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Sample records for resistance tomography ert

  1. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) Applied to Karst Carbonate Aquifers: Case Study from Amdoun, Northwestern Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Sami, Khomsi; Bédir, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    The Amdoun region is characterized by a high degree of karstification due to the climate impact (±1500 mm year-1) and the development of fracture network. Survey using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is deployed to provide a cost-effective characterization of the subsurface karst environments. A total of seven ERT profiles with lengths of 315 m were evaluated at the Béja governorate (NW Tunisia). The area represents a small syncline of Boudabbous limestone rocks (Lower Eocene), which is covered by a thin layer of clay. In this study, an ERT survey was conducted to examine the spatial distribution and shape of underground cavities in the karst area in Jebel Sabah anticline and Aïn Sallem-Zahret Medien syncline. In this study, geological, hydro-geological and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) methods were applied to determine the geometry of the perched aquifer in the Amdoun region (NW Tunisia). The area is characterized by fractured and karstic limestone aquifer of Late Cretaceous (Abiod Fm.) and Lower Eocene (Boudabbous Fm.). The aquifers have a karstic functioning and drain aquifers of economical interest, despite some wells exploiting them. Seven resistivity profiles were conducted along the survey area at three sites. The orientation, extension and the degree of inclination of those profiles are shown in the location map. The correct resistivity data were interpreted using Earth Imager 2D software. The results of the interpreted geo-electrical sections showed that the resistivity of the carbonate aquifer varied between 2.5 to over 5794 Ωm. The thickness of the perched aquifer ranged from 15 to 50 m, while its depth from the surface lies between 10 and 60 m. The ERT not only provided precise near surface information, but was also very useful for establishing the 3D geometry and the position of several potential cavities and karts. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths. The low resistivity of cavities

  2. The `L' Array, a method to model 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Chavez-Hernandez, G.; Delgado, C.; Tejero-Andrade, A.

    2010-12-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method designed to calculate the distribution of apparent electrical resistivities in the subsoil by means of a great number of observations with the aim of determining an electrical image displaying the distribution of true resistivities in the subsoil. Such process can be carried out to define 2D or 3D models of the subsurface. For a 3D ERT, usually, the electrodes are placed in a squared grid keeping the distance between adjacent electrodes constant in the x and y directions. Another design employed, consists of a series of parallel lines whose space inter-lines must be smaller or equal to four times the electrode separation. The most common electrode arrays frequently employed for this type of studies are the pole-pole, pole-dipole and dipole-dipole. Unfortunately, ERT surface sampling schemes are limited by physical conditions or obstacles, like buildings, highly populated urban zones, and geologic/topographic features, where the lines of electrodes cannot be set. However, it is always necessary to characterize the subsoil beneath such anthropogenic or natural features. The ‘L’ shaped array has the main purpose to overcome such difficulties by surrounding the study area with a square of electrode lines. The measurements are obtained by switching automatically current and potential electrodes from one line to the other. Each observation adds a level of information, from one profile to the other. Once the total levels of data are completed, the opposite ‘L’ array can be measured following the same process. The complete square is computed after the parallel profiles are observed as well. At the end, the computed resistivities are combined to form a 3D matrix of observations. Such set of data can be inverted to obtain the true resistivity distribution at depth in the form of a working cube, which can be interpreted. The method was tested with theoretical models, which included a set of two resistive cubes

  3. Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): A Minimally Invasive Method

    SciTech Connect

    Newmark, R L; Ramirez, A L; Daily, W D

    2002-08-05

    Successful geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), will require monitoring the CO{sub 2} injection to confirm the performance of the caprock/reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO{sub 2} and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are especially well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the presence and nature of the formation fluids. High resolution tomographs of electrical properties are now used for site characterization and to monitor subsurface migration of fluids (i.e., leaking underground tanks, infiltration events, steam floods, contaminant movement, and to assess the integrity of engineered barriers). When electrical resistance tomography (ERT) imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, the method is nearly transparent to reservoir operators, and reduces the need for additional drilling. Using numerical simulations and laboratory experiments, we have conducted sensitivity studies to determine the potential of ERT methods to detect and monitor the migration of CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. These studies have in turn been applied to the design and implementation of the first field casing surveys conducted in an oil field undergoing a CO{sub 2} flood.

  4. Core-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring of CO2-brine mixture in Fontainebleau sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosch, David; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Bellmunt, Fabian; Luquot, Linda; Gouze, Philippe

    2016-07-01

    The main goal of the monitoring stage of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is to obtain an accurate estimation of the subsurface CO2 accumulation and to detect any possible leakage. Laboratory experiments are necessary to investigate the small scale processes governing the CO2-brine-rock interaction. They also provide a means to calibrate the results coming from field scale geophysical methods. In this work we set up an experimental system which is able to perform Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements on centimeter-scale rock samples at various P-T conditions. We present the results of two new experiments related to CO2 monitoring, performed on a cylindrical (4 × 8 cm) Fontainebleau rock sample. In the first one, we have quantified the CO2 saturation at different volume fractions, representing zones from a deep saline aquifer with varying degrees of saturation. In the second one, we have monitored and quantified the effect of CO2 dissolution in the brine at a pressure of 40 bar during eight days, emulating the invasion of CO2 into a shallow aquifer. Results highlight the importance of accounting for the contribution of surface conductivity in highly CO2-saturated regions, even in clay-free rocks, and also for brine conductivity variation due to CO2 dissolution. Ignoring any of these effects will end up in a CO2 saturation underestimation. We present a modified CO2 saturation equation to account for these two influences.

  5. Identifying the changes of geo-engineering properties of dunites due to weathering utilizing electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ündül, Ömer; Tuğrul, Atiye; Özyalın, Şenol; Halil Zarif, İ.

    2015-04-01

    Weathering phenomena have an important role in many construction facilities with varying depths and grades. Due to the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of weathering profiles of some rocks, uncertainities exist in determining the geo-engineering properties. Geo-electrical studies have been utilized to overcome such uncertainities for various subsurface conditions including the determination of boundaries between weathered and unweathered parts of different rock types. In this study, the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) results were correlated with conventional methods in determining the effects of weathering on the geo-engineering properties of dunites. During the research, weathering grades were determined by field studies including discontinuity spacings, aperture and properties of fill materials. The detailed petrographical studies, determination of petrophysical properties (e.g. water absorption and effective porosity) and mechanical properties (e.g. unconfined compressive strength (UCS)) constitute the laboratory studies. ERT studies were carried out in a row of sixty electrodes with electrode spacings of 0.5 m utilizing a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration. According to the comparison of the inversion model sections with the weathering profiles obtained by field and laboratory studies it is concluded that the use of ERT with a Wenner-Schlumberger configuration supplies comparable data for wider subsurface areas from the view of weathering and its effect on geo-engineering properties of dunites. In addition, ERT techniques are very useful where conventional techniques are inadequate in determining the full weathering profile.

  6. Automated time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for improved process analysis and long-term monitoring of frozen ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Christian; Hilbich, Christin; Fuss, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Determining the subsurface ice and unfrozen water content in cold regions are important tasks in all kind of cryospheric studies, but especially on perennial (permafrost) or seasonal frozen ground, where little insights can be gained from direct observations at the surface. In the absence of boreholes, geophysical methods are often the only possibility for visualising and quantifying the subsurface characteristics. Their successful applications in recent years lead to more and more sophisticated approaches including 2- and 3-dimensional monitoring and even quantifying the ice and unfrozen water content evolution within the subsurface. Due to the strong sensitivity of electrical resistivity to the phase change between unfrozen water and ice, the application of electrical and electromagnetic techniques has been especially successful. Within these methods, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is often favoured due to its comparatively easy and fast data processing, its robustness against ambient noise and its good performance even in harsh, cold and heterogeneous environments. Numerous recent studies have shown that ERT is principally suitable to spatially delineate ground ice, differentiate between ice-poor and ice-rich occurrences, monitor freezing, thawing and infiltration processes. However, resistivity surveys have still to be made manually, which poses large constraints concerning the comparability of measurements at specific time instances, e.g. the choice of the date for end-of-summer measurements, and/or the possibility for measurements during winter, when many locations are inaccessible. Furthermore, many climate studies require the analysis of statistically meaningful properties, such as maximum/minimum values and monthly or annual mean values, which cannot be determined using temporally sparse and irregularly spaced measurements. As a new system for future automated measurements with regular time interval (e.g. 1 measurement per day), an automated ERT

  7. Monitoring active layer thaw and freeze-back in four different periglacial landforms in Svalbard using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliussen, H.; Oswald, A.; Watanabe, T.; Christiansen, H. H.; Matsuoka, N.

    2012-04-01

    Thawing and freezing of the active layer has an important impact on the underlying permafrost through latent heat effects and changes in effective thermal conductivity and mechanisms of heat transport. Information on the active layer freeze/thaw dynamics is therefore important to understand the permafrost response to climate variability. In addition, active layer deepening may be an early sign of permafrost degradation, making monitoring programs such as the CALM network important. Active layer depths are traditionally measured by mechanical probing in fine-grained sediments or by vertical arrays of ground temperature sensors. The first technique prevents measurements to be made in stony sediments, while the latter technique gives only a point value of the active layer depth. In this study we have tested Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) as a tool to measure and monitor active layer depth and freeze/thaw dynamics. The electrical resistivity of the ground is largely dependent on the unfrozen water content, making resistivity monitoring a potentially valuable tool to delineate freeze and thaw extent, and patterns in soil moisture. The results presented here are part of the IPY 2007-2009 research project 'Permafrost Observatory Project: A Contribution to the Thermal State of Permafrost in Norway and Svalbard' (TSP NORWAY) and the IPA periglacial working group project on 'High-Resolution Periglacial Climate Indicators'. Electrode arrays were installed permanently in four different periglacial landforms in the Adventdalen valley area in central Svalbard; a solifluction slope in May 2007, a loess terrace (the UNISCALM site) in September 2007, and a mudboil site and ice-wedge site in June 2009 (Watanabe et al., submitted). The arrays were 16m long, giving maximum profile depths of 2m, and electrodes were installed with 0.2m spacing. Measurements were made with irregular but approximately two- to four-week time intervals, depending on weather conditions and

  8. Tri-Dimensional Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT-3D) Technique, an Efficient Tool to Unveil the Subsoil of Archaeological Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Vargas, D.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Tejero, A.

    2014-12-01

    Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography techniques (ERT-3D) have demonstrated to be an efficient tool to study the subsurface of areas of archaeological interest by special arrays designed to 'illuminate' the subsoil beneath the structure under study. 'L'- and 'Corner'-arrays are applied to design alternative electrode geometries, which attempt to cover the subsurface with enough resistivity observations underneath the studied target. Two examples are presented where novel geometries can be applied to investigate the subsoil of two important pyramids in Mexico. First, the archaeological site of Cuicuilco is studied. The area is found towards the southern portion of the Mexican Basin. This pyramid presents a circular structure of 110 m in diameter and a total height of 25 m. The region is partially covered by the lava flows that came from an eruptive event form the Xitle Volcano 1500 years ago. The geophysical study was carried out at the base of the pyramid. 48 electrodes were deployed along a circular transect, with an electrode separation of 5.4 m. A total of 1716 apparent resistivity observations were measured. The inverted model computed is obtained with an investigation depth of 30 m, approximately (Figure 1, in color). A resistive anomaly can be observed towards the central portion of the model. This anomaly can be associated to a burial chamber, excavated by the archaeologists. The second example corresponds to the pyiramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the southern lowlands of Mexico, within the Yucatan Peninsula. Previous GPR studies carried out within the pyramid's Plaza provided evidences of a buried tunnel excavated within the limestone rocks. Such feature seemed to run beneath the eastern flank of the pyramide. The geophysical study was carried out by employing 96 flat-surface electrodes, which surrounded the edifice forming a square geometry. A total of 5,350 apparent resistivity observations were

  9. High Resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in a Transition Zone Environment: Application for Detailed Internal Architecture and Infilling Processes Study of a Rhône River Paleo-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillet, Grégoire M.; Rizzo, Enzo; Revil, André; Vella, Claude

    2005-06-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was applied in a sand-infilled paleo-channel located in the Rhône Delta, in Southern France. The detailed pattern and sedimentological evolution of the channel fill deposits - know from both historical and geological sources - made it the ideal site to test the ERT method. A geoelectrical survey was performed, using the ABEM SAS-4000 multi-electrode array system in March 2003. Very low electrical resistivity values were obtained, ranging from 0.3 to 10 Ohm m, consistent with the high salinity measured in situ (the pore water conductivity was found to range from 0.9 to 1.2 S/m at 25 °C). The electrical resistivity profiles reflect mainly salinity variations. Indeed, in this case, salinity is so high that surface conductivity associated with clay minerals can be safely neglected. ERT provided valuable high-resolution information that complemented other exiting data such as historical information, bathymetric, geological, and lithostratigraphic data, which allowed the architecture of the channel to be defined. The ERT was used to determine the infilling dynamics of the Pégoulier Channel, which opens new perspectives in terms of paleoenvironmental reconstruction and paleodynamic studies.

  10. Revealing plot scale heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics under contrasting vegetation assemblages using 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, Jonathan; Tetzlaff, Doerthe; Bradford, John; Soulsby, Chris

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental component of the water cycle that influences many hydrological processes, such as flooding, solute transport, biogeochemical processes, and land-atmosphere interactions. The relationship between vegetation and soil moisture is complex and reciprocal. Soil moisture may affect vegetation distribution due to its function as the primary source of water, in turn the structure of vegetation canopies regulate water partitioning into interception, throughfall and steam flow. Such spatial differences in inputs, together with complex patterns of water uptake from distributed root networks can create marked heterogeneity in soil moisture dynamics at small scales. Traditional methods of monitoring soil moisture have revolved around limited point measurements, but improved geophysical techniques have facilitated a trend towards more spatially distributed measurements to help understand this heterogeneity. Here, we present a study using 3D ERT surveys in a 3.2km upland catchment in the Scottish Highlands where increasing afforestation (for climate change adaptation, biofuels and conservation) has the potential to increase interception losses and reduce soil moisture storage. The study combined 3D surveys, traditional point measurements and laboratory analysis of soil cores to assess the plot scale soil moisture dynamics in podzolic soils under forest stands of 15m high Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) and adjacent non-forest plots dominated by heather (Calluna vulgaris) shrubs (<0.5m high). These dominant species are typical of forest and non-forest vegetation communities the Scottish Highlands. Results showed differences in the soil moisture dynamics under the different vegetation types, with heterogeneous patterns in the forested site mainly correlated with canopy cover and mirroring interception losses. Temporal variability in the forested site was greater, probably due to the interception, and increased evapotranspiration losses relative to the

  11. Mapping Contaminant Remediation with Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, J.; Power, C.; Tsourlos, P.; Karaoulis, M.; Giannopoulos, A.; Soupios, P. M.; Simyrdanis, K.

    2014-12-01

    The remediation of sites contaminated with industrial chemicals - specifically dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) like coal tar and chlorinated solvents - represents a major geoenvironmental challenge. Remediation activities would benefit from a non-destructive technique to map the evolution of DNAPL mass in space and time. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has long-standing potential in this context but has not yet become a common tool at DNAPL sites. This work evaluated the potential of time-lapse ERT for mapping DNAPL mass reduction in real time during remediation. Initially, a coupled DNAPL-ERT numerical model was developed for exploring this potential at the field scale, generating realistic DNAPL scenarios and predicting the response of an ERT survey. Also, new four-dimensional (4D) inversion algorithms were integrated for tracking DNAPL removal over time. 4D ERT applied at the surface for mapping an evolving DNAPL distribution was first demonstrated in a laboratory experiment. Independent simulation of the experiment demonstrated the reliability of the DNAPL-ERT model for simulating real systems. The model was then used to explore the 4D ERT approach at the field scale for a range of realistic DNAPL remediation scenarios. The approach showed excellent potential for mapping shallow DNAPL changes. However, remediation at depth was not as well resolved. To overcome this limitation, a new surface-to-horizontal borehole (S2HB) ERT configuration is proposed. A second laboratory experiment was conducted that demonstrated that S2HB ERT does better resolve changes in DNAPL distribution relative to surface ERT, particularly at depth. The DNAPL-ERT model was also used to demonstrate the improved mapping of S2HB ERT for field scale DNAPL scenarios. Overall, this work demonstrates that, with these innovations, ERT exhibits significant potential as a real time, non-destructive geoenvironmental remediation site monitoring tool.

  12. Electrical Resistance Tomography imaging of concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Karhunen, Kimmo; Seppaenen, Aku; Lehikoinen, Anssi; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Kaipio, Jari P.

    2010-01-15

    We apply Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) for three dimensional imaging of concrete. In ERT, alternating currents are injected into the target using an array of electrodes attached to the target surface, and the resulting voltages are measured using the same electrodes. These boundary measurements are used for reconstructing the internal (3D) conductivity distribution of the target. In reinforced concrete, the metallic phases (reinforcing bars and fibers), cracks and air voids, moisture gradients, and the chloride distribution in the matrix carry contrast with respect to conductivity. While electrical measurements have been widely used to characterize the properties of concrete, only preliminary results of applying ERT to concrete imaging have been published so far. The aim of this paper is to carry out a feasibility evaluation with specifically cast samples. The results indicate that ERT may be a feasible modality for non-destructive evaluation of concrete.

  13. Electrical resistivity tomography investigations on a paleoseismological trenching study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berge, Meriç Aziz

    2014-10-01

    Two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) investigation was performed in a paleoseismological trenching study. Data acquisition strategies such as the selection of electrode configuration and electrode intervals of ERT application were investigated in this paper. The ERT results showed that the Wenner and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays yielded similar results for subsurface characteristics whereas the DD array provided slightly different results. The combined usage of these arrays produced satisfactory images of the subsurface resistivity distribution. In addition, the electrode spacing tests revealed that a suitable interpretation of subsurface geology can be obtained from a 5 m electrode interval. However, a suitable trenching location defined by successful 2D resistivity models was obtained for 1 m electrode spacing. Therefore, the comparison of the trench and ERT results was also possible. The results of trenching and ERT studies substantially support each other.

  14. Electrical resistance tomography of concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Binley, A.; Henry-Poulter, S.

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the feasibility of using Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to nondestructively examine the interior of concrete structures such as bridge pillars and roadways. We report the results of experiments wherein ERT is used to image the two concrete specimens in the laboratory. Each specimen is 5 inches square and 12 inches long and contained steel reinforcing rods along its length. Twenty electrodes were placed on each sample and an-image of electrical resistivity distribution was generated from current and voltage measurements. We found that the images show the general location of the reinforcing steel and, what`s more important, delineate the absence of the steel. The method may therefore be useful for determining if such steel has been destroyed by corrosion, however to make it useful, the technique must have better resolution so that individual reinforcing steel units are resolved.

  15. Electrical resistance tomography for imaging concrete structures

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.

    1995-11-08

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) has been used to non-destructively examine the interior of reinforced concrete pillars in the laboratory during a water infiltration experiment. ERT is a technique for determining the electrical resistivity distribution within a volume from measurement of injected currents and the resulting electrical potential distribution on the surface. The transfer resistance (ratio of potential to injected current) data are inverted using an algorithm based on a finite element forward solution which is iteratively adjusted in a least squares sense until the measured and calculated transfer resistances agree to within some predetermined value. Laboratory specimens of concrete pillars, 61.0 cm (24 in) in length and 20.3 cm (8 in) on a side, were prepared with various combinations of steel reinforcing bars and voids (1.27 cm diameter) which ran along the length of the pillars. An array of electrodes was placed around the pillar to allow for injecting current and measuring the resulting potentials. After the baseline resistivity distribution was determined, water was added to a void near one comer of the pillar. ERT was used to determine the resistivity distribution of the pillar at regular time intervals as water was added. The ERT images show very clearly that the water was gradually imbibed into the concrete pillar during the course of the experiment. The resistivity decreased by nearly an order of magnitude near the point of water addition in the first hour, and by nearly two orders of magnitude by the end of the experiment. Other applications for this technology include monitoring of curing in concrete structures, detecting cracks in concrete structures, detecting rebar location and corrosion state, monitoring slope stability and the stability of footings, detecting and monitoring leaks from storage tanks, monitoring thermal processes during environmental remediation, and for detecting and monitoring contaminants in soil and groundwater.

  16. Resistivity structure of the Furnas hydrothermal system (Azores archipelago, Portugal) from AMT and ERT imaging.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rath, Volker; Silva, Catarina; Hogg, Colin; Kiyan, Duygu; Viveiros, Fatima; Eleuterio, Joana; Gresse, Marceau

    2016-04-01

    The Furnas volcanic complex is located in the eastern part of the São Miguel Island and comprises a 5 km × 8 km summit depression filled by two nested calderas with several craters and a lake. Present-day volcanic activity of Furnas volcano is mostly located in the northern part of the caldera, within the Furnas village and north to Furnas Lake, where hydrothermal manifestations are mainly fumarolic fields, steam vents, thermal springs, and intense soil diffuse degassing. Considering the Furnas volcano as a whole, the total integrated CO2 efflux is extremely high, with a total amount of CO2 close to 1000 ton per day (Viveiros et al., 2009). We present the first results of an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), combined with audio-magneto-telluric (AMT) measurements aligned along two profiles inside the caldera. The purpose of this survey is to delimit the extent, the geometry, and the depth of the hydrothermal system and to correlate the deep resistivity structure with high resolution cartography of diffuse CO2 flux (Viveiros et al, 2015). The ERT and AMT methods are complementary in terms of resolution and penetration depth: ERT can image the structural details of shallow hydrothermal system (down to 100 m in our study) while AMT can image at lower resolution deeper structures at the roots of a volcano (down to 4 km in our study). Our first independent 2D inversions of the ERT-AMT data show a good agreement between the surficial and deeper features. Below the main fumarole area we observe a low resistivity body (less than 1 Ohmm) which corresponds well to the high CO2 flux at the surface and is associated with an extended conductive body at larger depth. These results strongly suggest the presence of hydrothermal waters at depth or/and the presence of altered clay-rich material. On a larger scale however, the geometry of the conducting zones differs slightly from what was expected from earlier surface studies, and may not be directly related to fault zones

  17. Measuring turbulence in a flotation cell using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Jun; Xie, Weiguo; Runge, Kym; Bradshaw, Dee

    2015-11-01

    Measuring turbulence in an industrial flotation environment has long been problematic due to the opaque, aggressive, and abrasive three-phase environment in a flotation cell. One of the promising measurement techniques is electrical resistance tomography (ERT). By measuring the conductivity distribution across a measurement area, ERT has been adopted by many researchers to monitor and investigate many processes involving multiphase flows. In the research outlined in this paper, a compact ERT probe was built and then used to measure the conductivity distribution within a 60 l flotation cell operated with water and air. Two approaches were then developed to process the ERT data and estimate turbulence-related parameters. One is a conductivity variance method and the other is based on the Green-Kubo relations. Both rely on and use the fluctuation in the ERT measurement caused by bubbles moving through the measurement area changing the density of the fluid. The results from both approaches were validated by comparing the results produced by the ERT probe in a 60l flotation cell operated at different air rates and impeller speeds to that measured using an alternative turbulence measurement device. The second approach is considered superior to the first as the first requires the development of auxiliary information which would not usually be known for a new system.

  18. Electrical resistance tomography from measurements inside a steel cased borehole

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Schenkel, Clifford; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2000-01-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produced from measurements taken inside a steel cased borehole. A tomographic inversion of electrical resistance measurements made within a steel casing was then made for the purpose of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution in the formation remotely from the borehole. The ERT method involves combining electrical resistance measurements made inside a steel casing of a borehole to determine the electrical resistivity in the formation adjacent to the borehole; and the inversion of electrical resistance measurements made from a borehole not cased with an electrically conducting casing to determine the electrical resistivity distribution remotely from a borehole. It has been demonstrated that by using these combined techniques, highly accurate current injection and voltage measurements, made at appropriate points within the casing, can be tomographically inverted to yield useful information outside the borehole casing.

  19. Contact resistance problems applying ERT on low bulk density forested stony soils. Is there a solution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deraedt, Deborah; Touzé, Camille; Robert, Tanguy; Colinet, Gilles; Degré, Aurore; Garré, Sarah

    2015-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has often been put forward as a promising tool to quantify soil water and solute fluxes in a non-invasive way. In our experiment, we wanted to determine preferential flow processes along a forested hillslope using a saline tracer with ERT. The experiment was conducted in the Houille watershed, subcatchment of the Meuse located in the North of Belgian Ardennes (50° 1'52.6'N, 4° 53'22.5'E). The climate is continental but the soil under spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and Douglas fire stand (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco) remains quite dry (19% WVC in average) during the whole year. The soil is Cambisol and the parent rock is Devonian schist covered with variable thickness of silty loam soil. The soil density ranges from 1.13 to 1.87 g/cm3 on average. The stone content varies from 20 to 89% and the soil depth fluctuates between 70 and 130 cm. The ERT tests took place on June 1st 2012, April 1st, 2nd and 3rd 2014 and May 12th 2014. We used the Terrameter LS 12 channels (ABEM, Sweden) in 2012 test and the DAS-1 (Multi-Phase Technologies, United States) in 2014. Different electrode configurations and arrays were adopted for different dates (transect and grid arrays and Wenner - Schlumberger, Wenner alpha and dipole-dipole configurations). During all tests, we systematically faced technical problems, mainly related to bad electrode contact. The recorded data show values of contact resistance above 14873 Ω (our target value would be below 3000 Ω). Subsequently, we tried to improve the contact by predrilling the soil and pouring water in the electrode holes. The contact resistance improved to 14040 Ω as minimum. The same procedure with liquid mud was then tested to prevent quick percolation of the water from the electrode location. As a result, the lower contact resistance dropped to 11745 Ω. Finally, we applied about 25 litre of saline solution (CaCl2, 0.75g/L) homogeneously on the electrode grid. The minimum value of

  20. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Busato, Laura; Boaga, Jacopo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Binley, Andrew; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona

    2016-04-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  1. Micro 3D ERT tomography for data assimilation modelling of active root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Vanella, D.; Consoli, S.; Binley, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Within the soil-plant-atmosphere system, root activity plays a fundamental role, as it connects different domains and allows a large part of the water and nutrient exchanges necessary for plant sustenance. The understanding of these processes is not only useful from an environmental point of view, making a fundamental contribution to the understanding of the critical zone dynamics, but also plays a pivotal role in precision agriculture, where the optimisation of water resources exploitation is mandatory and often carried out through deficit irrigation techniques. In this work, we present the results of non-invasive monitoring of the active root zone of two orange trees (Citrus sinensis, cv Tarocco Ippolito) located in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy) and drip irrigated with two different techniques: partial root drying and 100% crop evapotranspiration. The main goal of the monitoring activity is to assess possible differences between the developed root systems and the root water uptake between the two irrigation strategies. The monitoring is conducted using 3D micro-electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) based on an apparatus composed of a number of micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) housing 12 electrodes each, plus a number of surface electrodes. Time-lapse measurements conducted both with long-term periodicity and short-term repetition before and after irrigation clearly highlight the presence and distribution of root water uptake zone both at shallow and larger depth, likely to correspond to zones utilized during the irrigation period (shallow) and during the time when the crop is not irrigated (deep). Subsidiary information is available in terms of precipitation, sap flow measurements and micrometeorological evapotranspiration estimates. This data ensemble lends itself to the assimilation into a variably saturated flow model, where both soil hydraulic parameters and root distribution shall be identified. Preliminary results in this directions show

  2. Electrical resistance tomography to monitor unsaturated moisture flow in cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hallaji, Milad; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2015-03-15

    Traditionally the electrically-based assessment of the moisture flow in cement-based materials relies on two- or four-point measurements. In this paper, imaging of moisture distribution with electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is considered. Especially, the aim is to study whether ERT could give information on unsaturated moisture flows in cases where the flow is non-uniform. In the experiment, the specimens are monitored with ERT during the water ingress. The ERT reconstructions are compared with neutron radiographs, which provide high resolution information on the 2D distribution of the moisture. The results indicate that ERT is able to detect the moisture movement and to show approximately the shape and position of the water front even if the flow is nonuniform.

  3. Geophysical Exploration of Castle Remains in Barwałd Górny (Near Kalwaria Zebrzydowska, Poland) Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with Assistance of Depth of Investigation Index (DOI) Method.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glazer, Michał; Kula, Damian; Saternus, Robert; Lewicki, Paweł

    2014-09-01

    In March of 2014 at ruins of the 14th century castle, situated at the top of Mount Żar in Małopolska region, Poland, geophysical surveys were performed. Surveys were planned to investigate remains of the castle that could remain in the ground. Electrical Resistivity Tomography method was used there. In the paper 4 sections have been presented. During interpretation, as the supporting method, maps of Depth-of-Investigation (DOI) index have been used. Results of the surveys can point out potential remains of the castle walls and ruins of buildings that were situated in the stronghold

  4. Infiltration front monitoring using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oxarango, Laurent; Audebert, Marine; Guyard, Helene; Clement, Remi

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) geophysical method is commonly used to identify the spatial distribution of electrical resisitivity in the soil at the field scale. Recent progress in commercial acquisition systems allows repeating fast acquisitions (10 min) in order to monitor a 3D dynamic phenomenon. Since the ERT method is sensitive to moisture content variations, it can thus be used to delineate the infiltration shape during water infiltration. In heterogeneous conditions, the 3D infiltration shape is a crucial information because it could differ significantly from the homogeneous behavior. In a first step, the ERT method is validated at small scale (<1m) studying a suction infiltrometer test. The experiment is carried out in a pit filled with a homogenous silty-sandy soil. It is instrumented by 17 resistivity probes and 3 commercial capacitive moisture content probes to provide local measurements of the moisture content variation. The Multiple Inversion and Clustering Strategy (MICS) (Audebert et al 2014) is used to delineate the infiltration patern. A satisfying agreement between infiltration delineation and sensor measurements is obtained with a few centimeter accuracy on the moisture front location. In a second step, the same methodology is applied at a larger scale (> 10m). Two examples of leachate injection monitoring in municipal solid waste landfills are used to put forward benefits and limitations of the ERT-MICS method. Effective infiltration porosities in a range between 3% and 8% support the assumption of a flow in heterogeneous media. Audebert, M., R. Clément, N. Touze-Foltz, T. Günther, S. Moreau, and C. Duquennoi (2014), Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS), Journal of Applied Geophysics, 111, 320-333. Keywords: ERT, infiltration front, field survey

  5. Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barriers using Electrical Resistance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A; Bratton, W; Maresca, J; Daily, W; Dickerson, W

    2003-12-08

    An electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method is being evaluated as a measurement tool to determine the integrity of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) during and after construction of the barrier and as a monitoring tool to determine the long-term operational health of the barrier. The method is novel because it inserts the electrodes directly into the barrier itself. Numerical modeling calculations indicate that the ERT method can detect flaws (voids) in the barrier as small as 0.11 m{sup 2} (0.33 m x 0.33 m) when the aspect ratio of the electrodes are 2:1. Laboratory measurements indicate that the change in resistance over time of the iron-filling mixture used to create the PRB is sufficient for ERT to monitor the long-term health of the barrier. The use of this ERT method allows for the cost-effective installation of the barrier, especially when the vadose zone is large, because borehole installation methods, rather than trenching methods, can be used.

  6. Investigations of discontinuous permafrost using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewkowicz, Antoni

    2016-04-01

    We have used electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) extensively over the past five years to examine frozen ground characteristics at natural and disturbed sites within the discontinuous permafrost zones of northern Canada. Examples of pure research include investigations to delimit permafrost patch size, to examine changes in permafrost conditions at altitudinal treeline, and to assess permafrost thickness in palsa bogs. Applied research has included hazard mapping where ERT, in association with boreholes, has been used to characterize permafrost conditions in different terrain units at Yukon communities as part of planning for climate change adaptation. ERT has also been used to examine temporal change through repeated surveys at sites equipped with permanent arrays. Rapid change is occurring at sites which were subject to recent forest fire in the Northwest Territories. Gradual reductions in average resistivity at sites along the Alaska Highway in Yukon and northern British Columbia indicate progressive increases in unfrozen moisture while ground temperatures at the same sites have increased only very slightly. We conclude that ERT should become a standard technique for the investigation of discontinuous permafrost sites and should be incorporated as a monitoring technique within international programs such as the Global Terrestrial Network for Permafrost.

  7. Observation of infiltration experiments with time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Altfelder, Sven; Günther, Thomas; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Grissemann, Christoph

    2010-05-01

    analysed quantitatively. For the first experiment this calculation shows one day after the infiltration about 40% of the infiltrated water being lost to the groundwater. For the second experiment the quantitative interpretation takes into account the increased conductivity of the infiltrating tracer solution compared to the pore water of the vadose zone before infiltration. Another infiltration experiment is done on Loess. Due to the low infiltration rate only about 9l of water could be infiltrated within about 3 h (38mm/h). The time lapse ERT clearly reveals the water remaining close to surface and no sign of resistivity change due to the infiltration is observed to penetrate deeper than 30cm. At this depth the plough pan seems to inhibit the infiltration. The analysis shows the high sensitivity of the ERT method. Although the original water content is quite high and therefore the resistivity changes due to water content changes are small (the flat part of the Archie function) the time lapse ERT inversion depicts the changes of resistivity quite clearly. The experiments show the advantages of ERT measurements to observe the infiltration process in real time. However, the interpretation of such measurements still poses difficulties mainly due to the limited resolution and the ill posedness of the inversion problem of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). These problems are investigated further in order to advance the applicability of the method to infiltration problems showing signs of preferential flow.

  8. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  9. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Chesnut, Dwayne A.; Daily, William D.

    1994-01-01

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  10. Applications of electrical resistance tomography to subsurface environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-11-15

    We are developing a new imaging technique, Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), to map subsurface liquids as flow occurs during natural or clean-up processes and to map geologic structure. Natural processes (such as surface water infiltrating the vadose zone) and man-induced processes (such as tank leaks and clean-up processes such as steam injection), can create changes in a soil`s electrical properties that are readily measured. We have conducted laboratory and a variety of field experiments to investigate the capabilities and limitations of ERT for imaging underground structures and processes. In the last four years we have used ERT to successfully monitor several field processes including: a subsurface steam injection process (for VOC removal), an air injection process (below the water table) for VOC removal, water infiltration through the vadose zone, radio-frequency heating, ohmic heating, and tank and pond leaks. The information derived from ERT can be used by remediation projects to: detect and locate leaks, determine the effectiveness of clean-up processes, select appropriate clean-up alternatives, and to verify the installation and performance of subsurface barriers.

  11. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Cooper, John F.; Daily, William D.

    1996-01-01

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  12. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOEpatents

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  13. Imaging pathways in fractured rock using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, Judith; Slater, Lee; Johnson, Timothy B.; Shapiro, Allen M.; Tiedeman, Claire; Ntlargiannis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Carole D.; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Lacombe, Pierre; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges exist in delineating bedrock fracture zones because these cause abrupt changes in geological and hydrogeological properties over small distances. Borehole observations cannot sufficiently capture heterogeneity in these systems. Geophysical techniques offer the potential to image properties and processes in between boreholes. We used three-dimensional cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a 9 m (diameter) × 15 m well field to capture high-resolution flow and transport processes in a fractured mudstone contaminated by chlorinated solvents, primarily trichloroethylene. Conductive (sodium bromide) and resistive (deionized water) injections were monitored in seven boreholes. Electrode arrays with isolation packers and fluid sampling ports were designed to enable acquisition of ERT measurements during pulsed tracer injections. Fracture zone locations and hydraulic pathways inferred from hydraulic head drawdown data were compared with electrical conductivity distributions from ERT measurements. Static ERT imaging has limited resolution to decipher individual fractures; however, these images showed alternating conductive and resistive zones, consistent with alternating laminated and massive mudstone units at the site. Tracer evolution and migration was clearly revealed in time-lapse ERT images and supported by in situ borehole vertical apparent conductivity profiles collected during the pulsed tracer test. While water samples provided important local information at the extraction borehole, ERT delineated tracer migration over spatial scales capturing the primary hydrogeological heterogeneity controlling flow and transport. The fate of these tracer injections at this scale could not have been quantified using borehole logging and/or borehole sampling methods alone.

  14. Electrical resistivity tomography as a tool for monitoring CO2 injection: Demonstration of leakage detection during bench-scale experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, S. J.; Carrigan, C. R.; LaBrecque, D. J.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2011-12-01

    Field-scale studies have shown Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to be an effective tool for imaging resistivity anomalies and monitoring infiltration events in the near subsurface. ERT also shows potential for monitoring CO2 injections, despite deployment challenges in the deep subsurface. We present results from analog bench-scale experiments aimed at evaluating the ability of ERT to quantify the volume and spatial distribution of a gas injected into a brine-saturated porous medium. We injected measured volumes of gas into translucent chambers filled with quartz sand, lined with electrodes, and saturated with a low resistivity salt solution. Between injections, a CCD camera captured high-resolution images, and an ERT data acquisition system scanned the chamber. Using the CCD images, quantitative visualization techniques resulted in high-resolution measurements of the spatial distribution and saturation of the injected gas. Direct comparison to inverted resistivity fields then provided a quantitative measure of the ability of ERT to estimate the total volume of injected gas and its spatial distribution within the chamber. We present results from two experiments designed to represent different injection scenarios: (A) low injection rate and strong capillary barrier, and (B) high injection rate and weaker capillary barrier. Results show that ERT provides good estimates of the shape, size and location of the primary gas plume, but underestimates gas content and does not detect thin pathways of gas from the injection port or within the overlying capillary barrier. However, ERT measurements did detect a change in saturation within the primary plume caused by leakage through the capillary barrier in (B), demonstrating the potential utility of ERT as a leakage-monitoring tool. Repeated ERT scans during our experiments led to degradation in data quality that corresponded with an increase in measured contact resistance. Decreased data quality over time is clearly a

  15. Delineation of graves using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nero, Callistus; Aning, Akwasi Acheampong; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Noye, Reginald M.

    2016-03-01

    A suspected old royal cemetery has been surveyed at the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) campus, Kumasi, Ghana using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) with the objective of detecting graves in order to make informed decisions with regard to the future use of the area. The survey was conducted on a 10,000 m2 area. Continuous Vertical Electrical Sounding (CVES) was combined with the roll along technique for 51 profiles with 1 m probe separation separated by 2 m. Inverted data results indicated wide resistivity variations ranging between 9.34 Ωm and 600 Ωm in the near surface. Such heterogeneity suggests a disturbance of the soil at this level. Both high (≥ 600 Ωm) and low resistivity (≤ 74.7 Ωm) anomalies, relative to background levels, were identified within the first 4 m of the subsurface. These were suspected to be burial tombs because of their rectangular geometries and resistivity contrasts. The results were validated with forward numerical modeling results. The study area is therefore an old cemetery and should be preserved as a cultural heritage site.

  16. Monitoring of olive oil mills' wastes using electrical resistivity tomography techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simyrdanis, Kleanthis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Kirkou, Stella; Sarris, Apostolos; Tsourlos, Panagiotis

    2014-08-01

    Olive oil mills' wastes (OOMW) are one of the byproducts of the oil production that can lead to serious environmental pollution when they are deposited in ponds dug on the ground surface. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) method can provide a valuable tool in order to monitor through time the physical flow of the wastes into the subsurface. ERT could potentially locate the electrical signature due to lower resistivity values resulting from the leakage of OOMW to the subsurface. For this purpose, two vertical boreholes were installed (12m depth, 9 m apart) in the vicinity of an existing pond which is filled with OOMW during the oil production period. The test site is situated in Saint Andreas village about 15km south of the city of Rethymno (Crete, Greece). Surface ERT measurements were collected along multiple lines in order to reconstruct the subsurface resistivity models. Data acquisition was performed with standard and optimized electrode configuration protocols. The monitoring survey includes the ERT data collection for a period of time. The study was initiated before the OOMW were deposited in the pond, so resistivity fluctuations are expected due to the flow of OOMW in the porous subsurface media through time. Preliminary results show the good correlation of the ERT images with the drilled geological formations and the identification of low resistivity subsurface zone that could be attributed to the flow of the wastes within the porous layers.

  17. Can we quantify local groundwater recharge using electrical resistivity tomography?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, U.; Günther, T.; Ganz, C.; Lamparter, A.

    2012-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a common tool to observe flow processes within the saturated/unsaturated zones. While it is still doubtful whether the method can reliably yield quantitative results the qualitative success has been shown in "numerous" examples. To quantify the rate of rainfall which reaches the groundwater table is still a problematic venture due to a sad combination of several physical and mathematical obstacles that may lead to huge errors. In 2007 an infiltration experiment was performed and observed using 3D array ERT. The site is located close to Hannover, Germany, on a well studied sandy soil. The groundwater table at this site was at a depth of about 1.3 m. The inversion results of the ERT data yield reliably looking pictures of the infiltration process. Later experiments nearby using tracer fluid and combined TDR and resistivity measurements in the subsurface strongly supported the assumption that the resistivity pictures indeed depict the water distributions during infiltration reliably. The quantitative interpretation shows that two days after infiltration about 40% of the water has reached the groundwater. However, the question remains how reliable this quantitative interpretation actually is. The first obstacle: The inversion of the ERT data gives one possible resistivity distribution within the subsurface that can explain the data. It is not necessarily the right one and the result depends on the error model and the inversion parameters and method. For these measurements we assume the same error for every single quadrupole (3%), applied the Gauss-Newton method and minimum length constraints in order to reduce the smoothing to a minimum (very small lambda). Numerical experiments showed little smoothing using this approach, and smoothing must be suppressed if preferential flow is to be seen. The inversion showed artefacts of minor amplitude compared with other inversion parameter settings. The second obstacle: The

  18. Sinkhole detection using electrical resistivity tomography in Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youssef, Ahmed M.; El-Kaliouby, Hesham; Zabramawi, Yasser A.

    2012-12-01

    Karst phenomena exist in different areas in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, causing serious environmental problems that affect urban development and infrastructure (buildings, roads and highways). One of the most important problems are sinkholes, which most of the time consist of unfilled voids. These sinkholes are formed as a result of the chemical leaching of carbonate and evaporite formations by percolating water. Field investigations show that there are many surface expressions of sinkholes in the area; some appear on the ground surface and others are hidden in the subsurface. Geophysical data were collected at the study area using two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with different electrode spacings to delineate buried sinkholes and associated subsurface cavities. Our findings indicated that the dipole-dipole method using an electrode spacing of 1 m was successful in detecting a known subsurface sinkhole. According to the ERT method the detected sinkhole depth ranges from 2 to 4 m, its height ranges from 2 to 4 m, and its width ranges from 5 to 7 m. Field observation has verified the geophysical data, especially along the profile A-A\\. Finally, closely spaced ERT profiles were successful in determining the three-dimensional volume of the subsurface sinkhole.

  19. Electrical Resistivity Tomography in the characterisation of wetting patterns of historical masonry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, Laura; Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Ortiz de Cosca, Raquel Otero; García-Morales, Soledad

    2016-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique widely used to identify subsurface structures based on electrical resistivity measurements made at the surface. In recent years this technique has been used for surveying historic buildings and characterise the subsurface of walls by using non-invasive EKG electrodes. This methods is used to locate wet areas based on the lower electrical resistivity wet materials have in relation to dry ones. A good knowledge of the wetting patterns of historic buildings during, for example, rainfalls is crucial to understand the decay processes that take place in the building and plan interventions. This paper presents results of transects of Electric Resistivity Tomography of walls of the Monastery of Santa Maria de Mave (Palencia, Spain), a 9th century Romanesque building, during rainfall. ERT transects were performed with a GeoTom device (Geolog2000) in areas with and without buttresses to understand how this architectural detail affected the wetting dynamics of the building. The ERT results were integrated with other resistivity-based techniques and Thermohygrometric survey in a GIS and showed how lower resistivity surface measurements ERT correspond with areas of higher humidity. Resistivity-based techniques measured and evaporation focal points take in the interior of the building mark the outer ground level. The highest moisture content measurements do not always correspond to the visibly most damaged areas of the wall. The consecutive ERT transects show the wall getting wetter as rainfall progresses. The comparison of the measurements obtained of a wall affected by water obtained with GIS mapping, allowed to quickly studying the development of moisture in the wall over time, which is essential for a correct diagnosis of the building. Research funded by Madrid's Regional Government project Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914

  20. Tracking tracer motion in a 4-D electrical resistivity tomography experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Nilsson, H.; Kuras, O.; Bai, L.

    2016-05-01

    A new framework for automatically tracking subsurface tracers in electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) monitoring images is presented. Using computer vision and Bayesian inference techniques, in the form of a Kalman filter, the trajectory of a subsurface tracer is monitored by predicting and updating a state model representing its movements. Observations for the Kalman filter are gathered using the maximally stable volumes algorithm, which is used to dynamically threshold local regions of an ERT image sequence to detect the tracer at each time step. The application of the framework to the results of 2-D and 3-D tracer monitoring experiments show that the proposed method is effective for detecting and tracking tracer plumes in ERT images in the presence of noise, without intermediate manual intervention.

  1. Predicting and tracking spatiotemporal moments in electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J.; Bai, L.

    2015-12-01

    Visualisation is an invaluable tool in the study of near sub-surface processes, whether by mathematical modelling or by geophysical imaging. Quantitative analysis can further assist interpretation of the ongoing physical processes, and it is clear that any reliable model should take direct observations into account. Using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), localised areas can be surveyed to produce 2-D and 3-D time-lapse images. This study investigates combining quantitative results obtained via ERT with spatio-temporal motion models in tracer experiments to interpret and predict fluid flow. As with any indirect imaging technique, ERT suffers specific issues with resolution and smoothness as a result of its inversion process. In addition, artefacts are typical in the resulting volumes. Mathematical models are also a source of uncertainty - and in combining these with ERT images, a trade-off must be made between the theoretical and the observed. Using computational imaging, distinct regions of stable resistivity can be directly extracted from a time-slice of an ERT volume. The automated nature, as well the potential for more than one region-of-interest, means that multiple regions can be detected. Using Kalman filters, it is possible to convert the detections into a process state, taking into account pre-defined models and predicting progression. In consecutive time-steps, newly detected features are assigned, where possible, to existing predictions to create tracks that match the tracer model. Preliminary studies looked at a simple motion model, tracking the centre of mass of a tracer plume with assumed constant velocity and mean resistivity. Extending the model to factor in spatial distribution of the plume, an oriented semi-axis is used to represent the centralised second-order moment, with an increasing factor of magnitude to represent the plume dispersion. Initial results demonstrate the efficacy of the approach, significantly improving reliability as the

  2. Tank Leak Experiment at the Monk Tank Site, 200 East Area: Electrical Resistance Tomography-Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.D.; Binley, A.

    2001-09-20

    This report covers the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) work performed at the Mock Tank site, 200 East Area, Hanford Reservation, during the months of July and August, 2001. The work reported herein is to be considered preliminary because it is work in progress. Some of the analyses and interpretation of results are incomplete at this time.

  3. Electrical Resistivity Tomography Monitoring of Soil Remediation for a Garbage Dump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    shi, X.; Luo, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Fu, Q.; Xu, Z.

    2011-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was firstly used to investigate the distribution of contaminated soil in a garbage dump area, Wuhan city, China. The result shows that sulfated soil resistivity is about 4 to 7 ohm-m, which is relatively lower than normal soil resistivity of about 15 to 25 ohm-m. The distribution of contaminated soil was delineated using ERT images. Then, ERT survey was carried out in this area for monitoring of remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. Werner measurements with 60 electrodes of 1 m spacing were taken during the 9-well oxygen injection and nutrition liquid injection period. The difference of apparent resistivity between before gas injection and after gas injection was used to delineate the channel of gas and the trace of gas migration in the porous garbage dump. The electrical resitivity changes between before and after nutrition liquid injection were used to analyze the liquid migration and distribution. The dynamic procedures of gas and water migration are outlined. The results suggest that ERT is a powerful technique for monitoring of soil remediation.

  4. Imaging Pathways in Fractured Rock Using Three-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Judith; Slater, Lee; Johnson, Timothy; Shapiro, Allen; Tiedeman, Claire; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Johnson, Carole; Day-Lewis, Frederick; Lacombe, Pierre; Imbrigiotta, Thomas; Lane, John

    2016-03-01

    Major challenges exist in delineating bedrock fracture zones because these cause abrupt changes in geological and hydrogeological properties over small distances. Borehole observations cannot sufficiently capture heterogeneity in these systems. Geophysical techniques offer the potential to image properties and processes in between boreholes. We used three-dimensional cross borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in a 9 m (diameter) × 15 m well field to capture high-resolution flow and transport processes in a fractured mudstone contaminated by chlorinated solvents, primarily trichloroethylene. Conductive (sodium bromide) and resistive (deionized water) injections were monitored in seven boreholes. Electrode arrays with isolation packers and fluid sampling ports were designed to enable acquisition of ERT measurements during pulsed tracer injections. Fracture zone locations and hydraulic pathways inferred from hydraulic head drawdown data were compared with electrical conductivity distributions from ERT measurements. Static ERT imaging has limited resolution to decipher individual fractures; however, these images showed alternating conductive and resistive zones, consistent with alternating laminated and massive mudstone units at the site. Tracer evolution and migration was clearly revealed in time-lapse ERT images and supported by in situ borehole vertical apparent conductivity profiles collected during the pulsed tracer test. While water samples provided important local information at the extraction borehole, ERT delineated tracer migration over spatial scales capturing the primary hydrogeological heterogeneity controlling flow and transport. The fate of these tracer injections at this scale could not have been quantified using borehole logging and/or borehole sampling methods alone. PMID:26172032

  5. Remote-Controlled Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Concurrent Ground-Penetrating Radar Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, A.; Daniels, J. J.; Yeh, T. J.; Zhu, J.; Niemeier, J. J.; Mansheim, T. J.; Hart, T. R.; Shaelek, K. S.; Illman, W. A.; Craig, A. J.

    2008-12-01

    A team of researchers at The University of Iowa, Ohio State University, and the University of Arizona have developed an over-the-internet experimental setup that enables researchers and educators at remote locations to make concurrent electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground penetrating radar (GPR) measurements. The setup is comprised of a carefully constructed sandbox with known layers of sand with embedded wells and ERT electrodes. A GPR transmitter and receiver are mounted on an xy-traverse scanner. Computers control all the components. Computer software and communications interfaces allow remote users to perform concurrent ERT and GPR measurements and retrieve the measured results in real- time over the internet. A camera enables each internet user to view the active experiment. The users can then apply various inversion- and post-processing algorithms to the data, fuse their results, interpret the data, and adjust the data collection for additional data runs. The system allows for flexible and rapid ERT measurements by researchers developing inversion algorithms, and near real-time 3D images of dielectric constant variations (moisture and water concentrations) in the model. It also has utility in geophysics education, enabling real-time demonstration of ERT and GPR measurements. The distributed arrangement allows institutions at different locations to collaborate and leverage their individual strengths: experimental and cyberinfrastructure knowledge, ERT expertise, and GPR expertise. Large subsystems in the laboratory were designed as stand-alone equipment without any network capability, and this posed major technical obstacles. Our plans include extending the system to interface with pumps and pressure transducers to facilitate hydrologic tomography experiments and possibly offer the research setup to other investigators who do not have access to a laboratory system.

