyoshi, Tomoe; Nitta, Hiroshi; Kinoshita, Atsuhiro; Morio, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    Even though English is most frequently the common language when the patient's native language differs from that of a dentist, the opportunities for Japanese undergraduate dental students to learn dental English are now quite limited. The purposes of our study were to investigate: the effectiveness and feasibility of the computer-assisted simulation materials as one solution strategy for dental English education in Japan, and the needs and demands for dental English from the learners' side. Interactive simulation materials for medical interviews in English and clinical cases which were translated to English, were delivered via Learning Management System (LMS) to nineteen trainee residents of dentistry (residents). Evaluation for the materials, learners' knowledge and interests in the contents, and ease of operation were obtained by post-questionnaire (response rates were 100% and 95%, respectively). Both questionnaire-surveys received positive feedback toward the materials, yet 47% answered that they lacked the level of knowledge about contents of the medical interview in English. Results were sufficient to suggest that the residents would like to have the opportunity to study or practice medical interview in English, or English related to dentistry, and that the simulation materials could be one of the solution strategies for opportunity provision. PMID:27181485

  16. The Evolution of Dental Materials for Hybrid Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Since the immemorial, the replacement of missing teeth has been a medical and cosmetic necessity for human kind. Nowadays, middle-aged population groups have experienced improved oral health, as compared to previous generations, and the percentage of edentulous adults can be expected to further decline. However, with the continued increase in the number of older adult population, it is anticipated that the need for some form of full-mouth restoration might increase from 53.8 million in 1991 to 61 million in 2020 [1]. Denture prosthetics has undergone many development stages since the first dentures were fabricated. The introduction of computer-aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has resulted in a more accurate manufacturing of prosthetic frameworks, greater accuracy of dental restorations, and in particular, implant supported prosthesis. PMID:24893781

  17. The evolution of dental materials for hybrid prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Since the immemorial, the replacement of missing teeth has been a medical and cosmetic necessity for human kind. Nowadays, middle-aged population groups have experienced improved oral health, as compared to previous generations, and the percentage of edentulous adults can be expected to further decline. However, with the continued increase in the number of older adult population, it is anticipated that the need for some form of full-mouth restoration might increase from 53.8 million in 1991 to 61 million in 2020 [1]. Denture prosthetics has undergone many development stages since the first dentures were fabricated. The introduction of computer-aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) has resulted in a more accurate manufacturing of prosthetic frameworks, greater accuracy of dental restorations, and in particular, implant supported prosthesis. PMID:24893781

  18. Cytogenetic genotoxic investigation in peripheral blood lymphocytes of subjects with dental composite restorative filling materials.

    PubMed

    Pettini, F; Savino, M; Corsalini, M; Cantore, S; Ballini, A

    2015-01-01

    Dental composite resins are biomaterials commonly used to aesthetically restore the structure and function of teeth impaired by caries, erosion, or fracture. Residual monomers released from resin restorations as a result of incomplete polymerization processes interact with living oral tissues. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of a common dental composite material (Enamel Plus-HFO), in subjects with average 13 filled teeth with the same material, compared to a control group (subjects having neither amalgam nor composite resin fillings). Genotoxicity assessment of composite materials was carried out in vitro in human peripheral blood leukocytes using sister-chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberrations (CA) cytogenetic tests. The results of correlation and multiple regression analyses confirmed the absence of a relationship between SCE/cell, high frequency of SCE(HFC) or CA frequencies and exposure to dental composite materials. These results indicate that composite resins used for dental restorations differ extensively in vivo in their cytotoxic and genotoxic potential and in their ability to affect chromosomal integrity, cell-cycle progression, DNA replication and repair. PMID:25864763

  19. Retention of a resin-based sealant and a glass ionomer used as a fissure sealant in children with special needs

    PubMed Central

    Nualart-Grollmus, Zacy-Carola

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this research is to evaluate the retention of sealants of resin and resin-modified ionomeric glass pits and fissures, on first permanent molars of special patients. Material and Methods: The sample was comprised by 32 children. The ages were between 7 and 18 years. The sealing procedure was made with the relative isolation of the molars to be sealed, through the use of cotton rolls. Two molars were sealed with Clinpro Sealant 3M Dental and the others with Vitremer. Checking of the sealants was made after 3 and 6 months of their placement, evaluating with 3 values: TR: Totally Restrained; PR: Partially Restrained; and CL: Completely Lost. Results: 67.18% of the resinous sealants, and 70.31% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful after three months. After six months, 57.81% of the resin-based sealants and 51.56% of the glass ionomer sealants were successful. When performing the Chi-square statistical analysis (P<0.05) no statistical significance was observed after 6 months. Conclusions: The retention of the resin sealant was similar to that of the glass ionomer cement at the end of six months and the retention of sealants on maxillary teeth was higher than on mandibular teeth. Key words:Sealant, glass ionomer, retention, caries, special needs. PMID:25674325

  20. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-01-01

    Under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI's anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements. During the reporting period, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, UTSI has completed the batch mode experiments to evaluate the performance enhancement effect caused by organic acids on the resin's exhaustion efficiency. At present, batch mode experiments are being conducted to locate the position of the CO[sub 3]= and SO[sub 4]= ions in the affinity chart, and also reviewing/assessing the ASPEN Code's capabilities for use in the development of the Best Process Schematic and related economics.

  1. Removal of dental filling materials by Er:YAG laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibst, Raimund; Keller, Ulrich

    1991-05-01

    In previous reports it could be shown that pulsed Er:YAG laser radiation is effective for the removal of dental enamel, dentin, and caries. Damage to the adjacent hard substances is minimal. Temperature measurements and animal studies revealed that thermal pulp damage can be avoided. The experimental results make the Er:YAG laser promising for the preparation of dental cavities. In many cases patients already have fillings which have to be removed. In the present work, investigation is made of the effect of Er:YAG laser radiation on various restorative filling materials. The experiments demonstrate that removal is possible for all tested cements, composites and amalgam. Ablation efficiency is comparable to that of enamel and dentin, and thus sufficient for practical applications. Morphology of crater walls indicates greater thermal side effects than for natural dental hard substances.

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND VERIFICATION OF NEW SOLID DENTAL FILLING TEMPORARY MATERIALS CONTAINING ZINC. FORMULA DEVELOPMENT STAGE.

    PubMed

    Pytko-Polończyk, Jolanta; Antosik, Agata; Zajac, Magdalena; Szlósarczyk, Marek; Krywult, Agnieszka; Jachowicz, Renata; Opoka, Włodzimierz

    2016-01-01

    Caries is the most popular problem affecting teeth and this is the reason why so many temporary dental filling materials are being developed. An example of such filling is zinc oxide paste mixed with eugenol, Thymodentin and Coltosol F®. Zinc-oxide eugenol is used in dentistry because of its multiplied values: it improves heeling of the pulp by dentine bridge formation; has antiseptic properties; is hygroscopic. Because of these advantages compouds of zinc oxide are used as temporary fillings, especially in deep caries lesions when treatment is oriented on support of vital pulp. Temporary dental fillings based on zinc oxide are prepared ex tempone by simple mixing powder (Thymodentin) and eugenol liqiud together or a ready to use paste Coltosol F®. Quantitative composition depends mainly on experience of person who is preparing it, therefore, exact qualitative composition of dental fillings is not replicable. The main goal of the study was to develop appropriate dental fillings in solid form containing set amount of zinc oxide. Within the study, the influence of preparation method on solid dental fillings properties like mechanical properties and zinc ions release were examined. PMID:27476293

  3. Determination of residual monomers resulting from the chemical polymerization process of dental materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boboia, S.; Moldovan, M.; Ardelean, I.

    2013-11-13

    The residual monomer present in post-polymerized dental materials encourages premature degradation of the reconstructed tooth. That is why the residual monomer should be quantified in a simple, fast, accurate and reproducible manner. In our work we propose such an approach for accurate determination of the residual monomer in dental materials which is based on low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry. The results of the NMR approach are compared with those of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique. The samples under study contain the main monomers (2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloyloxypropoxy)phenyl]propane and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate) constituting the liquid phase of most dental materials and an initiator. Two samples were analyzed with different ratios of chemical initiation systems: N,N-dimethyl-p-toluide: benzoyl peroxide (1:2 and 0.7:1.2). The results obtained by both techniques highlight that by reducing the initiator the polymerization process slows down and the amount of residual monomer reduces. This prevents the premature degradation of the dental fillings and consequently the reduction of the biomaterial resistance.

  4. Investigation of the electrical properties of some dental composite restorative materials before and after laser exposure.

    PubMed

    ElKestawy, M A; Saafan, S A; Shehata, M M; Saafan, A M

    2006-10-01

    Some electrical properties, such as piezoelectricity, ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent of nine commercial types of dental composite restorative materials, have been investigated before and after laser exposure for 3s to study the effect of a probable laser exposure during some surgeries on the electrical properties of these materials. No piezoelectric effect has been found in these materials before and after laser exposure. The materials were found to be good insulators (very poorly conducting materials). The temperature and frequency dependence of ac conductivity, dielectric constant and loss tangent have not shown significant changes in values after laser exposure. PMID:16387356

  5. Priorities for future innovation, research, and advocacy in dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Watson, T; Fox, C H; Rekow, E D

    2013-11-01

    Innovations in materials science, both within and outside of dentistry, open opportunities for the development of exciting direct restorative materials. From rich dialog among experts from dental and non-dental academic institutions and industry, as well as those from policy, research funding, and professional organizations, we learned that capitalizing on these opportunities is multifactorial and far from straightforward. Beginning from the point when a restoration is needed, what materials, delivery systems, and skills are needed to best serve the most people throughout the world's widely varied economic and infrastructure systems? New research is a critical element in progress. Effective advocacy can influence funding and drives change in practice and policy. Here we articulate both research and advocacy priorities, with the intention of focusing the energy and expertise of our best scientists on making a difference, bringing new innovations to improve oral health. PMID:24129817

  6. Influence of radiopaque fillers on physicochemical properties of a model epoxy resin-based root canal sealer

    PubMed Central

    COLLARES, Fabrício Mezzomo; KLEIN, Mariana; SANTOS, Paula Dapper; PORTELLA, Fernando Freitas; OGLIARI, Fabrício; LEITUNE, Vicente Castelo Branco; SAMUEL, Susana Maria Werner

    2013-01-01

    Objective To verify the influence of radiopaque fillers on an epoxy resin-based sealer. Material and Methods Experimental sealers were formulated by adding 20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, 100% and 120% of calcium tungstate, ytterbium trifluoride or barium sulphate by weight to an epoxy-resin-base. Setting time, flow, film thickness, radiopacity, sorption, solubility, pH and push-out bond strength were evaluated. Results The setting time ranged from 373 to 612.66 min, the flow varied from 13.81±0.49 to 22.49±0.37 mm, and the film thickness ranged from 16.67±5.77 to 33.33±11.54 µm. The lowest pH was 5.47±0.53, and the highest was 6.99±0.03. Radiopacity varied from 0.38±0.04 to 2.57±0.21 mmAl and increased with the amount of filler. Calcium tungstate sealers had a higher sorption and solubility than other sealers. There was no significant difference in the push-out bond strength among the fillers at the 120% concentration. Conclusion The inorganic fillers evaluated and their concentrations affect the physicochemical properties of an epoxy resin-based root canal sealer. PMID:24473719

  7. Quantification of Staphylococcus aureus adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merghni, Abderrahmen; Kammoun, Dorra; Hentati, Hajer; Janel, Sébastien; Popoff, Michka; Lafont, Frank; Aouni, Mahjoub; Mastouri, Maha

    2016-08-01

    In the oral cavity dental restorative biomaterials can act as a reservoir for infection with opportunistic Staphylococcus aureus pathogen, which can lead to the occurrence of secondary caries and treatment failures. Our aim was to evaluate the adhesion forces by S. aureus on four dental restorative biomaterials and to correlate this finding to differences in specific surface characteristics. Additionally, the influence of salivary conditioning films in exerted adhesion forces was investigated. The substrate hydrophobicity was measured by goniometer and the surface free energy was calculated using the equilibrium advancing contact angle values of water, formamide, and diiodomethane on the tested surfaces. The surface roughness was determined using atomic force microscope (AFM). Additionally, cell force spectroscopy was achieved to quantify the forces that drive cell-substrate interactions. S. aureus bacterium exerted a considerable adhesion forces on various dental restorative materials, which decreased in the presence of saliva conditioning film. The influence of the surface roughness and free energy in initial adhesion appears to be more important than the effect of hydrophobicity, either in presence or absence of saliva coating. Hence, control of surface properties of dental restorative biomaterials is of crucial importance in preventing the attachment and subsequent the biofilm formation.

  8. Mechanical properties of new dental pulp-capping materials.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Matthew J; Casey, Jeffery A; VanderWeele, Richard A; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical properties of pulp-capping materials may affect their resistance to fracture during placement of a final restorative material or while supporting an overlying restoration over time. The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, flexural strength, and flexural modulus of 2 new pulp-capping materials (TheraCal LC and Biodentine), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and calcium hydroxide over time. Specimens were created in molds and tested to failure in a universal testing machine after 15 minutes, 3 hours, and 24 hours. The MTA specimens did not set at 15 minutes. At all time periods, TheraCal LC had the greatest compressive and flexural strengths. After 3 and 24 hours, Biodentine had the greatest flexural modulus. TheraCal LC had greater early strength to potentially resist fracture during immediate placement of a final restorative material. Biodentine had greater stiffness after 3 hours to potentially provide better support of an overlying restoration under function over time. PMID:26742167

  9. Fluoride release and antibacterial activity of selected dental materials.

    PubMed

    Marczuk-Kolada, Grazyna; Jakoniuk, Piotr; Mystkowska, Joanna; Łuczaj-Cepowicz, Elzbieta; Waszkiel, Danuta; Dabrowski, Jan Ryszard; Leszczyńska, Katarzyna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the fluoride ion release and antibacterial activities of the glassionomer cement Fuji IX and the compomer (composite modified polyacid) Dyract AP. Fluoride ion release was measured using direct potentiometry with an Orion fluoride ion selective electrode. The measurement was carried out after 1, 4, 7, 14, 30, and 60 days of storage in phosphate buffer at pH 6.8. The antibacterial activity of the materials was evaluated against the bacteria Streptococcus mutans ATCC 35668, Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, Streptococcus sanguis ATCC 10556, and Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393. The agar diffusion test was applied. The material specimens were assessed twice: after setting and seven days later. Zones of bacterial growth inhibition were measured in millimeters after 24 hours. The results of the study showed that both materials released ion fluoride, with a higher emission of Fuji IX than Dyract AP. The highest level of emission was observed on the seventh day of the study in both materials. After 24 hours of bonding there was inhibition of bacterial growth by Fuji IX, whereas Dyract AP did not show similar activity. On the eighth day after polymerization, Dyract AP was significantly more active towards Streptococcus sanguis and salivarius. PMID:18493226

  10. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  11. Effect of surfactant on surface hardness of dental stone and investment casts produced from polyvinyl siloxane duplicating materials.

    PubMed

    Al-Johani, Attalah; Clark, Robert K F; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R

    2008-06-01

    Polyvinylsiloxane duplicating materials are typically treated with a topical surfactant before pouring dental models, but the use of topical surfactants in the dental laboratory may affect the surface hardness of the resultant models. The effect of two different topical surfactants on surface hardness of two dental stones (FujiRock and Dentstone) and one phosphate bonded investment material (Croform WB) produced from polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) dental laboratory duplicating moulds was investigated. Topical surfactants affected the surface hardness of FujiRock, Dentstone and Croform WB investment material. Surface hardness of FujiRock increased with Wax-Mate surfactant. However, surface hardness of Croform WB investment material decreased with both topical surfactants. PMID:18637383

  12. Cytotoxicity and biocompatibility of Zirconia (Y-TZP) posts with various dental cements

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeongsoon; Ko, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Endodontically treated teeth with insufficient tooth structure are often restored with esthetic restorations. This study evaluated the cytotoxicity and biological effects of yttria partially stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) blocks in combination with several dental cements. Materials and Methods Pairs of zirconia cylinders with medium alone or cemented with three types of dental cement including RelyX U200 (3M ESPE), FujiCEM 2 (GC), and Panavia F 2.0 (Kuraray) were incubated in medium for 14 days. The cytotoxicity of each supernatant was determined using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays on L929 fibroblasts and MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. The levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA were evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and IL-6 protein was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey post-hoc tests. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The MTT assays showed that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were more susceptible to dental cements than L929 fibroblasts. The resin based dental cements increased IL-6 expression in L929 cells, but reduced IL-6 expression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Conclusions Zirconia alone or blocks cemented with dental cement showed acceptable biocompatibilities. The results showed resin-modified glass-ionomer based cement less produced inflammatory cytokines than other self-adhesive resin-based cements. Furthermore, osteoblasts were more susceptible than fibroblasts to the biological effects of dental cement. PMID:27508157

  13. Resistance to fracture of dental roots obturated with different materials.

    PubMed

    Celikten, Berkan; Uzuntas, Ceren Feriha; Gulsahi, Kamran

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the vertical fracture resistance of roots obturated with different root canal filling materials and sealers. Crowns of 55 extracted mandibular premolar teeth were removed to provide root lengths of 13 mm. Five roots were saved as negative control group (canals unprepared and unfilled). Fifty root canals were instrumented and then five roots were saved as positive control group (canals prepared but unfilled). The remaining 45 roots were randomly divided into three experimental groups (n = 15 root/group) and obturated with the following procedures: in group 1, glass ionomer-based sealer and cone (ActiV GP obturation system); in group 2, bioceramic sealer and cone (EndoSequence BC obturation system); and in group 3, roots were filled with bioceramic sealer and cone (Smartpaste bio obturation system). All specimens were tested in a universal testing machine for measuring fracture resistance. For each root, the force at the time of fracture was recorded in Newtons. The statistical analysis was performed by using Kruskal-Wallis and post hoc test. There were no significant differences between the three experimental groups. The fracture values of three experimental and negative control groups were significantly higher than the positive control group. Within the limitations of this study, all materials increased the fracture resistance of instrumented roots. PMID:25756048

  14. A novel laser-based method for controlled crystallization in dental prosthesis materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cam, Peter; Neuenschwander, Beat; Schwaller, Patrick; Köhli, Benjamin; Lüscher, Beat; Senn, Florian; Kounga, Alain; Appert, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    Glass-ceramic materials are increasingly becoming the material of choice in the field of dental prosthetics, as they can feature both high strength and very good aesthetics. It is believed that their color, microstructure and mechanical properties can be tuned such as to achieve an optimal lifelike performance. In order to reach that ultimate perfection a controlled arrangement of amorphous and crystalline phases in the material is required. A phase transformation from amorphous to crystalline is achieved by a heat treatment at defined temperature levels. The traditional approach is to perform the heat treatment in a furnace. This, however, only allows a homogeneous degree of crystallization over the whole volume of the parent glass material. Here a novel approach using a local heat treatment by laser irradiation is presented. To investigate the potential of this approach the crystallization process of SiO2-Li2O-Al2O3-based glass has been studied with laser systems (pulsed and continuous wave) operating at different wavelengths. Our results show the feasibility of gradual and partial crystallization of the base material using continuous laser irradiation. A dental prosthesis machined from an amorphous glassy state can be effectively treated with laser irradiation and crystallized within a confined region of a few millimeters starting from the body surface. Very good aesthetics have been achieved. Preliminary investigation with pulsed nanosecond lasers of a few hundreds nanoseconds pulse width has enabled more refinement of crystallization and possibility to place start of phase change within the material bulk.

  15. Process Development of Porcelain Ceramic Material with Binder Jetting Process for Dental Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyanaji, Hadi; Zhang, Shanshan; Lassell, Austin; Zandinejad, Amirali; Yang, Li

    2016-03-01

    Custom ceramic structures possess significant potentials in many applications such as dentistry and aerospace where extreme environments are present. Specifically, highly customized geometries with adequate performance are needed for various dental prostheses applications. This paper demonstrates the development of process and post-process parameters for a dental porcelain ceramic material using binder jetting additive manufacturing (AM). Various process parameters such as binder amount, drying power level, drying time and powder spread speed were studied experimentally for their effect on geometrical and mechanical characteristics of green parts. In addition, the effects of sintering and printing parameters on the qualities of the densified ceramic structures were also investigated experimentally. The results provide insights into the process-property relationships for the binder jetting AM process, and some of the challenges of the process that need to be further characterized for the successful adoption of the binder jetting technology in high quality ceramic fabrications are discussed.

  16. Experiments in Natural and Synthetic Dental Materials: A Mouthful of Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masi, James V.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of these experiments are to show that the area of biomaterials, especially dental materials (natural and synthetic), contain all of the elements of good and bad design, with the caveat that a person's health is directly involved. The students learn the process of designing materials for the complex interactions in the oral cavity, analyze those already used, and suggest possible solutions to the problems involved with present technology. The N.I.O.S.H. Handbook is used extensively by the students and judgement calls are made, even without extensive biology education.

  17. Translucency of human teeth and dental restorative materials and its clinical relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yong-Keun

    2015-04-01

    The purpose was to review the translucency of human teeth and related dental materials that should be considered for the development of esthetic restorative materials. Translucency is the relative amount of light transmission or diffuse reflection from a substrate surface through a turbid medium. Translucency influences the masking ability, color blending effect, and the degree of light curing through these materials. Regarding the translucency indices, transmission coefficient, translucency parameter, and contrast ratio have been used, and correlations among these indices were confirmed. Translucency of human enamel and dentine increases in direct proportion to the wavelength of incident light in the visible light range. As for the translucency changes by aging, limited differences were reported in human dentine, while those for enamel proved to increase. There have been studies for the adjustment of translucency in dental esthetic restorative materials; the size and amount of filler and the kind of resin matrix were modified in resin composites, and the kind of ingredient and the degree of crystallization were modified in ceramics. Based on the translucency properties of human enamel and dentine, those of replacing restorative materials should be optimized for successful esthetic rehabilitation. Biomimetic simulation of the natural tooth microstructure might be a promising method.

  18. Investigation of thiol-ene and thiol-ene-methacrylate based resins as dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Neil B.; Couch, Charles L.; Schreck, Kathleen M.; Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Boulden, Jordan E.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this work was to evaluate thiol-norbornene and thiol-ene-methacrylate systems as the resin phase of dental restorative materials and demonstrate their superior performance as compared to dimethacrylate materials. Methods Polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversions were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Flexural strength and modulus were determined with a 3-point flexural test. Polymerization-induced shrinkage stress was measured with a tensometer. Results Thiol-ene polymer systems were demonstrated to exhibit advantageous properties for dental restorative materials in regards to rapid curing kinetics, high conversion, and low shrinkage and stress. However, both the thiol-norbornene and thiol-allyl ether systems studied here exhibit significant reductions in flexural strength and modulus relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA. By utilizing the thiol-ene component as the reactive diluent in dimethacrylate systems, high flexural modulus and strength are achieved while dramatically reducing the polymerization shrinkage stress. The methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems both exhibited equivalent flexural modulus (2.1 ± 0.1 GPa) and slightly reduced flexural strength (95 ± 1 and 101 ± 3 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (flexural modulus; 2.2 + 0.1 GPa and flexural strength; 112 ± 3 MPa). Both the methacrylate-thiol-allyl ether and methacrylate-thiol-norbornene systems exhibited dramatic reductions in shrinkage stress (1.1 ± 0.1 and 1.1 ± 0.2 MPa, respectively) relative to BisGMA/TEGDMA (2.6 ± 0.2 MPa). Significance The improved polymerization kinetics and overall functional group conversion, coupled with reductions in shrinkage stress while maintaining equivalent flexural modulus, result in a superior overall dental restorative material as compared to traditional bulk dimethacrylate resins. PMID:19781757

  19. Ultrashort pulse laser processing of hard tissue, dental restoration materials, and biocompatibles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, A.; Strassl, M.; Beer, F.; Verhagen, L.; Wittschier, M.; Wintner, E.

    2007-07-01

    During the last few years, ultra-short laser pulses have proven their potential for application in medical tissue treatment in many ways. In hard tissue ablation, their aptitude for material ablation with negligible collateral damage provides many advantages. Especially teeth representing an anatomically and physiologically very special region with less blood circulation and lower healing rates than other tissues require most careful treatment. Hence, overheating of the pulp and induction of microcracks are some of the most problematic issues in dental preparation. Up till now it was shown by many authors that the application of picosecond or femtosecond pulses allows to perform ablation with very low damaging potential also fitting to the physiological requirements indicated. Beside the short interaction time with the irradiated matter, scanning of the ultra-short pulse trains turned out to be crucial for ablating cavities of the required quality. One main reason for this can be seen in the fact that during scanning the time period between two subsequent pulses incident on the same spot is so much extended that no heat accumulation effects occur and each pulse can be treated as a first one with respect to its local impact. Extension of this advantageous technique to biocompatible materials, i.e. in this case dental restoration materials and titanium plasma-sprayed implants, is just a matter of consequence. Recently published results on composites fit well with earlier data on dental hard tissue. In case of plaque which has to be removed from implants, it turns out that removal of at least the calcified version is harder than tissue removal. Therefore, besides ultra-short lasers, also Diode and Neodymium lasers, in cw and pulsed modes, have been studied with respect to plaque removal and sterilization. The temperature increase during laser exposure has been experimentally evaluated in parallel.

  20. Dental materials as an aid for victim identification: examination of calcined remains by SEM/EDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.

    2010-06-01

    Detection and identification of human remains in situations in which they are calcined, disarticulated, and fragmented may be a challenging task. In such situations the non-biological materials that may be present in the dentition can provide the best evidence available for potential identification. Four human jaw segments were utilized. A known combination of dental resins was placed in each segment, when possible. Other restorations, pre-existing in the cadavers, were retained. The jaw segments were cremated in a commercial cremation oven for 2.5 hrs at 1010C. Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) was used to analyze the dentition and fragmented debris. Analysis with SEM/EDS demonstrated the ability to confirm brand of known dental resins placed in each cadaver. In addition, pre-existing materials in each jaw segment were profiled and a likely brand name suggested. It was shown that microscopic fragments of heat-altered materials could be identified and classified, adding another level of certainty in victim identification.

  1. An optical coherence tomography investigation of materials defects in ceramic fixed partial dental prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Hughes, Michael; Bradu, Adrian; Todea, Carmen; Rominu, Mihai; Laissue, Philippe L.; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2008-04-01

    Metal ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial prostheses are mainly used in the frontal part of the dental arch because for esthetics reasons. The masticatory stress may induce fractures of the bridges. There are several factors that are associated with the stress state created in ceramic restorations, including: thickness of ceramic layers, mechanical properties of the materials, elastic modulus of the supporting substrate material, direction, magnitude and frequency of applied load, size and location of occlusal contact areas, residual stresses induced by processing or pores, restoration-cement interfacial defects and environmental defects. The fractures of these bridges lead to functional, esthetic and phonetic disturbances which finally render the prosthetic treatment inefficient. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detection and analysis of possible material defects in metal-ceramic and integral ceramic fixed partial dentures.

  2. Depth of cure of contemporary bulk-fill resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Yap, Adrian U Jin; Pandya, Mirali; Toh, Wei Seong

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the depth of cure (DOC) of packable and flowable bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBCs) including PRG (prereacted glass ionomer) and short-fiber materials. The materials were placed in a black split-mold with a 7 mm deep recess and cured at 700 mW/cm(2) for 20 s using a LED curing light. DOC was assessed using the ISO scraping and Knoops hardness tests. Data (n=5) were computed and analyzed using one-way ANOVA/Scheffe's post hoc test (p<0.05). ISO DOC ranged from 3.66 to 2.54 mm while DOC based on hardness testing ranged from 3 to 1.5 mm. For all materials, a decrease in hardness was observed with increasing depths. The DOC of bulk-fill RBCs was product dependent and greater than standard composites. At 4 mm depth, none of the bulk-fill RBCs had a depth: top hardness ratio of 0.8 and above. PMID:27252008

  3. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries.

  4. Students' perceptions of materials and techniques used at European dental schools in the education of fixed prosthodontics.

    PubMed

    Brand, Henk S; Kamell, Hassib; Kharbanda, Aron K; Dozic, Alma

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the materials and procedures used by students in dental schools across Europe for teaching fixed prosthodontics. An online questionnaire, containing twenty-eight dichotomous, multiple-choice, and Likert scale rating questions, was sent to students in forty dental schools. After excluding dental schools in which less than 10 percent of the students responded, 775 questionnaires from ten schools remained for statistical analysis. Among these respondents, acrylic resin teeth were said to be the most commonly used material during preclinical practice (46-96 percent), and use of extracted teeth varied from 8 to 65 percent. At nine of the ten institutions, metal-ceramic was reported to be most commonly used for fixed dental prostheses. There was large variation in the type of finish line for a metal-ceramic fixed dental prosthesis: students at five institutions reported using a shoulder finish line, three a chamfer finish line, and two a shoulder-bevel finish line. A similar variation was observed with regard to the final cementation of metal-ceramic fixed dental prostheses: students at four institutions reporting most frequently using glass ionomer cement, with three using zinc phosphate cement and three using carboxylate cement. The responding European dental students varied considerably in their opinions about whether they were preclinically properly trained for the first preparation on a patient and in their overall rating of their education in fixed prosthodontics. Responding students in the United Kingdom, Sweden, and Nijmegen, The Netherlands, rated their fixed prosthodontics training overall the highest. Overall, this study found a wide variation amongst dental schools with regard to their education in fixed prosthodontics and their rating of this teaching. PMID:24002851

  5. Effects of Various Dental Materials on Alkaline Phosphatase Extracted from Pulp: An Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Lorin R.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory experiment that demonstrates the effects of various dental materials on a representative enzyme from the pulp is outlined. The experiment encourages students to consider the effects that various restorative materials and techniques might have on enzymes in the living pulp. (Author/MLW)

  6. 75 FR 16511 - Pentron Clinical Technologies, a Wholly-Owned Subsidiary of Kerr Dental/Sybron Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... the Federal Register on February 16, 2010 (75 FR 7037). At the request of the State Agency, the... such as dental prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental... prosthetics, dental composites, dental impressions, dental adhesives, and other dental materials to...

  7. Influence of dental resin material composition on cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lammeier, Carmen; Li, YuPing; Lunos, Scott; Fok, Alex; Rudney, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The purpose of this study was to investigate cross-polarization-optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) signal attenuation through different resin material compositions. Four distinct composite systems were used: Filtek supreme ultra (FSU) (3M ESPE), IPS empress direct (EMD) (Ivoclar Vivadent), estelite sigma quick (SQK) (Tokuyama Dental), and Z100 (3M ESPE). Cross-sectional images of different composite-demineralized phantoms (n=108) were collected using a 1310-nm intraoral cross-polarization swept source OCT (CP-OCT) imaging system. %T quantified the CP-OCT signal attenuation. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer chemical analysis was utilized to determine how different matrix/filler compositions affected attenuation of the near infrared (NIR) signal. CP-OCT imaging of dental resin composites showed enormous variation in signal attenuation. For each of our composite systems, there was not a consistent attenuation difference in the NIR signal for A to D shades. The four composites had similar measured backscattering values but attenuated the overall signal to different degrees. When comparing the A2 shades between the four different composite systems, the order of highest to lowest of %T was EMD>Z100, FSU>SQK (ANOVA, Tukey, p<0.0001). As a result, we demonstrate the importance of understanding how the constituents of composite materials affect CP-OCT signal attenuation. PMID:23224001

  8. Dynamic cure measurement of dental polymer composites using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomlins, Peter H.; Palin, Will M.; Shortall, Adrian C.

    2008-02-01

    Dental amalgam is being increasingly replaced by Light-activated resin-based dental composites. However, these materials are limited by inefficient setting reactions as a function of depth, constraining the maximum extent of cure and reducing biocompatibility. In this paper we demonstrate a novel metrological tool for dynamic monitoring of refractive index and thickness change through curing resins using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. We present real-time measurements from pre- to post-cure of a series of un-filled bisphenol-A diglycidyl ether dimethacrylate (bisGMA) and triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) resins with different inhibitor concentrations. Our results demonstrate that refractive index measurements are sensitive to the extent of cure of such resins and that the inhibitor concentration strongly affects the cure dynamics and final extent of cure.

  9. Choosing the Right Dental Material and Making Sense of the Options: Evidence and Clinical Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zaid; Eliyas, Shiyana; Vere, Joseph William

    2015-09-01

    Decision-making is a fundamental aspect of clinical dentistry. Advances in technology and trends towards more conservative technologies have broadened the options available to patients and dentists, increasing the range of choices and opportunities to restore teeth. With such a broad range of dental materials, there are a number of factors to consider in making an appropriate choice. We present several decision-making dilemmas. Namely; how to restore worn lower anterior teeth, what to consider when replacing crowns, materials to consider when providing cuspal protection for posterior teeth, and finally the issues to consider when selecting a luting cement. The evidence supporting different clinical choices is considered in a discussion of the various dilemmas faced. PMID:26591251

  10. Thiol-Ene functionalized siloxanes for use as elastomeric dental impression materials

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Megan A.; Jankousky, Katherine C.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Thiol- and allyl-functionalized siloxane oligomers are synthesized and evaluated for use as a radical-mediated, rapid set elastomeric dental impression material. Thiol-ene siloxane formulations are crosslinked using a redox-initiated polymerization scheme, and the mechanical properties of the thiol-ene network are manipulated through the incorporation of varying degrees of plasticizer and kaolin filler. Formulations with medium and light body consistencies are further evaluated for their ability to accurately replicate features on both the gross and microscopic levels. We hypothesize that thiol-ene functionalized siloxane systems will exhibit faster setting times and greater detail reproduction than commercially available polyvinylsiloxane (PVS) materials of comparable consistencies. Methods Thiol-ene functionalized siloxane mixtures formulated with varying levels of redox initiators, plasticizer, and kaolin filler are made and evaluated for their polymerization speed (FTIR), consistency (ISO4823.9.2), and surface energy (goniometer). Feature replication is evaluated quantitatively by SEM. The Tg, storage modulus, and creep behavior are determined by DMA. Results Increasing redox initiation rate increases the polymerization rate but at high levels also limits working time. Combining 0.86 wt% oxidizing agent with up to 5 wt% plasticizer gave a working time of 3 min and a setting time of 2 min. The selected medium and light body thiol-ene formulations also achieved greater qualitative detail reproduction than the commercial material and reproduced micrometer patterns with 98% accuracy. Significance Improving detail reproduction and setting speed is a primary focus of dental impression material design and synthesis. Radical-mediated polymerizations, particularly thiol-ene reactions, are recognized for their speed, reduced shrinkage, and ‘click’ nature. PMID:24553250

  11. The use of SEM/EDS analysis to distinguish dental and osseus tissue from other materials.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Ward, Dennis C; Braz, Valéria S; Stewart, John

    2002-09-01

    With increasing frequency, relatively small, fragmentary evidence thought to be osseous or dental tissue of human origin is submitted to the forensic laboratory for DNA analysis with the request for positive identification. Prior to performing DNA analysis, however, it is prudent to first perform a presumptive test or "screen" to determine whether the questioned material may be eliminated from further consideration. When material is shown not to be consistent with bone/teeth, DNA testing is not performed. When such determinations cannot be made from gross morphological features, elemental analysis can be indicative. This presumptive test is made possible by applying scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in conjunction with an X-ray spectral database recently developed by the FBI laboratory. This database includes spectra for many different materials including known examples of bone and tooth from many different contexts and representing the full range of taphonomic conditions. Results of SEM/EDS analysis of evidence can be compared to these standards to determine if they are consistent with bone and/or tooth and, if not, then what the material might represent. Analysis suggests that although the proportions and amounts of calcium and phosphorus are particularly important in differentiating bone and tooth from other materials, other minor differences in spectral profile can also provide significant discrimination. Analysis enables bone and tooth to be successfully distinguished from other materials in most cases. Exceptions appear to be ivory, mineral apatite, and perhaps some types of corals. PMID:12353578

  12. Reasons for Placement of Restorations on Previously Unrestored Tooth Surfaces by Dental PBRN Dentists

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Marcelle M.; Gordan, Valeria V.; Qvist, Vibeke; Litaker, Mark S.; Rindal, D. Brad; Williams, O.D.; Fellows, Jeffrey L.; Ritchie, Lloyd K.; Mjör, Ivar A.; McClelland, Jocelyn; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To identify and quantify the reasons for placing restorations on unrestored permanent tooth surfaces and the dental materials used by Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN; www.DentalPBRN.org) dentists. Methods A total of 229 DPBRN practitioner-investigators collected data on 9,890 consecutive restorations from 5,810 patients. Information included: (1) reasons for restoring; (2) tooth and surfaces restored; and (3) restorative materials employed. Results Primary caries (85%) and non-carious defects (15%), which included abrasion/ abfraction/ erosion lesions and tooth fracture, were the main reasons for placement of restorations. Restorations due to caries were frequently placed on occlusal surfaces (49%), followed by distal, mesial, buccal/facial, lingual/palatal, and incisal surfaces. Amalgam was used for 46% of the molar and 45% of the premolar restorations. Directly placed resin-based composite (RBC) was used for 48% of the molar, 49% of the premolar, and 92% of the anterior restorations. Conclusion Dental caries on occlusal and proximal surfaces of molar teeth are the main reasons for placing restorations on previously unrestored tooth surfaces by DPBRN practitioner-investigators. RBC is the material most commonly used for occlusal and anterior restorations. Amalgam remains the material of choice to restore proximal caries in posterior teeth, although there are significant differences by DPBRN region. PMID:20354094

  13. Materials Science and Technology, Volume 14, Materials Science and Technology A Comprehensive Treatment - Volume 14: Medical and Dental Materials Cahn,R.W.(ed.)/Haasen,P.(ed.)/Kramer,E.J.(ed.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, David F.

    1996-12-01

    The applications of metals, ceramics, and polymers in medical and dental engineering is becoming ever more widespread. Technologists in these fields are provided with a unique overview of materials, performances and applications. From the Contents: Williams: Biofunctionality and Biocompatibility. Kohn/Ducheyne: Materials for Bone and Joint Replacement. Baquey: Materials in the Cardiovascular System. Aebischer/Goddard/ Galletti/ Lysaght: Biomaterials and Artificial Organs. Yannas: Materials for Skin and Nerve Regeneration. Watts: Dental Restorative Materials. Williams: Materials for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Materials for Ophthalmology. Causton: Medical and Dental Adhesives. Reichert/Saavedra: Materials Consideration in the Selection, Performance, and Adhesion of Polymeric Encapsulants for Implantable Sensors. Campbell/Jones: Materials for Implantable Electrodes and Electronic Devices. Brunstedt/Anderson: Materials for Drug Delivery. Jones: Materials for Fixed and Removable Prosthodontics.

  14. Fabrication of Silicon Nitride Dental Core Ceramics with Borosilicate Veneering material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wananuruksawong, R.; Jinawath, S.; Padipatvuthikul, P.; Wasanapiarnpong, T.

    2011-10-01

    Silicon nitride (Si3N4) ceramic is a great candidate for clinical applications due to its high fracture toughness, strength, hardness and bio-inertness. This study has focused on the Si3N4 ceramic as a dental core material. The white Si3N4 was prepared by pressureless sintering at relative low sintering temperature of 1650 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of Si3N4 ceramic is lower than that of Zirconia and Alumina ceramic which are popular in this field. The borosilicate glass veneering was employed due to its compatibility in thermal expansion. The sintered Si3N4 specimens represented the synthetic dental core were paintbrush coated by a veneer paste composed of borosilicate glass powder (<150 micrometer, Pyrex) with 5 wt% of zirconia powder (3 wt% Y2O3 - partial stabilized zirconia) and 30 wt% of polyvinyl alcohol (5 wt% solution). After coating the veneer on the Si3N4 specimens, the firing was performed in electric tube furnace between 1000-1200°C. The veneered specimens fired at 1100°C for 15 mins show good bonding, smooth and glossy without defect and crazing. The veneer has thermal expansion coefficient as 3.98×10-6 °C-1, rather white and semi opaque, due to zirconia addition, the Vickers hardness as 4.0 GPa which is closely to the human teeth.

  15. Phenolic resin-based porous carbons for adsorption and energy storage applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramaratne, Nilantha P.