  6. Electrical resistivity tomography study of Taal volcano hydrothermal system, Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikos, I.; Vargemezis, G.; Zlotnicki, J.; Puertollano, J. R.; Alanis, P. B.; Pigtain, R. C.; Villacorte, E. U.; Malipot, G. A.; Sasai, Y.

    2012-10-01

    Taal volcano (311 m in altitude) is located in The Philippines (14°N, 121°E) and since 1572 has erupted 33 times, causing more than 2,000 casualties during the most violent eruptions. In March 2010, the shallow structures in areas where present-day surface activity takes place were investigated by DC resistivity surveys. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) lines were performed above the two identified hydrothermal areas located on the northern flank of the volcano and in the Main Crater, respectively. Due to rough topography, deep valleys, and dense vegetation, most measurements were collected using a remote method based on a laboratory-made equipment. This allowed retrieval of information down to a depth of 250 m. ERTs results detail the outlines of the two geothermal fields defined by previous self-potential, CO2 soil degassing, ground temperature, and magnetic mapping (Harada et al. Japan Acad Sci 81:261-266, 2005; Zlotnicki et al. Bull Volcanol 71:29-49, 2009a, Phys Chem Earth 34:294-408, 2009b). Hydrothermal fluids originate mainly from inside the northern part of the Main Crater at a depth greater than the bottom of the Crater Lake, and flow upward to the ground surface. Furthermore, water from the Main Crater Lake infiltrates inside the surrounding geological formations. The hydrothermal fluids, outlined by gas releases and high temperatures, cross the crater rim and interact with the northern geothermal field located outside the Main Crater.

  7. Small scale monitoring of a bioremediation barrier using miniature electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentenac, Philippe; Hogson, Tom; Keenan, Helen; Kulessa, Bernd

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, in the laboratory, the efficiency of a barrier of oxygen release compound (ORC) to block and divert a diesel plume migration in a scaled aquifer model using miniature electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) as the monitoring system. Two plumes of contaminant (diesel) were injected in a soil model made of local sand and clay. The diesel plumes migration was imaged and monitored using a miniature resistivity array system that has proved to be accurate in soil resistivity variations in small-scaled models of soil. ERT results reflected the lateral spreading and diversion of the diesel plumes in the unsaturated zone. One of the contaminant plumes was partially blocked by the ORC barrier and a diversion and reorganisation of the diesel in the soil matrix was observed. The technique of time-lapse ERT imaging showed that a dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contaminant like diesel can be monitored through a bioremediation barrier and the technique is well suited to monitor the efficiency of the barrier. Therefore, miniature ERT as a small-scale modelling tool could complement conventional techniques, which require more expensive and intrusive site investigation prior to remediation.

  8. The data preprocessing in apparent resistivity pesudo-section construction of two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Although three-dimensional (3-D) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey has become a popular practice in the site characterization and process monitoring, the two-dimensional (2-D) ERT survey is still often used in the field. This is because that the 2-D ERT survey is relatively easy to do and the focus of site characterization is on the information of 2-D cross section, not necessarily of the 3-D subsurface structure. Examples of such practice include tunnel line and crossing fault survey. In these cases, depending on the property of surface soil to be surveyed, the 2-D ERT survey with pole-pole array may occasionally make us obtain quality good data, however it often gives us a suit of data set both with real and erroneous ones that incorporated the effects of electrode contact and not far enough far electrodes. Without preprocessing, the apparent resistivity pseudo-section constructed from this kind of data set may quite deviate from the real one and the information obtained from it may be misleading and even completely incorrect. In this study, we developed a method of far electrode dynamic correction that is appropriate for raw data preprocessing from 2-D pole-pole array ERT survey. Based on this method, we not only can find and delete the abnormal data points easily, but also can position the coordinates of far electrodes actually working in the field, thus delete the far electrode effects and make best use of the looked strange data points. The method also makes us to be able to judge the effects of electrode contact and avoid using such data points in the following apparent resistivity pseudo-section construction. With this preprocessing to the data set, the constructed apparent resistivity pseudo-section is demonstrated to be more approximate to the real one. This makes the following reversion calculation more robust. We'll introduce this far electrode dynamic correction method and show application examples in the meeting.

  9. Preliminary analysis of the use of electrical resistance tomography for injectate tracking at the Geysers geothermal field

    SciTech Connect

    Creed, Bob; Daily, Bill

    1996-01-24

    Current geochemical and geophysical injectate tracking methods are useful reservoir management techniques but do not track injectate movement quick enough to maximize injection efficiency or avoid negative impacts on nearby steam production wells. A preliminary analysis indicates that two dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) may be useful for imaging plume movement resulting from Geysers/Lake County Effluent Pipeline injectate in near real time. ERT models comparing an injection plume resistivity of 50 Ohm-m with background resistivities of 10, 100 (typical Geysers greywacke), and 500 Ohm-m (typical Geysers felsite) indicate that liquid plumes can be imaged at depths of 6,000 feet to 8,000 feet or greater for resistivity contrasts of 2 to 1 or greater. Further refinement of the ERT model could be accomplished with more data on porosity in the vicinity of the borehole, resistivity measurements, and reservoir engineering estimates of plume temperature and saturation. Based on the results of this analysis and previous successes in using ERT to map shallow subsurface steam and water movement in porous media it is likely, but not certain, that ERT will prove to be an additional reservoir management tool to be used in conjunction with additional geochemical, geophysical, and reservoir engineering techniques. A field scale test at The Geysers is required to verify the utility of ERT for injectate tracking. The goal of this paper is to stimulate discussion among geothermal researchers regarding use of the ERT technique for injectate tracking at The Geysers and get some input on the appropriateness and utility of the assumptions used.

  10. 2D Time-lapse Resistivity Monitoring of an Organic Produced Gas Plume in a Landfill using ERT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amaral, N. D.; Mendonça, C. A.; Doherty, R.

    2014-12-01

    This project has the objective to study a landfill located on the margins of Tietê River, in São Paulo, Brazil, using the electroresistivity tomography method (ERT). Due to huge organic matter concentrations in the São Paulo Basin quaternary sediments, there is subsurface depth related biogas accumulation (CH4 and CO2), induced by anaerobic degradation of the organic matter. 2D resistivity sections were obtained from a test area since March 2012, a total of 7 databases, being the last one dated from October 2013. The studied line has the length of 56m, the electrode interval is of 2m. In addition, there are two boreholes along the line (one with 3 electrodes and the other one with 2) in order to improve data quality and precision. The boreholes also have a multi-level sampling system that indicates the fluid (gas or water) presence in relation to depth. With our results it was possible to map the gas plume position and its area of extension in the sections as it is a positive resistivity anomaly, with the gas level having approximately 5m depth. With the time-lapse analysis (Matlab script) between the obtained 2D resistivity sections from the site, it was possible to map how the biogas volume and position change in the landfill in relation to time. Our preliminary results show a preferential gas pathway through the subsurface studied area. A consistent relation between the gas depth and obtained microbiological data from archea and bacteria population was also observed.

  11. Uncertainty quantification of CO₂ saturation estimated from electrical resistance tomography data at the Cranfield site

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yang, Xianjin; Chen, Xiao; Carrigan, Charles R.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2014-06-03

    A parametric bootstrap approach is presented for uncertainty quantification (UQ) of CO₂ saturation derived from electrical resistance tomography (ERT) data collected at the Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) carbon sequestration site. There are many sources of uncertainty in ERT-derived CO₂ saturation, but we focus on how the ERT observation errors propagate to the estimated CO₂ saturation in a nonlinear inversion process. Our UQ approach consists of three steps. We first estimated the observational errors from a large number of reciprocal ERT measurements. The second step was to invert the pre-injection baseline data and the resulting resistivity tomograph was used as the priormore » information for nonlinear inversion of time-lapse data. We assigned a 3% random noise to the baseline model. Finally, we used a parametric bootstrap method to obtain bootstrap CO₂ saturation samples by deterministically solving a nonlinear inverse problem many times with resampled data and resampled baseline models. Then the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation were calculated from the bootstrap samples. We found that the maximum standard deviation of CO₂ saturation was around 6% with a corresponding maximum saturation of 30% for a data set collected 100 days after injection began. There was no apparent spatial correlation between the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation but the standard deviation values increased with time as the saturation increased. The uncertainty in CO₂ saturation also depends on the ERT reciprocal error threshold used to identify and remove noisy data and inversion constraints such as temporal roughness. Five hundred realizations requiring 3.5 h on a single 12-core node were needed for the nonlinear Monte Carlo inversion to arrive at stationary variances while the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic inverse approach may expend days for a global search. This indicates that UQ of 2D or 3D ERT inverse problems can be performed

  12. Uncertainty quantification of CO₂ saturation estimated from electrical resistance tomography data at the Cranfield site

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xianjin; Chen, Xiao; Carrigan, Charles R.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    2014-06-03

    A parametric bootstrap approach is presented for uncertainty quantification (UQ) of CO₂ saturation derived from electrical resistance tomography (ERT) data collected at the Cranfield, Mississippi (USA) carbon sequestration site. There are many sources of uncertainty in ERT-derived CO₂ saturation, but we focus on how the ERT observation errors propagate to the estimated CO₂ saturation in a nonlinear inversion process. Our UQ approach consists of three steps. We first estimated the observational errors from a large number of reciprocal ERT measurements. The second step was to invert the pre-injection baseline data and the resulting resistivity tomograph was used as the prior information for nonlinear inversion of time-lapse data. We assigned a 3% random noise to the baseline model. Finally, we used a parametric bootstrap method to obtain bootstrap CO₂ saturation samples by deterministically solving a nonlinear inverse problem many times with resampled data and resampled baseline models. Then the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation were calculated from the bootstrap samples. We found that the maximum standard deviation of CO₂ saturation was around 6% with a corresponding maximum saturation of 30% for a data set collected 100 days after injection began. There was no apparent spatial correlation between the mean and standard deviation of CO₂ saturation but the standard deviation values increased with time as the saturation increased. The uncertainty in CO₂ saturation also depends on the ERT reciprocal error threshold used to identify and remove noisy data and inversion constraints such as temporal roughness. Five hundred realizations requiring 3.5 h on a single 12-core node were needed for the nonlinear Monte Carlo inversion to arrive at stationary variances while the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) stochastic inverse approach may expend days for a global search. This indicates that UQ of 2D or 3D ERT inverse problems can be performed on a

  13. Monitoring a pilot CO2 injection experiment in a shallow aquifer using 3D cross-well electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lassen, R. N.; Looms, M. C.; Jensen, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Three dimensional electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a pilot CO2 injection experiment at Vrøgum, Denmark. The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of the ERT method for monitoring the two opposing effects from gas-phase and dissolved CO2 in a shallow unconfined siliciclastic aquifer. Dissolved CO2 increases water electrical conductivity (EC) while gas phase CO2 reduce EC. We injected 45kg of CO2 into a shallow aquifer for 48 hours. ERT data were collected for 50 hours following CO2 injection. Four ERT monitoring boreholes were installed on a 5m by 5m square grid and each borehole had 24 electrodes at 0.5 m electrode spacing at depths from 1.5 m to 13 m. ERT data were inverted using a difference inversion algorithm for bulk EC. 3D ERT successfully detected the CO2 plume distribution and growth in the shallow aquifer. We found that the changes of bulk EC were dominantly positive following CO2 injection, indicating that the effect of dissolved CO2 overwhelmed that of gas phase CO2. The pre-injection baseline resistivity model clearly showed a three-layer structure of the site. The electrically more conductive glacial sand layer in the northeast region are likely more permeable than the overburden and underburden and CO2 plumes were actually confined in this layer. Temporal bulk EC increase from ERT agreed well with water EC and cross-borehole ground penetrating radar data. ERT monitoring offers a competitive advantage over water sampling and GPR methods because it provides 3D high-resolution temporal tomographic images of CO2 distribution and it can also be automated for unattended operation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC. LLNL IM release#: LLNL-PROC-657944.

  14. Electrical resistance tomography for real-time mapping of the solid-liquid interface in tanks containing optically opaque fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madupu, Amar; Mazumdar, Anindra; Zhang, Jinsong; Roelant, David; Srivastava, Rajiv

    2005-03-01

    The visualization of settled solid layers in vessels have many applications, of interest here is for facilitating the efficient retrieval of high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from underground storage tanks at Department of Energy sites. Visualization of the solids interface with opaque liquid above can"t be accomplished by regular optical imaging methods and hence our interest in using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT). The ideal arrangement for 3-D ERT imaging inside tanks is to use a multiple ring electrode system, which is complex and expensive. This research describes ERT imaging done with a single linear array as a benchmark study to ascertain the viability of its imaging of the interface. Experiments focused upon systematic analysis of many ERT tomograms of two simple settled solids layers (horizontal, 30o) using pulverized kaolin clay (10μdia) and water. Visualization was done using commercial ERT software. Injection current and electrode orientation were the two system parameters varied and analyzed. Reproducibility, accuracy and reliability of this ERT system will be presented.

  15. Visualizing Moisture Storage in Basin Lysimeters Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnabel, W.; Munk, J.; Lee, W.

    2010-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to evaluate soil moisture in two large (10m x 20m x 2m) basin lysimeters over a four-year period in Anchorage, Alaska. The lysimeters were intended to test the efficacy of two competing landfill cover designs, thus water balance information was collected over the entire experimental period. The first lysimeter contained a thin (0.5m) layer of compacted soil within its 2m depth and was planted with local grasses. The second lysimeter contained no compacted soil layer and was planted with deep-rooting woody vegetation to maximize moisture removal via evapotranspiration. After four years of observation, 291mm of moisture percolated through the compacted soil lysimeter compared to 201mm in the evapotranspiration lysimeter. This presentation describes the observed water balance results, discusses efficacy of utilizing compacted soils versus evapotranspiration as the primary means of minimizing infiltration into engineered soil systems, and demonstrates the use of ERT as a technique for visualizing soil moisture storage.

  16. Prospecting for clay minerals within volcanic successions: Application of electrical resistivity tomography to characterise bentonite deposits in northern Sardinia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, V.; Testone, V.; Oggiano, G.; Testa, A.

    2014-12-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is applied to prospect for and characterise a bentonitic clay deposit in northern Sardinia. Sardinian bentonites derived from the hydrothermal alteration of thick successions of pyroclastic flows and epiclastites are associated with the Oligo-Miocene calc-alkaline volcanic cycle. The alteration of these rocks is generally controlled by faults that control the local circulation of hydrothermal fluids. Two-dimensional ERT investigations were performed close to a faulted area to define the location, thickness and lateral continuity of the clayey body, and determine how it relates to faulting and stratigraphy. A line-based three-dimensional ERT data acquisition was carried out in a selected area to estimate the available clay reserves. The reliability of these resistivity models was assessed by comparison with local borehole data. Finally, the interpretation of the ERT results was optimised through synthetic modelling of the electrical resistivity imaging technique. The results define the extent and geometry of the bentonitic deposit with good accuracy and outline the scenarios where the ERT method may provide optimal results when prospecting for clay deposits.

  17. Electrical Resistivity, Seismic Refraction Tomography and Drilling Logs to Identify the Heterogeneity and the Preferential Flow in a Shallow Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.

    2015-12-01

    The study site is located at the Center for Environmental Education and Research (CEER) at Susquehanna University. Electrical Resistivity and Seismic Refraction Tomography (ERT and SRT), as well as several pumping tests were performed to identify zones of heterogeneities and hydrogeophysical characteristics of a shallow unconfined aquifer. The combination of these methods was selected to study the local geology and the subsurface preferential pathways of groundwater flow. 22 Dipole-Dipole ERT transects with 56 electrodes each and 11 SRT transects with 24 geophones each were performed. Drilling logs of 5 observation wells located within the site were also used. All drilling logs showed clearly the heterogeneity of the aquifer when compared to each other. The combination of ERT and SRT indicated that a potential zone of preferential flow is present within the aquifer and can be accurately identified based on the approach adopted in this study. The drilling logs served to specifically identify the soil and the geological formations making the heterogeneity of the aquifer. 3D ERT and SRT block diagrams were generated to connect all formations shown in the 2D tomography profiles to visualize the pathways of preferential flow and non-conductive formations. While ERT has proven to show saturated areas of the subsurface, SRT was more effective in identifying the bedrock-soil discontinuity and other near surface formations contributing to the local heterogeneity.

  18. A cylindrical electrical resistivity tomography array for three-dimensional monitoring of hydrate formation and dissociation.

    PubMed

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Rücker, Carsten; Schicks, Judith M

    2013-10-01

    The LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) was developed to investigate various processes during gas hydrate formation and dissociation under simulated in situ conditions of relatively high pressure and low temperature (close to natural conditions). To monitor the spatial hydrate distribution during hydrate formation and the mobility of the free gas phase generated during hydrate dissociation, a cylindrical Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) array was implemented into LARS. The ERT contains 375 electrodes, arranged in 25 circular rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The electrodes were attached to a neoprene jacket surrounding the sediment sample. Circular (2D) dipole-dipole measurements are performed which can be extended with additional 3D cross measurements to provide supplemental data. The data quality is satisfactory, with the mean standard deviation due to permanent background noise and data scattering found to be in the order of 2.12%. The measured data are processed using the inversion software tool Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography to solve the inverse problem. Here, we use data recorded in LARS to demonstrate the data quality, sensitivity, and spatial resolution that can be obtained with this ERT array. PMID:24182137

  19. Assessing the performance of a cold region evapotranspiration landfill cover using lysimetry and electrical resistivity tomography.

    PubMed

    Schnabel, William E; Munk, Jens; Abichou, Tarek; Barnes, David; Lee, William; Pape, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    In order to test the efficacy ofa cold-region evapotranspiration (ET) landfill cover against a conventional compacted clay (CCL) landfill cover, two pilot scale covers were constructed in side-by-side basin lysimeters (20m x 10m x 2m) at a site in Anchorage, Alaska. The primary basis of comparison between the two lysimeters was the percolation of moisture from the bottom of each lysimeter. Between 30 April 2005 and 16 May 2006, 51.5 mm of water percolated from the ET lysimeter, compared to 50.6 mm for the the CCL lysimeter. This difference was not found to be significant at the 95% confidence level. As part of the project, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was utilized to measure and map soil moisture in ET lysimeter cross sections. The ERT-generated cross sections were found to accurately predict the onset and duration of lysimeter percolation. Moreover, ERT-generated soil moisture values demonstrated a strong linear relationship to lysimeter percolation rates (R-Squared = 0.92). Consequently, ERT is proposed as a reliable tool for assessing the function of field scale ET covers in the absence of drainage measurement devices. PMID:22574381

  20. Development of a Landslide Monitoring System using Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hen-Jones, R. M.; Hughes, P. N.; Glendinning, S.; Gunn, D.; Chambers, J.; Stirling, R.

    2015-12-01

    Current assessments of slope stability rely on the use of point sensors, the results of which are often difficult to interpret, have relatively high associated installation and maintenance costs, and do not provide large-area coverage. A new system is currently under development, based on the use of integrated geophysical - geotechnical sensors to monitor ground water conditions via electrical resistivity tomography. This study presents the results of an in-situ electrical resistivity tomography survey, gathered over a two year investigation period at a full-scale clay test embankment in Northumberland, UK. The 3D resistivity array comprised 288 electrodes, at 0.7m grid spacing, covering an area of approximately 90 m2. The first year of investigation involved baseline data collection, followed by a second year which saw a series of deliberate interventions targeted at weakening the slope, to determine whether corresponding geotechnical property changes would be reflected in resistivity images derived from ERT. These interventions included the manual extension of four tension cracks already present in the slope, and the installation of a sprinkler system, eight months later. Laboratory methods were employed to derive a system of equations for relating resistivity to geotechnical parameters more directly relevant to slope stability, including moisture content, suction and shear strength. These equations were then applied to resistivity data gathered over the baseline and intervention periods, yielding geotechnical images of the subsurface which compared well with in-situ geotechnical point sensors. During the intervention period, no slope movement was recorded, however, tensiometers at 0.5 m and 1.0 m depths showed elevated pore pressures, with positive pressures being recorded at depths less than 0.5 m. Resistivity images were successful in capturing the extension of the tension cracks, and in identifying the development of a potential shear failure plane as water

  1. Estimation of tree root distribution using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmaltz, Elmar; Uhlemann, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    Trees influence soil-mantled slopes mechanically by anchoring in the soil with coarse roots. Forest-stands play an important role in mechanical reinforcement to reduce the susceptibility to slope failures. However, the effect of stabilisation of roots is connected with the distribution of roots in the ground. The architecture and distribution of tree roots is diverse and strongly dependent on species, plant age, stand density, relief, nutrient supply as well as climatic and pedologic conditions. Particularly trees growing on inclined slopes show shape-shifting root systems. Geophysical techniques are commonly used to non-invasively study hydrological and geomorphological subsurface properties, by imaging contrasting physical properties of the ground. This also poses the challenge for geophysical imaging of root systems, as properties, such as electrical resistivity, of dry and wet roots fall within the range of soils. The objective of this study is whether electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) allows a reliable reproduction of root systems of alone-standing trees on diverse inclined slopes. In this regard, we set the focus on the branching of secondary roots of two common walnut trees (Juglans regia L.) that were not disturbed in the adjacencies and thus expected to develop their root systems unhindered. Walnuts show a taproot-cordate root system with a strong tap-root in juvenile age and a rising cordate rooting with increasing age. Hence, mature walnuts can exhibit a root system that appears to be deformed or shifted respectively when growing at hillslope locations. We employed 3D ERT centred on the tree stem, comprising dipole-dipole measurements on a 12-by-41 electrode grid with 0.5 m and 1.0m electrode spacing in x- and y-direction respectively. Data were inverted using a 3D smoothness constrained non-linear least-squares algorithm. First results show that the general root distribution can be estimated from the resistivity models and that shape

  2. Imaging of unconformity related uranium ore zones by crosshole ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, M.; Kim, C.; Son, J.

    2011-12-01

    For the exploration of unconformity type uranium deposits in the Athabasca basin, Canada, electrical resistiivty survey is commonly used to define graphtic conductors in the basement. The method, however, can not provide enough resolution since the exploration target is seated in depth greater than 300 m while the width is less than 50 m. To overcome this inherent problem and introduce new exploration technology, we applied the crosshole ERT(Electrical Resistivity Tomography) technology in the Athabasca basin. Since the drillholes are not vertical and randomly oriented, 3D ERT inversion algorithm, accommodating arbitray electrode locations, was used to reconstruct 2D surbsurface resistivity image. For the 2D inversion in 3D inversion code, subsurface was assumed to be two-dimensional. We also applied the full 3D inversion to the field data set from several drillholes. In the ERT images, we could observe the graphitic pelite zone with very low resistivity which is our exploration target. By defining the accurate location of graphtic conductor, we could understand the basic setting of the site. Moreover, in the 3D ERT image, we could define anomalous zone in 3D space which can be related to the uranium target. By this introductory ERT survey, we could show that ERT can be used as a new geophysical exploration method in the Athabasca basin. In the current exploration procedure, barren drillholes are abandoned and further geophysical surveys using thes holes are rare in most cases. Since ERT technique can provide very high resolution image of the subsurface, we can have more detailed information to design the drilling program and this can lead to the cost reduction of exploration program. We expect crosshole ERT will become a standard geophysical methods in the exploration projects in the Athabasca basin.

  3. Electrical resistance tomography for monitoring the infiltration of water into a pavement section

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, M.; Daily, B.; Ramirez, A.

    1997-07-03

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to follow the infiltration of water into pavement section at the UC Berkeley Richmond Field Station. A volume of pavement 1m square and 1.29 m deep was sampled by an ERT array consisting of electrodes in 9 drilled holes plus 8 surface electrodes. The data were collected using a computer controlled data acquisition system capable of collecting a full data set in under 1 hour, allowing for nearly real time sampling of the infiltration. The infiltration was conducted in two phases. During the first phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-concrete (AC) layers at a slow rate of about 8 ml per hour for a period of about 6 days. In the second phase, water was introduced into the asphalt-treated-permeable base (ATPB) layer at a more rapid rate of about 100 ml/h for about 2 days. The ERT images show that water introduced into the upper AC layers shows up as a decrease in resistivity which grows with time. The images also appear to show that when water moves into the layers below the ATPB, the resistivity increases; an unexpected result. There are some indications that the water moved laterally as well as down into the deeper ATPB and the aggregate base. The images also show that when water is introduced directly into the ATPB and aggregate layer, the water moves into the the underlying materials much more quickly.

  4. Characterization of a contaminated wellfield using 3D electrical resistivity tomography implemented with geostatistical, discontinuous boundary, and known conductivity constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Slater, Lee D.; Ntarlagiannis, Dimitrios; Greenwood, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2012-09-17

    Continuing advancements in subsurface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) are giving the method increasing capability for understanding shallow subsurface properties and processes. The inability of ERT imaging data to uniquely resolve subsurface structure and the corresponding need include constraining information remains one of the greatest limitations, and provides one of the greatest opportunities, for further advancing the utility of the method. In this work we describe and demonstrate a method of incorporating constraining information into an ERT imaging algorithm in the form on discontinuous boundaries, known values, and spatial covariance information. We demonstrate the approach by imaging a uranium-contaminated wellfield at the Hanford Site in southwestern Washington State, USA. We incorporate into the algorithm known boundary information and spatial covariance structure derived from the highly resolved near-borehole regions of a regularized ERT inversion. The resulting inversion provides a solution which fits the ERT data (given the estimated noise level), honors the spatial covariance structure throughout the model, and is consistent with known bulk-conductivity discontinuities. The results are validated with core-scale measurements, and display a significant improvement in accuracy over the standard regularized inversion, revealing important subsurface structure known influence flow and transport at the site.

  5. Can we use Electrical Resistivity Tomography to measure root zone moisture dynamics in fields with multiple crops?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Coteur, I.; Wongleecharoen, C.; Diels, J.; Vanderborght, J.

    2012-12-01

    Agriculture on shallow or steep soils in the humid tropics often leads to low resource use efficiency. Contour hedgerow intercropping systems have been proposed to reduce run-off and control soil erosion. However, competition for water and nutrients between crops and associated hedgerows may reduce the overall performance of contour hedgerow systems. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a valuable technique to assess the distribution and dynamics of soil moisture non-invasively. Root water uptake is a spatially variable and small-scale process, which requires at least decimeter resolution and a high sensitivity in order to be able to monitor changes in time and space. Careful experimental design is of uttermost importance in order to maximize the information content of the ERT survey and to gain insights in the possibilities and limitations of the survey. Virtual experiments in combination with absolute and spatial performance measures provide a way to optimize the information that can be retrieved from an ERT experiment. We used this approach to identify a suitable measurement methodology to monitor water fluxes in a contour hedgerow intercropping system in Ratchaburi province, Thailand. The virtual experiment showed that there are important differences between the tested measurement configurations. We saw that the optimal ERT array was capable of recognizing distinct water depletion zones under the different crops. However, sharp contrasts in the 1-D water depletion profile are smoothened. ERT measurements conducted in Thailand showed that the soils of our experimental plots were very heterogeneous both along the slope as with depth. This observation highlighted some constraints of the ERT method for soil moisture monitoring in the field, such as the difficulty to define a relationship between electrical conductivity and soil moisture in very heterogeneous soils. Nevertheless, the data indeed revealed contrasting water depletion patterns under monocropping

  6. PILOT-SCALE FIELD VALIDATION OF THE LONG ELECTRODE ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TOMOGRAPHY METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    GLASER DR; RUCKER DF; CROOK N; LOKE MH

    2011-07-14

    Field validation for the long electrode electrical resistivity tomography (LE-ERT) method was attempted in order to demonstrate the performance of the technique in imaging a simple buried target. The experiment was an approximately 1/17 scale mock-up of a region encompassing a buried nuclear waste tank on the Hanford site. The target of focus was constructed by manually forming a simulated plume within the vadose zone using a tank waste simulant. The LE-ERT results were compared to ERT using conventional point electrodes on the surface and buried within the survey domain. Using a pole-pole array, both point and long electrode imaging techniques identified the lateral extents of the pre-formed plume with reasonable fidelity, but the LE-ERT was handicapped in reconstructing the vertical boundaries. The pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays were also tested with the LE-ERT method and were shown to have the least favorable target properties, including the position of the reconstructed plume relative to the known plume and the intensity of false positive targets. The poor performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays was attributed to an inexhaustive and non-optimal coverage of data at key electrodes, as well as an increased noise for electrode combinations with high geometric factors. However, when comparing the model resolution matrix among the different acquisition strategies, the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays using long electrodes were shown to have significantly higher average and maximum values than any pole-pole array. The model resolution describes how well the inversion model resolves the subsurface. Given the model resolution performance of the pole-dipole and dipole-dipole arrays, it may be worth investing in tools to understand the optimum subset of randomly distributed electrode pairs to produce maximum performance from the inversion model.

  7. Measurement of air distribution and void fraction of an upwards air-water flow using electrical resistance tomography and a wire-mesh sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olerni, Claudio; Jia, Jiabin; Wang, Mi

    2013-03-01

    Measurements on an upwards air-water flow are reported that were obtained simultaneously with a dual-plane electrical resistance tomograph (ERT) and a wire-mesh sensor (WMS). The ultimate measurement target of both ERT and WMS is the same, the electrical conductivity of the medium. The ERT is a non-intrusive device whereas the WMS requires a net of wires that physically crosses the flow. This paper presents comparisons between the results obtained simultaneously from the ERT and the WMS for evaluation and calibration of the ERT. The length of the vertical testing pipeline section is 3 m with an internal diameter of 50 mm. Two distinct sets of air-water flow rate scenarios, bubble and slug regimes, were produced in the experiments. The fast impedance camera ERT recorded the data at an approximate time resolution of 896 frames per second (fps) per plane in contrast with the 1024 fps of the wire-mesh sensor WMS200. The set-up of the experiment was based on well established knowledge of air-water upwards flow, particularly the specific flow regimes and wall peak effects. The local air void fraction profiles and the overall air void fraction were produced from two systems to establish consistency for comparison of the data accuracy. Conventional bulk flow measurements in air mass and electromagnetic flow metering, as well as pressure and temperature, were employed, which brought the necessary calibration to the flow measurements. The results show that the profiles generated from the two systems have a certain level of inconsistency, particularly in a wall peak and a core peak from the ERT and WMS respectively, whereas the two tomography instruments achieve good agreement on the overall air void fraction for bubble flow. For slug flow, when the void fraction is over 30%, the ERT underestimates the void fraction, but a linear relation between ERT and WMS is still observed.

  8. Sensing uniaxial tensile damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lestari, Wahyu; Pinto, Brian; La Saponara, Valeria; Yasui, Jennifer; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2016-08-01

    This work describes the application of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) in sensing damage in fiber-reinforced polymer composites under uniaxial quasi-static tension. Damage is manifested as numerous matrix cracks which are distributed across the composite volume and which eventually coalesce into intralayer cracks. Hence, tensile damage is distributed throughout the volume, and could be more significant outside the sensor area. In this work, tensile damage of unidirectional glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites (GFRP) and plain weave carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composites (CFRP) is sensed by utilizing a spray-on nanocomposite sensor, which is then instrumented by boundary electrodes. The resistance change distribution within the sensor area is reconstructed from a series of boundary voltage measurements, and ERT is implemented using a maximum a posteriori approach and assumptions on the type of noise in the reconstruction. Results show that this technique has promise in tracking uniaxial damage in composites. The different fiber architectures (unidirectional GFRP, plain weave CFRP) give distinct features in the ERT, which are consistent with the physical behavior of the tested samples.

  9. Final Report, FY 2001 200 East Vadose Test Site Hanford Washington Electrical Resistance Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.

    2001-06-30

    This report covers the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) work performed at the Hanford Reservation, 200 East Area Vadose test (Sisson and Lu) site during the period March 23 through May 5,2001. The purposes of the ERT work were to: (1) Compare and contrast the development of the highly concentrated sodium thiosulfate plume (FY 01 work) with the fresh river water plume observed during FY 00. (2) Use the resistance images to infer the dynamics of the plume during two or three of the sodium thio-sulfate releases and during the water ''chaser'' release. (3) Determine the influence of the site's steel casings on the ability to construct reliable ERT images. (4) Determine if the steel casings at the site can be used as long electrodes to provide useful images of at least one release. (5) Develop quantitative estimates of the noise in the data and its effect on reconstructed images. Eleven electrode arrays (nine electrodes arrays available for the FY00 work), each with 15 electrodes, were installed at the site. These were used to perform 3D surveys before, during, and after 3 different spills.

  10. Fracture network characterisation of a landslide by electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szalai, S.; Szokoli, K.; Novák, A.; Tóth, Á.; Metwaly, M.; Prácser, E.

    2014-06-01

    In contrary to most of the landslide studies which concentrate to the sliding surface in this paper the fracture system of a loess landslide is investigated. The continuity and geometry, orientation and dip of the major fractures are crucial parameters for assessing rock stability and landslide evolution. Rain infiltrating moreover easily into the rock mass through fractures providing lubrication for the material to slide, and increases the self-mass of the material increasing the slumping rate. Fracture maps enable beside of the characterisation of the fractured area the delineation of the endangered area of slow-moving landslides in due time and getting information about its inner structure. For constructing such maps Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) measurements have been carried out using different geoelectric configurations. In spite of the high density of the fractures and their changing physical parameters in function of their water content - which make the interpretation rather difficult - a number of fractures have been detected and more or less well localised. On the basis of the present research the application of the Schlumberger and the Pole-Dipole arrays is recommended to fulfil the aim of the study. The optimised Stummer array is at the same time the only array which presents conductive anomalies (supposedly water filled fractures), as well, and indicates that fractures elongate deep downwards. Because these features seem to be realistic based on field observations or theoretical considerations the Stummer array may be a very good tool for completing e.g. P-Dp measurements. The study area could have been divided by all arrays into differently fractured zones, which assists a lot in understanding the landslide structure and evolution. It was shown, moreover, that in the still passive area there are thick fractures, too, verifying its dangerousness, as well. The ERT results enabled localising the rupture surfaces of future slumps which proved to

  11. Electrical resistance tomography of unsaturated flow and transport in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Buettner, H M; Bussod, G; Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    1998-12-28

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT), a new geophysical imaging technique, was used to study the movement of a tracer through the test block at the Unsaturated Zone Transport Test (UZTT) at Busted Butte, Nevada. Data were collected four times starting in July and ending in early September, 1998. ERT baseline images show a resistivity structure which is consistent with the known lithology in the rear part of the test block. There appears to be a low resistivity region in the front half of the block, particularly near the bottom. Difference images from August 19 and September 9 show clear and consistent resistivity decreases in the region near injection holes 18, 20, and 21 which can be associated with the injection of conductive water. The images show very little effect in the region around the other injection holes, 23, and 24 through 27 where far less water was injected. Difference images from August 19 and September 9 show resistivity decreases which could be interpreted as water moving down into the block. This is the same region which has an anomalously low resistivity in the baseline image. These results should be considered preliminary, and are subject to further interpretation.

  12. Re-Inversion of Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography Data from the Hanford Site B-Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-05-01

    This report documents the three-dimensional (3D) inversion results of surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data collected over the Hanford Site B-Complex. The data were collected in order to image the subsurface distribution of electrically conductive vadose zone contamination resulting from both planned releases of contamination into subsurface infiltration galleries (cribs, trenches, and tile fields), as well as unplanned releases from the B, BX, and BY tank farms and/or associated facilities. Electrically conductive contaminants are those which increase the ionic strength of pore fluids compared to native conditions, which comprise most types of solutes released into the subsurface B-Complex. The ERT data were collected and originally inverted as described in detail in report RPP-34690 Rev 0., 2007, which readers should refer to for a detailed description of data collection and waste disposal history. Although the ERT imaging results presented in that report successfully delineated the footprint of vadose zone contamination in areas outside of the tank farms, imaging resolution was not optimized due to the inability of available inversion codes to optimally process the massive ERT data set collected at the site. Recognizing these limitations and the potential for enhanced ERT characterization and time-lapse imaging at contaminated sites, a joint effort was initiated in 2007 by the U.S. Department of Energy – Office of Science (DOE-SC), with later support by the Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), to develop a high-performance distributed memory parallel 3D ERT inversion code capable of optimally processing large ERT data sets. The culmination of this effort was the development of E4D (Johnson et al., 2010,2012) In 2012, under the Deep Vadose Zone Applied Field Research Initiative (DVZ-AFRI), the U.S. Department of Energy – Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation

  13. Pedotransfer functions in soil electrical resistivity estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is recognized as a powerful non-invasive soil survey and monitoring method. Relationships between ER and soil water contents that are needed to infer the spatial distribution of soil moisture from the ERT results, are known to reflect soil properties. ...

  14. ERTS & EROS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geotimes, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Describes the proposed investigations to be conducted with ERTS (Earth Resources Technology Satellite), the first experimental satellite for systematically surveying earth resources by remote sensing. Launching set for June, 1972. (PR)

  15. An Ultra-Precise System for Electrical Resistivity Tomography Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, Douglas J; Adkins, Paula L

    2008-12-09

    The objective of this research was to determine the feasibility of building and operating an ERT system that will allow measurement precision that is an order of magnitude better than existing systems on the market today and in particular if this can be done without significantly greater manufacturing or operating costs than existing commercial systems. Under this proposal, we performed an estimation of measurement errors in galvanic resistivity data that arise as a consequence of the type of electrode material used to make the measurements. In our laboratory, measurement errors for both magnitude and induced polarization (IP) were estimated using the reciprocity of data from an array of electrodes as might be used for electrical resistance tomography using 14 different metals as well as one non-metal - carbon. In a second phase of this study, using archival data from two long-term ERT surveys, we examined long-term survivability of electrodes over periods of several years. The survey sites were: the Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (which was sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy as part of the civilian radioactive waste management program), and a water infiltration test at a site adjacent to the New Mexico Institute of Mines and Technology in Socorro, New Mexico (sponsored by the Sandia/Tech vadose program). This enabled us to compare recent values with historical values and determine electrode performance over the long-term as well as the percentage of electrodes that have failed entirely. We have constructed a prototype receiver system, made modifications and revised the receiver design. The revised prototype uses a new 24 bit analog to digital converter from Linear Technologies with amplifier chips from Texas Instruments. The input impedance of the system will be increased from 107 Ohms to approximately 1010 Ohms. The input noise level of the system has been decreased to approximately 10 Nanovolts and system resolution to about 1 Nanovolt at

  16. Hydrological Interpretation of ERT Monitoring Data on active landslides by implementation of numerical modelling at sites of the LAMOND Long-Term Landslide Monitoring Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyer, Stefan; Ottowitz, David; Supper, Robert; Jochum, Birgit; Riegler, Monika; Scolobig, Anna; Pfeiler, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Five landslides are monitored in the framework of the LAMOND Network using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), three of these are located in Austria, one in Italy and one in France. Hydrological interpretation of the collected ERT data is typically carried out qualitatively on a visual basis. In this study, numerical modelling in combination with parameter estimation is implemented to build a basis for an enhanced interpretation. Parameter estimation is carried out by Comsol Multiphysics using Richard's equation and the Optimization module. The result of the forward model (water saturation) is compared to the ERT section (resistivity) using Archies law. The study LAMOND is funded by the Austrian Academy of sciences.

  17. Heterogeneous reactive transport under unsaturated transient conditions characterized by 3D electrical resistivity tomography and advanced lysimeter methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Markus; Slater, Lee

    2015-04-01

    Our ability to predict flow and transport processes in the unsaturated critical zone is considerably limited by two characteristics: heterogeneity of flow and transience of boundary conditions. The causes of heterogeneous flow and transport are fairly well understood, yet the characterization and quantification of such processes in natural profiles remains challenging. This is due to current methods of observation, such as staining and isotope tracers, being unable to observe multiple events on the same profile and offering limited spatial information. In our study we demonstrate an approach to characterize preferential flow and transport processes applying a combination of geoelectrical methods and advanced lysimeter techniques. On an agricultural soil profile, which was transferred undisturbed into a lysimeter container, we systematically applied a variety of input flow boundary conditions, resembling natural precipitation events. We measured breakthroughs of a conservative tracer and of nitrate, originating from the application of a slow release fertilizer and serving as a reactive tracer. Flow and transport in the soil column were observed using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), tensiometers, water content probes and a multicompartment suction plate (MSP). These techniques allowed a direct validation of water content dynamics and tracer breakthrough under transient boundary conditions characterized noninvasively by ERT. We were able to image the advancing infiltration front and the advancing front of tracer and nitrate using time lapse ERT. Water content changes associated with the advancing infiltration front dominated over pore fluid conductivity changes during short term precipitation events. Conversely, long-term displacement of the solute fronts was monitored during periods of constant water content in between infiltration events. We observed preferential flow phenomena through ERT and through the MSP, which agreed in general terms. The preferential

  18. Detection of Underground Cavities in a Karst Area using an Electrical Resistivity Tomography Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, M.; Park, S.; Kim, C.

    2012-12-01

    The construction of large-scale facilities is inevitably increasing in the areas with weak rock mass, such as karst areas due to rapidly growing needs in modern cities for infrastructure projects. Surface geophysical methods and boring method usually carry out the investigation of the spatial distribution and shapes of underground cavities formed in the karst subsidence area, but they have some restrictions in areas where buildings and facilities are already situated. Therefore, the application of other geophysical techniques with higher resolution and precise images is required. The study area, located in Muan-gun, Jeollanam-do in the south-western part of Korea, is a karst area where ground subsidence caused by limestone cavities frequently occurs. In addition, the Kwangju fault passes through this area with many fault-fractured zones is developed. These fault-fractured zones produce clay and cause limestone dissolution due to groundwater flow within the limestone formation, resulting in developing limestone cavities. More reliable geophysical method to investigate the underground structures is necessary to apply. Recently, the electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) technique has been increasingly applied to the underground cavity detection filled with groundwater and/or clays. In this study, we conducted an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in order to investigate the spatial distribution and shapes of underground cavities developed in the karst area. First, we conducting a numerical modeling of ERT for various electrical arrays on two models with similar to the field survey conditions. The first numerical model is a sinkhole-type structure such as collapse of upper layer with weak zones, and the second model is a platy vein-type structure with clustered cavity of low resistivity such as inclined fault fractures. The electrical arrays used in the numerical modeling include pole-pole, dipole-dipole, pole-dipole, and dipole-pole arrays. The results of the

  19. Gas-water two-phase flow characterization with Electrical Resistance Tomography and Multivariate Multiscale Entropy analysis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chao; Zhao, Jia; Dong, Feng

    2015-03-01

    Flow behavior characterization is important to understand gas-liquid two-phase flow mechanics and further establish its description model. An Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) provides information regarding flow conditions at different directions where the sensing electrodes implemented. We extracted the multivariate sample entropy (MSampEn) by treating ERT data as a multivariate time series. The dynamic experimental results indicate that the MSampEn is sensitive to complexity change of flow patterns including bubbly flow, stratified flow, plug flow and slug flow. MSampEn can characterize the flow behavior at different direction of two-phase flow, and reveal the transition between flow patterns when flow velocity changes. The proposed method is effective to analyze two-phase flow pattern transition by incorporating information of different scales and different spatial directions. PMID:25304040

  20. Electrical Resistance Tomography Field Trials to Image CO2 Sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newmark, R.

    2003-12-01

    , telluric noise can be comparable to the signal levels during periods of geomagnetic activity. Finally, instrumentation stability over long periods is necessary to follow trends in reservoir behavior for several years. Solutions to these and other problems will be presented along with results from the first two years of work at a producing field undergoing CO2 flood. If electrical resistance tomography (ERT) imaging can be performed using existing well casings as long electrodes, it will substantially reduce the cost to monitor CO2 sequestration. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  1. Monitoring CO 2 sequestration into deep saline aquifer and associated salt intrusion using coupled multiphase flow modeling and time lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan Lu; CHI Zhang; Hai Hanag; Timothy C. Johnson

    2014-04-01

    Successful geological storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2) require efficient monitoring of the migration of CO2 plume during and after large-scale injection in order to verify the containment of the injected CO2 within the target formation and to evaluate potential leakage risk. Field studies have shown that surface and cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be a useful tool in imaging and characterizing solute transport in heterogeneous subsurface. In this synthetic study, we have coupled a 3-D multiphase flow model with a parallel 3-D time-lapse ERT inversion code to explore the feasibility of using time-lapse ERT for simultaneously monitoring the migration of CO2 plume in deep saline formation and potential brine intrusion into shallow fresh water aquifer. Direct comparisons of the inverted CO2 plumes resulting from ERT with multiphase flow simulation results indicate the ERT could be used to delineate the migration of CO2 plume. Detailed comparisons on the locations, sizes and shapes of CO2 plume and intruded brine plumes suggest that ERT inversion tends to underestimate the area review of the CO2 plume, but overestimate the thickness and total volume of the CO2 plume. The total volume of intruded brine plumes is overestimated as well. However, all discrepancies remain within reasonable ranges. Our study suggests that time-lapse ERT is a useful monitoring tool in characterizing the movement of injected CO2 into deep saline aquifer and detecting potential brine intrusion under large-scale field injection conditions.

  2. Tomographic Site Characterization Using CPT, ERT, and GPR

    SciTech Connect

    Rexford M. Morey

    1997-05-23

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the cleanup of inactive DOE sites and for bringing DOE sites and facilities into compliance with federal, state and local laws and regulations. The DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) needs advanced technologies that can make environmental restoration and waste management operations more efficient and less costly. These techniques are required to better characterize the physical, hydrogeological, and chemical properties of the subsurface while minimizing and optimizing the use of boreholes and monitoring wells. Today the cone penetrometer technique (CPT) is demonstrating the value of a minimally invasive deployment system fix site characterization. Applied Research Associates is developing two new sensor packages for site characterization and monitoring. The two new methods are: . Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and . Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Tomography. These sensor systems are now integrated with the Cone Penetrometer Technique (CPT). The results of this program now make it possible to install ERT and GPR units by CPT methods and thereby reduce installation costs and total costs for ERT and GPR surveys. These two techniques can complement each other in regions of low resistivity where ERT is more effective and regions of high resistivity where GPR is more effective. The results show that CPT-installed GeoWells can be used in both ERT and GPR borehole tomographic subsurface imaging. These two imaging techniques can be used for environmental site characterization and environmental remediation monitoring. Technologies used for site characterization and monitoring have numerous and diverse applications within site clean-up and waste management operations.

  3. ERT of seasonal changes in steep permafrost rocks with laboratory-calibrated temperature-resistivity behavior, an incorporated resistance error model, and temperature validation (Zugspitze, German/Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Verleysdonk, S.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2008-12-01

    Rockwall instability at the Zugspitze North Face is evident due to the 3.5(±0.5)*108 m3 rockslide that occurred in 3700 B.P from the permafrost-affected Zugspitze (2962 m a.s.l.) North Face and was interpreted as a delayed permafrost response to the Holocene Climatic Optimum (Gude and Barsch, 2005; Jerz and Poschinger, 1995). Thawing of rock permafrost is a key promoting and triggering factor for rock instability, rock creep, and rockfalls. Rock instability in permafrost-affected bedrock is governed by shear stress, hydrostatic pressures, and friction along one or several planes of weaknesses in the rock mass. Friction along planes of weaknesses (without fine-grained cleft fillings) is susceptible to subzero temperature changes due to alterations in intact rock mass strength and ice-mechanical properties along planes of weaknesses. We argue that rock permafrost geophysical surveys have the potential to provide spatially resolved information on subzero temperatures that could serve as highly-important input for stability models. Here we present the first monthly ERT (electrical resistance tomography) results in steep permafrost rocks over the whole summer thaw period. Temperature-resistivity behavior of limestone from the study site was measured in the laboratory during repeated cycles of freezing at 0.2-0.4°C increments and exhibited a two-fold linear relationship divided by a freezing point at about -0.5°C. Field measurements were taken from February to October 2007 in a gallery close to the Zugspitze North Face at 2800 m a.s.l. and display thawing and refreezing behavior up to 30 m depth from the north face. We applied high-resolution, time-lapse 2D ERT with 140 electrodes and ca. 2000 resistance measurements per time frame. Local topographic settings and electrode positions were accommodated in an 8600 finite-element mesh with three different resolutions and varying boundary conditions according to the field setup. Resistivity images were computed using a

  4. ERT monitoring of environmental remediation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Brecque, D. J.; Ramirez, A. L.; Daily, W. D.; Binley, A. M.; Schima, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The use of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to monitor new environmental remediation processes is addressed. An overview of the ERT method, including design of surveys and interpretation, is given. Proper design and lay-out of boreholes and electrodes are important for successful results. Data are collected using an automated collection system and interpreted using a nonlinear least squares inversion algorithm. Case histories are given for three remediation technologies: Joule (ohmic) heating, in which clay layers are heated electrically; air sparging, the injection of air below the water table; and electrokinetic treatment, which moves ions by applying an electric current. For Joule heating, a case history is given for an experiment near Savannah River, Georgia, USA. The target for Joule heating was a clay layer of variable thickness. During the early stages of heating, ERT images show increases in conductivity due to the increased temperatures. Later, the conductivities decreased as the system became dehydrated. For air sparging, a case history from Florence, Oregon, USA is described. Air was injected into a sandy aquifer at the site of a former service station. Successive images clearly show the changes in shape of the region of air saturation with time. The monitoring of an electrokinetic laboratory test on core samples is shown. The electrokinetic treatment creates a large change in the core resistivity, decreasing near the anode and increasing near the cathode. Although remediation efforts were successful both at Savannah River and at Florence, in neither case did experiments progress entirely as predicted. At Savannah River, the effects of heating and venting were not uniform and at Florence the radius of air flow was smaller than expected. Most sites are not as well characterized as these two sites. Improving remediation methods requires an understanding of the movements of heat, air, fluids and ions in the sub-surface which ERT can provide. The

  5. Characterization and calibration of seawater intrusion models using electrical resistivity tomography (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, F. H.; Kemna, A.; Antonsson, A.; Engesgaard, P. K.; Beaujean, J.

    2009-12-01

    The urban development of coastal regions create seawater intrusion (SWI) problems which threatens groundwater quality and coastal ecosystems. To study SWI, one needs both robust measuring technologies, and reliable predictions. A key aspect in the calibration of SWI models involves reproducing measured groundwater chloride concentrations. Drilling such multi-screen wells to obtain a whole concentration profile is a risky task if reliable information about the position of the salt wedge is not available. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is increasingly being used to characterize seawater intrusion and constrain corresponding models, given its high sensitivity to ion concentration in groundwater and its relatively high spatial resolution. We have investigated the potential of ERT using field data from a site in Almeria, SE Spain and synthetic data. Simulations have been run for several scenarios, with a simple hydrogeological model reflecting the local site conditions. The simulations showed that only the lower salt concentrations of the seawater-freshwater transition zone could be recovered, due to the loss of resolution with depth. We quantified this capability in terms of image appraisal indicators (cumulative sensitivity) associated with the measurement setup and showed that the mismatch between the targeted and imaged parameter values occurs from a certain threshold. Similarly, heterogeneity may only be determined accurately if located in an adequately sensitive area. Inversion of the synthetic data was performed by coupling an inversion code (PEST) with a finite-difference density-dependent flow and transport modeling code (HTS). The numerical results demonstrate the capacity of sensitivity-filtered ERT images to constrain transverse hydraulic dispersivity and longitudinal hydraulic conductivity of homogeneous seawater intrusion models. At the field site, we identified SWI at the scale of a few kilometers down to a hundred meters. Borehole logs show a

  6. Time-lapse ERT for the monitoring of soil-plant interactions in the root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Rossi, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Fadda, G.; Putti, M.; Marani, M.

    2013-12-01

    The application of time-lapse non invasive 3D micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been proven to be an efficient tool to monitor the soil-plant interactions and particularly the root zone activity. This information can support water balance modeling in the upper subsoil critical zone. Here we present the results of two field experiments in very different environments: the case of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region (Northern Italy), and the case of salt-marshes plants in the Venice Lagoon. The micro-scale ERT apparatus consists of buried electrodes installed on micro boreholes, plus mini-electrodes on the ground surface. We collected repeated ERT, TDR and tensiometer data. For the apple orchard site test we adopted controlled irrigation tests in different seasons, while in the lagoon salt-marshes we monitored the root-plant activity during tidal flooding. The results demonstrate that micro-scale ERT is a very effective tool to characterize subsoil conditions and monitor root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. Micro-scale ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity, as demonstrated in the case of the apple orchard, while ERT and moisture measurements in the lagoon environment show a high resistivity suction layer located at root depth even during marsh flooding. Both observations will be important pieces of information for the comprehension of relevant eco- hydrological dynamics.

  7. Time-lapse ERT for the monitoring of soil-plant interactions in the root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Rossi, M.; D'Alpaos, A.; Fadda, G.; Putti, M.; Marani, M.

    2011-12-01

    The application of time-lapse non invasive 3D micro-scale electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been proven to be an efficient tool to monitor the soil-plant interactions and particularly the root zone activity. This information can support water balance modeling in the upper subsoil critical zone. Here we present the results of two field experiments in very different environments: the case of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region (Northern Italy), and the case of salt-marshes plants in the Venice Lagoon. The micro-scale ERT apparatus consists of buried electrodes installed on micro boreholes, plus mini-electrodes on the ground surface. We collected repeated ERT, TDR and tensiometer data. For the apple orchard site test we adopted controlled irrigation tests in different seasons, while in the lagoon salt-marshes we monitored the root-plant activity during tidal flooding. The results demonstrate that micro-scale ERT is a very effective tool to characterize subsoil conditions and monitor root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. Micro-scale ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity, as demonstrated in the case of the apple orchard, while ERT and moisture measurements in the lagoon environment show a high resistivity suction layer located at root depth even during marsh flooding. Both observations will be important pieces of information for the comprehension of relevant eco- hydrological dynamics.

  8. Electrical resistivity tomography as monitoring tool for unsaturated zone transport: an example of preferential transport of deicing chemicals.

    PubMed

    Wehrer, Markus; Lissner, Heidi; Bloem, Esther; French, Helen; Totsche, Kai Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive spatially resolved monitoring techniques may hold the key to observe heterogeneous flow and transport behavior of contaminants in soils. In this study, time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was employed during an infiltration experiment with deicing chemical in a small field lysimeter. Deicing chemicals like potassium formate, which frequently impact soils on airport sites, were infiltrated during snow melt. Chemical composition of seepage water and the electrical response was recorded over the spring period 2010. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomographs are able to show the infiltration of the melt water loaded with ionic constituents of deicing chemicals and their degradation product hydrogen carbonate. The tomographs indicate early breakthrough behavior in parts of the profile. Groundtruthing with pore fluid conductivity and water content variations shows disagreement between expected and observed bulk conductivity. This was attributed to the different sampling volume of traditional methods and ERT due to a considerable fraction of immobile water in the soil. The results show that ERT can be used as a soil monitoring tool on airport sites if assisted by common soil monitoring techniques. PMID:24194415

  9. River terrace sand and gravel deposit reserve estimation using three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography for bedrock surface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, J. E.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Penn, S.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Loke, M. H.; Gunn, D. A.

    2013-06-01

    We describe the application of 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to the characterisation and reserve estimation of an economic fluvial sand and gravel deposit. Due to the smoothness constraints used to regularise the inversion, it can be difficult to accurately determine the geometry of sharp interfaces. We have therefore considered two approaches to interface detection that we have applied to the 3D ERT results in an attempt to provide an accurate and objective assessment of the bedrock surface elevation. The first is a gradient-based approach, in which the steepest gradient of the vertical resistivity profile is assumed to correspond to the elevation of the mineral/bedrock interface. The second method uses an intrusive sample point to identify the interface resistivity at a location within the model, from which an iso-resistivity surface is identified that is assumed to define the interface. Validation of these methods has been achieved through direct comparison with observed bedrock surface elevations that were measured using real-time-kinematic GPS subsequent to the 3D ERT survey when quarrying exposed the bedrock surface. The gradient-based edge detector severely underestimated the depth to bedrock in this case, whereas the interface resistivity method produced bedrock surface elevations that were in close agreement with the GPS-derived surface. The failure of the gradient-based method is attributed to insufficient model sensitivity in the region of the bedrock surface, whereas the success of the interface resistivity method is a consequence of the homogeneity of the mineral and bedrock, resulting in a consistent interface resistivity. These results highlight the need for some intrusive data for model validation and for edge detection approaches to be chosen on the basis of local geological conditions.

  10. Application of electrical resistivity tomography technique for investigation of landslides: a case from Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drahor, Mahmut G.; Göktürkler, Gökhan; Berge, Meriç A.; Kurtulmuş, T. Özgür

    2006-05-01

    Electrical resistivity imaging is a widely used tool in near surface geophysical surveys for investigation of various geological, environmental and engineering problems including landslide. In this study, an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was conducted in a landslide area, located in the Söke district of Aydın, Turkey. In 2003, the Neogene-aged units on the slope next to a newly built school building became unstable due to an excavation work and moved after a heavy rainfall. The resulting landslide partly covered the school. The authors carried out a 2-D resistivity survey along three profiles over the landslide mass using a Wenner configuration. It yielded useful information about the geometry and characteristics of the landslide. In addition, a 2-D synthetic resistivity modelling study was carried out to understand the response of the resistivity method to a landslide problem before the field surveys. Eight boreholes were also drilled in the landslide area. Both the drilling and resistivity results indicated the presence of a fault in the site. Also, the resistivity data from the line measured along the axis of the landslide revealed the surface of rupture.

  11. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600 ppm) in 3 months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique.

  12. Electrical resistivity tomography to monitor enhanced biodegradation of hydrocarbons with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 at a pilot scale.

    PubMed

    Masy, Thibaut; Caterina, David; Tromme, Olivier; Lavigne, Benoît; Thonart, Philippe; Hiligsmann, Serge; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons (HC) represent the most widespread contaminants and in-situ bioremediation remains a competitive treatment in terms of cost and environmental concerns. However, the efficiency of such a technique (by biostimulation or bioaugmentation) strongly depends on the environment affected and is still difficult to predict a priori. In order to overcome these uncertainties, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) appears as a valuable non-invasive tool to detect soil heterogeneities and to monitor biodegradation. The main objective of this study was to isolate an electrical signal linked to an enhanced bacterial activity with ERT, in an aged HC-contaminated clay loam soil. To achieve this, a pilot tank was built to mimic field conditions. Compared to a first insufficient biostimulation phase, bioaugmentation with Rhodococcus erythropolis T902.1 led to a HC depletion of almost 80% (6900 to 1600ppm) in 3months in the center of the contaminated zone, where pollutants were less bioavailable. In the meantime, lithological heterogeneities and microbial activities (growth and biosurfactant production) were successively discriminated by ERT images. In the future, this cost-effective technique should be more and more transferred to the field in order to monitor biodegradation processes and assist in selecting the most appropriate remediation technique. PMID:26697744

  13. Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvon, Dina; Vladimir, Shevnin; Boris, Nikulin; Albert, Ryjov; Alexey, Skobelev

    2013-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography at the search of groundwater near Anapa town in the south of Russia. Kvon D. A.(1)*, Shevnin V.A.(1), Nikulin B. A.(1), Ryjov A. A.(2), Skobelev A. O.(1) (1)Geophysical dept., Faculty of Geology, Moscow state university; (2)VSEGINGEO Due to acute shortage of fresh drinking water near Anapa town (not far from the Black Sea), geophysical investigations were performed for searching and mapping aquifers in the area, where, according to rare wells exist probability to find fresh underground water. Geophysical explorations were carried out by Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method and water resistivity measurements. The resistivity of fresh groundwater is 15 Ohm.m, its salinity is 0.4 g/l. The structure of the area has been obtained by previous geological and hydrogeological studies and boreholes drilling. Geological structure of the area consists of two parts: the upper part of cross-section presented by loose lacustrine-alluvial sediments of Upper Pleistocene - Holocene, the lower part presented by hard rocs of carbonate-flysch formation of Upper Cretaceous age consisted of marl and limestone. Prospective areas to find underground water are: water-bearing horizon of upper Pleistocene-Holocene sediments, which is presented by gravel layer (base layer of modern lacustrine-alluvial sediments), and fractured zones in hard rocks of the carbonate-flysch formation of Maastricht age (Supseh formation). Analysis of rocks' resistivity obtained from Electrical resistivity tomography followed by calculation of rock resistivity on known petrophysical parameters (in Petrowin program created by A. A. Ryjov) [Shevnin et al., 2007]. The calculation showed that there is low clay content in carbonate rocks of the studied area, and the rock is limestone, not marl. Measurement of rock samples with X-ray radiometric method showed high calcium content (30-35%) or 75-87.5% limestone. This fact shows that flysch formation of the area is mainly

  14. Evaluating the Performance of Short-Term Heat Storage in Alluvial Aquifer with 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Hydrological Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, T.; Robert, T.; Paulus, C.; Bolly, P. Y.; Koo Seen Lin, E.; Nguyen, F.

    2015-12-01

    In the context of energy demand side management (DSM), energy storage solutions are needed to store energy during high production periods and recover energy during high demand periods. Among currently studied solutions, storing energy in the subsurface through heat pumps and/or exchangers (thermal energy storage) is relatively simple with low investment costs. However, the design and functioning of such systems have strong interconnections with the geology of the site which may be complex and heterogeneous, making predictions difficult. In this context, local temperature measurements are necessary but not sufficient to model heat flow and transport in the subsurface. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) provides spatially distributed information on the temperature distribution in the subsurface. In this study, we monitored, with 4D ERT combined with multiple hydrological measurements in available wells, a short-term heat storage experiment in a confined alluvial aquifer. We injected heated water (ΔT=30K) during 6 hours with a rate of 3 m³/h. We stored this heat during 3 days, and then we pumped it back to estimate the energy balance. We collected ERT data sets using 9 parallel profiles of 21 electrodes and cross-lines measurements. Inversion results clearly show the ability of ERT to delimit the thermal plume growth during injection, the diffusion and decrease of temperature during storage, and the decrease in size after pumping. Quantitative interpretation of ERT in terms of temperature estimates is difficult at this stage due to strong spatial variations of the total dissolved solid content in the aquifer, due to historical chloride contamination of the site. However, we demonstrated that short-term heat storage in alluvial aquifer is efficient and that ERT combined with hydrological measurements is a valuable tool to image and estimate the temperature distribution in the subsurface. Moreover, energy balance shows that up to 75% of the energy can be easily

  15. Adjoint-state inversion of electric resistivity tomography data of seawater intrusion at the Argentona coastal aquifer (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-López, Sheila; Carrera, Jesús; Ledo, Juanjo; Queralt, Pilar; Luquot, Linda; Martínez, Laura; Bellmunt, Fabián

    2016-04-01

    Seawater intrusion in aquifers is a complex phenomenon that can be characterized with the help of electric resistivity tomography (ERT) because of the low resistivity of seawater, which underlies the freshwater floating on top. The problem is complex because of the need for joint inversion of electrical and hydraulic (density dependent flow) data. Here we present an adjoint-state algorithm to treat electrical data. This method is a common technique to obtain derivatives of an objective function, depending on potentials with respect to model parameters. The main advantages of it are its simplicity in stationary problems and the reduction of computational cost respect others methodologies. The relationship between the concentration of chlorides and the resistivity values of the field is well known. Also, these resistivities are related to the values of potentials measured using ERT. Taking this into account, it will be possible to define the different resistivities zones from the field data of potential distribution using the basis of inverse problem. In this case, the studied zone is situated in Argentona (Baix Maresme, Catalonia), where the values of chlorides obtained in some wells of the zone are too high. The adjoint-state method will be used to invert the measured data using a new finite element code in C ++ language developed in an open-source framework called Kratos. Finally, the information obtained numerically with our code will be checked with the information obtained with other codes.

  16. Rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, M.; Yamamiya, K.; Shimada, J.

    2008-12-01

    Many researchers have studied about the hydrological process, especially rainfall-runoff process, in the headwater region using multi hydrometric methods. Since the possibility has been recognized that bedrock groundwater has important role to play in the rainfall-runoff process, it is important to comprehend the rainfall infiltration process within fluctuations of bedrock groundwater. However, we would need many hydrological instruments to understand this process precisely. So we have applied electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method to understand rainfall infiltration process in the area that is estimated the contribution of bedrock groundwater for rainfall-runoff processes. Resistivity changes with the saturation rate of the pore fluid in the subsurface material. So it is possible to estimate spatial and temporal distribution of subsurface water by using ERT. In this study, we will estimate rainfall infiltration process in mountain headwater region using resistivity method. The study area is the Mamushi-dani watershed in Shiranui, Kumamoto, Japan. We described the bedrock groundwater storage systems using resistivity method in this watershed previously. Resistivity has been observed at 2 measurement lines in slope areas of this watershed. Both measurement lines have 47m in length, 1m electrode spacing and 48 electrodes. We used the multi-electrode system, NEXT-400(Kowa Co. Ltd., Japan) for measuring apparent resistivity and the application software, E-tomo (Diaconsultant Co. Ltd., Japan) for inversion of apparent resistivity data. The observed resistivity data were compared with water head observed at borehole and specific discharge observed at foot of the watershed. Inverted resistivity profiles and observed hydrological data showed the interface between saturated and unsaturated zone. During rainfall occurs, resistivity in surface area gets lower than that before the rainfall and resistivity in some part of unsaturated area shows increasing tendency. Both

  17. Electrical resistivity tomography for studying liquefaction induced by the May 2012 Emilia-Romagna earthquake (Mw = 6.1, northern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, A.; Quadrio, B.; Bellanova, J.; Lapenna, V.; Piscitelli, S.

    2014-04-01

    This work shows the result of an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey carried out for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface affected by the coseismic effects of the Mw = 6.1 Emilia-Romagna (northern Italy) earthquake that occurred on 20 May 2012. The most characteristic coseismic effects were ground failure, lateral spreading and liquefaction that occurred extensively along the paleo-Reno River in the urban areas of San Carlo and Mirabello (southwestern portion of Ferrara Province). In total, six electrical resistivity tomographies were performed and calibrated with surface geological surveys, exploratory boreholes and aerial photo interpretations. This was one of first applications of the electrical resistivity tomography method in investigating coseismic liquefaction.

  18. Contribution of 3D inversion of Electrical Resistivity Tomography data applied to volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for geological structures imaging. Such structures can present complex characteristics that conventional 2D inversion processes cannot perfectly integrate. Here we present a new 3D inversion algorithm named EResI, firstly developed for levee investigation, and presently applied to the study of a complex lava dome (the Puy de Dôme volcano, France). EResI algorithm is based on a conventional regularized Gauss-Newton inversion scheme and a 3D non-structured discretization of the model (double grid method based on tetrahedrons). This discretization allows to accurately model the topography of investigated structure (without a mesh deformation procedure) and also permits a precise location of the electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that a complete 3D unstructured discretization limits the number of inversion cells and is better adapted to the resolution capacity of tomography than a structured discretization. This study shows that a 3D inversion with a non-structured parametrization has some advantages compared to classical 2D inversions. The first advantage comes from the fact that a 2D inversion leads to artefacts due to 3D effects (3D topography, 3D internal resistivity). The second advantage comes from the fact that the capacity to experimentally align electrodes along an axis (for 2D surveys) depends on the constrains on the field (topography...). In this case, a 2D assumption induced by 2.5D inversion software prevents its capacity to model electrodes outside this axis leading to artefacts in the inversion result. The last limitation comes from the use of mesh deformation techniques used to accurately model the topography in 2D softwares. This technique used for structured discretization (Res2dinv) is prohibed for strong topography (>60 %) and leads to a small computational errors. A wide geophysical survey was carried out

  19. Seawater intrusion mapping using electrical resistivity tomography and hydrochemical data. An application in the coastal area of eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece.

    PubMed

    Kazakis, N; Pavlou, A; Vargemezis, G; Voudouris, K S; Soulios, G; Pliakas, F; Tsokas, G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the extent and geometrical characteristics of seawater intrusion in the coastal aquifer of the eastern Thermaikos Gulf, Greece. Hydrochemical data and geoelectrical measurements were combined and supplemented to determine the hydrochemical regime of the study site in regard to seawater phenomena. Chemical analysis of groundwater was performed in 126 boreholes and fifteen electrical resistivity tomographies (ERT) were measured, whereas in two sites the ERT measurements were repeated following the wet season. The Cl(-) concentrations recorded reached 2240 mg/L indicating seawater intrusion which was also verified by ionic ratios. The ionic ratios were overlapped and a seawater intrusion map (SWIM) was produced. A significant part of the coastal aquifer (up to 150 km(2)) is influenced by seawater intrusion. The areas with the most intensive salinization are located between Nea Kallikratia-Epanomi and Aggelochori-Peraia. According to the ERTs, in the influenced areas the salinization of the aquifer exceeds 1 km toward the mainland and its depth reaches 200 m. In the area surrounding Thessaloniki airport, the ERTs revealed salinization of the upper aquifer to depths of up to 40 m, whereas the lower aquifer is uninfluenced. This abnormal distribution of seawater intrusion demonstrates the value of geoelectrical methods in the study of seawater intrusion especially in areas with limited available hydrochemical data. PMID:26605830

  20. Olive-oil mill wastewater transport under unsaturated and saturated laboratory conditions using the geoelectrical resistivity tomography method and the FEFLOW model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seferou, P.; Soupios, P.; Kourgialas, N. N.; Dokou, Z.; Karatzas, G. P.; Candasayar, E.; Papadopoulos, N.; Dimitriou, V.; Sarris, A.; Sauter, M.

    2013-09-01

    An integrated approach for monitoring the vertical transport of a solute into the subsurface by using a geophysical method and a simulation model is proposed and evaluated. A medium-scale (1 m3) laboratory tank experiment was constructed to represent a real subsurface system, where an olive-oil mill wastewater (OOMW) spill might occur. High-resolution cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was performed to monitor the OOMW transport. Time-lapse ERT images defined the spatial geometry of the interface between the contaminated and uncontaminated soil into the unsaturated and saturated zones. Knowing the subsurface characteristics, the finite element flow and transport model FEFLOW was used for simulating the contaminant movement, utilizing the ERT results as a surrogate for concentration measurements for the calibration process. A statistical analysis of the ERT measurements and the corresponding transport model results for various time steps showed a good agreement between them. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the most important parameters of the simulation model (unsaturated flow, saturated flow and transport) was performed. This laboratory-scale study emphasizes that the combined use of geophysical and transport-modeling approaches can be useful for small-scale field applications where contaminant concentration measurements are scarce, provided that its transferability from laboratory to field conditions is investigated thoroughly.

  1. Electrical Resistivity Tomography to characterize localized freshwater discharge in coastal environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumm, Max; Scheuermann, Alexander; Hauck, Christian; Welti, Nina

    2014-05-01

    North Stradbroke Island, located in the Pacific Ocean about 40 km east of Brisbane in Queensland, Australia, is formed by massive sand dunes of heights up to 229 m. The Island represents a reservoir for vast amounts of groundwater and plays an important role for the regional water supply. Therefore a detailed understanding of its hydrogeological features is of particular interest. In the intertidal zone on the western shores of the island, two localized freshwater springs with 4 m and 6 m in diameter were found. Hydrochemical investigations could not unequivocally identify the source of the freshwater by comparing its chemical properties to adjacent surface water and groundwater features. This case study presents the application of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in order to identify the source of the discharged freshwater and to delineate preferential flow paths in the saturated sand sediments. Several measurements with in-line arrays switching 48 electrodes as well as square arrays with 96 electrodes were conducted. The results of two- and three-dimensional data inversion were refined and verified implementing additional information. In-lab resistivity measurements on undisturbed samples of the sand sediments from the area under investigation as well as data from drill cores were considered for the refinement of the inversion model. The field work was impeded by the tides and allowed only for short periods for set up and measurement. A semi-confined aquifer formed by a layer of cemented sand at 7 m to 8 m depth perforated at the location of the springs could be identified. The interpretation of ERT data without considering additional geological and in lab resistivity data did not unambiguously indicate the real geological structure of the subsurface. High conductivities in the saturated sandy sediments lead to low investigation depths. Porosity-conductivity relationships for the loose sediments as well as for the cemented sand layer had to be modified to

  2. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic

  3. The effect of irrigation frequency on water depletion by bell pepper: the added value of electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garré, Sarah; Assouline, Shmuel; Furman, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The dynamics of root uptake, and its relation to soil moisture, is a very important component in the terrestrial water balance and may determine water resources management, ecology and agriculture. In this research we explore the spatial and temporal distribution of soil water under different irrigation schemes in high resolution using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Bell pepper was planted in containers and irrigated in two different schemes, differing only in irrigation frequency. The daily dose remains the same for both treatments. This irrigation difference results in different spatio-temporal distribution of the soil water in the root zone, which in turn implies spatio-temporal differences in root uptake. The experiment was conducted under very high evapotranspiration (ET) conditions. The resistivity surveys, using 96 electrodes placed around the growth chamber were taken over 10 times daily. Plants subjected to high frequency irrigation generally were faster in growth and matured about a week earlier. This is primarily attributed to the higher water content that exists in the root zone, and primarily during the high ET periods at noon. The 3-D resistivity distributions provide an interesting insight into the water depletion by the crop in space and time. However, the ERT survey also encountered some challenges related to time-varying error levels and electrode contact changes during wetting and drying cycles.

  4. The effect of irrigation frequency on water depletion by bell pepper: the added value of electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garre, S.; Assouline, S.; Furman, A.

    2013-12-01

    The dynamics of root uptake, and its relation to soil water content, are still insufficiently understood. Nevertheless, it is a very important component in the terrestrial water balance and may determine water resources management, ecology and agriculture. In this research we explore the spatial and temporal distribution of soil water under different irrigation schemes in high resolution using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Bell peppers were planted in a chamber and irrigated in two different schemes, differing only in irrigation frequency. The daily dose remains the same for both treatments. This irrigation difference results in different spatio-temporal distribution of the soil water in the root zone, which in turn implies spatio-temporal differences in root uptake. The experiment was conducted under very high evapotranspiration (ET) conditions. The resistivity surveys, using 96 electrodes placed around the growth chamber were taken over 10 times daily. Plants subjected to high frequency irrigation generally were faster in growth and matured about a week earlier. This is primarily attributed to the higher water content that exists in the root zone, and primarily during the high ET periods at noon. The 3-D resistivity distributions provide an interesting insight into the water depletion by the crop in space and time. However, the ERT survey also encountered some challenges related to time-varying error levels and electrode contact changes during wetting and drying cycles.

  5. Electrical resistivity tomography applied to a complex lava dome: 2D and 3D models comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portal, Angélie; Fargier, Yannick; Lénat, Jean-François; Labazuy, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    The study of volcanic domes growth (e.g. St. Helens, Unzen, Montserrat) shows that it is often characterized by a succession of extrusion phases, dome explosions and collapse events. Lava dome eruptive activity may last from days to decades. Therefore, their internal structure, at the end of the eruption, is complex and includes massive extrusions and lava lobes, talus and pyroclastic deposits as well as hydrothermal alteration. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method, initially developed for environmental and engineering exploration, is now commonly used for volcano structure imaging. Because a large range of resistivity values is often observed in volcanic environments, the method is well suited to study the internal structure of volcanic edifices. We performed an ERT survey on an 11ka years old trachytic lava dome, the Puy de Dôme volcano (French Massif Central). The analysis of a recent high resolution DEM (LiDAR 0.5 m), as well as other geophysical data, strongly suggest that the Puy de Dôme is a composite dome. 11 ERT profiles have been carried out, both at the scale of the entire dome (base diameter of ~2 km and height of 400 m) on the one hand, and at a smaller scale on the summit part on the other hand. Each profile is composed of 64 electrodes. Three different electrode spacing have been used depending on the study area (35 m for the entire dome, 10 m and 5 m for its summit part). Some profiles were performed with half-length roll-along acquisitions, in order to keep a good trade-off between depth of investigation and resolution. Both Wenner-alpha and Wenner-Schlumberger protocols were used. 2-D models of the electrical resistivity distribution were computed using RES2DINV software. In order to constrain inversion models interpretation, the depth of investigation (DOI) method was applied to those results. It aims to compute a sensitivity index on inversion results, illustrating how the data influence the model and constraining models

  6. Monitoring radio-frequency heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1993-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor a radio-frequency heating process for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. A dipole antenna located in a horizontal well in the unsaturated zone was used to heat a contaminated clay layer. The heat-induced changes were tomographically imaged by their effects on the formation electrical resistivity. The resistivity changes observed appear to be related to heating and vaporization of the pore water, formation of steam condensate, and infiltration of rainwater through the heated zones and adjacent areas. There is a clear asymmetry downward in the resistivity decreases associated with the heating process. The resistivity decreases observed in the vicinity of the heating well are believed to be caused by the heating and downward migration of warm water originally located within a radius of a few feet around the heating well; the magnitude of the change is between 10--20%. The decreasing resistivity implies an increasing rate of radio wave attenuation as heating progressed; therefore, the rate of energy deposition around the heating well increased while the penetration distance of the radio waves decreased. Saturation changes in the clay near the antenna during heating were estimated to be 50--55% based on the observed resistivity decreases. Resistivity changes observed at distances greater than 3 meters to one side of the antenna appear to be related to rainwater infiltration. We propose that gaps in near surface clay layers allow rainwater to migrate downward and reach the top of clay rich zone penetrated by the antenna borehole. The water may then accumulate along the top of the clay.

  7. Monitoring Preferential Flow Processes in a Forest Soil with TDR and ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberdoerster, C.; Vanderborght, J.; Kemna, A.; Vereecken, H.

    2009-04-01

    A tracer experiment was performed at a forest site with a structured soil. An area of 6 m x 8 m was sprinkled with a calcium chloride solution for 24 hours at an irrigation rate of 4 mm per hour. This solute pulse was subsequently leached out for 40 days using the same irrigation rate. The tracer movement in the soil profile was monitored using horizontally installed time-domain reflectometry (TDR) probes and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) measurements down to a depth of 3 m. The ERT installation consisted of twelve boreholes equipped with sixteen electrodes each. The tracer breakthrough curves that were observed deeper in the soil profile by both TDR and ERT clearly indicated signs of preferential flow with an early arrival of the peak concentration and a long tail of the breakthrough curve. The comparison between ERT and TDR showed that ERT underestimated the TDR derived bulk electrical conductivity and this deviation could not be explained completely by different sample locations and spatial variability of the soil properties. Therefore, differences between TDR and ERT are assumed to be caused by regularization effects induced by the geophysical inversion. Nevertheless, the courses of the breakthrough curves that were observed with the two methods were very similar. This indicates that preferential flow through a small part of the pore volume can be observed with ERT. Although the method cannot resolve the tracer movement at the scale of the individual preferential flow paths, it offers the possibility to image spatial distribution of the preferential flow path density and the velocity within the flow paths.

  8. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Distributed Temperature Measurements in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, Giorgio; Boaga, Jacopo; Busato, Laura; Perri, Maria Teresa; Putti, Mario; Pasetto, Damiano; Majone, Bruno; Bellin, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical and biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones. We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream, plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed Raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  9. Assessment of local hydraulic properties from electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of a three-dimensional synthetic tracer test experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Salandin, P.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years geophysical methods have become increasingly popular for hydrological applications. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) represents a potentially powerful tool for subsurface solute transport characterization since a full picture of the spatiotemporal evolution of the process can be obtained. However, the quantitative interpretation of tracer tests is difficult because of the uncertainty related to the geoelectrical inversion, the constitutive models linking geophysical and hydrological quantities, and the a priori unknown heterogeneous properties of natural formations. Here an approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation technique is applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K by incorporating time-lapse cross-hole ERT data. Electrical data consist of three-dimensional cross-hole ERT images generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. Under the assumption that the solute spreads as a passive tracer, for high Peclet numbers the spatial moments of the evolving plume are dominated by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. The assimilation of the electrical conductivity 4D images allows updating of the hydrological state as well as the spatial distribution of K. Thus, delineation of the tracer plume and estimation of the local aquifer heterogeneity can be achieved at the same time by means of this interpretation of time-lapse electrical images from tracer tests. We assess the impact on the performance of the hydrological inversion of (i) the uncertainty inherently affecting ERT inversions in terms of tracer concentration and (ii) the choice of the prior statistics of K. Our findings show that realistic ERT images can be integrated into a hydrological model even within an uncoupled inverse modeling framework. The reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution is satisfactory in the portion

  10. Time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography: a powerful tool for landslide monitoring?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, A.

    2011-12-01

    The extreme rainfall events and the quick snowmelt occurrences play an important role in the triggering of the landslides. The occurrence of one of these factors can determine the variation of water content in the first layers of the subsoil and as a consequence a quick soil saturation inducing both an increase in pore-water pressures and the overloaded of the slopes progressively collapsing. The electrical resistivity, self-potential, electromagnetic induction and GPR methods can be considered as the most appropriate for assessing the presence of water in the underground. Such methods allow us to study the behavior of water content over much wider and deeper areas than those offered by traditional methods (thermo-gravimetric, tensiometric, TDR, etc) based on spot measures and concerning small volumes. In particular, the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which has already proved to be a powerful tool both for the geometrical reconstruction of a landslide body (location of sliding surface, estimation of the thickness of the slide material) and the individuation of high water content areas, can be considered as an alternative tool to be employed for a qualitative and quantitative water content monitoring in the first layers of the subsoil. Indeed, time-lapse 2D ERT can be tested in order to gather information on the temporal and spatial patterns of water infiltration processes and water content variation. This work reports the preliminary results from a new prototype system planned to obtain time-lapse 2D ERTs, TDR and precipitation measurements in two landslide areas located in the Southern Apennine chain (Italy). The system was planned with the aim to estimate the variation of the resistivity parameter on a long period considering the water content variation, the rain water infiltration and the seasonal changes. The prototype system, linked to a pc used for storing data and managing the time interval acquisition, consists of: a resistivimeter connected to a

  11. Resistive plate chambers in positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, Paulo; Blanco, Alberto; Couceiro, Miguel; Ferreira, Nuno C.; Lopes, Luís; Martins, Paulo; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fonte, Paulo

    2013-07-01

    Resistive plate chambers (RPC) were originally deployed for high energy physics. Realizing how their properties match the needs of nuclear medicine, a LIP team proposed applying RPCs to both preclinical and clinical positron emission tomography (RPC-PET). We show a large-area RPC-PET simulated scanner covering an axial length of 2.4m —slightly superior to the height of the human body— allowing for whole-body, single-bed RPC-PET acquisitions. Simulations following NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturers Association, USA) protocols yield a system sensitivity at least one order of magnitude larger than present-day, commercial PET systems. Reconstruction of whole-body simulated data is feasible by using a dedicated, direct time-of-flight-based algorithm implemented onto an ordered subsets estimation maximization parallelized strategy. Whole-body RPC-PET patient images following the injection of only 2mCi of 18-fluorodesoxyglucose (FDG) are expected to be ready 7 minutes after the 6 minutes necessary for data acquisition. This compares to the 10-20mCi FDG presently injected for a PET scan, and to the uncomfortable 20-30minutes necessary for its data acquisition. In the preclinical field, two fully instrumented detector heads have been assembled aiming at a four-head-based, small-animal RPC-PET system. Images of a disk-shaped and a needle-like 22Na source show unprecedented sub-millimeter spatial resolution.

  12. Assessment of vascular response after drug-eluting stents implantation in patients with diabetes mellitus: an optical coherence tomography sub-study of the J-DESsERT.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takashi; Akasaka, Takashi; Tanimoto, Takashi; Takano, Masamichi; Seino, Yoshitane; Nasu, Kenya; Itoh, Tomonori; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Okura, Hiroyuki; Shinke, Toshiro; Kotani, Jun-Ichi; Ito, Shigenori; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Muramatsu, Toshiya; Nakamura, Masato; Nanto, Shinsuke

    2016-04-01

    Even in the drug-eluting stent era, diabetes mellitus (DM) patients have high incidences of restenosis and repeat revascularization after percutaneous coronary intervention. The aim of this study was to compare vascular response after stent implantation between sirolimus-eluting stent (SES) and paclitaxel-eluting stent (PES) by using optical coherence tomography (OCT) in DM patients as well as in non-DM patients. In the Japan-Drug Eluting Stents Evaluation; a Randomized Trial (J-DESsERT), the OCT sub-study enrolled 75 patients who underwent 8 months follow-up imaging after SES or PES implantation. Mean neointimal hyperplasia (NIH) thickness was significantly thinner in SES than PES in the DM group (77 ± 47 vs. 201 ± 114 μm, p < 0.001) and in the non-DM group (84 ± 37 vs. 212 ± 128 μm, p < 0.001). Unevenness of NIH thickness in longitudinal axis was significantly smaller in SES than PES in the DM group (348 ± 191 vs. 726 ± 385 μm, p < 0.001) and in the non-DM group (344 ± 174 vs. 679 ± 314 μm, p < 0.001). The percentage of uncovered struts was significantly greater in SES than PES in the DM group (24 ± 4 vs. 9 ± 14 %, p < 0.001) and in the non-DM group (16 ± 16 vs. 3 ± 4 %, p = 0.002). Compared with PES, SES showed more potent NIH inhibition in DM patients as well as in non-DM patients. PMID:25630713

  13. Quantifying potential recharge in mantled sinkholes using ERT.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Benjamin F; Schreiber, Madeline E

    2009-01-01

    Potential recharge through thick soils in mantled sinkholes was quantified using differential electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Conversion of time series two-dimensional (2D) ERT profiles into 2D volumetric water content profiles using a numerically optimized form of Archie's law allowed us to monitor temporal changes in water content in soil profiles up to 9 m in depth. Combining Penman-Monteith daily potential evapotranspiration (PET) and daily precipitation data with potential recharge calculations for three sinkhole transects indicates that potential recharge occurred only during brief intervals over the study period and ranged from 19% to 31% of cumulative precipitation. Spatial analysis of ERT-derived water content showed that infiltration occurred both on sinkhole flanks and in sinkhole bottoms. Results also demonstrate that mantled sinkholes can act as regions of both rapid and slow recharge. Rapid recharge is likely the result of flow through macropores (such as root casts and thin gravel layers), while slow recharge is the result of unsaturated flow through fine-grained sediments. In addition to developing a new method for quantifying potential recharge at the field scale in unsaturated conditions, we show that mantled sinkholes are an important component of storage in a karst system. PMID:18823398

  14. Determining the boundary of inclusions with known conductivities using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm by electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chao; Xu, Yaoyuan; Dong, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is a non-intrusive technique to image the electrical conductivity distribution of a closed vessel by injecting exciting current into the vessel and measuring the boundary voltages induced. ERT image reconstruction is characterized as a severely nonlinear and ill-posed inverse problem with many unknowns. In recent years, a growing number of papers have been published which aim to determine the locations and shapes of inclusions by assuming that their conductivities are piecewise constant and isotropic. In this work, the boundary of inclusions is reconstructed by ERT with a boundary element method. The Jacobian matrix of the forward problem is first calculated with a direct linearization method based on the boundary element, and validated through comparison with that determined by the finite element method and analytical method. A boundary reconstruction algorithm is later presented based on the Levenberg-Marquardt (L-M) method. Several numerical simulations and static experiments were conducted to study the reconstruction quality, where much importance was given to the smoothness of boundaries in the reconstruction; thus, a restriction of the curve radius is introduced to adjust the damping parameter for the L-M algorithm. Analytical results on the stability and precision of the boundary reconstruction demonstrate that stable reconstruction can be achieved when the conductivity of the objects differs much from that of the background medium, and convex boundaries can also be precisely reconstructed. Contrarily, the reconstructions for inclusions with similar conductivities to the background medium are not stable. The situation of an incorrect initial estimation of the inclusions' number is numerically studied and the results show that the boundary of inclusions could be correctly reconstructed with a splitting/merging function under the aforementioned proper operation condition of the present algorithm.

  15. Electrical Resistivity Tomography of the Karstic Aquifer of Bittit spring (Middle Atlas, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qarqori, Kh.; Rouai, M.; Moreau, F.; Saracco, G.; Hermitte, D.; Boualoul, M.; Dauteuil, O.; Biessy, G.; Sahbi, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Tabular Middle Atlas reservoir is one of the most important aquifers in northern Morocco. It is mainly a water table fractured reservoir consisting of Lias limestone and dolomite. The matrix permeability is very low and water flows essentially along open fractures and karsts. The Bittit Spring belongs to this karstic system and constitutes an important aquifer lying at the junction between the tabular reservoir and the Sais basin. Bittit spring, with an average annual discharge of about 1600 l/s, contributes largely to water supply of the big city of Meknes. Groundwater circulation is complex due to tectonics and to presence of karstic Quaternary travertine overlying Lias carbonate. In Bittit area, travertine is mostly covered by Quaternary basalt. Up to now water flow paths and the underground karst organization remain misknown, and turbidity affects the water quality after rain events. To highlight these issues, an integrated geophysical survey was performed in this area in the framework of a French-Moroccan scientific project. The geophysical imaging was carried out mainly by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Resistivity data were acquired by an ABEM Terrameter SAS1000 and a multi-electrode Lund system imaging using a Wenner array configuration of 64 electrodes and 5m spacing, reaching a depth of about 50m. Topographic corrections and 2D inversion models were performed using Res2Dinv software package. Seven 2D resistivity high resolution images have been obtained allowing to detect, delineate important fractures and also to hydrogeological characterization of the underground karst. A borehole of 100m depth was drilled in order to correlate and calibrate geophysical data and proposed models. Two sub-vertical fracture families have been identified with NE-SW and NW-SE directions respectively. These results correlate well with fracture data analysis gathered from remote sensing Spot images at large scale, and from local field fracture scanline surveys. A

  16. Gas-Liquid flow characterization in bubble columns with various gas-liquid using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Haibo; Yuhuan, Han; Suohe, Yang

    2009-02-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) is an advanced and new detecting technique that can measure and monitor the parameters of two-phase flow on line, such as gas-liquid bubble column. It is fit for the industrial process where the conductible medium serves as the disperse phase to present the key bubble flow characteristics in multi-phase medium. Radial variation of the gas holdup and mean holdups are investigated in a 0.160 m i. d. bubble column using ERT with two axial locations (Plane 1 and Plane 2). In all the experiments, air was used as the gas phase, tap water as liquid phase, and a series of experiments were done by adding KCl, ethanol, oil sodium, and glycerol to change liquid conductivity, liquid surface tension and viscosity. The superficial gas velocity was varied from 0.02 to 0.2 m/s. The effect of conductivity, surface tension, viscosity on the mean holdups and radial gas holdup distribution is discussed. The results showed that the gas holdup decrease with the increase of surface tension and increase with the increase of viscosity. Meanwhile, the settings of initial liquid conductivity slightly influence the gas holdup values, and the experimental data increases with the increase of the initial setting values in the same conditions.

  17. L- and Corner-arryas for 3D electric resistivity tomography: An alternative for geophysical surveys in urban zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez Segura, R. E.; Tejero-Andrade, A.; Delgado-Solorzano, C.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2011-12-01

    3D Electric Resitivity Tomography methods carried out on heavily urbanized areas become a difficult task, since buildings, houses or other type of obstacles do not allow parallel ERT arrays to be deployed. Therefore, insufficient information from the subsoil could be obtained. The present paper presents two new techniques, which allow acquiring information beneath a construction by simply surrounding the building or buildings to be studied by a series of ERT profiles. Apparent resistivities are obtained from L-shaped profiles, where alternations between current and potential electrodes along this array are carried out in an automatic way. Four L-arrays and four Corner-arrays are needed to cover the subsurface beneath the studied area. A field test was carried out on a small University of Mexico main Campus garden, where trees and other anthropogenic structures were the so called 'obstacles'. Geophysical work was performed employing parallel arrays (traditional methodology) and compared with this new method presented. Results show that the new method has a poor resolution towards the central portion of the area, mainly from anomalies produced by shallow structures as compared with the traditional grid method. However, the L- and Corner- arrays are more sensitive to anomalies produced by deeper objects, which cannot be observed in the traditional method. The final goal is to apply this method to study habitational complexes built on top of the ancient lake of Mexico City, where buildings are in constant risk due to fracturing and subsidence.

  18. State Waste Discharge Permit Application: Electric resistance tomography testing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This permit application documentation is for a State Waste Discharge Permit issued in accordance with requirements of Washington Administrative Code 173-216. The activity being permitted is a technology test using electrical resistance tomography. The electrical resistance tomography technology was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and has been used at other waste sites to track underground contamination plumes. The electrical resistance tomography technology measures soil electrical resistance between two electrodes. If a fluid contaminated with electrolytes is introduced into the soil, the soil resistance is expected to drop. By using an array of measurement electrodes in several boreholes, the areal extent of contamination can be estimated. At the Hanford Site, the purpose of the testing is to determine if the electrical resistance tomography technology can be used in the vicinity of large underground metal tanks without the metal tank interfering with the test. It is anticipated that the electrical resistance tomography technology will provide a method for accurately detecting leaks from the bottom of underground tanks, such as the Hanford Site single-shell tanks.

  19. An ensemble Kalman filter approach to identify the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution from electrical resistivity tomography time-lapse monitoring of three-dimensional tracer test experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Perri, M. T.; Salandin, P.

    2012-04-01

    An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) images generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. Assuming that the solute spreads as a passive tracer, for high Peclet numbers the spatial moments of the evolving plume are dominated by the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. The assimilation of the electrical conductivity 4D images allows updating both the hydrological state in terms of solute concentration and the spatial distribution of K. Thus, delineation of the tracer plume and estimation of the aquifer heterogeneity at the local scale can be achieved at the same time by means of this interpretation of time-lapse electrical images from tracer tests. We assess the impact on the performance of the hydrological inversion of the uncertainty inherently affecting ERT inversions in terms of tracer concentration and the choice of the prior statistics of K. The results show that realistic ERT images can be integrated into a hydrological model even within an uncoupled inverse modeling framework, the reconstruction of the hydraulic conductivity spatial distribution being satisfactory in the portion of the domain directly covered by the passage of the tracer. Aside from the issues commonly affecting inverse models, the proposed approach is subject to the problem of the filter inbreeding and the retrieval performance is sensitive to the choice of K prior geostatistical parameters.

  20. Application Of ERT For Tracking CO2 Plume Growth And Movement At The SECARB Cranfield Site

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C R; Ramirez, A L; Newmark, R L; Aines, R; Friedmann, S J

    2009-04-27

    Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) installed to track the development of an injected subsurface CO{sub 2} plume at the SECARB Cranfield, MS. sequestration site will be the deepest subsurface application of this method to date. ERT utilizes vertical arrays of electrodes, usually in a cross-well arrangement, to perform four-electrode measurements of changes in the spatial distribution of electrical resistance within a subsurface formation. Because a formation containing super-critical CO{sub 2} is approximately five times as resistive as its surroundings, significant resistance changes are anticipated during plume growth and movement within a brine-filled formation. ERT has also been shown to be quite sensitive to CO{sub 2} saturation changes. The Cranfield ERT electrode arrays will be emplaced at a depth exceeding 10,000 ft. (3280 m); the system design and installation must address significant challenges associated with both the depth and borehole conditions including temperatures of 258 F (126 C), pressures exceeding 5000 psi and a groundwater pH of 3. In addition, the system must allow co-located emplacement and concurrent operation with other monitoring techniques that utilize the same boreholes. ERT electrode and cabling will be attached to the outside of the well casing, allowing free access to the interior of the well, which is required by some of the other monitoring techniques being fielded. We will highlight these design challenges along with preliminary simulations indicating the anticipated level of imaging and the advantages of applying the technique in conjunction with other methods (such as cross-well seismics) to more accurately track the properties, location and movement of CO{sub 2} plumes.

  1. Quantitative inverse modelling of a cylindrical object in the laboratory using ERT: An error analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korteland, Suze-Anne; Heimovaara, Timo

    2015-03-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a geophysical technique that can be used to obtain three-dimensional images of the bulk electrical conductivity of the subsurface. Because the electrical conductivity is strongly related to properties of the subsurface and the flow of water it has become a valuable tool for visualization in many hydrogeological and environmental applications. In recent years, ERT is increasingly being used for quantitative characterization, which requires more detailed prior information than a conventional geophysical inversion for qualitative purposes. In addition, the careful interpretation of measurement and modelling errors is critical if ERT measurements are to be used in a quantitative way. This paper explores the quantitative determination of the electrical conductivity distribution of a cylindrical object placed in a water bath in a laboratory-scale tank. Because of the sharp conductivity contrast between the object and the water, a standard geophysical inversion using a smoothness constraint could not reproduce this target accurately. Better results were obtained by using the ERT measurements to constrain a model describing the geometry of the system. The posterior probability distributions of the parameters describing the geometry were estimated with the Markov chain Monte Carlo method DREAM(ZS). Using the ERT measurements this way, accurate estimates of the parameters could be obtained. The information quality of the measurements was assessed by a detailed analysis of the errors. Even for the uncomplicated laboratory setup used in this paper, errors in the modelling of the shape and position of the electrodes and the shape of the domain could be identified. The results indicate that the ERT measurements have a high information content which can be accessed by the inclusion of prior information and the consideration of measurement and modelling errors.

  2. Dynamic Inversion for Hydrological Process Monitoring with Electrical Resistance Tomography Under Model Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Lehikoinen, A.; Huttunen, J.M.J.; Finsterle, S.; Kowalsky, M.B.; Kaipio, J.P.

    2009-08-01

    We propose an approach for imaging the dynamics of complex hydrological processes. The evolution of electrically conductive fluids in porous media is imaged using time-lapse electrical resistance tomography. The related dynamic inversion problem is solved using Bayesian filtering techniques, that is, it is formulated as a sequential state estimation problem in which the target is an evolving posterior probability density of the system state. The dynamical inversion framework is based on the state space representation of the system, which involves the construction of a stochastic evolution model and an observation model. The observation model used in this paper consists of the complete electrode model for ERT, with Archie's law relating saturations to electrical conductivity. The evolution model is an approximate model for simulating flow through partially saturated porous media. Unavoidable modeling and approximation errors in both the observation and evolution models are considered by computing approximate statistics for these errors. These models are then included in the construction of the posterior probability density of the estimated system state. This approximation error method allows the use of approximate - and therefore computationally efficient - observation and evolution models in the Bayesian filtering. We consider a synthetic example and show that the incorporation of an explicit model for the model uncertainties in the state space representation can yield better estimates than a frame-by-frame imaging approach.

  3. Sandbox experiments on Uraninite Ore: ERT and SP measurments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear energy, considering its own intrinsic merits, would be a leading source for meeting the energy requirement in present and future scenario. Concealed Uranium deposits under sedimentary cover, with poor surface indications calls for reorientation of survey with large inputs involving integrated geophysical approach. Sand Box experiments have been carried out over Uraninite ore. The tank is a glass fish tank (height 39 cm, length 75 cm, width 30 cm). It was filled with sand up to 35 cm high. The sand was saturated from below to minimize the entrapment of the gas bubbles. The average size for sand grains is ~ 0.295mm. The formation factor of the sand is 3.5, with a negligible surface conductivity because of the coarse nature of the sand grains. The dimension of considered Uraninite ore sample is 4cm x 4cm x 4cm. The depth of top of the ore sample is kept at 3cm. In this paper both resistivity and self-potential measurements were carried out for possible detection of Uraninite. The resistivity measurements were made with 64 non-polarizable electrodes using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) equipment of FlashRes Universal developed by ZZ Resistivity Imaging Pty. Ltd. We have used screws of length 3cm as electrodes. The separation between these electrodes are ~ 1cm. The resistivity tomography results clearly outlines the target Uraninite body. The resistivity tomography results also detects small heterogeneities associated with air bubbles possibly due to unsaturated pore spaces. SP measurements were made using two non-polarizing Pb/PbCl2 electrodes and a Fluke 289 voltmeter (sensitivity 0.001 mV, internal impedance 100 MOhm). The reference electrode was located on the corner of the sandbox. The other electrode was used to scan the electrical potential at the surface of the sand. SP measurements were made with a spacing of 3 cm over the same ERT profile. The SP results also shows a dip (or a low SP anomaly) over the target ore body sample. Thus, both SP and

  4. Application of electrical resistivity tomography for investigating the internal structure of a translational landslide and characterizing its groundwater circulation (Kualiangzi landslide, Southwest China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Chengpeng; Xu, Qiang; Zhang, Qiang; Ran, Jiaxin; Lv, Hongbin

    2016-08-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a widely used tool in near surface geophysical surveys for the investigation of various geological and engineering problems, including landslides. In this study, the internal structure of the southern region of the Kualiangzi landslide, which is located in Sichuan province, China, was investigated using four ERT profiles, drill cores, and inclinometer data. The characteristics of the groundwater circulation were evaluated from variations in electrical resistivity and groundwater level. The results showed that the sliding surface corresponds to a deep zone with low resistivity and that the sliding material consists of clay, gravelly soil, and weathered sandstone and mudstone. The thickness of the sliding material is 50 m in the main tension trough and decreases to several meters in the direction of sliding. The dip angle of the sliding surface that has low resistivity is generally consistent with that of the bedrock. The groundwater level in the tension trough and in the middle transitional part from hill-country to flat terrain was highest in the landslide. The groundwater level close to the toe front of the landslide was the lowest. The groundwater is recharged by the precipitation and generally drains to the toe front by seasonal springs along the sliding surface. The rapid increment of the groundwater level in the tension trough kept pace with that of the displacement rate after intense rainfall. The improved understanding of internal structure and groundwater recirculation is beneficial for the analysis of the mechanisms of translational landslides and their hazard prevention.