    The main objective of this dissertation research is to develop phenolic resin based carbon materials for range of applications by soft-templating and Stober-like synthesis strategies. Applications Studied in this dissertation are adsorption of CO2, bio-molecular and heavy metal ions, and energy storage devices. Based on that, our goal is to design carbon materials with desired pore structure, high surface area, graphitic domains, incorporated metal nanoparticles, and specific organic groups and heteroatoms. In this dissertation the organic-organic self-assembly of phenolic resins and triblock copolymers under acidic conditions will be used to obtain mesoporous carbons/carbon composites and Stober-like synthesis involving phenolic resins under basic condition will be used to prepare polymer/carbon particles and their composites. The structure of this dissertation consists of an introductory chapter (Chapter 1) discussing the general synthesis of carbon materials, particularly the soft-templating strategy and Stober-like carbon synthesis. Also, Chapter 1 includes a brief outline of applications namely adsorption of CO2, biomolecule and heavy metal ions, and supercapacitors. Chapter 2 discusses the techniques used for characterization of the carbon materials studied. This chapter starts with nitrogen adsorption analysis, which is used to measure the specific surface area, pore volume, distribution of pore sizes, and pore width. In addition to nitrogen adsorption, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution thermogravimetric analysis (HR-TGA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and CHNS elemental analysis (EA) are mentioned too. Chapter 3 is focused on carbon materials for CO2 adsorption. There are different types of porous solid materials such as silicate, MOFs, carbons, and zeolites studied for CO2 adsorption. However, the carbon based materials are considered to be the best candidates for CO 2 adsorption to the industrial point of

  16. Time-dependent strength and fatigue resistance of dental direct restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lohbauer, Ulrich; Frankenberger, Roland; Krämer, Norbert; Petschelt, Anselm

    2003-12-01

    Elastic modulus (EM), initial fracture strength (FS) and flexural fatigue limit (FFL) of dental restorative materials were measured in a simulated oral environment to correlate mechanical response under the influence of water with the chemical nature of the test materials under investigation. One resin composite (RC; Tetric Ceram, Ivoclar-Vivadent Corp., Liechtenstein), an ion-leaching resin composite (ILRC; Ariston pHc, Ivoclar-Vivadent Corp., Liechtenstein) a compomer (CO; Dyract AP, Dentsply Corp., USA) and a glass-ionomer cement (GIC; Ketac Molar, 3MEspe Corp., Germany) were tested. Static EM, FS and dynamic FFL experiments were performed. The FFL was determined under cyclic loading for 10(5) cycles in terms of a staircase approach. The materials were stored for 1, 8, 30, 90 and 180 days in 37 degrees C distilled water, respectively. The RC degraded over time due to water adsorption followed by failure within the resin matrix. The ILRC suffered from a pronounced decrease in FS as well as in FFL due to a constant ion-leaching and macroscopic crack growth. CO failed over time due to resin-filler interface cracking. The GIC exhibited improved mechanical performance over time due to a post-hardening mechanism. The results reveal the necessity for substantial preclinical evaluation of direct restorative materials. The material parameters under investigation are capable of predicting clinical performance over time. PMID:15348497

  17. Microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-15Zr alloy used as dental implant material.

    PubMed

    Medvedev, Alexander E; Molotnikov, Andrey; Lapovok, Rimma; Zeller, Rolf; Berner, Simon; Habersetzer, Philippe; Dalla Torre, Florian

    2016-09-01

    Ti-Zr alloys have recently started to receive a considerable amount of attention as promising materials for dental applications. This work compares mechanical properties of a new Ti-15Zr alloy to those of commercially pure titanium Grade4 in two surface conditions - machined and modified by sand-blasting and etching (SLA). As a result of significantly smaller grain size in the initial condition (1-2µm), the strength of Ti-15Zr alloy was found to be 10-15% higher than that of Grade4 titanium without reduction in the tensile elongation or compromising the fracture toughness. The fatigue endurance limit of the alloy was increased by around 30% (560MPa vs. 435MPa and 500MPa vs. 380MPa for machined and SLA-treated surfaces, respectively). Additional implant fatigue tests showed enhanced fatigue performance of Ti-15Zr over Ti-Grade4. PMID:27258932

  18. Dental materials. Amorphous intergranular phases control the properties of rodent tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Lyle M; Cohen, Michael J; MacRenaris, Keith W; Pasteris, Jill D; Seda, Takele; Joester, Derk

    2015-02-13

    Dental enamel, a hierarchical material composed primarily of hydroxylapatite nanowires, is susceptible to degradation by plaque biofilm-derived acids. The solubility of enamel strongly depends on the presence of Mg(2+), F(-), and CO3(2-). However, determining the distribution of these minor ions is challenging. We show—using atom probe tomography, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and correlative techniques—that in unpigmented rodent enamel, Mg(2+) is predominantly present at grain boundaries as an intergranular phase of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP). In the pigmented enamel, a mixture of ferrihydrite and amorphous iron-calcium phosphate replaces the more soluble Mg-ACP, rendering it both harder and more resistant to acid attack. These results demonstrate the presence of enduring amorphous phases with a dramatic influence on the physical and chemical properties of the mature mineralized tissue. PMID:25678658

  19. Electrochemical study on microbiology-related corrosion of metallic dental materials.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Chung; Oshida, Yoshiki; Gregory, Richard L; Andres, Carl J; Barco, Thomas M; Brown, David T

    2003-01-01

    Microbiology-related corrosion has been noted in industry for many years. It is widely recognized that microorganisms affect the corrosion of metal and alloys immersed in aqueous environments. Under similar conditions, the effect of bacteria in the oral environment on the corrosion of dental metallic materials remains unknown. The purpose of this study is to investigate the corrosion behavior of dental metallic materials in the presence of Streptococcus mutans and its growth byproducts. Samples were commercially pure titanium (CPT), Ti-6Al-4V (TAV), Ti-Ni (TN), Co-Cr-Mo alloy (CCM), 316L stainless steel (SSL), 17Cr-4Ni PH-type stainless steel (PH), and Ni-Cr alloy (NC). Using Gamry corrosion test system, surfaces were exposed to (1) sterilized Ringer's solution as a control for (2), (2) S. mutans mixed with sterilized Ringer's solution; (3) sterilized tryptic soy broth as a control for (4), and (4) byproducts of S. mutans mixed with sterilized tryptic soy broth. Corrosion parameters (EOCP, ECORR, ICORR, etc.) were corrected for all tested samples. Averaged values of these parameters were statistically analyzed by t-test to identify significant differences. It was concluded that (1) S. mutans reduced the EOCP of CPT, TAV, TN, and SSL, and the byproducts of S. mutans reduced the EOCP of TAV, TN, SSL, and PH. (2) S. mutans increased the ICORR of PH, and byproducts of S. mutans increased the ICORR of all the samples. (3) S. mutans reduced the ECORR of CPT, TAV and TN, and the byproducts of S. mutans reduced the ECORR of TN, SSL, PH, and NC. (4) S. mutans increased the IPASS of CPT, and the byproducts of S. mutans increased the IPASS of CPT, PH, and NC. PMID:12883177

  20. Dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Tony M

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is the core diagnostic modality of veterinary dentistry. Dental radiographs assist in detecting hidden painful pathology, estimating the severity of dental conditions, assessing treatment options, providing intraoperative guidance, and also serve to monitor success of prior treatments. Unfortunately, most professional veterinary training programs provide little or no training in veterinary dentistry in general or dental radiology in particular. Although a technical learning curve does exist, the techniques required for producing diagnostic films are not difficult to master. Regular use of dental x-rays will increase the amount of pathology detected, leading to healthier patients and happier clients who notice a difference in how their pet feels. This article covers equipment and materials needed to produce diagnostic intraoral dental films. A simplified guide for positioning will be presented, including a positioning "cheat sheet" to be placed next to the dental x-ray machine in the operatory. Additionally, digital dental radiograph systems will be described and trends for their future discussed. PMID:19410234

  1. [Analysis of the inhibitory capacity against bacterial growth of several materials of dental use. Preliminar].

    PubMed

    Canivell, M; Lopez, J L; Teresa, V; Salas, E J; Ciordia, M V

    2011-01-01

    Dental plaque is one of the reasons for odontogenic infection. Although multiple bacteria are involved in these processes, A.actinomycetemcomitans and S.mutans are considered directly responsible for localized aggressive periodontitis and caries respectively. On the other hand, it seems clear that the oral flora utilizes especially not well polished surfaces or without bacteriastatic capacity in order to obtain better adhesion. Based on those facts we expect to prove the inhibitory capacity "in vitro" of some materials used for teeth restoration and for the cementation of accessories against one common bacterium in the human flora and two pathogenic bacteria of the oral cavity. We prepared, following the manufacturer's instructions, 18 discs for each one of the materials used in the study (2 composites and 2 ionomeros of glass). 6 discs of each material are incubated with A. actinomycetemcomitans, S. mutans and E. coli. 3 of them are incubated directly on the discs and the other 3 are incubated previously in an artificial saliva for 24 days. From the results, should be highlighted that only one of the materials demonstrated inhibitory capacity against A. actinomycetemcomitans and E. coli. None of them demonstrated inhibitory capacity against S. mutans. PMID:21716233

  2. The effect of a mouthrinse containing essential oils on dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    von Fraunhofer, J A; Kelley, J I; DePaola, L G; Meiller, T F

    2006-01-01

    Mouthrinses that contain essential oils are effective for controlling plaque and periodontal disease. Recent studies have shown that such mouthrinses are effective at preventing the formation of biofilm in dental unit waterlines. However, there is no information in the literature regarding the effect of such mouthrinses on restorative materials used within the oral cavity. Specimens of three common restorative materials (a glass ionomer, a composite resin, and amalgam) were subjected to continuous exposure to Listerine and distilled water for 10 days; at that time, the strength, fluid sorption, and surface appearance of the specimens were compared. Specimens of the test materials also were placed in intraoral devices; volunteer patients wore these devices for 12 hours per day for a period of 10 days. During that time, the patients were instructed to rinse twice daily for 30 seconds with Listerine Cool Mint or a non-active mouthrinse. After 10 days, the specimens were salvaged from the devices and inspected by visible and SEM examination. This study indicates that routine use of mouthrinses containing essential oils (or even prolonged exposure to such mouthrinses) has no adverse effects on restorative materials that might be expected to react to such mixtures because of their chemical compositions. It was concluded that active mouthrinses do not appear to have any adverse effects on a variety of restorative biomaterials. PMID:17134077

  3. A Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Ceramic and Resin Denture Teeth on Different Acrylic Resin Bases

    PubMed Central

    Corsalini, Massimo; Venere, Daniela Di; Pettini, Francesco; Stefanachi, Gianluca; Catapano, Santo; Boccaccio, Antonio; Lamberti, Luciano; Pappalettere, Carmine; Carossa, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare the shear bond strength of different resin bases and artificial teeth made of ceramic or acrylic resin materials and whether tooth-base interface may be treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting. Experimental measurements were carried on 80 specimens consisting of a cylinder of acrylic resin into which a single tooth is inserted. An ad hoc metallic frame was realized to measure the shear bond strength at the tooth-base interface. A complete factorial plan was designed and a three-way ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA) was carried out to investigate if shear bond strength is affected by the following factors: (i) tooth material (ceramic or resin); (ii) base material (self-curing or thermal-curing resin); (iii) presence or absence of aluminium oxide sandblasting treatment at the tooth-base interface. Tukey post hoc test was also conducted to evaluate any statistically significant difference between shear strength values measured for the dif-ferently prepared samples. It was found from ANOVA that the above mentioned factors all affect shear strength. Furthermore, post hoc analysis indi-cated that there are statistically significant differences (p-value=0.000) between measured shear strength values for: (i) teeth made of ceramic material vs. teeth made of acrylic resin material; (ii) bases made of self-curing resin vs. thermal-curing resin; (iii) specimens treated with aluminium oxide sandblasting vs. untreated specimens. Shear strength values measured for acryl-ic resin teeth were on average 70% higher than those measured for ceramic teeth. The shear bond strength was maximized by preparing samples with thermal-curing resin bases and resin teeth submitted to aluminium oxide sandblasting. PMID:25614770

  4. 1,3-Diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid as an alternative coinitiator for acidic photopolymerizable dental materials.

    PubMed

    Münchow, Eliseu A; Valente, Lisia L; Peralta, Sonia L; Fernández, María Raquel; Lima, Giana da S; Petzhold, Cesar L; Piva, Evandro; Ogliari, Fabrício A

    2013-10-01

    The ethyl-4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB) is widely used as a coinitiator of the camphorquinone (CQ), but in acidic circumstances it might present some instability, reducing the polymerization efficiency of the material. Considering this, new coinitiators are being evaluated. Hence, this study evaluated the kinetic of polymerization (KP), the degree of conversion (DC), and the rate of polymerization (RP ) of experimental resin adhesives containing 1,3-diethyl-2-thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as a coinitiator of the CQ. The experimental monomeric blend was prepared with bisphenol A glycidyl dimethacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, and acidic monomers. CQ was added at 1 mol % as photoinitiator. Six groups were formulated: four containing concentrations of 0.1, 0.5, 1, and 2 mol % of TBA, one without coinitiator, and the last one containing 1 mol % of EDAB (control group). The KP and the RP were performed using real-time Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy. The group without coinitiator has not formed a polymer, whereas the addition of TBA resulted in the conversion of monomers in polymer. The DC of the adhesives was as higher as the increase in the TBA content. The group with 2 mol % of TBA presented improved DC and reactivity (RP ) than the other groups and the control one. Hence, the TBA has performed as a coinitiator of the CQ for the radical polymerization of methacrylate resin adhesives and it has improved the DC and the reactivity of the materials. Thus, it is a potential coinitiator for the photopolymerization of dental materials. PMID:23564499

  5. Investigation of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing.

    PubMed

    Falland-Cheung, Lisa; Piccione, Neil; Zhao, Tianqi; Lazarjan, Milad Soltanipour; Hanlin, Suzanne; Jermy, Mark; Waddell, J Neil

    2016-06-01

    Routine forensic research into in vitro skin/skull/brain ballistic blood backspatter behavior has traditionally used gelatin at a 1:10 Water:Powder (W:P) ratio by volume as a brain simulant. A limitation of gelatin is its high elasticity compared to brain tissue. Therefore this study investigated the use of dental alginate and agar impression materials as a brain simulant for ballistic testing. Fresh deer brain, alginate (W:P ratio 91.5:8.5) and agar (W:P ratio 81:19) specimens (n=10) (11×22×33mm) were placed in transparent Perspex boxes of the same internal dimensions prior to shooting with a 0.22inch caliber high velocity air gun. Quantitative analysis to establish kinetic energy loss, vertical displacement elastic behavior and qualitative analysis to establish elasticity behavior was done via high-speed camera footage (SA5, Photron, Japan) using Photron Fastcam Viewer software (Version 3.5.1, Photron, Japan) and visual observation. Damage mechanisms and behavior were qualitatively established by observation of the materials during and after shooting. The qualitative analysis found that of the two simulant materials tested, agar behaved more like brain in terms of damage and showed similar mechanical response to brain during the passage of the projectile, in terms of energy absorption and vertical velocity displacement. In conclusion agar showed a mechanical and subsequent damage response that was similar to brain compared to alginate. PMID:27131216

  6. CHIPPING FRACTURE RESISTANCE OF DENTAL CAD/CAM RESTORATIVE MATERIALS: PART I, PROCEDURES AND RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G. D.; Giuseppetti, A. A.; Hoffman, K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The edge chipping test was used to measure the fracture resistance of CAD/CAM dental restoration ceramics and resin composites. Methods An edge chipping machine was used to evaluate six materials including one feldspathic porcelain, two glass ceramics, a filled resin-composite, a yttria-stabilized zirconia, and a new ceramic-resin composite material. Force versus edge distance data were collected over a broad range of forces and distances. Data were analyzed by several approaches and several chipping resistance parameters were evaluated. The effects of using different indenter types were explored. Results The force versus distance trends were usually nonlinear with good fits to a power law equation with exponents usually ranging from 1.2 to 1.9. The order of chipping resistance (from least to greatest) was: feldspathic porcelain and a leucite glass ceramic (which were similar), followed by the lithium disilicate glass ceramic and the two resin composites (which were similar), and finally the zirconia which had the greatest resistance to chipping. Chipping with a Vickers indenter required 28% to 45% more force than with the sharp conical 120° indenter. The two indenters rank materials approximately the same way. The power law exponents were very similar for the two indenters for a particular material, but the exponents varied with material. The Rockwell C indenter gives different power law trends and rankings. Significance Despite the variations in the trends and indenters, simple comparisons between materials can be made by chipping with sharp conical 120° or Vickers indenters at 0.50 mm. Broad distance ranges are recommended for trend evaluation. PMID:24685178

  7. Comparison of CT-Number and Gray Scale Value of Different Dental Materials and Hard Tissues in CT and CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Emadi, Naghmeh; Safi, Yaser; Akbarzadeh Bagheban, Alireza; Asgary, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Computed tomography (CT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) are valuable diagnostic aids for many clinical applications. This study was designed to compare the gray scale value (GSV) and Hounsfield unit (HU) of selected dental materials and various hard tissues using CT or CBCT. Methods and Materials: Three samples of all test materials including amalgam (AM), composite resin (CR), glass ionomer (GI), zinc-oxide eugenol (ZOE), calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement, AH-26 root canal sealer (AH-26), gutta-percha (GP), Coltosol (Col), Dycal (DL), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), zinc phosphate (ZP), and polycarbonate cement (PC) were prepared and scanned together with samples of bone, dentin and enamel using two CBCT devices, Scanora 3D (S3D) and NewTom VGi (NTV) and a spiral CT (SCT) scanner (Somatom Emotion 16 multislice spiral CT);. Subsequently, the HU and GSV values were determined and evaluated. The data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. The level of significance was determined at 0.05. Results: There were significant differences among the three different scanners (P<0.05). The differences between HU/GSV values of 12 selected dental materials using NTV was significant (P<0.05) and for S3D and SCT was insignificant (P>0.05). All tested materials showed maximum values in S3D and SCT (3094 and 3071, respectively); however, bone and dentin showed low/medium values (P<0.05). In contrast, the tested materials and tissues showed a range of values in NTV (366 to15383; P<0.05). Conclusion: Scanner system can influence the obtained HU/GSV of dental materials. NTV can discriminate various dental materials, in contrast to S3D/SCT scanners. NTV may be a more useful diagnostic aid for clinical practice. PMID:25386210

  8. Matching the optical properties of direct esthetic dental restorative materials to those of human enamel and dentin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragain, James Carlton, Jr.

    One of the goals of the restorative dentist is to restore the appearance of the natural dentition. Clinical matching of teeth and restorative materials are seldom accurate and shade selection techniques are subjective. The first specific aim of this research was to characterize the optical absorption and scattering that occurs within enamel, dentin, and composite resin and compomer restorative materials and to relate those phenomena to translucency and color. The second aim was to evaluate small color differences among composite restorative materials which would be detectable by humans. The last aim was to lay the foundation for developing an improved model of specifying layers of dental restorative materials in order to match the translucency and color to those of human enamel. The Kubelka-Munk theory was validated for enamel, dentin, and the restorative materials. These tissues and materials were then characterized in terms of their color parameters. Tooth cores were also characterized in terms of color space parameters. Human subjects were evaluated for their abilities to discriminate small color differences in the dental composite resin materials. The following conclusions were derived from this study: (1) Kubelka-Munk theory accurately predicts the diffuse reflectance spectra of enamel, dentin, and the direct esthetic dental restorative materials studied. (2) Scattering and absorption coefficients of the dental tissues and esthetic restorative materials can be directly calculated from diffuse reflectance measurements of a uniformly thick slab of tissue/material using black and white backings and the appropriate refractive index. (3) For tooth cores, there is a positive correlation between L* and b* and a negative correlation between L* and a*. (4) The range of translucency parameters for the restorative materials studied does not match those of enamel and dentin. (5) None of the shades of the dental composite resin restorative materials studied fit into the

  9. Microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to Er,Cr:YSGG laser-etched primary enamel.

    PubMed

    Sungurtekin-Ekci, Elif; Oztas, Nurhan

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Er,Cr:YSGG laser pre-treatment alone, or associated with acid-etching, on the microtensile bond strength of a resin-based fissure sealant to primary enamel. Twenty-five human primary molars were randomly divided into five groups including (1) 35 % acid etching, (2) 2.5-W laser etching, (3) 3.5-W laser etching, (4) 2.5-W laser etching + acid etching, and (5) 3.5-W laser etching + acid etching. Er,Cr:YSGG laser was used at a wavelength of 2.780 nm and pulse duration of 140-200 μs with a repetition rate of 20 Hz. Following surface pre-treatment, the fissure sealant (ClinPro™, 3M Dental Products) was applied. Each tooth was sectioned and subjected to microtensile testing. Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. The microtensile bond strength values of group 1 were significantly higher than those of group 2, while no statistically significant difference was detected between groups 1, 3, 4, and 5. It was concluded that 3.5-W laser etching produced results comparable to conventional acid etching technique, whereas 2.5-W laser etching was not able to yield adequate bonding performance. PMID:25847685

  10. Effect of root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers.

    PubMed

    Rached-Júnior, Fuad Jacob Abi; Souza, Angélica Moreira; Macedo, Luciana Martins Domingues; Raucci-Neto, Walter; Baratto-Filho, Flares; Silva, Bruno Marques; Silva-Sousa, Yara Teresinha Corrêa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different root canal filling techniques on the bond strength of epoxy resin-based sealers. Sixty single-rooted canines were prepared using ProTaper (F5) and divided into the following groups based on the root filling technique: Lateral Compaction (LC), Single Cone (SC), and Tagger Hybrid Technique (THT). The following subgroups (n = 10) were also created based on sealer material used: AH Plus and Sealer 26. Two-millimeter-thick slices were cut from all the root thirds and subjected to push-out test. Data (MPa) was analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The push-out values were significantly affected by the sealer, filling technique, and root third (p < 0.05). AH Plus (1.37 ± 1.04) exhibited higher values than Sealer 26 (0.92 ± 0.51), while LC (1.80 ± 0.98) showed greater bond strength than THT (1.16 ± 0.50) and SC (0.92 ± 0.25). The cervical (1.45 ± 1.14) third exhibited higher bond strength, followed by the middle (1.20 ± 0.72) and apical (0.78 ± 0.33) thirds. AH Plus/LC (2.26 ± 1.15) exhibited the highest bond strength values, followed by AH Plus/THT (1.32 ± 0.61), Sealer 26/LC (1.34 ± 0.42), and Sealer 26/THT (1.00 ± 0.27). The lowest values were obtained with AH Plus/SC and Sealer 26/SC. Thus, it can be concluded that the filling technique affects the bond strength of sealers. LC was associated with higher bond strength between the material and intra-radicular dentine than THT and SC techniques. PMID:26910020

  11. In vitro evaluation of a newly produced resin-based endodontic sealer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yoo-Seok; Choi, Yoorina; Lim, Myung-Jin; Yu, Mi-Kyung; Hong, Chan-Ui; Lee, Kwang-Won

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A variety of root canal sealers were recently launched to the market. This study evaluated physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, and sealing ability of a newly launched resin-based sealer (Dia-Proseal, Diadent) compared to the existing root canal sealers (AHplus, Dentsply DeTrey and ADseal, Metabiomed). Materials and Methods The physicochemical properties of the tested sealers including pH, solubility, dimensional change, and radiopacity were evaluated. Biocompatibility was measured using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. For microleakage test, single-rooted teeth were instrumented, and obturated with gutta-percha and one of the sealers (n = 10). After immersion in 1% methylene blue solution for 2 weeks, the specimens were split longitudinally. Then, the maximum length of staining was measured. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey test (p = 0.05). Results Dia-Proseal showed the highest pH value among the tested sealers (p < 0.05). ADseal showed higher dimensional change compared to AHplus and Dia-Proseal (p < 0.05). The solubility values of AHplus and Dia-Proseal were similar, whereas ADseal had the lowest solubility value (p < 0.05). The flow values of sealer in increasing order were AHplus, DiaProseal, and ADseal (p < 0.05). The radiopacity of AHplus was higher than those of ADseal and Dia-Proseal (p < 0.05). The cell viability of the tested materials was statistically similar throughout the experimental period. There were no significant differences in microleakage values among the tested samples. Conclusions The present study indicates that Dia-Proseal has acceptable physicochemical properties, biocompatibility, and sealing ability. PMID:27508160

  12. Structure–property relationships in hybrid dental nanocomposite resins containing monofunctional and multifunctional polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguo; Sun, Xiang; Huang, Li; Gao, Yu; Ban, Jinghao; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2014-01-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS), have the potential to improve the mechanical properties of the methacrylate-based composites and resins used in dentistry. In this article, nanocomposites of methacryl isobutyl POSS (MI-POSS [bears only one methacrylate functional group]) and methacryl POSS (MA-POSS [bears eight methacrylate functional groups]) were investigated to determine the effect of structures on the properties of dental resin. The structures of the POSS-containing networks were determined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Monofunctional POSS showed a strong tendency toward aggregation and crystallization, while multifunctional POSS showed higher miscibility with the dimethacrylate monomer. The mechanical properties and wear resistance decreased with increasing amounts of MI-POSS, indicating that the MI-POSS agglomerates act as the mechanical weak point in the dental resins. The addition of small amounts of MA-POSS improved the mechanical and shrinkage properties. However, samples with a higher MA-POSS concentration showed lower flexural strength and flexural modulus, indicating that there is a limited range in which the reinforcement properties of MA-POSS can operate. This concentration dependence is attributed to phase separation at higher concentrations of POSS, which affects the structural integrity, and thus, the mechanical and shrinkage properties of the dental resin. Our results show that resin with 3% MA-POSS is a potential candidate for resin-based dental materials. PMID:24550674

  13. Quantitative evaluation of susceptibility effects caused by dental materials in head magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, S.; Ghielmi, M.; Basilico, F.; Macchi, A.; Novario, R.; Ferretti, R.; Binaghi, E.

    2016-03-01

    This work quantitatively evaluates the effects induced by susceptibility characteristics of materials commonly used in dental practice on the quality of head MR images in a clinical 1.5T device. The proposed evaluation procedure measures the image artifacts induced by susceptibility in MR images by providing an index consistent with the global degradation as perceived by the experts. Susceptibility artifacts were evaluated in a near-clinical setup, using a phantom with susceptibility and geometric characteristics similar to that of a human head. We tested different dentist materials, called PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI, Keramit NP, ILOR F, Zirconia and used different clinical MR acquisition sequences, such as "classical" SE and fast, gradient, and diffusion sequences. The evaluation is designed as a matching process between reference and artifacts affected images recording the same scene. The extent of the degradation induced by susceptibility is then measured in terms of similarity with the corresponding reference image. The matching process involves a multimodal registration task and the use an adequate similarity index psychophysically validated, based on correlation coefficient. The proposed analyses are integrated within a computer-supported procedure that interactively guides the users in the different phases of the evaluation method. 2-Dimensional and 3-dimensional indexes are used for each material and each acquisition sequence. From these, we drew a ranking of the materials, averaging the results obtained. Zirconia and ILOR F appear to be the best choice from the susceptibility artefacts point of view, followed, in order, by PAL Keramit, Ti6Al4V-ELI and Keramit NP.

  14. Evaluation of sorption, solubility and staining of universal and silorane resin-based composites.

    PubMed

    Anfe, T E de Almeida; Agra, C M; Vieira, G F

    2011-12-01

    Resin-based composite staining is a multifactoral phenomenon and can be caused by intrinsic and extrinsic factors. The purpose of this study was to compare staining, sorption and solubility of silorane resin-based and universal resin-based composites. Five different resin-based composites (4 Seasons, Charisma, Filtek Silorane, Filtek Supreme and Grandio) were tested. Twenty five specimens were prepared (10 mm diameter and 1.5 mm thick). To staining test, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 5): distilled water (control), coffee and red wine. The specimens were immersed in one of the solutions at 37 degrees C for 7 days. Using the values of L*, a*, b*, color variation (CIEDE2000) was determined. For sorption and solubility test, the specimens were divided into 2 groups (n = 5): with previous desiccation (Group 1) and with no previous desiccation (Group 2). The methodology used for sorption and solubility test was based on ISO 4049:2000. The results presented no significant difference in staining between composites. In sorption and solubility test, Filtek Silorane presented the smallest values, followed by Grandio. Under tested experimental conditions, it is not possible to assert the dependence of staining in sorption that composites are undergone. There was no significant correlation between colour change and sorption values. PMID:22645799

  15. Teeth and bones: applications of surface science to dental materials and related biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, F. H.

    2001-05-01

    Recent years have seen a considerable upsurge in publications concerning the surface structure and chemistry of materials with biological or biomedical applications. Within the body, gas-solid interactions become relatively less significant and solid-liquid or solid-solid interfaces dominate, providing new challenges for the surface scientist. The current paper aims to provide a timely review of the use of surface analysis and modification techniques within the biomaterials field. A broad overview of applications in a number of related areas is given with particular attention focusing on those materials commonly encountered in dentistry and oral or maxillofacial implantology. Several specific issues of current interest are discussed. The interaction between synthetic and natural solids, both in the oral environment and elsewhere in the body is important in terms of adhesion, related stresses and strains and ultimately the longevity of a dental restoration, biomedical implant, or indeed the surrounding tissue. Exposure to body fluids, of course, can also affect stability, leading to the degradation or corrosion of materials within the body. Whilst this could potentially be harmful, e.g., if cytotoxic elements are released, it may alternatively provide a route to the preferential release of beneficial substances. Furthermore, in some cases, the controlled disintegration of a biomaterial is desirable, allowing the removal of an implant, e.g., without the need for further surgery. The presence of cells in the immediate bioenvironment additionally complicates the situation. A considerable amount of current research activity is targeted at the development of coatings or surface treatments to encourage tissue growth. If this is to be achieved by stimulating enhanced cell productivity, determination of the relationship between cell function and surface composition is essential.

  16. Low-intensity lasers, modern filling materials, and bonding systems influence on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunin, Anatoly A.; Yesaulenko, I. E.; Zoibelmann, M.; Pankova, Svetlana N.; Ippolitov, Yu. A.; Oleinik, Olga I.; Popova, T. A.; Koretskaya, I. V.; Shumilovitch, Bogdan R.; Podolskaya, Elana E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the main reasons of low quality filling is breaking Ca-P balance in hard tissues. Our research was done with the purpose of studying the influence of low intensity lasers, diodic radiation, the newest filling and bonding systems on the processes of mineral metabolism in hard dental tissues while filling a tooth. 250 patients having caries and its compli-cations were examined and treated. Our complex research included: visual and instrumental examination, finding out the level of oral cavity hygiene, acid enamel biopsy, scanning electronic microscopy and X-ray spectrum microanalysis. Filling processes may produce a negative effect on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues the latter is less pronounced when applying fluoride-containing filling materials with bonding systems. It has also been found that bonding dentin and enamel systems are designed for both a better filling adhesion (i.e. mechanical adhesion) and migration of useful microelements present in them by their sinking into hard dental tissues (i.e. chemical adhesion). Our research showed a positive influence of low intensity laser and diodic beams accompanying the use of modern filling and bonding systems on mineral metabolism of hard dental tissues.

  17. Nanoparticulate zinc oxide as a coating material for orthopedic and dental implants.

    PubMed

    Memarzadeh, Kaveh; Sharili, Amir S; Huang, Jie; Rawlinson, Simon C F; Allaker, Robert P

    2015-03-01

    Orthopedic and dental implants are prone to infection. In this study, we describe a novel system using zinc oxide nanoparticles (nZnO) as a coating material to inhibit bacterial adhesion and promote osteoblast growth. Electrohydrodynamic atomisation (EHDA) was employed to deposit mixtures of nZnO and nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) onto the surface of glass substrates. Nano-coated substrates were exposed to Staphylococcus aureus suspended in buffered saline or bovine serum to determine antimicrobial activity. Our results indicate that 100% nZnO and 75% nZnO/25% nHA composite-coated substrates have significant antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, osteoblast function was explored by exposing cells to nZnO. UMR-106 cells exposed to nZnO supernatants showed minimal toxicity. Similarly, MG-63 cells cultured on nZnO substrates did not show release of TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines. These results were reinforced by both proliferation and differentiation studies which revealed that a substrate coated with exclusively nZnO is more efficient than composite surface coatings. Finally, electron and light microscopy, together with immunofluorescence staining, revealed that all cell types tested, including human mesenchymal cell (hMSC), were able to maintain normal cell morphology when adhered onto the surface of the nano-coated substrates. Collectively, these findings indicate that nZnO can, on its own, provide an optimal coating for future bone implants that are both antimicrobial and biocompatible. PMID:24862288

  18. Longer-Term Postcure Measurement of Cuspal Deformation Induced by Dimensional Changes in Dental Materials

    PubMed Central

    Falsafi, A.; Oxman, J. D.; Tse, P.-H.; Ton, T. T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim. This paper presents a simple, versatile in vitro methodology that enables indirect quantification of shrinkage and expansion stresses under clinically relevant conditions without the need for a dedicated instrument. Methods. For shrinkage effects, resulting cusp deformation of aluminum blocks with MOD type cavity, filled with novel filling compositions and commercial cements, has been measured using a bench-top micrometer and a Linear Variable Differential Transformer (LVDT, a displacement transducer) based instrument. Results. The results demonstrated the validity of the proposed simple methodology. The technique was successfully used in longer-term measurements of shrinkage and expansion stress for several dental compositions. Conclusions. In contrast to in situ techniques where a measuring instrument is dedicated to the sample and its data collection, the proposed simple methodology allows for transfer of the samples to the environment of choice for storage and conditioning. The presented technique can be reliably used to quantify stress development of curing materials under clinically relevant (oral) conditions. This enables direct examination and comparison of structural properties corresponding to the final stage of formed networks. The proposed methodology is directly applicable to the study of self-curing systems as they require mouth-type conditions (temperature and humidity) to achieve their designed kinetics and reactions. PMID:26257783

  19. Characteristics of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Deposited on Polymer Dental Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtake, Naoto; Uchi, Tomio; Yasuhara, Toshiyuki; Takashima, Mai

    2012-09-01

    Characterizations of diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposited on a polymer artificial tooth were performed. DLC films were deposited on dental parts made of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resin by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane. Wear resistance test results revealed that a DLC-coated resin tooth has a very high wear resistance against tooth brushing, and endures 24 h brushing without a marked weight decrease. Cell cultivation test results show that DLC plays an important role in preventing cell death. Moreover, a biocompatibility test using a rabbit revealed that a connective tissue in the vicinity of DLC-coated PMMA is significantly thinner than that of noncoated PMMA. The numbers of inflammatory cells in the vicinity of DLC-coated and noncoated surfaces are 0 and 508 cells/mm2, respectively. These results led us to conclude that DLC films are an excellent material for use as the coating of a polymer artificial tooth in terms of not only high wear resistance but also biocompatibility.

  20. Evaluation of MMA-4-META-TBB resin as a dental adhesive material.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y S

    1984-04-01

    A new adhesive resin containing a reactive monomer, 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META) was prepared, and its application to hard tooth tissues and metals was studied. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the average length of 4-META resin tags in enamel and dentin was 22 mu and 40 mu respectively. The tensile adhesive strength between 4-META resin and enamel was about 130 kg/cm2 after etching with 65% phosphoric acid. Its bond strength to dentin treated with a cleaning solution of 10% citric acid and 3% ferric chloride was about 190 kg/cm2. In precious alloys heated at 500 degrees C for 5-10 minutes, a bond strength of more than 100 kg/cm2 was obtained. The precious alloys containing Au, Ag, Pt and Cu should be selected especially for dental restorations. In polished non-precious alloys, the bond strength was greater than 100 kg/cm2. If non-precious alloys were oxidized with HNO3, the bond strength increased to 150-200 kg/cm2. The results suggest that the nickel-chromium alloy used in fixed prosthodontics must be treated chemically before adhesion with 4-META resin, but cobalt-chromium alloy used in removable partial dentures bonds well with 4-META resin without chemical treatment. In conclusion, MMA-4-META-TBB resin seems to be a promising adhesive material in dentistry. PMID:6571588

  1. Heat generation caused by ablation of dental restorative materials with an ultra short pulse laser (USPL) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Andreas; Wehry, Richard; Brede, Olivier; Frentzen, Matthias; Schelle, Florian

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess heat generation in dental restoration materials following laser ablation using an Ultra Short Pulse Laser (USPL) system. Specimens of phosphate cement (PC), ceramic (CE) and composite (C) were used. Ablation was performed with an Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and a pulse length of 8 ps. Heat generation during laser ablation depended on the thickness of the restoration material. A time delay for temperature increase was observed in the PC and C group. Employing the USPL system for removal of restorative materials, heat generation has to be considered.

  2. Finite element modeling of dental restoration through multi-material laser densification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Kun

    To provide guidance for intelligent selection of various parameters in the Multi-Material Laser Densification (MMLD) process for dental restorations, finite element modeling (FEM) has been carried out to investigate the MMLD process. These modeling investigations include the thermal analysis of the nominal surface temperature that should be adopted during experiments in order to achieve the desired microstructure; the effects of the volume shrinkage due to transformation from a powder compact to dense liquid on the temperature distribution and the size of the transformation zone; the evolution of transient temperature, transient stresses, residual stresses and distortions; and the effects of laser processing conditions, such as fabrication sequences, laser scanning patterns, component sizes, preheating temperatures, laser scanning rates, initial porosities, and thicknesses of each powder layer, on the final quality of the component fabricated via the MMLD process. The simulation results are compared with the experiments. It is found that the predicted temperature distribution matches the experiments very well. The nominal surface temperature applied on the dental porcelain body should be below 1273 K to prevent the forming of the un-desired microstructure (i.e., a leucite-free glassy phase). The simplified models that do not include the volume shrinkage effect provide good estimations of the temperature field and the size of the laser-densified body, although the shape of the laser-densified body predicted is different from that obtained in the experiment. It is also fount that warping and residual thermal stresses of the laser-densified component are more sensitive to the chamber preheating temperature and the thickness of each powder layer than to the laser scanning rate and the initial porosity of the powder layer. The major mechanism responsible for these phenomena is identified to be related to the change of the temperature gradient induced by these laser

  3. In vivo validation of the historical in vitro thermocycling temperature range for dental materials testing.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Claus-Peter; Canbek, Kerem; Euler, Thomas; Willershausen, Brita

    2004-09-01

    In dental research, restorative materials have been regularly subjected to alternating in vitro thermal stress in investigations since the 1950s, in order to simulate in vivo alternating temperature stress and to artificially stress them in vitro. The provocation temperature is mostly 5 degrees C for cold provocation, and 55 degrees C for hot provocation. These temperatures are determined quite arbitrarily based on very few examinations in vivo. Extensive temperature data for the approximal space of teeth, which is decisive for the success of fillings adhesively attached to dentin, has so far not been addressed. The objective of this study was to examine the interproximal temperature characteristics created in the space of all teeth in vivo with thermal alternating stress, and therefore to validate the in vitro standardized thermal alternating stress of 5-55 degrees C. Fifteen study participants with healthy teeth were used to determine the temperature in each inter-dental space, resulting from hot/cold provocation in the upper and lower jaw, from the central incisor to the second molars. This was performed by a thermal element (cable sensor GTF 300, Greisinger Electronic GmbH, Regenstauf, Germany). The temperature sensor was attached with dental floss into the interproximal space and the temperature was recorded by the computer. The participants in the pilot test had to state when they were able to sip an 85 degrees C hot drink. That particular temperature value was taken for hot provocation as maximum temperature reference. Cold ice water (0 degrees C) was used for cold provocation as minimum temperature reference. The respective recordings with a total of 14 measurements for each individual were performed simultaneously in the upper and lower jaw. The study participants were to start with hot provocation, followed by cold provocation. This cycle was repeated at least once with an individual dwell time. The highest recorded approximal space temperature was 52

  4. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren Leslie; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano and sub-micro scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. The electrical characterization of the composite samples are performed with the time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano and sub-micron size particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin.

  5. Electrical properties of epoxy resin based nano-composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, D. Randy; Ellis, Alvin R.; Parans Paranthaman, M.; Aytug, Tolga; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; More, Karren L.; Li, Jing; Goyal, Amit

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the electrical properties of composite materials prepared as nano- and sub-micron-scale metal-oxide particles embedded in a commercial resin. The filler particles are barium titanate and calcium copper titanate. The physical and structural characteristics of the constituents and the fabricated composites are reported. Electrical characterization of the composite samples is performed using time- and frequency-domain dielectric spectroscopy techniques. The electrical breakdown strength of samples with nano- and sub-micron-sized particles have better electrical insulation properties than the unfilled resin. The start-up funding for the research was provided by the US Department of Energy, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, and follow-on funding was continued by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the US Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 (D06-100).

  6. Adhesion of conventional and simplified resin-based luting cements to superficial and deep dentin.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mutlu; Mese, Ayse

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluated the bond strengths of conventional (chemically and dual-polymerized) and simplified resin-based luting cements with their corresponding adhesives to superficial dentin (SD) and deep dentin (DD). Recently extracted third molars (N = 70, n = 10 per group) were obtained and prepared for testing procedures. After using their corresponding etchants, primers, and/or adhesive systems, the conventional and simplified cements (Variolink II [group A, conventional], Bifix QM [group B, conventional], Panavia F2.0 [group C, conventional], Multilink Automix [group D, simplified], Superbond C&B [group E, conventional], Clearfil Esthetic Cement [group F, simplified], Ketac-Fil [group G, conventional]) were adhered incrementally onto the dentin surfaces using polyethylene molds (inner diameter 3.5 mm, height 5 mm) and polymerized accordingly. Resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC) acted as the control material. Shear bond strengths (1 mm/min) were determined after 500 times of thermocycling. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). Bond strength (MPa) results were significantly affected by the cement types and their corresponding adhesive systems (p ≤ 0.05). The shear bond strengths (MPa ± SD) for groups A-G were 14.6 ± 3.8, 18.9 ± 3.9, 5.5 ± 4.5, 3.1 ± 3.6, 1.1 ± 2.5, 15.5 ± 2.6, 7 ± 4.3 and 7.1 ± 5.8, 15.1 ± 7.8, 8.4 ± 7.3, 7.5 ± 7.3, 4.9 ± 5.1, 12.5 ± 2.1, 6 ± 2.6 for SD and DD, respectively. The level of dentin depth did not decrease the bond strength significantly (p > 0.05) for all cements, except for Variolink II (p < 0.05). On the SD, bond strength of resin cements with "etch-and-rinse" adhesive systems (Variolink II, Bifix QM, Super-Bond C&B) showed similar results being higher than those of the simplified ones. Simplified cements and RMGIC as control material showed inferior adhesion to superficial and deep dentin compared to conventional resin cements tested. PMID:21833482

  7. Combined effect of staining substances on the discoloration of esthetic Class V dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Keun; Powers, John M

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the combined effect of an organic substance (mucin as a substitute for salivary organic substances), chlorhexidine, and an iron compound/tea solution on the changes in the color of esthetic Class V dental restorative materials. Color of a glass ionomer, resin-modified glass ionomer, compomer and flowable resin composite of A2 shade, respectively, was determined according to the CIELAB color scale relative to the standard illuminant D65. Color was measured at baseline, and after sequential immersion in the following substances: Step-1, mucin in PBS (MCP) for 48 h; Step-2, chlorhexidine (CHX) for 24 h; Step-3, iron compound (IRN) or tea solution (TEA) up to 7 days; and Step-4, ultrasonic cleaning for 1 h. Color change (DeltaE(ab )*) was calculated by the equation: DeltaE(ab)* = [(DeltaL*)(2) + (Deltaa*)(2) + (Deltab*)(2)](1/2), of which DeltaL(*) indicates changes in value, Deltaa(*) indicates changes in red-green parameter and Deltab(*) indicates changes in yellow-blue parameter. DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in MCP and CHX were compared, and DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in IRN or TEA, and subsequent ultrasonic cleaning were compared with respect to the restorative material and immersion substance. DeltaE(ab)* and changes in the color parameters (DeltaL(*), DeltaC(ab)* and DeltaH(ab)*) were analyzed by repeated measures, analysis of variance and a post-hoc test at the 0.05 level of significance. Color changes after immersion in MCP were acceptable (DeltaE(ab)* < 3.3), and those after immersion in CHX were generally acceptable. The range of DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in IRN was 3.1-19.6, and that after ultrasonic cleaning was 2.4-9.6. The range of DeltaE(ab)* values after immersion in TEA was 10.7-21.1, and that after ultrasonic cleaning was 11.9-14.5. Color changes of four Class V restorative materials after combined treatment with mucin, chlorhexidine and an iron compound/tea solution were not acceptable

  8. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of a Resin-Based Root Canal Sealer: 10-Year Recall Data

    PubMed Central

    Zmener, Osvaldo; Pameijer, Cornelis H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. This retrospective clinical and radiographical study evaluated the 10-year outcome of one-visit endodontic treatment with gutta-percha and a methacrylate resin-based sealer. Methods. From an initial sample size of 180 patients, 89 patients with 175 root canals responded to a recall. Treatment outcome was based on predetermined clinical and radiographic criteria. Results. Root canals had been adequately filled to the working length in 80 teeth (89.88%), short in 6 instances (6.74%), while 3 (3.37%) with extrusion immediate postoperatively, showed no sealer in periradicular tissues. The difference in the outcomes of treatments with respect to age, gender, preoperative pulp or periapical status, the size of periapical lesions and the type of permanent restorations were not statistically significantly different (P > 0.05). Overall, 7 (7.86%) cases were considered clinically and radiographically a failure. A life table analysis showed a cumulative probability of success of 92.13% after 10 years with a 95% confidence interval of 83.0 to 94.0. Conclusions. The results of this retrospective clinical and radiographical study suggest that the tested methacrylate-resin based sealer used with gutta-percha performed similarly to other root canal sealers over a period 10 years. Clinical Implications. Considering the success rate after 10 years of this methacrylate resin-based sealer can be recommended as an alternative to other commonly used root canal sealers. PMID:22654909

  9. Dental Composite Restorations and Neuropsychological Development in Children: Treatment Level Analysis from a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Maserejian, Nancy N.; Trachtenberg, Felicia L.; Hauser, Russ; McKinlay, Sonja; Shrader, Peter; Bellinger, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Resin-based dental restorations may intra-orally release their components and bisphenol A. Gestational bisphenol A exposure has been associated with poorer executive functioning in children. Objectives To examine whether exposure to resin-based composite restorations is associated with neuropsychological development in children. Methods Secondary analysis of treatment level data from the New England Children’s Amalgam Trial, a 2-group randomized safety trial conducted from 1997–2006. Children (N=534) aged 6–10 y with >2 posterior tooth caries were randomized to treatment with amalgam or resin-based composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate-composite for permanent teeth; urethane dimethacrylate-based polyacid-modified compomer for primary teeth). Neuropsychological function at 4- and 5-year follow-up (N=444) was measured by a battery of tests of executive function, intelligence, memory, visual-spatial skills, verbal fluency, and problem-solving. Multivariable generalized linear regression models were used to examine the association between composite exposure levels and changes in neuropsychological test scores from baseline to follow-up. For comparison, data on children randomized to amalgam treatment were similarly analyzed. Results With greater exposure to either dental composite material, results were generally consistent in the direction of slightly poorer changes in tests of intelligence, achievement or memory, but there were no statistically significant associations. For the four primary measures of executive function, scores were slightly worse with greater total composite exposure, but statistically significant only for the test of Letter Fluency (10-surface-years β= −0.8, SE=0.4, P=0.035), and the subtest of color naming (β= −1.5, SE=0.5, P=0.004) in the Stroop Color-Word Interference Test. Multivariate analysis of variance confirmed that the negative associations between composite level and executive function were not

  10. Corrosion behaviour of commercially pure titanium shot blasted with different materials and sizes of shot particles for dental implant applications.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Conrado; Gil, F Javier; Fonseca, Carlos; Barbosa, Mario; Planell, Josep Anton

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the osseointegration of the commercially pure titanium (c.p. Ti) dental implant is improved when the metal is shot blasted in order to increase its surface roughness. This roughness is colonised by bone, which improves implant fixation. However, shot blasting also changes the chemical composition of the implant surface because some shot particles remain adhered on the metal. The c.p. Ti surfaces shot blasted with different materials and sizes of shot particles were tested in order to determine their topographical features (surface roughness, real surface area and the percentage of surface covered by the adhered shot particles) and electrochemical behaviour (open circuit potential, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic polarisation). The results demonstrate that the increased surface area of the material because of the increasing surface roughness is not the only cause for differences found in the electrochemical behaviour and corrosion resistance of the blasted c.p. Ti. Among other possible causes, those differences may be attributed to the compressive residual surface stresses induced by shot blasting. All the materials tested have an adequate corrosion and electrochemical behaviour in terms of its possible use as dental implant material. PMID:12419627

  11. Retreatability of Root Canals Obturated Using Gutta-Percha with Bioceramic, MTA and Resin-Based Sealers

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Yilmaz, Zeliha; Sungur, Derya Deniz; Altundasar, Emre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the retreatability of root canals obturated with gutta-percha (GP) and three different endodontic sealers [iRoot SP (bioceramic sealer), MTA Fillapex (MTA-based sealer) and AH-26 (epoxy resin-based sealer)] using the ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR) system. Methods and Materials: Forty extracted single-rooted human teeth were prepared with universal ProTaper files up to F4 (40/0.06). Specimens were randomly divided into four groups according to obturation technique/material: single-cone GP/AH-26, lateral compaction of GP/AH-26, single-cone GP/iRoot SP, and single-cone GP/MTA Fillapex. Root fillings were removed with PTR. The time taken to reach the working-length (TWL) was recorded. Roots were longitudinally sectioned and each half was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Three observers scored each third of all specimen. Obtained data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Welch and Games-Howell tests. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: In single-cone GP/MTA Fillapex group the TWL was significantly shorter. The remnant of filling material in the apical and middle thirds of groups was similar and higher than the coronal thirds. Conclusion: None of the tested sealers were completely removed from the root canal system. PMID:25834591

  12. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  13. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  14. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a rotary... materials intended for use in the fabrication of dental devices. (b) Classification. Class I...

  17. Novel Dental Restorative Materials having Low Polymerization Shrinkage Stress via Stress Relaxation by Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Young; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Abuelyaman, Ahmed S.; Oxman, Joe D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To produce a reduced stress dental restorative material while simultaneously maintaining excellent mechanical properties, we have incorporated an allyl sulfide functional group into norbornene-methacrylate comonomer resins. We hypothesize that the addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) enabled by the presence of the allyl sulfide relieves stress in these methacrylate-based systems while retaining excellent mechanical properties owing to the high glass transition temperature of norbornene-containing resins. Methods An allyl sulfide-containing dinorbornene was stoichiometrically formulated with a ring-containing allyl sulfide-possessing methacrylate. To evaluate the stress relaxation effect as a function of the allyl sulfide concentration, a propyl sulfide-based dinorbornene, not capable of addition-fragmentation, was also formulated with the methacrylate monomer. Shrinkage stress, the glass transition temperature and the elastic modulus were all measured. The composite flexural strength and modulus were also measured. ANOVA (CI 95%) was conducted to determine differences between the means. Results Increasing the allyl sulfide content in the resin dramatically reduces the final stress in the norbornene-methacrylate systems. Both norbornene-methacrylate resins demonstrated almost zero stress (more than 96% stress reduction) compared with the conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA 70/30 wt% control. Mechanical properties of the allyl sulfide-based dental composites were improved to the point of being statistically indistinguishable from the control BisGMA-TEGDMA by changing the molar ratio between the methacrylate and norbornene functionalities. Significance The allyl sulfide-containing norbornene-methacrylate networks possessed super-ambient Tg, and demonstrated significantly lower shrinkage stress when compared with the control (BisGMA/TEGDMA 70 to 30 wt%). Although additional development remains, these low stress materials exhibit excellent mechanical

  18. Application of the thin electrolyte layer technique to corrosion testing of dental materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledvina, Martin

    Proper simulation of the oral environment for the corrosion testing of dental materials is crucial for determining corrosion rates and mechanisms correctly. In this study, the thin electrolyte layer technique (TET) was characterized and employed to investigate the importance of the chemical composition of the testing environment on the outcome of electrochemical tests. The thickness of the electrolyte layer in TET is only 0.5 mm and contains only 20 muL of electrolyte. This arrangement simulates the physical characteristics of the oral environment and facilitates testing in human saliva. Oxygen availability for reduction on the sample surface was determined, using cathodic polarization of Pt in borate buffer, to be lower in TET than in traditional (bulk electrolyte) techniques. Appreciable differences were found during polarization experiments on 316 L SS in saline and artificial saliva. Oxygen content was found to play a significant role in the corrosivity of various species contained in artificial saliva. Potentiodynamic polarization employing human saliva in TET on 316L SS proved to be very different from tests performed in artificial saliva. This was believed to be due to the presence of organic species, specifically proteins, contained in human saliva. This was further confirmed by cyclic polarization and corrosion current measurements of four commercial nickel-chromium (NiCr) alloys with varying amounts of Be. For this phase of the experiment, artificial saliva (AS), AS with 1% albumin, AS with 1% of mucin and parotid human saliva were employed as electrolytes. The results obtained in the various electrolytes depended on the composition, microstructure, stability of passive film, and the presence of casting porosity of the alloys tested. Proteins had insignificant effect on alloys with highly stable passive films, whereas, corrosion rates increased substantially in those alloys with compromised passive film formation. Proteins, especially mucin, lowered the

  19. Non-Thermal Atmospheric Plasma: Can it Be Taken as a Common Solution for the Surface Treatment of Dental Materials?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emre, Seker; Mehmet, Ali Kilicarslan; Serdar, Polat; Emre, Ozkir; Suat, Pat

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the surface roughness and wetting properties of various dental prosthetic materials after different durations of non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) treatment. One hundred and sixty discs of titanium (Ti) (n:40), cobalt chromium (Co-Cr) (n:40), yttrium stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystals (Y-TZP) (n:40) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) (n:40) materials were machined and smoothed with silicon carbide papers. The surface roughness was evaluated in a control group and in groups with different plasma exposure times [1-3-5 s]. The average surface roughness (Ra) and contact angle (CA) measurements were recorded via an atomic force microscope (AFM) and tensiometer, respectively. Surface changes were examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analyzed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey HSD test α=0.05). According to the results, the NTAP surface treatment significantly affected the roughness and wettability properties (P < 0.05). SEM images reveal that more grooves were present in the NTAP groups. With an increase in the NTAP application time, an apparent increment was observed for Ra, except in the PMMA group, and a remarkable reduction in CA was observed in all groups. It is concluded that the NTAP technology could enhance the roughening and wetting performance of various dental materials. supported by the Department of Scientific Research, Eskisehir Osmangazi University, Turkey (No. 201441045)

  20. Analysis of the probability of multiple taxa in a combined sample of Swartkrans and Kromdraai dental material.

    PubMed

    Fuller, K

    1996-11-01

    It has been argued (Grine, [1988] Evolutionary History of the "Robust" Australopithecines [New York. Aldine de Gruyter], pp. 223-243) that the australopithecine material from Swartkrans and Kromdraai represents distinct species. In an attempt to test the validity of separate taxa at Swartkrans and Kromdraai, Cope's (Cope [1989] Systematic Variation in Cercopithecus Dental Samples [Austin: University of Texas]) method of analysis was adapted and utilized. This procedure includes an analysis of the coefficients of variation (CVs) of the individual posterior teeth (buccal-lingual breadth) of a combined fossil sample compared with the CVs of several known single taxon reference groups. The Cope and Lacy (Cope and Lacy [1992] Am. J. Phys. Anthropol. 89:359-378) stimulation technique was also employed in the analysis. Based on these analyses, there is no justification for a taxonomic separation between the australopithecine material from Swartkrans and Kromdraai. Therefore, the assertion that the Swartkrans and Kromdraai material represent two distinct species is not indicated by the available dental metric evidence. PMID:8922186

  1. Optical properties of dental restorative materials in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm for the simulation of color perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friebel, Moritz; Povel, Kirsten; Cappius, Hans-Joachim; Helfmann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Aesthetic restorations require dental restorative materials to have optical properties very similar to those of the teeth. A method is developed to this end to determine the optical parameters absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs, anisotropy factor g, and effective scattering coefficient μs' of dental restorative materials. The method includes sample preparation and measurements of transmittance and reflectance in an integrating sphere spectrometer followed by inverse Monte Carlo simulations. Using this method the intrinsic optical parameters are determined for shade B2 of the light-activated composites TPH® Spectrum®, Esthet-X®, and the Ormocer® Definite® in the wavelength range 400 to 700 nm. By using the determined parameters μa, μs, and g together with an appropriate phase function, the reflectance of samples with 1-mm layer thickness and shade B2 could be predicted with a very high degree of accuracy using a forward Monte Carlo simulation. The color perception was calculated from the simulated reflectance according to the CIELAB system. We initiate the compilation of a data pool of optical parameters that in the future will enable calculation models to be used as a basis for optimization of the optical approximation of the natural tooth, and the composition of new materials and their production process.

  2. Surface roughness and morphology of dental nanocomposites polished by four different procedures evaluated by a multifractal approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ţălu, Ştefan; Stach, Sebastian; Lainović, Tijana; Vilotić, Marko; Blažić, Larisa; Alb, Sandu Florin; Kakaš, Damir

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of different dental polishing methods on surface texture parameters of dental nanocomposites. The 3-D surface morphology was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and multifractal analysis. Two representative dental resin-based nanocomposites were investigated: a nanofilled and a nanohybrid composite. The samples were polished by two dental polishing protocols using multi-step and one-step system. Both protocols were then followed by diamond paste polishing. The 3-D surface roughness of samples was studied by AFM on square areas of topography on the 80 × 80 μm2 scanning area. The multifractal spectrum theory based on computational algorithms was applied for AFM data and multifractal spectra were calculated. The generalized dimension Dq and the singularity spectrum f(α) provided quantitative values that characterize the local scale properties of dental nanocomposites polished by four different dental polishing protocols at nanometer scale. The results showed that the larger the spectrum width Δα (Δα = αmax - αmin) of the multifractal spectra f(α), the more non-uniform was the surface morphology. Also, the 3-D surface topography was described by statistical parameters, according to ISO 25178-2:2012. The 3-D surface of samples had a multifractal nature. Nanofilled composite had lower values of height parameters than nanohybrid composites, due to its composition. Multi-step polishing protocol created a better finished surface, for both tested materials, than one-step polishing protocol, even when it was followed by diamond paste polishing. Diamond paste polishing created smooth surface and reduced roughness of tested materials.

  3. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    New, P F; Rosen, B R; Brady, T J; Buonanno, F S; Kistler, J P; Burt, C T; Hinshaw, W S; Newhouse, J H; Pohost, G M; Taveras, J M

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region. PMID:6828719

  4. Potential hazards and artifacts of ferromagnetic and nonferromagnetic surgical and dental materials and devices in nuclear magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    New, P.F.J.; Rosen, B.R.; Brady, T.J.; Buonanno, F.S.; Kistler, J.P.; Burt, C.T.; Hinshaw, W.S.; Newhouse, J.H.; Pohost, G.M.; Taveras, J.M.

    1983-04-01

    The risks to patients with metal surgical implants who are undergoing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging and the artifacts caused by such implants were studied. Twenty-one aneurysm and other hemostatic clips and a variety of other materials (e.g., dental amalgam, 14 karat gold) were used. Longitudinal forces and torques were found to be exerted upon 16 of the 21 clips. With five aneurysm clips, forces and torques sufficient to produce risk of hemorrhage from dislocation of the clip from the vessel or aneurysm, or cerebral injury by clip displacement without dislodgement were identified. The induced ferromagnetism was shown to be related to the composition of the alloys from which the clips were manufactured. Clips with 10-14% nickel are evidently without sufficient induced ferromagnetism to cause hazard. The extent of NMR imaging artifacts was greater for materials with measurable ferromagnetic properties, but metals without measurable ferromagnetism in our tests also resulted in significant artifacts. Dental amalgam and 14 karat gold produced no imaging artifacts, but stainless steels in dentures and orthodontic braces produced extensive artifacts in the facial region.

  5. Infection Control in Dental Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... Based Dental Sealant Programs Dental Sealant FAQs Sealant Efficiency Assessment for Locals and States ... of infection control remain unchanged, new technologies, materials, equipment, and data require continuous evaluation of current ...

  6. An interview study of persons who attribute health problems to dental filling materials--part two in a triangulation study on 65 and 75 years old Swedes.

    PubMed

    Ståhlnacke, Katri; Söderfeldt, Björn

    2013-01-01

    Dental materials are perceived as a health problem by some people, although scientists do not agree about possible causes of such problems. The aim of this paper was to gain a deeper knowledge and understanding of experiences from living with health problems attributed to dental materials. Addressed topics were the type of problem, both as to general and oral health, perceived causes of the problems,their experienced effect on life, and reception by health professionals. Persons, who in a previous large questionnaire study had answered that they had experienced troubles from dental materials and also agreed to answer follow-up questions, were contacted with a request to take part in an interview study. Eleven individual interviews were held.The interviews were transcribed verbatim and the material was analysed according to the Qualitative Content Analysis method. Meaning units were extracted and condensed into a number of codes, which were combined into subcategories, categories, and themes. Four themes were identified: 1) Long-term oral, mental, and somatic difficulties of varying character, caused by dental amalgam. 2) Problems treated mainly by replacement of dental material in fillings. 3) Powerful effects on life, mostly negative. 4) The reception by health professionals was generally good, but with elements of encounters where they felt treated with nonchalance and lack of respect. In conclusion, people who attributed their health difficulties to dental materials had a complex range of problems and the perception was that amalgam/mercury was the cause of the troubles. The reception from health professionals was perceived as generally good, although with occasional negative experiences. PMID:24341165

  7. Degradation of dental ZrO2-based materials after hydrothermal fatigue. Part I: XRD, XRF, and FESEM analyses.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Jorge; Pinto, Ana M; Monteiro, Regina C C; Braz Fernandes, Francisco M; Laranjeira, Pedro; Veiga, João P

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the effect of simulated low-temperature degradation (s-LTD) and hydrothermal fatigue on the degradation of three ZrO(2)-based dental materials. Lava, IPS, and NanoZr discs were randomly assigned to (1) Control-Storage in distilled water at 37°C; (2) Aging at 134°C for 5 h (s-LTD); (3) Thermocycling in saliva for 30,000 cycles (TF). XRD revealed that ZrO(2) m phase was identified in all groups but TF increased the m phase only for Lava. Under the FESEM, Lava showed no alterations under s-LTD, but displayed corrosion areas up to 60 µm wide after TF. We conclude that TF accelerated the degradation of Lava through an increase in the m phase and grain pull-out from the material surface. PMID:22447060

  8. Investigation of eluted monomers from resin-based root canal sealer by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis

    PubMed Central

    Omurlu, Huma; Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Dalkilic, Evrim Eliguzeloglu; Tamer, Ugur; Torul, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the current study was to determine the amount of urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA), bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA), poly (ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate (PEGDMA), bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA), and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) eluted from resin-based root canal sealer, epiphany, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Materials and Methods: Epiphany was placed into the plastic molds and light-cured with a light emitting diode. After the curing process, each specimen in the first group (n = 12) was immersed in Eppendorf tubes containing a phosphate-buffered saline solution (PBS) and incubated for 45 s. In the second group, each specimen (n = 12) was immersed in Eppendorf tubes containing PBS and incubated for 24 h. Of the specimen extracts, 100 μL were subjected to HPLC. Analysis of data was accomplished with one-way analysis of variance (P < 0.05). Results: All of the samples eluted HEMA, UDMA, Bis-GMA, PEGDMA, and Bis-EMA. A significant difference was determined between the time periods of HEMA, UDMA, PEGDMA, and Bis-EMA (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of the current study showed that Epiphany releases HEMA, UDMA, Bis-GMA, PEGDMA, and Bis-EMA in both time periods. PMID:27011746

  9. Solid phase extraction and HPLC analysis of toxic components eluted from methyl methacrylate dental materials.

    PubMed

    Shintani, H; Tsuchiya, T; Hata, Y; Nakamura, A

    1993-01-01

    Methyl methacrylate polymer (PolyMMA) is widely used as the composite resin for the dental plate. During the fabrication process of PolyMMA for the polymerization reaction, benzoylperoxide (BPO) and N,N-dimethyl p-toluidine (DMPT) are added as the initiator and the stimulator, respectively. Because these compounds exhibit toxicity as well as a residue potential, their use raises concerns regarding human safety. The degree of dissolution into serum was determined to evaluate risk to the user. Analysis was by HPLC combined with solid-phase extraction using a C-18 column. The eluted compounds were found to be in the order of 10 to 100 ppm. PMID:8492570

  10. Evaluation of Training and Curriculum Materials Used in a Pilot Test of a Comprehensive Dental Health Program (TATTLETOOTH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruchter, Dorothy A.

    Tattletooth was designed to help alleviate the physical, psychological and social problems associated with dental disease by teaching proper dental hygiene techniques and by stressing the importance of good dental health to the social and psychological well-being of the whole person. The program provided for the entire community with the provision…

  11. Antibacterial activity of dental composites containing quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine nanoparticles against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Nurit; Yudovin-Farber, Ira; Bahir, Ran; Domb, Abraham J; Weiss, Ervin I

    2006-07-01

    The antibacterial activity of quaternary ammonium polyethylenimine (PEI) nanoparticles embedded at 1%w/w with clinically used bonding, flowable and hybrid dental composite resins and cured by light polymerization was studied. The antibacterial activity was tested with Streptoccocus mutans by: (i) the agar diffusion test (ADT); (ii) the direct contact test; (iii) bacterial growth in the materials elute; (iv) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Using the direct contact test, antibacterial activity (p<0.001) was found in all three types of composite resins incorporated with the synthesized nanoparticles. The effect lasted for at least 1 month. SEM demonstrated bacterial debris and no streptococcal chains at 24h of bacterial contact. The addition of 1%w/w of nanoparticles did not affect the flexural modulus and the flexural strength of the dental composite materials. The results indicate that quaternary ammonium PEI nanoparticles immobilized in resin-based materials have a strong antibacterial activity upon contact without leach-out of the nanoparticles and without compromise in mechanical properties. PMID:16564083

  12. Bacteriostatic and anti-collagenolytic dental materials through the incorporation of polyacrylic acid modified CuI nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Renne, Walter George; Mennito, Anthony Samuel; Schmidt, Michael Gerard; Vuthiganon, Jompobe; Chumanov, George

    2015-05-19

    Provided are antibacterial and antimicrobial surface coatings and dental materials by utilizing the antimicrobial properties of copper chalcogenide and/or copper halide (CuQ, where Q=chalcogens including oxygen, or halogens, or nothing). An antimicrobial barrier is created by incorporation of CuQ nanoparticles of an appropriate size and at a concentration necessary and sufficient to create a unique bioelectrical environment. The unique bioelectrical environment results in biocidal effectiveness through a multi-factorial mechanism comprising a combination of the intrinsic quantum flux of copper (Cu.sup.0, Cu.sup.1+, Cu.sup.2+) ions and the high surface-to-volume electron sink facilitated by the nanoparticle. The result is the constant quantum flux of copper which manifests and establishes the antimicrobial environment preventing or inhibiting the growth of bacteria. The presence of CuQ results in inhibiting or delaying bacterial destruction and endogenous enzymatic breakdown of the zone of resin inter-diffusion, the integrity of which is essential for dental restoration longevity.

  13. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  14. Dental composites and amalgam and physical development in children.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, N N; Hauser, R; Tavares, M; Trachtenberg, F L; Shrader, P; McKinlay, S

    2012-11-01

    Resin-based composite dental restoration materials may release bisphenol-A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical. Using secondary analysis of a randomized clinical safety trial of amalgam vs. composites, we tested the hypothesis that dental restoration materials affect children's growth. Children (N = 218 boys, N = 256 girls) aged 6 to 10 yrs at baseline with ≥ 2 decayed posterior teeth were randomized to amalgam or composites (bisphenol-A-diglycidyl-dimethacrylate composite for permanent teeth, urethane-dimethacrylate compomer for primary teeth) for treatment of posterior caries throughout follow-up. Primary outcomes for this analysis were 5-year changes in BMI-for-age z-scores, body fat percentage (BF%), and height velocity; exploratory analyses (n = 113) examined age at menarche. Results showed no significant differences between treatment assignment and changes in physical development in boys [(composites vs. amalgam) BF%, 4.9 vs. 5.7, p = 0.49; (BMI-z-score) 0.13 vs. 0.25, p = 0.36] or girls (8.8 vs. 7.7, p = 0.95; 0.36 vs. 0.21, p = 0.49). Children with more treatment on primary teeth had greater increases in BF% regardless of material type. Girls assigned to composites had lower risk of menarche during follow-up (hazard ratio = 0.57, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). Overall, there were no significant differences in physical development over 5 years in children treated with composites or amalgam. Additional studies examining these restoration materials in relation to age at menarche are warranted (clinicaltrials.gov number NCT00065988). PMID:22972857

  15. Comparison of microleakage from stainless steel crowns margins used with different restorative materials: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Memarpour, Mahtab; Derafshi, Reza; Razavi, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obtaining optimal marginal adaption with prefabricated stainless steel crowns (SSCs) is difficult, especially after removing dental caries or defects in cervical areas. This situation requires the use of an SSC after tooth reconstruction. This study evaluated microleakage and material loss with five restorative materials at SSC margins. Materials and Methods: One hundred and twenty primary molar teeth were randomly divided into six groups (n = 20). Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of the teeth in groups 1-5. Cavities were restored with amalgam, resin-based composite, glass ionomer (GI), zinc phosphate, or reinforced zinc oxide eugenol (Zonalin). Group 6 without cavity preparation was used as a control. Restorations with SSCs were prepared according to standard methods. Then, SSCs were fitted so that the crown margins overlaid the restorative materials and cemented with GI. After thermocycling, the specimens were placed in 0.5% fuchsin and sectioned. The proportions of mircoleakage and material loss were evaluated with a digital microscope. Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: The groups differed significantly (P < 0.001). Amalgam and GI showed the least microleakage. Amalgam restorations had significantly less microleakage than the other materials (P < 0.05). Microleakage was greatest with resin-based composite, followed by Zonalin. Material loss was greater in samples restored with Zonalin and zinc phosphate. Conclusion: When SSC margins overlaid the restoration materials, cavity restoration with amalgam or GI before SSC placement led to less microleakage and material loss. Regarding microleakage and material loss, resin-based composite, zinc phosphate, and Zonalin were not suitable options. PMID:26962309

  16. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  17. In vitro comparison of antibacterial properties of bioceramic-based sealer, resin-based sealer and zinc oxide eugenol based sealer and two mineral trioxide aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gurpreet; Gupta, Iti; Elshamy, Faheim M. M.; Boreak, Nezar; Homeida, Husham Elraih

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our goal of the study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of endodontic sealers against the E. faecalis. Materials and Methods: Six millimeters wells were made for each material in all the preinoculated petri plates. Then, the petri plates were incubated for 24 h. The zones of inhibition appeared were measured, and the measurements were put to statistical analysis. Results: EndoSequence BC Sealer, MM-mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), and ProRoot MTA showed maximum means of diameter of zones of inhibition, whereas MM-seal and Endoseal did not show any zones of inhibition. Conclusion: EndoSequence BC Sealer was found to be a better endodontic sealer as compared to resin-based and zinc oxide-eugenol-based sealer. PMID:27403055

  18. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  19. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Views of Community Workers on the Dental Health Education Material Available in New South Wales for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinkhorn, Anthony; Gittani, Jamily

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To record the views of individuals whose main professional role is community liaison on dental health education material for culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Methods: Tape-recorded interviews were undertaken, reviewed by two individuals and themes identified. Results: Twenty four individuals were interviewed out of a…

  20. In vitro and in vivo studies of ultrafine-grain Ti as dental implant material processed by ECAP.

    PubMed

    An, Baili; Li, Zhirui; Diao, Xiaoou; Xin, Haitao; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Xiaorui; Wu, Yulu; Li, Kai; Guo, Yazhou

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface characterization of ultrafine-grain pure titanium (UFG-Ti) after sandblasting and acid-etching (SLA) and to evaluate its biocompatibility as dental implant material in vitro and in vivo. UFG-Ti was produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) using commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti). Microstructure and yield strength were investigated. The morphology, wettability and roughness of the specimens were analyzed after they were modified by SLA. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were seeded onto the specimens to evaluate its biocompatibility in vitro. For the in vivo study, UFG-Ti implants after SLA were embedded into the femurs of New Zealand rabbits. Osseointegration was investigated though micro-CT analysis, histological assessment and pull-out test. The control group was CP-Ti. UFG-Ti with enhanced mechanical properties was produced by four passes of ECAP in BC route at room temperature. After SLA modification, the hierarchical porous structure on its surface exhibited excellent wettability. The adhesion, proliferation and viability of cells cultured on the UFG-Ti were superior to that of CP-Ti. In the in vivo study, favorable osseointegration occurred between the implant and bone in CP and UFG-Ti groups. The combination intensity of UF- Ti with bone was higher according to the pull-out test. This study supports the claim that UFG-Ti has grain refinement with outstanding mechanical properties and, with its excellent biocompatibility, has potential for use as dental implant material. PMID:27287096

  1. Ex vivo and in vitro synchrotron-based micro-imaging of biocompatible materials applied in dental surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rack, A.; Stiller, M.; Nelson, K.; Knabe, C.; Rack, T.; Zabler, S.; Dalügge, O.; Riesemeier, H.; Cecilia, A.; Goebbels, J.

    2010-09-01

    Biocompatible materials such as porous bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics or titanium are regularly applied in dental surgery: ceramics are used to support the local bone regeneration in a given defect, afterwards titanium implants replace lost teeth. The current gold standard for bone reconstruction in implant dentistry is the use of autogenous bone grafts. But the concept of guided bone regeneration (GBR) has become a predictable and well documented surgical approach using biomaterials (bioactive calcium phosphate ceramics) which qualify as bone substitutes for this kind of application as well. We applied high resolution synchrotron microtomography and subsequent 3d image analysis in order to investigate bone formation and degradation of the bone substitute material in a three-dimensional manner, extending the knowledge beyond the limits of classical histology. Following the bone regeneration, titanium-based implants to replace lost teeth call for high mechanical precision, especially when two-piece concepts are used in order to guaranty leak tightness. Here, synchrotron-based radiography in comparison with classical laboratory radiography yields high spatial resolution in combination with high contrast even when exploiting micro-sized features in these kind of highly attenuating objects. Therefore, we could study micro-gap formation at interfaces in two-piece dental implants with the specimen under different mechanical load. We could prove the existence of micro-gaps for implants with conical connections as well as to study the micromechanical behavior of the mating zone of conical implants during loading. The micro-gap is a potential issue of failure, i. e. bacterial leakage which can induce an inflammatory process.

  2. Chipping fracture resistance of dental CAD/CAM restorative materials: Part 2. Phenomenological model and the effect of indenter type

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, G.D.; Giuseppetti, A.A.; Hoffman, K.H.

    2014-01-01

    The edge chipping resistances of six CAD/CAM dental restoration materials are analyzed and correlated to other mechanical properties. A new quadratic relationship that is based on a phenomenological model is presented. Objective The purpose of this study was to further analyze the edge chipping resistance of the brittle materials evaluated in Part 1. One objective was to determine why some force-distance trends were linear and others were nonlinear. A second objective was to account for differences in chipping resistance with indenter type. Methods Edge chipping experiments were conducted with different indenters, including some custom-made sharp conical indenters. A new force – distance quadratic expression was correlated to the data and compared to the linear and power law trends. Results The new quadratic function was an excellent fit in every instance. It can account for why some materials can be fit by a linear trend, while others can be fit by the power law trend. The effects of indenter type are accounted for variations in crack initiation and by the wedging stresses once an indentation hole is created. Significance The new quadratic force – edge distance function can be used with edge chipping data for all brittle materials, not just those evaluated in this study. The data trends vary from linear to nonlinear depending upon the material’s hardness, fracture toughness, and elastic modulus. PMID:24685179

  3. Osteoblast integration of dental implant materials after challenge by sub-gingival pathogens: a co-culture study in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bingran; van der Mei, Henny C; Rustema-Abbing, Minie; Busscher, Henk J; Ren, Yijin

    2015-12-01

    Sub-gingival anaerobic pathogens can colonize an implant surface to compromise osseointegration of dental implants once the soft tissue seal around the neck of an implant is broken. In vitro evaluations of implant materials are usually done in monoculture studies involving either tissue integration or bacterial colonization. Co-culture models, in which tissue cells and bacteria battle simultaneously for estate on an implant surface, have been demonstrated to provide a better in vitro mimic of the clinical situation. Here we aim to compare the surface coverage by U2OS osteoblasts cells prior to and after challenge by two anaerobic sub-gingival pathogens in a co-culture model on differently modified titanium (Ti), titanium-zirconium (TiZr) alloys and zirconia surfaces. Monoculture studies with either U2OS osteoblasts or bacteria were also carried out and indicated significant differences in biofilm formation between the implant materials, but interactions with U2OS osteoblasts were favourable on all materials. Adhering U2OS osteoblasts cells, however, were significantly more displaced from differently modified Ti surfaces by challenging sub-gingival pathogens than from TiZr alloys and zirconia variants. Combined with previous work employing a co-culture model consisting of human gingival fibroblasts and supra-gingival oral bacteria, results point to a different material selection to stimulate the formation of a soft tissue seal as compared to preservation of osseointegration under the unsterile conditions of the oral cavity. PMID:26674427

  4. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  5. Biocompatibility of dental materials used in contemporary endodontic therapy: a review. Part 2. Root-canal-filling materials.

    PubMed

    Hauman, C H J; Love, R M

    2003-03-01

    Root-canal-filling materials are either placed directly onto vital periapical tissues or may leach through dentine. The tissue response to these materials therefore becomes important and may influence the outcome of endodontic treatment. This paper is a review of the biocompatibility of contemporary orthograde and retrograde root-canal-filling materials. PMID:12657140

  6. Survey of attitudes, materials and methods preferred in root canal therapy by general dental practice in Turkey: Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Gul Celik; Kaya, Bulem Ureyen; Tac, Ali Gurhan; Kececi, Ayse Diljin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To gather information on the materials and methods employed in root canal treatment by dentists in Turkey. Methods: A questionnaire was distributed to 1,527 dentists who attended the Turkish Dental Association Congress. Respondents were asked to choose one or more suitable answers for the questions. Data was gathered for demographic and professional information regarding stages, materials, and methods commonly used in endodontic therapy. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical package SPSS. Descriptive statistics were given as frequencies (n) and percent (%). Chi-square (χ2) test was used to investigate the influence of gender and the years of professional activity for the materials and techniques employed. Results: The response rate was 49%. A total of 97% of respondents were working in a general dental practice. Of respondents, 44% were using an agent containing arsenic or aldehyde. Only 5.1% of the respondents preferred the rubber dam isolation method. Sodium hypochlorite was the most popular choice (73%) as a root canal irrigation solution. Calcium hydroxide was the most commonly used medicament (53%). Most of the practitioners (77%) preferred radiographs for working-length determination. Root canal preparation done solely with K-Files or in combination with other instruments was preferred by 73.1% of the respondents. Ni-Ti hand or rotary files were used by 79.7% of the practitioners. Polymer based root canal sealers were the sealers most frequently chosen (48.4%). The majority of the respondents (66.2%) preferred cold lateral condensation as an obturation technique. Gender affected the preference of intracanal medicament, periapical radiographs for working-length determination, root canal instrument, root canal sealers, and root canal obturation technique (P<.05). Years of professional experience affected the preference of devitalizing agents, irrigation solutions, intracanal medicament, root canal instrument, root canal sealer, and

  7. Dosimetric consideration for patients with dental filling materials undergoing irradiation of oral cavity using RapidArc: challenges and solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mail, Noor; Albarakati, Y.; Khan, M. Ahmad; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.

    2012-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of dental filling materials (DFM) on RapidArcTM treatment plans and delivery in a patient undergoing radiotherapy treatment. The presence of DFM creates uncertainties in CT number and causes long streaking artifacts in the reconstructed images which greatly affect the dose distribution inside the oral cavity. The influence of extensive dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was performed using a geometrically well defined head and neck IMRT verification phantom (PTW, Freiburg, Germany) together with inserts from DFM (Amalgam, 11.3 g/cm3). The phantom was scanned using Siemens SOMATOM Sensation CT simulator (Siemens AG, Germany) under standard head and neck imaging protocol (120 kV, 120 mAs, voxel size 1×1×2 mm3). Three RapidArcTM plans were created in the Varian Eclipse treatment planning System (TPS) to treat oral cavity using the same CT dataset including; 1) raw CT image, 2) streaking artifacts replaced with a mask of 10 HU and 3) 2 cm thick 6000 HU virtual filter (a volume around the teeth in TPS to mimic extra attenuation). The virtual filter thickness optimization was purely based on measured PDD data acquired with DFM and the calculation in Eclipse Planning System using direct beam. The dose delivery and distribution for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic EBT2 (International Specialty Product, Wayne, NJ, USA) film measurements. The artifact mask and virtual filter around the teeth in the planning was found very useful to reduce the discrepancies between the dose plan and delivery. From clinical point of view, these results can be helpful to understand the increase of mucositis in patient having DFM, and further investigation is underway for clinical solution.

  8. Rechargeable biofilm-controlling tubing materials for use in dental unit water lines.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Porteous, Nuala; Sun, Yuyu

    2011-08-01

    A simple and practical surface grafting approach was developed to introduce rechargeable N-halamine-based antimicrobial functionality onto the inner surfaces of continuous small-bore polyurethane (PU) dental unit waterline (DUWL) tubing. In this approach, tetrahydrofuran (THF) solution of a free-radical initiator, dicumyl peroxide (DCP), flowed through the PU tubing (inner diameter of 1/16 in., or 1.6 mm) to diffuse DCP into the tubing's inner walls, which was used as initiator in the subsequent grafting polymerization of methacrylamide (MAA) onto the tubing. Upon chlorine bleach treatment, the amide groups of the grafted MAA side chains were transformed into acyclic N-halamines. The reactions were confirmed with attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR) spectra and iodometric titration. The mechanical properties of the tubing were not significantly affected by the grafting reactions. The biofilm-controlling function of the new N-halamine-based PU tubing was evaluated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), one of the most isolated water bacteria from DUWLs, in a continuous bacterial flow model. Bacteria culturing and SEM studies showed that the inner surfaces of the new N-halamine-based PU tubing completely prevented bacterial biofilm formation for at least three to four weeks. After that, bacteria began to colonize the tubing surface. However, the lost function was fully regenerated by exposing the tubing inner surfaces to diluted chlorine bleach. The recharging process could be repeated periodically to further extend the biofilm-controlling duration for long-term applications. PMID:21721534

  9. Effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam dental restorative material: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernavin, Igor; Hogan, Sean P.