  5. Characterization of a dismissed landfill via electrical resistivity tomography and mise-à-la-masse method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Carlo, Lorenzo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Caputo, Maria Clementina; Deiana, Rita; Vurro, Michele; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2013-11-01

    Electrical resistivity methods are widely used for environmental applications, and they are particularly useful for the characterization and monitoring of sites where the presence of contamination requires a thorough understanding of the location and movement of water, that can act as a carrier of solutes. One such application is landfill studies, where the strong electrical contrasts between waste, leachate and surrounding formations make electrical methods a nearly ideal tool for investigation. In spite of the advantages, however, electrical investigation of landfills poses also challenges, both logistical and interpretational. This paper presents the results of a study conducted on a dismissed landfill, close to the city of Corigliano d'Otranto, in the Apulia region (Southern Italy). The landfill is located in an abandoned quarry, that was subsequently re-utilized about thirty years ago as a site for urban waste disposal. The waste was thought to be more than 20 m thick, and the landfill bottom was expected to be confined with an HDPE (high-density poli-ethylene) liner. During the digging operations performed to build a nearby new landfill, leachate was found, triggering an in-depth investigation including also non-invasive methods. The principal goal was to verify whether the leachate is indeed confined, and to what extent, by the HDPE liner. We performed both surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and mise-à-la-masse (MALM) surveys, facing the severe challenges posed by the rugged terrain of the abandoned quarry complex. A conductive body, probably associated with leachate, was found as deep as 40 m below the current landfill surface i.e. at a depth much larger than the expected 20 m thickness of waste. Given the logistical difficulties that limit the geometry of acquisition, we utilized synthetic forward modeling in order to confirm/dismiss interpretational hypotheses emerging from the ERT and MALM results. This integration between measurements and

  6. Ecohydrologic Investigations of Shallow Lateral Subsurface Flow in Tropical Soils using Time-Lapse Surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, F. L.; Mojica, A.; Abebe, N. A.; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project

    2010-12-01

    The hydrologic effects of deforestation and aforestation in the tropics remain an area of active research. Hydrologic predictions of land-use change effects remain elusive. One of the unique features of catchment hydrology in the tropics is the effect of intense, continuous biological activity by insects, shrubs, trees, and small mammals. Sapprolitic soils derived from weathered bedrock cover widespread areas. These soils have low matrix permeabilities on the order of 1 mm/h, are 10 to 20 m in thickness and have relatively low activity because they have been depleted of light cations by annual rainfall over 2000 mm. As part of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama Canal Watershed Experiment, Agua Salud Project, we have observed shallow subsurface flow in tropical soils in central Panama using an introduced salinity contrast and surface electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In 2009 and 2010, experiments were conducted in a 30 year-old secondary succession forest, and in two former pasture sites that were planted with native timber species and teak, respectively, in 2008. At each site, saline water (NaCl tagged with LiBr) was introduced to the soil using two different methods: soil pits and ponded surface applications. Results showed the strongest response in the case of ponded surface applications with observed changes in resistivity between -50% and 50%. In soil pit applications, the change in electrical resistivity varied from -10% to 10%. Results suggest that in the case of surface application, a transient perched water table is created near the bottom of the bioturbation layer that activates the downslope macropore network and results in bulk flow velocities that are significantly higher than observed soil matrix permeabilities. When heavy rainfall occurred during tests, increased mobility of the salinity contrast more clearly showed the active layer where most flow occurred. Time-series ERT observations enabled measurements of downslope bulk

  7. Application of 2-D geoelectrical resistivity tomography for mountain permafrost detection in sporadic permafrost environments: Experiences from Eastern Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Mountain permafrost covers some 2000 km² of the Austrian Alps which is less than 2.5% of the national territory. Delineating the altitudinal lower limit of permafrost in the mountains of Austria is difficult due the complex topography, the rather sparseness of field verification data and the lack of long-term permafrost monitoring data. Such monitoring data should cover different slope aspects, different elevations, different substrates and different mountain regions of Austria. In this study it was attempted to delineate the lower limit of permafrost at two study sites in the Tauern Range, Austria, applying two-dimensional geoelectrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In addition, multi-annual ground temperature data collected by miniature temperature datalogger (MDT) were used to validate the results. At the study site Hochreichart (maximum elevation 2416 m asl), located in the Seckauer Tauern Range, 14 ERT profiles (lengths 48-196 m; electrode spacing 2, 2.5 or 4 m) were measured at elevations between 1805 and 2416 m asl. Measurements were carried out at two cirques (Reichart, Schöneben) and at the summit plateau of Hochreichart. Results at this site indicate that permafrost lenses are detectable at elevations down to c.1900 m asl at radiation-sheltered sites. Furthermore, at the summit plateau permafrost only occurs as rather small lenses. The ERT-based permafrost pattern is generally confirmed by the MTD data with negative mean annual ground temperature values at only a few monitoring sites. However, the possibility of air-filled cavities causing higher resistive zones faking permafrost existence cannot be excluded because coarse-grained sediments (i.e. relict rock glaciers and autochthonous block fields) are widespread at this study site. At the second study site Kögele Cirque (maximum elevation 3030 m asl) located in the Schober Mountains 12 ERT profiles (lengths 48 m; electrode spacing 2 m) were measured at elevations between 2631 and 2740 m asl. Spatially

  8. Monitoring hillslope moisture dynamics with surface ERT for enhancing spatial significance of hydrometric point measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, R.; Heller, K.; Günther, T.; Kleber, A.

    2015-01-01

    Besides floodplains, hillslopes are basic units that mainly control water movement and flow pathways within catchments of subdued mountain ranges. The structure of their shallow subsurface affects water balance, e.g. infiltration, retention, and runoff. Nevertheless, there is still a gap in the knowledge of the hydrological dynamics on hillslopes, notably due to the lack of generalization and transferability. This study presents a robust multi-method framework of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in addition to hydrometric point measurements, transferring hydrometric data into higher spatial scales to obtain additional patterns of distribution and dynamics of soil moisture on a hillslope. A geoelectrical monitoring in a small catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains was carried out at weekly intervals from May to December 2008 to image seasonal moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale. To link water content and electrical resistivity, the parameters of Archie's law were determined using different core samples. To optimize inversion parameters and methods, the derived spatial and temporal water content distribution was compared to tensiometer data. The results from ERT measurements show a strong correlation with the hydrometric data. The response is congruent to the soil tension data. Water content calculated from the ERT profile shows similar variations as that of water content from soil moisture sensors. Consequently, soil moisture dynamics on the hillslope scale may be determined not only by expensive invasive punctual hydrometric measurements, but also by minimally invasive time-lapse ERT, provided that pedo-/petrophysical relationships are known. Since ERT integrates larger spatial scales, a combination with hydrometric point measurements improves the understanding of the ongoing hydrological processes and better suits identification of heterogeneities.

  9. Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Ground Penetrating Radar for locating buried petrified wood sites: a case study in the natural monument of the Petrified Forest of Evros, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargemezis, George; Diamanti, Nectaria; Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Fikos, Ilias

    2014-05-01

    A geophysical survey was carried out in the Petrified Forest of Evros, the northernmost regional unit of Greece. This collection of petrified wood has an age of approximately 35 million years and it is the oldest in Greece (i.e., older than the well-known Petrified Forest of Lesvos island located in the North Aegean Sea and which is possibly the largest of the petrified forests worldwide). Protection, development and maintenance projects still need to be carried out at the area despite all fears regarding the forest's fate since many petrified logs remain exposed both in weather conditions - leading to erosion - and to the public. This survey was conducted as part of a more extensive framework regarding the development and protection of this natural monument. Geophysical surveying has been chosen as a non-destructive investigation method since the area of application is both a natural ecosystem and part of cultural heritage. Along with electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys have been carried out for investigating possible locations of buried fossilized tree trunks. The geoelectrical sections derived from ERT data in combination with the GPR profiles provided a broad view of the subsurface. Two and three dimensional subsurface geophysical images of the surveyed area have been constructed, pointing out probable locations of petrified logs. Regarding ERT, petrified trunks have been detected as high resistive bodies, while lower resistivity values were more related to the surrounding geological materials. GPR surveying has also indicated buried petrified log locations. As these two geophysical methods are affected in different ways by the subsurface conditions, the combined use of both techniques enhanced our ability to produce more reliable interpretations of the subsurface. After the completion of the geophysical investigations of this first stage, petrified trunks were revealed after a subsequent excavation at indicated

  10. Cross-borehole ERT monitoring of a tracer injection into chlorinated-solvent contaminated fractured mudstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J.; Slater, L. D.; Johnson, T. C.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Imbrigiotta, T. E.; Johnson, C. D.; Lacombe, P.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Ntarlagiannis, D.; Shapiro, A. M.; Tiedeman, C. R.

    2014-12-01

    There is a need to monitor remedial injections in contaminated fractured rock to determine if targeted areas have been reached and to monitor treatment effectiveness. While detailed information can be obtained at boreholes, these locations are limited; determining connectivity in fracture networks is difficult and borehole monitoring locations may miss the injection entirely. The primary and secondary domains in fractured rock have hydraulic conductivities that differ by orders of magnitude such that tracer injections commonly have rapid breakthrough followed by extended tailings. Often, it is presumed that the tracer is transported into dead-end pore spaces or unknown inter-connected networks and/or sorbed into the primary porosity. Cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), guided by information from borehole geophysical logging and hydraulic testing, has the potential to monitor the fate of tracer injections between borehole locations. ERT has been under-exploited in fractured rock due to: (1) a lack of available 3D codes, (2) a lack of computing resources to accommodate a large number of model parameters, and (3) limitations of regularization constraints used in ERT modeling for representing fractured rock settings along with a full understanding of these constraints. Recognizing numerous advances in ERT imaging and building on our previous studies, we present results from a field-scale ERT experiment in fractured rock. We use ERT to monitor a conductive tracer injection in a fractured mudstone at the Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) in New Jersey. A custom-built electrode array included inflatable bladders to isolate fractures within each borehole and allowed for discrete water sampling and injection. By injecting the tracer in pulses and collecting 3D ERT measurements following each pulse, we were able to (1) avoid rapid breakthrough and large dilution rates and thus maintain a high conductivity contrast, and (2) characterize ambient flow by

  11. Time Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography, Distributed Temperature Measurements and Modeling in the Hyporheic Zone of an Alpine River.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, J.; Busato, L.; Perri, M. T.; Strapazzon, G.; Pasetto, D.; Putti, M.; Cano Paoli, K.; Majone, B.; Bellin, A.; Cassiani, G.

    2014-12-01

    The hyporheic zone is a very complex transition zone, where interrelated hydrological and biogeochemical processes take place, mainly controlled by the exchanges of water between the stream and the surrounding riparian zone and underlying aquifer. Modeling may offer an opportunity to deepen our understanding on how these important ecosystems work. However this is only possible if hydrological and biogeochemical models are coupled to measurements that can constrain the model predictions and lead to robust estimates of the system key parameters and processes. Monitoring of the hyporheic zone faces similar problems of groundwater monitoring, often exacerbated by the strong physical biogeochemical gradients that characterize this transition area. Geophysical time-lapse techniques can provide a dynamic monitoring of the hyporheic and riparian zones.We installed in the hyporheic zone of the Vermigliana creek, Trentino, Italy, a monitoring system composed of (a) an Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) apparatus for time-lapse monitoring of electrical resistivity changes, (b) an optical fiber for DTS monitoring of temperature. The installation below the river bed was done thanks to the recent horizontal directional drilling technology capable to be remote-guided during perforation. We installed 48 electrodes below the stream,plus 24 electrodes on the top of the riparian zone, thus closing nearly entirely the region to be monitored. Parallel to the ERT cable we also installed raman technology fiber optic cable for the distributed monitoring of the subsoil temperature. We present here the results of the time-lapse measurement surveys of the first year, together with the flow/transport modeling conducted to link quantitatively the data collected to the hydraulic parameters of the system. The hyporheic zone evidences an active underflow dynamics that, to be correctly described, needs accurate distributed variably saturated flow and transport modeling.

  12. Analysis of Lab-Scale Drainage and Imbibition Experiments with ERT and High Resolution CCD Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breen, S. J.; Detwiler, R. L.; Carrigan, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Field-scale studies have shown Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to be an effective tool for imaging resistivity anomalies such as those caused by infiltration events or migration of conductive solutes. However, the actual distribution of parameters of interest (e.g., saturation or ion concentration) is rarely known at field sites, and therefore the accuracy of ERT inversion results is difficult to assess quantitatively. Lab-scale experiments provide the opportunity to test ERT in controlled environments, where the true parameter distributions can be better constrained and even measured in real time. We present results from analog bench-scale experiments aimed at evaluating the ability of ERT to quantify the spatial distribution of water during repeated drainage and imbibition cycles in a near-uniform porous medium. Our experiments represent a well-controlled analog for field-scale processes. We inject and withdraw measured volumes of water (resistivity similar to groundwater) into translucent chambers filled with quartz sand and lined with electrodes. Once the chamber is fully saturated, imbibition and drainage cycles are carried out. Simultaneously, a CCD camera captures high-resolution images, and an ERT data acquisition system scans the chamber. Processing of the CCD images using quantitative visualization techniques results in high-resolution measurements of the spatial distribution of the water, which are compared directly to inverted resistivity fields to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of the ERT inversions. Thus, these experiments combine the two key advantages of numerical studies and field studies: 1) independent saturation measurements and 2) real, non-synthetic, ERT data. They also allow a high degree of control over the physical processes under investigation. Results from recent ERT data taken during gas injection experiments into a brine-saturated background showed reasonably high sensitivity to the spatial distribution of electrically

  13. Integrated MVG and ERT Survey Over a Shallow Cave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, M.; Armadillo, E.; Carmisciano, C.; Stefanelli, P.; Caratori Tontini, F.; Cocchi, L.

    2009-05-01

    An integrated geophysical MVG (Microgravity Vertical Gradient) and ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) survey was performed over a shallow cave in the Armetta Mountain karst area, close to the Liguria-Piedmont watershed (Tanaro valley). The aim of this study is to test the response of a known shallow karst cave. The cave was developed in the Mesozoic sedimentary cover (dolostones and limestones - CAU : Caprauna Armetta Unit); the shallowest portion of the cave exhibits narrow passages and, at about 30 m below the entrance, a fossil meander which links two large chambers, that represent the target of the geophysical survey. The site was surveyed with five, 235 m long, ERT sections, crosscutting the underground voids; 53 MVG stations was collected in an area of 150 by 50 meters above the cave. The ERT prospecting was performed using a Syscal R1 (Iris Instrument) multielectrode system with sets of 48 electrodes evenly spaced each 5 meters. A Wenner-Schlumberger array was used. The MVG survey was performed using a LaCoste&Romberg D model gravity meters equipped with a digital data acquisition through the Aliod feedback system, GPS tracking and automatic tide corrections, with a nominal resolution of 1 microGal (10 nm/s2). Each MVG station was achieved by two successive readings performed at the bottom and top of a 1.80 meters high tower frame. Differential GPS, with acquisition rate of 1 Hz and sampling time of 120 s, was used for the geographic position. The results of the integrated survey show a clear geophysical response of the hollow which exhibits high resistivity values and a negative gravity anomaly. This paper confirms the effectiveness of the geophysical exploration even in a quite complex environment giving a precise location of the voids. The application of such techniques can be efficient in site surveying where the conceivable presence of hollows may be expected.

  14. Application of electrical resistivity tomography to map lithological differences and subsurface structures (Eastern Sudetes, Czech Republic)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Dominika; Stan-Kłeczek, Iwona

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the subsurface lithological variability and thickness of each metamorphic rocks unit by means of geophysical methods, which were presented within the framework of SEDIBUD. Research was performed on the ridge and the steep eastern slope of the Orlik massif (1204 m) in the Hrubý Jesenik range of the Eastern Sudetes, the Czech Republic. To obtain a spatial image of a geological rock mass, the non-invasive and relatively rapid method of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was used, which resulted in the creation of six profiles using the Dipole-Dipole and Wenner-Schlumberger arrays. As complementary methods, vertical electrical sounding (VES) and seismic refraction tomography were chosen. Fifteen measuring points along two profiles obtained by vertical electrical sounding allowed the determination of the following in the vertical section layers of different resistivity and thickness at direct points in contact primarily with Devonian quartzite rocks and weathered covers. In a series of field studies, a four-layered rock mass was examined in which the first layer is of fine-grained materials with medium- and large-size clasts, the second layer is quartzite, the third is gneiss and the fourth is phyllite. The five profiles measured by seismic refraction tomography made it possible to draw the boundary between the studied phyllites, gneisses and quartzites. In addition, geophysical surveys and the results of mineralogical composition analysis allowed us to determine the nature and thickness of the weathered layers present on the massif area, which, in the upper sections, are predominantly a clayey loam partially covered with blocks. The inclination of the slope is associated with an increase in the fraction of coarse material. The majority of the thickness of these layers is related to the local flattened surfaces and the presence of numerous streams, which contributed to the accumulation of the sediments that were also

  15. Monitoring six-phase ohmic heating of contaminated soils using electrical resistance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.L.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-01

    Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) was used to monitor six-phase ohmic heating used for the insitu remediation of volatile organic compounds from subsurface water and soil at the Savannah River Site, near Aiken, South Carolina. The changes in electrical conductivity caused by six-phase ohmic-heating in a clay layer located in the vadose zone were monitored during a period of approximately 2 months, before, during and after heating. From an array of electrodes located in 4 boreholes, we collected electrical resistivity data between five pairs of adjacent holes pairs. This data was used to calculate tomographs which showed the electrical conductivity changes along five vertical planes. The difference tomographs show the combined effects of moisture redistribution and heating caused by six-phase heating and vapor extraction. The tomographs show that most of the clay layer increased in electrical conductivity during the first 3 weeks of the 4 week long heating phase. At this time, the electrical conductivities near the center of the heating array were twice as large as the pre-heat conductivities. Then the electrical conductivity started to decrease for portions of the clay layer closest to the vapor extraction well. We propose that the conductivity decreases are due to the removal of moisture by the heating and vacuum extraction. Parts of the clay layer near the extraction well reached electrical conductivities as low as 40% of the pre-heating values. We propose that these regions of lower than ambient electrical conductivities are indicators of regions where the vapor removal by vacuum extraction was most effective. At the end of the heating phase, our estimates suggest that the clay saturation may have dropped to as low as 10% based on the observed conductivity changes.

  16. Comparing spatial series of soil bulk electrical conductivity as obtained by Time Domain Reflectometry and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeed, Ali; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Comegna, Allessandro; Garre, Sarah; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Coppola, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Conventional ground survey of soil root zone salinity by direct soil sampling are time consuming, costly and destructive. Alternatively, soil salinity can be evaluated by measuring the bulk electrical conductivity, σb, in the field. This approach is faster and cheaper, and allows a more intensive surveying. Measurements of σb can be made either in situ or with remote devices. Time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensors allow simultaneous measurements of water content, θ, and σb. They may be calibrated for estimating the electrical conductivity of the soil solution (σw). However, they have a relatively small observation window and thus they are thought to only provide local-scale measurements. The spatial range of the sensors is limited to tens of centimeters and extension of the information to a large area can be problematic. Also, information on the vertical distribution of the σb soil profile may only be obtained by installing sensors at different depths. In this sense, the TDR may be considered as an invasive technique. Compared to the TDR, other geophysical methods based for example on the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) techniques represent an alternative in respect to those traditional for soil salinity characterization. In order to deduce the actual distribution of the bulk electrical conductivity, σb, in the soil profile, one needs to invert the signal coming from ERT sensors. The latter, in turn, depends on the specific depth distribution of the σb, as well as on the electrical configuration of the sensor used. With these premises, the main aim of this study is to estimate the vertical σb distribution starting from resistivity data series measured using the ERT method under different salinity conditions and using TDR data as ground-truth data for calibration and validation of the ERT sensor. This way, limited measured TDR data may be used for translating extensive ERT apparent electrical conductivity, σa, measurements to estimate depth

  17. Time-lapse 3D electrical resistivity tomography to monitor soil-plant interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Putti, Mario

    2013-04-01

    In this work we present the application of time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro- electrical tomography (ERT) to monitor soil-plant interactions in the root zone in the framework of the FP7 Project CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the Hydrology of Mediterranean Basins). The goal of the study is to gain a better understanding of the soil-vegetation interactions by the use of non-invasive techniques. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus for the monitoring of the root zone of a single apple tree in an orchard located in the Trentino region, Northern Italy. The micro-ERT apparatus consists of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. We collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements for one year and performed two different controlled irrigation tests: one during a very dry Summer and one during a very wet and highly dynamic plant growing Spring period. We also ran laboratory analyses on soil specimens, in order to evaluate the electrical response at different saturation steps. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In particular, we note that in very dry conditions, 3D micro ERT can image water plumes in the shallow subsoil produced by a drip irrigation system. In the very dynamic growing season, under abundant irrigation, micro 3D ERT can detect the main suction zones caused by the tree root activity. Even though the quantitative use of this technique for moisture content balance suffers from well-known inversion difficulties, even the pure imaging of the active root zone is a valuable contribution. However the integration of the measurements in a fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion is the way forward for a better understanding of subsoil interactions between biomass, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

  18. Floodplain architecture of an actively meandering river (the Ploučnice River, the Czech Republic) as revealed by the distribution of pollution and electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matys Grygar, T.; Elznicová, J.; Tůmová, Š.; Faměra, M.; Balogh, M.; Kiss, T.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the floodplain architecture of the Ploučnice River, a naturally meandering river in the Czech Republic, using manual drill coring, the element analysis of sediments, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). The Ploučnice River has received diffuse pollution since the early twentieth century (mainly Pb) followed by a prominent, temporally well-defined pollution pulse from uranium mining in the 1970s and 1980s (mainly U and 226Ra). The pollution created a chemostratigraphic (temporal) framework for overbank fines. We used geographical information systems (GIS) to describe the channel's dynamics and visualise fluvial landforms. We sampled and analysed the finest floodplain sediments in the top 1 to 2 m of the floodplain fill (silty and sandy deposits), and we used ERT to visualise bodies of coarser and deeper strata at depths down to ~ 3 m. Several limits of ERT imaging have been found by a comparison of the resistivity domains with lithological descriptions of the cores: several decimetre-thick strata were not revealed (they are below the spatial resolution of that method), and humidity affected the results that were obtained in the topmost strata. The space for deposition of fluvial sediments in the Ploučnice River is being created by (1) natural lateral shifts in the channel (up to 0.5 m/year); (2) meander loop development and cutoffs at the timescale of decades to centuries and spatial scale of up to ~ 1/4 of the floodplain width; and (3) more substantial reorganisation of the channel structure by avulsions, probably at the timescale of centuries. These processes continuously create space for the deposition of overbank fines on the top of former point bars and in swales and abandoned channels. As a consequence of the speed of the channel shifts, at least 80% of the fine-grained top of the floodplain fill (overbank fines) was reworked over approximately three centuries.

  19. Spatial analysis of subsoil compaction on cultivated land by means of penetrometry, electrical resistence tomography and X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumr, David; Vláčilová, Markéta; Dostál, Tomáš; Jeřábek, Jakub; Sobotková, Martina; Sněhota, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Soil compaction is a well recognized phenomena in the agricultural land. Various effects can alter the degree of the compaction in the field. The topsoil is regularly loosened due to agrotechnical operations, but the subsoil remains usually compacted. Various studies show increasing bulk density and decreasing saturated hydraulic conductivity in the plough pan, even though some authors argue that it does not have to be always the case due to presence of bio-macropores. Hence the structural properties of the subsoil and the spatial distribution of the compacted layer depth within the cultivated fields are important factors influencing soil water regime, nutrients regime and runoff generation. The aim of the contribution is to present the results of the monitoring of the plough pan depth spatial distribution at the experimental catchment Nucice (Central Bohemia, Czech Republic). The soils are classified as Luvisols and Cambisols with a loamy Ap horizon (0.1 - 0.2 m deep) underlined by a silty and silty-clay B horizon. The content of clay particles in the topsoil is around 8%. The soil has low inner aggregate (soil matrix) hydraulic conductivity, with measured values of approximately 0.1 - 2 cm d-1. The bulk topsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) is significantly higher and varies depending on the season. To observe the divide between topsoil and subsoil layers in detail and to be able to compare the soil structure and pore networks of both layers we inspected undisturbed soil samples with X-ray computed tomography. The divide between the conservatively tilled topsoil and the subsoil is clearly observable also on terrain. To identify its exact position we implemented a combination of penetrometry, soil sampling and electrical resistance tomography (ERT). The penetration tests accompanied by soil probing were done in an irregular network across the whole catchment based on the slopes and distance to the stream. Several 2D ERT measurements were done locally on a

  20. 3D Electrical resistivity tomography monitoring of an artificial tracer injected within the hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houzé, Clémence; Pessel, Marc; Durand, Veronique

    2016-04-01

    Due to the high complexity level of hyporheic flow paths, hydrological and biogeochemical processes which occur in this mixing place are not fully understood yet. Some previous studies made in flumes show that hyporheic flow is strongly connected to the streambed morphology and sediment heterogeneity . There is still a lack of practical field experiment considering a natural environment and representation of natural streambed heterogeneities will be always limited in laboratories. The purpose of this project is to propose an innovative method using 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) monitoring of an artificial tracer injection directly within the streambed sediments in order to visualize the water pathways within the hyporheic zone. Field experiment on a small stream was conducted using a plastic tube as an injection piezometer and home-made electrodes strips arranged in a rectangular form made of 180 electrodes (15 strips of 12 electrodes each). The injection of tracer (NaCl) lasted approximatively 90 minutes, and 24h monitoring with increasing step times was performed. The physical properties of the water are controlled by CTD probes installed upstream and downstream within the river. Inverse time-lapse tomographs show development and persistence of a conductive water plume around the injection point. Due to the low hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments (clay and overlying loess), the tracer movement is barely visible, as it dilutes gradually in the pore water. Impact of boundary conditions on inversion results can lead to significant differences on images, especially in the shallow part of the profiles. Preferential paths of transport are not highlighted here, but this experiment allows to follow spatially and temporarily the evolution of the tracer in a complex natural environment .

  1. A spatially adaptive total variation regularization method for electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xizi; Xu, Yanbin; Dong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The total variation (TV) regularization method has been used to solve the ill-posed inverse problem of electrical resistance tomography (ERT), owing to its good ability to preserve edges. However, the quality of the reconstructed images, especially in the flat region, is often degraded by noise. To optimize the regularization term and the regularization factor according to the spatial feature and to improve the resolution of reconstructed images, a spatially adaptive total variation (SATV) regularization method is proposed. A kind of effective spatial feature indicator named difference curvature is used to identify which region is a flat or edge region. According to different spatial features, the SATV regularization method can automatically adjust both the regularization term and regularization factor. At edge regions, the regularization term is approximate to the TV functional to preserve the edges; in flat regions, it is approximate to the first-order Tikhonov (FOT) functional to make the solution stable. Meanwhile, the adaptive regularization factor determined by the spatial feature is used to constrain the regularization strength of the SATV regularization method for different regions. Besides, a numerical scheme is adopted for the implementation of the second derivatives of difference curvature to improve the numerical stability. Several reconstruction image metrics are used to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the reconstructed results. Both simulation and experimental results indicate that, compared with the TV (mean relative error 0.288, mean correlation coefficient 0.627) and FOT (mean relative error 0.295, mean correlation coefficient 0.638) regularization methods, the proposed SATV (mean relative error 0.259, mean correlation coefficient 0.738) regularization method can endure a relatively high level of noise and improve the resolution of reconstructed images.

  2. Combined electrical resistivity tomography and magnetic resonance sounding investigation of the surface-water/groundwater interaction in the Urema Graben, Mozambique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirindja, F. J.; Dahlin, T.; Perttu, N.; Steinbruch, F.; Owen, R.

    2016-05-01

    This study focusses on the hydrogeology of Urema Graben, especially possible interactions between surface water and groundwater around Lake Urema, in Gorongosa National Park (GNP). Lake Urema is the only permanent water source for wildlife inside GNP, and there are concerns that it will disappear due to interferences in surface-water/groundwater interactions as a result of changes in the hydraulic environment. As the lake is the only permanent water source, this would be a disaster for the ecosystem of the park. The sub-surface geology in Urema Graben was investigated by 20 km of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and three magnetic resonance sounding (MRS) surveys. The average depth penetration was 60 and 100 m, respectively. The location of the ERT lines was decided based on general rift morphology and therefore orientated perpendicular to Urema Graben, from the transitional areas of the margins of the Barue platform in the west to the Cheringoma plateau escarpments in the east. ERT and MRS both indicate a second aquifer, where Urema Lake is a window of the first upper semi-confined aquifer, while the lower aquifer is confined by a clay layer 30-40 m thick. The location and depth of this aquifer suggest that it is probably linked to the Pungwe River which could be a main source of recharge during the dry season. If a dam or any other infra-structure is constructed in Pungwe River upstream of GNP, the groundwater level will decrease which could lead to drying out of Urema Lake.

  3. Imaging high stage river-water intrusion into a contaminated aquifer along a major river corridor using 2D time-lapse surface electrical resistivity tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wallin, Erin L.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Greenwood, William J.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-03-29

    The Hanford 300 Area is located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington State, USA, and was a former site for nuclear fuel processing operations. Waste disposal practices resulted in persistent unsaturated zone and groundwater contamination, the primary contaminant of concern being uranium. Uranium behavior at the site is intimately linked with river stage driven groundwater-river water exchange such that understanding the nature of river water intrusion into the 300 Area is critical for predicting uranium desorption and transport. In this paper we use time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to image the inland intrusion of river during high stage conditions. We demonstrate a modified time-lapse inversion approach, whereby the transient water table elevation is explicitly modeled by removing regularization constraints across the water table boundary. This implementation was critical for producing meaningful imaging results. We inverted approximately 1200 data sets (400 per line over 3 lines) using high performance computing resources to produce a time-lapse sequence of changes in bulk conductivity caused by river water intrusion during the 2011 spring runoff cycle over approximately 125 days. The resulting time series for each mesh element was then analyzed using common time series analysis to reveal the timing and location of river water intrusion beneath each line. The results reveal non-uniform flows characterized by preferred flow zones where river water enters and exits quickly with stage increase and decrease, and low permeability zones with broader bulk conductivity ‘break through’ curves and longer river water residence times. The time-lapse ERT inversion approach removes the deleterious effects of changing water table elevation and enables remote and spatial continuous groundwater-river water exchange monitoring using surface based ERT arrays under conditions where groundwater and river water conductivity are in contrast.

  4. Uncertainty in training image-based inversion of hydraulic head data constrained to ERT data: Workflow and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Thomas; Nguyen, Frédéric; Caers, Jef

    2015-07-01

    In inverse problems, investigating uncertainty in the posterior distribution of model parameters is as important as matching data. In recent years, most efforts have focused on techniques to sample the posterior distribution with reasonable computational costs. Within a Bayesian context, this posterior depends on the prior distribution. However, most of the studies ignore modeling the prior with realistic geological uncertainty. In this paper, we propose a workflow inspired by a Popper-Bayes philosophy that data should first be used to falsify models, then only be considered for matching. We propose a workflow consisting of three steps: (1) in defining the prior, we interpret multiple alternative geological scenarios from literature (architecture of facies) and site-specific data (proportions of facies). Prior spatial uncertainty is modeled using multiple-point geostatistics, where each scenario is defined using a training image. (2) We validate these prior geological scenarios by simulating electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data on realizations of each scenario and comparing them to field ERT in a lower dimensional space. In this second step, the idea is to probabilistically falsify scenarios with ERT, meaning that scenarios which are incompatible receive an updated probability of zero while compatible scenarios receive a nonzero updated belief. (3) We constrain the hydrogeological model with hydraulic head and ERT using a stochastic search method. The workflow is applied to a synthetic and a field case studies in an alluvial aquifer. This study highlights the importance of considering and estimating prior uncertainty (without data) through a process of probabilistic falsification.

  5. Implementation of ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography for inspecting the Greco-Roman Necropolis at Kilo 6 of the Golden Mummies Valley, Bahariya Oasis, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Abbas M.; Ghazala, Hosni H.; Mesbah, Hany S.; Atya, Magdy A.; Radwan, Ali; Hamed, Diaa E.

    2016-06-01

    Bahariya Oasis is one of the lately inspected spots in Egypt and has a long historical record extending from the old kingdom till the emergence of Islam. Since June 1999, the Valley of the Golden Mummies near Bawiti (at kilometer 6 on the road leads to Farafra Oasis) became significant due to the discoveries of amazing mummies of gelded faces. The archeologists believe that the Valley has more valuable tombs that still unrevealed. Also, the possibility that the Greco-Roman Necropolis extends to areas other than Kilo-6 is sustainable. The ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography are two geophysical tools that have successful applications in archeological assessment. The two techniques were used in integration plan to assert the archeological potentiality of the studied site and to map the feasible tombs. Sum of 798 GPR profiles and 19 ERT cross sections was carried out over the study area. The results of them were analyzed to envisage these results in archeological terms.

  6. Fourier-based magnetic induction tomography for mapping resistivity.

    PubMed

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography is used as an experimental tool for mapping the passive electromagnetic properties of conductors, with the potential for imaging biological tissues. Our numerical approach to solving the inverse problem is to obtain a Fourier expansion of the resistivity and the stream functions of the magnetic fields and eddy current density. Thus, we are able to solve the inverse problem of determining the resistivity from the applied and measured magnetic fields for a two-dimensional conducting plane. When we add noise to the measured magnetic field, we find the fidelity of the measured to the true resistivity is quite robust for increasing levels of noise and increasing distances of the applied and measured field coils from the conducting plane, when properly filtered. We conclude that Fourier methods provide a reliable alternative for solving the inverse problem. PMID:21301637

  7. Fourier-based magnetic induction tomography for mapping resistivity

    SciTech Connect

    Puwal, Steffan; Roth, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic induction tomography is used as an experimental tool for mapping the passive electromagnetic properties of conductors, with the potential for imaging biological tissues. Our numerical approach to solving the inverse problem is to obtain a Fourier expansion of the resistivity and the stream functions of the magnetic fields and eddy current density. Thus, we are able to solve the inverse problem of determining the resistivity from the applied and measured magnetic fields for a two-dimensional conducting plane. When we add noise to the measured magnetic field, we find the fidelity of the measured to the true resistivity is quite robust for increasing levels of noise and increasing distances of the applied and measured field coils from the conducting plane, when properly filtered. We conclude that Fourier methods provide a reliable alternative for solving the inverse problem.

  8. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, W.D.; Ramirez, A.L.

    1999-06-22

    An electrical resistance tomography method is described which uses steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constrain the models. 2 figs.

  9. Electrical resistance tomography using steel cased boreholes as electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.

    1999-01-01

    An electrical resistance tomography method using steel cased boreholes as electrodes. The method enables mapping the electrical resistivity distribution in the subsurface from measurements of electrical potential caused by electrical currents injected into an array of electrodes in the subsurface. By use of current injection and potential measurement electrodes to generate data about the subsurface resistivity distribution, which data is then used in an inverse calculation, a model of the electrical resistivity distribution can be obtained. The inverse model may be constrained by independent data to better define an inverse solution. The method utilizes pairs of electrically conductive (steel) borehole casings as current injection electrodes and as potential measurement electrodes. The greater the number of steel cased boreholes in an array, the greater the amount of data is obtained. The steel cased boreholes may be utilized for either current injection or potential measurement electrodes. The subsurface model produced by this method can be 2 or 3 dimensional in resistivity depending on the detail desired in the calculated resistivity distribution and the amount of data to constain the models.

  10. Electrical resistivity tomography to delineate greenhouse soil variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, R.; Amato, M.; Bitella, G.; Bochicchio, R.

    2013-03-01

    Appropriate management of soil spatial variability is an important tool for optimizing farming inputs, with the result of yield increase and reduction of the environmental impact in field crops. Under greenhouses, several factors such as non-uniform irrigation and localized soil compaction can severely affect yield and quality. Additionally, if soil spatial variability is not taken into account, yield deficiencies are often compensated by extra-volumes of crop inputs; as a result, over-irrigation and overfertilization in some parts of the field may occur. Technology for spatially sound management of greenhouse crops is therefore needed to increase yield and quality and to address sustainability. In this experiment, 2D-electrical resistivity tomography was used as an exploratory tool to characterize greenhouse soil variability and its relations to wild rocket yield. Soil resistivity well matched biomass variation (R2=0.70), and was linked to differences in soil bulk density (R2=0.90), and clay content (R2=0.77). Electrical resistivity tomography shows a great potential in horticulture where there is a growing demand of sustainability coupled with the necessity of stabilizing yield and product quality.

  11. Applying FDEM, ERT and GPR at a site with soil contamination: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tzu-Pin; Chen, Chien-Chih; Tong, Lun-Tao; Chang, Ping-Yu; Chen, Yi-Chieh; Dong, Tien-Hsing; Liu, Hsin-Chang; Lin, Chih-Ping; Yang, Kai-Hsing; Ho, Ching-Jen; Cheng, Shih-Nan

    2015-10-01

    This study employed the combination of three methods, namely the Frequency Domain Electromagnetic (FDEM), Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to evaluate a heavy-metal contaminated site for both pre- and post-remediation investigations. The main goals were to verify the position and the integrity of the underground storage tanks (UST), and to determine the effectiveness of remediation to ensure no contaminants remained at the site. In general, the GPR survey was effective at locating shallowly buried objects. However, due to the highly conductive nature of the heavy-metal laden sludge, the GPR signals were attenuated severely. Thus, the first attempt to use GPR in the pre-remediation investigation did not achieve the desired results and other methods were deployed. The existence of the UST and the sludge within were confirmed by ERT and the UST shape was mapped by FDEM. The principal remediation scheme was soil replacement by replacing the contaminated soil with clean silt. Based on the distinctive property differences of the contaminated soil and the clean silt, the completion of the remediation was confirmed by the differences between pre-remediation and post-remediation in GPR, ERT and FDEM results.

  12. The inner structure of La Fossa di Vulcano (Vulcano Island, southern Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy) revealed by high resolution electric resistivity tomography coupled with self-potential, temperature, and soil CO2 gas measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revil, A.; Finizola, A.

    2007-12-01

    La Fossa cone is an active stratovolcano located on Vulcano Island, in the Aeolian Archipelago (southern Italy). Its activity is characterized by explosive phreatic eruptions and phreato-magmatic eruptions producing wet and dry pyroclastic surges, pumice fall deposits and highly viscous lava flows. Nine profiles of 2D high resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) (electrode spacing 20 meters, with a depth of penetration > 200 meters) were performed across this edifice to image its inner structure. In addition, we also measured the self-potential, the flux of CO2, and the temperature along these profiles. These data provide complementary information to interpret the ERT profiles. The ERT profiles allow to identify the main structural boundaries (and their associated fluid circulations) structuring the shallow architecture of the Fossa cone. The hydrothermal system is identified by very low values of the electrical resistivity (< 20 Ù m). Its lateral extension is clearly limited by the crater boundaries, which are relatively resistive (> 400 Ù m). Inside the crater, it is possible to follow the plumbing system of the main fumarolic area at depth. On the flank of the edifice, a thick layer of tuff is also marked by low resistivity values (in the range 1 to 20 Ù m). The ashes and pyroclastic materials ejected during the XIX Century eruptions and covering the flank of the volcano corresponds to relatively resistive materials (several hundreds to several thousands Ù m). Laboratory measurements are performed to determine the streaming coupling coefficient of the main materials forming the edifice. A 2D simulation of the ground water flow is performed over the edifice using the finite element code Comsol Multiphysics 3.3. Forward and inverse modeling of the self- potential data can be used to put constraints on the flux of water in the flanks of the edifice and inside the crater. The result reveals the very high potentiality of these methods for high

  13. Electrical Resistivity Tomography for the Detection of Subsurface Cavities in the Hofuf area of Eastern Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H. R.; Kaka, S. I.; Al-Mulhim, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Hofuf area in Eastern Saudi Arabia is marked by numerous karstic features including sinkholes, solution cavities and caves. These features have always been a hazard to the stability of the flyover bridges being built in the area. Recent development projects in the area included the construction of two flyover bridges at most heavily trafficked intersections in Hofuf city. Several investigations were attempted including conventional geotechnical investigations using boreholes, however, these did not furnish necessary information to visualize the subsurface cavities. Consequently, an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) survey was carried out to map the shallow subsurface strata at two proposed sites for future flyover bridges with the aims to detect and map the subsurface cavities. ABEM LUND Imaging System (http://abem.se/products/sas4000/sas4000.php) consisting of Terrameter with an automatic electrode selector was used to acquire apparent resistivity data during the survey. Cables with 2 to 5m electrode take-out spacing were adopted with a total of 160 to 400 m layout using Wenner-Schlumberger configuration. During the data acquisition process, connectivity and grounding at all electrodes were verified. Due to extreme dry surface condition, bentonite slurry was used for proper grounding of the electrodes. Windows based software, RES2DINV and RES3DINV developed by Geotomo Software (http://www.geoelectrical.com/index.php) were used for the inverse modeling of the acquired apparent resistivity data resulting in 2-D and 3-D absolute / true resistivity models of the subsurface conditions. The results show the presence of small to large isolated cavities at various depths which were subsequently verified by drilling boreholes. This study enables us to make a number of recommendations for the design and construction of safe foundation systems for the proposed flyover bridges.

  14. Widening ERTS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercanti, E. P.

    1974-01-01

    In less than two years of operation ERTS-1 is shown to have successfully completed its experimental mission and to be delivering an ever-increasing roster of benefits. The widening ERTS applications reviewed include air quality and weather modification, aid to oil exploration, ore-deposit exploration, short-lived event observation, flood area assessment and flood-plain mapping, land and water quality assessment, soil association mapping, crop production measurements, wildlife resources, drought and desertification studies, ground-water exploration, watershed surveys, snow and ice monitoring, surface water mapping, and iceberg surveys. Future projects and developments are also briefly reviewed.

  15. Time-lapse ERT interpretation methodology for leachate injection monitoring based on multiple inversions and a clustering strategy (MICS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audebert, M.; Clément, R.; Touze-Foltz, N.; Günther, T.; Moreau, S.; Duquennoi, C.

    2014-12-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in municipal waste landfills functioning as bioreactors. To quantify the water content and to assess the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). This geophysical method is based on the inversion process, which presents two major problems in terms of delimiting the infiltration area. First, it is difficult for ERT users to choose an appropriate inversion parameter set. Indeed, it might not be sufficient to interpret only the optimum model (i.e. the model with the chosen regularisation strength) because it is not necessarily the model which best represents the physical process studied. Second, it is difficult to delineate the infiltration front based on resistivity models because of the smoothness of the inversion results. This paper proposes a new methodology called MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy), which allows ERT users to improve the delimitation of the infiltration area in leachate injection monitoring. The MICS methodology is based on (i) a multiple inversion step by varying the inversion parameter values to take a wide range of resistivity models into account and (ii) a clustering strategy to improve the delineation of the infiltration front. In this paper, MICS was assessed on two types of data. First, a numerical assessment allows us to optimise and test MICS for different infiltration area sizes, contrasts and shapes. Second, MICS was applied to a field data set gathered during leachate recirculation on a bioreactor.

  16. Combining Cross-Borehole Georadar and Electrical Resistance Tomography to Monitor Moisture Content and Pore Water Electrical Conductivity in the Vadose Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Looms, M. C.; Nielsen, L.; Jensen, K. H.; Thybo, H.; Binley, A.

    2004-12-01

    Cross-borehole georadar and electrical resistance tomography (ERT) measurements are being conducted at two field sites in Denmark to monitor spatial and temporal variation of moisture content and tracer transport. At both field sites the geology is characterised by a thick layer (i.e.~20-30 m) of unsaturated melt water sand and gravel. At one of the field sites, Hjelm Hede, a very simple setup was constructed. Four boreholes were drilled along a line to a depth of 12 m. The outer two boreholes (7 m apart) were equipped with ERT instrumented PVC-tubes (electrodes every 50 cm) while the inner boreholes (5 m apart) had access tubes for georadar installed. The estimated water content values collected by the two large-scale geophysical methods have at this locality been compared to water content values determined by a conventional method - TDR. During previous investigations a total of 7 one-meter-long TDR probes were installed horizontally at five depths, from 0.75 m to 6.00 m. The TDR probes were installed in a well located approximately 30 m from the test area. The use of TDR probes to determine water content represents the soil physical properties at small-scale. A comparison will therefore be appropriate when evaluating properties across different sampling scales. Initial field results based on georadar match TDR results within a few percent. The second field site, Arrenaes, is located by an artificial infiltration plant. Two identical field setups have been established each having four ERT and four georadar boreholes. The boreholes were drilled to form a cross consisting of two lines, each with the same geometry as was used at Hjelm Hede. The two setups are located 8.5 m apart enabling an evaluation of the spatial variability. In future tests one of the fields will, furthermore, be irrigated to accelerate flow. The setups provide the possibility of combining the water content images using cross-borehole georadar with the bulk conductivity images achieved from the

  17. Combining ERT and modeling for investigating soil water content variability in a Maize field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beff, Laure; Couvreur, Valentin; Gunther, Thomas; Draye, Xavier; Javaux, Mathieu

    2014-05-01

    In this study we monitored the 3-D soil water content (SWC) evolution in a Maize field plot (3.9 m long, 1.8 m wide and 1.4 m deep) during a drying period of two weeks with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Our aim was to identify how SWC was evolving with time and whether SWC variability was mainly induced by difference between plants (inter-plants) and by the roots distribution of the plants themselves (intra-plant). Field SWC monitoring was realized at four dates with Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). At the plot scale, the variability was mainly impacted by the vertical differences of SWC (between 61% and 85%), especially at the end of the drying period when the difference of SWC between surface and depth was the most important. The SWC distribution was largely affected by the presence of the maize rows. When the soil dried out, the SWC variability induced by root distribution, and indirectly by the sowing pattern in rows, became prevalent. By using biophysical numerical model, we were able to properly simulate the evolution of the SWC variability induced by the root distribution during the 15-d period and characterize the amount of compensation induced by the plant root system.

  18. 2D and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography imaging of earthquake related ground deformations at the Ancient Roman Forum and Isis Temple of Baelo Claudia (Cádiz, South Spain).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    The ancient roman city of Baelo Claudia has been subject of several papers on earthquake environmental effects (EEE) and well as earthquake archaeological effects (EAE). During the field training course on archaeoseismology and palaeoseismology conducted in September 2009 (INQUA-IGCP567 Workshop) held at Baelo Claudia, four Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) profiles were carried out, by the teams of the Salamanca University (Spain), RWTH Aachen University (Germany) and the Geological Survey of Spain (IGME). ERT surveys were developed in the eastern side of the ancient roman Forum across the unexcavated sector of the archaeological site heading on the 1st Century AD Isis Temple. Each ERT profile was constituted by a 48 multielectrode array with spacing of 2 m resulting in a total length of investigation of around 384 m. ERT lines were separated 10 m each other resulting in a total research area of 3840 m2 to a mean investigation depth of 16 m. The selected survey configurations were Pole-Dipole and Wenner in order to get detailed information about lateral resistivity contrasts, but with a reasonable depth of investigation. The resulting 2D resistivity pseudosections clearly display deformations of the buried roman pavements which propagated in depth within the pre-roman clayey substratum of the Bolonia Bay area.. 3D modelling of the 2D pseudosections indicates that the observed deformations are related to near-surface landsliding, being possible to calculate the minimum volume of mobilized material. ERT 3D imaging allow to refine previous GPR surveys conducted at this same area and to get a subsurface picture of ground deformations caused by repeated earthquakes during the 1st and 3rd Centuries AD. Preliminary calculated volume for the mobilized materials affecting the foundations of the Isis Temple and Forum clearly points to a minimum ESI-07 VIII Intensity validating previous research in the zone. This study has been supported by the Spanish Research Projects

  19. A low cost ERT prototype in the Cultural Heritage monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, M.; Loperte, A.; Soldovieri, F.

    2012-04-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a well-established geophysical technique useful in geology and environmental studies. Its low intrusivity, which is a key feature for its success in the above-mentioned fields, can be a strong limitation for the systematic application of the ERT in the Cultural Heritage and civil infrastructures monitoring application fields. In fact, usually, the injection of the electric current in the structure (or ground) is realized through stainless steel electrodes, which have to be fixed into the medium so to achieve a good electric contact with a low electrode resistance. However, Geophysical characterization of Cultural Heritage needs more stringent requirements in terms of minimal or not-intrusivity. To comply with this requirement, in this work an ERT system has been developed, which is based on the use of medical Ag/AgCl electrodes located on the structure also thanks to the help of and conductive gel so to keep low the electric contact resistance; the electrodes are excited by a classical DC georesistivimeter. Such a type of low cost electrodes makes it possible to perform non invasive diagnostics by also ensuring a stability of measurement in a time period comparable with the ones required for the survey in cultural heritage. In addition, the use of Ag/AgCl minimizes electrode polarization phenomena. This work is concerned with the set-up and the testing of a prototypical ERT system, where the Ag/AgCl electrodes are commanded by the IRIS Syscal Junior georesistivimeter, which is of interest Cultural Heritage and civil infrastructures characterization and monitoring. Preliminary test have demonstrated the possibility to inject electrical current (10-30 mA) into reinforced concrete and marble and measure an induced voltage of the order of ranging from 0.1 to 10 mV; also the electrodes exhibit a good stability even if they are used as current electrodes. The use of an electroconductive material such as a water based gel, which

  20. Combined Seismic Refraction Inversion, Reflection, and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Imaging of a Glacially Buried Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, J.; Ogunsuyi, O.; Schmitt, D. R.; Rokosh, C. D.; Pawlowicz, J. G.

    2008-12-01

    Buried valleys are common in the regions of the Northern Hemisphere covered by ice sheets during the last glaciation. The valleys are filled by a variety of glacio-lacustrine and glacio-fluvial sedimentation. These valleys are important sources of fresh water, aggregates, and even shallow methane deposits. The surface expressions of the buried valleys, however, are often not apparent and they are often only serendipitously found during drilling for water or petroleum. Geophysical investigations of one deep (~ 350 m) buried valley in northern Alberta that had been located on the basis of geophysical logs were carried out. This buried valley was somewhat unique in that shallow (~ 30 m) methane deposits, providing a significant hazard to drilling, exist. A 10 km high resolution seismic profile (vibrator sweep 14 Hz to 250 Hz, 40 Hz geophone singles at 4 m spacing) was obtained. Significant differences in the raw shot records were apparent across the array due to the lateral differences in compressional wave velocity between the untouched bedrock and the valley fill sediments. Travel time inversion of first arrivals and deeper reflections further quantifies this lateral variation showing that the valley fill and bedrock velocities differ by more than 50% ranging from about 1700 m/s to nearly 3000 m/s, respectively. The reflection seismic image agrees well with the refraction inversion. The gross structure of the steep-sided valley is apparent. The internal architecture, however, shows a variety of clino-form dipping reflectors at the edge of the valley that are possibly related to subglacial sedimentation, a strong dipping reflector that is unconformable with the others and may be representative of recurrent discharge events, and numerous flat lying reflectors that are likely related to lacustrine sedimentation. Co-incident electrical resistivity tomography, too, is largely in agreement with the gross structure. The clay rich bedrock shales are substantially more

  1. Resolution of sea ice microstructure using cross borehole resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingham, M.; Jones, K.; Pringle, D. J.; Eicken, H.