    1996-09-01

    The Nd:YAG laser has been marketed as an instrument for use on both hard and soft dental tissues. Its potential for use on hard tissues is limited but it may be the instrument of choice for use in certain soft tissue procedures. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of the Nd:YAG laser on amalgam restorations which frequently occur on tooth surfaces adjacent to areas of soft tissue which may be subjected to the laser. The amalgam used was Tytin. The laser firing was controlled by a computer and a constant repetition rate of 40 Hz was used. Energy per pulse was altered as follows, 30 mJ, 40 mJ, 60 mJ, 80 mJ, 120 mJ and 140 mJ. Exposure times of 0.05 sec, 0.125 sec, 0.25 sec, 0.5 sec, 1 sec, 2 sec, 3 sec, 4 sec, and 5 sec were used. The width of defect was measured using a Nikon measurescope with 10x magnification and it was established that the damage threshold lies between 0.125 sec and 0.25 sec for 30 mJ per pulse. The data was analyzed using a one way ANOVA statistical test. There was a significant correlation between the width of the defect and energy per pulse setting as well as exposure time. The findings indicate that amalgam restorations are prone to damage from inadvertent laser exposure and clinicians must take measures to protect such restorations during lasing of soft tissues.

  10. Dimensional Changes of Alginate Dental Impression Materials-An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Thombare, Ram U

    2015-01-01

    Background Dentists are always looking ahead for more dimensionally stable material for accurate and successful fabrication of prosthesis in this competitive world. Arrival of newer materials and increased material market puts dentists in dilemma for selection of material. Aim The study evaluated the effect of variations in time of pour and temperature on dimensional stability of three brands of commercially available alginates. Materials and Methods Velplast, Marieflex & Zelgan alginate impression materials were evaluated by measuring dimensional accuracy of the master cast. A die was prepared and mounted on the apparatus for the ease of impression making. The prepared casts were categorized into five groups and made up of three brands of alginate impression material with variation in time of pour viz: immediate, 20&40 minutes interval and with varying temperature of 250C, 300C & 400C. Results Impressions showed least distortion at varying degrees of temperature for 20 minutes, but the values obtained by storing of alginate impressions for 20 minutes at 300C were found to be nearly accurate than the values obtained by storing of impression at 400C. However, storing showed shrinkage of impressions. Conclusion Marieflex showed better accuracy in comparison with other two materials. Maintenance of temperature and humidity play key role during storage & transport to prevent distortion. But the study suggests immediate pouring which will minimize the distortion. The manipulation instructions, temperature of mixing water, environment & water powder ratio also plays key role in minimizing the distortion. PMID:26436059

  11. Fluorine uptake into human enamel around a fluoride-containing dental material during cariogenic pH cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, H.; Yamamoto, H.; Nomachi, M.; Yasuda, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Murata, Y.; Kijimura, T.; Sano, H.; Sakai, T.; Kamiya, T.

    2007-07-01

    the enamel adjacent to the material remained a caries inhibition zone due to low rate of demineralization. With caries progression, fluorine accumulated in the subsurface of the caries lesion, while the outermost surface of the caries lesion gradually dissolved under increasing pH cycling. The data obtained using PIGE (TIARA, JAPAN) technique were useful to understand the fluorine benefit for preventing dental caries by means of fluoride-containing dental materials.

  12. Modeling dental composite shrinkage by digital image correlation and finite element methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Terry Yuan-Fang; Huang, Pin-Sheng; Chuang, Shu-Fen

    2014-10-01

    Dental composites are light-curable resin-based materials with an inherent defect of polymerization shrinkage which may cause tooth deflection and debonding of restorations. This study aimed to combine digital image correlation (DIC) and finite element analysis (FEA) to model the shrinkage behaviors under different light curing regimens. Extracted human molars were prepared with proximal cavities for composite restorations, and then divided into three groups to receive different light curing protocols: regular intensity, low intensity, and step-curing consisting of low and high intensities. For each tooth, the composite fillings were consecutively placed under both unbonded and bonded conditions. At first, the shrinkage of the unbonded restorations was analyzed by DIC and adopted as the setting of FEA. The simulated shrinkage behaviors obtained from FEA were further validated by the measurements in the bonded cases. The results showed that different light curing regimens affected the shrinkage in unbonded restorations, with regular intensity showing the greatest shrinkage strain on the top surface. The shrinkage centers in the bonded cases were located closer to the cavity floor than those in the unbonded cases, and were less affected by curing regimens. The FEA results showed that the stress was modulated by the accumulated light energy density, while step-curing may alleviate the tensile stress along the cavity walls. In this study, DIC provides a complete description of the polymerization shrinkage behaviors of dental composites, which may facilitate the stress analysis in the numerical investigation.

  13. Effects of Dental Methacrylates on Oxygen Consumption and Redox Status of Human Pulp Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nocca, Giuseppina; Callà, Cinzia; Martorana, Giuseppe Ettore; Cicillini, Loredana; Lupi, Alessandro; Cordaro, Massimo; Luisa Gozzo, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have already demonstrated that the incomplete polymerization of resin-based dental materials causes the release of monomers which might affect cell metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, urethane dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate on (1) cellular energy metabolism, evaluating oxygen consumption rate, glucose consumption, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity, and lactate production, and (2) cellular redox status, through the evaluation of glutathione concentration and of the activities of enzymes regulating glutathione metabolism. Methods. Human pulp cells were used and oxygen consumption was measured by means of a Clark electrode. Moreover, reactive oxygen species production was quantified. Enzymatic activity and glucose and lactate concentrations were determined through a specific kit. Results. Triethylene glycol dimethacrylate, 1,4-butanediol dimethacrylate, and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced a decrease in oxygen consumption rate, an enhancement of glucose consumption, and lactate production, whilst glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity were not significantly modified. Moreover, the monomers induced an increase of reactive oxygen species production with a consequent increase of superoxide dismutase and catalase enzymatic activities. A depletion of both reduced and total glutathione was also observed. Conclusion. The obtained results indicate that dental monomers might alter energy metabolism and glutathione redox balance in human pulp cells. PMID:24693541

  14. Measurement of the fluorescence of restorative dental materials using a 655-nm diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanin, Fatima A. A.; Souza-Campos, Dilma H.; Zanin, Sissi; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Pecora, Jesus D.; Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Harari, Sonia

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the level of fluorescence of seven restorative materials using 655 nm diode laser. The laser fluorescence system has ben used as an auxiliary method for the detection of carious lesions. This new diagnostic method increases information which are important for the choice of treatment by the Dentist. The characteristic of restorative materials and sealers interferes in the values obtained by the apparatus during the detection of secondary carious lesions. The optical properties of each biological tissue or material are related to the interaction with the laser beam. Aware of that, the fluorescence of healthy dentin and enamel is 0-15, the authors determined the fluorescence of seven restorative materials with 10 teeth in each group. The laser reading scale differed according to the materia, ranging from 1 to 22 with several materials, for example the sealer without inorganic filler and the glass ionomer, showing fluorescence values similar to carious enamel which interferes with the readings around the restorations resulting in a false positive. Knowledge of restoration material fluorescence can aid in the detection of secondary carious lesions around the restorations.

  15. The impacts of dental filling materials on RapidArc treatment planning and dose delivery: Challenges and solution

    SciTech Connect

    Mail, Noor; Al-Ghamdi, S.; Saoudi, A.; Albarakati, Y.; Ahmad Khan, M.; Saeedi, F.; Safadi, N.

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The presence of high-density material in the oral cavity creates dose perturbation in both downstream and upstream directions at the surfaces of dental filling materials (DFM). In this study, the authors have investigated the effect of DFM on head and neck RapidArc treatment plans and delivery. Solutions are proposed to address (1) the issue of downstream dose perturbation, which might cause target under dosage, and (2) to reduce the upstream dose from DFM which may be the primary source of mucositis. In addition, an investigation of the clinical role of a custom-made plastic dental mold/gutter (PDM) in sparing the oral mucosa and tongue reaction is outlined.Methods: The influence of the dental filling artifacts on dose distribution was investigated using a geometrically well-defined head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification phantom (PTW, Freiberg, Germany) with DFM inserts called amalgam, which contained 50% mercury, 25% silver, 14% tin, 8% copper, and 3% other trace metals. Three RapidArc plans were generated in the Varian Eclipse System to treat the oral cavity using the same computer tomography (CT) dataset, including (1) a raw CT image, (2) a streaking artifacts region, which was replaced with a mask of 10 HU, and (3) a 2 cm-thick 6000 HU virtual filter [a volume created in treatment planning system to compensate for beam attenuation, where the thickness of this virtual filter is based on the measured percent depth dose (PDD) data and Eclipse calculation]. The dose delivery for the three plans was verified using Gafchromic-EBT2 film measurements. The custom-made PDM technique to reduce backscatter dose was clinically tested on four head and neck cancer patients (T3, N1, M0) with DFM, two patients with PDM and the other two patients without PDM. The thickness calculation of the PDM toward the mucosa and tongue was purely based on the measured upstream dose. Patients’ with oral mucosal reaction was clinically examined

  16. Modeling of water absorption induced cracks in resin-based composite supported ceramic layer structures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D; Soboyejo, W O

    2008-01-01

    Cracking patterns in the top ceramic layers of the modeled dental multilayers with polymer foundation are observed when they are immersed in water. This article developed a model to understand this cracking mechanism. When water diffuses into the polymer foundation of dental restorations, the foundation will expand; as a result, the stress will build up in the top ceramic layer because of the bending and stretching. A finite element model based on this mechanism is built to predict the stress build-up and the slow crack growth in the top ceramic layers during the water absorption. Our simulations show that the stress build-up by this mechanism is high enough to cause the cracking in the top ceramic layers and the cracking patterns predicted by our model are well consistent with those observed in experiments on glass/epoxy/polymer multilayers. The model is then used to discuss the life prediction of different dental ceramics. PMID:17497681

  17. Dental implant materials. I. Some effects of preparative procedures on surface topography.

    PubMed

    Smith, D C; Pilliar, R M; Chernecky, R

    1991-09-01

    The effect of different treatments for preparing implant materials was examined by scanning electron microscopy and by contact angle measurements. The materials examined were Ti6A14V alloy, Co-Cr-Mo alloy, A12O3, and synthetic hydroxyapatite. Samples were prepared with solid or porous surfaces of these materials. These were detergent-cleaned and then either autoclaved (steam sterilization), radiation-sterilized, nitric acid-etched, or plasma-cleaned. The results of wettability studies indicated marked changes in surface energy corresponding to the different preparation methods, and differences in surface morphology were also observed. These differences could have significant consequences on in vivo implant behaviour as mediated by tissue-implant interactions. PMID:1663951

  18. Prototyping artificial jaws for the Bristol Dento-Munch Robo-Simulator. 'A parallel robot to test dental components and materials'.

    PubMed

    Alemzadeh, Kazem; Raabe, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the robot periphery for the Robotic Dental Testing Simulator based on a Parallel Robot (i.e. Stewart Platform) to simulate the wear of materials on dental components, such as individual teeth, crowns or a full set of teeth. Current chewing simulators move in only 1 or 2 degrees of freedom (DOF) and therefore lack accuracy. The Bristol simulator has been developed to replicate accurate human chewing patterns in 6-DOF. This paper describes the artificial jaws and compliance module of the robot. The jaws have been reverse engineered and represent a human-like mandible and maxilla with artificial teeth. Each clinically fabricated tooth consists of a crown and glass ceramic roots which are connected using resin cement. Correct occlusion of the artificial jaws assembly was assessed by a dental teaching simulator. A compliance module had to be built between the lower jaw and the robot platform to sustain the fluctuating forces that occur during normal chewing in the occlusal contact areas, where these high bite forces are major causes of dental component failure. A strain gauge force transducer has been integrated into the machined lower jaw, underneath the second molars, to measure axial biting forces applied to the posterior teeth. PMID:18002240

  19. [Bio-tribological properties of dental prosthesis made of nitriding titanium alloy material].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Luo, Jingcong; Qin, Tingwu; Li, Juan; Feng, Jielin; Huang, Wei; He, Xin

    2004-04-01

    Titanium alloy material (TC4) samples were treated with nitriding technique. The dynamic friction and wear behavior of the modified layer were examined on a reciprocating sliding rig in artificial saliva. Microhardness, depth profile and wear mechanisms were investigated by means of MVK-H12, TALYSURF6, XPS and microscopy. The results demonstrate that after being treated with nitriding technique the titanium alloy material (TC4) has better tribological behavior and up-graded wear resistance. The wear mechanism involves adhesion. PMID:15143554

  20. Determination of diffusion coefficients of biocides on their passage through organic resin-based renders.

    PubMed

    Styszko, Katarzyna; Kupiec, Krzysztof

    2016-10-01

    In this study the diffusion coefficients of isoproturon, diuron and cybutryn in acrylate and silicone resin-based renders were determined. The diffusion coefficients were determined using measuring concentrations of biocides in the liquid phase after being in contact with renders for specific time intervals. The mathematical solution of the transient diffusion equation for an infinite plate contacted on one side with a limited volume of water was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. The diffusion coefficients through the acrylate render were 8.10·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for isoproturon, 1.96·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for diuron and 1.53·10(-9) m(2) s(-1) for cybutryn. The results for the silicone render were lower by one order of magnitude. The compounds with a high diffusion coefficient for one polymer had likewise high values for the other polymer. PMID:27391050

  1. High-performance UV-curable epoxy resin-based microarray and microfluidic immunoassay devices.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Liu, Yingshuai; Gan, Ye; Li, Chang Ming

    2009-06-15

    Immunoassay devices including microarray and microfluidic systems were fabricated with an UV-curable resin by a new economic approach, which can not only simply produce a 3-dimensional (3D) patterned structure, but also simultaneously introduce functional epoxide groups for efficient protein immobilization. The performance of the epoxy resin-based microarray was improved by optimization of printing buffer, probe concentration, and immobilization time, showing a detection dynamic range of 5 orders of magnitude and a limit of detection (LOD) of 10 pg mL(-1) for immunoglobulin G (IgG). The developed microfluidic immunoassay device demonstrates a LOD of 100 pg mL(-1) for IL-5 detection. The device can also be used to colorimetrically detect proteins via naked human eyes for immunoassays. This work provides a simple and inexpensive method to fabricate a sensitive immunoassay device, especially a 3D microfluidic system, which has great potential to develop a portable immunoassay device via human eye detection for point-of-care service and/or high throughput screening of infectious diseases. PMID:19346122

  2. Surface and line-edge roughness in acid-breakable resin-based positive resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamizu, Toshio; Shiraishi, Hiroshi

    2003-06-01

    A positive chemical amplification resist based on acid-catalyzed fragmentation of acetal groups in its main-chain has been developed as a means for reducing line-edge roughness. The resist consists of an acid-generator, an acid-diffusion controller and an acid-breakable (AB) resin that is synthesized through a co-condensation reaction between polyphenol and aromatic multi-functional vinylether compound. The effects of the fractionation of AB resins on resin properties and line-edge roughness (LER) are evaluated. Although AB resins have wide molecular-weight distributions, the density of acetal groups in this AB resin is found to be almost constant except in the lower molecular-weight components. The resist with a fractionated resin from which such components removed provides the high resolution of 60-nm line-and-space (L/S) patterns with fairly low LER. AFM analysis shows the surface roughness (SR) for the resist with the fractionated resin is smaller than that for a resist using non-fractionated AB resin, and that the SR value is not altered throughout the range of exposure doses up to just below the beginning of dissolution. By using the fractionated AB resin, the AB resin-based resist (ABR) is capable of forming sub-100 nm L/S patterns with less than 5 nm of LER (3σ).

  3. A therapeutic strategy for spinal cord defect: human dental follicle cells combined with aligned PCL/PLGA electrospun material.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinghan; Yang, Chao; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jie; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell implantation has been utilized for the repair of spinal cord injury; however, it shows unsatisfactory performance in repairing large scale lesion of an organ. We hypothesized that dental follicle cells (DFCs), which possess multipotential capability, could reconstruct spinal cord defect (SCD) in combination with biomaterials. In the present study, mesenchymal and neurogenic lineage characteristics of human DFCs (hDFCs) were identified. Aligned electrospun PCL/PLGA material (AEM) was fabricated and it would not lead to cytotoxic reaction; furthermore, hDFCs could stretch along the oriented fibers and proliferate efficiently on AEM. Subsequently, hDFCs seeded AEM was transplanted to restore the defect in rat spinal cord. Functional observation was performed but results showed no statistical significance. The following histologic analyses proved that AEM allowed nerve fibers to pass through, and implanted hDFCs could express oligodendrogenic lineage maker Olig2 in vivo which was able to contribute to remyelination. Therefore, we concluded that hDFCs can be a candidate resource in neural regeneration. Aligned electrospun fibers can support spinal cord structure and induce cell/tissue polarity. This strategy can be considered as alternative proposals for the SCD regeneration studies. PMID:25695050

  4. A Therapeutic Strategy for Spinal Cord Defect: Human Dental Follicle Cells Combined with Aligned PCL/PLGA Electrospun Material

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Li, Lei; Xiong, Jie; Xie, Li; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell implantation has been utilized for the repair of spinal cord injury; however, it shows unsatisfactory performance in repairing large scale lesion of an organ. We hypothesized that dental follicle cells (DFCs), which possess multipotential capability, could reconstruct spinal cord defect (SCD) in combination with biomaterials. In the present study, mesenchymal and neurogenic lineage characteristics of human DFCs (hDFCs) were identified. Aligned electrospun PCL/PLGA material (AEM) was fabricated and it would not lead to cytotoxic reaction; furthermore, hDFCs could stretch along the oriented fibers and proliferate efficiently on AEM. Subsequently, hDFCs seeded AEM was transplanted to restore the defect in rat spinal cord. Functional observation was performed but results showed no statistical significance. The following histologic analyses proved that AEM allowed nerve fibers to pass through, and implanted hDFCs could express oligodendrogenic lineage maker Olig2 in vivo which was able to contribute to remyelination. Therefore, we concluded that hDFCs can be a candidate resource in neural regeneration. Aligned electrospun fibers can support spinal cord structure and induce cell/tissue polarity. This strategy can be considered as alternative proposals for the SCD regeneration studies. PMID:25695050

  5. In vitro inhibition of bacteria from root canals of primary teeth by various dental materials.

    PubMed

    Tchaou, W S; Turng, B F; Minah, G E; Coll, J A

    1995-01-01

    The primary tooth pulpectomy is a common clinical procedure. The choice of filling material is important to the success rate, but antibacterial properties of such materials against organisms known to inhabit infected primary root canals have not been well documented. This study compared the antibacterial effectiveness of 10 materials: 1. Calcium hydroxide mixed with camphorated parachlorophenol (Ca(OH)2+CPC) 2. Calcium hydroxide mixed with sterile water (Ca(OH)2+H2O) 3. Zinc oxide mixed with CPC (ZnO+CPC) 4. Zinc oxide mixed with eugenol (ZOE) 5. ZOE mixed with formocresol (ZOE+FC) 6. Zinc oxide mixed with sterile water (ZnO+H2O) 7. ZOE mixed with chlorhexidine dihydrochloride (ZOE+CHX) 8. Kri paste 9. Vitapex paste 10. Vaseline (control) These materials were compared against microbial specimens obtained from 13 infected primary teeth by using an agar diffusion assay. The results suggest that the materials could be divided into three categories. Category I, with the strongest antibacterial effect included ZnO+CPC, Ca(OH)2+CPC, and ZOE+FC. Category II, with a medium antibacterial effect included ZOE+CHX, Kri, ZOE, and ZnO+H2O. Category III, with no or minimal antibacterial effect included Vitapex, Ca(OH)2+H2O, and Vaseline. There were no significant differences within each category, but there were significant differences between the categories. The one exception was the antibacterial effect of ZOE+FC which was not significantly different from ZOE+CHX, Kri, or ZOE. PMID:8524684

  6. The assessment of surface roughness and microleakage of eroded tooth-colored dental restorative materials

    PubMed Central

    Hussein, Thulfiqar Ali; Bakar, Wan Zaripah Wan; Ghani, Zuryati Ab; Mohamad, Dasmawati

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the effect of acidic solution on surface roughness and microleakage of tooth-colored restorative materials. Materials and Methods: A 160 box-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 160 human molars, and assigned to four groups: Group A restored with Ketac™ Molar Easymix, Group B with Fuji II™ LC, Group C with Ketac™ N100, and Group D with Filtek™ Z250, and subdivided into study and control groups (n = 20). Study groups were immersed in lemon juice (pH = 2.79) for 24 h, whilst controlgroups in deionized distilled water. All samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye, sectioned into two equal halves for surface roughness, and microleakage tests. Data were analyzed using Mann–Whitney and Kruskal–Wallis tests at P < 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in surface roughness of Ketac™ Molar, Fuji II™ LC, and Ketac™ N100. No significant difference was found in microleakage of Ketac™ Molar and Fuji II™ LC; however, there were significant differences in the gingival margin of Ketac™ N100, and the occlusal margin of Filtek™ Z250. Conclusions: All glass ionomer cements were eroded after exposure to the acidic drink. Filtek™ Z250 and Ketac™ Molar Easymix showed more microleakage. All materials showed more microleakage at the gingival margins. PMID:25506139

  7. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  8. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  9. Application of XAD-resin based passive air samplers to assess local (roadside) and regional patterns of persistent organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Barthel, Paul; Thuens, Sabine; Shunthirasingham, Chubashini; Westgate, John N; Wania, Frank; Radke, Michael

    2012-07-01

    We used XAD-resin based passive air samplers (PAS) to measure atmospheric levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at five ombrotrophic bogs in Eastern Canada. The aims of our study were to investigate the influence of local roads on contaminant levels in the bogs, to derive the regional pattern of atmospheric concentrations, and to assess the uncertainties of the method. Expanded uncertainties based on the duplicate PAS deployed at 24 sites were good for the PAHs, while the deployment period of approx. 100 days was too short to yield acceptable uncertainties for PCBs. The regional PAH distribution was in good agreement with the calculated source proximity of the sampled bogs. We conclude that XAD-resin based PAS deployed for comparatively short periods are well suited for measuring atmospheric concentrations of volatile PAHs, while in remote regions longer deployment is necessary for less volatile PAHs and for PCBs. PMID:22516712

  10. Silica/quercetin sol-gel hybrids as antioxidant dental implant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catauro, Michelina; Papale, Ferdinando; Bollino, Flavia; Piccolella, Simona; Marciano, Sabina; Nocera, Paola; Pacifico, Severina

    2015-06-01

    The development of biomaterials with intrinsic antioxidant properties could represent a valuable strategy for preventing the onset of peri-implant diseases. In this context, quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, has been entrapped at different weight percentages in a silica-based inorganic material by a sol-gel route. The establishment of hydrogen bond interactions between the flavonol and the solid matrix was ascertained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. This technique also evidenced changes in the stretching frequencies of the quercetin dienonic moiety, suggesting that the formation of a secondary product occurs. Scanning electron microscopy was applied to detect the morphology of the synthesized materials. Their bioactivity was shown by the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on sample surface soaked in a fluid that simulates the composition of human blood plasma. When the potential release of flavonol was determined by liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry techniques, the eluates displayed a retention time that was 0.5 min less than quercetin. Collision-activated dissociation mass spectrometry and untraviolet-visible spectroscopy were in accordance with the release of a quercetin derivative. The antiradical properties of the investigated systems were evaluated by DPPH and ABTS methods, whereas the 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate assay highlighted their ability to inhibit the H2O2-induced intracellular production of reactive oxygen species in NIH-3T3 mouse fibroblast cells. Data obtained, along with data gathered from the MTT cytotoxicity test, revealed that the materials that entrapped the highest amount of quercetin showed notable antioxidant effectiveness.

  11. Influence of Different Drinks on the Colour Stability of Dental Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Topcu, Fulya Toksoy; Sahinkesen, Gunes; Yamanel, Kivanc; Erdemir, Ugur; Oktay, Elif Aybala; Ersahan, Seyda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to evaluate the discolouration effects of artificial saliva, granule lemon juice, coffee (without sugar), coca cola, sour cherry juice, fresh carrot juice and red wine on resin-based composite materials that are commonly used in restorative dentistry. Methods Colour of four brands of resin composites (Filtek Z 250 (3M Espe), Filtek Supreme (3M Espe), Quadrant (Cavex), Charisma (Heraeus-Kulzer)) of A2 shade was measured after one day of immersion in eight different solutions. Colour measurements were obtained by using a XL-20 Trismus Colourimeter and colour differences (ΔE) were estimated. For statistical evaluation, analysis of variance (ANOVA), Dunnett and Tukey tests were used at a significance level of 0.05. Results For the four restorative materials tested, the lowest ΔE values were observed in the artificial saliva, while ΔE values were the highest in red wine group. When comparing the four different restorative materials, Filtek Supreme exhibited the least colour changes whereas Filtek Z250 was the least colour-stable. Conclusions Dental resin composites and drinking solutions were significant factors that may affect the colour stability. After immersion for one day, all materials showed visible colour changes. The red wine solution exhibited more staining than others in three groups. Filtek Supreme showed significantly the least colour change due to its nano particle sizes. PMID:19262731

  12. Evaluation of Marginal Integrity of Four Bulk-Fill Dental Composite Materials: In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Orłowski, Mirosław; Tarczydło, Bożena; Chałas, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to compare under in vitro conditions marginal sealing of 4 different bulk-fill materials composite restorations of class II. Methods. Comparative evaluation concerned 4 composites of a bulk-fill type: SonicFill, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill, Filtek Bulk Fill, and SDR. The study used 30 third molars without caries. In each tooth 4 cavities of class II were prepared. The prepared tooth samples were placed in a 1% methylene blue solution for 24 h, and after that in each restoration the depth of dye penetration along the side walls was evaluated. Results. The highest rating (score 0, no dye penetration) was achieved by 93.33% of the restorations made of the SDR material, 90% of restorations of SonicFill system, 86.66% of restorations of the composite Filtek Bulk Fill, and 73.33% of restorations of the Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill. Conclusion. The performed study showed that bulk-fill flowable or sonic-activated flowable composite restorations have better marginal sealing (lack of discoloration) in comparison with bulk-fill paste-like composite. PMID:25874254

  13. High elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites for dental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yijun

    2007-12-01

    Dental restorations account for more than $3 billion dollars a year on the market. Among them, all-ceramic dental crowns draw more and more attention and their popularity has risen because of their superior aesthetics and biocompatibility. However, their relatively high failure rate and labor-intensive fabrication procedure still limit their application. In this thesis, a new family of high elastic modulus nanopowder reinforced resin composites and their mechanical properties are studied. Materials with higher elastic modulus, such as alumina and diamond, are used to replace the routine filler material, silica, in dental resin composites to achieve the desired properties. This class of composites is developed to serve (1) as a high stiffness support to all-ceramic crowns and (2) as a means of joining independently fabricated crown core and veneer layers. Most of the work focuses on nano-sized Al2O3 (average particle size 47 nm) reinforcement in a polymeric matrix with 50:50 Bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (Bis-GMA): triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) monomers. Surfactants, silanizing agents and primers are examined to obtain higher filler levels and enhance the bonding between filler and matrix. Silane agents work best. The elastic modulus of a 57.5 vol% alumina/resin composite is 31.5 GPa compared to current commercial resin composites with elastic modulus <15 GPa. Chemical additives can also effectively raise the hardness to as much as 1.34 GPa. Besides>alumina, diamond/resin composites are studied. An elastic modulus of about 45 GPa is obtained for a 57 vol% diamond/resin composite. Our results indicate that with a generally monodispersed nano-sized high modulus filler, relatively high elastic modulus resin-based composite cements are possible. Time-dependent behavior of our resin composites is also investigated. This is valuable for understanding the behavior of our material and possible fatigue testing in the future. Our results indicate that with

  14. Surface texture measurement for dental wear applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, R. S.; Mullen, F.; Bartlett, D. W.

    2015-06-01

    The application of surface topography measurement and characterization within dental materials science is highly active and rapidly developing, in line with many modern industries. Surface measurement and structuring is used extensively within oral and dental science to optimize the optical, tribological and biological performance of natural and biomimetic dental materials. Although there has historically been little standardization in the use and reporting of surface metrology instrumentation and software, the dental industry is beginning to adopt modern areal measurement and characterization techniques, especially as the dental industry is increasingly adopting digital impressioning techniques in order to leverage CAD/CAM technologies for the design and construction of dental restorations. As dental treatment becomes increasingly digitized and reliant on advanced technologies such as dental implants, wider adoption of standardized surface topography and characterization techniques will become evermore essential. The dental research community welcomes the advances that are being made in surface topography measurement science towards realizing this ultimate goal.

  15. Dental sealants and restorations and urinary bisphenol A concentrations in children in the 2003-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Christy; Rue, Tessa; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Martin, Michael; Seminario, Ana Lucia; DeRouen, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Background Resin-based dental sealants and composites contain bisphenol A-glycidyl methacrylate, a bisphenol A (BPA) derivative. The authors hypothesized that a greater number of sealants or restorations would be associated with higher urinary BPA concentrations. Methods The authors examined urinary BPA measurements (in nanograms per milliliter) and oral examination data for 1,001 children aged 6 to 19 years from the dataset of the 2003-2004 National Health Examination and Nutrition Survey (NHANES). They categorized children into four groups according to number of occlusal sealants and number of restorations, separately. They estimated associations by using unadjusted and adjusted tobit regression models. Results The lowest quartile of BPA concentrations ranged from 0.3 ng/mL to 1.9 ng/mL, whereas the highest quartile ranged from 7.3 ng/mL to 149 ng/mL. In adjusted analysis, children with seven to 16 sealants had geometric mean BPA concentrations 25 percent higher than those of children with no sealants (95 percent confidence interval [CI], −14 percent to 82 percent; P = .23). In adjusted analyses, children with seven to 42 restorations had geometric mean BPA concentrations 20 percent higher than those of children with no restorations (95 percent CI, −6 percent to 53 percent; P = .13). Neither of these adjusted estimates was statistically significant. Conclusions Though the findings were in the direction hypothesized, the authors did not observe a statistically significant association between a greater number of sealants or restorations and higher urinary BPA concentrations. Additional studies are needed to determine the extent of oral and systemic exposure to BPA from resin-based dental restorative materials over time. Practical Implications Dentists should follow this issue carefully as it develops and as the body of evidence grows. There is insufficient evidence to change practice at this time. PMID:24982281

  16. Fracture Toughness of Veneering Ceramics for Fused to Metal (PFM) and Zirconia Dental Restorative Materials

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Janet B.; Quinn, George D.; Sundar, Veeraraghaven

    2010-01-01

    Veneering ceramics designed to be used with modern zirconia framework restorations have been reported to fracture occasionally in vivo. The fracture toughness of such veneering ceramics was measured and compared to that of conventional feldspathic porcelain veneering ceramics for metal framework restorations. The fracture toughness of the leucite free veneer was measured to be 0.73 MPa m ± 0.02 MPa m, which is less than that for the porcelain fused to metal (PFM) veneering ceramic: 1.10 MPa ± 0.2 MPa. (Uncertainties are one standard deviation unless otherwise noted.) The surface crack in flexure (SCF) method was suitable for both materials, but precrack identification was difficult for the leucite containing feldspathic porcelain PFM veneer. PMID:21833158

  17. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  18. In vitro toothbrushing abrasion of dental resin composites: packable, microhybrid, nanohybrid and microfilled materials.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Rafael Ratto de; Ribeiro, Daiane dos Santos; Klumb, Mirian Margarete; Brandt, William Cunha; Correr-Sobrinho, Lourenço; Bueno, Márcia

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated weight loss and surface roughening after toothbrushing of different resin composites: one packable (Solitaire 2, Heraeus Kulzer), one microhybrid (Charisma, Heraeus Kulzer), one nanohybrid (Simile, Pentron) and one microfilled (Durafill VS, Heraeus Kulzer). Cylindrical specimens (n = 20) were prepared. Half of the samples were submitted to 60,000 strokes, at 4 Hz, with a dentifrice-water slurry. Control samples (n = 10) remained stored at 37 degrees C. Pre- and post-abrasion parameters for weight (mg) and surface roughness (Ra, microm) were determined on an analytical balance and a surface profilometer. Data were separately submitted to Repeated Measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 0.05). Percentages of weight loss were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (a = 0.05). The relationship between both evaluations was assessed by Pearson's test (a = 0.05). The means (%) for weight loss (standard deviation) were 0.65(0.2), 0.93(0.2), 1.25(0.6) and 1.25(0.4) for Simile, Durafill, Charisma and Solitaire, respectively. Baseline roughness means ranged from 0.065(0.01), 0.071(0.01), 0.066(0.02) and 0.074(0.01) for Simile, Durafill, Charisma and Solitaire, respectively, to 0.105(0.04), 0.117(0.03), 0.161(0.03) and 0.214(0.07) after testing. The composites with larger fillers presented higher weight loss and roughening than the finer materials (p < 0.05). For both evaluations, control specimens showed no significant alteration. No significant relationship between loss of weight and roughness alteration was detected (r = 0.322, p = 0.429). PMID:18622479

  19. Improved single- and multi-contact life-time testing of dental restorative materials using key characteristics of the human masticatory system and a force/position-controlled robotic dental wear simulator.

    PubMed

    Raabe, D; Harrison, A; Ireland, A; Alemzadeh, K; Sandy, J; Dogramadzi, S; Melhuish, C; Burgess, S

    2012-03-01

    . Experimental studies of wear using this simulator demonstrate that integrating the biological feature of combined force/position hybrid control in dental material testing improves the linearity and reduces the variability of results. In addition, it has been shown that present biaxially operated dental wear simulators are likely to provide misleading results in comparative in vitro/in vivo one-contact studies due to neglecting the occlusal sliding motion in one plane which could introduce an error of up to 49% since occlusal sliding motion D and volumetric wear loss V(loss) are proportional. PMID:22155971

  20. Telechelic Poly(2-oxazoline)s with a biocidal and a polymerizable terminal as collagenase inhibiting additive for long-term active antimicrobial dental materials

    PubMed Central

    Fik, Christoph P.; Konieczny, Stefan; Pashley, David H.; Waschinski, Christian J.; Ladisch, Reinhild S.; Salz, Ulrich; Bock, Thorsten; Tiller, Joerg C.

    2015-01-01

    Although modern dental repair materials show excellent mechanical and adhesion properties, they still face two major problems: First, any microbes that remain alive below the composite fillings actively decompose dentin and thus, subsequently cause secondary caries. Second, even if those microbes are killed, the extracellular proteases such as MMP, remain active and can still degrade collagenousdental tissue. In order to address both problems, a poly(2-methyloxazoline) with a biocidal quaternary ammonium and a polymerizable methacrylate terminal was explored as additive for a commercial dental adhesive. It could be demonstrated that the adhesive rendered the adhesive contact-active antimicrobial against S. mutans at a concentration of only 2.5 wt% and even constant washing with water for 101 days did not diminish this effect. Increasing the amount of the additive to 5 wt% allowed killing S. mutans cells in the tubuli of bovinedentin upon application of the adhesive. Further, the additive fully inhibited bacterial collagenase at a concentration of 0.5 wt% and reduced human recombinant collagenase MMP-9 to 13% of its original activity at that concentration. Human MMPs naturally bound to dentin were inhibited by more than 96% in a medium containing 5 wt% of the additive. Moreover, no adverse effect on the enamel/dentine shear bond strength was detected in combination with a dental composite. PMID:25130877

  1. Joining Dental Ceramic Layers With Glass

    PubMed Central

    Saied, MA; Lloyd, IK; Haller, WK; Lawn, BR

    2011-01-01

    Objective Test the hypothesis that glass-bonding of free-form veneer and core ceramic layers can produce robust interfaces, chemically durable and aesthetic in appearance and, above all, resistant to delamination. Methods Layers of independently produced porcelains (NobelRondo™ Press porcelain, Nobel BioCare AB and Sagkura Interaction porcelain, Elephant Dental) and matching alumina or zirconia core ceramics (Procera alumina, Nobel BioCare AB, BioZyram yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal, Cyrtina Dental) were joined with designed glasses, tailored to match thermal expansion coefficients of the components and free of toxic elements. Scanning electron microprobe analysis was used to characterize the chemistry of the joined interfaces, specifically to confirm interdiffusion of ions. Vickers indentations were used to drive controlled corner cracks into the glass interlayers to evaluate the toughness of the interfaces. Results The glass-bonded interfaces were found to have robust integrity relative to interfaces fused without glass, or those fused with a resin-based adhesive. Significance The structural integrity of the interfaces between porcelain veneers and alumina or zirconia cores is a critical factor in the longevity of all-ceramic dental crowns and fixed dental prostheses. PMID:21802131

  2. An in vitro evaluation of shear bond strength of silorane and bis-GMA resin-based composite using different curing units

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Manak; Malhotra, Neeraj; Mala, Kundabala

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate shear bond strength of silorane and bis-GMA based composite resins using self-etch and total-etch adhesive systems, and compare the effect of Quartz-tungten-halogen (QTH) and Light emitting diode (LED) on the shear bond strength of the experimental materials. Materials and Methods: Flat dentin surfaces were exposed on intact extracted molars and composite resin was built 2 mm in diameter. Teeth were divided randomly into four groups. Groups 1 and 2 were restored with P90 system adhesive and Filtek P90 and cured with QTH and LED units respectively. Groups 3 and 4 were restored with total etch adhesive and Filtek Z100 and cured with QTH and LED units respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing using Instrom Universal testing machine. Results: Data was subjected to one-way analysis of variance. Total-etch groups gave significantly higher shear bond strength values than the self-etch groups. No significant difference in shear bond strength was found between Groups 3 and 4, while Group 1 showed significantly higher values than Group 2. Conclusion: Type of light curing unit is not a significant factor affecting shear bond strength for bis-GMA RBCs using total-etch technique; while for curing silorane resin based composite (RBCs), conventional halogen curing units showed better results. PMID:22876019

  3. Dental Chairside Technique. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: local anesthesia; dental office emergencies; oral hygiene;…

  4. Development of ultra-hydrophilic and non-cytotoxic dental vinyl polysiloxane impression materials using a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Kyoung-Nam

    2013-05-01

    Dental vinyl polysiloxane (VPS) impression materials are widely used for the replication of intraoral tissue where hydrophilicity is important as the oral tissues are surrounded by wet saliva. Recent attempts to improve the wettability of VPS using a ‘surfactant’, however, have resulted in a high level of cytotoxicity. Hence, in this study, application of a non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) on VPS and its effects in terms of both hydrophilicity and cytotoxicity were investigated. The results showed that the application of the plasma jet resulted in significant improvement of hydrophilicity of VPS that had no surfactant, whereby the results were similar to commercially available products with the surfactant. The surface chemical analysis results indicated that this was due to the oxidation and decreased amount of hydrocarbon on the surface following NTAPPJ exposure. Meanwhile, an NTAPPJ-treated sample was shown to be non-cytotoxic. Therefore, the use of dental VPS impression materials without any surfactant, in conjunction with an NTAPPJ treatment, is a promising method for ultra-hydrophilic but yet non-cytotoxic materials.

  5. Performance of Dental Ceramics

    PubMed Central

    Rekow, E.D.; Silva, N.R.F.A.; Coelho, P.G.; Zhang, Y.; Guess, P.; Thompson, V.P.

    2011-01-01

    The clinical success of modern dental ceramics depends on an array of factors, ranging from initial physical properties of the material itself, to the fabrication and clinical procedures that inevitably damage these brittle materials, and the oral environment. Understanding the influence of these factors on clinical performance has engaged the dental, ceramics, and engineering communities alike. The objective of this review is to first summarize clinical, experimental, and analytic results reported in the recent literature. Additionally, it seeks to address how this new information adds insight into predictive test procedures and reveals challenges for future improvements. PMID:21224408

  6. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  7. Importance of Dental Records in Forensic Dental Identification

    PubMed Central

    Waleed, Petro; Baba, Feras; Alsulami, Salem; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The patient’s record maintains all the diagnostic information with regards to patients and contains valuable information that can be beneficial to the dentist as well as legal authorities during forensic human identification. Aim: Objective of the study was to compare dental records with an ideal dental record form, as well as to compare between dental records of private clinics and academic hospitals and to assess the awareness and the knowledge of the dentists regarding the maintenance of their dental records accurate for medico-legal purposes. Material and Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study between records kept in private clinics and academic teaching hospitals in Khartoum locality. Results: Our results showed that Students are more likely to encounter accurate dental records more than dentists in private clinics. In conclusion Students are more aware regarding medicolegal purposes of maintenance of dental records. Accurate maintenance of dental records is more among dental students. Therefore, private clinics encounter dental records as financial documents. PMID:25870492

  8. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  9. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  10. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  11. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Endosseous dental implant. 872.3640 Section 872...) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3640 Endosseous dental implant. (a) Identification. An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy,...