    2009-12-01

    As an inhomogeneous mixture of pure ice, brine, air and solid salts, the physical properties of sea ice depend on its highly temperature-dependent microstructure. Understanding the microstructure and the way it responds to variations not only in temperature but also salinity, is crucial in developing an improved understanding of the role that sea ice plays in climate. However progress in this is hindered by the difficulty in obtaining meaningful measurements of sea ice physical properties without disturbing the natural state of the ice. We have recently developed an application of cross-borehole dc resistivity tomography to make in-situ measurements which resolve the anisotropic resistivity structure of first-year landfast sea ice. We present results from measurements made in 2008 at Barrow, Alaska which demonstrate the evolution of the ice microstructure over the period of spring warming. Key conclusions are that a much greater degree of vertical electrical connectivity of brine channels appears to exist even when the ice is very cold, whereas a much higher horizontal component of resistivity indicates that horizontal connectivity is only established as the ice warms and brine inclusions expand.

  2. Complex electrical resistance tomography of a subsurface PCE plume

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W,; LeBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    A controlled experiment was conducted to evaluate the performance of complex electrical resistivity tomography (CERT) for detecting and delineating free product dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in the subsurface. One hundred ninety liters of PCE were released at a rate of 2 liters per hour from a point 0.5 m below ground surface. The spill was conducted within a double walled tank where saturated layers of sand, bentonite and a sand/bentonite mixture were installed. Complex electrical resistance measurements were performed. Data were taken before the release, several times during, and then after the PCE was released. Magnitude and phase were measured at 1 and 64 Hz. Data from before the release were compared with those during the release for the purpose of imaging the changes in conductivity resulting from the plume. Conductivity difference tomographs showed a decrease in electrical conductivity as the DNAPL penetrated the soil. A pancake-shaped anomaly developed on the top of a bentonite layer at 2 m depth. The anomaly grew in magnitude and extent during the release and borehole television surveys data confirmed the anomaly to be free-product PCE whose downward migration was stopped by the low permeability clay. The tomographs clearly delineated the plume as a resistive anomaly.

  3. Resistivity tomography of Pointe du Hoc cliffs for stability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udphuay, S.; Everett, M. E.; Warden, R.

    2008-12-01

    Pointe du Hoc WWII battlefield overlooking the English Channel in western Normandy, France, is an important cultural resource, being an integral component of the June 6 1944 D-Day invasion. Two major buildings, the forward observation post (OP) and Col. Rudder's command post (RCP), are now perched perilously close to the cliff's edge owing to six decades of cliff retreat. Geophysical surveys were carried out in March 2008 to investigate the risk of cliff failure and to inform possible geotechnical remediation strategies with a final goal toward re-opening the observation post that is now closed to visitors. The geophysical surveying is accomplished by high-resolution resistivity tomography, conducted in extreme topography and in the midst of dense cultural clutter. The results of the OP tomography indicate that the highest mass movement hazard is associated with the marine caverns at the base of the cliff at the point of strongest wave attack. These caverns occupy the future site of a sea arch which will threaten the OP building. There is a high probability of a soil wedge failure on the east facing cliff edge close to the OP building. Such a failure could damage or destroy the building. The possibility of a sudden catastrophic failure along any one of these fractures cannot be ruled out. The greatest risk at the RCP site, which is under less immediate threat, is associated with soil wedge failures at the top of the cliffs.

  4. Comparative Investigation of Guided Fuzzy Clustering and Mean Shift Clustering for Edge Detection in Electrical Resistivity Tomography Images of Mineral Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, Wil; Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jon; Bai, Li

    2014-05-01

    Geophysical surveying using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) can be used as a rapid non-intrusive method to investigate mineral deposits [1]. One of the key challenges with this approach is to find a robust automated method to assess and characterise deposits on the basis of an ERT image. Recent research applying edge detection techniques has yielded a framework that can successfully locate geological interfaces in ERT images using a minimal assumption data clustering technique, the guided fuzzy clustering method (gfcm) [2]. Non-parametric clustering techniques are statistically grounded methods of image segmentation that do not require any assumptions about the distribution of data under investigation. This study is a comparison of two such methods to assess geological structure based on the resistivity images. In addition to gfcm, a method called mean-shift clustering [3] is investigated with comparisons directed at accuracy, computational expense, and degree of user interaction. Neither approach requires the number of clusters as input (a common parameter and often impractical), rather they are based on a similar theory that data can be clustered based on peaks in the probability density function (pdf) of the data. Each local maximum in these functions represents the modal value of a particular population corresponding to a cluster and as such the data are assigned based on their relationships to these model values. The two methods differ in that gfcm approximates the pdf using kernel density estimation and identifies population means, assigning cluster membership probabilities to each resistivity value in the model based on its distance from the distribution averages. Whereas, in mean-shift clustering, the density function is not calculated, but a gradient ascent method creates a vector that leads each datum towards high density distributions iteratively using weighted kernels to calculate locally dense regions. The only parameter needed in both methods

  5. Modelling Sediment Thickness for Site-Effect Characterisation using H/V Spectral Ratio Analysis and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noten, Koen; Lecocq, Thomas; Watlet, Arnaud; Camelbeeck, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    The H/V Spectral Ratio (HVSR) analysis of ambient seismic noise has been widely used to estimate the fundamental site resonance frequency in the context of site-effect characterisation. In regions of unknown subsurface structure, in which there is a significant acoustic impedance contrast between sediments and the underlying bedrock, HVSR can be a very powerful tool to map bedrock morphology and sediment thickness. Calibrating the power-law relationship between the variation in fundamental frequency and sediment thickness around these unknown sites is crucial for sediment thickness mapping. This empirical relationship can be easily calculated by conducting HVSR analysis of ambient noise measurements above boreholes with known bedrock depth. Additional local H/V measurements above near-surface geophysical profiles, for instance created by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), allow training and improving the power-law relationship for sites with a shallow bedrock depth. As the compaction of sediments influences the Vs, one has however to take into account that this empirical relationship can only be applied in relative small areas with a similar local geology. Between 2008 and 2010, a seismic swarm (MLmax = 3.2) occurred in a hilly area, 20 km SE of Brussels (Belgium). 60 of the 300 recorded events were felt/heard by the local residents and were reported in the corresponding 'Did You Feel It' internet inquiries held by Royal Observatory of Belgium. Several low-magnitude events show a distinct macroseismic intensity variation that can be explained by the geological site effect, i.e. the local sediment thickness, affecting the human perception of these earthquake-induced ground motions. In this presentation, we apply the above described methodology and discuss the results of a geophysical survey including ERT-profiling, ambient noise recording, HVSR analysis in Geopsy and DEM-modelling to characterise the local site effects. The resulting sediment thickness model

  6. Long-term electrical resistivity monitoring of recharge-induced contaminant plume behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperikova, Erika; Hubbard, Susan S.; Watson, David B.; Baker, Gregory S.; Peterson, John E.; Kowalsky, Michael B.; Smith, Meagan; Brooks, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Geophysical measurements, and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data in particular, are sensitive to properties that are related (directly or indirectly) to hydrological processes. The challenge is in extracting information from geophysical data at a relevant scale that can be used to gain insight about subsurface behavior and to parameterize or validate flow and transport models. Here, we consider the use of ERT data for examining the impact of recharge on subsurface contamination at the S-3 ponds of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site in Tennessee. A large dataset of time-lapse cross-well and surface ERT data, collected at the site over a period of 12 months, is used to study time variations in resistivity due to changes in total dissolved solids (primarily nitrate). The electrical resistivity distributions recovered from cross-well and surface ERT data agrees well, and both of these datasets can be used to interpret spatiotemporal variations in subsurface nitrate concentrations due to rainfall, although the sensitivity of the electrical resistivity response to dilution varies with nitrate concentration. Using the time-lapse surface ERT data interpreted in terms of nitrate concentrations, we find that the subsurface nitrate concentration at this site varies as a function of spatial position, episodic heavy rainstorms (versus seasonal and annual fluctuations), and antecedent rainfall history. These results suggest that the surface ERT monitoring approach is potentially useful for examining subsurface plume responses to recharge over field-relevant scales.

  7. Hidden gully erosion - detection and characterization of piping systems using geomorphological and geophysical methods (GPR, ERT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatek-Jakiel, Anita; Kondracka, Marta

    2016-04-01

    The significance of piping in gully formation and hillslope hydrology has been discussed for many years. However, piping as a subsurface erosion caused by water flowing through the soil is still considered as one of the most difficult erosion processes to study, because it occurs below the soil surface and traces of piping become visible on the surface only when a pipe roof collapses, or a pipe inlet or a pipe outlet has been located. Detection of pipes and their complex characterization is still a methodological challenge. Therefore, this study aims at a better detection and characterization of piping systems in a mountainous area under a temperate climate using geomorphological mapping and geophysical methods (ground penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography). The survey was carried out in the Bereźnica Wyżna catchment, in the Bieszczady Mts. (Eastern Carpathians, Poland), where pipes develop in Cambisols at a depth ranging from ca 0.70 to 1.00 m. The geomorphological mapping was carried out in the in the whole catchment (2.96 km2), whereas the geophysical survey was limited to two zones (zone A - ca 32 x 82 m, zone B - ca 58 x 115 m). In this study a standard RAMAC GPR system (Malå GeoScience) with shielded 500 MHz antenna was used. The electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) was performed using electrical imaging system LUND with Terrameter SAS 4000 produced by company ABEM. The ERT and GPR data were interpreted in the RES2DINV (Geotomo Software) and RadExplorer software (DECO Geophysical Ltd) respectively. In total, 3 longitudinal and 26 transverse GPR profiles and five ERTs were performed. The used geophysical techniques are shown to be successful in identifying pipes tested in the pilot catchment. Pipes identified by GPR and ERT were verified by the surface indicators (i.e. lowering of surface above pipes). The GPR and ERT applications suggest that piping systems density is much greater than could be detected from surface observation alone

  8. Subspace-based analysis of the ERT inverse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Hadj Miled, Mohamed Khames; Miller, Eric L.

    2004-05-01

    In a previous work, we proposed a source-type formulation to the electrical resistance tomography (ERT) problem. Specifically, we showed that inhomogeneities in the medium can be viewed as secondary sources embedded in the homogeneous background medium and located at positions associated with variation in electrical conductivity. Assuming a piecewise constant conductivity distribution, the support of equivalent sources is equal to the boundary of the inhomogeneity. The estimation of the anomaly shape takes the form of an inverse source-type problem. In this paper, we explore the use of subspace methods to localize the secondary equivalent sources associated with discontinuities in the conductivity distribution. Our first alternative is the multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm which is commonly used in the localization of multiple sources. The idea is to project a finite collection of plausible pole (or dipole) sources onto an estimated signal subspace and select those with largest correlations. In ERT, secondary sources are excited simultaneously but in different ways, i.e. with distinct amplitude patterns, depending on the locations and amplitudes of primary sources. If the number of receivers is "large enough", different source configurations can lead to a set of observation vectors that span the data subspace. However, since sources that are spatially close to each other have highly correlated signatures, seperation of such signals becomes very difficult in the presence of noise. To overcome this problem we consider iterative MUSIC algorithms like R-MUSIC and RAP-MUSIC. These recursive algorithms pose a computational burden as they require multiple large combinatorial searches. Results obtained with these algorithms using simulated data of different conductivity patterns are presented.

  9. Applying electrical resistivity tomography and biological methods to assess the surface-groundwater interaction in two Mediterranean rivers (central Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iepure, Sanda; Gómez Ortiz, David; Lillo Ramos, Javier; Rasines Ladero, Ruben; Persoiu, Aurel

    2014-05-01

    Delineation of the extent of hyporheic zone (HZ) in river ecosystems is problematic due to the scarcity of spatial information about the structure of riverbed sediments and the magnitude and extent of stream interactions with the parafluvial and riparian zones. The several existing methods vary in both quality and quantity of information and imply the use of hydrogeological and biological methods. In the last decades, various non-invasive geophysical techniques were developed to characterise the streambed architecture and also to provide detailed spatial information on its vertical and horizontal continuity. All classes of techniques have their strengths and limitations; therefore, in order to assess their potential in delineating the lateral and vertical spatial extents of alluvial sediments, we have combined the near-surface images obtained by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) with biological assessment of invertebrates in two Mediterranean lowland rivers from central Spain. We performed in situ imaging of the thickness and continuity of alluvial sediments under the riverbed and parafluvial zone during base-flow conditions (summer 2013 and winter 2014) at two different sites with distinct lithology along the Tajuña and Henares Rivers. ERT was performed by installing the electrodes (1 m spacing) on a 47 m long transect normal to the river channel using a Wener-Schlumberger array, across both the riparian zones and the river bed. Invertebrates were collected in the streambed from a depth of 20-40 cm, using the Bou-Rouch method, and from boreholes drilled to a depth of 1.5 m in the riparian zone. The ERT images obtained at site 1 (medium and coarse sand dominated lithology) shows resistivity values ranging from ~20 to 80 ohm•m for the in-stream sediments, indicating a permeable zone up to ~ 0.5 m thick and extending laterally for ca. 5 m from the channel. These sediments contribute to active surface/hyporheic water exchanges and to low water retention in

  10. The summit part of Mount Etna revealed by High Resolution DC Electrical Resistivity Tomography coupled with complementary geophysical and soil gas techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finizola, Anthony; Ricci, Tullio; Antoine, Raphael; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline; Bernard, Julien; Brothelande, Elodie; Fargier, Yannick; Fauchard, Cyrille; Foucart, Brice; Gailler, Lydie; Gusset, Rachel; Lazarte, Ivonne; Martin, Erwan; Mézon, Cécile; Portal, Angélie; Poret, Matthieu; Rossi, Matteo

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the EC FP7 project "MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes", one profile coupling DC electrical resistivity tomography (Pole-Dipole configuration with a remote electrode located between 8-10 km from the middle of the different acquisitions, 64 electrodes and 40 m spacing between the electrodes), self-potential, soil CO2 degassing, Radon measurements and sub-surface (30cm depth) temperature have been performed between June 25th and July 13th 2015. This profile, NE-SW direction, crossed the summit part of Mount Etna. A total 5720m of profile was performed, with a roll along protocol of 1/4 of the dispositive, for each new acquisitions. A total of 6 acquisitions was made to complete the entire profile. For the first time in the world, a multi-electrodes DC ERT profile, of high resolution (40 m of spacing between the electrodes) reached, thanks to a pole-dipole configuration, 900m for the depth of investigation. The ERT profile clearly evidences the hydrothermal system of Mount Etna: the lowest resistivity values are associated with a large scale positive self-potential anomaly, and smaller wavelength anomalies for temperature, CO2 concentration and Radon, in the area where the electrical conductor reach the surface. Structural discontinuities such as the Elliptic crater, was clearly evidenced by a sharp decrease of the self-potential values in the inner part of this crater. The striking result of this profile is the presence of a resistive body located just below the NE crater. This structure displays the highest degassing values of the entire profile. We interpret this resistive body as a consequence of the thermic over-heated plume rising from the top of the shallow feeding system. Indeed, above several hundred of degrees Celsuis, it is impossible to consider rain water infiltration and the presence of a wet hydrothermal system. The consequence would be therefore to obtain this resistive body, centred on the area of main heat transfer. Above this

  11. Canadian ERTS program progress report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morley, L. W.; Mcquillan, A. K.

    1974-01-01

    Progress of the Canadian ERTS program is provided along with statistics on the production and role of ERTS images both from the CCRS in Ottawa and from the Prince Albert Saskatchewan satellite station. The types of products, difficulties of production and some of the main applications in Canada are discussed.

  12. Application of 2D surface ERT to on-site wastewater treatment survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquet, N.; French, H. K.

    2012-05-01

    Interest in the functioning of on-site wastewater treatment in rural areas has grown both among authorities and private companies in France and elsewhere in Europe. This is partly due to the enforcement of a new law that obliges communities to control on-site wastewater treatment systems. For extensive systems—mostly Vertical Flow Sand Filters (VFSF)—the introduction of this law revealed the absence of reliable methods to assess if a system was built according to recommendations and is operating well. The aim of this paper is to examine whether surface Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a reliable method for mapping outline of filter dimensions and reveal clogging effects. Using forward modeling of synthetic models, we created sensitivity maps of ideal resistivity maps revealing that the method is well-suited to outline the horizontal extent of the filter but not necessarily its constitutive layers because the coarse gravel layer near the surface reduces the sensitivity to features below this layer. Hence whatever the geophysical signal is produced by clogging, this will be difficult to detect. The most appropriate inversion procedure, i.e. the L1-norm inversion, reveals the filter extent with an error less than the electrode spacing independent of noise levels. Finally, the procedure is illustrated for a real case ERT survey on a full scale VFSF. This study reveals that simple surface ERT measurements provide a good estimate of the filter area, but additional methods are required for more detailed vertical analysis including potential detection of clogging effects.

  13. Cross-hole ERT monitoring of freshwater injection in a hyper-saline aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haaken, K.; Deidda, G. P.; Cassiani, G.; Kemna, A.; Deiana, R.; Putti, M.; Paniconi, C.; Schirru, F.; Mura, M.

    2012-04-01

    In November 2011 we performed a freshwater injection experiment in the hyper-saline aquifer underlying the Molentargius-Saline Regional Park located near Cagliari in southern Sardinia, very close to the coastline. The subsurface water reaches salinity levels as high as three times the NaCl content of seawater, most likely as a consequence of salt release from the nearby salt works, active from Roman times to the mid-twentieth century. Five ERT boreholes were drilled with 4 inches inner diameter to a depth of 20 m and positioned in the shape of a square with an 8-m long side, with one borehole at the centre. All boreholes are equipped with a fully screened PVC pipe bearing externally twenty-four stainless steel cylindrical electrodes from 0.6 m to 19 m depth with 0.8 m separation. The water table is stable around -5.2 m from the ground surface. The sediments are mostly composed of sands with thin layers of silty sand, clayey sand and silty clay. Electric fluid logs recorded in the boreholes allowed to discriminate two zones, with a transitional layer in between: (a) from the water table to 7.5 m the water electrical conductivity is about 2 S/m; (b) below 12 m depth the water electrical conductivity reaches 18.5 S/m. In November 2011 we injected 19.4 m3 of freshwater in about 4 hours using a double packer system positioned in the central borehole, with an injection chamber located between 13.5 and 14.5 m below ground surface. Time-lapse ERT monitoring was achieved by measuring along two 2D ERT planes corresponding to the two square diagonals, thus involving three boreholes at a time for a total of 72 electrodes. A mixture of skip 0 dipole-dipole and bipole-bipole configurations was used in each acquisition, that required about 1 hour using an IRIS Syscal Pro resistivity meter. The resulting ERT time-lapse images show clearly the development and motion of the injected freshwater bulb, that undergoes a fast vertical migration and a quick disappearance probably caused

  14. The lost church of Montemurro (Basilicata, Italy): Ground Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography for detecting its buried remains in S. Maria Square.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bavusi, Massimo; Giocoli, Alessandro; de Martino, Gregory; Loperte, Antonio; Lapenna, Vincenzo

    2010-05-01

    Montemurro is a little centre town located in the Agri Valley (Basilicata Region, Italy) which was affected by two catastrophic events: in the 1842 a very large landslide has damaged great part of the centre and in the 1857 the town was destroyed completely by the "Great Neapolitan Earthquake" (Mallet, 1862), a seismic event having epicenter in the Agri Valley (Cello et al., 2003; Bavusi et al., 2004). Signs of those tragic events can be still found in the fabric of the city. One of these is certainly S. Maria square, a place suspected to house a church before the disastrous events of 1842. This suspicion is supported by a series of evidences: a historical drawing, dating back to before 1842, shows a church in position compatible with the location of the square; in aerial view S. Maria square appears as tear in the fabric of the city; the tales of the erderlies of Montemurro speak about an ancient missing church in the town. Then, in the attempt to resolve the doubt about the presence of the church, a geophysical survey was planned in S. Maria Square with the aim to detect some buried masonry structures related to the church. In this work we selected two active techniques such as the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT). Sixty parallel GPR profiles 0.5 m spaced were gathered in S. Maria Square and in a contiguous street by using a GSSI SIR3000 system with a central frequency antenna of 200 MHz. Processed radargrams showed numerous reflectors and heterogeneities in the subsoil related to manmade objects. Then, a laborious data processing (Nuzzo et al., 2002) allowed to obtain several time-slices showing noticeable reflections compatible with masonry structures. Moreover, two ERT profiles were carried out by using an IRIS Syscal R2 system equipped with a multielectrode cable. The first ERT profile 86 m long and having 44 electrodes 2 m spaced allowed to investigate up to 9 m of depth. The second, overlapped on the previous

  15. Normal-reciprocal error models for quantitative ERT in permafrost environments: bin analysis versus histogram analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verleysdonk, Sarah; Flores-Orozco, Adrian; Krautblatter, Michael; Kemna, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used for the monitoring of permafrost-affected rock walls for some years now. To further enhance the interpretation of ERT measurements a deeper insight into error sources and the influence of error model parameters on the imaging results is necessary. Here, we present the effect of different statistical schemes for the determination of error parameters from the discrepancies between normal and reciprocal measurements - bin analysis and histogram analysis - using a smoothness-constrained inversion code (CRTomo) with an incorporated appropriate error model. The study site is located in galleries adjacent to the Zugspitze North Face (2800 m a.s.l.) at the border between Austria and Germany. A 20 m * 40 m rock permafrost body and its surroundings have been monitored along permanently installed transects - with electrode spacings of 1.5 m and 4.6 m - from 2007 to 2009. For data acquisition, a conventional Wenner survey was conducted as this array has proven to be the most robust array in frozen rock walls. Normal and reciprocal data were collected directly one after another to ensure identical conditions. The ERT inversion results depend strongly on the chosen parameters of the employed error model, i.e., the absolute resistance error and the relative resistance error. These parameters were derived (1) for large normal/reciprocal data sets by means of bin analyses and (2) for small normal/reciprocal data sets by means of histogram analyses. Error parameters were calculated independently for each data set of a monthly monitoring sequence to avoid the creation of artefacts (over-fitting of the data) or unnecessary loss of contrast (under-fitting of the data) in the images. The inversion results are assessed with respect to (1) raw data quality as described by the error model parameters, (2) validation via available (rock) temperature data and (3) the interpretation of the images from a geophysical as well as a

  16. Modelling orange tree root water uptake active area by minimally invasive ERT data and transpiration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Perri, Maria Teresa; Consoli, Simona; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The comprehension of the hydrological processes involving plant root dynamics is crucial for implementing water saving measures in agriculture. This is particular urgent in areas, like those Mediterranean, characterized by scarce water availability. The study of root water dynamics should not be separated from a more general analysis of the mass and energy fluxes transferred in the soil-plant-atmosphere continuum. In our study, in order to carry this inclusive approach, minimal invasive 3D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for soil moisture estimation was combined with plant transpiration fluxes directly measured with Sap Flow (SF) techniques and Eddy Covariance methods, and volumetric soil moisture measurements by TDR probes. The main objective of this inclusive approach was to accurately define root-zone water dynamics and individuate the root-area effectively active for water and nutrient uptake process. The monitoring was carried out in Eastern Sicily (south Italy) in summers 2013 and 2014, within an experimental orange orchard farm. During the first year of experiment (October 2013), ERT measurements were carried out around the pertinent volume of one fully irrigated tree, characterized by a vegetation ground cover of 70%; in the second year (June 2014), ERT monitoring was conducted considering a cutting plant, thus to evaluate soil water dynamics without the significant plant transpiration contribution. In order to explore the hydrological dynamics of the root zone volume surrounded by the monitored tree, the resistivity data acquired during the ERT monitoring were converted into soil moisture content distribution by a laboratory calibration based on the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. By using ERT data in conjunction with the agro-meteorological information (i.e. irrigation rates, rainfall, evapotranspiration by Eddy Covariance, transpiration by Sap Flow and soil moisture

  17. Gravimetric water distribution assessment from geoelectrical methods (ERT and EMI) in municipal solid waste landfill.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Gaël; Pilawski, Tamara; Dzaomuho-Lenieregue, Phidias; Hiligsmann, Serge; Delvigne, Frank; Thonart, Philippe; Robert, Tanguy; Nguyen, Frédéric; Hermans, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    The gravimetric water content of the waste material is a key parameter in waste biodegradation. Previous studies suggest a correlation between changes in water content and modification of electrical resistivity. This study, based on field work in Mont-Saint-Guibert landfill (Belgium), aimed, on one hand, at characterizing the relationship between gravimetric water content and electrical resistivity and on the other hand, at assessing geoelectrical methods as tools to characterize the gravimetric water distribution in a landfill. Using excavated waste samples obtained after drilling, we investigated the influences of the temperature, the liquid phase conductivity, the compaction and the water content on the electrical resistivity. Our results demonstrate that Archie's law and Campbell's law accurately describe these relationships in municipal solid waste (MSW). Next, we conducted a geophysical survey in situ using two techniques: borehole electromagnetics (EM) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). First, in order to validate the use of EM, EM values obtained in situ were compared to electrical resistivity of excavated waste samples from corresponding depths. The petrophysical laws were used to account for the change of environmental parameters (temperature and compaction). A rather good correlation was obtained between direct measurement on waste samples and borehole electromagnetic data. Second, ERT and EM were used to acquire a spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity. Then, using the petrophysical laws, this information was used to estimate the water content distribution. In summary, our results demonstrate that geoelectrical methods represent a pertinent approach to characterize spatial distribution of water content in municipal landfills when properly interpreted using ground truth data. These methods might therefore prove to be valuable tools in waste biodegradation optimization projects. PMID:26926783

  18. Observation of flow processes in the vadose zone using ERT on different space and time scales: results, obstacles, and suggestions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noell, Ursula; Ganz, Christina; Lamparter, Axel; Duijnisveld, Wilhelmus; Bachmann, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) observes the flow processes in the vadose zone indirectly. ERT has been used to estimate water flow in different soil types and under different flow conditions using active experiments or monitoring the natural process in many cases. Our experiments in sand and loess soil connected ERT with local soil probing using TDR devices and tensiometers in order to proof the reliability of the ERT inversion results in terms of infiltration velocity. Additionally, a colour tracer was used and sections through the infiltration zones were excavated in order to compare the shape of the dye -stained infiltration zone with the results of the ERT inversion. The data revealed the complicated infiltration pattern with a higher transport velocity in sand and a different shape than expected by classical soil hydraulic models. These results indicate the need for independent observations in order to correctly assess the water storage in the vadose zone with its hydrological consequences, the groundwater recharge and the contamination risk caused by rapid movement of water. ERT can be used for this purpose on different spatial- and time scales but for reliable results various obstacles need to be dealt with. Firstly, the ambiguity of the resistivity because soil resistivity depends on both, soil water content and electrical soil/water conductivity. This obstacle is less severe when the infiltration velocity is investigated, because then only the first onset of resistivity change is interpreted as the water arrival time. Our results show that the arrival of the water front as well as the final infiltration depth can be reliably detected. In contrast, this obstacle is very severe when the amount of water stored is observed using conductive tracer. The problem is not critical during a passive experiment when the natural rain fall and the waters fate through the vadose zone is monitored. The second obstacle is the limited resolution of ERT which

  19. Time-lapse ERT and DTS for seasonal and short-term monitoring of an alpine river hyporheic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Laura, Busato; Mariateresa, Perri; Giorgio, Cassiani

    2016-04-01

    The hyporheic zone (HZ) is the area located beneath and adjacent to rivers and streams, where the interactions between surface water and groundwater take place. This complex physical domain allows the transport of several substances from a stream to the unconfined aquifer below, and vice versa, thus playing a fundamental role in the river ecosystem. The importance of the hyporheic zone makes its characterization a goal shared by several disciplines, which range from applied geophysics to biogeochemistry, from hydraulics to ecology. The frontier field of HZ characterization stays in applied non-invasive methodologies as Electrical Resistivity Tomography - ERT - and Distributed Temperature Sensing - DTS. ERT is commonly applied in cross-well configuration or with a superficial electrodes deployment while DTS is used in hydro-geophysics in the last decade, revealing a wide applicability to the typical issues of this field of study. DTS for hydro-geophysics studies is based on Raman scattering and employs heat as tracer and uses a fiber-optic cable to acquire temperature values. We applied both techniques for an alpine river case studies located in Val di Sole, TN, Italy. The collected measurements allow high-resolution characterization of the hyporheic zone, overcoming the critical problem of invasive measurements under riverbeds. In this work, we present the preliminary results regarding the characterization of the hyporheic zone of the alpine river obtained combining ERT and DTS time-lapse measurements. The data collection benefits from an innovative instrumentation deployment, which consists of both an ERT multicore cable and a DTS fiber-optic located in two separated boreholes drilled 5m under the watercourse and perpendicular to it. In particular we present the first year monitoring results and a short time-lapse monitoring experiment conducted during summer 2015. The site and the results here described are part of the EU FP7 CLIMB (Climate Induced Changes on the

  20. Integrated GPR and ERT as Enhanced Detection for Subsurface Historical Structures Inside Babylonian Houses Site, Uruk City, Southern Iraq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Khersan, Emad H.; Al-Ani, Jassim M. T.; Abrahem, Salah N.

    2016-03-01

    Uruk archaeological site, which located in Al-Muthanna Governorate southern Iraq, was investigated by integrated geophysical methods, ground penetration radar (GPR) and electric resistivity tomography (ERT) to image the historical buried structures. The GPR images show large radar attributes characterized by its continuous reflections having different widths. GPR attributes at shallower depth are mainly representing the upper part of Babylonian Houses that can often be found throughout the study area. In addition, radargrams characterized objects such as buried items, buried trenches and pits which were mainly concentrated near the surface. The ERT results show the presence of several anomalies at different depths generally having low resistivities. It is clear that the first upper zone can be found throughout the whole area and it may represent the top zone of the Babylonian houses. This zone is characterized by its dry clay and sandy soil containing surface broken bricks and slag mixed with core boulders. The second one underneath the top shows a prominent lower resistivity zone. It is probably caused by the moisture content that reduces the resistivity. The thickness of this zone is not equal at all parts of the site. The third deeper zone typically represents the archaeological walls. Most of the main anomalies perhaps referred to the buried clay brick walls. The map of the archaeological anomalies distribution and 3D view of the foundations at the study area using GPR and ERT techniques clearly show the characteristics of the Babylonian remains. A contour map and 3D view of Uruk show that the archaeological anomalies are concentrated mainly at the NE part of the district with higher values of wall height that range between 6 and 8 m and reach to more than 10 m. At the other directions, there are fewer walls with lower heights of 4-6 m and reach in some places the wall foot.

  1. Influence of the geomembrane on time-lapse ERT measurements for leachate injection monitoring.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Grossin-Debattista, J; Günther, T; Touze-Foltz, N; Moreau, S

    2014-04-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal waste landfills as bioreactors. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). However, this method can present false variations in the observations due to several parameters. This study investigates the impact of the geomembrane on ERT measurements. Indeed, the geomembrane tends to be ignored in the inversion process in most previously conducted studies. The presence of the geomembrane can change the boundary conditions of the inversion models, which have classically infinite boundary conditions. Using a numerical modelling approach, the authors demonstrate that a minimum distance is required between the electrode line and the geomembrane to satisfy the good conditions of use of the classical inversion tools. This distance is a function of the electrode line length (i.e. of the unit electrode spacing) used, the array type and the orientation of the electrode line. Moreover, this study shows that if this criterion on the minimum distance is not satisfied, it is possible to significantly improve the inversion process by introducing the complex geometry and the geomembrane location into the inversion tools. These results are finally validated on a field data set gathered on a small municipal solid waste landfill cell where this minimum distance criterion cannot be satisfied. PMID:24529793

  2. Electrical resistivity of coal-bearing rocks under high temperature and the detection of coal fires using electrical resistance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhenlu; Wang, Deming; Wang, Yanming; Zhong, Xiaoxing; Tang, Xiaofei; Xi, Dongdong

    2016-02-01

    Coal fires are severe hazards to environment, health and safety throughout the world. Efficient and economical extinguishing of these fires requires that the extent of the subsurface coal fires should be delineated. Electrical and electromagnetic methods have been used to detect coal fires in recent years. However, the resistivity change of coal-bearing rocks at high temperature is rarely investigated. The resistivity characteristics of coal fires at different temperatures and depths are seldomly researched as well. In this paper, we present the results of measurements of several coal-bearing rocks' resistivity and permeability under high temperature. Two major causes for the change in resistivity with increasing temperature are recognized, there are the increase of charge carriers and thermal fracturing, of which the first one is probably the dominant cause. A set of 2-D simulations is carried out to compare the relation of resolution and efficiency of coal fires detection to temperature and depth when adopting the electrical resistance tomography. The simulation results show that the resolution and efficiency decrease with the decrease of temperature and the increase of depth. Finally, the electrical resistance tomography is used to delineate coal fires in the Anjialing Open Pit Mine. Most low-resistivity regions are verified as coal-fire areas according to the long-term monitoring of borehole temperature. The results indicate that the electrical resistance tomography can be used as a tool for the detection of coal fires.

  3. Monitoring and Modelling of Soil-Plant Interactions: the Joint Use of ERT, Sap Flow and Eddy Covariance to Define the Volume of Orange Tree Active Root Zones.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere are key factors controlling a number of environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes such as precision agriculture. In this contribution we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via 4D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration from Eddy Correlation (EC). This abundance of data are to be fed in spatially distributed soil models in order to comprehend the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in Eastern Sicily (Italy). We installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus consisting of 4 instrumented micro boreholes placed at the corners of a square (about 1.3 m in side) surrounding an orange tree. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, soil water sampling, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available for a long period of time allowing knowledge of the long term forcing conditions on the system. This wealth of information was used to calibrate a 1D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was collected from laboratory experiments as well as by time-lapse ERT monitoring of irrigation a few months after the main experiment, when the orange tree had been cut. The results of the calibrated modeling exercise allow the quantification of the soil volume interested by root water uptake. This volume is much smaller (an area less than 2 square meters, 40 cm thick) than generally believed and assumed in the design of classical drip irrigation schemes.

  4. Electrical methods (VES and ERT) for identifying, mapping and monitoring different saline domains in a coastal plain region (Alt Empordà, Northern Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarroca, Mario; Bach, Joan; Linares, Rogelio; Pellicer, Xavier M.

    2011-10-01

    SummaryThe spatial variability through time of the degree of salinity of soils and groundwater is a major issue concerning the sustainable management of water resources. The problem is accentuated in coastal plain areas where saline bodies of different origin coexist. We present an extensive geoelectrical resistivity dataset collected in the Alt Empordà clastic coastal aquifer system (NE Spain) integrating the results of field campaigns undertaken within a period of more than two decades. The dataset is unique in the literature and comprises highly valuable information for the investigation of saline domains. The joint application of Vertical Electrical Sounding (VES) and Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methods allowed the identification of saline domains and monitoring their evolution through time. Geophysical data gathered during field campaigns in 1982, 2002 and 2010 were calibrated and interpreted on the basis of soil and groundwater physico-chemical analyses and hydrogeological, stratigraphic and geomorphological data. The results illustrate the potential of electrical resistivity methods at differentiating saline domains in coastal aquifer areas and at modelling their configuration and evolution. Although the VES data processing allows solving the one-dimensional resistivity structure of the subsurface, the inversion imposes a 1D layered model, thus interpretation of two-dimensional structures is subject to the interpolation between discrete measures. In contrast, ERT data offer a continuous 2D-image of the resistivity distribution, both laterally and in depth. Given that the bulk resistivity of the medium is extremely sensitive to salt content, the ERT profiles permitted identifying and determining the geometry of hyper-saline areas (characterized by resistivities of less than 5 Ω m). The study demonstrates the efficiency of the electrical methods to map subsurface conductive zones and illustrates how the accurate knowledge of the hydrogeological

  5. The use of soil electrical resistivity to monitor plant and soil water relationships in vineyards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brillante, L.; Mathieu, O.; Bois, B.; van Leeuwen, C.; Lévêque, J.

    2015-03-01

    Soil water availability deeply affects plant physiology. In viticulture it is considered a major contributor to the "terroir" effect. The assessment of soil water in field conditions is a difficult task, especially over large surfaces. New techniques are therefore required in order to better explore variations of soil water content in space and time with low disturbance and with great precision. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) meets these requirements for applications in plant sciences, agriculture and ecology. In this paper, possible techniques to develop models that allow the use of ERT to spatialise soil water available to plants are reviewed. An application of soil water monitoring using ERT in a grapevine plot in Burgundy (north-east France) during the vintage 2013 is presented. We observed the lateral heterogeneity of ERT-derived fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) variations, and differences in water uptake depend on grapevine water status (leaf water potentials measured both at predawn and at solar noon and contemporary to ERT monitoring). Active zones in soils for water movements were identified. The use of ERT in ecophysiological studies, with parallel monitoring of plant water status, is still rare. These methods are promising because they have the potential to reveal a hidden part of a major function of plant development: the capacity to extract water from the soil.

  6. Detection of Old Mine Tunnels in Mexico City Highlands by Electric Resistivity Image Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, R. E.; Tejero, A.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J.

    2013-12-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methods have been applied to study cavities or subsurface subsidence threatening urbanized areas. Unfortunately, ERT-3D techniques carried out on heavily urbanized areas become a difficult task, since parallel ERT arrays cannot be deployed. Then, a conventional regular grid cannot be carried out. We present a subsidence problem located in a densely populated portion of Mexico City highlands. Since the damaged houses are in the middle of a highly populated low-class neighborhood, an unconventional ERT array had to be applied. At first, a ';T'-array formed by two perpendicular transects was applied, deployed within a small alley, that stretched from the house entrance. This study determined a tubular structure beneath the houses following an irregular path at depth. Finally, houses were demolished due to the extensive damaged in their foundations. This made possible to carry out a second ERT-3D study, which included a dipolar array called ';L' and ';Corner' arrays. Such a new work defined a similar tubular structure. The cavity entrance was discovered, when excavations were made, although its precise shape could not be defined. The ERT-3D interpretation contributed to locate and accurately determine the geometrical characteristics of the geological feature that caused the collapse of dwellings.

  7. Using electric resistivity tomography in a small scale catchment to evaluate the effectiveness of surfactans in water repellent soils of Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, Mary-Anne; Leopold, Matthias; McGrath, Gavan; Mattes, Falko; Murphy, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Water repellent soils (WRS) are a major limitation on crop production in the southwest of Western Australia, with losses estimated at 250 million per annum. The amelioration of WRS through surfactant application shows variable success in field trials. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of surfactants on surface runoff and infiltration on WRS in a new laboratory based approach. The experiment used a physical, bench-scale catchment model (0.7 m x 0.7 m), where soils were arranged with a ridge and furrow shape similar to agricultural practices. It quantified irrigation, surface runoff, interflow and basal flow volumes. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) was used to measure the sub-surface electrical resistivity which is influenced by the amount of water in the soil. Three WRS from Western Australia were tested: very severely repellent (MED score 4.2 from South Stirling), moderate-severely repellent (MED score 2.4 from Badgingarra), and low repellence (MED score 1 from Dandaragan). Two different surfactants were compared to an untreated control, with application in furrow according to common agricultural practice at two replications and multiple wetting and drying cycles. Using ERT data, 2D-volumetric water contents for each WRS and test run were calculated. Surfactant application increased water infiltration in moderate-severely repellent soils by up to 73%, concentrated within the furrows. Water content also increased below 20 mm depth, where seeds would be located, suggesting a successful amelioration strategy for water repellency in agriculture. Very severely WRS revealed a more concentrated flow where surfactant was applied and only a 33% increase in infiltration. This physical catchment model in conjunction with hydrological and geophysical methods provides a useful tool to assess the effectiveness of surfactants to increase water infiltration into non-wetting soils. It is an inexpensive tool and could be used in future research before the most

  8. Quantifying spatiotemporal dynamics of root-zone soil water in a mixed forest on subtropical coastal sand dune using surface ERT and spatial TDR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Junliang; Scheuermann, Alexander; Guyot, Adrien; Baumgartl, Thomas; Lockington, David A.

    2015-04-01

    We jointly used surface electrical resistivity tomography (surface ERT) and spatial time domain reflectometry (spatial TDR) to quantify spatial patterns and seasonal dynamics of root-zone soil water under three contrasting vegetation covers in a sand dune forest of subtropical coastal Australia. We wanted to obtain a better understanding of the applicability of both techniques in these environments as well as investigate vegetation-soil water interactions. Soil temperature and topographic changes were taken into account in soil resistivity interpretation. The results demonstrated the capability of both surface ERT and spatial TDR to spatially monitor root-zone soil water dynamics, with root mean square error (RMSE) <0.018 cm3 cm-3 and absolute deviation <0.034 cm3 cm-3 between gravimetrically derived water content and those derived by the two geophysical techniques. Soil water was depleted to low levels during the dry season but quickly replenished with onset of the wet season. Soil water content profiles revealed obvious differences in water dynamics of the dune sands under different vegetation covers, with highest infiltration and deep drainage under the grassland compared with tree cover. The spatial variation in soil water content due to rainfall interception by trees, root water uptake and preferential infiltration associated with stemflow could be detected by the joint use of surface ERT and spatial TDR. We conclude that surface ERT can be an effective method for quantifying two-dimensional root-zone soil water dynamics and understanding the hydrological processes in these sand dune environments, if complemented by the one-dimensional high-resolution soil water measurements from spatial TDR.

  9. Isolation of the combined water content and salinity effects on ERT measurement to locate the preferential flow pathways in water repellent soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brindt, Naaran; Rahav, Matan; Furman, Alex; Wallach, Rony

    2016-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been used for measuring the dynamics of water flow in soils without disturbing the soil, and recently for identifying the preferential flow pathways that are reported to develop in water repellent soils. Since electrical resistivity is affected mainly by soil saturation and salinity, and given that in many cases salinity in the root zone reaches high values, the isolation of spatial and temporal distribution of water content or salinity in the root zone from ERT scans is a challenge. A model for transient variation of soil water content and salinity within a well-mixed soil unit was developed in the frame of this challenge. The model aims to isolate the temporal changes in water content from subsequent ERT scans. The model assumes that four stages of water dynamics occur in the root zone during an irrigation cycle: 1) Soil water content decreases by evapotranspiration - no irrigation, 2) Irrigation with saline water begins, water content increases but remains below field capacity - negligible drainage, 3) Irrigation continues and drainage starts as the water content becomes higher than field capacity, and 4) Irrigation stops, water content is higher than field capacity, and water content decreases by drainage and evapotranspiration. These four stages restart when drainage stops and water content decreases solely by evapotranspiration. The model was solved analytically and successfully applied to a series of sequential ERT scans accomplished during and between subsequent irrigation events for a soil that was rendered hydrophobic by olive trees irrigated with saline water, and a soil in a citrus orchard that was rendered hydrophobic by prolonged effluent irrigation. The suggested model helps in distinguishing between the temporal changes in water content and salinity within a given soil volume, locating the preferential plow pathways, and tracking the spatial and temporal salinity variation within the root zone during and

  10. Multidisciplinary investigation (ERT, CO2, SP and T) reveals fluid circulation at Somma-Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poret, Matthieu; Ricci, Tullio; Finizola, Anthony; Delcher, Eric; Peltier, Aline

    2016-04-01

    Somma-Vesuvius volcano, located near the city of Naples, threatens about 800,000 peoples producing one of the highest volcanic risk in the world. In the framework of the EC FP7 project "MEDiterranean SUpersite Volcanoes" a multidisciplinary investigation was performed in March 2014. This survey aimed (1) at locating the present-day hydrothermal system of Somma-Vesuvius and (2) at identifying the preferential paths and fluid flows inside the volcano.
 The prospecting methods used were Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ABEM SAS 4000) with 64 electrodes at 40 m spacing (in Wenner alpha configuration), self-potential (SP), temperature (30 cm depth) and CO2 concentration in the soil at 20 m spacing. All the measurements were performed along a 7 km long profile completed with roll-along (North- West to South-East). The depth of investigation for ERT reached about 500 m. This method revealed an electrical conductive body (20-100 ohm.m) centered beneath the summit of the Vesuvius cone. This conductive body was interpreted as the present-day hydrothermal system of the volcanic complex. Regarding the shape of this structure we noticed a deeply different shape respect to the one observed on both Stromboli and Vulcano volcanoes. Indeed, the Vesuvius hydrothermal system appears to act as a body which is constrained up to 200-250 m below the surface and, moreover, also emphasized by the W-like shape of the SP signal. From ERT and SP results a diameter of around 1.7 km at the maximum depth of investigation is estimated for the hydrothermal system of Somma-Vesuvius.
 In addition, four weak thermal anomalies (6-13°C) are identified on the summit area. They can be explained as preferential paths of up-flowing fluids. It follows that the largest structure seen on both temperature signal and ERT tomography is related to the crater rim of the 1906 eruption. Furthermore, on both lower sides of Vesuvius cone a conductive body (300-600 ohm.m) is identified within a resistive

  11. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part II: Constraint methodology of hydrodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Oxarango, L; Duquennoi, C; Touze-Foltz, N; Forquet, N; Clément, R

    2016-09-01

    Leachate recirculation is a key process in the operation of municipal solid waste landfills as bioreactors. To ensure optimal water content distribution, bioreactor operators need tools to design leachate injection systems. Prediction of leachate flow by subsurface flow modelling could provide useful information for the design of such systems. However, hydrodynamic models require additional data to constrain them and to assess hydrodynamic parameters. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a suitable method to study leachate infiltration at the landfill scale. It can provide spatially distributed information which is useful for constraining hydrodynamic models. However, this geophysical method does not allow ERT users to directly measure water content in waste. The MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to delineate the infiltration area precisely during time-lapse ERT survey in order to avoid the use of empirical petrophysical relationships, which are not adapted to a heterogeneous medium such as waste. The infiltration shapes and hydrodynamic information extracted with MICS were used to constrain hydrodynamic models in assessing parameters. The constraint methodology developed in this paper was tested on two hydrodynamic models: an equilibrium model where, flow within the waste medium is estimated using a single continuum approach and a non-equilibrium model where flow is estimated using a dual continuum approach. The latter represents leachate flows into fractures. Finally, this methodology provides insight to identify the advantages and limitations of hydrodynamic models. Furthermore, we suggest an explanation for the large volume detected by MICS when a small volume of leachate is injected. PMID:27095292

  12. Application of time-lapse ERT to Characterize Soil-Water-Disease Interactions of Citrus Orchard - Case Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddinti, S. R.; Kbvn, D. P.; Ranjan, S.; Suradhaniwar, S.; J, P. A.; R M, G.

    2015-12-01

    Vidarbha region in Maharashtra, India (home for mandarin Orange) experience severe climatic uncertainties resulting in crop failure. Phytopthora are the soil-borne fungal species that accumulate in the presence of moisture, and attack the root / trunk system of Orange trees at any stage. A scientific understanding of soil-moisture-disease relations within the active root zone under different climatic, irrigation, and crop cycle conditions can help in practicing management activities for improved crop yield. In this study, we developed a protocol for performing 3-D time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) at micro scale resolution to monitor the changes in resistivity distribution within the root zone of Orange trees. A total of 40 electrodes, forming a grid of 3.5 m x 2 m around each Orange tree were used in ERT survey with gradient and Wenner configurations. A laboratory test on un-disturbed soil samples of the region was performed to plot the variation of electrical conductivity with saturation. Curve fitting techniques were applied to get the modified Archie's model parameters. The calibrated model was further applied to generate the 3-D soil moisture profiles of the study area. The point estimates of soil moisture were validated using TDR probe measurements at 3 different depths (10, 20, and 40 cm) near to the root zone. In order to understand the effect of soil-water relations on plant-disease relations, we performed ERT analysis at two locations, one at healthy and other at Phytopthora affected Orange tree during the crop cycle, under dry and irrigated conditions. The degree to which an Orange tree is affected by Phytopthora under each condition is evaluated using 'grading scale' approach following visual inspection of the canopy features. Spatial-temporal distribution of moisture profiles is co-related with grading scales to comment on the effect of climatic and irrigation scenarios on the degree and intensity of crop disease caused by Phytopthora.

  13. Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) mock-up in a space chamber test at General Electric's Space Division. The ERTS program represented a concentrated effort to observe and monitor the limited resources of the Earth, in order to best conserve and utilize the resources in support of a burgeoning world population. The first ERTS was launched in 1972 and was later named Land Remote-Sensing Satellite (Landsat), to better represent the civil satellite program's prime emphasis on remote sensing of land resources. Multiple sensors survey and relay back masses of data in various ways from the Landsat. NASA has built 7 Land Remote Sensing Satellites, which have helped agricultural experts pick up underutilized land areas and new prospects for land use through irrigation. It has also assisted in pinpointing the spread of crop disease and in charting new uses of the sea for oceanographers.

  14. Simultaneous estimation of local- and flowpath-scale rate-limited mass transfer parameters using electrical-resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Ong, J. B.; Lane, J. W.; Curtis, G. P.

    2012-12-01

    In the presence of rate-limited mass transfer (RLMT), conventional chemical sampling of the subsurface preferentially pulls pore water from the mobile domain. Therefore, the characteristics of the immobile domain must be inferred from the mobile tracer signal, which is modified with transport and immobile exchange over a representative length. Because conventional chemical data are not directly sensitive to the immobile zone, this representative length must be sufficient to allow enough exchange between the two domains to inform immobile parameter estimation (e.g., optimal Damkohler range). Flowpath "averaged" RLMT parameters may not well describe the true field variability in the immobile domain size and exchange coefficient, parameters which control the retention and subsequent long-term release of contaminants. In contrast, bulk electrical conductivity is sensitive to the volume-weighted ionic tracer concentration in both the mobile and immobile domains. When co-located bulk conductivity and fluid conductivity are analyzed concurrently, estimates can be obtained for (1) effective RLMT parameters averaged along the upgradient flowpath and (2) local-scale RLMT parameters for the volume from which chemical samples and electrical measurements are taken. Here, we use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), for the first time, to discriminate and identify effective flowpath and local-scale RLMT parameters, informing the true spatial variability in mass transfer. We apply this technique at the field scale at a uranium contamination site in Naturita, Colorado, USA. Inverse modeling was used to optimize parameter estimates to best simulate both the observed bulk and fluid conductivity, and objectively determine parameter sensitivity, correlation, and confidence. Local RLMT parameters were found to be most sensitive to changes in bulk conductivity, while effective flowpath parameters were most sensitive to changes in fluid conductivity. Observed non-linear hysteresis

  15. Spatial resolution of gas hydrate and permeability changes from ERT data in LARS simulating the Mallik gas hydrate production test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Thaler, Jan; Spangenberg, Erik; Schicks, Judith M.; Abendroth, Sven

    2014-05-01

    The German gas hydrate project SUGAR studies innovative methods and approaches to be applied in the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs. To enable laboratory studies in pilot scale, a large reservoir simulator (LARS) was realized allowing for the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions. LARS is equipped with a series of sensors. This includes a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) array composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each. The high-resolution ERT array is used to monitor the spatial distribution of the electrical resistivity during hydrate formation and dissociation experiments over time. As the present phases of poorly conducting sediment, well conducting pore fluid, non-conducting hydrates, and isolating free gas cover a wide range of electrical properties, ERT measurements enable us to monitor the spatial distribution of these phases during the experiments. In order to investigate the hydrate dissociation and the resulting fluid flow, we simulated a hydrate production test in LARS that was based on the Mallik gas hydrate production test (see abstract Heeschen et al., this volume). At first, a hydrate phase was produced from methane saturated saline water. During the two months of gas hydrate production we measured the electrical properties within the sediment sample every four hours. These data were used to establish a routine estimating both the local degrees of hydrate saturation and the resulting local permeabilities in the sediment's pore space from the measured resistivity data. The final gas hydrate saturation filled 89.5% of the total pore space. During hydrate dissociation, ERT data do not allow for a quantitative determination of free gas and remaining gas hydrates since both phases are electrically isolating. However, changes are resolved in the spatial distribution of the conducting liquid and the isolating phase with gas being the only mobile isolating phase

  16. Multispectral scanner (MSS), ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arlauskas, J.

    1973-01-01

    The multispectral scanner onboard ERTS-A spacecraft provides simultaneous images in three visible bands and one near infrared band. The instrument employs fiber optics to transfer optical images to the detectors and photomultiplier tubes. Detector outputs are digitized and multiplexed for transmission from the spacecraft by analog to digital processor.

  17. ERTS-1 anomalous dark patches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Through combined use of imagery from ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 satellites was found that when the sun elevation exceeds 55 degrees, the ERTS-1 imagery is subject to considerable contamination by sunlight even though the actual specular point is nearly 300 nautical miles from nadir. Based on sea surface wave slope information, a wind speed of 10 knots will theoretically provide approximately 0.5 percent incident solar reflectance under observed ERTS multispectral scanner detectors. This reflectance nearly doubles under the influence of a 20 knot wind. The most pronounced effect occurs in areas of calm water where anomalous dark patches are observed. Calm water at distances from the specular point found in ERTS scenes will reflect no solar energy to the multispectral scanner, making these regions stand out as dark areas in all bands in an ocean scene otherwise comprosed by a general diffuse sunlight from rougher ocean surfaces. Anomalous dark patches in the outer parts of the glitter zones may explain the unusual appearance of some scenes.

  18. ERTS-1 system performance overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boeckel, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    The ERTS-1 spacecraft had a life of one year as a design goal. At the end of one year, the spacecraft was still providing about 130 scenes per day in multispectral images having resolution and radiometric accuracy better than prelaunch predictions.

  19. Application of ensemble-based methods for assimilating 4D ERT data at the groundwater-river water interaction zone based on a coupled hydrogeophysical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Johnson, T.; Hammond, G. E.; Zachara, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    Dynamic groundwater-river water exchange between the Columbia River and the Hanford 300 Area has substantial influence on flow and transport processes and biogeochemical cycles at the site. Existing research efforts have shown that the groundwater-river water interaction zone is a heterogeneous and highly dynamic region exhibiting variability over a range of space and time scales. Since it is insufficient to rely on well-based information to characterize the spatially variable subsurface properties within this interaction zone, we have installed a large-scale (300 m by 300 m) 3-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) array to monitor river water intrusion and retreat at a temporal resolution of four images per day, using a novel time lapse ERT imaging methodology that explicitly accommodates the sharp, transient bulk conductivity contrast at the water table. The 4-dimensional electrical geophysical data is incorporated into ensemble-based data assimilation algorithms (e.g., ensemble Kalman filter and ensemble smoother) to statistically estimate the heterogeneous permeability field at the groundwater-river water interaction zone, which is critical for modeling flow and biogeochemical transport processes at the site. A new high performance computing capability has been developed to couple the ERT imaging code E4D (Johnson et al., 2010) with the site-scale flow and transport code, PFLOTRAN (Hammond et al., 2012), which serves as the forward simulator of the hydrogeophysical data assimilation. The joint, parallel, multi-physics code is able to simulate well-based pressure and pore-fluid conductivity measurements, as well as spatially continuous ERT measurements collected throughout the experiment. The data assimilation framework integrates both the well-based point measurements and spatially continuous ERT measurements in a sequential Bayesian manner. Our study demonstrates the effectiveness of ERT data for large-scale characterization of subsurface

  20. Focusing Sources on Induced Polarization and Electrical Resistivity Method Applied to Soil Pollution Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, A.; Lopez, A.; Induced Polarization Team

    2013-05-01

    In recent years the problems of soil contamination have been increasing and geophysical methods, particularly electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) have struggled to find and monitor cases of contamination. Moreover, Induced Polarization (IP) has shown promise in mapping contaminant plumes, although both techniques (ERT and IP) have problems like noise, inductive coupling, effects of electrodes, etc. limiting the precision and accuracy of the data. To overcome these problems, this paper introduces a novel technique of focusing sources. This technique reduces the effects of adjacent vertical formations and contacts due to the flowing of current in a vertical way at the zone where the electrode potentials have been deployed. This fact allows obtaining cleaner data of ERT and IP. In order to introduce the proposed technique a vertical contact synthetic model is studied and after to a cultivar area in Hidalgo State, México which presents different types of

  1. Pattern-Based Application of ERT to Soil Water for Plant Use (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    Traditional indices of soil water for support of plant growth, developed primarily for conventional agriculture as practiced through most of the 20th century, are based on concepts such as available water, field capacity, and wilting point, and require knowledge of soil water content and matric pressure. Much earth science today requires different or more detailed characterizations. Natural ecosystems, for example, concern (1) a multiplicity of species, (2) spatial variability as a primary characteristic of interest, and (3) wide-ranging time scales from minutes to decades. This and other expanding fields, such as precision agriculture, require discernment of patterns over sizeable scales yet with fine resolution. Established techniques for measuring soil moisture are generally poor for distinguishing spatial patterns. Installation of a huge number of probes for high-resolution pattern discernment is generally prohibitive in terms of both cost and system disturbance. Geophysical techniques such as electrical resistance tomography (ERT) have major advantages, being noninvasive and spatially continuous, but are seriously limited for accurate quantification of soil water. Besides the inherent difficulties of data inversion, calculations of water content from ERT resistivities rely on calibrations that are highly approximate at best and that generally fail to account for the frequently overwhelming influence of soil spatial heterogeneity. Much may be gained from plant-relevant interpretations of ERT-derived information that depend more on spatial and temporal patterns than on quantitative calibration. For example the water-supplying suitability of the particular volume of soil in which a plant is rooted depends not only on properties within that particular volume, but also on its relation to neighboring soil. Such features as impeding layers, preferential flow paths, and lateral spatial variations seriously influence soil moisture over small and large scales. ERT

  2. Mapping of near surface fold structures with GPR and ERT near Steinbrunn (Northern Burgenland, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, Ingrid; Chwatal, Werner; Häusler, Hermann; Scheibz, Jürgen; Steirer, Fritz

    2014-05-01

    In the transition zone between the southern Vienna Basin and the Eisenstadt basin, close to Wr. Neustadt, spectacular fold structures are exposed in the former sand pit of Steinbrunn. The succession of Upper Pannonian age consists of decimetre to meter thick sandy, silty and clayey beds, which are overlain by sandstone beds (Grundtner et al., 2009). The anticline and syncline structures were interpreted as of gravitational origin by Exner et al. (2009), and reinterpreted as of tectonic origin by Häusler (2012a). In order to gain a more detailed insight to the three dimensional distribution and orientation of the folds high resolution geophysics such as electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and electromagnetics (EM) were applied to map the surroundings of the sandpit. The ERT- and EM-profiles show that the uppermost layer is more clayey northwest and sandier southeast of the sandpit. This is important for the GPR because clay attenuates the radar signals and therefore no clear layering of the subsurface could be mapped in these areas. In order to directly compare ERT and GPR results with the lithology of the fold structures observed in the sandpit, a reference profile on top of the 140 m long wall of the sandpit was performed. Both methods clearly reveal fold structures paralleling the folded Pannonian strata of the outcrop. While the GPR data displays boundaries and their geometry in the succession, the resistivities in the ERT portrays a more smoothened image of the observed fold structure. In almost all GPR profiles wavelike structures are visible with axes in northern direction and dome-shaped structures with axes in eastern direction, deepening towards the west. In conclusion this pattern is comparable to sections of rounded buckle folds. Although there are clayey areas wave-like and dome-like reflections can be followed in the GPR profiles over a distance of several hundred meters. This is confirmed by the ERT profiles

  3. Soil-plant-atmosphere water balance via time-lapse 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Eddy covariance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, J.; Consoli, S.; Papa, R.; Cassiani, G.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere (SPA) is a key component for the characterization of the critical zone, housing a number of important mechanisms controlling hydrology, biota and climate. This understanding requires reliable methods for the quantification of these mass and energy exchanges encompassing possibly all three major components, i.e. soil, plants and atmosphere. In this work we present an attempt to characterize jointly the soil state changes and the energy and mass fluxes above a heterogeneous canopy, both mediated by the plant activity from roots to foliage. The experiments have been conducted within an orange orchard located in Eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, has been characterized using a time-lapse non-invasive 3D micro-electrical tomography (ERT) setup. We designed, built and installed a 3D electrical tomography apparatus consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, as well as laboratory characterization of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. The results demonstrate that 3D micro-ERT is capable of characterizing subsoil conditions and monitoring root zone activities, especially in terms of root zone suction regions. In terms of energy and mass fluxes, we used the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique to directly measure both the sensible and latent heat fluxes exchanged between the plant-atmosphere continuum. The EC method was integrated with the surface energy balance of the SPA system. The joint availability of state changes and fluxes allows for a quantitative analysis of mass balance in the soil-plant-atmosphere system. The

  4. DC Resistivity Studies of Shallow Geology in the Vicinity of Vistula River Flood Bank in Czernichów Village (Near Kraków in Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościcki, Włodzimierz Jerzy; Bania, Grzegorz; Ćwiklik, Michał; Borecka, Aleksandra

    2014-03-01

    DC resistivity methods, soundings and Electrical Resistivity Tomography, were applied to study shallow geology in the place of planned construction of an experimental flood bank. The geoelectrical surveys provided quantitative information about the spatial presence of the various geoelectrical/geological layers: alluvial soils, sands, gravels and clays. ERT allowed maps to be constructed showing subsurface structure. A combination of geoelectrical and geological information resulted in a much better identification of the geological structure.

  5. Pseudocolor transformation of ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. V.; Merifield, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    One of the photographic techniques which shows great promise as an aid in interpreting ERTS imagery is pseudocolor transformation. It is a process where each shade of gray in an original black-and-white image is seen as a different color in the transformation. The well known ERTS-1 MSS image of the Monterey Bay-San Francisco area was transformed using a technique which requires only two intermediate separations. Possible faults were delineated on an overlay of the transformation before referring to geologic maps. The results were quite remarkable in that all large active or recently active faults shown on the latest geologic map of California were interpreted from the image for all, or much, of their length. Perhaps the most interesting result was the Reliz fault. The fault is shown as covered; however, a lineation corresponding to the position of the fault is visible on the image. The usefulness of ERTS image in identifying recently active faults is demonstrable. Although the faults are also visible in the unenhanced image, they are clearly accentuated and more easily mapped on the pseudocolor transformation.

  6. Dissolution rates of subsoil limestone in a doline on the Akiyoshi-dai Plateau, Japan: An approach from a weathering experiment, hydrological observations, and electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akiyama, Sanae; Hattanji, Tsuyoshi; Matsushi, Yuki; Matsukura, Yukinori

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at estimating the controlling factors for the denudation rates of limestone, which often forms solution dolines on karst tablelands. Our approaches include (1) electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) to reveal shallow subsurface structures and hydrological settings, (2) automated monitoring of volumetric water content in soil profiles and manual measurements of subsurface CO2 concentrations and soil water chemistry, and (3) a field weathering experiment using limestone tablets with the micro-weight loss technique for determining current denudation rates. The field experiment and monitoring were carried out over 768 days from 2009-2011 at four sites with varying topographic and hydrological conditions along the sideslope of a doline on the Akiyoshi-dai karst plateau in SW-Japan. The installation depths of the limestone tablets were 15 cm or 50 cm below the slope surface. The soil moisture conditions varied site by site. Water-saturated conditions continued for 40-50% of the whole experimental period at 50-cm depth of upper and middle sites, while only 0-10% of the experimental period was water-saturated at the other sites. Chemical analysis revealed that the soil water was chemically unsaturated with calcite for all the sites. Spatial differences in concentrations of CO2 in soil pore air were statistically less significant. The denudation rates of the buried limestone tablets were 17.7-21.9 mg cm- 2 a- 1 at the upper and middle slopes, where the soil was water-saturated for a long time after precipitation. The lowest denudation of 3.9 mg cm- 2 a- 1 was observed on lower slopes where soil was not capable of maintaining water at a near saturation level even after precipitation. Statistical analysis revealed that the denudation rates of the tablets were strongly controlled by the duration for which soil pores were saturated by water (the conditions defined here are degrees of water saturation greater than 97%). Electrical resistivity tomography

  7. 3D monitoring of hydrate formation and dissociation using a cylindrical ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, Mike; Spangenberg, Erik; Thaler, Jan; Schicks, Judith M.; Reichardt, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the SUGAR-project (submarine gas hydrate reservoirs) innovative methods and approaches for the production of methane from hydrate-bearing reservoirs are studied. For this purpose a large reservoir simulator (LARS), allowing the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates under simulated in-situ conditions, was realized. Prior experiments within the LARS suggested higher hydrate formation rates in the boundary regions within the cylindrical reservoir, which is in agreement to the observed temperature distribution in the sediment sample. However, for improvement and validation of numerical reservoir modeling a sufficient quantitative understanding of the spatial distribution of hydrate formation and dissociation with respect to time is required. Since hydrate can be considered as an insulator, the resistivity in the reservoir will change with hydrate saturation. Thus, significant differences regarding the electrical properties within the investigated reservoir are expected and suggest the application of an electrical tomographic system. Tomographic measurements constitute a popular technique for high resolution imaging of various geometries. Therefore, a cylindrical electrical resistance tomography (ERT) composed of 25 electrode rings featuring 15 electrodes each, is implemented into the LARS. In advance, a number of numerical simulations has been carried out to optimize the electrode arrangement providing the best resolution for the resistivity tomography. As the present phases (sediment, liquid, hydrates, and gas) cover a wide range of electrical properties, the ERT allows the monitoring of the spatial distribution of the various phases during the experiments. These data serve as basis for numerical simulations of production scenarios in the LARS and the field. At a confining pressure of 12 - 15 MPa and a pore pressure of 8 - 11 MPa hydrate is formed at 278 K from methane-saturated water (no free gas phase) within the sediment sample until a

  8. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography.

    PubMed

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E; Gamey, T Jeffrey; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-01-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies. PMID:15819938

  9. Plume and lithologic profiling with surface resistivity and seismic tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, David B; Doll, William E.; Gamey, Jeff; Sheehan, Jacob R; Jardine, Philip M

    2005-03-01

    Improved surface-based geophysical technologies that are commercially available provide a new level of detail that can be used to guide ground water remediation. Surface-based multielectrode resistivity methods and tomographic seismic refraction techniques were used to image to a depth of approximately 30 m below the surface at the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research Field Research Center. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the research center on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to conduct in situ field-scale studies on bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Bioremediation studies are being conducted on the saprolite, shale bedrock, and ground water at the site that have been contaminated with nitrate, uranium, technetium, tetrachloroethylene, and other contaminants (U.S. DOE 1997). Geophysical methods were effective in imaging the high-ionic strength plume and in defining the transition zone between saprolite and bedrock zones that appears to have a significant influence on contaminant transport. The geophysical data were used to help select the location and depth of investigation for field research plots. Drilling, borehole geophysics, and ground water sampling were used to verify the surface geophysical studies.

  10. Cross-section electrical resistance tomography of La Soufrière of Guadeloupe lava dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Gibert, Dominique; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Adler, Andy

    2014-06-01

    The electrical resistivity distribution at the base of La Soufrière of Guadeloupe lava dome is reconstructed by using transmission electrical resistivity data obtained by injecting an electrical current between two electrodes located on opposite sides of the volcano. Several pairs of injection electrodes are used in order to constitute a data set spanning the whole range of azimuths, and the electrical potential is measured along a cable covering an angular sector of ≈120° along the basis of the dome. The data are inverted to perform a slice electrical resistivity tomography (SERT) with specific functions implemented in the EIDORS open source package dedicated to electrical impedance tomography applied to medicine and geophysics. The resulting image shows the presence of highly conductive regions separated by resistive ridges. The conductive regions correspond to unconsolidated material saturated by hydrothermal fluids. Two of them are associated with partial flank collapses and may represent large reservoirs that could have played an important role during past eruptive events. The resistive ridges may represent massive andesite and are expected to constitute hydraulic barriers.

  11. ERTS-1 applications to California resource inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colwell, R. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. ERTS-1 information will be utilized by resource management groups working in the fields of forestry, hydrology, range management, and agriculture to develop resource inventories of the state of California. Five examples are given of the use of ERTS-1 imagery and aerial photography in identifying different crops and field conditions.

  12. Understanding leachate flow in municipal solid waste landfills by combining time-lapse ERT and subsurface flow modelling - Part I: Analysis of infiltration shape on two different waste deposit cells.

    PubMed

    Audebert, M; Clément, R; Moreau, S; Duquennoi, C; Loisel, S; Touze-Foltz, N

    2016-09-01

    Landfill bioreactors are based on an acceleration of in-situ waste biodegradation by performing leachate recirculation. To quantify the water content and to evaluate the leachate injection system, in-situ methods are required to obtain spatially distributed information, usually electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). In a previous study, the MICS (multiple inversions and clustering strategy) methodology was proposed to improve the hydrodynamic interpretation of ERT results by a precise delimitation of the infiltration area. In this study, MICS was applied on two ERT time-lapse data sets recorded on different waste deposit cells in order to compare the hydrodynamic behaviour of leachate flow between the two cells. This comparison is based on an analysis of: (i) the volume of wetted waste assessed by MICS and the wetting rate, (ii) the infiltration shapes and (iii) the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This paper shows that leachate hydrodynamic behaviour is comparable from one waste deposit cell to another with: (i) a high leachate infiltration speed at the beginning of the infiltration, which decreases with time, (ii) a horizontal anisotropy of the leachate infiltration shape and (iii) a very small fraction of the pore volume used by the leachate flow. This hydrodynamic information derived from MICS results can be useful for subsurface flow modelling used to predict leachate flow at the landfill scale. PMID:27103399

  13. Towards an operational ERTS - requirements for implementing cartographic applications of an operational ERTS type satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvocoresses, A. P.

    1974-01-01

    After nearly 18 months of successful operation of the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1), a careful look at the future in order. Judging from the results of ERTS-1 experiments, public sales of ERTS-1 products and overall worldwide response it is believed that ERTS-1 has demonstrated an earth sensing mode that should become operational. It is recognized that several studies leading to the definition of an operational ERTS have been made. However cartographic requirements are generally more basic and demanding than those of the earth science disciplines and are therefore treated separately in this report. One assumption made is that the configuration of ERTS, particularly with respect to the multispectral scanner and data transmission rates cannot be materially altered.

  14. Digital registration of ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonrud, L. O.; Henrikson, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Two requirements for the registration of Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) data are discussed. These requirements are registration of ERTS data acquired on separate passes and registration of ERTS data to a ground reference. Performances of a semi-automatic warp algorithm and an automatic pipeline processing algorithm demonstrate that either procedure is useful, depending upon the user's requirements. In two cases where the time lapse between passes of the satellite were 90 days and 18 days the automatic pipeline processor reduced the mean radial registration error to 0.28 and 0.58 pixel, respectively. It is concluded that this technique is promissing for high-volume production processing.

  15. A step towards temperature-referenced ERT: Laboratory-calibrated ERT of seasonal changes in permafrost rock walls at the Zugspitze (German/Austrian Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautblatter, M.; Verleysdonk, S.; Flores-Orozco, A.; Kemna, A.

    2009-04-01

    High-resolution ERT with 127 electrodes and on average 1550 datum points was conducted in a 276 m long gallery along the permafrost-affected north face of the Zugspitze in 2800 m a.s.l. in Februray, May, June, July, August, September and October 2007. Inversion was performed in a 8400 finite element grid with adjusted boundary conditions. To receive quantitatively reliable ERT values, we fitted a smoothness-constrained Occam's inversion to an empirically measured normal-reciprocal error model. Water-saturated dolomised Wetterstein limestone was measured in the laboratory to freeze at 30 (±3) kohmm at -0.5 (±0.1) °C, independent of initial or refreezing paths. Resistivity of unfrozen limestones increases by less than 104 ohmm/°C. According to laboratory values, temperature referencing of ERT below -0.5 °C could be described by p [in kohmm] = 19 - 19.3 (±2.1) * t [in C°] with an R² of 0.99. A comparison of the absolute ERT plots and monthly changes is consistent with the temporal changes of air temperature and rock temperature data. Maximum resistivity changes (30 kohmm ≈ lab analogue +1.5°C warming) in depths up to 27 m occur coincidently to maximum measured cleftwater flow in May. Differences in snow coverage seem to dominate the general distribution of permafrost and the timing of thaw in the rock wall transect. Refreezing from the rock wall starts in September is apparent in both, resistivity changes and expansion of the high-resistivity body. Error-controlled inversion and temperature calibration in the laboratory present the first approach towards quantitative temperature-referenced ERT in permafrost rocks.

  16. Anisotropic resistivity tomography: A model study for characterization of fractured rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Yutaka

    1994-12-31

    Since fractured rocks often exhibit anisotropy with respect to hydraulic conductivity, it is expected that anisotropy may play an important factor in describing their electrical properties. Based upon this observation, numerical experiments have been carried out to determine whether anisotropic resistivity tomography can be used for characterization of fractured rocks. In fractured rock masses, the conventional 2-D inversion in which anisotropy is ignored produces peculiar distortions of the resistivity distribution. In contrast, the inversion accounting for anisotropy reconstructs anisotropic background media, as well as conductive anomalies associated with the zones of concentrated fracturing. It is also found that the fracture planes inclined with respect to the strike direction may have no significant effects on 2-D inversion if the angle is within about 20{degree}.

  17. Tank leak detection using electrical resistance methods

    SciTech Connect

    Ramirez, A.; Daily, W.; Binley, A.; LaBrecque, D.

    1996-01-01

    Large volumes of hazardous liquids and high-level radioactive wastes are stored worldwide in surface and underground tanks. Frequently these tanks are found to leak, thereby resulting in not only a loss of stored inventory, but in contamination to soils and groundwater. It is important to develop a reliable method of detecting leaks before large quantities are emitted into the environment surround the tanks. Two field experiments were performed to evaluate the performance of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) as a leak detection method under metal underground storage tanks (UST). This paper provides a summary of the field experiments performed under a 15 m diameter steel tank mockup located at the Hanford Reservation.

  18. Assessment of borehole resistivity tomography for subsurface CO2 leakage : Lab-scale study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, E.; Son, J.; Jung, H.; Santamarina, C.

    2011-12-01

    The geological sequestration of carbon dioxide CO2 to reduce greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere faces difficulties related to non-homogeneous underground conditions, poorly characterized interconnected geo- systems, and complex hydro-chemo-mechanical effects that involve the reservoir rock and caprock mineralogy, the saturating fluid, and the injected fluid. Given these uncertainties, extensive monitoring of CO2 injection projects is required. We developed a unique laboratory facility for the direct observation of subsurface CO2 leakage evolution. A thin transparent tank (WxHxD=30cmx60cmx2.6cm, gap=0.15cm) is filled with different sizes of glass-beads to form controlled layered stratigraphies; then the medium is saturated with water mixed with a universal pH indicator. The flow-controlled injection of CO2 is carefully controlled using pressure transducers, and time-lapse photography permits capturing the evolution of gas invasion and diffusion. Subsequent image analyses permit extracting flow paths, displacements, invaded volume, pH and density contours of carbonated water. These coupled phenomena and situation changes are monitored using borehole resistivity tomography concept. Results show the nature of CO2 gas migration in the near surface, the effect of fine-grained layers such as the cap-rock, sediment drying, water acidification near conduits and subsequent diffusion, the convection of carbonated water, and the of feasibility borehole resistivity tomography for the detection of CO2 leakage.

  19. Crop identification using ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, M. L.; Heilman, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    Digital analysis of August 15 ERTS-I imagery for southeastern South Dakota was performed to determine the feasibility of conducting crop surveys from satellites. Selected areas of bands 4, 5, 6, and 7 positive transparencies were converted to digital form utilizing Signal Analysis and Dissemination Equipment (SADE). The optical transmission values were printed out in a spatial format. Visual analysis of the printouts indicated that cultivated areas were readily distinguished from non-cultivated areas in all four bands. Bare soil was easily recognized in all four bands. Corn and soybeans, the two major crops in the area, were treated as separate classes rather than as a single class called row crops. Bands 6 and 7 provided good results in distinguishing between corn and soybeans.

  20. High resolution 3D ERT to help GPR data interpretation for researching archaeological items in a geologically complex subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, S.; Leucci, G.; Mazzone, F.

    2008-09-01

    Muro Leccese (Lecce) contains one the most important Messapian archaeological sites in southern Italy. The archaeological interest of the site arises from the discovery of the remains of Messapian walls, tombs, roads, etc. (4th-2nd centuries BC) in the neighbourhood. The archaeological remains were found at about 0.3 m depth. At present the site belongs to the municipality, which intends to build a new sewer network through it. The risk of destroying potentially interesting ancient archaeological structures during the works prompted an archaeological survey of the area. The relatively large dimensions of the area (almost 10,000 m 2), together with time and cost constraints, made it necessary to use geophysical investigations as a faster means to ascertain the presence of archaeological items. Since the most important targets were expected to be located at a soil depth of about 0.3 m, a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) survey was carried out in an area located near the archaeological excavations. Unfortunately the geological complexity did not allow an easy interpretation of the GPR data. Therefore a 3D electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) scan was conducted in order to resolve these interpretation problems. A three-way comparison of the results of the dense ERT measurements parallel to the x axis, the results of the measurements parallel to the y axis and the combined results was performed. Subsequently the synthetic model approach was used to provide a better characterization of the resistivity anomalies visible on the ERT field data. The 3D inversion results clearly illustrate the capability to resolve in view of quality 3D structures of archaeological interest. According to the presented data the inversion models along one direction ( x or y) seems to be adequate in reconstructing the subsurface structures. Naturally field data produce good quality reconstructions of the archaeological features only if the x-line and y-line measurements are considered together

  1. Sinkhole risk assessment by ERT: The case study of Sirino Lake (Basilicata, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giampaolo, V.; Capozzoli, L.; Grimaldi, S.; Rizzo, E.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of natural or artificial lakes and reservoirs that can drain because of natural phenomena can generate catastrophic events affecting urban and agricultural areas next to the source area. Therefore, geophysical prospecting techniques have been applied in the study of Sirino Lake, which, during the last century, was affected by the sudden opening of small sinkholes, resulting in the almost total draining of the lake and in the sudden increase of water flow rates of distal springs. Two electrical resistivity tomographies (ERTs) were carried out across the lake, using electrode arrays located on land and across the water body. Self-potential (SP) data were acquired around the lake shore and the surrounding area. The geophysical prospecting contributed significant data toward explaining the unique hydrogeological characteristics of the lake. Integration of geophysical, geological, hydrogeological, and geomorphological data allowed us to estimate the thickness of the lacustrine deposits beneath the lake, to describe the main patterns of the subsurface fluid flows in the area, and to identify possible water escape routes causing the piping phenomena.

  2. GPR to constrain ERT data inversion in cavity searching: Theoretical and practical applications in archeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlando, Luciana

    2013-02-01

    I used theoretical forward models to show that a cavity embedded in a stratified sedimentary sequence can induce an equivalence problem in the ERT data inversion. Conductive top soil increases the misfit between the ground feature and the ERT model. The misfit depends on array and stratigraphy sequences. The latter induce an equivalence problem that manifests itself as wrong cavity depth positioning. The misfit is greater in the data acquired with Schlumberger array than with dipole-dipole. The ambiguity of ERT data inversion problems was tested in the detection of cavities linked to an 8th-6th century B.C. Sabine tomb, 3 m wide × 3 m long × 2 m high, excavated from a shaly gray volcanic ash (cinerite) layer covered by semi-lithoid tuff and top soil layers. In the real study I reduced the ambiguity in the inverse problem of ERT data using a priori information on geometry and resistivity of the cavity. The constrains were carried out from georadar data acquired with 80 and 200 MHz antenna. I demonstrate that this procedure has a practical application in cavity detection, and is a key to the reduction of the uncertainty inherent in the inversion process of ERT data.

  3. Parallel inversion of a massive ERT data set to characterize deep vadose zone contamination beneath former nuclear waste infiltration galleries at the Hanford Site B-Complex (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.; Rucker, D. F.; Wellman, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford Site, located in south-central Washington, USA, originated in the early 1940's as part of the Manhattan Project and produced plutonium used to build the United States nuclear weapons stockpile. In accordance with accepted industrial practice of that time, a substantial portion of relatively low-activity liquid radioactive waste was disposed of by direct discharge to either surface soil or into near-surface infiltration galleries such as cribs and trenches. This practice was supported by early investigations beginning in the 1940s, including studies by Geological Survey (USGS) experts, whose investigations found vadose zone soils at the site suitable for retaining radionuclides to the extent necessary to protect workers and members of the general public based on the standards of that time. That general disposal practice has long since been discontinued, and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) is now investigating residual contamination at former infiltration galleries as part of its overall environmental management and remediation program. Most of the liquid wastes released into the subsurface were highly ionic and electrically conductive, and therefore present an excellent target for imaging by Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) within the low-conductivity sands and gravels comprising Hanford's vadose zone. In 2006, USDOE commissioned a large scale surface ERT survey to characterize vadose zone contamination beneath the Hanford Site B-Complex, which contained 8 infiltration trenches, 12 cribs, and one tile field. The ERT data were collected in a pole-pole configuration with 18 north-south trending lines, and 18 east-west trending lines ranging from 417m to 816m in length. The final data set consisted of 208,411 measurements collected on 4859 electrodes, covering an area of 600m x 600m. Given the computational demands of inverting this massive data set as a whole, the data were initially inverted in parts with a shared memory inversion code, which

  4. Electrical resistivity characterization and defect detection on a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) on an experimental site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirieix, C.; Fernández Martínez, J. L.; Riss, J.; Genelle, F.

    2013-03-01

    In this paper we analyze the onsite characterization of a geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) that serves to ensure the impermeability of a landfill cap by DC electrical methods. The imaging of the GCL geoelectrical properties is a challenging problem because it is a very thin (between 4 and 7 mm thick) and resistive layer (from 100,000 to 2,000,000 Ω·m) depending on meteorological conditions and aging. We compare results obtained using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) using two different kinds of arrays (dipole-dipole DD and Wenner-Schlumberger) on an experimental site with engineered defects. To confirm these results and to find the real onsite GCL resistivity we have performed sampling of the posterior distribution of this parameter using vertical electrical sounding (VES) inversions. Different VES methods were extracted from ERT with DD array and converted into a Schlumberger array. As a main conclusion the dipole-dipole array provides a better resistivity resolution of the defects than the Wenner-Schlumberger array. On ERT images, the defect detection seems to be impossible if the GCL has very high resistivity, as it happened when it was put in place. Taking into account the equivalence rules, the inversions are in both cases (ERT and VES) compatible. The GCL resistivity estimated from PSO (particle swarm optimization) varies from 3.0 105 to 1.106 Ω·m depending on saturation conditions during the twenty first months of its placing. Then, the resistivity dropped to 4.104-9.104 Ω·m, indicating a probable chemical damage of the GCL due to aging. Finally the fact that the VES inversions are solved via PSO sampling allows for the detection of a very thin and resistive layer and opens the possibility of performing micro VES surveys along the landfill to detect possible GCL defects.

  5. High resolution electrical resistivity tomography of golf course greens irrigated with reclaimed wastewater: Hydrological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Himi, Mahjoub; Gallardo, Helena; Sendrós, Alexandre; Marguí, Eva; Queralt, Ignasi; Casas, Albert

    2014-05-01

    Actually, there are over 300 golf courses and more than three thousand licensed players in Spain. For this reason golf cannot be considered simply a hobby or a sport, but a very significant economic activity. Considered as one of the most rapidly expanding land-use and water demanding business in the Mediterranean, golf course development generates controversy. In the recent years there has been a considerable demand for golf courses to adopt environmentally sustainable strategies and particularly water authorities are forcing by law golf managers to irrigate with alternative water resources, mainly reclaimed wastewater. Watering practices must be based on soil properties that are characterized by samples removed from the different zones of the golf course and submitted to an accredited physical soil testing laboratory. Watering schedules are critical on greens with poor drainage or on greens with excessively high infiltration rates. The geophysical survey was conducted over the greens of the Girona Golf Club. Eighteen electrical resistivity tomographies were acquired using a mixed Wenner-Schlumberger configuration with electrodes placed 0.5 meter apart. Small stainless-steel nails were used as electrodes to avoid any damage in the fine turfgrass of greens The resistivity meter was set for systematically and automatically selects current electrodes and measurement electrodes to sample apparent resistivity values. Particle size analysis (PSA) has been performed on soil materials of any putting green. The PSA analysis has been composed of two distinct phases. The first has been the textural analysis of the soils for determining the content of sand, silt, and clay fraction via the use of a stack of sieves with decreasing sized openings from the top sieve to the bottom. Subsequently, the hydraulic conductivity of the substrates has been evaluated by means of Bredding and Hazen empirical relationships. The results of this research show that the electrical resistivity

  6. Electromagnetic Induction and Electrical Resistivity Tomography Applied to evaluate contamination at a site of disposal of animal wastes from a feedlot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, C. M.; Marquez Molina, J.; Losinno, B.; Urricariet, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    In Argentina, the systems of animal feeding in pens (feedlots) are expanding the production, generating a great quantity of solids and liquid residuals, being a highly risky source of soil and groundwater contamination. The aim of this work was to evaluate the relation between soil bulk conductivity and the distribution of concentrations of nitrates and other potential contaminants of groundwater from animal manure. Shallow electromagnetic induction (EMI) and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) surveys were carried out at a pen of a feedlot at San Pedro , Bs. As. Province , Argentina, where large quantities of manure (3.5 m height) had been placed at the center of them, for a few months of activity. Soil sampling up to 2 m depth was performed for physical and chemical analysis. Wells were drilled for monitoring groundwater level (12 m depth) and water quality. Soil texture was defined as loamy clayey silty. Distribution of electrical conductivity obtained from the two exploration methods was similar, being higher the values at the pen than at the background site, coinciding with laboratory measurements of electrical conductivity of the saturation paste extract. At the center of the pen, bellow the manure accumulation, the highest values of conductivity were found (greater than 120mS/m), decreasing to the surroundings. However, values of N-NO3 in soil were lower at the center of the pen than at the surroundings. Concentration decreases with depth at sites of the pen with high soil compaction. Water content showed a strong influence on values of conductivity. Groundwater values of NO3 concentration do not exceed the level for human consumption although SO4 concentration increases respect to background deeper well.Values of conductivity and N-NO3 were still lower compared with the ones found at another pen with 10 years of use. An EMI survey carried out two years later showed an increase of twice the values of electrical conductivity. We conclude that higher

  7. Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography for Constraining a Hydrogeological Model in a Data Sparse Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S.; Allen, D. M.

    2013-12-01

    Geological and hydrogeological data are often spatially limited in mountainous regions. In these settings, geophysical techniques can be used to constrain hydrogeological models by providing insight into the hydrostratigraphy and the continuity of units in the subsurface. This study we used electrical resistivity tomography coupled with a priori geological data from residential water wells to improve the accuracy and confidence of a hydrogeological model. The study area is situated within the mountainous Cowichan watershed in British Columbia, Canada. Throughout the watershed, unconsolidated deposits of variable thickness overlie bedrock. Based on available water well information, at high elevation, sediment thickness is on the order of a few metres, but within the valley bottom, sediment thickness can be up to 300 m. The unconsolidated deposits are heterogeneous due to a complex depositional environment that was controlled by glacial advances and recessions, most notably during the Fraser Glaciation. Six electrical resistivity transects of various lengths spanning 135 to 830 metres were conducted in an area of the watershed that is particularly data poor. The electrical resistivity transects were strategically placed, first, to make use of available lithology information from existing water wells in order to constrain the geophysical interpretation, and second, to contribute data to areas that lack subsurface lithological records. Electrical resistivity was measured using a AGI SuperSting R1 system, and data were processed using robust inversion software to identify stark geophysical contacts. The technique successfully delineated zones of conductive and resistive units that have been interpreted as aquitards (clay and till formations), aquifers (water bearing sand and gravel lenses), and bedrock based on dielectric contrast. Available surficial geology and bedrock geology maps, coupled with residential well drilling records, further assisted in mapping the

  8. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOEpatents

    Berryman, James G.; Daily, William D.; Ramirez, Abelardo L.; Roberts, Jeffery J.

    2000-01-01

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  9. Model Stacking (MOST) technique applied in cross-hole ERT field data for the detection of Thessaloniki ancient walls' depth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontarakis, Konstantinos; Apostolopoulos, George V.

    2013-06-01

    A cross-hole Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) study was undertaken near the center of Thessaloniki in order to detect the depth of the existing city walls in the planned route of the new city underground train. This cross-hole setup was used for a study of measurements with various electrode arrays in real urban field conditions to evaluate the resolution of the models which is produced by each array and the reliability of the models which is produced by the newly published "MOST" technique. The pole-tripole array (C2-C1P1P2) produces high resolution models, even when only borehole electrodes are used. The bipole-bipole C1C2-P1P2 array, when used for cross-hole measurements only, produces higher resolution models compared to the C1P1-C2P2 array, even with a lower signal-to-noise ratio, which can result in extremely high RMS error, when noise, systematic or not, must be faced. The models of both arrays are greatly improved by the use of surface electrodes. The pole-bipole array (C1-P1P2) is proved to be less accurate in imaging and quite unstable to the noisy urban environment and to systematic errors. Furthermore, the Model Stacking (MOST) interpretation technique leads to better results with models of greater resolution and fewer artifacts compared even with the combined data inversion. Finally, the ERT cross-hole analysis has been reliable in detecting the city walls.

  10. Three-dimensional anisotropic inversion of resistivity tomography data in an abandoned mine area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Son, Jeong-Sul

    2011-02-01

    We have developed an inversion code for three-dimensional (3D) resistivity tomography including the anisotropy effect. The algorithm is based on the finite element approximations for the forward modelling and Active Constraint Balancing method is adopted to enhance the resolving power of the smoothness constraint least-squares inversion. Using numerical experiments, we have shown that anisotropic inversion is viable to get an accurate image of the subsurface when the subsurface shows strong electrical anisotropy. Moreover, anisotropy can be used as additional information in the interpretation of subsurface. This algorithm was also applied to the field dataset acquired in the abandoned old mine area, where a high-rise apartment block has been built up over a mining tunnel. The main purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the safety analysis of the building due to old mining activities. Strong electrical anisotropy has been observed and it was proven to be caused by geological setting of the site. To handle the anisotropy problem, field data were inverted by a 3D anisotropic tomography algorithm and we could obtain 3D subsurface images, which matches well with geology mapping observations. The inversion results have been used to provide the subsurface model for the safety analysis in rock engineering and we could assure the residents that the apartment has no problem in its safety after the completion of investigation works.

  11. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

    2011-12-01

    This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

  12. ERTS imagery for ground-water investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Gerald K.; Deutsch, Morris

    1975-01-01

    ERTS imagery offers the first opportunity to apply moderately high-resolution satellite data to the nationwide study of water resources. This imagery is both a tool and a form of basic data. Like other tools and basic data, it should be considered for use in ground-water investigations. The main advantage of its use will be to reduce the need for field work. In addition, however, broad regional features may be seen easily on ERTS imagery, whereas they would be difficult or impossible to see on the ground or on low-altitude aerial photographs. Some present and potential uses of ERTS imagery are to locate new aquifers, to study aquifer recharge and discharge, to estimate ground-water pumpage for irrigation, to predict the location and type of aquifer management problems, and to locate and monitor strip mines which commonly are sources for acid mine drainage. In many cases, boundaries which are gradational on the ground appear to be sharp on ERTS imagery. Initial results indicate that the accuracy of maps produced from ERTS imagery is completely adequate for some purposes.

  13. Laboratory study of the cross-hole resistivity tomography: The Model Stacking (MOST) Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leontarakis, Konstantinos; Apostolopoulos, George V.

    2012-05-01

    Model experiments in the laboratory are used to find the optimal measuring and interpretation parameters that affect the quality of the results for the improved application of resistivity tomography between boreholes or between the surface and a tunnel. The experiments have shown that the detection ability of each crosshole electrode array is different and depends on the form of the sensitivity pattern. The bipole-bipole array, with current and potential pairs in different boreholes, has quite low signal and very good resolution of confined bodies in homogeneous half-spaces, but the resolution decreases as the half-space becomes more complex. The bipole-bipole array with the electrodes of each bipole in different boreholes produces a stronger signal, causing the models to be greatly influenced, even by the presence of small targets. However, the resolution quality is poor, mainly in the middle of the area between the boreholes. Pole-bipole array shows good resolution of the targets detection, but it is less accurate when conditions become noisier. The pole-tripole array has the best resolution, even when the environment becomes more complex or noisier, but the produced models have also many artifacts. The combined arrays' data inversion yields the greatest influence of the targets on resistivity models, usually with very good positioning or shape resolution, but with many more intense artifacts, since this method inevitably combines the advantages and disadvantages of each array. A new approach to improve the quality of resistivity models has been developed, based on a stacking technique, through the processing of different arrays' inverted models ("MOST" technique). The improvement of the MOST models' quality has been measured, comparing each final resistivity model with the corresponding real one, highlighting this way the efficiency of this technique, in contrary to the combined arrays' data inversion.

  14. Three-dimensional spatial and temporal monitoring of soil water content using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qi You; Shimada, Jun; Sato, Akira

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a noninvasive method for monitoring three-dimensional (3-D) spatial and temporal variations of soil water content in the field, soil moisture tomography. The basic idea of the method originates from Archie's relationship between soil resistivity and water content. Initially, 88 electrodes were densely buried within a 3.5 m×3.5 m square area, and potentials at the electrodes were measured by pole-pole and Wenner array methods at given time intervals. An inversion calculation of the 3-D soil resistivity was then conducted based on these potential data. Next, 46 soil samples were taken at representative positions in the square, and the parameters in the Archie's relationship were measured in the laboratory. Then, the 3-D distributions of the parameters were obtained by a distance weight interpolation method. Finally, based on Archie's relationship and the 3-D distribution of the soil resistivity and the related parameters, 3-D distributions of soil water content were calculated. To evaluate the obtained water content, the calculated water contents were compared with those measured by heat-probe-type soil moisture sensors, and a comparison between the spatial distribution patterns of calculated water content and soil bulk dry density was conducted. The 3-D variations of the calculated water content during a rainfall event were also analyzed. The results show that there are ±0.10 cm3/cm3 errors in the calculated water content, but between the calculated and the measured water content there exists a good linear relationship. It is possible to use the calculated water content to analyze the very general 3-D distribution characteristics of the soil moisture and investigate the 3-D rainfall infiltration process, the redistribution of soil water after rain, and other hydrological processes in the field. The proposed method is preferred for porous media where the water resistivity is relatively stable.

  15. Preferential upward flow in soils: A 3D comparison of modeled and ERT-derived data from a salt tracer experiment under evaporation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtold, Michel; Vanderborght, Jan; Herbst, Michael; Weihermueller, Lutz; Kasteel, Roy; Ippisch, Olaf; Guenther, Thomas; Vereecken, Harry

    2010-05-01

    Upward water flow induced by evaporation or groundwater level rise can cause soil salinization and transport of contaminants to the soil surface. A limitation for the prediction of upward transport using numerical models might be an incomplete process description of this transport within the models, especially under consideration of heterogeneous structures. In contrast to infiltration conditions, few experimental datasets of transport under upward flow conditions that can be used to test existing models exist. Therefore, we studied upward transport at the pedon-scale in a laboratory soil with a defined heterogeneity and controlled upper and lower boundary conditions. A second aim was the assessment of the potential of Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to image and characterize upward transport and to use these temporal and spatial highly resolved experimental data to validate current model approaches. Using stochastic simulation, we designed a laboratory soil composed of three materials, which represent a correlated indicator field with horizontal and vertical heterogeneity. A salt tracer experiment was performed over 40 days with steady-state upward flow. Constant evaporation conditions were established using an air-conditioning chamber. A constant water level with the tracer solution was imposed at the lower boundary. ERT results showed solute mass flowing upwards along a few preferential pathways and accumulating heterogeneously at the soil surface. Three-dimensional numerical simulations based on Richards' and the convection-dispersion equation satisfactorily described solute transport in the lower part of the soil, whereas closer to the surface larger discrepancies occurred. On the experimental side, uncertainties in the petrophysical relationship and spatial smoothing inherent to the applied Occam-type smoothness constrained geophysical inversion contributed to observed deviations between ERT and model results. Comparing measured with modeled (using

  16. The trophic classification of lakes using ERTS multispectral scanner data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, R. J.; Boland, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Lake classification methods based on the use of ERTS data are described. Preliminary classification results obtained by multispectral and digital image processing techniques indicate satisfactory correlation between ERTS data and EPA-supplied water analysis. Techniques for determining lake trophic levels using ERTS data are examined, and data obtained for 20 lakes are discussed.

  17. Landslide monitoring in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Dong; Hu, Xiang-Yun; Shan, Chun-Ling; Li, Rui-Heng

    2016-03-01

    The dynamic monitoring of landslides in engineering geology has focused on the correlation among landslide stability, rainwater infiltration, and subsurface hydrogeology. However, the understanding of this complicated correlation is still poor and inadequate. Thus, in this study, we investigated a typical landslide in southwestern China via time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) in November 2013 and August 2014. We studied landslide mechanisms based on the spatiotemporal characteristics of surface water infiltration and flow within the landslide body. Combined with borehole data, inverted resistivity models accurately defined the interface between Quaternary sediments and bedrock. Preferential flow pathways attributed to fracture zones and fissures were also delineated. In addition, we found that surface water permeates through these pathways into the slipping mass and drains away as fissure water in the fractured bedrock, probably causing the weakly weathered layer to gradually soften and erode, eventually leading to a landslide. Clearly, TLERT dynamic monitoring can provide precursory information of critical sliding and can be used in landslide stability analysis and prediction.

  18. Distribution-based fuzzy clustering of electrical resistivity tomography images for interface detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, W. O. C.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Oxby, L. S.; Bai, L.

    2014-04-01

    A novel method for the effective identification of bedrock subsurface elevation from electrical resistivity tomography images is described. Identifying subsurface boundaries in the topographic data can be difficult due to smoothness constraints used in inversion, so a statistical population-based approach is used that extends previous work in calculating isoresistivity surfaces. The analysis framework involves a procedure for guiding a clustering approach based on the fuzzy c-means algorithm. An approximation of resistivity distributions, found using kernel density estimation, was utilized as a means of guiding the cluster centroids used to classify data. A fuzzy method was chosen over hard clustering due to uncertainty in hard edges in the topography data, and a measure of clustering uncertainty was identified based on the reciprocal of cluster membership. The algorithm was validated using a direct comparison of known observed bedrock depths at two 3-D survey sites, using real-time GPS information of exposed bedrock by quarrying on one site, and borehole logs at the other. Results show similarly accurate detection as a leading isosurface estimation method, and the proposed algorithm requires significantly less user input and prior site knowledge. Furthermore, the method is effectively dimension-independent and will scale to data of increased spatial dimensions without a significant effect on the runtime. A discussion on the results by automated versus supervised analysis is also presented.

  19. ERTS-1 imagery and native plant distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musick, H. B.; Mcginnies, W.; Haase, E.; Lepley, L. K.

    1974-01-01

    A method is developed for using ERTS spectral signature data to determine plant community distribution and phenology without resolving individual plants. An Exotech ERTS radiometer was used near ground level to obtain spectral signatures for a desert plant community, including two shrub species, ground covered with live annuals in April and dead ones in June, and bare ground. It is shown that comparisons of scene types can be made when spectral signatures are expressed as a ratio of red reflectivity to IR reflectivity or when they are plotted as red reflectivity vs. IR reflectivity, in which case the signature clusters of each component are more distinct. A method for correcting and converting the ERTS radiance values to reflectivity values for comparison with ground truth data is appended.

  20. Monitoring the geothermal fluid using time lapse electrical resistivity tomography: The Pisciarelli fumarolic field test site (Campi Flegrei, South Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedele, Alessandro; Giulia Di Giuseppe, Maria; Troiano, Antonio; Somma, Reanto; Caputo, Teresa; Patella, Domenico; Troise, Claudia; De Natale, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Pisciarelli area is a fumarolic field subject to very short time morphological changes. A number of critical problems affect this area, i.e. increase of temperature of the fumaroles above the average background temperature, local seismicity and occurrence of fumaroles mixed with jets of boiling water. The presence of a very shallow aquifer seem to have the control on the behavior and composition of the fumaroles. This fumarolic field is still largely unknown regarding geophysical surveys mainly because of its limited space, surrounded on the eastern side by intense urbanization inside the large Agnano crater (Troiano et al. 2014). Currently is mainly affected by geochemical, thermal and seismic monitoring which may not fully explain the behaviour of fluids surface. Many monitoring or time lapse (TL) applications are discussed in literature (e.g., White, 1994; Daily et al., 1995; Barker and Moore, 1998; Ramirez and Daily, 2001; Carter, 2002; Slater et al., 2002; Singha and Gorelick, 2005; Cassiani et al., 2006; Swarzenski et al., 2006; de Franco et al., 2009). However all these experiments are devoted to the use of the ERT for tracer tests or in contaminant hydrology and are characterized by a short monitoring period due to the complexity and problems of long-time instrument maintenance. We propose and present a first approach of a geophysical monitoring by time lapse electrical resistivity in a fumarolic field. The profiles were acquired in January 2013, in January, March, May, July, September and November 2014 respectively. They cross the Pisciarelli area following approximately the NS direction and were characterized by a 2.5 m electrode spacing and maximum penetration depth of about 20 m. and will supply fundamental evidences on the possible seasonal resistivity fluctuations or if the resistivity changes are indicative of an increase in volcanic gases present in the hydrothermal system.

  1. Diazo Printing of ERTS Color Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Kowalik, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 color composites were made with the help of a Diazo developer and printer. Five single channel, density standards were established, using typical ERTS images, in order to determine exposure time. These standards were used to develop a graph from which the exposure time for any transparency can be estimated. Exposure times varied from 3 to 30 minutes, and clear colored polyester sheets from two manufactures were used with slightly different, but equally successful, results.