  12. Anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization process. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sheth, A.C.; Dharmapurikar, R.

    1992-12-31

    Under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-90PC90309, the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is contracted to further develop its anion-exchange, resin-based desulfurization concept to desulfurize alkali metal sulfates. From environmental as well as economic viewpoints, it is necessary to remove soluble sulfates from the wastes created by flue gas desulfurization systems. In order to do this economically, a low-cost desulfurization process for spent sorbents is necessary. UTSI`s anion-exchange resin-based desulfurization concept is believed to satisfy these requirements. During the reporting period, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992, UTSI has completed the batch mode experiments to evaluate the performance enhancement effect caused by organic acids on the resin`s exhaustion efficiency. At present, batch mode experiments are being conducted to locate the position of the CO{sub 3}= and SO{sub 4}= ions in the affinity chart, and also reviewing/assessing the ASPEN Code`s capabilities for use in the development of the Best Process Schematic and related economics.

  13. Evaluation of the effect of tooth and dental restoration material on electron dose distribution and production of photon contamination in electron beam radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bahreyni Toossi, Mohammad Taghi; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Akbari, Fatemeh; Mehrpouyan, Mohammad; Sobhkhiz Sabet, Leila

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of tooth and dental restoration materials on electron dose distribution and photon contamination production in electron beams of a medical linac. This evaluation was performed on 8, 12 and 14 MeV electron beams of a Siemens Primus linac. MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized and a 10 × 10 cm(2) applicator was simulated in the cases of tooth and combinations of tooth and Ceramco C3 ceramic veneer, tooth and Eclipse alloy and tooth and amalgam restoration materials in a soft tissue phantom. The relative electron and photon contamination doses were calculated for these materials. The presence of tooth and dental restoration material changed the electron dose distribution and photon contamination in phantom, depending on the type of the restoration material and electron beam's energy. The maximum relative electron dose was 1.07 in the presence of tooth including amalgam for 14 MeV electron beam. When 100.00 cGy was prescribed for the reference point, the maximum absolute electron dose was 105.10 cGy in the presence of amalgam for 12 MeV electron beam and the maximum absolute photon contamination dose was 376.67 μGy for tooth in 14 MeV electron beam. The change in electron dose distribution should be considered in treatment planning, when teeth are irradiated in electron beam radiotherapy. If treatment planning can be performed in such a way that the teeth are excluded from primary irradiation, the potential errors in dose delivery to the tumour and normal tissues can be avoided. PMID:26581762

  14. Effect of thermal shock loadings on stability of dentin-composite polymer material adhesive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Gribov, Andrey N.

    2015-03-01

    In the past several decades the problem of longevity and durability of adhesive interfaces between hard tooth tissues and composite resin-based materials are of great interest among dental researchers and clinicians. These parameters are partially determined by adhesive system mechanical properties. In the present research project nanoindentation has been examined to test hardness of dental adhesive systems. A series of laboratory experiments was performed to study the effect of light curing time and oxygen inhibition phenomenon on light-cured adhesive material hardness. An adhesive system AdperTM Single Bond (3M ESPE) was selected as a material for testing. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the maximum values of hardness were observed after the material had been light-cured for 20 seconds, as outlined in guidelines for polymerization time of the adhesive system. The experimental studies of oxygen inhibition influence on adhesive system hardness pointed out to the fact that the dispersive layer removal led to increase in adhesive system hardness. A long - time exposure of polymerized material of adhesive system at open air at room temperature resulted in no changes in its hardness, which was likely to be determined by the mutual effect of rival processes of air oxygen inhibition and directed light curing.

  15. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  16. [Hardening of dental instruments].

    PubMed

    Gerasev, G P

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of prolonging the service life of stomatological instruments by the local hardening of their working parts is discussed. Such hardening should be achieved by using hard and wear-resistant materials. The examples of hardening dental elevators and hard-alloy dental drills are given. New trends in the local hardening of instruments are the treatment of their working parts with laser beams, the application of coating on their surface by the gas-detonation method. The results of research work and trials are presented. PMID:7300627

  17. Effect of different pH solvents on micro-hardness and surface topography of dental nano-composite: An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Aftab Ahmed; Siddiqui, Adel Zia; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Zahid, Ambreen; Divakar, Darshan Devang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Erosion of tooth surface is attributed to recent shift in diet pattern and frequent use of beverages. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effects of different beverages on surface topography and hardness of nano-filled composite material. Methods: Sixty flat disc shaped resin composite samples were fabricated and placed in distilled water for 24 hours. After 24 hours test samples were dried and divided into 4 groups. Group A (n=15) specimens were placed in tight amber bottle comprising 25 ml of artificial saliva. Similarly Group B, C and D were stored in equal amounts of orange juice, milk and coca cola drink respectively. Samples were checked for hardness and surface changes were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. Results: There were strong significant difference observed in samples immersed in orange juice and artificial saliva. A strong significant difference was seen between Group D and Group A. Group A and Group C showed no significant difference. The micro-hardness test showed reduced values among all samples. Conclusion: Beverages consumed daily have a negative influence on hardness and surface degradation of nano-filled dental composite. Comparatively, nano-filled composites possess higher surface area to volume ratio of their fillers particle size may lead to higher surface roughness than other resin based dental biomaterials. PMID:26430417

  18. Preparation and characterization of new dental porcelains, using K-feldspar and quartz raw materials. Effect of B2O3 additions on sintering and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Harabi, Abdelhamid; Guerfa, Fatiha; Harabi, Esma; Benhassine, Mohamed-Tayeb; Foughali, Lazhar; Zaiou, Soumia

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of temperature and boric oxide (B2O3) addition on sintering and mechanical properties of a newly developed dental porcelain (DP) prepared from local Algerian raw materials. Based on a preliminary work, the new selected composition was 75wt.% feldspar, 20wt.% quartz and 5wt.% kaolin. It was prepared by sintering the mixture at different temperatures (1100-1250°C). The optimum sintering conditions gave a relatively higher density (2.47g/cm(3)) and excellent mechanical properties. The three point flexural strength (3PFS) and Martens micro-hardness of dental porcelains were 149MPa and 2600MPa, respectively. This obtained 3PFS value is more than four times greater than that of hydroxyapatite (HA) value (about 37MPa) sintered under the same conditions. However, the sintering temperature was lowered by about 25 and 50°C for 3 and 5wt.% B2O3 additions, respectively. But, it did not improve furthermore the samples density and their mechanical properties. It has also been found that B2O3 additions provoke a glass matrix composition variation which delays the leucite formation during sintering. PMID:27157725

  19. DENTAL PULP TISSUE ENGINEERING

    PubMed Central

    Demarco, FF; Conde, MCM; Cavalcanti, B; Casagrande, L; Sakai, V; Nör, JE

    2013-01-01

    Dental pulp is a highly specialized mesenchymal tissue, which have a restrict regeneration capacity due to anatomical arrangement and post-mitotic nature of odontoblastic cells. Entire pulp amputation followed by pulp-space disinfection and filling with an artificial material cause loss of a significant amount of dentin leaving as life-lasting sequelae a non-vital and weakened tooth. However, regenerative endodontics is an emerging field of modern tissue engineering that demonstrated promising results using stem cells associated with scaffolds and responsive molecules. Thereby, this article will review the most recent endeavors to regenerate pulp tissue based on tissue engineering principles and providing insightful information to readers about the different aspects enrolled in tissue engineering. Here, we speculate that the search for the ideal combination of cells, scaffolds, and morphogenic factors for dental pulp tissue engineering may be extended over future years and result in significant advances in other areas of dental and craniofacial research. The finds collected in our review showed that we are now at a stage in which engineering a complex tissue, such as the dental pulp, is no longer an unachievable and the next decade will certainly be an exciting time for dental and craniofacial research. PMID:21519641

  20. Current trends in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Gaviria, Laura; Salcido, John Paul; Guda, Teja

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss is very a very common problem; therefore, the use of dental implants is also a common practice. Although research on dental implant designs, materials and techniques has increased in the past few years and is expected to expand in the future, there is still a lot of work involved in the use of better biomaterials, implant design, surface modification and functionalization of surfaces to improve the long-term outcomes of the treatment. This paper provides a brief history and evolution of dental implants. It also describes the types of implants that have been developed, and the parameters that are presently used in the design of dental implants. Finally, it describes the trends that are employed to improve dental implant surfaces, and current technologies used for the analysis and design of the implants. PMID:24868501

  1. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  2. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... facts so you can make an informed decision as to whether dental implants are right for your ... the jaw bone. It’s obviously not the same as the original connection , but functions just the same. ...

  3. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  4. High energy X-ray diffraction study of a dental ceramics–titanium functional gradient material prepared by field assisted sintering technique

    SciTech Connect

    Witte, K.; Bodnar, W.; Schell, N.; Lang, H.; Burkel, E.

    2014-09-15

    A functional gradient material with eleven layers composed of a dental ceramics and titanium was successfully consolidated using field assisted sintering technique in a two-step sintering process. High energy X-ray diffraction studies on the gradient were performed at High Energy Material Science beamline at Desy in Hamburg. Phase composition, crystal unit edges and lattice mismatch along the gradient were determined applying Rietveld refinement procedure. Phase analysis revealed that the main crystalline phase present in the gradient is α-Ti. Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient with a decreasing increment between every next layer, following rather the weight fraction of titanium. The crystal unit edge a of titanium remains approximately constant with a value of 2.9686(1) Å, while c is reduced with increasing amount of titanium. In the layer with pure titanium the crystal unit edge c is constant with a value of 4.7174(2) Å. The lattice mismatch leading to an internal stress was calculated over the whole gradient. It was found that the maximal internal stress in titanium embedded in the studied gradient is significantly smaller than its yield strength, which implies that the structure of titanium along the whole gradient is mechanically stable. - Highlights: • High energy XRD studies of dental ceramics–Ti gradient material consolidated by FAST. • Phase composition, crystallinity and lattice parameters are determined. • Crystallinity increases stepwisely along the gradient following weight fraction of Ti. • Lattice mismatch leading to internal stress is calculated over the whole gradient. • Internal stress in α-Ti embedded in the gradient is smaller than its yield strength.

  5. Dental Caries (Tooth Decay)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find Data by Topic > Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) Main Content Dental caries (tooth decay) remains the most prevalent chronic ... important source of information on oral health and dental care in the United States since the early ...

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Sealing Ability of New MTA Based Sealers with Conventional Resin Based Sealer: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jasuja, Purshottam; Verma, Kanika Gupta; Juneja, Suruchi; Mathur, Aditi; Walia, Rashmeet; Kakkar, Ashish; Singla, Metashi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Root canal obturation is the most important step in the root canal treatment that aims to obtain a complete hermetic seal and to prevent the re-growth of microorganisms in the root canal system. To accomplish this, many endodontic obturation materials and sealers are being used. Aim To evaluate and compare the apical microleakage of a resin based sealer; Adseal with Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) based sealers; Pro root MTA and MTA Fillapex. Materials and Methods Total 75 extracted human single rooted teeth were taken and decoronated at cemento-enamel junction. The access cavities and biomechanical preparation were performed using endodontic rotary system. The teeth were randomly divided into five groups with n=15; Group I - Gutta-percha and Adseal sealer; Group II - Gutta-percha and MTA Fillapex; Group III- Gutta-percha and Pro root MTA; Group IV- Gutta-percha without sealer (positive control group); Group V- Root canal remained empty (negative control). All the specimens were stored at 370C with 100% humidity for one week. All root surfaces except the apical 2mm were covered with two layers of nail varnish and then immersed in an aqueous solution of 2% methylene blue dye for 72 hours. Roots were longitudinally split using a diamond disk. Linear apical dye penetration was measured under Stereomicroscope at 40X magnification. Statistical Analysis The data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using paried t-test, ANOVA for interclass comparison, with SPSS statistical software (version 20.0). Results The intraobserver reliability was found to be insignificant in each of the triplicate study of all the three study samples. MTA Fillapex group showed maxmium apical microleakage followed by Pro root MTA and Adseal sealer. Conclusion The results concluded that Adseal sealer showed minimal dye penetration followed by Pro root MTA and MTA Fillapex. Thus, concluding that Adseal sealer is better in apical sealing than Pro root MTA and MTA Fillapex.

  7. Polymerization efficiency of curing lamps: a universal energy conversion relationship predictive of conversion of resin-based composite.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, Rolf H; Erickson, Robert L; Davidson, Carel L

    2004-01-01

    A universal energy-conversion relationship (ECRu) predictive of conversion of a resin-based composite (RBC) polymerized with any light source has been described. This relationship was derived from an energy conversion relationship for RBC polymerized with a tungsten-halogen lamp and the lamp's efficiency relative to a hypothetical standard lamp. The ECRu was then used to predict conversion throughout RBC polymerized with an LED lamp using the lamp's relative efficiency compared to the standard lamp. The universal energy scale has also been described as predictive of scrape-back lengths for this RBC family when polymerized with any light source. Despite a 31% greater relative efficiency, scrape-back lengths from RBC polymerized using the LED lamp were predicted to be only 6% greater than those polymerized with the tungsten-halogen lamp when RBC is polymerized on an equal energy basis. This result was experimentally verified. PMID:14753341

  8. Fit accuracy of metal partial removable dental prosthesis frameworks fabricated by traditional or light curing modeling material technique: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Anan, Mohammad Tarek M.; Al-Saadi, Mohannad H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to compare the fit accuracies of metal partial removable dental prosthesis (PRDP) frameworks fabricated by the traditional technique (TT) or the light-curing modeling material technique (LCMT). Materials and methods A metal model of a Kennedy class III modification 1 mandibular dental arch with two edentulous spaces of different spans, short and long, was used for the study. Thirty identical working casts were used to produce 15 PRDP frameworks each by TT and by LCMT. Every framework was transferred to a metal master cast to measure the gap between the metal base of the framework and the crest of the alveolar ridge of the cast. Gaps were measured at three points on each side by a USB digital intraoral camera at ×16.5 magnification. Images were transferred to a graphics editing program. A single examiner performed all measurements. The two-tailed t-test was performed at the 5% significance level. Results The mean gap value was significantly smaller in the LCMT group compared to the TT group. The mean value of the short edentulous span was significantly smaller than that of the long edentulous span in the LCMT group, whereas the opposite result was obtained in the TT group. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the fit of the LCMT-fabricated frameworks was better than the fit of the TT-fabricated frameworks. The framework fit can differ according to the span of the edentate ridge and the fabrication technique for the metal framework. PMID:26236129

  9. Recommendations for conducting controlled clinical studies of dental restorative materials. Science Committee Project 2/98--FDI World Dental Federation study design (Part I) and criteria for evaluation (Part II) of direct and indirect restorations including onlays and partial crowns.

    PubMed

    Hickel, Reinhard; Roulet, Jean-François; Bayne, Stephen; Heintze, Siegward D; Mjör, Ivar A; Peters, Mathilde; Rousson, Valentin; Randall, Ros; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tyas, Martin; Vanherle, Guido

    2007-01-01

    clinical trial designs, guidelines for design, randomization, number of subjects, characteristics of participants, clinical assessment, standards and calibration, categories for assessment, criteria for evaluation, and supplemental documentation. Part 2 of the review considers categories of assessment for esthetic evaluation, functional assessment, biological responses to restorative materials, and statistical analysis of results. The overall review represents a considerable effort to include a range of clinical research interests over the past years. As part of the recognition of the importance of these suggestions, the review is being published simultaneously in identical form in both the Journal of Adhesive Dentistry and Clinical Oral Investigations. Additionally, an extended abstract will be published in the International Dental Journal, giving a link to the web full version. This should help to introduce these considerations more quickly to the scientific community. PMID:18341239

  10. The Level of Dental Anxiety and Dental Status in Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Dobros, Katarzyna; Hajto-Bryk, Justyna; Wnek, Anna; Zarzecka, Joanna; Rzepka, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to assess potential correlation between dental anxiety and overall dental status in adult patients, in consideration of the frequency of dental appointments and individual dental hygiene practices. Materials and Methods: Individual dental anxiety levels were assessed with the aid of the Corah’s dental anxiety scale (DAS). The study embraced 112 patients of the University Dental Clinic, Kraków. Following clinical and X-ray exams, respectively, decayed, missing and filled teeth (DMFT) index and dental treatment index (DTI) were computed for each study subject. Results: Mean DAS among the 112 subjects under study was 9.41 standard deviation (SD = 3.36). Mean DMFT value was 15.86 (SD = 7.00), whereas DTI value was 0.76 (SD = 0.27). The number of decayed teeth and an individual dental anxiety level were found to be correlated (r = 0.26). Higher dental anxiety correlated with lower DTI value (r = −0.22) and lesser frequency of dental appointments (r = 0.22). Conclusions: Individual dental anxiety level appears to impact overall dental status, frequency of dental appointments and everyday oral health practices. Every conceivable effort should therefore be undertaken with a view to effectively diminishing dental anxiety levels in the patients. How to cite the article: Dobros K, Hajto-Bryk J, Wnęk A, Zarzecka J, Rzepka D. The level of dental anxiety and dental status in adult patients. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):11-4. PMID:25083026

  11. Development of Dental Health Knowledge Tests for the Primary Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleinman, Susan P.

    1981-01-01

    A project was designed to provide evaluation materials for dental health education programs at the primary level. Reliable test instruments that assessed cognitive understanding of dental concepts by primary age children were designed. (JN)

  12. Film Thickness and Flow Properties of Resin-Based Cements at Different Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, R

    2013-01-01

    Statement of Problem: For a luting agent to allow complete seating of prosthetic restorations, it must obtain an appropriate flow rate maintaining a minimum film thickness. The performance of recently introduced luting agents in this regard has not been evaluated. Purpose: To measure and compare the film thickness and flow properties of seven resin-containing luting cements at different temperatures (37°C, 25°C and10°C). Material and Methods: Specimens were prepared from five resin luting cements; seT (SDI), Panavia F (Kuraray), Varioloink II (Ivoclar), Maxcem (Kerr), Nexus2 (Kerr) and two resin-modified glass-ionomer luting cements (RM-GICs); GC Fuji Plus (GC Corporation), and RelyX Luting 2 (3 M/ESPE). The film thickness and flow rate of each cement (n=15) was determined using the test described in ISO at three different temperatures. Results: There was a linear correlation between film thickness and flow rate for most of the materials. Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials while the effect of temperature on film thickness was material dependent. At 37°C, all products revealed a film thickness of less than 25µm except for GC Fuji Plus. At 25°C, all cements produced a film thickness of less than 27 µm except for seT. At 10°C, apart from seT and Rely X Luting 2, the remaining cements showed a film thickness smaller than 20 µm. Conclusion: Cooling increased fluidity of almost all materials, however. the film thickness did not exceed 35 µm in either condition, in spite of the lowest film thickness being demonstrated at the lowest temperature. PMID:24724120

  13. Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Ralph C.

    1988-01-01

    Dental caries is one of the most prevalent diseases afflicting mankind. It reached a peak in the 1950s but has been declining drastically in recent years in children and young adults. This article describes the three contributing factors in dental caries: microbial plaque, tooth susceptibility, and diet, and discusses practical preventive measures which help to reduce caries incidence. Some of these, such as vaccines and antimicrobial varnishes, are still in the research stages, while others, such as sucrose substitutes, low-calorie sweeteners, and limitation of frequency of sugar snacks are well established and can be promoted by family physicians. PMID:21253193

  14. Restorative material and other tooth-specific variables associated with the decision to repair or replace defective restorations: findings from The Dental PBRN

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Valeria V.; Riley, Joseph L.; Worley, Donald C.; Gilbert, Gregg H.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Using data from dentists participating in The Dental Practice-Based Research Network (DPBRN), the study had 2 main objectives: (1) to identify and quantify the types of restorative materials in the existing failed restorations; and (2) to identify and quantify the materials used to repair or replace those failed restorations. Methods This cross-sectional study used a consecutive patient/restoration recruitment design. Practitioner-investigators recorded data on consecutive restorations in permanent teeth that needed repair or replacement. Data included the primary reason for repair or replacement, tooth surface(s) involved, restorative materials used, and patient demographics. Results Data for 9,875 restorations were collected from 7,502 patients in 197 practices for which 75% of restorations were replaced and 25% repaired. Most of the restorations that were either repaired or replaced were amalgam (56%) for which most (56%) of the material used was direct tooth-colored. The restorative material was 5 times more likely to be changed when the original restoration was amalgam (OR=5.2, p<.001). The likelihood of changing an amalgam restoration differed as a function of the tooth type (OR=3.0, p<.001), arch (OR=6.6, p<.001); and number of surfaces in the original restoration (OR=12.2, p<.001). Conclusion The probability of changing from amalgam to another restorative material differed with several characteristics of the original restoration. The change was most likely to take place when (1) the treatment was a replacement; (2) the tooth was not a molar; (3) the tooth was in the maxillary arch; and (4) the original restoration involved a single surface. PMID:22342563

  15. Novel bioactive polyester scaffolds prepared from unsaturated resins based on isosorbide and succinic acid.

    PubMed

    Smiga-Matuszowicz, Monika; Janicki, Bartosz; Jaszcz, Katarzyna; Łukaszczyk, Jan; Kaczmarek, Marcin; Lesiak, Marta; Sieroń, Aleksander L; Simka, Wojciech; Mierzwiński, Maciej; Kusz, Damian

    2014-12-01

    In this study new biodegradable materials obtained by crosslinking poly(3-allyloxy-1,2-propylene succinate) (PSAGE) with oligo(isosorbide maleate) (OMIS) and small amount of methyl methacrylate were investigated. The porous scaffolds were obtained in the presence of a foaming system consisted of calcium carbonate/carboxylic acid mixture, creating in situ porous structure during crosslinking of liquid formulations. The maximum crosslinking temperature and setting time, the cured porous materials morphology as well as the effect of their porosity on mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation process were evaluated. It was found that the kind of carboxylic acid used in the foaming system influenced compressive strength and compressive modulus of porous scaffolds. The MTS cytotoxicity assay was carried out for OMIS using hFOB1.19 cell line. OMIS resin was found to be non-toxic in wide range of concentrations. On the ground of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations and energy X-ray dispersive analysis (EDX) it was found that hydroxyapatite (HA) formation at the scaffolds surfaces within short period of soaking in phosphate buffer solution occurs. After 3h immersion a compact layer of HA was observed at the surface of the samples. The obtained results suggest potential applicability of resulted new porous crosslinked polymeric materials as temporary bone void fillers. PMID:25491802

  16. FATIGUE OF DENTAL CERAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; Lawn, Brian R

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics. Data/sources The nature of various fatigue modes is elucidated using fracture test data on ceramic layer specimens from the dental and biomechanics literature. Conclusions Failure modes can change over a lifetime, depending on restoration geometry, loading conditions and material properties. Modes that operate in single-cycle loading may be dominated by alternative modes in multi-cycle loading. While post-mortem examination of failed prostheses can determine the sources of certain fractures, the evolution of these fractures en route to failure remains poorly understood. Whereas it is commonly held that loss of load-bearing capacity of dental ceramics in repetitive loading is attributable to chemically-assisted 'slow crack growth' in the presence of water, we demonstrate the existence of more deleterious fatigue mechanisms, mechanical rather than chemical in nature. Neglecting to account for mechanical fatigue can lead to gross overestimates in predicted survival rates. Clinical significance Strategies for prolonging the clinical lifetimes of ceramic restorations are proposed based on a crack-containment philosophy. PMID:24135295

  17. [Maintenance care for dental implant].

    PubMed

    Kamoi, K

    1989-10-01

    Dental implant has tried at the early stage in 19th century recovering an oral function and esthetics. Technological revolutions in biochemical and new materials have developed on the remarkable change in the dental implants, nowadays we call the three generation therapy for dental implantology. There are many kinds of methods and techniques in dental implants, however a lot of troublesome complication on the process of surgical phase, construction of prothodontics and prognosis of maintenance care. In the proceedings of this symposium, I would like to propose you how to manage the maintenance care for various kind of dental implants through the methodology and case presentations. Tendenay and future for dental implants The current outlook of dental implant has increasing supply and demand not only dentists but also patients. According to Japanese Welfare Ministry's report in 1987, average missing teeth over sixty years old generations are approximately 42% in accordance with NIDR (U.S.A.) research. They are missed on ten over teeth in full 28th teeth dentitions owing to dental caries and periodontal diseases. Generally speaking, latent implant patients are occupied on the same possibility of needs for dental implants both Japan and U.S.A. Management of maintenance care The patients hardly recognized the importance of plaque control for the maintenance care in the intraoral condition after implantation. Dentists and dental staffs must be instruct patients for importance of plaque removal and control, because they already had forgotten the habit of teeth cleaning, especially in the edenturous conditions. 1) Concept of establishment in oral hygiene. Motivation and instruction for patients include very important factors in dental implants as well as in periodontal diseases. Patients who could not achieve on good oral hygiene levels obtained no good results in the long term observations. To establish good oral hygiene are how to control supra plaque surrounding tissues

  18. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  19. Dental crowns

    MedlinePlus

    ... cover a tooth Replace a misshapen tooth or dental implant Correct a misaligned tooth Talk to your dentist ... the tooth pulled and replaced with a tooth implant. Your crown could chip or crack: If you grind your teeth or clench your jaw, you may need to ...

  20. Fire and heat resistant laminating resins based on maleimido substituted aromatic cyclotriphosphazene polymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Devendra (Inventor); Fohlen, George M. (Inventor); Parker, John A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    4-Aminophenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes are reacted with maleic anhydride to produce maleamic acids which are converted to the maleimides. The maleimides are polymerized. By selection of starting materials (e.g., hexakis amino or trisaminophenoxy trisphenoxy cyclotriphosphazenes), selection of molar proportions of reactants, use of mixtures of anhydrides and use of dianhydrides as bridging groups a variety of maleimides and polymers are produced. The polymers have high limiting oxygen indices, high char yields and other useful heat and fire resistant properties making them useful as, for example, impregnants of fabrics.

  1. Novel bio-based thermoset resins based on epoxidized vegetable oils for structural adhesives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivasubramanian, Shivshankar

    Conventional engineered wood composites are bonded for the most part through formaldehyde-based structural adhesives such as urea formaldehyde (UF), melamine formaldehyde (MF), phenol formaldehyde (PF) and resorcinol formaldehyde (RF). Formaldehyde is a known human carcinogen; the occupational exposure and emission after manufacturing of these binders is raising more and more concern. With increasing emphasis on environmental issues, there is clear incentive to replace these hazardous conventional formaldehyde-based binders with cco-friendly resins having similar properties but derived from renewable sources, bearing in mind the economics of the structural wood composite industry. In this thesis, the curing reaction of bio-derived epoxy thermosets with inexpensive, low-toxicity precursors, including polyimines and amino acids was investigated. Epoxidized linseed oil (ELO) and epoxidized soybean oil (ESO) were successfully crosslinked with both branched polyethyleneimine (PEI) and triethylenetetramine (fETA). Epoxidized castor oil (ECO) was crosslinked with polyethyleneimine (PEI), having different molecular weights. Curing conditions were optimized through solvent uptake and soluble fraction analysis. Finally, the mechanical properties of the optimized compositions of rigid bioepoxies were evaluated using dynamic mechanical rheological testing (DMRT). While not as stiff as conventional materials, optimized materials have sufficient room temperature moduli to show promise for coatings and as binders in engineered wood products.

  2. High Temperature Transfer Molding Resins Based on 2,3,3',4'-Biphenyltetracarboxylic Dianhydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. G., Jr.; Connell, J. W.; Hergenrother, P. M.; Yokota, R.; Criss, J. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop materials for resin transfer molding (RTM) processes to fabricate high performance/high temperature composite structures, phenylethynyl containing imides have been under investigation. New phenylethynyl containing imide compositions were prepared using 2,3,3',4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride (a-BPDA) and evaluated for cured glass transition temperature (Tg), melt flow behavior, and for processability into flat composite panels via RTM. The a-BPDA imparts a unique combination of properties that are desirable for high temperature transfer molding resins. In comparison to its symmetrical counterpart (i.e. 3,3',4,4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride), a-BPDA affords oligomers with lower melt viscosities and when cured, higher Tgs. Several candidates exhibited the appropriate combination of properties such as a low and stable melt viscosity required for RTM processes, high cured Tg, and moderate toughness. The chemistry, physical, and composite properties of select resins will be discussed.

  3. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06). None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76). When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05) at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3-Q1, 1.25-0.00) compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3-Q1, 0.25-0.00). The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin. PMID:23739787

  4. Acid-Breakable Resin-Based Chemical Amplification Positive Resist for Electron-Beam Mastering: Design and Lithographic Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamizu, Toshio; Shiraishi, Hiroshi

    2004-07-01

    A positive chemical amplification resist based on acid-catalyzed fragmentation of acetal groups in its main chain has been developed as a means of reducing line-edge roughness. The resist consists of an acid generator, an acid-diffusion controller and an acid-breakable (AB) resin that is synthesized through a co-condensation reaction between polyphenol and aromatic multifunctional vinylether compound. The effects of the fractionation of AB resins on resin properties and line-edge roughness (LER) are evaluated. Although AB resins have wide molecular weight distributions, the density of acetal groups in this AB resin is found to be almost constant except in the lower molecular weight components. The resist with a fractionated resin from which such components are removed provides high-resolution patterns (70-nm-wide pit) with fairly low LER. AFM analysis shows that the surface roughness (SR) of the resist with the fractionated resin is smaller than that of a resist using nonfractionated AB resin, and that the SR value is not altered throughout the range of exposure doses up to just below the start of dissolution. By using the fractionated AB resin, the AB resin-based resist (ABR) is capable of forming sub-100 nm L/S patterns with less than 5 nm of LER (3σ).

  5. Evaluation of the Clinical Impact of ISO 4049 in Comparison with Miniflexural Test on Mechanical Performances of Resin Based Composite

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Luigi; Fabiano, Francesca; Bonaccorsi, Lucio Maria; Fabiano, Valerio; Borsellino, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different specimens dimensions on the mechanical properties of a commercial microfilled resin composite by using a modified ISO 4049 standard protocol, that generally provides specimen dimensions of 25 mm length × 2 mm width × 2 mm height; these standard dimensions are not clinically realistic considering the teeth diameter and length average. Furthermore, the overlapping irradiations required lead to specimens that are not homogeneous with the presence of some flaws due to packaging steps. For this reason, a miniflexural test was employed in this work both to simulate clinically realistic dimensions and to concentrate fewer defects. The flexural tests were performed at varying span length, in the range between 18.5 mm as stated by the ISO 4049 flexural test (IFT) and 10.5 mm according to the miniflexural test (MFT), at the increasing of layers with a 1 mm buildup multilayering technique. The results evidenced the impact of specimen dimensions on mechanical performances and consequently stability of resin-based composite with the formation of an asymmetrical structure which possesses higher stiffness and strength at increasing layering steps. PMID:25815011

  6. Adaptation and penetration of resin-based root canal sealers in root canals irradiated with high-intensity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura-Netto, Cacio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Palo, Renato Miotto; Prokopowitsch, Igor; Pameijer, Cornelis H.; Marques, Marcia Martins

    2015-03-01

    This research analyzed the quality of resin-based sealer adaptation after intracanal laser irradiation. Extracted teeth (n=168) were root canal treated and divided into four groups, according to dentin surface treatment: no laser; Nd:YAG laser (1.5 W, 100 mJ, 15 Hz) diode laser (2.5 W in CW), and Er:YAG laser (1 W, 100 mJ, 10 Hz). The teeth were divided into four subgroups according to the sealer used: AH Plus, EndoREZ, Epiphany, and EpiphanySE. For testing the sealing after root canal obturation, the penetration of silver nitrate solution was measured, whereas to evaluate the adaptation and penetration of the sealer into the dentin, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used. The ESEM images were analyzed using a four-grade criteria score by three evaluators. The inter-examiner agreement was confirmed by Kappa test and the scores statistically compared by the Kruskal-Wallis' test (p<0.05). Both adaptation and sealer penetration in root canals were not affected by the laser irradiation. Nd:YAG and diode laser decreased the tracer penetration for AH Plus, whereas EndoREZ and EpiphanySE performances were affected by Nd:YAG irradiation (p<0.05). It can be concluded that intracanal laser irradiation can be used as an adjunct in endodontic treatment; however, the use of hydrophilic resin sealers should be avoided when root canals were irradiated with Nd:YAG laser.

  7. Dental education and dental practice.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J R

    1984-01-01

    This paper relates recent modes of dental practice to changes that the public and government are likely to ask the health care professions to make in the future. As usual they are asking for the best of all worlds. First, that we maintain the clinical model to the highest standards of personal dental care based and tested against the best research at our disposal, whilst we ensure there is no reduction in the high technical standards for which british dentists have a reputation. Second, that the profession is required to consider ways of providing care on the medicosocial model for the whole community at an economic level the country will afford. The broad changes in dental education have been reviewed, from the technical apprenticeship to the establishment of strong university departments in teaching hospitals. The importance of a sound biomedical foundation and of research both to education and the credibility of dental practice as a primary health care profession is stressed if the profession is to retain its position as a sister to medicine and not slide down to that of a technical ancillary. PMID:6374141

  8. Electrospun melamine resin-based multifunctional nonwoven membrane for lithium ion batteries at the elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qingfu; Yu, Yong; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Jianjun; Liu, Zhihong; Cui, Guanglei

    2016-09-01

    A flame retardant and thermally dimensional stable membrane with high permeability and electrolyte wettability can overcome the safety issues of lithium ion batteries (LIBs) at elevated temperatures. In this work, a multifunctional thermoset nonwoven membrane composed of melamine formaldehyde resin (MFR) nano-fibers was prepared by a electro-spinning method. The resultant porous nonwoven membrane possesses superior permeability, electrolyte wettability and thermally dimensional stability. Using the electrospun MFR membrane, the LiFePO4/Li battery exhibits high safety and stable cycling performance at the elevated temperature of 120 °C. Most importantly, the MFR membrane contains lone pair electron in the nitrogen element, which can chelate with Mn2+ ions and suppress their transfer across the separator. Therefore, the LiMn2O4/graphite cells with the electrospun MFR multifunctional membranes reveal an improved cycle performance even at high temperature. This work demonstrated that electrospun MFR is a promising candidate material for high-safety separator of LIBs with stable cycling performance at elevated temperatures.

  9. [Abrasion resistance of dental materials. 3. Surface quality study of Evicrol by wear measurements at different layer depths].

    PubMed

    Tappe, A; Eichhorn, T

    1980-04-01

    Abrasion determinations in various layer depths showed that the layer of the filling material Evicrol directly under the matrix-hardened surface is more abrasion-resistant than the matrix- hardened surface. From this it is concluded that it is good practice to overfill in making restorations of Evicrol and to remove a certain layer of material (approximately 0.25 mm, according to Fraunhofer). PMID:6935842

  10. A comparative study of sliding wear of nonmetallic dental restorative materials with emphasis on micromechanical wear mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Dupriez, Nataliya Deyneka; von Koeckritz, Ann-Kristin; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the in vitro tribological behavior of modern nonmetallic restorative materials. Specimen prepared of IPS e.max Press lithium disilicate glass ceramic, IPS Empress Esthetic leucite-reinforced glass ceramic, Everest ZS Blanks yttria-stabilized zirconia and Lava Ultimate composite were subjected to wear using a wear machine designed to simulate occlusal loads. The wear of the investigated materials and antagonists were evaluated by a three-dimensional surface scanner. The quantitative wear test results were used to compare and rank the materials. Specimens were divided into two groups with steatite and alumina antagonists. For each antagonist material an analysis of variance was applied. As a post hoc test of the significant differences, Tukey's honest significant difference test was used. With steatite antagonist: wear of zirconia < wear of leucite-reinforced ceramic < wear of lithium disilicate ceramic < wear of Lava Ultimate composite. No significant wear difference was found for steatite antagonist. The wear of IPS e.max Press and Lava Ultimate against hard alumina was found to be twice lower as compared to their wear when opposing to steatite. The differences were associated with materials mechanical properties (hardness and fracture toughness) and with materials microstructure. Wear mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25303041

  11. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or impacted teeth The presence and extent of dental caries (cavities) Bone damage (such as from periodontitis ) Abscessed ... Dental x-rays can reveal dental cavities (tooth decay) before they ... take yearly bitewings for the early development of cavities.

  12. DDS: The Dental Diagnostic Simulation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tira, Daniel E.

    The Dental Diagnostic Simulation (DDS) System provides an alternative to simulation systems which represent diagnostic case studies of relatively limited scope. It may be used to generate simulated case studies in all of the dental specialty areas with case materials progressing through the gamut of the diagnostic process. The generation of a…

  13. Dental Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirtoft, Ingegerd

    1983-12-01

    Ten years have passed since the first articles appeared in this new field. The qualities of the laser light together with the need of contactless 3-D measurements for different dental purposes seemed to be extremely promising, but still just a few scientists have used the method and mostly for laboratory studies. For some reason there has been a preponderance for orthodontic measurements. This seems to be a bit peculiar from holographic view compared with measurements for engineering purposes, which usually are made on metals. So naturally holography can become a clinical tool for measurements in the field of fixed bridges, removable partial dentures and implants. One of the problems is that the need for holography in dental research must be fulfilled in collaboration with physicists. Only a two-way communication during an entire experiment can balance both technical and odontological demands and thus give practical and clinical important results. The need for an easy way of handling the evaluation to get all required information is another problem and of course the holographic equipment must be converted to a box easy to handle for everyone. At last the position of dental holography today is going to be carefully examined together with an attempt to look into the hopefully exciting and not to utopic future for this research field.

  14. Lorentz contact resonance spectroscopy for nanoscale characterisation of structural and mechanical properties of biological, dental and pharmaceutical materials.

    PubMed

    Khanal, Dipesh; Dillon, Eoghan; Hau, Herman; Fu, Dong; Ramzan, Iqbal; Chrzanowski, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has been widely used to obtain topographical information and to quantify nanostructural properties of different materials. Qualitative and quantitative imaging is of particular interest to study material-material interactions and map surface properties on a nanoscale (i.e. stiffness and viscoelastic properties). These data are essential for the development of new biomedical materials. Currently, there are limited options to map viscoelastic properties of materials at nanoscale and at high resolutions. Lorentz contact resonance (LCR) is an emerging technique, which allows mapping viscoelasticity of samples with stiffness ranging from a few hundred Pa up to several GPa. Here we demonstrate the applicability of LCR to probe and map the viscoelasticity and stiffness of 'soft' (biological sample: cell treated with nanodiamond), 'medium hard' (pharmaceutical sample: pMDI canister) and 'hard' (human teeth enamel) specimens. The results allowed the identification of nanodiamond on the cells and the qualitative assessment of its distribution based on its nanomechanical properties. It also enabled mapping of the mechanical properties of the cell to demonstrate variability of these characteristics in a single cell. Qualitative imaging of an enamel sample demonstrated variations of stiffness across the specimen and precise identification of enamel prisms (higher stiffness) and enamel interrods (lower stiffness). Similarly, mapping of the pMDI canister wall showed that drug particles were adsorbed to the wall. These particles showed differences in stiffness at nanoscale, which suggested variations in surface composition-multiphasic material. LCR technique emerges as a valuable tool for probing viscoelasticity of samples of varying stiffness's. PMID:26518012

  15. Fatigue analysis of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing resin-based composite vs. lithium disilicate glass-ceramic.