  2. ERTS-1 data applied to strip mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, A. T.; Schubert, J.

    1976-01-01

    Two coal basins within the western region of the Potomac River Basin contain the largest strip-mining operations in western Maryland and West Virginia. The disturbed strip-mine areas were delineated along with the surrounding geological and vegetation features by using ERTS-1 data in both analog and digital form. The two digital systems employed were (1) the ERTS analysis system, a point-by-point digital analysis of spectral signatures based on known spectral values and (2) the LARS automatic data processing system. These two systems aided in efforts to determine the extent and state of strip mining in this region. Aircraft data, ground-verification information, and geological field studies also aided in the application of ERTS-1 imagery to perform an integrated analysis that assessed the adverse effects of strip mining. The results indicated that ERTS can both monitor and map the extent of strip mining to determine immediately the acreage affected and to indicate where future reclamation and revegetation may be necessary.

  3. Applicability of ERTS-1 to Montana geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, R. M. (Principal Investigator); Alt, D. D.; Berg, R. A.; Johns, W. M.; Flood, R. E.; Hawley, K. T.; Wackwitz, L. K.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A detailed band 7 ERTS-1 lineament map covering western Montana and northern Idaho has been prepared and is being evaluated by direct comparison with geologic maps, by statistical plots of lineaments and known faults, and by field checking. Lineament patterns apparent in the Idaho and Boulder batholiths do not correspond to any known geologic structures. A band 5 mosaic of Montana and adjacent areas has been laid and a lineament annotation prepared for comparison with the band 7 map. All work to date indicates that ERTS-1 imagery is very useful for revealing patterns of high-angle faults, though much less useful for mapping rock units and patterns of low-angle faults. Large-scale mosaics of U-2 photographs of three test sites have been prepared for annotation and comparison with ERTS-1 maps. Mapping of Quaternary deposits in the Glacial Lake Missoula basin using U-2 color infrared transparencies has been successful resulting in the discovery of some deposits not previously mapped. Detailed work has been done for Test Site 354 D using ERTS-1 imagery; criteria for recognition of several rock types have been found. Photogeologic mapping for southeastern Montana suggest Wasatch deposits where none shown of geologic map.

  4. Water turbidity detection using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 images of two federal reservoirs in Kansas exhibit good correlation with suspended load. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery may prove useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  5. Assessment of contamination by intensive cattle activity through electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sainato, Claudia M.; Losinno, Beatriz N.; Malleville, Horacio J.

    2012-01-01

    The intensive animal production is considered highly risky for groundwater and soil because of high mobility of some contaminants from animal wastes. The aim of this work was to obtain an electrical conductivity image of unsaturated and saturated zones at a feedlot (cattle feeding field) at the surroundings of Buenos Aires city (Argentina) in order to detect the most critical sectors of the field, with regard to contamination by animal wastes. Dipole-dipole electrical soundings (electrical resistivity tomography) were performed at the corral zone and the surroundings. 2D and 3D models of conductivity were obtained. Even if there is a calcareous plate below some parts of the corrals and soil compaction is high, vertical infiltration or subsurface runoff may have occurred since these sites, with high animal charge, show soil conductivities higher than the surroundings. The models showed higher conductivities of saturated zone increasing in the direction of groundwater flow. These results were taken into account for further designs of soil and groundwater sampling. Groundwater conductivity was three times greater downgradient from the corrals with high concentrations of nitrates and phosphorous. A zone of high conductivity was found below a small channel of effluents from the corrals.

  6. Hydro-geophysical interpretation of fractured and karstified limestones reservoirs: A case study from Amdoun region (NW Tunisia) using electrical resistivity tomography, digital elevation model (DEM) and hydro-geochemical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redhaounia, Belgacem; Aktarakçi, Hasan; Ilondo, Batobo Ountsche; Gabtni, Hakim; Khomsi, Sami; Bédir, Mourad

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater from fractures and karst in limestone rocks is an important source of drinking water in the semi-arid climatic environment of North-Western Tunisia where cool and rainy seasons alternate with hot dry seasons. Due to varying climatic conditions and anthropogenic interventions the fractured limestone aquifer systems (Abiod and Boudabbous/El Gueria Formations) tend to be complex. The lack of data on the fractured and karstified aquifers in Amdoun region (NW Tunisia) to establish the hydrogeological potential between different rock formations of Upper Cretaceous and Lower Eocene has often discouraged researchers from attempting to model such aquifers. On the SE flank of the Jebel Sabbah anticline, Electrical Resistivity Tomography Data were collected along three different lines of 315 m of length each. The expected vertical penetration depth was 60 m. This hydro-geophysical investigation consisting of geological, structural, and geo-morphological studies, has demonstrated that groundwater in the carbonate rocks, in Amdoun area, occur in fracture zones and weathered parts of the rocks in the karst aquifers. The hydrochemical data (major ion geochemistry) indicate that these groundwaters are characterized by the dominance a Ca-Mg-HCO3 water type. Geochemical pattern is mainly controlled by the dissolution of carbonate minerals. Generally, TDS increases from the Amdoun Monts towards the discharge area (53 < TDS<332 mg l-1). These results are assessed using numerous geophysical data such as ERT imaging and geological knowledge. Finally, we show how these results could be used to improve the management of karst groundwater resources in Amdoun (NW Tunisia) complex terrain.

  7. Resistivity and self-potential tomography applied to groundwater remediation and contaminant plumes: Sandbox and field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, D.; Revil, A.; Hort, R. D.; Munakata-Marr, J.; Atekwana, E. A.; Kulessa, B.

    2015-11-01

    Geophysical methods can be used to remotely characterize contaminated sites and monitor in situ enhanced remediation processes. We have conducted one sandbox experiment and one contaminated field investigation to show the robustness of electrical resistivity tomography and self-potential (SP) tomography for these applications. In the sandbox experiment, we injected permanganate in a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated environment under a constant hydraulic gradient. Inverted resistivity tomograms are able to track the evolution of the permanganate plume in agreement with visual observations made on the side of the tank. Self-potential measurements were also performed at the surface of the sandbox using non-polarizing Ag-AgCl electrodes. These data were inverted to obtain the source density distribution with and without the resistivity information. A compact horizontal dipole source located at the front of the plume was obtained from the inversion of these self-potential data. This current dipole may be related to the redox reaction occurring between TCE and permanganate and the strong concentration gradient at the front of the plume. We demonstrate that time-lapse self-potential signals can be used to track the kinetics of an advecting oxidizer plume with acceptable accuracy and, if needed, in real time, but are unable to completely resolve the shape of the plume. In the field investigation, a 3D resistivity tomography is used to characterize an organic contaminant plume (resistive domain) and an overlying zone of solid waste materials (conductive domain). After removing the influence of the streaming potential, the identified source current density had a magnitude of 0.5 A m-2. The strong source current density may be attributed to charge movement between the neighboring zones that encourage abiotic and microbially enhanced reduction and oxidation reactions. In both cases, the self-potential source current density is located in the area of strong resistivity

  8. Seismic refraction and electrical resistivity tomography to investigate subsurface controls on vegetation distribution in a mountain watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, W.; Bradford, J. H.; Seyfried, M. S.

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate subsurface controls on the distribution of vegetation at two sites located within the Reynolds Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). Located in southwestern Idaho, the Reynolds Creek CZO extends over a steep elevation-climatic gradient (mean annual precipitation 250 - 1100 mm/yr, mean annual temperature 5.5 °C to 11°C). The existing, publically available hydroclimatic data are long-term and spatially extensive, including precipitation (>50 yr), snow course SWE (>50 yr), temperature (30-50 yr), soil moisture and temperature (>10 yr), and some soil depth data. Both sites we investigated were at elevation greater than 2000m, and both sites showed abrupt changes in vegetation with no surface expression of changes in the underlying geology. The first site, termed Dry Meadow (DM), consists of a grassy meadow that transitions from being saturated to the surface during the spring runoff to dry with a water table at a depth of 4-6m in the late summer. The grassy meadow transitions abruptly to sage brush dominated terrain with no significant change in elevation. The second site, termed the Aspen Grove (AG), shows an abrupt transition from dry grassy terrain to an Aspen grove along a constant, and low gradient hill slope. At both sites we acquired high density seismic refraction data (1m receiver spacing) along transects that ranged from 95 to 160 m. Additionally we acquired 107 m long electrical resistivity profiles in both dipole-dipole and Wenner arrays with 2 m electrode spacing. At both sites, both seismic and ERT data indicate a distinct and abrupt drop in depth to the top of the weathered rock surface of 10-15 m. These topographic lows in the bedrock may be either erosional or structurally controlled, but in either case create accommodation space for the accumulation of sediment and an altered groundwater distribution that can accommodate a shift in the dominant vegetation type.

  9. Ert Applied to the Characterization of Subsidence in Mexico City: Ancient Structures Affecting Urban Utilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arango, C.; Chavez, R. E.; Cifuentes-Nava, G.; Hernández-Quintero, E.

    2013-05-01

    The problem of subsidence in Mexico City is basically due to the rapid extraction of groundwater for water supply in addition to the geological conditions. The most typical manifestations of the phenomena are presented as cracks and fractures due to compaction of ancient lake clayish sediments. This phenomenon has caused major affectations to city infrastructure because of the differential subsidence. Fractured buildings, sinkholes, among others manifestations, are potentially sources of collapses, which exposes the population to a serious risk. A small portion of Iztacalco County is being affected by this problem, specifically, in a crossroad formed by two important avenues: La Viga and Plutarco Elias Calles, where the area apparently increases its topographical level. The Electrical Resistivity Tomography technique was selected in order to obtain a resistivity image of the subsoil, which allows identify the main features associated to the terrain uprising. Three (ERT) profiles 200 m, were deployed on the mentioned crossroad in order to characterize the subsurface structures affecting the topographical level of the avenues. A big resistivity anomaly (~ 1000 ohm-m) could be observed towards the central part of the crossroad, coinciding with the major lifting level on surface. This feature appears at 15 m deep in all the profiles and depicts an approximate extension of 100 m in the E-W direction and 60 m in N-S axis. On the other hand, the surrounding material seems to correspond to a higher-saturated environment (lacustrine sediments <10 ohm-m). Shallow anomalies were also detected related to urban artifacts (pipes, sewers, etcetera). The apparently terrain uprising can be associated to a differential subsidence. However, the mentioned avenues were ancient water channels since pre-Hispanic times, where the caudal was enough to allow small steam boating at late nineteenth century. These waterways served as main routes for the exchange of goods during colonial times

  10. Modeling of shaft tombs in western Mexico by mean of resistive tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alatorre-Zamora, M. A.; Gutierrez-Peña, Q. J.; Gomez-Gomez, G.; Rosas-Elguera, J.

    2013-05-01

    The archaeological affluence of Mexico is huge. However, the western part of the country is viewed as lacking of important prehispanic constructions. Discoveries since 1970 have exposed an ancient culture that has been termed as Teuchitlan Tradition. This culture is characterized by ceremonial centers formed with circular pyramids and several rectangular platforms surrounding them, and tombs below any of these structures. The tombs in turn are typically composed of a vertical shaft and one to three horizontal chambers, where bodies were placed. Due to this character is also referred to as Shaft Tombs Culture. The tombs are located mainly in low cohesion pumice, welded tephras and volcanic ash deposits. The vertical shafts were usually filled, and there was always the camera. Two major centers developed by this culture are found in Teuchitlan and El Arenal, in the western state of Jalisco. The former has been rebuilt and is currently open to tourism, while the latter is not restored yet. The latter apparently has two ceremonial centers located at two different altitudes. We conducted a survey in both sites with resistive tomography. The first study was conducted in Teuchitlan, on a circular platform. In this structure there are already located three shaft tombs. The results obtained using the Wenner alpha array with equidistance of 0.5 and 1 meter, are successful. The data have been modeled using the program RES2DINV, and models obtained show the presence of a boot-shaped tomb and other like bottle. The graves are identified with higher resistivity values, while values lower than 30 ohm-m indicate moisture leaks at the ends of the structure. Theoretical modeling of the tombs and the building was carried out, which is compared with the actual sections and their inversion models. Coincidences are appreciable. With this results, were conducted two lines in ceremonial centers of El Arenal, to identify the occurrence of shaft tombs. The two centers are separated by

  11. ERTS-B imagery interpretation techniques in the Tennessee Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, R. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The proposed investigation is a continuation of an ERTS-1 project. The principal missions are to serve as the principal supporter on computer and image processing problems for the multidisciplinary ERTS effort of the University of Tennessee, and to carry out research in improved methods for the computer processing, enhancement, and recognition of ERTS imagery.

  12. Preliminary Geologic Application of ERTS-1 Imagery in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.; Tailleur, I. L.; Patton, W. W., Jr.; Fischer, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    The geologic application of ERTS-1 imagery in Alaska is discussed. The results of the investigation are relevant to the three national problems of: (1) identifying minable minerals, (2) accelerating the finding and development of sources of petroleum and gas, and (3) the need to preserve the environment. The use of ERTS-1 imagery in developing a netallogenetic map of Alaska is described. Illustrations of the accomplishments produced by ERTS-1 data are provided.

  13. Relevance of ERTS-1 to the state of Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C. (Principal Investigator); Wells, T. L.; Wukelic, G. E.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. To date, only one significant result has been reported for the Ohio ERTS program. This result relates to the proven usefulness of ERTS-1 imagery for mapping and inventorying strip-mined areas in southeastern Ohio. ERTS provides a tool for rapidly and economically acquiring an up-to-date inventory of strip-mined lands for state planning purposes which was not previously possible.

  14. Automated thematic mapping and change detection of ERTS-1 images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gramenopoulos, N. (Principal Investigator); Alpaugh, H.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An ERTS-1 image was compared to aircraft photography and maps of an area near Brownsville, Texas. In the coastal region of Cameron County, natural and cultural detail were identified in the ERTS-1 image. In Hidalgo County, ground truth was located on the ERTS-1 image. Haze and 50% cloud cover over Hidalgo County reduced the usefulness of multispectral techniques for recognizing crops.

  15. Agricultural applications of ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draeger, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of ERTS imagery for the production of land use stratifications as a preliminary step in the crop inventory process, all land within San Joaquin County was delineated into broad land use and crop category classes based on their appearance on the ERTS-1 Color composite image. The stratification of the agricultural land use categories proved to be a relatively simple task, taking each of three interpreters approximately 30 minutes to complete. The three interpretations were quite similar requiring only minor revisions to produce a consensus stratification. A total of 13 different agricultural strata were recognized, differing both in general field size and relative proportions of crop types and degree of irrigation. Upon comparing these interpretations, it was concluded that nearly all boundaries were truly representative of differing cropping practices. In a number of cases, the stratifications agreed almost exactly with soil type boundaries as drawn by earlier soils surveys.

  16. Regional agriculture surveys using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draeger, W. C.; Nichols, J. D.; Benson, A. S.; Larrabee, D. G.; Jenkus, W. M.; Hay, C. M.

    1974-01-01

    The Center for Remote Sensing Research has conducted studies designed to evaluate the potential application of ERTS data in performing agricultural inventories, and to develop efficient methods of data handling and analysis useful in the operational context for performing large area surveys. This work has resulted in the development of an integrated system utilizing both human and computer analysis of ground, aerial, and space imagery, which has been shown to be very efficient for regional crop acreage inventories. The technique involves: (1) the delineation of ERTS images into relatively homogeneous strata by human interpreters, (2) the point-by-point classification of the area within each strata on the basis of crop type using a human/machine interactive digital image processing system; and (3) a multistage sampling procedure for the collection of supporting aerial and ground data used in the adjustment and verification of the classification results.

  17. Mineral exploration potential of ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, W. A. (Principal Investigator); Erskine, M. C., Jr.; Prindle, R. O.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Further analysis of ERTS-1 MSS imagery of Arizona has led to division of the earlier reported three major regional fault/fracture systems into eight subdivisions. These are: System A - N40E to N50E; System B - N50W; System C - N35W; System D - N65E to N75E; System E - N-E; System F - N25W average; System G - N75W average; and System H - close to E-W. Their individual significance to known porphyry coppers and correlation to the Wasatch-Jerome and Front Orogens, the Texas Zone and Basin Range topography is postulated in the report. In this study area of Arizona the ERTS-1 mapped structural trends confirm and greatly extend some concepts of porphyry copper distribution based on prior geologic knowledge of major structural trends.

  18. Application of ERTS imagery to geological mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, A.; Aranibar, O.; Ballon, P.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In comparing the interpretation of the imagery with that of photomosaics, the following results were derived. The drainage networks of the RBV images show information in greater detail than the photomosaics, and maps, yet maintain scale differences. However, for the basins the mosaics and maps provide better information. The geomorphology is best interpreted in the images of the ERTS-1, not only for the regional countryside, but also for the morphological formations. It was concluded that the satellite images offer the better possibility for identifying the alignment of joints and faults. In the images the relation is 4 to 1. The considered N-S alignments were identified in both systems with a ratio of 2 to 1. The E-W alignments for the areas considered in the ERTS-1 images show a basic Paleozoic formation not previously detected.

  19. Water depth estimation with ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced 9.5 inch ERTS-1 images were produced for an investigation on ocean water color. Such images lend themselves to water depth estimation by photographic and electronic density contouring. MSS-4 and -5 images of the Great Bahama Bank were density sliced by both methods. Correlation was found between the MSS-4 image and a hydrographic chart at 1:467,000 scale, in a number of areas corresponding to water depth of less than 2 meters, 5 to 10 meters and 10 to about 20 meters. The MSS-5 image was restricted to depths of about 2 meters. Where reflective bottom and clear water are found, ERTS-1 MSS-4 images can be used with density contouring by electronic or photographic methods for estimating depths to 5 meters within about one meter.

  20. Applicability of ERTS-1 to Montana geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, R. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic maps of four test sites were compiled at 1/250,000. Band 7 prints enlarged to 1/500,000 scale are the best for the purpose, and negative prints provide a valuable supplement. More than 100 mapped lineaments represent most of the major faults of the area and a large number of suspected faults, including many of northeast trend. Under ideal conditions dip slopes may be recognized, laccoliths outlined, and axial traces drawn for narrow, plunging folds. Use of ERTS-1 imagery will greatly facilitate construction of a needed tectonic map of Montana. From ERTS-1 imagery alone, it was possible to identify up-turned undivided Paleozoic and Mesozoic strata and to map the boundaries of mountain glaciation, intermontane basins, a volcanic field, and an area of granitic rocks. It was also possible to outline clay pans associated with bentonite. However, widespread recognition of gross rock types will be difficult.

  1. ERTS/Nimbus radiation environment information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    The results of the ERTS/Nimbus satellite investigation of electron flux levels are presented. Flux calculations were made with the use of two electron environment models, both of which are static and describe the environment during the solar maximum conditions of October 1967. It is concluded that the construction of these models makes it possible to infer a change of the average quiet time electron flux levels as a function of the solar cycle.

  2. Urban street patterns detectable from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The major street patterns in Lincoln, Nebraska, are detectable on the January 24, 1973 ERTS MSS-4 image. To further study and identify the street patterns, a 3x Polaroid enlargement was made of the city from the image. An overlay of the enlargement was used to map the street patterns, with reference to the original image for clarity. The technique seems to be adaptable for updating standard road maps.

  3. Studies of images of short lived events using ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deutschman, W. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The program to study short-lived events with the ERTS-1 satellite has evaluated 97 events reported by the Center for Short-Lived Phenomena. Forty-eight of these events were listed as candidates for ERTS-1 coverage and 8 of these were considered significant enough to immediately alert the ERTS operation staff by telephone. Studies of the images received from six events indicate that useful data on short-lived events can be obtained from ERTS-1 that would be difficult or impossible to obtain by other methods.

  4. Application of ERTS imagery to environmental studies of Lake Champlain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, A. O.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS Imagery has provided data relating to a number of environmental and limnological concerns such as water quality, lake flooding and lake ice formation. Pollution plume data provided by ERTS was recently used in the Supreme Court case involving the States of Vermont and New York and a paper company. Flooding of lowland tracts has been a major concern due to a repetitive pattern of high lake levels over the past three years, and ERTS imagery is being used to construct the first series of flood maps of the affected areas. Lake ice development and turbidity patterns have also been studied from ERTS, since these have significance for shore erosion studies.

  5. Resistivity and Seismic Surface Wave Tomography Results for the Nevşehir Kale Region: Cappadocia, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşkun, Nart; Çakır, Özcan; Erduran, Murat; Arif Kutlu, Yusuf

    2014-05-01

    The Nevşehir Kale region located in the middle of Cappadocia with approximately cone shape is investigated for existence of an underground city using the geophysical methods of electrical resistivity and seismic surface wave tomography together. Underground cities are generally known to exist in Cappadocia. The current study has obtained important clues that there may be another one under the Nevşehir Kale region. Two-dimensional resistivity and seismic profiles approximately 4-km long surrounding the Nevşehir Kale are measured to determine the distribution of electrical resistivities and seismic velocities under the profiles. Several high resistivity anomalies with a depth range 8-20 m are discovered to associate with a systematic void structure beneath the region. Because of the high resolution resistivity measurement system currently employed we were able to isolate the void structure from the embedding structure. Low seismic velocity zones associated with the high resistivity depths are also discovered. Using three-dimensional visualization techniques we show the extension of the void structure under the measured profiles.

  6. Combined ERT-TDEM measurements for studying submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) at Dor Beach, Israel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, E.; Goldman, M.; Weinstein, Y.; Yechieli, Y.

    2008-12-01

    During last years, Dor Beach became a major test site for hydrogeological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the SGD phenomenon in Israel. The high resolution time-series ERT measurements using 112-m long cable carried out at the site in 2006 have provided important information regarding shallow coastal hydrogeology up to the maximum exploration depth of approximately 20 m (Swarzenski et al, 2006). In a recent experiment (summer 2008), we focused on deeper parts of the site. This goal was achieved by using roughly two times longer shore diagonal and shore perpendicular ERT lines accompanied by onshore TDEM measurements. Such a combination allowed obtaining reliable information regarding the distribution of electrical resistivity up to a maximum depth of approximately 100 m. As a result, an additional high resistivity structure has been detected at a depth of approximately 63 m, which most likely represents the underlying Carmel Cretaceous aquifer saturated with water of lower than seawater salinity. Two saline/freshwater interfaces were detected at depths of approximately 17 m and 49 m. The upper interface between fresh and brackish water was detected by both ERT and TDEM, while the lower fresh/seawater interface was detected by TDEM alone.

  7. Assessment of a design to monitor the influence of crop residue management on the dynamics of soil water content with ERT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelin, Marie; Hiel, Marie-Pierre; Hermans, Thomas; Binley, Andrew; Garre, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    Choices related to crop residue management affect the soil structure. As a consequence, they may determine the spatio-temporal dynamics of water content and eventually the crop yields. In order to better understand the influence of these strategies on hydraulic processes occurring at the plot scale, we opted for the use electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). This approach presents the advantage to limit soil disturbance but is still faced to important challenges when applied in an agricultural field context. Especially changing soil-electrode contact has to be considered, as it can lead to bad quality data, especially for setups with small electrodes and small inter-electrode distance. The objective of this study was to test the efficiency of a high-resolution 3-D field measurement design to properly assess the dynamics of soil water content. ERT measurements were conducted in a Cutanic Siltic Luvisol in Gembloux, Belgium, on two plots of 2m2 ploughed in Oct 2014 at a depth of 25 cm and sown with maize in April 2015. The plants were removed on one of the plots in order to obtain a bare soil reference. A grid of 98 surface stainless steel electrodes was layed-out on each plot and four sticks supporting each eight stainless steel electrodes were vertically inserted into the soil up to 1.20 m to get more detailed information in depth. The experiments were performed between Jul and Oct 2015, in order to get measurements both in dry and wet periods. For surface and borehole monitoring, a dipole-dipole array configuration including in-line and cross-line measurements was adopted. Normal and reciprocal measurements were performed systematically to assess the data quality: only the datasets with a mean reciprocal error lower than 3% were considered for the data inversion. This contribution will show the first inverted results showing the complexity of experimental design and data analysis for high-resolution, timelapse ERT in field conditions. Based on these results, we

  8. Electrical tomography and magnetic imaging of Zeida's abandoned mine tailings (Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachhab, A.; Dekayir, A.; Benyassine, E. M.; Rouai, M.; Parisot, J. C.; Mathé, P. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Zeida (Pb-Zn) mine was closed since 1985 and contains huge dams of mine waste deposited without adjustment or remediation. These tailings contain large amount of Pb (3000 ppm) and Zn (140 ppm) expressed mainly as galena, wulfenite and barite. The subsurface of the studied area is constituted mainly by weathered granite coved in some places by Triassic red formations. A geophysical survey was conducted by using Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) combined with Magnetic Imagery to explore the subsurface area and understand how the mine waste is interacting with the groundwater. Two-Dimensional ERT revealed the occurrence of rounded structures with high resistivity values corresponding to spherical boulders of weathered granite. Resistivity values within the boulders decrease gradually from the center toward the outer layers. This granite was found to be covered by highly conductive materials from the tailings of the mine reaching a depth extending up to 60 m. Magnetic maps revealed local magnetic anomalies reaching 400 nT due to old buried pipes at the mine site of Zeida. These anomalies correspond to the presence of faults used as pathways to recharge the groundwater reservoir

  9. Monitoring and modelling of soil-plant interactions: the joint use of ERT, sap flow and eddy covariance data to characterize the volume of an orange tree root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2015-05-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere control a number of key environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes e.g. in precision agriculture. In this paper we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the key parameters of such complex flow system. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via "time-lapse" electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration (ET) from eddy covariance (EC). This abundance of data is fed to spatially distributed soil models in order to characterize the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, were characterized mainly by the ERT set-up, consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro-boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) placed at the corners of a square (with about 1.3 m long sides) surrounding the orange tree, plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and time domain reflectometry (TDR) soil moisture measurements, soil water sampling, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. We conducted a laboratory calibration of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and porewater electrical conductivity. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available allowing for knowledge of the system's long-term forcing conditions on the system. This information was used to calibrate a 1-D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3-D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was

  10. Monitoring and modelling of soil-plant interactions: the joint use of ERT, sap flow and Eddy Covariance data to characterize the volume of an orange tree root zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassiani, G.; Boaga, J.; Vanella, D.; Perri, M. T.; Consoli, S.

    2014-12-01

    Mass and energy exchanges between soil, plants and atmosphere control a number of key environmental processes involving hydrology, biota and climate. The understanding of these exchanges also play a critical role for practical purposes e.g. in precision agriculture. In this paper we present a methodology based on coupling innovative data collection and models in order to obtain quantitative estimates of the key parameters of such complex flow system. In particular we propose the use of hydro-geophysical monitoring via 4-D Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) in conjunction with measurements of plant transpiration via sap flow and evapotranspiration from Eddy Covariance (EC). This abundance of data is fed to a spatially distributed soil model in order to characterize the distribution of active roots. We conducted experiments in an orange orchard in Eastern Sicily (Italy), characterized by the typical Mediterranean semi-arid climate. The subsoil dynamics, particularly influenced by irrigation and root uptake, were characterized mainly by the ERT setup, consisting of 48 buried electrodes on 4 instrumented micro boreholes (about 1.2 m deep) placed at the corners of a square (about 1.3 m in side) surrounding the orange tree, plus 24 mini-electrodes on the surface spaced 0.1 m on a square grid. During the monitoring, we collected repeated ERT and TDR soil moisture measurements, soil water samples, sap flow measurements from the orange tree and EC data. We conducted a laboratory calibration of the soil electrical properties as a function of moisture content and pore water electrical conductivity. Irrigation, precipitation, sap flow and ET data are available allowing knowledge of the system's long term forcing conditions on the system. This information was used to calibrate a 1-D Richards' equation model representing the dynamics of the volume monitored via 3-D ERT. Information on the soil hydraulic properties was collected from laboratory and field experiments. The

  11. Integrated electrical geophysical surveys (ERT and SP) for the study of buried structure in a archeological complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Sergio; Mazzone, Fiorella; Maglio, Graziano

    2010-05-01

    Geophysical methods, particularly ERT, are very popular in archeological investigations. The success of the ERT method depends on the difference between the resistivity properties of the potential archeological targets (walls, roads, cavities etc..) and the surrounding environment. In this context often the main issue is to identify cavities or antropic buried structures. In this work we have used ERT and SP combined surveys for the study of buried structures in a farm of artistic importance of the XVII century located near Lecce (Salento peninsula, Italy). In the courtyard of the farm, characterized by the presence of two access holes to a possible underground cavity, we performed a 3D ERT that consists of 7 parallel profiles with 15 electrodes and a resolution of 0.7m, inverted with robust method. Also we performed a 3D SP surveys with 70 data points and a resolution of 1m using non-polarizing Cu/CuSO4 electrodes and a high internal impedance voltmeter using the Charge Occurence Probability (COP) algorithm. In correspondence of the two access holes both methods demonstrate clearly the presence of a cavity that extends to a depth of about 1.8m from ground level probably used for storage of rainwater. Furthermore the ERT surveys show the presence of a second cavity at greater depths (2.5m) that is not resolved by the SP method. The 3D inversion results clearly illustrate the capability to resolve in view of quality 3D structures of archeological interest. Particularly, in this work, we underline the role of SP surveys in this context and the good correlation with ERT surveys.

  12. Air quality indices from ERTS-1 MSS information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, E. L.; Stryker, S.; Ward, E. A.

    1973-01-01

    Comparison between ground based atmospheric turbidity network measurements and the average scene grayness from MSS Channel 4 data is in progress. Correlation between these two sources is promising. If continued correlation occurs for other ERTS-1 overflight dates and ground test sites, a new operational use of ERTS-1 useful to Federal, state, and international organizations will become available.

  13. Water resources. [monitoring and management from ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 applications in snow and ice monitoring, surface water monitoring, including monitoring of wetland areas and flood inundated area mapping, and also watershed monitoring for runoff prediction are discussed. Results also indicate that geological features can be noted which relate to ground water. ERTS-1 data can be used successfully in operational situations by water resources management agencies.

  14. Effective use of ERTS multisensor data in the Great Plains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, V. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. One unique advantage of ERTS imagery for delineating soil associations is the large area that can be scanned with one photo. Although soil associations usually are published at scales of 1:500,000 or 1:1,000,000, the delineations are drawn on much larger scale maps covering small pieces of the scene and then pieced together. Alluvial areas are usually swollen out of proportion to other soil areas. ERTS imagery puts alluvial areas into their proper size. A second feature of ERTS imagery is that a soil association map constructed with its aid assures that the cartographic level of the associations is more nearly the same. Another advantage of ERTS imagery is that the actual shape and configuration of soil associations are apparent. Also with ERTS imagery significant new delineations may become apparent which were missed when constructing soil association maps from conventional large scale photos.

  15. Geological and environmental applications of the ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    The significant results from geological investigations made with the aid of the ERTS spacecraft can be grouped into four broad categories: mapping, land form analysis, structural studies, and the search for mineral deposits. Illustrations of how ERTS has been used in such studies are given, including photomosaics of Nevada and of southern Morocco, and a photogeological interpretation of the Rhodesian craton. Environmental applications of ERTS are illustrated by an ERTS update of an Indiana strip mine map, an ERTS image of Lake Michigan showing particulate plumes and their effect on the weather, and an image of the New York Bight area showing the location and extent of an acid-iron wastes dump and a sewage sludge dump.

  16. Exploitation of ERTS-1 imagery utilizing snow enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobber, F. J.; Martin, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Photogeological analysis of ERTS-simulation and ERTS-1 imagery of snowcovered terrain within the ERAP Feather River site and within the New England (ERTS) test area provided new fracture detail which does not appear on available geological maps. Comparative analysis of snowfree ERTS-1 images has demonstrated that MSS Bands 5 and 7 supply the greatest amount of geological fracture detail. Interpretation of the first snow-covered ERTS-1 images in correlation with ground snow depth data indicates that a heavy blanket of snow (more than 9 inches) accentuates major structural features while a light "dusting", (less than 1 inch) accentuates more subtle topographic expressions. An effective mail-based method for acquiring timely ground-truth (snowdepth) information was established and provides a ready correlation of fracture detail with snow depth so as to establish the working limits of the technique. The method is both efficient and inexpensive compared with the cost of similarly scaled direct field observations.

  17. Drainage basin characteristics from ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollyday, E. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-derived measurements of forests, riparian vegetation, open water, and combined agricultural and urban land use were added to an available matrix of map-derived basin characteristics. The matrix of basin characteristics was correlated with 40 stream flow characteristics by multiple regression techniques. Fifteen out of the 40 equations were improved. If the technique can be transferred to other physiographic regions in the nation, the opportunity exists for a potential annual savings in operations of about $250,000.

  18. Author index to published ERTS-1 reports

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidwell, Timothy C.; Mitchell, Cheryl A.

    1975-01-01

    This index has been compiled to assist the reader in locating and obtaining reports on the 334 scientific experiments conducted under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Resources Technology Satellite-1 (ERTS-1) (renamed Landsat) program.  Each NASA-designated experimenter was required to submit written reports on his investigation: these were designated type 1, type 2, and type 3 reports.  Type 1 reports were periodic (monthly or bimonthly) progress summaries; type 2 were comprehensive scientific and technical reports; and type 3 were final report.  Investigators were also encourage to present their more significant findings in professional or technical journals and proceedings of symposia.

  19. Remote detection of aerosol pollution by ERTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.; Brandy, A. R.; Kindle, E. C.; Blais, R. N.; Hilton, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    Photogrammetric and densitometric examination of ERTS-1 MSS imagery of Eastern Virginia coupled with extensive ground truth air quality and meteorological data has shown that the identification and surveying of fixed particulate emitters (smoke plumes) is feasible. A description of the ground truth network is included. The quantitative monitoring of smoke stacks from orbital altitudes over state size regions appears possible when tied to realistic plume models and minimal ground truth. Contrast reductions over urban areas can possibly be utilized to produce isopleths of particulates when supplemented by local measurements.

  20. Remote detection of aerosol pollution by ERTS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E. (Principal Investigator); Bandy, A. R.; Kindle, E. C.; Blais, R. N.; Hilton, G. M.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Photogrammetric and densitometric examination of ERTS-1 MSS imagery of eastern Virginia coupled with extensive ground truth air quality and meteorological data has shown that the identification and surveying of fixed particulate emitters (smoke plumes) is feasible. A description of the ground truth network is included. The quantitative monitoring of smoke stacks from orbital altitudes over state-size regions appears possible when tied to realistic plume models and minimal ground truth. Contrast reductions over urban areas can possibly be utilized to produce isopleths of particulates when supplemented by local measurements.

  1. Station Readiness Test for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this SRT is to establish testing procedures which will verify that ERTS supporting stations can effectively support the ERTS mission. This SRT is applicable to all supporting stations for the ERTS-A and ERTS-B mission.

  2. 2D Electrical Resistivity Tomography surveys optimisation of the solutes transports in porous media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekmine, G.; Pessel, M.; Auradou, H.

    2009-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography applied in borehole or cross-borehole is a method often used to follow the invasion process of pollutant [Daily, 1991]. The aim of this work is to test experimentally the electrode arrays and inversion process used to obtain a spatial representation of tracer propagation in porous media. Experiments were conducted in a plexiglas container with glass beads of 166 microns in diameter. The height of the container is 275 mm, its width 85 mm and its thickness 10 mm. 21 electrodes, equally spaced, are placed along each of the lateral sides of the porous medium : these electrodes are used to perform the electrical measurements. The porous medium is lightened from behind and a video camera records the propagation of the fluids. The fluid containing the tracer (i.e the pollutant) is a water solution containing a small amount of dye together with NaCl (0.5g/l up to 2.0g/l). The medium is first saturated by a water solution containing a slight concentration of NaCl so that its density is smaller than the injected fluid. An upward flow is first established, then the denser fluid is injected at the bottom and over the full width of the medium. In this way, the flow is stabilized by gravity avoiding the development of unstable fingers. Still, the fluids are miscible and a mixing front develops during the flow: in the present study, both the determination by optical and electrical imaging of the mean position of the front and its width are of interest. The comparison of the two techniques allows to study the ability of the inversion process to quantify the solute transport. The electrical measurements are acquired by a standard multi electrode system (IRIS Instruments) and the data are inverted with the Res2Dinv software which models the 2D distribution of conductivity contrasts. The obtained bulk conductivity can be related through Archie's law to fluid conductivity by the porosity and the cementation factor which have been experimentally

  3. Electrical resistivity tomography for studying liquefaction induced by the May 2012 Emilia-Romagna earthquake (Mw = 6.1, North Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giocoli, A.; Quadrio, B.; Bellanova, J.; Lapenna, V.; Piscitelli, S.

    2013-10-01

    This work shows the result of an Electrical Resistivity Tomography survey carried out for imaging and characterizing the shallow subsurface affected by the coseismic effects of the Mw = 6.1 Emilia-Romagna (North Italy) earthquake occurred on 20 May 2012. The most characteristic coseismic effects were ground failure, lateral spreading and liquefaction that occurred extensively along the paleo-Reno river in the urban areas of San Carlo, a hamlet of Sant'Agostino municipality, and of Mirabello (south-western portion of the Ferrara Province). Totally, six Electrical Resistivity Tomography were performed and calibrated with surface geological surveys, exploratory borehole and aerial photo interpretations. This was one of the first applications of the Electrical Resistivity Tomography method in investigating coseismic liquefaction.

  4. Calibration of electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, W; Ramirez, A

    2000-05-01

    Over the past 10 years we have developed methods for imaging the electrical resistivity of soil and rock formations. These technologies have been called electrical resistance tomography of ERT (e.g. Daily and Owen, 1991). Recently we have been striving to extend this capability to include images of electric impedance--with a new nomenclature of electrical impedance tomography or EIT (Ramirez et al., 1999). Electrical impedance is simply a generalization of resistance. Whereas resistance is the zero frequency ratio of voltage and current, impedance includes both the magnitude and phase relationship between voltage and current at frequency. This phase and its frequency behavior is closely related to what in geophysics is called induced polarization or (Sumner, 1976). Why is this phase or IP important? IP is known to be related to many physical phenomena of importance so that image of IP will be maps of such things as mineralization and cation exchange IP (Marshall and Madden, 1959). Also, it is likely that IP, used in conjunction with resistivity, will yield information about the subsurface that can not be obtained by either piece of information separately. In order to define the accuracy of our technologies to image impedance we have constructed a physical model of known impedance that can be used as a calibration standard. It consists of 616 resistors, along with some capacitors to provide the reactive response, arranged in a three dimensional structure as in figure 1. Figure 2 shows the construction of the network and defines the coordinate system used to describe it. This network of components is a bounded and discrete version of the unbounded and continuous medium with which we normally work (the subsurface). The network has several desirable qualities: (1) The impedance values are known (to the accuracy of the component values). (2) The component values and their 3D distribution is easily controlled. (3) Error associated with electrode noise is eliminated. (4

  5. Structural lineaments of Gaspe from ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffensen, R.

    1973-01-01

    A test study was conducted to assess the value of ERTS images for mapping geologic features of the Gaspe Peninsula, Quebec. The specific objectives of the study were: 1) to ascertain the best procedure to follow in order to obtain valuable geologic data as a result of interpretation; and 2) to indicate in which way these data could relate to mineral exploration. Of the four spectral bands of the Multispectral scanner, the band from 700 to 800 nanometers, which seems to possess the best informational content for geologic study, was selected for analysis. The original ERTS image at a scale of 1:3,700,000 was enlarged about 15 times and reproduced on film. Geologically meaningful lines, called structural lineaments, were outlined and classified according to five categories: morpho-lithologic boundaries, morpho-lithologic lineaments, fault traces, fracture zones and undefined lineaments. Comparison with the geologic map of Gaspe shows that morpho-lithologic boundaries correspond to contacts between regional stratigraphic units. Morpholithologic lineaments follow bedding trends, whereas fracture traces appear as sets of parallel lineaments, intersecting at high angles the previous category of lineaments. Fault traces mark more precisely the location of faults already mapped and spot the presence of presumable faults, not indicated on the geologic map.

  6. Ground control requirements for precision processing of ERTS images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, Thomas C.

    1972-01-01

    When the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-A) flies in 1972, NASA expects to receive and bulk-process 9,000 images a week. From this deluge of images, a few will be selected for precision processing; that is, about 5 percent will be further treated to improve the geometry of the scene, both in the relative and absolute sense. Control points are required for this processing. This paper describes the control requirements for relating ERTS images to a reference surface of the earth. Enough background on the ERTS-A satellite is included to make the requirements meaningful to the user.

  7. A Preliminary Assessment of ERTS Imagery for Marine Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewing, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    The application of ERTS-1 imagery to identifying marine resources is discussed. Specific reference is made to the use of ERTS-1 for observing the onset of the spring growing season in the ocean while it occurs. ERTS-1 data is used for the following purposes: (1) location of large areas of seasonally variable biological activity, (2) measurement of water depth in shallow seas, (3) monitoring of sewer discharges, (4) assessment of erosion damage to beaches and shoreline installations, and (5) navigation through ice-filled waterways.

  8. All-digital precision processing of ERTS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, R. (Principal Investigator)

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Digital techniques have been developed and used to apply precision-grade radiometric and geometric corrections to ERTS MSS and RBV scenes. Geometric accuracies sufficient for mapping at 1:250,000 scale have been demonstrated. Radiometric quality has been superior to ERTS NDPF precision products. A configuration analysis has shown that feasible, cost-effective all-digital systems for correcting ERTS data are easily obtainable. This report contains a summary of all results obtained during this study and includes: (1) radiometric and geometric correction techniques, (2) reseau detection, (3) GCP location, (4) resampling, (5) alternative configuration evaluations, and (6) error analysis.

  9. Relevance of ERTS-1 to the state of Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C.; Wells, T. L.; Wukelic, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During the first six months of project effort the ability of ERTS-1 imagery to be used for mapping and inventorying strip-mined areas in southeastern Ohio was reported as a significant project result. During this reporting period, the potential of using ERTS-1 imagery in water quality and coastal zone management of Lake Erie became apparent and the extent that ERTS-1 imagery could contribute to localized (metropolitan/urban), multicounty, and overall state land use needs was experimentally demonstrated.

  10. Is fully coupled hydrogeophysical inversion really better than uncoupled? A comparison study using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camporese, M.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.; Salandin, P.; Binley, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion error have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled inversion approaches. On one hand, the main advantage of coupled approaches is that the numerical models for the geophysical and hydrological processes are linked together such that the geophysical data are inverted directly for the hydrological properties of interest, avoiding artifacts related to the classical geophysical inversions. On the other hand, uncoupled approaches, relying upon a geophysical inversion that is carried out before estimating the hydrological variable of interest, could reveal something about the process that is not accounted for in a model, i.e., they are not constrained by the conceptualization of the hydrological model. In spite of the appeal and popularity of fully coupled inversion approaches, their superiority over more traditional uncoupled methods still needs to be objectively proven; the aim of this work is to shed some light on this debate. An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is here applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) data generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. In the coupled version of the proposed inverse modeling approach, the K distribution is retrieved by assimilating raw ERT resistance data without the need for a preliminary geoelectrical inversion. In the uncoupled version, K is estimated by assimilating electrical conductivity data derived from a previously performed classical geophysical inversion of the same resistance dataset. We compare the performance of the two approaches in a number of simulation

  11. IP4DI: A software for time-lapse 2D/3D DC-resistivity and induced polarization tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaoulis, M.; Revil, A.; Tsourlos, P.; Werkema, D. D.; Minsley, B. J.

    2013-04-01

    We propose a 2D/3D forward modelling and inversion package to invert direct current (DC)-resistivity, time-domain induced polarization (TDIP), and frequency-domain induced polarization (FDIP) data. Each cell used for the discretization of the 2D/3D problems is characterized by a DC-resistivity value and a chargeability or complex conductivity for TDIP/FDIP problems, respectively. The governing elliptic partial differential equations are solved with the finite element method, which can be applied for both real and complex numbers. The inversion can be performed either for a single snapshot of data or for a sequence of snapshots in order to monitor a dynamic process such as a salt tracer test. For the time-lapse inversion, we have developed an active time constrained (ATC) approach that is very efficient in filtering out noise in the data that is not correlated over time. The forward algorithm is benchmarked with simple analytical solutions. The inversion package IP4DI is benchmarked with three tests, two including simple geometries. The last one corresponds to a time-lapse resistivity problem for cross-well tomography during enhanced oil recovery. The algorithms are based on MATLAB® code package and a graphical user interface (GUI).

  12. 3D modeling and inversion of the electrical resistivity tomography using steel cased boreholes as long electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Liu, De-Jun; Ai, Qing-Hui; Qin, Min-Jun

    2014-10-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography using a steel cased borehole as a long electrode is an advanced technique for geoelectrical survey based on the conventional mise-à-la-masse measurement. In most previous works, the steel casing is simplified as a transmission line current source with an infinitely small radius and constant current density. However, in practical stratified formations with different resistivity values, the current density along the casing cannot be constant. In this study, the steel casing is modeled by a conductive physical volume that the casing occupies in the finite element mesh. The current supply point is set on the center of the top surface of the physical volume. Synthetic modeling, using both a homogenous and layered formation, demonstrates reasonability of the forward modeling method proposed herein. Based on this forward modeling method, the inversion procedure can be implemented by using a freeware R3t (Lancaster University, UK). Inversion results of synthetic modeling data match fairly well with the defined target location and validate that the method works on the inversion of the casing-surface electrical resistivity data. Finally, a field example of Changqing oil field in China is carried out using the inversion method to image water flooding results and to discover wells with great potential to enhance residual oil recovery.

  13. Electrical Resistivity Tomographies on the detection of adobe buried archaeological structures in Piramide Sur in Cahuachi (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, L.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.; Lasaponara, R.; Orefici, G.

    2012-04-01

    During the last two decades of excavations, adobe pyramids dating back from the 6th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D have been unearthed in the ancient Ceremonial Centre of Cahuachi near Nasca (Peru) by an Italian-Peruvian mission directed by Giuseppe Orefici. One of the archaeological sectors, called sector A, has been almost excavated and restored. To complete sector A only a terraced mound named "Piramide Sur" needs to be excavated. In order to provide useful information on the presence of buried structures and platforms as well on the geological stratigraphy a multi-scale approach based on the integration of satellite remote sensing with geophysical techniques was employed. Such investigations were carried out by the Italian mission ITACA, funded by the Italian Ministry Affairs and composed of researchers of two institutes of CNR (IMAA and IBAM), which provides a scientific support for archaeological research, since 2007. In particular, the subsurface features were investigated by Geoelectrical prospecting, performed by using a georesistivimeter for tomography which observe the resistivity value along sections. Several tomographies were carried out to investigate the shallow and deep structure of the pyramid both along the main flank at Nord and on the top. Finally, the integration of all data acquired by the different remote sensing techniques allowed for spatially characterizing the archaeological features, thus providing important information for the planning of the next archaeological campaign.

  14. Investigation of suspected gulls in the Jurassic limestone strata of the Cotswold Hills, Gloucestershire, England using electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, A. J. M.; Uhlemann, S.; Pook, G. G.; Oxby, L.

    2016-09-01

    An electrical resistivity tomography survey has clearly indicated the presence of substantial vertical zones of contrasting material beneath a set of conspicuous linear surface hollows that cut across a spur forming part of the Cotswold Hills escarpment in Gloucestershire. These zones are compared with nearby quarry exposures and are inferred to be gulls - graben-like structures at least 80 m deep filled with collapsed blocks of bedrock with intervening air-filled spaces, lying within areas of relatively undisrupted gently dipping strata, and which under some circumstances would present a significant geohazard. Our results confirm the great potential of this non-invasive and rapid survey technique for investigating such phenomena, and provide an exemplar for comparison with surveys elsewhere, to assist identification of similar features.

  15. Image-guided inversion of electrical resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, J.; Revil, A.; Karaoulis, M.; Hale, D.; Doetsch, J.; Cuttler, S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is based on solving a Poisson equation for the electrical potential and is characterized by a good sensitivity only in the vicinity of the electrodes used to gather the data. To provide more information to ERT, we propose an image-guided or structure-constrained inversion of the apparent resistivity data. This approach uses structural information obtained directly from a guiding image. This guiding image can be drawn from a high resolution geophysical method based on the propagation equation (e.g. migrated seismic or ground penetrating radar images) or possibly from a geological cross-section of the subsurface based on some prior geological expertise. The locations and orientations of the structural features can be extracted by image processing methods to determine the structure tensor and the semblances of the guiding image at a set of pixel. Then, we introduce these structural constraints into the inversion of the apparent resistivity data by weighting the four-direction smoothing matrix to smooth along, but not across, structural features. This approach allows preserving both discontinuities and coherences in the inversion of the resistivity data. The image-guided inversion is also combined with an image-guided interpolation approach used to focus a smooth resistivity image. This yields structurally-appealing resistivity tomograms, while the whole process remains computationally efficient. Such a procedure generates a more realistic resistivity distribution (closer to the true ones), which can be, in turn, used quantitatively using appropriate petrophysical transforms, to obtain parameters of interest such as porosity and saturation. We check the validity of this approach using two synthetic case studies as well as two real datasets. For the field data, the image used to guide the inversion of the electrical resistivity data is a GPR section in the first case and a combination of seismic and structural information in the

  16. ERTS-1 views the Great Lakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, W. A.; Pease, S. R.

    1973-01-01

    The meteorological content of ERTS images, particularly mesoscale effects of the Great Lakes and air pollution dispersion is summarized. Summertime lake breeze frontal clouds and various winter lake-effect convection patterns and snow squalls are revealed in great detail. A clear-cut spiral vortex over southern Lake Michigan is related to a record early snow storm in the Chicago area. Marked cloud changes induced by orographic and frictional effects on Lake Michigan's lee shore snow squalls are seen. The most important finding, however, is a clear-cut example of alterations in cumulus convection by anthropogenic condensation and/or ice nuclei from northern Indiana steel mills during a snow squall situation. Jet aircraft condensation trails are also found with surprising frequency.

  17. Applicability of ERTS-1 to Montana geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidman, R. M. (Principal Investigator); Alt, D. D.; Berg, R.; Johns, W.; Flood, R.; Hawley, K.; Wackwitz, L.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Late autumn imagery provides the advantages of topographic shadow enhancement and low cloud cover. Mapping of rock units was done locally with good results for alluvium, basin fill, volcanics, inclined Paleozoic and Mesozoic beds, and host strata of bentonite beds. Folds, intrusive domes, and even dip directions were mapped where differential erosion was significant. However, mapping was not possible for belt strata, was difficult for granite, and was hindered by conifers compared to grass cover. Expansion of local mapping required geologic control and encountered significant areas unmappable from ERTS imagery. Annotation of lineaments provided much new geologic data. By extrapolating test site comparisons, it is inferred that 27 percent of some 1200 lineaments mapped from western Montana represent unknown faults. The remainder appear to be localized mainly by undiscovered faults and sets of minor faults or joints.

  18. ERTS applications in state land use planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pincura, P. G.; Meier, C. J.; Garrett, G. B.; Herd, L.; Wukelic, G. E.; Stephan, J. G.; Smail, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    The progress made and limitations encountered in using ERTS-1 data for resource management in Ohio is surveyed. Photo-opto-electronic techniques were used with special facility equipment and resolution to 10-30 meters was required to determine strip mine features. Lake Erie's sediment patterns were detected along with flooding conditions, large scale vegetative damage caused by toxic air pollutants was identified, Ohio land use categories were tabulated and thematic map containing forested areas was derived. The experimental findings regarding utility/relevance assessment were ranked in 4 classes for all the applications involved. Preliminary recommendations for operational satellite earth resources survey data requirements are presented and data analysis and product dissemination are proposed to be centralized in conjunction with thermal IR data and an increased resolution.