    PubMed

    Ankyu, Shuhei; Nakamura, Keisuke; Harada, Akio; Hong, Guang; Kanno, Taro; Niwano, Yoshimi; Örtengren, Ulf; Egusa, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Resin-based composite molar crowns made by computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have been proposed as an inexpensive alternative to metal-ceramic or all-ceramic crowns. However, there is a lack of scientific information regarding fatigue resistance. This study aimed to analyze the fatigue behavior of CAD/CAM resin-based composite compared with lithium disilicate glass-ceramic. One-hundred and sixty bar-shaped specimens were fabricated using resin-based composite blocks [Lava Ultimate (LU); 3M/ESPE] and lithium disilicate glass-ceramic [IPS e.max press (EMP); Ivoclar/Vivadent]. The specimens were divided into four groups: no treatment (NT); thermal cycling (TC); mechanical cycling (MC); and thermal cycling followed by mechanical cycling (TCMC). Thermal cycling was performed by alternate immersion in water baths of 5°C and 55°C for 5 × 10(4) cycles. Mechanical cycling was performed in a three-point bending test, with a maximum load of 40 N, for 1.2 × 10(6) cycles. In addition, LU and EMP molar crowns were fabricated and subjected to fatigue treatments followed by load-to-failure testing. The flexural strength of LU was not severely reduced by the fatigue treatments. The fatigue treatments did not significantly affect the fracture resistance of LU molar crowns. The results demonstrate the potential of clinical application of CAD/CAM-generated resin-based composite molar crowns in terms of fatigue resistance. PMID:27203408

  16. Dental Fear among Medical and Dental Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Hakim, H.; Razak, I. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the prevalence and level of dental fear among health related undergraduates and to identify factors causing such fear using Kleinknecht's Dental Fear Survey (DFS) questionnaire. Methods. Kleinknecht's DFS questionnaire was used to assess dental fear and anxiety among the entire enrollment of the medical and dental undergraduates' of the University of Malaya. Results. Overall response rate was 82.2%. Dental students reported higher prevalence of dental fear (96.0% versus 90.4%). However, most of the fear encountered among dental students was in the low fear category as compared to their medical counterpart (69.2 versus 51.2%). Significantly more medical students cancelled dental appointment due to fear compared to dental students (P = 0.004). “Heart beats faster” and “muscle being tensed” were the top two physiological responses experienced by the respondents. “Drill” and “anesthetic needle” were the most fear provoking objects among respondents of both faculties. Conclusion. Dental fear and anxiety are a common problem encountered among medical and dental undergraduates who represent future health care professionals. Also, high level of dental fear and anxiety leads to the avoidance of the dental services. PMID:25386615

  17. Change in color of a maxillofacial prosthetic silicone elastomer, following investment in molds of different materials

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Tania; Kheur, Mohit; Coward, Trevor; Patel, Naimesha

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In the authors’ experience, the color of silicone elastomer following polymerization in molds made of gypsum products is slightly different from the color that was matched in the presence of the patient, before the silicone is packed. It is hypothesized that the investing materials and separating media have an effect on the color during the polymerization process of the silicone. Materials and Methods: This study compares and evaluates the change in color of silicone elastomer packed in three commonly used investing materials - Dental stone (white color), dental stone (green color), and die stone (orange color); coated with three different separating media – Alginate-based medium, soap solution and a resin-based die hardening material. Pigmented silicone samples of dimensions 1.5 cm × 2 cm × 0.5 cm were made from the elastomer in the above-mentioned mold materials using combinations of the mentioned separating media. These served as test group samples. Control group samples were made by packing a mix of the same pigmented elastomer in stainless steel molds. The L*, a*, b* values of the test and control group samples were determined using a spectrophotometer. The change in color (Delta E) was calculated between the control and test groups. Results: The mean L, a, b values for the control group were, 31.8, 26.2, and 36.3, respectively. Average values of change in color (Delta E) for samples packed utilizing alginate-based medium, die hardener, and soap solution, respectively in white dental stone (2.70, 2.74, and 2.88), green dental stone (2.19, 2.23, 2.42), and orange die stone (3.19, 2.72, 2.80) were tabulated. Conclusion: Among the investing materials studied, die stone showed the most color change (3.19), which was statistically significant. Among the separating media, die hardener showed the least color change (2.23). The best combination of an investing material and separating media as per this investigation is a dental stone (green) and alginate

  18. A Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of Resin based Sealers on Retention of Crown Cemented with Three Types of Cement – An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sumeet; Patel, J.R.; Sethuraman, Rajesh; Singh, Sarbjeet; Wazir, Nikhil Dev; Singh, Harvinder

    2014-01-01

    Aim: In an effort to control postoperative sensitivity, dentin sealers are being applied following crown preparations, with little knowledge of how crown retention might be affected. A previous study demonstrated no adverse effect when using a gluteraldehyde-based sealer, and existing studies have shown conflicting results for resin-based products. This study determined the retention of the casting cemented with three types of cement, with and without use of resin sealers and it determined the mode of failure. Materials and Methods: Extracted human molars (n=60) were prepared with a flat occlusal, 20-degree taper, and 4-mm axial length. The axial surface area of each preparation was determined and specimens were distributed equally among groups (n=10). A single-bottle adhesive system (one step single bottle adhesive system) was used to seal dentin, following tooth preparation. Sealers were not used on the control specimens. The test castings were prepared by using Ni-Cr alloy for each specimen and they were cemented with a seating force of 20 Kg by using either Zinc Phosphate (Harvard Cement), Glass Ionomer (GC luting and lining cement,GC America Inc.) and modified-resin cement (RelyXTMLuting2). Specimens were thermocycled for one month and were then removed along the path of insertion by using a Universal Testing Machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a p value of .05. The nature of failure was recorded and the data was analyzed by using Chi-square test. Results: Mean dislodgement stress for Zinc phosphate (Group A) was 24.55±1.0 KgF and that for zinc phosphate with sealer (Group D) was 14.65±0.8 KgF. For glass ionomer (Group B) without sealer, the mean value was 32.0±1.0 KgF and mean value for glass ionomer with sealer (Group E) was 37.90±1.0 KgF. The mean value for modified resin cement (Group C) was 44.3±1.0KgF and that for modified resins with sealer (Group F) was 57.2±1.2 KgF. The tooth failed before casting dislodgement in 8 to 10

  19. Biocompatibility of dental materials used in contemporary endodontic therapy: a review. Part 1. Intracanal drugs and substances.

    PubMed

    Hauman, C H J; Love, R M

    2003-02-01

    Irrigation solutions and intracanal medicaments are used within the root canal to clean and aid in disinfecting the dentinal walls. Although these materials are intended to be contained within the root canal, they invariably contact the periapical tissues, either through inadvertent extrusion through the apex or leaching. This paper is a review on the methodology involved in biocompatibility testing followed by a discussion on biocompatibility of contemporary intracanal drugs and substances used in endodontics. PMID:12657150

  20. Synthesis of poly(alkenoic acid) with L-leucine residue and methacrylate photopolymerizable groups useful in formulating dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Buruiana, Tinca; Nechifor, Marioara; Melinte, Violeta; Podasca, Viorica; Buruiana, Emil C

    2014-01-01

    To develop resin-modified glass ionomer materials, we synthesized methacrylate-functionalized acrylic copolymer (PAlk-LeuM) derived from acrylic acid, itaconic acid and N-acryloyl-L-leucine using (N-methacryloyloxyethylcarbamoyl-N'-4-hydroxybutyl) urea as the modifying agent. The spectroscopic (proton/carbon nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) characteristics, and the gel permeation chromatography/Brookfield viscosity measurements were analysed and compared with those of the non-modified copolymer (PAlk-Leu). The photocurable copolymer (PAlk-LeuM, ~14 mol% methacrylate groups) and its precursor (PAlk-Leu) were incorporated in dental ionomer compositions besides diglycidyl methacrylate of bisphenol A (Bis-GMA) or an analogue of Bis-GMA (Bis-GMA-1), triethylene glycol dimethacrylate and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The kinetic data obtained by photo-differential scanning calorimetry showed that both the degree of conversion (60.50-75.62%) and the polymerization rate (0.07-0.14 s(-1)) depend mainly on the amount of copolymer (40-50 wt.%), and conversions over 70% were attained in the formulations with 40 wt.% PAlk-LeuM. To formulate light-curable cements, each organic composition was mixed with filler (90 wt.% fluoroaluminosilicate/10 wt.% hydroxyapatite) into a 2.7:1 ratio (powder/liquid ratio). The light-cured specimens exhibited flexural strength (FS), compressive strength (CS) and diametral tensile strength (DTS) varying between 28.08 and 64.79 MPa (FS), 103.68-147.13 MPa (CS) and 16.89-31.87 MPa (DTS). The best values for FS, CS and DTS were found for the materials with the lowest amount of PAlk-LeuM. Other properties such as the surface hardness, water sorption/water solubility, surface morphology and fluorescence caused by adding the fluorescein monomer were also evaluated. PMID:24701975

  1. Use of a compact fiber optic spectrometer for spectral feedback during the laser ablation of dental hard tissues and restorative materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joyce Y.; Fan, Kenneth; Fried, Daniel

    2006-02-01

    One perceived disadvantage of caries removal using lasers is the loss of the tactile feedback associated with the handpiece. However, alternative methods of acoustic and optical feedback become available with the laser that can be exploited to provide information about the chemical composition of the material ablated, the ablation efficiency and rate, the depth of the incision, and the surface and plume temperature during ablation. Such information can be used to increase the selectivity of ablation, avoid peripheral thermal damage and excessive heat deposition in the tooth, and provide a mechanism of robotic automation. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that a compact fiberoptic spectrometer could be used to differentiate between the ablation of sound and carious enamel and dentin and between dental hard tissues and composite. Sound and carious tooth surfaces along with composite restorative materials were scanned with λ=0.355, 2.79 and 9.3 μm laser pulses at irradiation intensities ranging from 0.5-100 J/cm2 and spectra were acquired from λ=250-900-nm using a compact fiber-optic spectrometer. Emission spectra varied markedly with the laser wavelength and pulse duration. Optical feedback was not successful in differentiating between sound and carious enamel and dentin even with the addition of various chromophores to carious lesion areas. However, the spectral feedback was successfully used to differentiate between composites and sound enamel and dentin enabling the selective removal of composite from tooth surfaces using a computer controlled λ=9.3-μm pulsed CO II laser and scanning system.

  2. Comparative Evaluation of the Artefacts Index of Dental Materials on Two-Dimensional Cone-beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fusong; Chen, Litong; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to propose the artefact index on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of clinical prosthodontics materials, and to compare the effect of the artefacts on CBCT image clarity of normal oral tissues. Seven spheres of different materials were secured on the centre of a resin baseboard, respectively, and four human molars in vitro were placed at 10 mm front, back, left and right of the sphere. The board was scanned using CBCT with the same setting. 10 tomographic images from each of the seven data sets with clear artefacts was selected. The grayscale measuring tool of Photoshop software was used to measure the grayscale (G0) within the boundary of tomographic image and the grayscales of the streaky artefacts that were 1 mm and 20 mm outside the circular boundary (G1 and G2). The arc length, L1, of the circular boundary with artefacts was measured; the circumference, L2, was calculated. The artefact index, A, was determined as (G1/G0) × 0.5 + (G2/G1) × 0.4 + (L2/L1) × 0.1. The artefact index A can comprehensively represent the effect of artefacts on CBCT image clarity for oral tissue. PMID:27185627

  3. Application of reference point indentation for micro-mechanical surface characterization of calcium silicate based dental materials.

    PubMed

    Antonijević, Djordje; Milovanović, Petar; Riedel, Christoph; Hahn, Michael; Amling, Michael; Busse, Björn; Djurić, Marija

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate micromechanical properties of Biodentine and two experimental calcium silicate cements (CSCs) using Reference Point Indentation (RPI). Biomechanical characteristics of the cement type and the effects of a radiopacifier, liquid components, acid etching treatment and bioactivation in simulated body fluid (SBF) were investigated by measuring the microhardness, average unloading slope (Avg US) and indentation distance increase (IDI). Biodentine had a greater microhardness than the experimental CSCs, while the Avg US and IDI values were not significantly different among investigated materials. There was a statistically significant difference in microhardness and IDI values between pure CSCs and radiopacified cements (p < 0.05). Micromechanical properties were not affected by different liquid components used. Acid-etching treatment reduced Biodentine's microhardness while cements' immersion in SBF resulted in greater microhardness and higher IDI values compared to the control group. Clearly, the physiological environment and the cements' composition affect their surface micromechanical properties. The addition of calcium chloride and CSCs' immersion in SBF are beneficial for CSCs' micromechanical performance, while the addition of radiopacifiers and acid etching treatment weaken the CSCs' surface. Application of RPI aids with the characterization of micromechanical properties of synthetic materials' surfaces. PMID:26888441

  4. Comparative Evaluation of the Artefacts Index of Dental Materials on Two-Dimensional Cone-beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fusong; Chen, Litong; Wang, Xiaofei; Wang, Yong; Lyu, Peijun; Sun, Yuchun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to propose the artefact index on cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of clinical prosthodontics materials, and to compare the effect of the artefacts on CBCT image clarity of normal oral tissues. Seven spheres of different materials were secured on the centre of a resin baseboard, respectively, and four human molars in vitro were placed at 10 mm front, back, left and right of the sphere. The board was scanned using CBCT with the same setting. 10 tomographic images from each of the seven data sets with clear artefacts was selected. The grayscale measuring tool of Photoshop software was used to measure the grayscale (G0) within the boundary of tomographic image and the grayscales of the streaky artefacts that were 1 mm and 20 mm outside the circular boundary (G1 and G2). The arc length, L1, of the circular boundary with artefacts was measured; the circumference, L2, was calculated. The artefact index, A, was determined as (G1/G0) × 0.5 + (G2/G1) × 0.4 + (L2/L1) × 0.1. The artefact index A can comprehensively represent the effect of artefacts on CBCT image clarity for oral tissue. PMID:27185627

  5. [Biocompatibility of dental amalgam].

    PubMed

    Missias, P

    1990-10-01

    The purpose of the present review was to present a detailed description of those current scientific results and opinions relative to the biocompatibility of dental amalgam. The first section of the percent review to the pulpar reactions caused by amalgam fillings, especially when no protective base has been used, while the second part concerns itself with the biocompatibility of the dental amalgam per se. Specifically, reference is made to: a) the adverse reactions due to amalgam fillings both on the patient's physiological system and on the dentist's employing the material under consideration. b) those investigation results bearing a relation on the amount of mercury liberated during the amalgam filling procedures, i.e., mixing, condensation, finishing and polishing and/or removal of old amalgam fillings. c) Liberation of mercury, as well as metallic ions in the patients mouth cavity during chewing and/or during the process of intrabuccal galvanization and corrosion, and d) on the amount of mercury traced in the blood and urine of the patient following amalgam fillings. No conclusive evidence on any adverse reactions on the patient's health, attributable to the liberation of mercury from amalgam fillings, could be presented by the scientific investigations under consideration. Moreover, the number of cases reported on toxic reactions due to dental amalgam is negligible compared to the immense number of amalgam fillings performed in practice. It merits mentioning in this connection, however, the fact that the total amount of mercury attained by the patient from any other source, in conjunction with that liberated from amalgam fillings, could by all means contribute to a number of toxic reactions on the patient's health in general. Conclusively, one could state without reservations, that dental amalgam fillings per se are by and large free of toxic reactions on the patient, based on current scientific observations. Mentioning is finally made on several simple but

  6. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... child to bed with a bottle of milk, juice, or sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which are essential to overall good health. Poor dental development, dental disease, and dental trauma ...

  7. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  8. FTIR investigation of monomer polymerisation and polyacid neutralisation kinetics and mechanisms in various aesthetic dental restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Young, A M; Rafeeka, S A; Howlett, J A

    2004-02-01

    Diamond ATR FTIR has been used to quantify light catalysed polymerisation and polyacid neutralisation rates in various glass ionomer cements (GIC), resin-modified GICs (RMGIC) and compomers. At 150s after the start of light exposure, levels of methacrylate polymerisation on the lower surfaces of 1mm thick specimens were 97% and 98% for the RMGIC, Vitremer and Fuji II LC and 47% and 37% for the compomers, Compoglass and Dyract. After light exposure, polymerisation rates for the compomers decreased linearly with inverse time. By 50,000s Compoglass and Dyract were 62% and 51% polymerised. Initial rate of polyacid neutralisation in the GIC Shofu HIFI was 0.32 times that of Fuji IX GIC. Those in Vitremer, Fuji II LC, Compoglass and Dyract were 0.16, 0.09, 0.004 and 0.004 times that of Fuji IX. Excluding short initial periods, log of neutralisation rates decreased linearly with log-time. Average gradients were -1.35 for the GIC, -0.80 for the RMGIC and -0.59 for the compomers. By 50,000s, polyacid salt concentrations for the RMGIC and compomers were 0.41 and 0.016 times that of the GIC. Reaction mechanisms have been discussed and used to help interpret material mechanical properties, fluoride release rates and adhesion to tooth structure. PMID:14609671

  9. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  10. Dental stem cell patents.

    PubMed

    Morsczeck, Christian; Frerich, Bernhard; Driemel, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    A complex human tissue harbors stem cells that are responsible for its maintenance or repair. These stem cells have been isolated also from dental tissues such as the periodontal ligament, dental papilla or dental follicle and they may offer novel applications in dentistry. This following review summarizes patents about dental stem cells for dental tissue engineering and considers their value for regenerative dentistry. PMID:19149737

  11. Dental Office Procedures. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apfel, Maura; Weaver, Trudy Karlene

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains three units covering the following topics: ethics and jurisprudence; the appointment book; and…

  12. Gold color in dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Cameron, T

    1997-01-01

    This article will help the dental laboratory with alloy selection by exploring how the relationship among color, ductility and strength applies to gold and how color can be quantified. Because higher quality materials translate into higher profits, upselling to the dentist and patient is also discussed. PMID:9524484

  13. Optical approach in characterizing dental biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoli, Nazif; Vučić, Zlatko; Milat, Ognjen; Gladić, Jadranko; Lovrić, Davorin; Pandurić, Vlatko; Marović, Danijela; Moguš-Milanković, Andrea; Ristić, Mira; Čalogović, Marina; Tarle, Zrinka

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the current activities of a research collaborative program between three institutions from Zagreb (School of Dental Medicine, Institute of Physics, and Institute Ruđer Bo\\vsković). Within the scope of this program, it is planned to investigate and find guidelines for the refinement of the properties of dental biomaterials (DBs) and of procedures in restorative dental medicine. It is also planned to identify and model the dominant mechanisms which control polymerization of DBs. The materials to be investigated include methacrylate based composite resins, new composite materials with amorphous calcium phosphate, silorane based composite resins, glass-ionomer cements, and giomer.

  14. Comparing the effect of a resin based sealer on crown retention for three types of cements: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pankaj; Thummar, Mansukh; Shah, Dipti; Pitti, Varun

    2013-09-01

    To determine the effect of resin based sealer on retention of casting cemented with three different luting agents. 55 extracted molar teeth were prepared with a flat occlusal surface, 20° taper and 4 mm axial height. The axial surface of each specimen was determined. The specimen were then distributed into five groups based on decreasing surface area, so each cementation group contained 11 specimens with similar mean axial surface area. A two-step, single bottle universal adhesive system (One-Step-Resinomer, Bisco) was used to seal dentin after the tooth preparation. Sealer was not used on the control specimens except for the modified-resin cement (Resinomer, Bisco) specimens that required use of adhesive with cementation. Using ceramometal (Wirobond(®), BEGO), a casting was produced for each specimen and cemented with either zinc phosphate (Harvard), glass ionomer (Vivaglass) or modified resin cement (Resinomer) with single bottle adhesive. All the castings were cemented with a force of 20 kg. Castings were thermal cycled at 5 and 55 °C for 2,500 cycles and were then removed along the path of insertion using a universal testing machine at 0.5 mm/min. A single-factor ANOVA was used with a = 0.05. The nature of failure was also recorded. The mean stress removal for non sealed zinc phosphate, sealed zinc phosphate, non sealed glass ionomer, sealed glass ionomer and modified resin cement was found to be 3.56, 1.92, 2.40, 4.26, 6.95 MPa respectively. Zinc phosphate cement remained principally on the castings when the tooth surface was treated with the sealer and was found on both the tooth and the casting when the sealer was not used. Fracture of root before dislodgement was seen in 9 of 11 specimens with modified resin cement. Resin sealer decreases the retention of the castings when used with zinc phosphate and increases it when used with glass ionomer cement. The highest mean dislodgement force was measured with modified resin cement. PMID:24431752

  15. Flexural strength of dental composite restoratives: comparison of biaxial and three-point bending test.

    PubMed

    Chung, S M; Yap, A U J; Chandra, S P; Lim, C T

    2004-11-15

    This study compared two test methods used to evaluate the flexural strength of resin-based dental composites. The two test methods evaluated were the three-point bending test4 and the biaxial flexural test. Materials used in this investigation were from the same manufacturer (3M ESPE) and included microfill (A110), minifill (Z100 and Filtek Z250), polyacid modified (F2000), and flowable [Filtek Flowable (FF)] composites. Flexural strength was determined with the use of both test methods after 1 week of conditioning in water at 37 degrees C. Data were analyzed with the use of an ANOVA/Scheffe test and an independent-samples t test at significance level 0.05. Mean flexural strength (n = 7) ranged from 66.61 to 147.21 and 67.27 to 182.81 MPa for three-point bending and ball-on-three-ball biaxial test methods, respectively. In both test methods, Z100 was significantly stronger than all other composites evaluated. In the three-point bending test, flexural strength of Z250 was significantly higher than A110, F2000 and FF, and FF was significantly stronger than A110 and F2000. The biaxial test method arrived at the same conclusions except that there was no significant difference between Z250 and FF. Pearson's correlation revealed a significantly (p < 0.01) positive and good correlation (R2 = 0.72) in flexural strength between the two test methods. Although the biaxial test has the advantage of utilizing small specimens, the low reproducibility of this test method does not support the proposition that it is a more reliable test method when compared to the ISO three-point bending test. PMID:15386492

  16. Comparison of the effect of shear bond strength with silane and other three chemical presurface treatments of a glass fiber-reinforced post on adhesion with a resin-based luting agent: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Belwalkar, Vaibhavi Ramkrishna; Gade, Jaykumar; Mankar, Nikhil Purushottam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Loss of retention has been cited to be the most common cause of the failure of postretained restoration with irreversible consequences when materials with different compositions are in intimate contact at the post/adhesive interface. With this background, a study was conducted to improve the adhesion at the resin phase of fiber posts using silane and other chemical pretreatments. Materials and Methods: Hundred glass fiber-reinforced posts were tested with 4 different protocols (n = 25) using silane as a control (Group A) and other three experimental groups, namely, Group B-20% potassium permanganate, Group C-4% hydrofluoric acid, and Group D-10% hydrogen peroxide were pretreated on the postsurface followed by silanization. These specimens were bonded with dual-polymerizing resin-based luting agent, which were then loaded at the crosshead speed of 1 mm/min to record the shear bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test for multiple group comparisons and the post hoc Bonferroni test for pairwise comparisons (P < 0.05). Results: Group B showed more influence on the shear bond strength when compared to other protocols, respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Alone silanization as a surface treatment did not improve the bond strength. Combination of chemical presurface treatments followed by silanization significantly enhanced the bond strength at the post/adhesive interface. PMID:27307666

  17. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  18. The dental amalgam controversy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Feuer, George; Injeyan, H Stephen

    1996-01-01

    In spite of the long history of mercury amalgam as a dental restorative material, its use continues to be controversial. Mercury vapour is continuously released from dental amalgam and is ultimately absorbed into a variety of tissues. Experimental data have demonstrated that the uptake, tissue retention and excretion of mercury from dental amalgam is significant. Evidence has accumulated indicating a relationship between tissue mercury levels and a multitude of clinical manifestations. However, the clinical significance of mercury toxicity from dental amalgams is a matter for debate. The literature is devoid of randomized clinical trials that are rigorously designed to address this issue. Thus, although research data renders the notion of amalgam safety questionable, the dental community appears determined to continue its use as long as unequivocal evidence correlating amalgam mercury toxicity to specific clinical conditions is lacking.

  19. Zirconia in dental implantology: A review

    PubMed Central

    Apratim, Abhishek; Eachempati, Prashanti; Krishnappa Salian, Kiran Kumar; Singh, Vijendra; Chhabra, Saurabh; Shah, Sanket

    2015-01-01

    Background: Titanium has been the most popular material of choice for dental implantology over the past few decades. Its properties have been found to be most suitable for the success of implant treatment. But recently, zirconia is slowly emerging as one of the materials which might replace the gold standard of dental implant, i.e., titanium. Materials and Methods: Literature was searched to retrieve information about zirconia dental implant and studies were critically analyzed. PubMed database was searched for information about zirconia dental implant regarding mechanical properties, osseointegration, surface roughness, biocompatibility, and soft tissue health around it. The literature search was limited to English language articles published from 1975 to 2015. Results: A total of 45 papers met the inclusion criteria for this review, among the relevant search in the database. Conclusion: Literature search showed that some of the properties of zirconia seem to be suitable for making it an ideal dental implant, such as biocompatibility, osseointegration, favourable soft tissue response and aesthetics due to light transmission and its color. At the same time, some studies also point out its drawbacks. It was also found that most of the studies on zirconia dental implants are short-term studies and there is a need for more long-term clinical trials to prove that zirconia is worth enough to replace titanium as a biomaterial in dental implantology. PMID:26236672

  20. [Dental records and responsibility].

    PubMed

    Brands, W G

    2006-03-01

    Dental records are more than a small part of the bookkeeping. In most dental practises, keeping records is the task of a dental assistant. In civil court, the dentist is in most countries liable for the mistakes of his employees. In disciplinary court however there may be doubt whether the dentist is responsible for the mistakes of his assistant. Contrary to their American colleagues, Dutch dental assistants and dental hygienists cannot be summoned before a disciplinary court. As these para-medics perform more and more dental treatment, independently or after delegation, they should be assigned there own disciplinary responsibility. PMID:16566401

  1. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  2. Dental cavities

    MedlinePlus

    ... it with a material such as silver alloy, gold, porcelain, or composite resin. Porcelain and composite resin ... teeth. Many dentists consider silver amalgam (alloy) and gold to be stronger, and these materials are often ...

  3. The Dental Solid Waste Management in Different Categories of Dental Laboratories in Abha City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Qahtani, Ali S.; Al-Qarni, Marie M.; Al-Homrany, Rami M.; Aboalkhair, Ayyob E.; Madalakote, Sujatha S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the awareness, attitude, practice and facilities among the different categories of dental laboratories in Abha city. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 dental technicians were surveyed in the study. The dental laboratories included in the study were teaching institute (Group I), Government Hospital (Group II), Private Dental Clinic (Group III) and Independent laboratory (Group IV). The pre-tested anonymous questionnaire was used to understand knowledge, attitude, facilities, practice and orientation regarding biomedical waste management. Results: The knowledge of biomedical waste categories, colour coding and segregation was better among Group I (55-65%) and Group II (65-75%). The lowest standard of waste disposal was practiced at Group IV (15-20%) and Group III (25-35%). The availability of disposal facilities was poor at Group IV. The continuous education on biomedical waste management lacked in all the Groups. Conclusion: The significant improvement in disposal facilities was required at Group III and Group IV laboratories. All dental technicians were in need of regular training of biomedical waste management. Clinical Significance: The dental laboratories are an integral part of dental practice. The dental laboratories are actively involved in the generation, handling and disposal of biomedical waste. Hence, it is important to assess the biomedical waste management knowledge, attitude, facilities and practice among different categories of dental laboratories. PMID:26962373

  4. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some are: Bitewing Periapical Palatal (also called occlusal) ...

  5. Dental education in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Masuoka, David; Komabayashi, Takashi; Reyes-Vela, Enrique

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to provide information about dental education in Mexico, including its history, the dental school system, curriculum and dental licensure. In 1977, there were only 59 Mexican dental schools; however, there were 83 schools registered in the last official national count in 2007. Forty-one dental schools are public, and the other 42 are private. Every year the number of private dental schools increases. Admission to dental schools in Mexico requires a high school diploma. All classes are conducted in Spanish. To obtain licensure in Mexico, dental students must complete a 3 to 5-year program plus a year of community service. No formal nationwide standard clinical/didactic curriculum exists in Mexico. There are approximately 153,000 dentists in Mexico, a number that increases each year. The dentist-patient ratio is approximately 1:700. However, the high percentage of inactive licensed dentists in Mexico points to a serious problem. PMID:24984634

  6. Dental education in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Komabayashi, Takashi; Razak, Abdul Aziz Abdul; Bird, William F

    2007-12-01

    There was only one dental school in Malaysia until 1997 but five new schools have been established since 1998. This review provides information about dental education in Malaysia including; the history of dental education, the current dental school system and curriculum, and dental licensure. There are four public and two private dental schools in Malaysia. High school graduates are required to take the nationwide matriculation entrance examination or the Higher School Certificate (HSC) to apply for a dental degree programme. A five-year dental programme leads to the BDS or the DDS degree. National or state examinations are not required to practise dentistry. Currently, there are approximately 2,500 dentists, with a ratio of 1 dentist for every 10,000 people. PMID:18265775

  7. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... work hard to help your students fulfill their dreams, and play a crucial... Learn more Dental School ... Terms of Use | Website Feedback | Website Help ©2016 American Dental Education Association® (ADEA), 655 K Street, NW, ...

  8. Dental unit waterlines disinfection using hypochlorous acid-based disinfectant

    PubMed Central

    Shajahan, Irfana Fathima; Kandaswamy, D; Srikanth, Padma; Narayana, L Lakshmi; Selvarajan, R

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the efficacy of a new disinfectant to disinfect the dental unit waterlines. Materials and Methods: New dental unit waterlines were installed in 13 dental chairs, and biofilm was allowed to grow for 10 days. Disinfection treatment procedure was carried out in the 12 units, and one unit was left untreated. The dental unit waterlines were removed and analyzed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) (TESCAN VEGA3 SBU). Result: On examination, SEM images showed that there was no slime layer or bacterial cells seen in any of the 12 cut sections obtained from the treated dental waterlines which mean that there was no evident of biofilm formation. Untreated dental unit waterlines showed a microbial colonization with continuous filamentous organic matrix. There was significant biofilm formation in the control tube relative to the samples. Conclusion: The tested disinfectant was found to be effective in the removal of biofilm from the dental unit waterlines. PMID:27563184

  9. Contemporary methacrylate resin-based root canal sealers exhibit different degrees of ex vivo cytotoxicity when cured in their self-cured mode.

    PubMed

    Ames, Jason M; Loushine, Robert J; Babb, Brian R; Bryan, Thomas E; Lockwood, Petra E; Sui, Mai; Roberts, Steven; Weller, R Norman; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2009-02-01

    The cytotoxicity of four methacrylate resin-based sealers was investigated by the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay, which measures cell viability by assessing its succinate dehydrogenase activity. The sealers were polymerized in the self-cured mode to simulate the setting condition upon their extrusion into periradicular tissues. Disks were prepared from EndoREZ (Ultradent, South Jordan, UT), RealSeal (SybronEndo, Orange, CA), MetaSEAL (Parkell, Farmington, NY), and RealSeal SE (SybronEndo) together with positive and negative controls. After setting, they were placed in direct contact with rat osteosarcoma (ROS 17/2.8) cells and for 5 succeeding weeks after immersing in simulated body fluid (SBF). All sealers exhibited severe toxicity initially (week 0). EndoREZ and RealSeal remained severely toxic after five cycles of SBF immersion. Toxicity of the two self-etching resin-based sealers MetaSEAL and RealSeal SE decreased gradually over time. Transmission electron microscopy of cells exposed to RealSeal SE showed variable degrees of cell injury that reflect its toxicity status. Cells with intact mitochondria were identifiable after the sealer became noncytotoxic at week 5. PMID:19166778

  10. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  11. Perspectives from Dental Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Bruce J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper responds to the Institute of Medicine's 1995 report concerning the present status and future needs of dental education in the United States. It examines whether real reform is occurring at the National Institute of Dental Research, within the academic dental community, and within the practicing profession. It concludes that very little…

  12. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  13. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  14. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  15. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  16. Patients awareness and attitude towards dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kohli, Shivani; Bhatia, Shekhar; Kaur, Arvinder; Rathakrishnan, Tiviya

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to assess the awareness of the patients regarding implant-retained prosthesis as an option for tooth replacement and the knowledge about tooth replacement as a whole including source of information and attitude towards it amongst Malaysian population. Materials and Methods: Information on demographic characteristics, knowledge about implant as an option for missing tooth replacement, source of information and knowledge about other options of tooth replacement were obtained from patients visiting various dental outpatient departments of hospital and private dental clinics using nationwide self-explanatory survey. Results: Amongst the 1013 response retrieved, 27% of respondents felt moderately well informed about the dental implant treatment. Only 9% of the respondents had dental implant treatment before and 17% felt well informed about different alternatives of replacing missing teeth. The dentists were the main source of information regarding dental implant treatment modality followed by friends and electronic media. 55.6% respondents felt implant to be as good as own teeth during function whereas high cost was the major limiting factor for implant treatment. Conclusion: 56% of Malaysian population was aware of dental implant as an alternative for replacing missing teeth. Necessary efforts and measures should be made to raise the awareness of dental implant treatment in the country. PMID:26752875

  17. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  18. An Instructional Resource Center in a Senior Dental Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrong, Joseph M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Development of an instructional materials center and self-instructional materials on clinical dental procedures is described. The center is located near students' operatories and the student-tested programs were developed cost-effectively and relatively quickly. (MSE)

  19. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  20. Dental Anxiety Among Adults: An Epidemiological Study in South India

    PubMed Central

    Appukuttan, Devapriya; Subramanian, Sangeetha; Tadepalli, Anupama; Damodaran, Lokesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dental anxiety is a major barrier for dental care utilization. Hence, identifying anxious individuals and their appropriate management becomes crucial in clinical practice. Aim: The study aims to assess dental anxiety, factors influencing dental anxiety, and anxiety towards tooth extraction procedure among patients attending a dental hospital in India. Materials and Methods: The study sample consisted of 1,148 consecutive patients aged 18-70 years. The assessment tools consisted of a consent form, history form, a questionnaire form containing the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) which was used to assess the level of dental anxiety, and an additional question on anxiety towards dental extraction procedure. Results: Among the study group, 63.7% were men and 36.3% were women. Based on the MDAS score, 45.2% of the participants were identified to be less anxious, 51.8% were moderately or extremely anxious, and 3% were suffering from dental phobia. Mean MDAS total score was 10.4 (standard deviation (SD) = 3.91). Female participants and younger subjects were more anxious (P < 0.001). Subjects who were anxious had postponed their dental visit (P < 0.001). Participants who had negative dental experience were more anxious (P < 0.05). Notably, 82.6% reported anxiety towards extraction procedure. Significant association was seen between anxiety towards extraction procedure and the respondents gender (P < 0.05), age (P < 0.001), education level (P < 0.05), employment status (P < 0.001), income (P < 0.001), self-perceived oral health status (P < 0.05), and their history of visit to dentist (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Significant percentage of population was suffering from dental anxiety in this study population. A plethora of factors like age, gender, education level, occupation, financial stability, and previous bad dental experience influences dental anxiety to various levels. Extraction followed by drilling of tooth and receiving local anesthetic injection

  1. Bone manipulation procedures in dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Yuvika; Jindal, Govind; Garg, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The use of dental implants for the rehabilitation of missing teeth has broadened the treatment options for patients and clinicians equally. As a result of advances in research in implant design, materials, and techniques, the use of dental implants has increased dramatically in the past two decades and is expected to expand further in the future. Success of dental implants depends largely on the quality and quantity of the available bone in the recipient site. This however may be compromised or unavailable due to tumor, trauma, periodontal disease, etc., which in turn necessitates the need for additional bone manipulation. This review outlines the various bone manipulation techniques that are used to achieve a predictable long-term success of dental implants. PMID:27433052

  2. Usefulness of an energy-binned photon-counting x-ray detector for dental panoramic radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Tatsumasa; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Ogawa, Koichi; Fujiwara, Shuu

    2015-03-01

    A newly developed dental panoramic radiography system is equipped with a photon-counting semiconductor detector. This photon-counting detector acquires transparent X-ray beams by dividing them into several energy bands. We developed a method to identify dental materials in the patient's teeth by means of the X-ray energy analysis of panoramic radiographs. We tested various dental materials including gold alloy, dental amalgam, dental cement, and titanium. The results of this study suggest that X-ray energy scattergram analysis could be used to identify a range of dental materials in a patient's panoramic radiograph.

  3. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental laboratories (labside solution) and dental production centers. This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dental technicians understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. The technical and economic criteria are described for four labside and two production center dental NC milling machines available on the market. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of milling machines to mill prosthetic materials and various restoration shapes. The economic criteria are focused on investment cost and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is discussed through the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. It can be asserted that dental production center milling machines offer a wider range of materials and types of restoration shapes than labside solutions, while labside solutions offer a wider range than chairside solutions. The accuracy and integrity of restorations may be improved as a function of the embedded technologies provided. However, the more complex the technical solutions available, the more skilled the user must be. Investment cost and interoperability with third-party software increase according to the quality of the embedded technologies implemented. Each private dental practice may decide which fabrication option to use depending on the scope of the practice. PMID:27274561

  4. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  5. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  6. Dental fillings in Civil War skulls: what do they tell us?

    PubMed

    Glenner, R A; Willey, P; Sledzik, P S; Junger, E P

    1996-11-01

    This article discusses the dental techniques, methods and materials used in the South during the Civil War based on the dental restorations found in the skulls of four confederate soldiers. The skulls display a variety of dental filling materials, including thorium, lead, tin and tin amalgam. These materials were used at a time when more valuable materials, such as gold and silver, were not readily available in the South. PMID:8952248

  7. The Influence of Dentist and Nondentist Parents on Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Elaine; And Others

    1983-01-01

    A study supported three hypotheses, that students with dentist parents: (1) receive greater reinforcement of their education; (2) interact more with their parents on dentally related material; and (3) perceive greater well-being during their dental school years. A fourth hypothesis, that students with dentist parents earn better grades, was not…

  8. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3640 - Endosseous dental implant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... An endosseous dental implant is a device made of a material such as titanium or titanium alloy, that...) Classification. (1) Class II (special controls). The device is classified as class II if it is a root-form... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Root-Form Endosseous Dental Implants and Endosseous...

  10. Curriculum Development of Learning Activity Packets, Dental Assisting Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hempler, Nancy A.

    A dental assisting instructor was provided with 250 hours of released time to develop standardized Learning Activity Packets (LAPs) for the Dental Assisting program at the Bellingham (Washington) Vocational Technical Institute. The instructor reviewed unit objectives, gathered input from local dental professionals, reviewed reference materials,…

  11. Preparation and characterization of sizable macroporous epoxy resin-based monolithic supports for flow-through systems.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh Mai; Dinh, Ngoc Phuoc; Cam, Quach Minh; Sparrman, Tobias; Irgum, Knut

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents further results from our efforts to prepare sizable macroporous monolithic materials from epoxy resins and polyamines by emulsion polymerization. For their uses as supports in flow systems, the study aimed at developing materials possessing maximum fluid permeability, high mechanical stability, and a controlled porosity and surface area. Characterization of the materials has been carried out using different techniques, focusing on morphological and mechanical features, and on the surface chemistry. Morphology and porosity were studied with SEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), and (2)H NMR cryoporosimetry. The chemical composition of the bulk structures and their surfaces was studied by means of bulk elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and potentiometric titration was used to assess the relative amounts of amines and epoxy groups. Essentially, the morphological features were a high fluid permeability, but rather low specific surface area. Convective flow was facilitated by large, interconnected, and evenly spaced macropores which were formed by nonporous skeletons of the connected-rod type. Despite the interfacial nature of the polymerization, the bulk and the surface of the fully cured materials showed similar elemental compositions. All materials were found to have a high surface density of hydroxyl groups, which facilitates functionalization reactions. PMID:19670275

  12. Techniques for dental implant nanosurface modifications

    PubMed Central

    Bathala, Lakshmana Rao; Sangur, Rajashekar

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Dental implant has gained clinical success over last decade with the major drawback related to osseointegration as properties of metal (Titanium) are different from human bone. Currently implant procedures include endosseous type of dental implants with nanoscale surface characteristics. The objective of this review article is to summarize the role of nanotopography on titanium dental implant surfaces in order to improve osseointegration and various techniques that can generate nanoscale topographic features to titanium implants. MATERIALS AND METHODS A systematic electronic search of English language peer reviewed dental literature was performed for articles published between December 1987 to January 2012. Search was conducted in Medline, PubMed and Google scholar supplemented by hand searching of selected journals. 101 articles were assigned to full text analysis. Articles were selected according to inclusion and exclusion criterion. All articles were screened according to inclusion standard. 39 articles were included in the analysis. RESULTS Out of 39 studies, seven studies demonstrated that bone implant contact increases with increase in surface roughness. Five studies showed comparative evaluation of techniques producing microtopography and nanotopography. Eight studies concluded that osteoblasts preferably adhere to nano structure as compared to smooth surface. Six studies illustrated that nanotopography modify implant surface and their properties. Thirteen studies described techniques to produce nano roughness. CONCLUSION Modification of dental osseous implants at nanoscale level produced by various techniques can alter biological responses that may improve osseointegration and dental implant procedures. PMID:25558347

  13. Holography And Holometry Applications In Dental Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenborg, George C.

    1987-06-01

    The earliest reference to holographic applications appeared in the dental literature in 1972 when Wictorin, Bjelkhagen and Abramson described a method to study elastic deformation of defective gold solder joints in simulated fixed bridges. Their paper, published in the Swedish dental literature, offered a concise presentation of the interferometry technique which led to the development of other research applications of holographic interferometry(holometry) in dentistry. In this presentation, the development and application of the interferometry technique in the dental field will be discussed. Various interesting and potentially useful applications of holography have appeared in the dental literature over the past decade. Some of these, which will be discussed, include the use of holograms as a storage medium for dental study models, multiplexing of computer(CT) scan sections to form white light viewable holograms and the potential application of holographic training aids in the teaching of the basic courses of dental anatomy and restorative dentistry. In addition, some unique related applications will be mentioned including a laser reflection method for accurate non-contact measurement of tooth mobility/movement and a technique for contour mapping of occlusal surfaces to measure wear of restorative materials.

  14. Reversal of dental fluorosis: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Dhaval N.; Shah, Jigna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical reversal of dental fluorosis with various combinations of calcium, vitamin D3, and ascorbic acid, along with changes in levels of certain biochemical parameters concerned with dental fluorosis. The role of fluoride level of drinking water in the etiology of dental fluorosis and the prevalence of dental fluorosis in both dentitions and teeth were also assessed. Materials and Methods: A total number of 50 patients with clinical features of dental fluorosis without trauma and any adverse habits were selected. Of these, in 30 co-operative patients, estimation of water fluoride level and pretreatment and post-treatment serum and urine fluoride levels were done with ion selective electrode method. The selected 30 patients were divided into three groups, that is, group A, group B, and group C, and were given various combinations of medications like calcium with vitamin D3 supplements, ascorbic acid with vitamin D3 supplements, and chlorhexidine mouthwash (placebo) for three months, respectively. These 30 patients were assessed for any change in the clinical grading of dental fluorosis. Results: No change in clinical grading of dental fluorosis was noted. Considerable reduction in serum and urine fluoride levels was noted in both group A and group B patients. Dental fluorosis was noted in permanent teeth more commonly than deciduous teeth, and permanent maxillary central incisors had the highest prevalence rate. Conclusion: This study comprises only 30 patients with three months of follow-up. So, this sample of patients and duration of follow-up period are conclusive to observe changes in biochemical parameters but not sufficient to observe changes in clinical grading. PMID:23633850

  15. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  16. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  17. [Prosthetic dental alloys. 1].

    PubMed

    Quintero Engelmbright, M A

    1990-11-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132464

  18. [Prosthetic dental alloys (2)].

    PubMed

    Quintero Englembright, M A

    1990-12-01

    A wide variety of restoration materials for prosthetic odontology is now available to the dental surgeon, either of the covalent type (acrylic resins), metallic (alloys), ionic (porcelains), or a combination of them, as in the so-called composites, such as the composite resins, or as ceramics-metals mixtures. An example of the latter is a product called Miracle-Mix, a glass ionomere cement reinforced with an amalgam alloy. In those cases where the blend is done by a synterization process, the material is called Cermet. The above-listed alternatives clearly evidence day-to-day advances in odontology, with researchers and manufacturers engaged the world over in improving existing products or developing new ones to enrich the dentist's armamentarium. As a side effect of this constant renewal, those dentists who have failed to update their knowledge fall behind in their practice as they persist in using products they have known for years, and may be deceived by advertisements of too-often unreliable products. It is, therefore, important to be aware of available products and their latest improvements. PMID:2132470

  19. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  20. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  1. Release and toxicity of dental resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Saurabh K.; Saxena, Payal; Pant, Vandana A.; Pant, Aditya B.

    2012-01-01

    Dental resin composite that are tooth-colored materials have been considered as possible substitutes to mercury-containing silver amalgam filling. Despite the fact that dental resin composites have improved their physico-chemical properties, the concern for its intrinsic toxicity remains high. Some components of restorative composite resins are released in the oral environment initially during polymerization reaction and later due to degradation of the material. In vitro and in vivo studies have clearly identified that these components of restorative composite resins are toxic. But there is a large gap between the results published by research laboratories and clinical reports. The objective of this manuscript was to review the literature on release phenomenon as well as in vitro and in vivo toxicity of dental resin composite. Interpretation made from the recent data was also outlined. PMID:23293458

  2. Dental Fear Among University Employees: Implications for Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaakko, Tarja; Milgrom, Peter; Coldwell, Susan E.; Getz, Tracy; Weinstein, Philip; Ramsay, Douglas S.

    1998-01-01

    A survey of 270 University of Washington permanent employees who were potential candidates for teaching clinics, found dental anxiety prevalent, correlating with poorer perceived dental health, longer intervals between dental appointments, higher frequency of past fear behaviors, more physical symptoms during last dental injection, and more…

  3. Online directed journaling in dental hygiene clinical education.

    PubMed

    Gwozdek, Anne E; Klausner, Christine P; Kerschbaum, Wendy E

    2009-01-01

    Reflecting upon and sharing of clinical experiences in dental hygiene education is a strategy used to support the application of didactic material to patient care. The promotion of interactive, clinically focused discussions creates opportunities for students to foster critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene practice. Twenty-eight dental hygiene students in their first semester of patient care utilized online directed journaling via blogging software, as a reflection and sharing strategy. Journal entries found critical thinking and socialization themes including connection of didactic material to clinical experience, student-patient interaction, student-student collaboration, and a vision of the professional role of the dental hygienist. A 7 item evaluation instrument provided data that the online journaling strategy was perceived as effective and valuable by the students. Online directed journaling is a strategy that has the potential to enhance critical thinking and socialization skills in dental hygiene clinical education. PMID:19370811

  4. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  5. Composition of Mineral Produced by Dental Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Volponi, A.A.; Gentleman, E.; Fatscher, R.; Pang, Y.W.Y.; Gentleman, M.M.; Sharpe, P.T.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells isolated from different dental tissues have been described to have osteogenic/odontogenic-like differentiation capacity, but little attention has been paid to the biochemical composition of the material that each produces. Here, we used Raman spectroscopy to analyze the mineralized materials produced in vitro by different dental cell populations, and we compared them with the biochemical composition of native dental tissues. We show that different dental stem cell populations produce materials that differ in their mineral and matrix composition and that these differ from those of native dental tissues. In vitro, BCMP (bone chip mass population), SCAP (stem cells from apical papilla), and SHED (stem cells from human-exfoliated deciduous teeth) cells produce a more highly mineralized matrix when compared with that produced by PDL (periodontal ligament), DPA (dental pulp adult), and GF (gingival fibroblast) cells. Principal component analyses of Raman spectra further demonstrated that the crystallinity and carbonate substitution environments in the material produced by each cell type varied, with DPA cells, for example, producing a more carbonate-substituted mineral and with SCAP, SHED, and GF cells creating a less crystalline material when compared with other dental stem cells and native tissues. These variations in mineral composition reveal intrinsic differences in the various cell populations, which may in turn affect their specific clinical applications. PMID:26253190

  6. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  7. Colorless and high strength MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 glass-ceramic dental material using zirconia as nucleating agent.

    PubMed

    Dittmer, Marc; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-02-01

    Glasses in the system of MgO/Al2 O3 /SiO2 with different concentrations of zirconia as nucleating agent, some of them additionally doped with ZnO or P2 O5 , were annealed in a temperature range from 950 to 1150°C. The use of zirconia led to colorless glass-ceramics, which were transparent to opaque. In all studied compositions, α-/β-quartz-solid-solutions, zirconia as well as spinel or gahnite (ZnAl2 O4 )/spinel-solid-solution precipitated. The highest bending strength of 475 MPa was obtained after annealing at 1000°C for 3 h. The increase of the annealing temperature or an increase in the zirconia concentration resulted in an increase of the microhardness up to 13.3 GPa and of the fracture toughness up to 2.7 MPa m(1/2) . The addition of ZnO results in an increase of the hardness up to 12.5 GPa. The addition of ZnO or P2 O5 led to a fracture toughness of 2 MPa m(1/2) . The described physical properties had to be highly advantageous for the preparation of colorless high strength dental glass-ceramics. PMID:22102399

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ion-imprinted resin based on carboxymethyl cellulose for selective removal of UO₂²⁺.

    PubMed

    Monier, M; Abdel-Latif, D A

    2013-09-12

    In this work, the surface ion-imprinting technique was employed for the preparation of surface ion-imprinted chelating microspheres resin based on modified salicylaldehyde-carboxymethyl cellulose (U-CMC-SAL) in presence of uranyl ions as a template and formaldehyde as a cross-linker. Various instrumental techniques such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR and X-ray diffraction spectra were utilized for full characterization of the prepared polymeric samples. The prepared resin exhibited a higher capability for selective removal of UO₂²⁺ when compared to the non-imprinted resin (N-CMC-SAL). Also, different important parameters such as pH, temperature, time and initial metal ion concentration were examined in order to evaluate the optimum condition for the adsorption process. The results indicated that pH 5 was the best for the UO₂²⁺ uptake, in addition, the adsorption was exothermic in nature, follows the second-order kinetics and the adsorption isotherm showed the best fit with Langmuir isotherm model with maximum adsorption capacity of 180 ± 1 and 97 ± 1 mg/g for both U-CMC-SAL and N-CMC-SAL respectively. Desorption and regeneration were carried out using 0.5M HNO3 solution and the results confirmed that the resin keeps about 92% of its original efficiency after five consecutive adsorption-desorption operations. PMID:23911510

  9. Infection control practices for dental radiography.

    PubMed

    Palenik, Charles John

    2004-06-01

    Infection control for dental radiography employs the same materials, processes, and techniques used in the operatory, yet unless proper procedures are established and followed, there is a definite potential for cross-contamination to clinical area surfaces and DHCP. In general, the aseptic practices used are relatively simple and inexpensive, yet they require complete application in every situation. PMID:15218669

  10. Silver Nanoparticles in Dental Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, Juliana Mattos; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Sanches, Heloísa Lajas; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; Poiate, Isis Andréa Venturini Pola

    2015-01-01

    Silver has been used in medicine for centuries because of its antimicrobial properties. More recently, silver nanoparticles have been synthesized and incorporated into several biomaterials, since their small size provides great antimicrobial effect, at low filler level. Hence, these nanoparticles have been applied in dentistry, in order to prevent or reduce biofilm formation over dental materials surfaces. This review aims to discuss the current progress in this field, highlighting aspects regarding silver nanoparticles incorporation, such as antimicrobial potential, mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and long-term effectiveness. We also emphasize the need for more studies to determine the optimal concentration of silver nanoparticle and its release over time. PMID:25667594

  11. Dental Charting. Learning Activities, Unit Tests, Progress Chart, and Work Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Univ., Austin. Center for Occupational Curriculum Development.

    These materials are part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. These student materials, designed to be used with the Dental Charting Student Manual, consist of learning activities, unit…

  12. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  13. Foreign body ingestion during dental implant procedures.

    PubMed

    Santos, Thiago de Santana; Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; Vajgel, André; Cavalcanti, Thames Bruno Barbosa; Nogueira, Luiz Ricardo Gomes de Caldas; Laureano Filho, José Rodrigues

    2012-03-01

    Two cases of swallowing of foreign material related to dental implants during dental practice are described. A conservative approach by clinical-radiographic follow-up was performed in both cases; however, one of the patients required colonoscopy under general anesthesia for the removal of the impacted foreign body from the intestinal region. These complications not only have associated economic cost but also carry the risk of malpractice litigation against the professional; thus, the surgeon was responsible for all the costs of hospital and surgery management of this case. Details of the clinical signs, radiographic examinations, type of treatment, and follow-up are presented. PMID:22446442

  14. Prototyping of Dental Structures Using Laser Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. O.; Kosenko, M. S.; Petrovskiy, V. N.; Mironov, V. D.

    2016-02-01

    The results of experimental studies of the effect of an ytterbium fiber laser radiation parameters on processing efficiency and quality of ZrO2 ceramics widely used in stomatology are presented. Laser operating conditions with optimum characteristics for obtaining high quality final surfaces and rapid material removal of dental structures are determined. The ability of forming thin-walled ceramic structures by laser milling technology (a minimum wall thickness of 50 μm) is demonstrated. The examples of three-dimensional dental structures created in computer 3D-models of human teeth using laser milling are shown.

  15. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  16. Diagnostic imaging for dental implant therapy.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  17. Application of color image processing and low-coherent optical computer tomography in evaluation of adhesive interfaces of dental restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessudnova, Nadezda O.; Shlyapnikova, Olga A.; Venig, Sergey B.; Genina, Elina A.; Sadovnikov, Alexandr V.

    2015-03-01

    Durability of bonded interfaces between dentin and a polymer material in resin-based composite restorations remains a clinical dentistry challenge. In the present study the evolution of bonded interfaces in biological active environment is estimated in vivo. A novel in vivo method of visual diagnostics that involves digital processing of color images of composite restorations and allows the evaluation of adhesive interface quality over time, has been developed and tested on a group of volunteers. However, the application of the method is limited to the analysis of superficial adhesive interfaces. Low-coherent optical computer tomography (OCT) has been tested as a powerful non-invasive tool for in vivo, in situ clinical diagnostics of adhesive interfaces over time. In the long-term perspective adhesive interface monitoring using standard methods of clinical diagnostics along with colour image analysis and OCT could make it possible to objectivise and prognosticate the clinical longevity of composite resin-based restorations with adhesive interfaces.

  18. Dental Caries and Periodontal Status of Mentally Handicapped Institutilized Children

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sarika; Arya, Astha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental caries and periodontal disease are the most prevalent dental disease among mentally retarded children worldwide. Aims and Objectives: A study was carried out in Jodhpur city of Rajasthan state of India to assess the Dental caries and periodontal Status of Mentally handicapped attending special schools children in Jodhpur city. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in 80 mentally handicapped subjects, attending a Special Needs school in Jodhpur City. Dental caries and Periodontal Status were recorded following the WHO basic oral health survey. Results: None of the subject had healthy periodontal status, dental caries was found in 79.2% of the subjects, Lymphadenopathy was observed in highest number of subjects 55 (76.3%). Conclusion: Health professionals should therefore be aware of the impact of mental illness and its treatment on oral health, Health personnel should receive training to support and provide all possible services to this population. PMID:25177632

  19. The impact of dental phobia on patient consent.

    PubMed

    Muschik, S; Kallow, J

    2015-08-28

    Dental anxiety is prevalent across a broad spectrum of the population. Dental phobia is extreme dental fear, which interferes with normal functioning. For any dental treatment, it is an ethical, legal and professional duty of dentists to obtain valid informed consent from their patients. The question arises as to how dental phobia impacts on patients' ability to give valid informed consent. Extreme fear may impair patient ability to understand information about the procedure, their capacity to make balanced decisions, and to make these decisions voluntarily. A trusting rapport between dentist and patient, supporting patient understanding by providing useful information material, and keeping regular appointments, may help overcome these obstacles. Other factors impacting on the informed consent process are institutional in nature. Implementing ways to overcome these is part of the dentist's duty to obtain valid consent. PMID:26315183

  20. Bisphenol A in dental sealants and its estrogen like effect

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Malik, Poonam; Singh, Jyotirmay

    2012-01-01

    Bisphenol A or BPA-based epoxy resins are widely used in the manufacture of commercial products, including dental resins, polycarbonate plastics, and the inner coating of food cans. BPA is a precursor to the resin monomer Bis-GMA. During the manufacturing process of Bis-GMA dental sealants, Bisphenol A (BPA) might be present as an impurity or as a degradation product of Bis-DMA through esterases present in saliva. Leaching of these monomers from resins can occur during the initial setting period and in conjunction with fluid sorption and desorption over time and this chemical leach from dental sealants may be bioactive. Researchers found an estrogenic effect with BPA, Bis-DMA, and Bis-GMA because BPA lacks structural specificity as a natural ligand to the estrogen receptor. It generated considerable concern regarding the safety of dental resin materials. This review focuses on the BPA in dental sealants and its estrogen-like effect. PMID:22629496

  1. Comparison of dental maturity between two ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Stefanac-Papić, J; Alkadri, K Z; Legović, M; Galić, N

    1998-12-01

    Dental maturity is one of the indicators of the craniofacial region growth and development. The aim of the study was to identify and compare dental growth and development in two ethnic groups. The material consisted of 480 orthopantomograms; 240 selected from orthodontic and dental patients from Zagreb (Croatia) and Damascus (Syria) each. Each ethnic group included 120 boys and 120 girls, while the radiographs were classified into 6 groups of 20 each, according to sex and chronologic age (8-13 years). Dental maturity was evaluated by the method of Nolla. The results were statistically analyzed and presented in tables. The subjects from Damascus showed a delay in dental maturity by 1 (girls) to 2 (boys) years compared to the homologous group from Zagreb. The reference values determined in the study may serve as a diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic tool in the orthodontics and pedodontics of the respective cities. PMID:9951152

  2. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  3. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  4. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Topics ADVERTISEMENT Advocacy Advocacy Advocacy Issues Health Care Reform ADA Positions, Policies and Statements Legal Advocacy and ... Children's Dental Health Month ADA Seal of Acceptance Fluoride in Water Advocating for the Public Prevention Summit ...

  5. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental exams, and getting necessary treatments such as fluoride, extractions, fillings, or braces and other orthodontics. ... provider if your infant needs to take oral fluoride . THE FIRST TRIP TO THE DENTIST Your child's ...

  6. Complications of dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Lillich, J D

    1998-08-01

    Both retrospective data and clinical experience indicate that complications of dental surgery are occasionally encountered and, to some extent, are inevitable. Many of the reported complications related to dental surgery such as incomplete removal of diseased teeth or removal of the wrong tooth can be avoided with sound preoperative planning and intraoperative technique. Diseased teeth should be properly identified prior to and during surgery. In addition, complete removal of the diseased tooth must be performed. Use of intraoperative radiographic examination to confirm the location of the diseased tooth and to document its removal cannot be overemphasized. Iatrogenic fracture of the maxillary or mandibular alveolar walls or palatine bone can be avoided by proper placement of the dental punch. The chances of developing incisional drainage or secondary sinusitis can be reduced by use of appropriate systemic antibiotics. These factors should guide the surgical approach to dental surgery to reduce the likelihood of developing common complications. PMID:9742671

  7. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  8. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cantor A, Zakher B, et al. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... nih.gov/pubmed/15606059 . Ng MW. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  9. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  10. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  11. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  12. Understanding dental CAD/CAM for restorations - dental milling machines from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. Part A: chairside milling machines.

    PubMed

    Lebon, Nicolas; Tapie, Laurent; Duret, Francois; Attal, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The dental milling machine is an important device in the dental CAD/CAM chain. Nowadays, dental numerical controlled (NC) milling machines are available for dental surgeries (chairside solution). This article provides a mechanical engineering approach to NC milling machines to help dentists understand the involvement of technology in digital dentistry practice. First, some technical concepts and definitions associated with NC milling machines are described from a mechanical engineering viewpoint. The technical and economic criteria of four chairside dental NC milling machines that are available on the market are then described. The technical criteria are focused on the capacities of the embedded technologies of these milling machines to mill both prosthetic materials and types of shape restorations. The economic criteria are focused on investment costs and interoperability with third-party software. The clinical relevance of the technology is assessed in terms of the accuracy and integrity of the restoration. PMID:27027102

  13. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  14. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  15. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  16. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  17. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  18. Dental fitness classification in the Canadian forces.

    PubMed

    Groves, Richard R

    2008-01-01

    The Canadian Forces Dental Services utilizes a dental classification system to identify those military members dentally fit for an overseas deployment where dental resources may be limited. Although the Canadian Forces Dental Services dental classification system is based on NATO standards, it differs slightly from the dental classification systems of other NATO country dental services. Data collected by dental teams on overseas deployments indicate a low rate of emergency dental visits by Canadian Forces members who were screened as dentally fit to deploy. PMID:18277717

  19. Maintaining dental records: Are we ready for forensic needs?

    PubMed Central

    Astekar, Madhusudan; Saawarn, Swati; Ramesh, Gayathri; Saawarn, Nisheeth

    2011-01-01

    Context: Dental remains are usually the last to get destroyed among body parts after death. They may be useful for personal identification in cases of mass disasters and decomposed unidentified bodies. Dental records may help in the identification of suspects in criminal investigations and in medicolegal cases. Maintenance of dental records is legally mandatory in most of the European and American countries. Unfortunately, the law is not very clear in India, and the awareness is very poor. Aims: To assess the awareness regarding the dental record maintenance among dentists in Rajasthan, to deduce the quality of average dental records kept by them and to evaluate the potential use of their maintained records, in any of forensic or medicolegal cases. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 dental practitioners of different cities in Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods: Data were collected through a structured questionnaire, which was responded by the study population in the course of a telephonic interview. The questionnaire addressed on the mode of maintaining dental records in their regular practice. Statistical Analysis Used: The data so gathered were subjected for descriptive analysis. Results: As for knowledge or awareness about maintaining dental records, surprisingly a very low percentile (about 38%) of surveyed dentists maintained records. Sixty-two percent of the dentists were maintaining no records at all. Conclusion: Nonmaintenance or poor quality of records maintained indicates that the dentists in Rajasthan are not prepared for any kind of forensic and medicolegal need if it arises. PMID:22408320

  20. A Comparison between Cytotoxicity Induced by Two Resin Based Sealers (2Seal and AH Plus) in Saos-2 and MG-63 Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Ehsani, Maryam; Zabihi, Ebrahim; Gharouee, Hamed

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxicity induced by two resin-based sealers, 2Seal and AH Plus, in two osteoblast-like cell lines, MG-63 and Saos-2. Using sterile discs of both sealers in complete media, 24- and 72-h extracts were prepared. The extracts were exchanged with Saos-2 or MG-63 cell culture media at 75% confluence, and after 24 h incubation, cell viability tests were performed for each extract and cell line using MTT and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. Corresponding incubated media were used as negative control groups. For both extracts and sealers, cytotoxicity was observed in both cell lines. For Saos-2, there was no statistical difference in toxicity between the sealers for either extract (p > 0.05). For MG-63, the 2Seal 24-h extract and the AH Plus 72-h extract had greater cytotoxicity than the other extracts (p < 0.05(. Both AH Plus and 2Seal demonstrated significant cytotoxicity in these two cell lines. In contrast to 2Seal, the cytotoxicity of AH Plus in the MG-63 cell line increased with extraction time from 24 to 72 h. The AH Plus and 2Seal 24-h extracts showed different levels of cytotoxicity in the MG-63 cell line, while in the Saos-2 cell line there were no detectable differences. This may reflect higher sensitivity of the MG-63 cell line compared to Saos-2 toward cytotoxicity induced by these two sealers, or different kinetics of toxicant release from the sealers. PMID:24551778

  1. Caries-preventive effect of glass ionomer and resin-based fissure sealants on permanent teeth: An update of systematic review evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This article constitutes a partial update of the original systematic review evidence by Yengopal et al. from 15 January 2008 (published in the Journal of Oral Science in 2009) with primary focus on research quality in regard to bias risk in trials. Its aim is to update the existing systematic review evidence from the English literature as to whether caries occurrence on pits and fissures of teeth sealed with either GIC or resin is the same. Methods In addition to the 12 trials included during the original systematic review, 5 new trials were identified during the database search (up to 26 August 2010) and 2 further trials were included from a hand search and reference check. Of these, 3 trials were excluded and 16 were accepted for data extraction and quality assessment. The quality of accepted trials was assessed, using updated quality criteria, and the risk of bias was investigated in more depth than previously reported. In addition, the focus of quantitative synthesis was shifted to single datasets that were extracted from the accepted trials. Results Twenty-six dichotomous and 4 continuous datasets were extracted. Meta-analysis and cumulative meta-analysis were used in combining clinically homogenous datasets. The overall outcome of the computed datasets suggest no difference between the caries-preventive effects of GIC- and resin-based fissure sealants. Conclusions This overall outcome is in agreement with the conclusions of the original systematic review. Although the findings of the trials identified in this update may be considered to be less affected by attrition- and publication bias, their risk of selection- and detection-/performance bias is high. Thus, verification of the currently available results requires further high quality randomised control trials. PMID:21276215

  2. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  3. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  4. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  5. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food... DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A dental... and dental alloy particles, such as silver, tin, zinc, and copper. The mixed dental amalgam...

  7. Cytocompatibility, cytotoxicity and genotoxicity analysis of dental implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reigosa, M.; Labarta, V.; Molinari, G.; Bernales, D.

    2007-11-01

    Several types of materials are frequently used for dental prostheses in dental medicine. Different treatments with titanium are the most used. The aim of the present study was to analyze by means of cytotoxicity and cytocompatibility techniques the capacity of dental implants to integrate to the bone tissue. Cultures of UMR 106 cell line derived from an osteosarcoma were used for bioassays mainly because they show many of the properties of osteoblasts. Dental implant samples provided by B&W company were compared with others of recognized trademarks. The first ones contain ASTM titanium (8348 GR2) with acid printing. Cytotoxicity was analyzed by means of lysosome activity, using the neutral red technique and alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. Cell variability was determined by means of the acridine ethidium-orange bromide technique. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni and Duncan post-ANOVA tests were used for the statistical analysis. The assays did not show significant differences among the dental implants analyzed. Our findings show that the dental prostheses studied present high biocompatibility, quantified by the bioassays performed. The techniques employed revealed that they can be a useful tool for the analysis of other materials for dental medicine use.

  8. An Investigation into the Accuracy of Two Currently Available Dental Impression Materials in the Construction of Cobalt-Chromium Frameworks for Removable Partial Dentures.

    PubMed

    Dubal, Rajesh Kumar; Friel, Tim; Taylor, Philip D

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the suitability of irreversible hydrocolloid as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. Scans of casts derived from (1) alginate and (2) addition-cured polyvinylsiloxane impressions were superposed on to a control. The differences within and between groups were compared at fixed landmarks. The investigation revealed a high degree of scan coincidence within and between groups. However, certain features, such as undercuts, resulted in a lower degree of scan coincidence. Irreversible hydrocolloid appears to be a viable alternative to addition-cured polyvinyl-siloxane as an impression material for cobalt-chromium framework construction. PMID:26415334

  9. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  10. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  11. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education. PMID:20007494

  12. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  13. Patch Testing with Dental Screening Series in Oral Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Kim, Woo-Il; Mun, Je-Ho; Song, Margaret; Kim, Hoon-Soo; Kim, Byung-Soo; Kim, Moon-Bum

    2015-01-01

    Background The oral mucosa is constantly exposed to several irritants and allergens including dental materials, but the role of contact allergy in oral disease is obscure. Objective To analyze positive patch test results in patients with oral diseases and evaluate the clinical relevance of oral diseases with contact allergy to dental materials. Methods We retrospectively analyzed patch test results with dental screening series in 44 patients with oral disease from 2004~2011. Results Oral diseases included oral lichen planus (54.5%), cheilitis (27.3%), burning mouth syndrome (9.1%), and others (9.1%). Thirty-one of 44 patients (70.5%) had positive reactions to one or more allergens. The most commonly detected allergens were gold sodium thiosulfate (25.0%) and nickel sulfate (25.0%), followed by potassium dichromate (22.7%), cobalt (15.9%), palladium (6.8%), mercury (4.5%), copper (4.5%), and methylhydroquinone (4.5%). Six of 24 patients with oral lichen planus had a symptom in areas adjacent to dental materials and positive patch test reactions to allergens contained in the suspected dental materials. Conclusion Patch tests with dental screening series are worth considering for oral diseases, especially for oral lichen planus. PMID:26273153

  14. Clinical research-the silent partner in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Mandel, I D

    1993-07-01

    For 5,000 years innovative researchers, often anonymously, have been providing dentists and their antecedents with a rich inheritance of information, techniques, and materials. The giants of dental research of the past can still serve as role models today. This paper presents a history of clinical research and relates past work to current and future trends. In the last few decades, both technical innovation and oral biology and prevention have been progressing at an accelerated rate to provide a steady influx of new answers to dental practitioners and to elicit new questions from the next generation of dental investigators. PMID:8210314

  15. Five practices of efficient factories applied to dental education.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P

    2015-05-01

    Efficient factories, such as dental school clinics (DSC), are trying to improve the quality of their product by reducing inefficiencies, error rates, and wastage. Dental education is an expensive business for the student and the institution. Dental materials and equipment are costly, and students are novice providers who work slowly and inefficiently compared to an experienced dentist; this is not a good business model. The objective of this article was to present and apply five practices of efficient factories that could be applied to the DSC setting. I propose that this will lead to improved educational outcomes and improved patient outcomes in DSC. PMID:25891379

  16. Relation between pulpal neuropeptides and dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlou Haghighi, Ali; Nafarzadeh, Shima; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Naseri, Mandana; Ahangari, Zohreh

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dental pulp has neural fibers that produce neuropeptides like Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The inflammation of dental pulp can lead to an increase amount of SP and CGRP release, especially in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, it can be assumed that neuropeptides have some role in the progression of inflammation of the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between the presence and concentration of neuropeptides in dental pulps of carious teeth caries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this purpose, pulpal tissues were collected from 40 teeth (20 carious and 20 intact). Pulpal samples were cultured for 72 hours. ELISA reader was used for the detection of SP and CGRP in supernatant fluids. Statistical analysis was made by Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests. RESULTS: SP and CGRP were present in 65% and 20% of inflamed pulpal samples, respectively and 40% and 5% of normal pulpal samples, respectively. Level of SP was significantly higher in inflamed pulp samples compared to intact pulps; however, there was no statistical difference when the other groups and neuropeptides were compared. The mean concentration of SP in normal pulps was 3.4 times greater than that of CGRP; interestingly in inflamed pulps the concentration of SP was 22.3 times greater than CGRP. CONCLUSION: We can conclude that in inflamed dental pulps, the concentration of SP is higher than CGRP. It can be hypothesized that CGRP has less effect on the inflammatory changes of dental pulps. PMID:24778684

  17. Preventive dental care for children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Drummond, B K

    2001-03-01

    Preventive dental care for children and adolescents requires a good understanding of the dental caries process and the particular relationships that exist throughout childhood and young adulthood. Only when these relationships are understood can they be used to diagnose dental caries risk and apply appropriate preventive therapies and restorative care that is effective. The need to diagnose risk when applying preventive care is as important for individual patients as it is for population groups. At the individual level, the aim is to aid the development of a healthy functioning dentition for life. This applies in the population group level but the cost benefits also become important in justifying the funding to carry out preventive practices. Risk can be determined by general factors including the socioeconomic status, access to optimally fluoridated drinking water and age. Specific factors include the microbiology of the dental plaque, dietary practices, oral hygiene practices, individual fluoride use and previous dental caries history. Once the risk has been diagnosed and the related factors identified, the best preventive approach can be selected. This may include oral hygiene, dietary change, fluoride recommendations, restorative care using fluoride releasing materials or antibacterial mouthwashes. The dentist may play several roles in preventive dental care. The first is as the giver of advice and care for the individual child patient; the second is as an advocate to help the child get the care by getting the consent and support of the parents; and the third may be to lobby for the appropriate funding to obtain this care in publicly funded programs. PMID:11458617

  18. Attitudes of dental professionals toward tobacco use

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Dipika Kalyan; Pawar, Sudarshana Devendrasing; Mandal, Anahita; Shah, Rohit Ajay; Rodrigues, Silvia Victor; Desai, Ankit Bharat; Pathare, Pragalbha Nandkumar; Shingnapurkar, Saurabh Hemant; Vijayakar, Harshad Narayan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The habit of tobacco consumption has plagued all nations from time immemorial. While tobacco use is decreasing in many developed countries, it is increasing in developing countries like India. Health care professionals have a key role to play to motivate and advise tobacco users to quit. Aim: The aim was to assess the attitudes and practice of dental professionals in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai toward tobacco cessation and the potential barriers faced. Materials and Methods: Questionnaire-based survey was conducted with 500 dental surgeons in Mumbai and Navi Mumbai. The questionnaire contained close-ended questions and assessed the smoking status of the professional, whether they impart tobacco cessation advice to their patients, whether the professional is trained for basic intervention, whether they would be eager to undergo training and also the potential barriers encountered by the professional. Statistical Analysis Used: The SPSS version 17 was used. Frequencies and percentages were used to determine distributions of the responses for each of the variables. Chi-square test was used for analysis. Results: It was observed that the majority of dental clinicians do not use tobacco and although 93% believed that it is the role of the dental professional to offer advice, 21% do not. Potential barriers reported were: Little chance of success, lack of training, lack of time, lack of remuneration, and the possibility of losing patients. Conclusions: Dental professionals must expand their horizon and armamentarium to tobacco intervention strategies inclusive of their regular preventive and therapeutic treatment modalities. Furthermore, the dental institutions (schools) should include tobacco intervention in the curriculum, but it should not be just theoretical knowledge rather it must have a practical component. PMID:26229275

  19. Nanotechnology Approaches for Better Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Tomsia, Antoni P.; Launey, Maximilien E.; Lee, Janice S.; Mankani, Mahesh H.; Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Saiz, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The combined requirements imposed by the enormous scale and overall complexity of designing new implants or complete organ regeneration are well beyond the reach of present technology in many dimensions, including nanoscale, as we do not yet have the basic knowledge required to achieve these goals. The need for a synthetic implant to address multiple physical and biological factors imposes tremendous constraints on the choice of suitable materials. There is a strong belief that nanoscale materials will produce a new generation of implant materials with high efficiency, low cost, and high volume. The nanoscale in materials processing is truly a new frontier. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades but they have serious shortcomings related to their osseointegration and the fact that their mechanical properties do not match those of bone. This paper reviews recent advances in the fabrication of novel coatings and nanopatterning of dental implants. It also provides a general summary of the state of the art in dental implant science and describes possible advantages of nanotechnology for further improvements. The ultimate goal is to produce materials and therapies that will bring state-of-the-art technology to the bedside and improve quality of life and current standards of care. PMID:21464998

  20. Spontaneous Differentiation of Dental Pulp stem cells on Dental polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bherwani, Aneel; Suarato, Giulia; Qin, Sisi; Chang, Chung-Cheh; Akhavan, Aaron; Spiegel, Joseph; Jurukovski, Vladimir; Rafailovich, Miriam; Simon, Marcia

    2012-02-01

    Dental pulp stem cells were plated on two dentally relevant materials i.e. PMMA commonly used for denture and Titanium used for implants. In both cases, we probed for the role of surface interaction and substrate morphology. Different films of PMMA were spun cast directly onto Si wafers; PMMA fibers of different diameters were electro spun onto some of these substrates. Titanium metal was evaporated onto Si surfaces using an electron beam evaporator. In addition, on some surfaces, P4VP nanofibers were spun cast. DPSC were grown in alpha-MEM supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, 0.2mM L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate, 2mm glutamine and 10mM beta-glycerol phosphate either with or without 10nM dexamethasone. After 21 days samples were examined using confocal microscopy of cells and by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX). In the case of Titanium biomineralization was observed independent of dexamethasone, where the deposits were templated along the fibers. Minimal biomineralization was observed on flat Titanium and PMMA samples. Markers of osteogenesis and specific signaling pathways are being evaluated by RT-PCR, which are up regulated on each surface, to understand the fundamental manner in which surfaces interact with cell differentiation.

  1. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  2. Discontinued dental attendance among elderly people in Sweden

    PubMed Central

    Grönbeck-Linden, Ingela; Hägglin, Catharina; Petersson, Anita; Linander, Per O.; Gahnberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Our objective was to study the loss of dental attendance and a possible age trend among patients aged ≥65 years in Sweden. Regular dental check-ups are considered to be an important factor in maintaining oral health. Approximately 80% of the adult population in Sweden are enrolled in a regular check-up system; however, dental practitioners often find that older patients attend fewer check-ups. Old people may naturally lose contact with dental services as they move to special housing or die. In this systematic study, these factors were investigated and used as exclusion criteria. Materials and Methods: Data were collected for all patients (n = 4759) aged 65 or older from the electronic journal system in 3 large public dental clinics in 3 communities. Their dental records for the years 2004–2009 were studied longitudinally by 1 person at each clinic; 1111 patients were excluded (patients died during study period, wanted emergency care only, obtained special dental care allowance, moved from the community or moved to special housing, or left the clinic for another caregiver). The statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 21 (IBM). Results: Of the 3648 patients (1690 men and 1958 women) included in the study, 13% lost contact with their dental service over the course of the study (10% of those were aged 65–79 and 21% ≥80). The decrease in regular dental contact had a statistically significant association with increasing age (P < 0.001). Conclusion: A considerable number of older people living independently or with moderate supportive care in their own homes lost contact with dental service despite enrolment in a recall system. PMID:27382538

  3. Dental therapists: a global perspective.

    PubMed

    Nash, David A; Friedman, Jay W; Kardos, Thomas B; Kardos, Rosemary L; Schwarz, Eli; Satur, Julie; Berg, Darren G; Nasruddin, Jaafar; Mumghamba, Elifuraha G; Davenport, Elizabeth S; Nagel, Ron

    2008-04-01

    In 1921, New Zealand began training school dental nurses, subsequently deploying them throughout the country in school-based clinics providing basic dental care for children. The concept of training dental nurses, later to be designated dental therapists, was adopted by other countries as a means of improving access to care, particularly for children. This paper profiles six countries that utilise dental therapists, with a description of the training that therapists receive in these countries, and the context in which they practice. Based on available demographic information, it also updates the number of dental therapists practising globally, as well as the countries in which they practice. In several countries, dental therapy is now being integrated with dental hygiene in training and practice to create a new type of professional complementary to a dentist. Increasingly, dental therapists are permitted to treat adults as well as children. The paper also describes the status of a current initiative to introduce dental therapy to the United States. It concludes by suggesting that dental therapists can become valued members of the dental team throughout the world, helping to improve access to care and reducing existing disparities in oral health. PMID:18478885

  4. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  5. Dental Hygiene Realpolitik Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bader, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Current conditions in dental hygiene influencing professional education are discussed. Workplace/practice issues include dental hygiene care as a component of dental practice, content, effects, and quality of care, hygienist supply and demand, and job satisfaction. Professional issues include the knowledge base, definitions of practice, and…

  6. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This guide contains 45 program standards for the dental laboratory technology program conducted in technical institutes in Georgia. The dental laboratory technology program, either diploma or associate degree, is designed to ensure that students gain basic competence in the job skills needed for an entry-level employee in dental laboratory…

  7. Shear Bond Strengths between Three Different Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Dental Materials and Veneering Ceramic and Their Susceptibility to Autoclave Induced Low-Temperature Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Manoti; Bhargava, Akshay; Gupta, Sharad; Gupta, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment as influencing the shear bond strength between three different commercially available zirconia core materials, namely, Upcera, Ziecon, and Cercon, layered with VITA VM9 veneering ceramic using Universal Testing Machine. The mode of failure between zirconia and ceramic was further analyzed as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed using stereomicroscope. X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analysis were done to estimate the phase transformation (m-phase fraction) and surface grain size of zirconia particles, respectively. The purpose of this study was to simulate the clinical environment by artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment so as the clinical function and nature of the bond between zirconia and veneering material as in a clinical trial of 15 years could be evaluated. PMID:27293439

  8. Shear Bond Strengths between Three Different Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Dental Materials and Veneering Ceramic and Their Susceptibility to Autoclave Induced Low-Temperature Degradation.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, Manoti; Bhargava, Akshay; Gupta, Sharad; Gupta, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment as influencing the shear bond strength between three different commercially available zirconia core materials, namely, Upcera, Ziecon, and Cercon, layered with VITA VM9 veneering ceramic using Universal Testing Machine. The mode of failure between zirconia and ceramic was further analyzed as adhesive, cohesive, or mixed using stereomicroscope. X-ray diffraction and SEM (scanning electron microscope) analysis were done to estimate the phase transformation (m-phase fraction) and surface grain size of zirconia particles, respectively. The purpose of this study was to simulate the clinical environment by artificial aging through steam and thermal treatment so as the clinical function and nature of the bond between zirconia and veneering material as in a clinical trial of 15 years could be evaluated. PMID:27293439

  9. To Analyse the Erosive Potential of Commercially Available Drinks on Dental Enamel and Various Tooth Coloured Restorative Materials – An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Jindal, Ritu; Mahajan, Sandeep; Sandhu, Sanam; Sharma, Sunila; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With the enormous change in life style pattern of a common man through the past few decades, there has been proportional variation in the amount and frequency of consumption of drinks. An increased consumption of these drinks will concurrently increase enamel surface roughness by demineralization, resulting in hypersensitivity and elevated caries risk. Aim The present study was designed to evaluate the erosive potential of commercially available drinks on tooth enamel and various tooth coloured restorative materials. Materials and Methods Extracted human teeth were taken and divided into four groups i.e. tooth enamel, glass ionomer cement, composite and compomer. Four commercially available drinks were chosen these were Coca -Cola, Nimbooz, Frooti and Yakult. The pH of each drink was measured. Each group was immersed in various experimental drinks for a period of 14 days. The erosive potential of each drink was measured by calculating the change in average surface roughness of these groups after the immersion protocol in various drinks. The data analysis was done by One Way Anova, Post-Hoc Bonferroni, and paired t –test. Results Group II-GIC showed highest values for mean of change in average surface roughness and the values were statistically significant (p<0.001) with tooth enamel, composite and compomer (p=0.002). Coca-cola showed the highest erosive potential and Yakult showed the lowest, there was no statistical significant difference between the results shown by Yakult and Frooti. Conclusion Characteristics which may promote erosion of enamel and tooth coloured restorative materials were surface texture of the material and pH of the drinks. PMID:27437343

  10. Influence of core design, production technique, and material selection on fracture behavior of yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal fixed dental prostheses produced using different multilayer techniques: split-file, over-pressing, and manually built-up veneers

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Deyar Jallal Hadi; Linderoth, Ewa H; Wennerberg, Ann; Vult Von Steyern, Per

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate and compare the fracture strength and fracture mode in eleven groups of currently, the most commonly used multilayer three-unit all-ceramic yttria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) with respect to the choice of core material, veneering material area, manufacturing technique, design of connectors, and radii of curvature of FDP cores. Materials and methods A total of 110 three-unit Y-TZP FDP cores with one intermediate pontic were made. The FDP cores in groups 1–7 were made with a split-file design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain, computer-aided design-on veneers, and over-pressed veneers. Groups 8–11 consisted of FDPs with a state-of-the-art design, veneered with manually built-up porcelain. All the FDP cores were subjected to simulated aging and finally loaded to fracture. Results There was a significant difference (P<0.05) between the core designs, but not between the different types of Y-TZP materials. The split-file designs with VITABLOCS® (1,806±165 N) and e.max® ZirPress (1,854±115 N) and the state-of-the-art design with VITA VM® 9 (1,849±150 N) demonstrated the highest mean fracture values. Conclusion The shape of a split-file designed all-ceramic reconstruction calls for a different dimension protocol, compared to traditionally shaped ones, as the split-file design leads to sharp approximal indentations acting as fractural impressions, thus decreasing the overall strength. The design of a framework is a crucial factor for the load bearing capacity of an all-ceramic FDP. The state-of-the-art design is preferable since the split-file designed cores call for a cross-sectional connector area at least 42% larger, to have the same load bearing capacity as the state-of-the-art designed cores. All veneering materials and techniques tested in the study, split-file, over-press, built-up porcelains, and glass–ceramics are, with a great safety margin, sufficient for clinical use

  11. Dental pulp stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ashri, Nahid Y.; Ajlan, Sumaiah A.; Aldahmash, Abdullah M.

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory periodontal disease is a major cause of loss of tooth-supporting structures. Novel approaches for regeneration of periodontal apparatus is an area of intensive research. Periodontal tissue engineering implies the use of appropriate regenerative cells, delivered through a suitable scaffold, and guided through signaling molecules. Dental pulp stem cells have been used in an increasing number of studies in dental tissue engineering. Those cells show mesenchymal (stromal) stem cell-like properties including self-renewal and multilineage differentiation potentials, aside from their relative accessibility and pleasant handling properties. The purpose of this article is to review the biological principles of periodontal tissue engineering, along with the challenges facing the development of a consistent and clinically relevant tissue regeneration platform. This article includes an updated review on dental pulp stem cells and their applications in periodontal regeneration, in combination with different scaffolds and growth factors. PMID:26620980

  12. Effects of various chair-side surface treatment methods on dental restorative materials with respect to contact angles and surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Sturz, Candida R C; Faber, Franz-Josef; Scheer, Martin; Rothamel, Daniel; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Available chair-side surface treatment methods may adversely affect prosthetic materials and promote plaque accumulation. This study investigated the effects of treatment procedures on three resin restorative materials, zirconium-dioxide and polyetheretherketone in terms of surface roughness and hydrophobicity. Treatments were grinding with silicon carbide paper or white Arkansas stone, blasting with prophylaxis powder and polishing with diamond paste. Surface roughness was assessed using confocal laser scanning. Hydrophobicity as measured by water contact angle was determined by computerized image analysis using the sessile drop technique. All of the specific surface treatments performed led to significant changes in contact angle values and surface roughness (Ra) values. Median contact angle values ranged from 51.6° to 114°. Ra values ranged from 0.008 µm to 2.917 µm. Air-polishing as well as other polishing procedures increased surface roughness values in all materials except zirconium dioxide. Polyetheretherketone displayed greatest change in contact angle values after air-polishing treatment. PMID:26632228

  13. Noise levels of dental equipment used in dental college of Damascus University

    PubMed Central

    Qsaibati, Mhd. Loutify; Ibrahim, Ousama

    2014-01-01

    Background: In dental practical classes, the acoustic environment is characterized by high noise levels in relation to other teaching areas. The aims of this study were to measure noise levels produced during the different dental learning clinics, by equipments used in dental learning areas under different working conditions and by used and brand new handpieces under different working conditions. Materials and Methods: The noise levels were measured by using a noise level meter with a microphone, which was placed at a distance of 15 cm from a main noise source in pre-clinical and clinical areas. In laboratories, the microphone was placed at a distance of 15 cm and another reading was taken 2 m away. Noise levels of dental learning clinics were measured by placing noise level meter at clinic center. The data were collected, tabulated and statistically analyzed using t-tests. Significance level was set at 5%. Results: In dental clinics, the highest noise was produced by micro motor handpiece while cutting on acrylic (92.2 dB) and lowest noise (51.7 dB) was created by ultrasonic scaler without suction pump. The highest noise in laboratories was caused by sandblaster (96 dB at a distance of 15 cm) and lowest noise by stone trimmer when only turned on (61.8 dB at a distance of 2 m). There was significant differences in noise levels of the equipment's used in dental laboratories and dental learning clinics (P = 0.007). The highest noise level recorded in clinics was at pedodontic clinic (67.37 dB). Conclusions: Noise levels detected in this study were considered to be close to the limit of risk of hearing loss 85 dB. PMID:25540655

  14. Dental Support Organizations.

    PubMed

    Dufurrena, Quinn

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Dental Support Organizations is a recently formed association of 33 companies representing a range of management and support services for dental practices. These organizations do not engage in the practice of dentistry, although in some cases they operate as holding companies for practices that do, thus separating the legal responsibility of providing treatment from the management and flow of funds. This report summarizes some of the recent trends in oral health care and dentists' practice patterns that are prompting the increased prevalence of this model. The general functioning of the DSO model is described, including some common variations, and the core values of ADSO are featured. PMID:26455048

  15. Nine years of DentEd--a global perspective on dental education.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, P A; Eaton, K A; Paganelli, C; Shanley, D

    2008-08-23

    This paper describes the three successive and successful DentEd projects, funded by the European Union, that established a productive thematic network which identified common content within the dental curriculum. It then developed an agreed professional profile, with a defined set of competences and a modular curriculum for all new dental graduates based on the European Credit Transfer System and trends in learning and assessment. The three phases took nine years to complete. Phase one investigated all aspects of dental undergraduate education and included over 30 visits to different dental schools by teams of dental educators. Phase two built on this work and included further visits to dental schools. Phase three refined the competency framework that had been developed in phase two and culminated in a global dental conference which finalised position papers on all aspects of dental education. The work and recommendations of the ICT in dental education group are considered in detail in the paper. The projects provided the stimulus for a number of European and international collaborations, including the web-based International Federation of Dental Education and Associations (IFDEA) Knowledge Centre and the International Virtual Dental School (IVIDENT), both of which aim to make increasingly sophisticated ICT-based educational material available worldwide and to promote international understanding. PMID:18724340

  16. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids.

    PubMed

    Hammerl, Emily E; Baier, Melissa A; Reinhard, Karl J

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present. PMID:26230855

  17. Assessment of the readability of dental health education literature.

    PubMed

    Blinkhorn, A S; Verity, J M

    1979-08-01

    General dental practitioners have an important role in the dissemination of information to their patients and their advice is often reinforced with written health education material. Unfortunately, this written information is often of limited value for particular groups of patients because of its level of readability. This investigation of the problem was in two parts; firstly, a group of 140 secondary schoolchildren were asked to explain the meaning of a selection of words in common use in dental health education, and secondly, the readability of some current dental health education literature was assessed using the Fog Index. The results indicate that current dental health education literature reflects the reading ability of the designers rather than the ability of the potential target group. Many of the words in the dental profession's preventive vocabulary were not understood by the children. Over 80% were unsure of the meaning of fluoride tablets, gum disease, gingivitis and oral hygiene. The results of this investigation indicate that dentists should ensure that dental health education literature is not unduly complex and should take more time explaining the dental vocabulary in lay terminology. PMID:293237

  18. [Two cases of personal identification from dental information].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, T; Yamada, Y; Ohtani, S; Kogure, T; Nagao, M; Takatori, T; Ohira, H; Yamamoto, I; Watanabe, A

    1997-08-01

    We describe two cases in which unknown bodies were positively identified from dental information and biochemical examination using tooth materials. In one case, a charred body was positively identified with little effort by comparison of antemortem dental records (dental chart and dental X-ray film) with postmortem data. In the other case, although the unknown individual had dental treatment, the police were unable to obtain the antemortem dental records of the victim. We then conducted biochemical analysis of teeth, facilitating personal identification using DNA analysis and age estimation based on aspartic acid racemization. The mutation obtained from the sequence of mtDNA and the genotypes of HLADQ alpha, HPRTB and ABO blood groups including the data for estimated age supported the kinship between the unknown individual and his mother. The data for maternally inherited mtDNA were of great importance in this case, since it was possible to obtain DNA from the mother. Dental identification in one of the most accurate methods of personal identification if suitable antemortem records are available. In the absence of such records, biochemical analysis of teeth also makes it possible to increase the probability of correct personal identification. PMID:9366140

  19. Agave Chewing and Dental Wear: Evidence from Quids

    PubMed Central

    Hammerl, Emily E.; Baier, Melissa A.; Reinhard, Karl J.

    2015-01-01

    Agave quid chewing is examined as a potential contributing behavior to hunter-gatherer dental wear. It has previously been hypothesized that the contribution of Agave quid chewing to dental wear would be observed in communities wherever phytolith-rich desert succulents were part of subsistence. Previous analysis of coprolites from a prehistoric agricultural site, La Cueva de los Muertos Chiquitos in Durango, Mexico, showed that Agave was a consistent part of a diverse diet. Therefore, quids recovered at this site ought to be useful materials to test the hypothesis that dental wear was related to desert succulent consumption. The quids recovered from the site were found to be largely derived from chewing Agave. In this study, the quids were found to be especially rich in phytoliths, and analysis of dental casts made from impressions left in the quids revealed flat wear and dental attrition similar to that of Agave-reliant hunter-gatherers. Based on evidence obtained from the analysis of quids, taken in combination with results from previous studies, it is determined that Agave quid chewing was a likely contributing factor to dental wear in this population. As such, our method provides an additional avenue of dental research in areas where quids are present. PMID:26230855

  20. A snapshot of cultural competency education in US dental schools.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Michael L; Bean, Canise Y; Casamassimo, Paul S

    2006-09-01

    During the last decade, cultural competency has received a great deal of attention in health care and the literature of many fields, including education, social services, law, and health care. The dental education literature provides little information regarding status, strategies, or guiding principles of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. This study was an attempt to describe the status of cultural competency education in U.S. dental schools. A web-based thirty-question survey regarding cultural competency education coursework, teaching, course materials, and content was sent in 2005 to the assistant/associate deans for academic affairs at fifty-six U.S. dental schools, followed up by subsequent email messages. Thirty-four (61 percent) dental school officials responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (twenty-eight; 82 percent) did not have a specific stand-alone cultural competency course, but indicated it was integrated into the curriculum. Recognition of local and national community diversity needs prompted course creation in most schools. Respondents at almost two-thirds of schools indicated that their impression of students' acceptance was positive. Teachers of cultural competency were primarily white female dentists. Few schools required faculty to have similar cultural competency or diversity training. Thirty-three of the thirty-four U.S. dental schools responding to this survey offer some form of coursework in cultural competency with little standardization and a variety of methods and strategies to teach dental students. PMID:16954420

  1. Dental image replacement on cone beam computed tomography with three-dimensional optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, or bite tray impression.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-H; Lee, J-W; Lim, S-H; Kim, Y-H; Kim, M-K

    2014-10-01

    The goal of the present study was to compare the accuracy of dental image replacement on a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) image using digital image data from three-dimensional (3D) optical scanning of a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression. A Bracket Typodont dental model was used. CBCT of the dental model was performed and the data were converted to stereolithography (STL) format. Three experimental materials, a dental cast, occlusal bite, and bite tray impression, were optically scanned in 3D. STL files converted from the CBCT of the Typodont model and the 3D optical-scanned STL files of the study materials were image-registered. The error range of each methodology was measured and compared with a 3D optical scan of the Typodont. For the three materials, the smallest error observed was 0.099±0.114mm (mean error±standard deviation) for registering the 3D optical scan image of the dental cast onto the CBCT dental image. Although producing a dental cast can be laborious, the study results indicate that it is the preferred method. In addition, an occlusal bite is recommended when bite impression materials are used. PMID:25015906

  2. Awareness of emergency management of dental trauma

    PubMed Central

    Namdev, Ritu; Jindal, Ayushi; Bhargava, Smriti; Bakshi, Lokesh; Verma, Reena; Beniwal, Disha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Traumatic dental injuries frequently occur in society and may occur at home. The ultimate prognosis of an avulsed tooth occurring in a child may depend on the parents’ knowledge of appropriate emergency measures. This study is aimed at evaluating the awareness level of a sample of Indian (Rohtak, Haryana) parents in the management of dental trauma. Materials and Methods: A total of 1500 parents were surveyed using a self-administered structured questionnaire. The questionnaire was divided into three parts. The tabulated data were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square test. Result: This study indicated a low level of knowledge regarding tooth avulsion and replantation procedures to be followed in emergency. The residing area and age of parent did not affect the knowledge and awareness of parents. Moreover, well-educated parents also had very little or no information about dental trauma first-aid. The lack of significance in correct answers between those with and without such experience indicated that past experience did not seem to have increase the knowledge of the correct emergency procedures. Very little or no information about tooth avulsion and replantation had been given to most of them. Conclusion: Dental injury prevention and management should be recognized as a major public health issue and adequate resources to be allocated for research in this area. Educational programs to improve the knowledge and awareness among the parents have to be implemented. PMID:25395768

  3. Drugs that promote dental caries.

    PubMed

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries result from erosion of tooth enamel or cementum by acidic substances produced by bacteria found in dental plaque. Caries can lead to pulp necrosis and tooth loss. Risk factors include certain dietary habits, poor oral hygiene, and dry mouth. Diabetes and Sjogren's syndrome can also promote dental caries. Psychotropic substances such as cocaine, methamphetamine, heroin and cannabis can promote dental caries. Many medicinal drugs facilitate the formation of dental caries, through various mechanisms; they include formulations with a high sugar content; drugs that cause dry mouth (especially antimuscarinics); drugs that lower the buccal pH (inhaled powders, etc.); and drugs that cause demineralisation (tetracyclines, etc.). In practice, patients (and parents) should be informed that some drugs can increase the risk of dental caries. They should be encouraged to adapt and reinforce dental hygiene, and advised to visit a dentist regularly. PMID:25802916

  4. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  5. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C-M

    2013-02-21

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm(3) insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm(2) photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm(3) dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm(2) field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT

  6. The dosimetric impact of dental implants on head-and-neck volumetric modulated arc therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Mu-Han; Li, Jinsheng; Price, Robert A., Jr.; Wang, Lu; Lee, Chung-Chi; Ma, C.-M.

    2013-02-01

    This work aims to investigate the dosimetric impact of dental implants on volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head-and-neck patients and to evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for the correction. An in-house Monte Carlo (MC) code was utilized for the dose calculation to account for the scattering and attenuation caused by the high-Z implant material. Three different dental implant materials were studied in this work: titanium, Degubond®4 and gold. The dose perturbations caused by the dental implant materials were first investigated in a water phantom with a 1 cm3 insert. The per cent depth dose distributions of a 3 × 3 cm2 photon field were compared with the insert material as water and the three selected dental implant materials. To evaluate the impact of the dental implant on VMAT patient dose calculation, four head-and-neck cases were selected. For each case, the VMAT plan was designed based on the artifact-corrected patient geometry using a treatment planning system (TPS) that was typically utilized for routine patient treatment. The plans were re-calculated using the MC code for five situations: uncorrected geometry, artifact-corrected geometry and artifact-corrected geometry with one of the three different implant materials. The isodose distributions and the dose-volume histograms were cross-compared with each other. To evaluate the effectiveness of using the material's electron-density ratio for dental implant correction, the implant region was set as water with the material's electron-density ratio and the calculated dose was compared with the MC simulation with the real material. The main effect of the dental implant was the severe attenuation in the downstream. The 1 cm3 dental implant can lower the downstream dose by 10% (Ti) to 51% (Au) for a 3 × 3 cm2 field. The TPS failed to account for the dose perturbation if the dental implant material was not precisely defined. For the VMAT patient dose calculation

  7. Smoking and dental implants

    PubMed Central

    Kasat, V.; Ladda, R.

    2012-01-01

    Smoking is a prevalent behaviour in the population. The aim of this review is to bring to light the effects of smoking on dental implants. These facts will assist dental professionals when implants are planned in tobacco users. A search of “PubMed” was made with the key words “dental implant,” “nicotine,” “smoking,” “tobacco,” and “osseointegration.” Also, publications on tobacco control by the Government of India were considered. For review, only those articles published from 1988 onward in English language were selected. Smoking has its influence on general as well as oral health of an individual. Tobacco negatively affects the outcome of almost all therapeutic procedures performed in the oral cavity. The failure rate of implant osseointegration is considerably higher among smokers, and maintenance of oral hygiene around the implants and the risk of peri-implantitis are adversely affected by smoking. To increase implant survival in smokers, various protocols have been recommended. Although osseointegrated dental implants have become the state of the art for tooth replacement, they are not without limitations or complications. In this litigious era, it is extremely important that the practitioner clearly understands and is able and willing to convey the spectrum of possible complications and their frequency to the patients. PMID:24478965

  8. Skylab Dental Examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Skylab 2 Commander Charles Conrad is seen undergoing a dental examination by the Medical Officer, Joseph Kerwin in the Skylab Medical Facility. In the absence of an examination chair, Conrad simply rotated his body to an upside down position to facilitate the procedure.

  9. Dental Health in TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... to occur in nearly 100% of the TSC population. Not all dental pits are cavities; they are just areas where enamel did not form, but can be an area where food can build up and start a cavity. Gums The gums may have small areas of growth called gingival fibromas , which are mostly harmless and ...

  10. Dental Issues & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... dental school, has extra training in caring for patients with disabilities. The Special Care Dentistry Association is a resource to find a dentist ... for children who grind their teeth, because the risk of the child choking on the mouthguard if it breaks ... Academy of Pediatric Dentistry www.aapd.org Find a dentist at www. ...

  11. Finding Dental Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Main Content National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) Improving the Nation's Oral Health National Institutes of Health Español Staff Directory A–Z Index Search Text size: Website Contents NIDCR Home Oral Health Diseases and Conditions Gum ...

  12. Dental Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yao-Sheng; Ho, Yi-Ching; Lee, Shyh-Yuan; Chuang, Ching-Cheng; Tsai, Jui-che; Lin, Kun-Feng; Sun, Chia-Wei

    2013-01-01

    This review paper describes the applications of dental optical coherence tomography (OCT) in oral tissue images, caries, periodontal disease and oral cancer. The background of OCT, including basic theory, system setup, light sources, spatial resolution and system limitations, is provided. The comparisons between OCT and other clinical oral diagnostic methods are also discussed. PMID:23857261

  13. [Instruction in dental radiology].

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, W J M; Kreulen, C M; Berkhout, W E R

    2016-04-01

    The diagnostic use of oral radiology is an essential part of daily dental practice. Due to the potentially harmful nature of ionising radiation, the clinical use of oral radiology in the Netherlands is framed by clinical practice guidelines and regulatory requirements. Undergraduate students receive intensive theoretical and practical training in practical and theoretical radiology, with the aim of obtaining the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor Tandartsen en Orthodontisten'-certificate, which is required for legal permission to use oral radiology in dental practice. It is recommended that the curriculum be expanded to include the areas of knowledge required to qualify for the 'Eindtermen Stralingshygiëne voor het gebruik van CBCT-toestellen door tandartsen' (the certificate for the use of conebeam radiology by dentists). The general dental practitioner is faced with changing laws and regulations in all areas of practice. One of the most significant legal changes in the field of dental radiology was the introduction of the new radiation protection and safety rules in 2014. Moreover, a large group of dentists is also being confronted with the transition from conventional to digital images, with all its challenges and changes in everyday practice. PMID:27073811

  14. Ethics of dental health screening.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Chandrashekar; Taha, Farheen

    2016-01-01

    Screening is the detection of disease at a point in its natural history when it is not yet symptomatic. In the natural history of dental caries, for example, the incipient lesions are at a reversible stage, which is a pre-symptomatic or an unrecognised symptomatic disease. Ideally, this is the stage during which screening should identify the risk of dental caries; however, presently, the so-called dental screening employed identifies the clinical cavitation of the tooth, which is very obvious to the individual. The individual already knows that he/she has dental caries and needs treatment, which the screening personnel (dental doctor) explains again during the screening procedure. Is it ethical to call such an event screening? The mushrooming of dental teaching hospitals has promoted regular screening of dental diseases among the communities and schoolchildren through their community dentistry-related activities. More often, it is a dental "check-up" that is carried out on the pretext of screening for dental diseases. Though the basic intention of this activity is to promote awareness of dental diseases and promote good health, there is also a hidden agenda to it. An artificial demand for dental care is created that is easily capitalised on by the dental teaching institutions to enhance its clinical activity. Dental screening is doing more harm than good as patients are made aware of the diseases for which they may not be able to afford treatment. This narrative review gives an account of the scientific evidence on screening for oral diseases, the current practices in screening and the ethical dilemmas of dental screening programmes. PMID:27474698

  15. Synchrotron-radiation-based X-ray micro-computed tomography reveals dental bur debris under dental composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Hedayat, Assem; Nagy, Nicole; Packota, Garnet; Monteith, Judy; Allen, Darcy; Wysokinski, Tomasz; Zhu, Ning

    2016-05-01

    Dental burs are used extensively in dentistry to mechanically prepare tooth structures for restorations (fillings), yet little has been reported on the bur debris left behind in the teeth, and whether it poses potential health risks to patients. Here it is aimed to image dental bur debris under dental fillings, and allude to the potential health hazards that can be caused by this debris when left in direct contact with the biological surroundings, specifically when the debris is made of a non-biocompatible material. Non-destructive micro-computed tomography using the BioMedical Imaging & Therapy facility 05ID-2 beamline at the Canadian Light Source was pursued at 50 keV and at a pixel size of 4 µm to image dental bur fragments under a composite resin dental filling. The bur's cutting edges that produced the fragment were also chemically analyzed. The technique revealed dental bur fragments of different sizes in different locations on the floor of the prepared surface of the teeth and under the filling, which places them in direct contact with the dentinal tubules and the dentinal fluid circulating within them. Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis of the dental bur edges revealed that the fragments are made of tungsten carbide-cobalt, which is bio-incompatible. PMID:27140158

  16. Dental Health - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) PDF California Dental Association Dental Tourism English 牙科旅行 - 繁體中文 (Chinese - Traditional) PDF California Dental ... NEEG MOB - Hmoob (Hmong) California Dental Association Dental Tourism English Kev Kho Hniav Txawv Teb Chaws - Hmoob ( ...

  17. Allied Dental Education: Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVore, Linda Rubinstein

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the status of the three allied dental disciplines (dental assisting, dental technology, and dental hygiene) gives a historical overview on allied dental programs, assesses their current status and enrollment trends, identifies critical issues affecting educational programs, and outlines a framework for innovation in recruitment and…

  18. Morphology, size distribution and elemental composition of several dental debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Shigeaki; Iwadera, Nobuki; Esaki, Mitsue; Aoyama, Ken-Ichi; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Uo, Motohiro; Morita, Manabu; Yawaka, Yasutaka; Watari, Fumio

    2012-12-01

    We investigated morphologies, size distributions and elemental compositions of dental debris formed by cutting/grinding teeth or dental alloys. The average size of debris formed by cutting/grinding dental alloy was around 100 μm and that of teeth was 20 μm. The debris formed by grinding with diamond or carborundum point had isotropic irregular shape, while the debris formed by cutting with carbide bar had characteristic lathe-cut shape. The elemental analysis indicated that the debris formed by grinding dental alloy with carborundum point consisted of not only the particles of the alloy but also the particles of Si compounds with the size of around 10 μm. The particles of Si compounds would be formed by abrasion of the grinding instrument (carborundum, SiC). Similarly, the debris formed by grinding with diamond point also contained submicro-sized particles consisting of C compounds. The results indicate that the morphology and composition of dental debris are varied depending on the combination between the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials and that the dental debris consist of both the workpiece and the cutting/grinding materials in some combination. In addition, some of the debris of tooth had the size less than 2 μm, which has a potential to induce inflammation. Though the inflammation can be expected at low level, it is required to investigate the details in future.

  19. Prevalence of Dental Fear and Anxiety amongst Patients in Selected Dental Clinics in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofori, Marian A.; Adu-Ababio, F.; Nyako, E. A.; Ndanu, Tom A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To find out the prevalence of dental anxiety and fear amongst patients in various selected dental clinics in Accra, Ghana. Study design: Dental patients (n = 279) who had either been exposed to dental treatments or had no prior dental exposure, attending four selected dental clinics in Accra were randomly sampled. They were interviewed…

  20. Quantification of dental prostheses on cone-beam CT images by the Taguchi method.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Rong-Fu; Fang, Kwang-Ming; Ty, Wong; Hu, Chia Yu

    2016-01-01

    The gray values accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is affected by dental metal prostheses. The distortion of dental CBCT gray values could lead to inaccuracies of orthodontic and implant treatment. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of scanning parameters and dental metal prostheses on the accuracy of dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) gray values using the Taguchi method. Eight dental model casts of an upper jaw including prostheses, and a ninth prosthesis-free dental model cast, were scanned by two dental CBCT devices. The mean gray value of the selected circular regions of interest (ROIs) were measured using dental CBCT images of eight dental model casts and were compared with those measured from CBCT images of the prosthesis-free dental model cast. For each image set, four consecutive slices of gingiva were selected. The seven factors (CBCTs, occlusal plane canting, implant connection, prosthesis position, coping material, coping thickness, and types of dental restoration) were used to evaluate scanning parameter and dental prostheses effects. Statistical methods of signal to noise ratio (S/N) and analysis of variance (ANOVA) with 95% confidence were applied to quantify the effects of scanning parameters and dental prostheses on dental CBCT gray values accuracy. For ROIs surrounding dental prostheses, the accuracy of CBCT gray values were affected primarily by implant connection (42%), followed by type of restoration (29%), prostheses position (19%), coping material (4%), and coping thickness (4%). For a single crown prosthesis (without support of implants) placed in dental model casts, gray value differences for ROIs 1-9 were below 12% and gray value differences for ROIs 13-18 away from pros-theses were below 10%. We found the gray value differences set to be between 7% and 8% for regions next to a single implant-supported titanium prosthesis, and between 46% and 59% for regions between double implant

  1. Dental therapists in general dental practices: an economic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beazoglou, Tryfon J; Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Heffley, Dennis R; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-08-01

    Dental access disparities are well documented and have been recognized as a national problem. Their major cause is the lack of reasonable Medicaid reimbursement rates for the underserved. Specifically, Medicaid reimbursement rates for children average 40 percent below market rates. In addition, most state Medicaid programs do not cover adults. To address these issues, advocates of better oral health for the underserved are considering support for a new allied provider--a dental therapist--capable of providing services at a lower cost per service and in low-income and rural areas. Using a standard economic analysis, this study estimated the potential cost, price, utilization, and dentist's income effects of dental therapists employed in general dental practices. The analysis is based on national general dental practice data and the broadest scope of responsibility for dental therapists that their advocates have advanced, including the ability to provide restorations and extractions to adults and children, training for three years, and minimum supervision. Assuming dental therapists provide restorative, extraction, and pulpal services to patients of all ages and dental hygienists continue to deliver all hygiene services, the mean reduction in a general practice costs ranges between 1.57 and 2.36 percent. For dental therapists treating children only, the range is 0.31 to 0.47 percent. The effects on price and utilization are even smaller. In addition, the effects on most dentists' gross income, hours of work, and net income are negative. The estimated economic impact of dental therapists in the United States on private dental practice is very limited; therefore, the demand for dental therapists by private practices also would probably be very limited. PMID:22855595

  2. Dental equipment test during zero-gravity flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The overall objectives of this program were to establish performance criteria and develop prototype equipment for use in the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) in meeting the needs of dental emergencies during space missions. The primary efforts during this flight test were to test patient-operator relationships, patent (manikin) restraint and positioning, task lighting systems, use and operation of dental rotary instruments, suction and particle containment system, dental hand instrument delivery and control procedures, and the use of dental treatment materials. The initial efforts during the flight focused on verification of the efficiency of the particle containment system. An absorptive barrier was also tested in lieu of the suction collector. To test the instrument delivery system, teeth in the manikin were prepared with the dental drill to receive restorations, some with temporary filling materials and another with definitive filling material (composite resin). The best particle containment came from the combination use of the laminar-air/suction collector in concert with immediate area suction from a surgical high-volume suction tip. Lighting in the treatment area was provided by a flexible fiberoptic probe. This system is quite effective for small areas, but for general tasks ambient illumination is required. The instrument containment system (elastic cord network) was extremely effective and easy to use. The most serious problem with instrument delivey and actual treatment was lack of time during the microgravity sequences. The restorative materials handled and finished well.

  3. Materialism.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Materialism is nearly universally assumed by cognitive scientists. Intuitively, materialism says that a person's mental states are nothing over and above his or her material states, while dualism denies this. Philosophers have introduced concepts (e.g., realization and supervenience) to assist in formulating the theses of materialism and dualism with more precision, and distinguished among importantly different versions of each view (e.g., eliminative materialism, substance dualism, and emergentism). They have also clarified the logic of arguments that use empirical findings to support materialism. Finally, they have devised various objections to materialism, objections that therefore serve also as arguments for dualism. These objections typically center around two features of mental states that materialism has had trouble in accommodating. The first feature is intentionality, the property of representing, or being about, objects, properties, and states of affairs external to the mental states. The second feature is phenomenal consciousness, the property possessed by many mental states of there being something it is like for the subject of the mental state to be in that mental state. WIREs Cogn Sci 2012, 3:281-292. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1174 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26301463

  4. Fibre-reinforced materials.

    PubMed

    Brown, D

    2000-11-01

    This paper considers the role of fibres in the reinforcement of composite materials, and the significance of the form the fibre takes and the material from which it is made. The current dental applications of fibre reinforcement, including dental cements and splints, fibres made into structures for use in composites, denture bases and the contemporary use of fibres in fixed partial dentures, are reviewed. Their role in biomedical implants is surveyed and their future forecast. PMID:11218597

  5. Finite Element Analysis Generates an Increasing Interest in Dental Research: A Bibliometric Study

    PubMed Central

    Diarra, Abdoulaziz; Mushegyan, Vagan; Naveau, Adrien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to provide a longitudinal overview of published studies that use finite element analysis in dental research, by using the SCI-expanded database of Web of Science® (Thomson Reuters). Material and Methods: Eighty publications from 1999-2000 and 473 from 2009-2010 were retrieved. This literature grew faster than the overall dental literature. The number of publishing countries doubled. The main journals were American or English, and dealt with implantology. For the top 10 journals publishing dental finite element papers, the mean impact factor increased by 75% during the decade. Results: Finite elements generate an increasing interest from dental authors and publishers worldwide. PMID:27006722

  6. Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Nutrition Home : Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Dental Enamel Defects and Celiac Disease Celiac disease manifestations ... affecting any organ or body system. One manifestation—dental enamel defects—can help dentists and other health ...

  7. Dental problems in athletes.

    PubMed

    Inouye, Jill; McGrew, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial injuries and diseases occur in athletes, and they may not always have access to dentists. Therefore team physicians should be aware of the common injuries and initial management. Treatment of dental injuries will depend on whether the teeth are primary or permanent. The most common type of fracture is crown fracture, but there are other dental injuries that can lead to future complications if not treated promptly and monitored closely. Tooth avulsions need to be handled properly, and athletes should see a dentist as soon as possible. Despite the urgency of some injuries, other orofacial injuries or diseases, such as lacerations and caries, should not be overlooked. Proper education and use of mouth guards can assist athletes in reducing their risk of orofacial injuries. PMID:25574879

  8. Development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after placement of dental implants: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamiri, Hashem Motahir; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Al-Maweri, Sadeq Ali; Tarakji, Bassel

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to highlight the development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma after the placement of dental implants. Materials and Methods: A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, accessed via the National Library of Medicine PubMed Interface, for articles published between 2000 and 2014 in English, relating to the occurrence of pyogenic granuloma or hemangioma in relation to dental implants. Results: Our search identified only four case reports of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma related to dental implants as reported in the English literature. Conclusion: Placement of dental implants can cause development of pyogenic granuloma and hemangioma, indicating that placement of dental implants requires well-trained specialists with perfect skills in dental implantology. Furthermore, the critical selection of the appropriate case is of paramount importance to avoid the occurrence of such complications. PMID:25992330

  9. Determination of Human-Health Pharmaceuticals in Filtered Water by Chemically Modified Styrene-Divinylbenzene Resin-Based Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Furlong, Edward T.; Werner, Stephen L.; Anderson, Bruce D.; Cahill, Jeffery D.

    2008-01-01

    In 1999, the Methods Research and Development Program of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory began the process of developing a method designed to identify and quantify human-health pharmaceuticals in four filtered water-sample types: reagent water, ground water, surface water minimally affected by human contributions, and surface water that contains a substantial fraction of treated wastewater. Compounds derived from human pharmaceutical and personal-care product use, which enter the environment through wastewater discharge, are a newly emerging area of concern; this method was intended to fulfill the need for a highly sensitive and highly selective means to identify and quantify 14 commonly used human pharmaceuticals in filtered-water samples. The concentrations of 12 pharmaceuticals are reported without qualification; the concentrations of two pharmaceuticals are reported as estimates because long-term reagent-spike sample recoveries fall below acceptance criteria for reporting concentrations without qualification. The method uses a chemically modified styrene-divinylbenzene resin-based solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge for analyte isolation and concentration. For analyte detection and quantitation, an instrumental method was developed that used a high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) system to separate the pharmaceuticals of interest from each other and coextracted material. Immediately following separation, the pharmaceuticals are ionized by electrospray ionization operated in the positive mode, and the positive ions produced are detected, identified, and quantified using a quadrupole mass spectrometer. In this method, 1-liter water samples are first filtered, either in the field or in the laboratory, using a 0.7-micrometer (um) nominal pore size glass-fiber filter to remove suspended solids. The filtered samples then are passed through cleaned and conditioned SPE cartridges at a rate of about 15

  10. Dental Assisting Education in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Industrial Education.

    A survey of 22 dental assisting programs showed an average of 1,124 hours of instruction in dental assisting for 15 four-semester, 955 for three three-semester, and 1,042 for four two-semester programs. The average instructional hours for the four-semester programs were 48 in introduction to dental assisting, 179 in the life sciences, 221 in the…

  11. Computerized assessment of dental student writing skills.

    PubMed

    Holtzman, Joseph M; Elliot, Norbert; Biber, Cheryl L; Sanders, R Michael

    2005-02-01

    This study tested the feasibility of using computer-based tools for the assessment of written materials produced by dental students. Written assignments produced by three consecutive incoming dental school classes (240 students) were assessed, and the performance among and between classes was analyzed. Computerized assessment of documents produced by students in the context of their regular coursework proved to be an efficient and effective mechanism for assessing performance. Student performance, assessed as a byproduct of this research, was disappointing. The performance of all classes fell below the eleventh grade level, with some students producing written material at a level of sophistication generally expected from middle school children. Existing technology shows promise as a vehicle for enhancing the assessment of dental students' written communication skills. The ease of use and minimal training necessary to apply this technology can help mitigate the time-intensive nature of writing assessment. If this assessment information is then used to enhance instruction--a process inherently available through software such as WebCT--the distance between assessment and instruction may be more readily bridged through an increase in the use of technology. PMID:15689614

  12. Fluorescence of dental porcelain.

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Clerjaud, B

    1993-01-01

    This study of the fluorescence of natural enamel and of dental ceramics shows the fluorescence of ceramics not containing rare earths decreases when the color saturation increases; the fluorescence of samples of the same shade guide are not homogenous; some guides show a strong green fluorescence; and two shade guides of the same origin can present completely different fluorescence. The cementing medium can affect the fluorescence of a ceramic prosthesis. PMID:8455155

  13. Dental Treatment Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Ida De Noronha De; Krishnan, Ramesh; Pavaskar, Rajdeep

    2014-01-01

    These case reports highlight dental treatment abuse performed by a quack on children. The anterior teeth of these children were metal capped using cement, which were otherwise healthy. The treatment was done on children without parental consent by a quack from Denmark who gave the reason as for resolving proclination of upper permanent incisors. The unanatomic, unaesthetic metal caps were removed after the child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. PMID:25177645

  14. Dental digital radiography.

    PubMed

    Moore, William S

    2002-05-01

    Digital images offer tremendous advantages to dentistry in terms of the potential for lower exposure to patients, absence of darkroom or processing problems, convenience of image enhancement techniques and capacity for remote teledentistry. Digital systems are now able to acquire all types of images including panoramic and cephalometric. As technology continues to improve they may ultimately replace film as the medium of choice for dental imaging. PMID:12046403

  15. Dental treatment abuse.

    PubMed

    Chalakkal, Paul; Ataide, Ida De Noronha De; Krishnan, Ramesh; Pavaskar, Rajdeep

    2014-07-01

    These case reports highlight dental treatment abuse performed by a quack on children. The anterior teeth of these children were metal capped using cement, which were otherwise healthy. The treatment was done on children without parental consent by a quack from Denmark who gave the reason as for resolving proclination of upper permanent incisors. The unanatomic, unaesthetic metal caps were removed after the child reported to the Department of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry. PMID:25177645

  16. The TATTLETOOTH Dental Program (Covering the Field Test Phase, Second Year). Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruchter, Dorothy A.; Higginson, George M.

    The Tattletooth program is a new dental health curriculum in which the students learn in the classroom to care for their teeth through brushing, flossing, and proper diet; and they receive needed support and encouragement to form good dental habits from their parents, dentists, and from community groups. Classroom materials for the Tattletooth…

  17. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  18. Are dental radiographs safe?

    PubMed

    Abbott, P

    2000-09-01

    Dental patients are often aware that radiation has the potential to harm them but they do not usually understand how or why and what potential harmful effects may arise from dental radiographs. The potential for undesirable effects must be balanced against the benefits obtained from radiographs. Dentists should address the concerns of patients who question the need for radiographs and allow them to make an informed decision. Data are available that relate radiation exposure levels from medical and dental radiographs to normal background exposure levels and allow comparisons with everyday risks in life. Recognized radiation authorities publish guidelines to help dentists with their use of radiographs, although, due to the time lag associated with testing and the publication of results, some of the published data may not always be entirely relevant to currently used X-ray machines and techniques. Dentists also have professional obligations not only to limit the use of radiographs to potentially beneficial situations but also to take good quality diagnostic radiographs, to limit the doses used, to use good radiation safety measures and to use modern equipment to achieve the best possible films. Radiographs must then be properly developed and viewed under appropriate conditions to gain the maximum possible diagnostic information from each exposure. PMID:11062940

  19. Dental diagnostics using optical coherence techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Nathel, H.; Colston, B.; Armitage, G.

    1994-11-15

    Optical radiation can be used for diagnostic purposes in oral medicine. However, due to the turbid, amorphous, and inhomogeneous nature of dental tissue conventional techniques used to transilluminate materials are not well suited to dental tissues. Optical coherence techniques either in the time- of frequency-domain offer the capabilities of discriminating scattered from unscattered light, thus allowing for imaging through turbid tissue. Currently, using optical time-domain reflectometry we are able to discriminate specular from diffuse reflections occurring at tissue boundaries. We have determined the specular reflectivity of enamel and dentin to be approximately 6.6 x 10{sup -5} and 1.3 x 10{sup -6}, respectively. Implications to periodontal imaging will be discussed.

  20. Dental implants in patients with bruxing habits.

    PubMed

    Lobbezoo, F; Brouwers, J E I G; Cune, M S; Naeije, M

    2006-02-01

    Bruxism (teeth grinding and clenching) is generally considered a contraindication for dental implants, although the evidence for this is usually based on clinical experience only. So far, studies to the possible cause-and-effect relationship between bruxism and implant failure do not yield consistent and specific outcomes. This is partly because of the large variation in the literature in terms of both the technical aspects and the biological aspects of the study material. Although there is still no proof for the suggestion that bruxism causes an overload of dental implants and of their suprastructures, a careful approach is recommended. There are a few practical guidelines as to minimize the chance of implant failure. Besides the recommendation to reduce or eliminate bruxism itself, these guidelines concern the number and dimensions of the implants, the design of the occlusion and articulation patterns, and the protection of the final result with a hard occlusal stabilization splint (night guard). PMID:16457676