  19. Seasonal vegetation differences from ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, M. D.; Rea, J.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the times when crop and forest vegetation experience seasonally related changes in development is important in understanding growth and yield relationships. This article describes how densitometry of earth resources technology satellite (ERTS-1) multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery can be used to identify such phenological events. Adjustments for instrument calibration, aperture size, gray-scale differences between overpasses, and normalization of changing solar elevation are considered in detail. Seasonal vegetation differences can be identified by densitometry of band 5 (0.6-0.7 microns) and band 7 (0.8-1.1 microns) MSS imagery. Band-to-band ratios of the densities depicted the changes more graphically than the individual band readings.

  20. Use of ERTS data for mapping Arctic sea ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C. (Principal Investigator); Bowley, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Data from ERTS passes crossing the Bering Sea in early March have been correlated with ice observations collected in the Bering Sea Experiment (BESEX). On two flights of the NASA CV-990 aircraft, the ice conditions in the vicinity of St. Lawrence Island reported by the onboard observer are in close agreement with the ice conditions mapped from the corresponding ERTS imagery. The ice features identified in ERTS imagery and substantiated by the aerial observer include the locations of boundaries between areas consisting of mostly grey ice and of mostly first and multi-year ice, the existence of shearing leads, and the occurrence of open water with the associated development of stratus cloud streaks. The BESEX correlative ice formation verifies the potential of practical applications of ERTS data.

  1. Applicability of ERTS for surveying Antarctic iceberg resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hult, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Ostrander, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This investigation explores the applicability of ERTS to (1) determine the Antarctic sea ice and environmental behavior that may influence the harvesting of icebergs, and (2) monitor iceberg locations, characteristics, and evolution. From image sampling, it is found that the potential applicability of ERTS to the research, planning, and harvesting operations can contribute importantly to the promise derived from broader scope studies for the use of Antarctic iceberg to relieve fresh Thermal sensor bands will provide coverage in daylight and darkness. Several years of comprehensive monitoring will be necessary to characterize sea ice and environmental behavior and iceberg evolution. Live ERTS services will assist harvesting control and claming operations and offer a means for harmonizing entitlements to iceberg resources. The valuable ERTS services will be more cost effective than other means and will be easily justified and borne by the iceberg harvesting operation.

  2. Glaciation of northwestern Wyoming interpreted from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of ERTS Imagery has shown a number of alpine glacial features can be recognized and mapped successfully. Although the Wyoming mountains are generally regarded as the type locality for Rocky Mountain glaciation some areas have not been studied from a glacial standpoint because of inaccessibility or lack of topographic control. ERTS imagery provides an excellent base for this type of regional geomorphic study. A map of maximum extent of Wisconsin Ice, flow directions and major glacial features was compiled from interpretation of the ERTS imagery. Features which can be mapped are large moraines, outwash fans and terraces. Present-day glaciers and snowfields are easily discriminated and mapped. Glaciers and glacial deposits which serve as aquifers play a significant role in the hydrologic cycle and are important because of the increasing demand placed on our water resources. ERTS provides a quick and effective method for change detection and inventory of these vital resources.

  3. An ERTS multispectral scanner experiment for mapping iron compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. An experimental plan for enhancing spectral features related to the chemical composition of geological targets in ERTS multispectral scanner data is described. The experiment is designed to produce visible-reflective infrared ratio images from ERTS-1 data. Iron compounds are promising remote sensing targets because they display prominent spectral features in the visible-reflective infrared wavelength region and are geologically significant. The region selected for this ERTS experiment is the southern end of the Wind River Range in Wyoming. If this method proves successful it should prove useful for regional geologic mapping, mineralogical exploration, and soil mapping. It may also be helpful to ERTS users in scientific disciplines other than geology, especially to those concerned with targets composed of mixtures of live vegetation and soil or rock.

  4. Assessment of Southern California environment from ERTS-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowden, L. W.; Viellenave, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    ERTS-1 imagery is a useful source of data for evaluation of earth resources in Southern California. The improving quality of ERTS-1 imagery, and our increasing ability to enhance the imagery has resulted in studies of a variety of phenomena in several Southern California environments. These investigations have produced several significant results of varying detail. They include the detection and identification of macro-scale tectonic and vegetational patterns, as well as detailed analysis of urban and agricultural processes. The sequential nature of ERTS-1 imagery has allowed these studies to monitor significant changes in the environment. In addiation, some preliminary work has begun directed toward assessing the impact of expanding recreation, agriculture and urbanization into the fragile desert environment. Refinement of enhancement and mapping techniques and more intensive analysis of ERTS-1 imagery should lead to a greater capability to extract detailed information for more precise evaluations and more accurate monitoring of earth resources in Southern California.

  5. Constraining complex aquifer geometry with geophysics (2-D ERT and MRS measurements) for stochastic modelling of groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, A.; Sekhar, M.; Descloitres, M.; Godderis, Y.; Ruiz, L.; Braun, J. J.

    2013-11-01

    Stochastic modelling is a useful way of simulating complex hard-rock aquifers as hydrological properties (permeability, porosity etc.) can be described using random variables with known statistics. However, very few studies have assessed the influence of topological uncertainty (i.e. the variability of thickness of conductive zones in the aquifer), probably because it is not easy to retrieve accurate statistics of the aquifer geometry, especially in hard rock context. In this paper, we assessed the potential of using geophysical surveys to describe the geometry of a hard rock-aquifer in a stochastic modelling framework. The study site was a small experimental watershed in South India, where the aquifer consisted of a clayey to loamy-sandy zone (regolith) underlain by a conductive fissured rock layer (protolith) and the unweathered gneiss (bedrock) at the bottom. The spatial variability of the thickness of the regolith and fissured layers was estimated by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles, which were performed along a few cross sections in the watershed. For stochastic analysis using Monte Carlo simulation, the generated random layer thickness was made conditional to the available data from the geophysics. In order to simulate steady state flow in the irregular domain with variable geometry, we used an isoparametric finite element method to discretize the flow equation over an unstructured grid with irregular hexahedral elements. The results indicated that the spatial variability of the layer thickness had a significant effect on reducing the simulated effective steady seepage flux and that using the conditional simulations reduced the uncertainty of the simulated seepage flux. As a conclusion, combining information on the aquifer geometry obtained from geophysical surveys with stochastic modelling is a promising methodology to improve the simulation of groundwater flow in complex hard-rock aquifers.

  6. Ability of High-Resolution Resistivity Tomography to Detect Fault and Fracture Zones: Application to the Tournemire Experimental Platform, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélis, C.; Noble, M.; Cabrera, J.; Penz, S.; Chauris, H.; Cushing, E. M.

    2016-02-01

    located at depth between two fault zones. This zone could be correlated with the fractured zones identified at 250-m depth in underground works. This study highlights the interest of multi-scale approaches to image complex heterogeneous near subsurface layers. Finally, this study shows that the electrical resistivity tomography is a useful and powerful tool to detect fault and fracture zones in upper limestones. Such a method is complementary to other geophysical and geological data.

  7. The use of ERTS imagery in reservoir management and operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, S. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Preliminary analysis of ERTS-1 imagery suggests that the configuration and areal coverage of surface waters, as well as other hydrologically related terrain features, may be obtained from ERTS-1 imagery to an extent that would be useful. Computer-oriented pattern recognition techniques are being developed to help automate the identification and analysis of hydrologic features. Considerable man-machine interaction is required while training the computer for these tasks.

  8. ERTS-1 applications to Minnesota land use mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D.; Gamble, J.; Prestin, S.; Trippler, D.; Meyer, M. P.; Ulliman, J. J.; Eller, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Land use class definitions that can be operationally employed with ERTS-1 imagery are being developed with the cooperation of personnel from several state, regional, and federal agencies with land management responsibilities within the state and the University of Minnesota. Investigations of urban, extractive, forest, and wetlands areas indicate that it is feasible to subdivide each of these classes into several sub-classes with the use of ERTS-1 images from one or more time periods.

  9. Relevance of ERTS to the State of Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ability to delineate and inventory strip mined areas using ERTS-1 imagery has been established. This gives Ohio a method to rapidly gain an up-to-date inventory of strip mined lands for state planning purposes, which has not been available previously. Smoke plume detection and sedimentation patterns in Sandusky Bay have also been determined from initial analysis of ERTS-1 data.

  10. Task 10: an ERTS Experiment for Mapping Iron Compounds, 1383

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, R. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary results of a spectral ratioing technique are shown for a region at the southern end of the Wind River Range, Wyoming. Digital ratio graymaps and analog ratio images have been produced for the test site, but ground truth is not yet available for thorough interpretation of these products. ERTS-1 analog ratio images were found generally better than either ERTS-1 single channel images or high altitude aerial photos for the discrimination of vegetation from non-vegetation in the test site region. Some linear geological features smaller than the ERTS-1 spatial resolution are seen as well in ERTS-1 ratio and single channel images as in high altitude aerial photography. Geochemical information appears to be extractable from ERTS-1 data. Good preliminary quantitative agreement between ERTS-1 derived ratios and laboratory derived reflectance ratios of rocks and minerals encourage plans to use lab data as training sets for a simple ratio gating logic approach to automatic recognition maps. Empirical atmospheric corrections indicate that atmospheric corrections are needed to make the ratio method, and possibly other types of data processing, consistent over large geographical and temporal displacements.

  11. Facilitating the exploitation of ERTS imagery using snow enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator); Martin, K. R.; Sheffield, C.; Russell, O.; Amato, R. V.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of all available (Gemini, Apollo, Nimbus, NASA aircraft) small scale snow covered imagery has been conducted to develop and refine snow enhancement techniques. A detailed photographic interpretation of ERTS-simulation imagery covering the Feather River/Lake Tahoe area was completed and the 580-680nm. band was determined to be the optimum band for fracture detection. ERTS-1 MSS bands 5 and 7 are best suited for detailed fracture mapping. The two bands should provide more complete fracture detail when utilized in combination. Analysis of early ERTS-1 data along with U-2 ERTS simulation imagery indicates that snow enhancement is a viable technique for geological fracture mapping. A wealth of fracture detail on snow-free terrain was noted during preliminary analysis of ERTS-1 images 1077-15005-6 and 7, 1077-15011-5 and 7, and 1079-15124-5 and 7. A direct comparison of data yield on snow-free versus snow-covered terrain will be conducted within these areas following receipt of snow-covered ERTS-1 imagery.

  12. Accurate modeling and inversion of electrical resistivity data in the presence of metallic infrastructure with known location and dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Timothy C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2015-06-26

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has been widely used in environmental applications to study processes associated with subsurface contaminants and contaminant remediation. Anthropogenic alterations in subsurface electrical conductivity associated with contamination often originate from highly industrialized areas with significant amounts of buried metallic infrastructure. The deleterious influence of such infrastructure on imaging results generally limits the utility of ERT where it might otherwise prove useful for subsurface investigation and monitoring. In this manuscript we present a method of accurately modeling the effects of buried conductive infrastructure within the forward modeling algorithm, thereby removing them from the inversion results. The method is implemented in parallel using immersed interface boundary conditions, whereby the global solution is reconstructed from a series of well-conditioned partial solutions. Forward modeling accuracy is demonstrated by comparison with analytic solutions. Synthetic imaging examples are used to investigate imaging capabilities within a subsurface containing electrically conductive buried tanks, transfer piping, and well casing, using both well casings and vertical electrode arrays as current sources and potential measurement electrodes. Results show that, although accurate infrastructure modeling removes the dominating influence of buried metallic features, the presence of metallic infrastructure degrades imaging resolution compared to standard ERT imaging. However, accurate imaging results may be obtained if electrodes are appropriately located.

  13. High-resolution Electrical Resistivity Tomography monitoring of a tracer test in a confined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, P. B.; Meldrum, P. I.; Kuras, O.; Chambers, J. E.; Holyoake, S. J.; Ogilvy, R. D.

    2010-04-01

    A permanent geoelectrical subsurface imaging system has been installed at a contaminated land site to monitor changes in groundwater quality after the completion of a remediation programme. Since the resistivities of earth materials are sensitive to the presence of contaminants and their break-down products, 4-dimensional resistivity imaging can act as a surrogate monitoring technology for tracking and visualising changes in contaminant concentrations at much higher spatial and temporal resolution than manual intrusive investigations. The test site, a municipal car park built on a former gasworks, had been polluted by a range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and dissolved phase contaminants. It was designated statutory contaminated land under Part IIA of the UK Environmental Protection Act due to the risk of polluting an underlying minor aquifer. Resistivity monitoring zones were established on the boundaries of the site by installing vertical electrode arrays in purpose-drilled boreholes. After a year of monitoring data had been collected, a tracer test was performed to investigate groundwater flow velocity and to demonstrate rapid volumetric monitoring of natural attenuation processes. A saline tracer was injected into the confined aquifer, and its motion and evolution were visualised directly in high-resolution tomographic images in near real-time. Breakthrough curves were calculated from independent resistivity measurements, and the estimated seepage velocities from the monitoring images and the breakthrough curves were found to be in good agreement with each other and with estimates based on the piezometric gradient and assumed material parameters.

  14. Time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography monitoring effects of an urban tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellmunt, F.; Marcuello, A.; Ledo, J.; Queralt, P.; Falgàs, E.; Benjumea, B.; Velasco, V.; Vázquez-Suñé, E.

    2012-12-01

    Tunnel construction in urban areas has recently become a topic of interest and has increased the use of tunnel boring machines. Monitoring subsurface effects due to tunnel building in urban areas with conventional surface geophysical techniques is not an easy task because of space constraints. Taking advantage of the construction of a new metro line in Barcelona (Spain), a geoelectrical experiment, which included borehole logging and time-lapse cross-hole measurements using permanent electrode deployments, was designed to characterise and to study the subsurface effects of the tunnel drilling in a test site. We present a case study in which the differences between time-lapse cross-hole resistivity measurements acquired before, during and after the tunnel drilling below the test site have been calculated using three different procedures: a constrained time-lapse inversion, a model subtraction and an inversion of the normalised data ratio. The three procedures have provided satisfactory images of the resistivity changes and tunnel geometry, but resistivity changes for the tunnel void were lower than predicted by modelling. This behaviour has been explained by considering a conductive zone around the tunnel. Further, an apparent resistivity pseudosection for the cross-hole data, equivalent to the case of the equatorial dipole-dipole on the surface, is introduced.

  15. Effect of surface fissure on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sailhac, P.; Gance, J.; Malet, J.

    2013-12-01

    Fissures are features of interest, prone to create preferential flow path, modifying locally the soil hydrogeological behavior. Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is a suitable tool to monitor such preferential flow path. However, this technique is not efficient in the presence of surface fissure, due to a bad resistivity recovering around the fissure vicinity during the inversion process. Therefore, we propose a description of fissure effect on raw apparent resistivity on three resistivity arrays. The purposes of the study are multiple. First, we aim at making ERT users aware of surface fissure effect, and propose a first help to interpret basically resistivity pseudo sections. Second, we propose to ERT users to automatically conduct a surface fissure survey on the studied profile, in order to consider each fissure in a forward DC model and to suppress their effect. Finally, this study is only a first step toward 2D fissure shape inversion, and time-lapse monitoring of fissure drying and filling. In this study, we create a fissure model based on different geomorphological descriptors. After describing the FEM-DC forward modeling strategy, we investigate the fissure effect on pseudo section of apparent resistivity for a Wenner-Schlumberger (WS), a dipole-dipole (DD) and a gradient (GRAD) array. We determine a fissure detectability threshold for each array and perform a sensitivity analysis on the different fissure parameters (position, width, depth, dip angles...). The crack filling or drying effect is also investigated. The possibility to remove fissure effect and to propose a first interpretation of time-lapse data is illustrated on real data. This study show again the higher sensitivity of the DD array compared to the GRAD and WS arrays. Not only the maximal amplitude in the pseudo section is higher for the DD array, but also the anomaly pattern created by the fissure is much larger for this acquisition geometry. The minimal depth detectable for the DD

  16. Characterization of groundwater and surface water mixing in a semiconfined karst aquifer using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyerhoff, Steven B.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Revil, André; Martin, Jonathan B.; Karaoulis, Marios; Graham, Wendy D.

    2014-03-01

    Groundwater flow in karst includes exchange of water between large fractures, conduits, and the surrounding porous matrix, which impacts both water quality and quantity. Electrical resistivity tomography combined with end-member mixing analysis (EMMA) and numerical flow and transport modeling was used to study mixing of karst conduit and matrix waters to understand spatial and temporal patterns of mixing during high flow and base flow conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first time EMMA and synthetic geophysical simulations have been combined. Here we interpret an 8 week time-lapse electrical resistivity data set to assess groundwater-surface mixing. We simulate flow between the karst conduits and the porous matrix to determine fractions of water recharged to conduits that has mixed with groundwater stored in the pore space of the matrix using a flow and transport model in a synthetic time-lapse resistivity inversion. Comparing the field and synthetic inversions, our results enable us to estimate exchange dynamics, spatial mixing, and flow conditions. Results showed that mixing occurred at a volumetric flux of 56 m3/d with a dispersivity around 1.69 m during the geophysical experiment. For these conditions, it was determined that conduit water composition ranged from 75% groundwater during base flow conditions to less than 50% groundwater in high flow conditions. Though subject to some uncertainties, the time-lapse inversion process provides a means to predict changing hydrologic conditions, leading to mixing of surface water and ground water and thus changes to water quantity and quality, as well as potential for water-rock reactions, in a semiconfined, sink-rise system.

  17. Potential of electrical resistivity tomography and muon density imaging to study spatio-temporal variations in the sub-surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesparre, Nolwenn; Cabrera, Justo; Courbet, Christelle

    2015-04-01

    We explore the capacity of electrical resistivity tomography and muon density imaging to detect spatio-temporal variations of the medium surrounding a regional fault crossing the underground platform of Tournemire (Aveyron, France). The studied Cernon fault is sub-vertical and intersects perpendicularly the tunnel of Tournemire and extends to surface. The fault separates clay and limestones layers of the Dogger from limestones layers of the Lias. The Cernon fault presents a thickness of a ten of meters and drives water from an aquifer circulating at the top of the Dogger clay layer to the tunnel. An experiment combining electrical resistivity imaging and muon density imaging was setup taking advantage of the tunnel presence. A specific array of electrodes were set up, adapted for the characterization of the fault. Electrodes were placed along the tunnel as well as at the surface above the tunnel on both sides of the fault in order to acquire data in transmission across the massif to better cover the sounded medium. Electrical resistivity is particularly sensitive to water presence in the medium and thus carry information on the main water flow paths and on the pore space saturation. At the same time a muon sensor was placed in the tunnel under the fault region to detect muons coming from the sky after their crossing of the rock medium. Since the muon flux is attenuated as function of the quantity of matter crossed, muons flux measurements supply information on the medium average density along muons paths. The sensor presents 961 angles of view so measurements performed from one station allows a comparison of the muon flux temporal variations along the fault as well as in the medium surrounding the fault. As the water saturation of the porous medium fluctuates through time the medium density might indeed present sensible variations as shown by gravimetric studies. During the experiment important rainfalls occurred leading variations of the medium properties

  18. Electrical resistivity tomography, VES and magnetic surveys for dam site characterization, Wukro, Northern Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haile, Tigistu; Atsbaha, Solomun

    2014-09-01

    Geophysical surveys involving the techniques of electrical resistivity imaging, electrical sounding and magnetics were employed to characterize the ground conditions at a proposed dam site at Hizaeti-Afras, Wukro, North Ethiopia. The techniques were utilized to map the depth to the competent formations, their relative suitability for foundation work and the presence and extent of weak zones in the subsurface. The work has mapped the different lithologic units of the subsurface and determined the depth to the basement rocks in the area. Through correlation of the inverse model resistivity sections of the imaging surveys, the geoelectric section of the sounding survey and the magnetic profile plots with available borehole lithologic logs, it is shown that the results very well supplement the geotechnical point data in addition to providing a wider coverage in mapping areas of weak ground that could otherwise be missed with widely spaced borehole information. The combined results of the survey show the proposed dam axis to be unsuitable. The power of the electrical resistivity imaging technique and its potential to map the shallow subsurface with adequate resolution are illustrated. The result is a strong suggestion that geophysical techniques can be used to assist and extrapolate borehole geotechnical data especially when large area is to be used for development of large infrastructure.

  19. The ERTS-1 investigation (ER-600). Volume 5: ERTS-1 urban land use analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Urban Land Use Team conducted a year's investigation of ERTS-1 MSS data to determine the number of Land Use categories in the Houston, Texas, area. They discovered unusually low classification accuracies occurred when a spectrally complex urban scene was classified with extensive rural areas containing spectrally homogeneous features. Separate computer processing of only data in the urbanized area increased classification accuracies of certain urban land use categories. Even so, accuracies of urban landscape were in the 40-70 percent range compared to 70-90 percent for the land use categories containing more homogeneous features (agriculture, forest, water, etc.) in the nonurban areas.

  20. ERTS evaluation for land use inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardy, E. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The feasibility of accomplishing a general inventory of any given region based on spectral categories from satellite data has been demonstrated in a pilot study for an area of 6300 square kilometers in central New York State. This was accomplished by developing special processing techniques to improve and balance contrast and density for each spectral band of an image scene to compare with a standard range of density and contrast found to be acceptable for interpretation of the scene. Diazo film transparencies were made from enlarged black and white transparencies of each spectral band. Color composites were constructed from these diazo films in combinations of hue and spectral bands to enhance different spectral features in the scene. Interpretation and data takeoff was accomplished manually by translating interpreted areas onto an overlay to construct a spectral map. The minimum area interpreted was 25 hectares. The minimum area geographically referenced was one square kilometer. The interpretation and referencing of data from ERTS-1 was found to be about 88% accurate for eight primary spectral categories.

  1. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The identification and area estimation of crops experiment tested the usefulness of ERTS data for crop survey and produced results indicating that crop statistics could be obtained from ERTS imagery. Soil association mapping results showed that strong relationships exist between ERTS data derived maps and conventional soil maps. Urban land use analysis experiment results indicate potential for accurate gross land use mapping. Water resources mapping demonstrated the feasibility of mapping water bodies using ERTS imagery.

  2. Adaptive time-lapse optimized survey design for electrical resistivity tomography monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul B.; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip I.; Chambers, Jonathan E.; Carrière, Simon; Oxby, Lucy S.; Loke, M. H.

    2015-10-01

    Adaptive optimal experimental design methods use previous data and results to guide the choice and design of future experiments. This paper describes the formulation of an adaptive survey design technique to produce optimal resistivity imaging surveys for time-lapse geoelectrical monitoring experiments. These survey designs are time-dependent and, compared to dipole-dipole or static optimized surveys that do not change over time, focus a greater degree of the image resolution on regions of the subsurface that are actively changing. The adaptive optimization method is validated using a controlled laboratory monitoring experiment comprising a well-defined cylindrical target moving along a trajectory that changes its depth and lateral position. The algorithm is implemented on a standard PC in conjunction with a modified automated multichannel resistivity imaging system. Data acquisition using the adaptive survey designs requires no more time or power than with comparable standard surveys, and the algorithm processing takes place while the system batteries recharge. The results show that adaptively designed optimal surveys yield a quantitative increase in image quality over and above that produced by using standard dipole-dipole or static (time-independent) optimized surveys.

  3. Estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) in high-risk cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson-Williams, K. A.; Gutmann, J. N.

    1991-01-01

    Menopausal estrogens are now being prescribed not only for symptom relief, but also to prevent the long-term sequelae of estrogen deficiency, namely osteoporosis and atherosclerotic disease. The well-established association between endometrial cancer and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) has become less of a clinical concern due to the recognition of the protective effect of progestogens in this setting. A small literature has emerged suggesting that extending ERT to the woman with a history of endometrial carcinoma imposes no increased risk of recurrence and may improve survival. Candidates for ERT should be women with a better prognostic profile with reference to their cancer. The relationship between ERT and breast cancer remains a topic of intense debate and investigation. Overall, the current literature finds no significant increase in risk among healthy women without a family history of breast cancer. There are no guidelines with reference to the woman with a history of breast cancer and the use of ERT. The most prudent approach with this population is to consider alternative treatments until more is known. PMID:1810102

  4. Lithostratigraphic interpretation from joint analysis of seismic tomography and magnetotelluric resistivity models using self-organizing map techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, K.; Muñoz, G.; Moeck, I.

    2012-12-01

    The combined interpretation of different models as derived from seismic tomography and magnetotelluric (MT) inversion represents a more efficient approach to determine the lithology of the subsurface compared with the separate treatment of each discipline. Such models can be developed independently or by application of joint inversion strategies. After the step of model generation using different geophysical methodologies, a joint interpretation work flow includes the following steps: (1) adjustment of a joint earth model based on the adapted, identical model geometry for the different methods, (2) classification of the model components (e.g. model blocks described by a set of geophysical parameters), and (3) re-mapping of the classified rock types to visualise their distribution within the earth model, and petrophysical characterization and interpretation. One possible approach for the classification of multi-parameter models is based on statistical pattern recognition, where different models are combined and translated into probability density functions. Classes of rock types are identified in these methods as isolated clusters with high probability density function values. Such techniques are well-established for the analysis of two-parameter models. Alternatively we apply self-organizing map (SOM) techniques, which have no limitations in the number of parameters to be analysed in the joint interpretation. Our SOM work flow includes (1) generation of a joint earth model described by so-called data vectors, (2) unsupervised learning or training, (3) analysis of the feature map by adopting image processing techniques, and (4) application of the knowledge to derive a lithological model which is based on the different geophysical parameters. We show the usage of the SOM work flow for a synthetic and a real data case study. Both tests rely on three geophysical properties: P velocity and vertical velocity gradient from seismic tomography, and electrical resistivity

  5. An evaluation of ERTS-1 imagery for mapping of major earth fractures and related features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. B.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Fractures of regional extent in the Wind River Mountains of Wyoming were mapped from ERTS-1 imagery. Most previously mapped fractures were confirmed by the ERTS-1 image study, and many new fractures were discovered. In one area, the ERTS-1 imagery appeared to give superior results to ground studies.

  6. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data for acquiring land use data of northern Megalopolis. [New England

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. B.; Lindgren, D. T.; Goldstein, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    State planners are increasingly becoming interested in ERTS as a possible method for acquiring land use data. An important consideration to them is whether ERTS can provide such data at a savings in both time and money over alternative systems. A preliminary evaluation of ERTS as a planning tool is given.

  7. ERTS-B (Earth Resources Technology Satellite). [spacecraft design remote sensor description, and technology utilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Mission plans and objectives of the ERTS 2 Satellite are presented. ERTS 2 follow-on investigations in various scientific disciplines including agriculture, meteorology, land-use, geology, water resources, oceanography, and environment are discussed. Spacecraft design and its sensors are described along with the Delta launch vehicle and launch operations. Applications identified from ERTS 1 investigations are summarized.

  8. Reconstruction of landslide movements by inversion of 4-D electrical resistivity tomography monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Paul; Chambers, Jonathan; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Meldrum, Philip; Smith, Alister; Dixon, Neil; Loke, Meng Heng

    2016-02-01

    Reliable tomographic inversion of geoelectrical monitoring data from unstable slopes relies critically on knowing the electrode positions, which may move over time. We develop and present an innovative inverse method to recover movements in both surface directions from geoelectrical measurements made on a grid of monitoring electrodes. For the first time, we demonstrate this method using field data from an active landslide to recover sequences of movement over timescales of days to years. Comparison with GPS measurements demonstrated an accuracy of within 10% of the electrode spacing, sufficient to correct the majority of artifacts that would occur in subsequent image reconstructions if incorrect positions are used. Over short timescales where the corresponding subsurface resistivity changes were smaller, the constraints could be relaxed and an order-of-magnitude better accuracy was achievable. This enabled the onset and acceleration of landslide activity to be detected with a temporal resolution of a few days.

  9. Electrical resistivity tomography to characterize a karstic Vauclusian spring: Fontaine d'Orbe (Pyrénées, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirieix, C.; Riss, J.; Rey, F.; Prétou, F.; Lastennet, R.

    2014-06-01

    The study site lies on a karst system in the Pyrénées (France) that crosses the Urgonian limestones. Organic matter was dumped on the west bank of the River Vert d'Arette, which polluted a spring (the Fontaine d'Orbe) situated on the east bank. Electrical resistivity tomography was utilised in order to understand the geometry of this karst outlet. After tests with the pole-pole array, the ideal electrode spacing was found to be less than 3 m. A conduit, a little less than 10 m wide, was discovered, which proved to be the terminal conduit of the karst system. It was established that the conduit traverses both banks of the River Vert d'Arette, thus presenting a hydraulic link between the two sides. Moreover, this conduit, which is totally submerged, passes under the riverbed and goes upwards to the spring. In addition to the geophysical measurements, hydrogeological measurements and observations were made. Based on the characterisation of the geometry of the karst network's terminal conduit, and the fact that is completely full of water and inclined, it is concluded that the Fontaine d'Orbe spring is of the Vauclusian variety.

  10. Plant-soil interactions in salt marsh environments: Experimental evidence from electrical resistivity tomography in the Venice Lagoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; D'Alpaos, Andrea; Cassiani, Giorgio; Marani, Marco; Putti, Mario

    2014-09-01

    The role of root water uptake in regulating soil water saturation in salt marshes is controversial. Modeling studies suggest that soil aeration is improved by transpiration, with implications for the distribution of vegetation species and of the associated topographic features controlling the hydraulic regime of the marshland and eventually its survival. Marsh vegetation plays a key role in the preservation of such critical environment, which represents unique marker for climatic change and impact studies. However, the direct quantification of space-time aeration patterns has remained elusive, in part, because of the limitations posed by high salinity to conventional observation techniques such as time or frequency domain reflectometry. Here we show that time-lapse microscale electrical resistivity tomography, coupled with tensiometric observations, allows the identification of variably saturated zones and the characterization of space-time soil moisture dynamics in a salt marsh in the Venice Lagoon (Italy). This is the first quantitative observational experiment which confirms that periodically flooded plants are capable of producing a persistently aerated layer below the flooded surface when transpiration proceeds at a sufficiently high rate. The experimental results are compared against previously published model predictions.

  11. Comparison of measuring strategies for the 3-D electrical resistivity imaging of tumuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsourlos, Panagiotis; Papadopoulos, Nikos; Yi, Myeong-Jong; Kim, Jung-Ho; Tsokas, Gregory

    2014-02-01

    Artificial erected hills like tumuli, mounds, barrows and kurgans comprise monuments of the past human activity and offer opportunities to reconstruct habitation models regarding the life and customs during their building period. These structures also host features of archeological significance like architectural relics, graves or chamber tombs. Tumulus exploration is a challenging geophysical problem due to the complex distribution of the subsurface physical properties, the size and burial depth of potential relics and the uneven topographical terrain. Geoelectrical methods by means of three-dimensional (3-D) inversion are increasingly popular for tumulus investigation. Typically data are obtained by establishing a regular rectangular grid and assembling the data collected by parallel two-dimensional (2-D) tomographies. In this work the application of radial 3-D mode is studied, which is considered as the assembly of data collected by radially positioned Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) lines. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this measuring mode over the regular grid measurements were investigated and optimum ways to perform 3-D ERT surveys for tumuli investigations were proposed. Comparative test was performed by means of synthetic examples as well as by tests with field data. Overall all tested models verified the superiority of the radial mode in delineating bodies positioned at the central part of the tumulus while regular measuring mode proved superior in recovering bodies positioned away from the center of the tumulus. The combined use of radial and regular modes seems to produce superior results in the expense of time required for data acquisition and processing.

  12. Applying petrophysical models to radar travel time and electrical resistivity tomograms: Resolution-dependent limitations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A.M.

    2005-01-01

    Geophysical imaging has traditionally provided qualitative information about geologic structure; however, there is increasing interest in using petrophysical models to convert tomograms to quantitative estimates of hydrogeologic, mechanical, or geochemical parameters of interest (e.g., permeability, porosity, water content, and salinity). Unfortunately, petrophysical estimation based on tomograms is complicated by limited and variable image resolution, which depends on (1) measurement physics (e.g., electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation), (2) parameterization and regularization, (3) measurement error, and (4) spatial variability. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters are altered by the inversion, which produces smoothly varying pixel-scale estimates. We refer to this loss of information as "correlation loss." Our approach upscales the core-scale relation to the pixel scale using the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. Synthetic examples evaluate the utility of radar travel time tomography (RTT) and electrical-resistivity tomography (ERT) for estimating water content. This work provides (1) a framework to assess tomograms for geologic parameter estimation and (2) insights into the different patterns of correlation loss for ERT and RTT. Whereas ERT generally performs better near boreholes, RTT performs better in the interwell region. Application of petrophysical models to the tomograms in our examples would yield misleading estimates of water content. Although the examples presented illustrate the problem of correlation loss in the context of near-surface geophysical imaging, our results have clear implications for quantitative analysis of tomograms for diverse geoscience applications. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  14. Using a new multichannel GPR and ERT method for high resolution archaeological mapping: application to a buried Gallo-Roman site in Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Raphael; Fauchard, Cyrille; Beaucamp, Bruno; Guilbert, Vincent

    2014-05-01

    We report on successful geophysical observations above a buried Gallo-Roman theatre in Normandy, France. The main objective of this study was to complete the previous archaeological surveys in order to localize the structure and precise its depth. The 100 m diameter theatre, lying between 50 cm and 3 m depth, was investigated using 1) a new multichannel Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR); 2) a 2D Electric Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and 3) geotechnical soundings. The multichannel GPR (IDS Stream X) is composed of 7 antennas working at a frequency of 200 MHz and with a spacing of 12 cm. Therefore, such system is well adapted to large-scale high-resolution surveys. In our case, the GPR was able to investigate the entire zone (1600 m2) in few hours. This survey led to the characterization of the subsurface up to 3 m depth. To complete the information obtained with the GPR, seven ERT profiles were acquired longitudinally and transversally to the structure. A Terrameter LS imaging system (ABEM) was used with a dipole-dipole configuration; as such protocol is sensitive to vertical structures. Three profiles are 32 m with a spacing of 1 m between electrodes, 2 profiles are 16 m with a 0.5 m spacing between electrodes, 1 profile is 19.20 m with a spacing of 0.6 m between electrodes and 1 profile is 64 m with a spacing of 1 m between electrodes. Such approach allowed to inverse the electric data up to a depth in the range 4-10 m. An excellent correlation is obtained between both methods, allowing us to propose a precise 3D visualisation of the Gallo-Roman theatre, in agreement with a partial model obtained from the previous archaeological surveys. Moreover, this study led to the discovery of other structures (confirmed by geotechnical soundings) and thus to complete the current archaeological model of the site. The Multichannel GPR clearly offers new potentials for the large-scale imaging of the subsurface. Combined with other geophysical and archaeological methods, it is a

  15. ERTS Applications in earthquake research and mineral exploration in California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdel-Gawad, M.; Silverstein, J.

    1973-01-01

    Examples that ERTS imagery can be effectively utilized to identify, locate, and map faults which show geomorphic evidence of geologically recent breakage are presented. Several important faults not previously known have been identified. By plotting epicenters of historic earthquakes in parts of California, Sonora, Mexico, Arizona, and Nevada, we found that areas known for historic seismicity are often characterized by abundant evidence of recent fault and crustal movements. There are many examples of seismically quiet areas where outstanding evidence of recent fault movements is observed. One application is clear: ERTS-1 imagery could be effectively utilized to delineate areas susceptible to earthquake recurrence which, on the basis of seismic data alone, may be misleadingly considered safe. ERTS data can also be utilized in planning new sites in the geophysical network of fault movement monitoring and strain and tilt measurements.

  16. The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nordberg, W.

    1973-01-01

    The first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) makes images of the earth's surface in four portions of the electromagnetic spectrum with sufficient spatial resolution and with a minimum of geometric distortions, so that these images may be applied experimentally to the study of geophysical processes relating to earth resources, to the exploration and conservation of these resources, and to the assessments of environmental stresses. During the first six months of operation, ERTS-1 has imaged 6.5 million square kilometers of the earth's surface every day, covering most major land masses and coastal zones as well as both polar regions of this planet. These images as well as the results of their analyses are available to all people throughout the world. Scientific investigators of all countries have been invited to participate in the utilization of ERTS-1 observations. Many of them have already demonstrated the great efficiency, economy, and reliability of making earth surveys from space.

  17. Water-management models in Florida from ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higer, A. L. (Principal Investigator); Rogers, R. H.; Coker, A. E.; Cordes, E. H.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The usefullness of ERTS 1 to improving the overall effectiveness of collecting and disseminating data was evaluated. ERTS MSS imagery and in situ monitoring by DCS were used to evaluate their separate and combined capabilities. Twenty data collection platforms were established in southern Florida. Water level and rainfall measurements were collected and disseminated to users in less than 2 hours, a significant improvement over conventional techniques requiring 2 months. ERTS imagery was found to significantly enhance the utility of ground measurements. Water stage was correlated with water surface areas from imagery in order to obtain water stage-volume relations. Imagery provided an economical basis for extrapolating water parameters from the point samples to unsampled data and provided a synoptic view of water mass boundaries that no amount of ground sampling or monitoring could provide.

  18. CARETS: An experimental regional information system using ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey CARETS (Central Atlantic Regional Ecological Test Site)/ERTS investigation is testing the applicability of ERTS data as input to an environmental information system for a multi-state mid-Atlantic region surrounding the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. The information system framework encompasses a flow of information through several stages from sensor to user, and involving evaluation and feedback from several potential users. Basic assumptions of the CARETS project model are that there is a measurable environmental impact associated with land use and land use change as determined with remote sensor data, and that the ERTS derived land use data sets, when properly calibrated, may thus provide regional planners and administrators with a shortcut to an understanding of the environmental changes that are going on in their regions.

  19. Vegetation density as deduced from ERTS-1 MSS response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegand, C. L.; Gausman, H. W.; Cuellar, J. A.; Gerbermann, A. H.; Richardson, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Reflectance from vegetation increases with increasing vegetation density in the 0.75- to 1.35 micron wavelength interval. Therefore, ERTS-1 bands 6 (0.7 to 0.8 micron) and 7 (0.8 to 1.1 micron) contain information that should relate to the probable yield of crops and the animal carrying capacity of rangeland. The results of an experiment designed specifically to test the relations among leaf area index (LAI), plant population, plant cover and plant height, and the ERTS-1 MSS responses for 3 corn, 10 sorghum, and 10 cotton fields are given. Plant population was as useful as LAI for characterizing the sorghum and corn fields, and plant height was as good as LAI for characterizing cotton fields. These findings generally support the utility of ERTS-1 data for explaining variability in green biomass, harvestable forage and other indicators of productivity.

  20. Environmental study of ERTS-1 imagery: Lake Champlain and Vermont

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, A. O.; Henson, E. B.; Pelton, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    Environmental concerns of the State of Vermont currently being stressed include water quality in Lake Champlain and a state-wide land use and capability plan. Significant results obtained from ERTS-1 relate directly to the above concerns. Industrial water pollution and turbidity in Lake Champlain have been identified and mapped and the ERTS pollution data will be used in the developing court suit which Vermont has initiated against the polluters. ERTS imagery has also provided a foundation for updating and revising land use inventories. Major classes of land use have been identified and mapped, and substantial progress has been made toward the mapping of such land use divisions as crop and forest type, and wetlands.

  1. Mapping a recent forest fire with ERTS-1 MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hitchcock, H. C.; Hoffer, R. M.

    1974-01-01

    Accurate fire boundary delineation provides essential information to forest managers in allocating suppression costs and planning regeneration efforts. The objective of this study was to test the capability of computer-aided analysis of ERTS-1 MSS data to accurately define the boundary of a recent forest fire and to discriminate spectral classes within the perimeter. Two frames of ERTS-1 MSS data were selected for analysis of the Moccasin Mesa Fire in Mesa Verde National Park. Data sets were collected one-half growing season and one full growing season after the fire. Results indicate that computer-aided analysis of ERTS-1 MSS data has the capability for accurately delineating fire boundaries and determining acreage of the burned area. Distinct spectral classes may also be defined within the fire perimeter.

  2. ERTS-1 Role in land management and planning in Minnesota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizer, J. E.; Brown, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Research on applications of ERTS-1 imagery to land use has focused on evaluating the ability of ERTS-1 imagery to update and refine the detail of land use information in the Minnesota Land Management Information System. Work has been directed toward defining the capabilities of the ERTS-1 system to provide information about surface cover by identifying forest, water, and wetland resources; urban and agricultural development: and testing and evaluating data input and output procedures. As capabilities were developed, meetings were held with administrators and resource information users from various agencies of government to identify their information needs. A full scale systems test for several selected pilot areas in the state is nearly complete. Users have been identified for each test area and they have been instrumental in identifying data requirements and analysis needs for administrative purposes. Users have both rural and urban orientations and provide a basis for evaluation of the results.

  3. Data relay system specifications for ERTS image interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, J. F.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments with the Data Collection System (DCS) of the Earth Resources Technology Satellites (ERTS) have been developed to stress ERTS applications in the Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Program. Active pursuit of this policy has resulted in the design of eight specific experiments requiring a total of 98 DCS ground-data platforms. Of these eight experiments, six are intended to make use of DCS data as an aid in image interpretation, while two make use of the capability to relay data from remote locations. Preliminary discussions regarding additional experiments indicate a need for at least 150 DCS platforms within the EROS Program for ERTS experimentation. Results from the experiments will be used to assess the DCS suitability for satellites providing on-line, real-time, data relay capability. The rationale of the total DCS network of ground platforms and the relationship of each experiment to that rationale are discussed.

  4. Environmental studies of Iceland with ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. S., Jr.; Boovarsson, A.; Frioriksson, S.; Thorsteinsson, I.; Palmason, G.; Rist, S.; Saemundsson, K.; Sigtryggsson, H.; Thorarinsson, S.

    1974-01-01

    Imagery from the ERTS-1 satellite can be used to study geological and geophysical phenomena which are important in relation to Iceland's natural resources. Multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery can be used to map areas of altered ground, intense thermal emission, fallout from volcanic eruptions, lava flows, volcanic geomorphology, erosion or build-up of land, snow cover, the areal extent of glaciers and ice caps, etc. At least five distinct vegetation types and barren areas can be mapped using MSS false-color composites. Stereoscopic coverage of iceland by side-lapping ERTS imagery permits precise analysis of various natural phenomena.

  5. Evaluation of ERTS-1 data for certain hydrological uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesnet, D. R. (Principal Investigator); Mcginnis, D. F.; Mcmillan, M. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 MSS data have been used in a variety of hydrologic research including snow-extent mapping; studies of snowmelt, snowmelt runoff, spectral reflectance of snow for assessing snowpack conditions, and snow albedo; lake ice formation, breakup, and migration; lake current measurements; multispectral studies of lake ice; and flood studies. MSS sensing of soil moisture over a well-vegetated test site was unsuccessfully attempted. Although a powerful research tool, ERTS-1 has very limited use as an operational system for hydrologic communities because of its 18-day revisit cycle and its lack of a quick look capability.

  6. Facilitating the exploitation of ERTS imagery using snow enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator); Martin, K. R.; Amato, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Detection and analysis of fracture systems can be more effectively conducted utilizing snow cover as an enhancement tool. From analysis within the Great Barrington Test Site it appears that the use of aeromagnetic data effectively supplements lineament data acquired using ERTS imagery. Coincidence of lineaments derived from aeromagnetics with lineaments interpreted from ERTS imagery apparently indicate the presence of mineralized fracture systems and dikes. Utilizing both tools can increase the speed and efficiency of mineral exploration and geological mapping in areas where bedrock is obscured by a thick unconsolidated sediment cover.

  7. ERTS-1 applications in hydrology and water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.; Rango, A.

    1973-01-01

    After having been in orbit for less than one year, the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) has shown that it provides very applicable data for more effective monitoring and management of surface water features over the globe. Mapping flooded areas, snowcover, and wetlands and surveying the size, type, and response of glaciers to climate are among the specific areas where ERTS-1 data were applied. In addition the data collection system has proven to be a reliable tool for gathering hydrologic data from remote regions. Turbidity variations in lakes and rivers were also observed and related to shoreline erosion, industrial plant effluent, and overall water quality.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Resistivity Anomalies Caused by Underground Caves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frid, V.; Averbach, A.; Frid, M.; Dudkinski, D.; Liskevich, G.

    2015-05-01

    Geophysical prospecting of underground caves being performed on a construction site is often still a challenging procedure. Estimation of a likelihood level of an anomaly found is frequently a mandatory requirement of a project principal due to necessity of risk/safety assessment. However, the methodology of such estimation is not hitherto developed. Aiming to put forward such a methodology the present study (being performed as a part of an underground caves mapping prior to the land development on the site area) consisted of application of electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) together with statistical analysis utilized for the likelihood assessment of underground anomalies located. The methodology was first verified via a synthetic modeling technique and applied to the in situ collected ERT data and then crossed referenced with intrusive investigations (excavation and drilling) for the data verification. The drilling/excavation results showed that the proper discovering of underground caves can be done if anomaly probability level is not lower than 90 %. Such a probability value was shown to be consistent with the modeling results. More than 30 underground cavities were discovered on the site utilizing the methodology.

  9. The ERTS-1 investigation (ER-600). Volume 1: ERTS-1 agricultural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Agriculture Analysis Team of the Johnson Space Center conducted a 1-year-long investigation of ERTS-1 multispectral data to evaluate how well features of agricultural importance could be detected, identified, and located; and their areal extent measured. Six study areas were selected in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Two basic analytical approaches were used to meet the objectives. The conventional image interpretation technique revealed that a particular color was an indication of the density of vegetative cover, not an indication of crop classification. Computer-aided techniques were used to classify crop types (i.e., small grains, truck farm crops, grasses, summer fallow) to accuracies as high as 95 percent on large (12 hectares or more) well-defined fields. A further breakdown into crop species (wheat, barley, soybeans, oats, corn) reduced the accuracy to 70 to 80 percent for single-date observations.

  10. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain hydrological uses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiesnet, D. R.; Mcginnis, D. F. (Principal Investigator); Matson, M.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Mapping of snow cover using ERTS-1 data proved to be six times faster than that done from U-2 photography. However, NOAA-2 VHRR snow cover mapping was almost as fast as ERTS-1, and it is available more frequently. Ice conditions in the Great Lakes can be readily determined by ERTS-1. Ice features characteristic of thawing conditions such as rotten ice, lack of pressure ridges, brash belts, and compacted ice edges can be identified. A great decrease in apparent reflectivity in band 7 as compared to band 4 also indicated melting conditions. Using sidelap from two successive ERTS-1 images of Lake Erie (February 17 and 18, 1973) a measure of ice movement was made, agreeing closely with the estimate from conventional methods. The same imagery permitted tentative identification of the following features: shuga, light and dark nilas, fast ice, icefoot, ice breccia, brash ice, fracturing, ridging, rafting, sastrugi, thaw holes, rotten ice, ice islands, dried ice puddles, hummocked ice, and leads.

  11. ERTS-1, a new window on our planet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Carter, William Douglas

    1976-01-01

    The launch, on July 23, 1972, of the first Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was a major step forward in extending man 's ability to inventory the Earth 's resources and to evaluate objectively his impact upon the environment. ERTS spacecraft represent the first step in merging space and remote-sensing technologies into a system for inventorying and managing the Earth 's resources. Examples presented in this book demonstrate ERTS ' vast potential for inventorying resources, monitoring environmental conditions, and measuring changes. Such information is essential for the full evaluation of the Federal lands and determining their future use, as well as for improved planning of overall land use throughout the United States and the world. Ten bureaus of the U.S. Department of Interior have roles in the ERTS project. Nearly all of these participating bureaus are represented in almost 100 papers included in this book. Chapter 3 is entitled ' Applications to Water Resources ' and contains 23 separate sections. (Woodard-USGS)

  12. Geological evaluation and applications of ERTS-1 imagery over Georgia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickering, S. M.; Jones, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 70mm and 9 x 9 film negatives are being used by conventional and color enhancement methods as a tool for geologic investigation. Geologic mapping and mineral exploration by conventional methods is very difficult in Georgia. Thick soil cover and heavy vegetation cause outcrops of bed rock to be small, rare and obscure. ERTS imagery, and remote sensing in general have helped delineate: (1) major tectonic boundaries; (2) lithologic contacts; (3) foliation trends; (4) topographic lineaments; and (5) faults. The ERTS-1 MSS imagery yields the greatest amount of geologic information on the Piedomont, Blue Ridge, and Valley and Ridge Provinces of Georgia where topography is strongly controlled by the bedrock geology. ERTS imagery, and general remote sensing techniques, have provided us with a powerful tool to assist geologic research; have significantly increased the mapping efficiency of our field geologists; have shown new lineaments associated with known shear and fault zones; have delineated new structural features; have provided a tool to re-evaluate our tectonic history; have helped to locate potential ground water sources and areas of aquifer recharge; have defined areas of geologic hazards; have shown areas of heavy siltation in major reservoirs; and by its close interval repetition, have aided in monitoring surface mine reclamation activities and the environmental protection of our intricate marshland system.

  13. Agricultural utilization of ERTS-1 data in Thailand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheosakul, P.; Indrambarya, B.; Morgan, J. O.; Vibulsresth, S.

    1974-01-01

    Recent advances made in three disciplinary areas that are of major importance to Thailand are briefly discussed. These areas are; (1) agriculture, (2) forestry, and (3) land use. Preliminary investigations of the ERTS-1 data have been so successful that the Thai Government has decided to develop a remote sensing data handling and research center.

  14. ERTS-1 flight evaluation report, 23 April - 23 July 1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The flight performance of the ERTS-1 satellite is analyzed for orbits 3810 to 5100. Systems analyzed include: orbital parameters, power subsystem, attitude control, telemetry, orbit adjust, thermal control, and data collection. Documents and reports related to the evaluation are also included.

  15. Digital correction of geometric and radiometric errors in ERTS data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakis, R.; Wesley, M. A.; Will, P. M.

    1971-01-01

    The sensor systems of the ERTS-A satellite are discussed and sources of geometric and radiometric errors in the received images are identified. Digital algorithms are presented for detection of reseau and ground control points, for rapid implementation of geometric corrections, and for radiometric correction of errors caused by shading, image motion, modulation transfer function, and quantum and systematic noise.

  16. Coastal applications of the ERTS-1 satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magoon, O. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Samples are given of the possible applications of ERTS-1 imagery to coastal and nearshore studies. Briefly discussed are: (1) obtaining regional views of extended coastal areas; (2) distribution of sediments; (3) coastal configurations and changes; (4) barrier islands; (5) underwater penetration, and (6) coastal waves.

  17. Computer techniques used for some enhancements of ERTS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingsley, F. C.; Goetz, A. F. H.

    1973-01-01

    The JPL VICAR image processing system has been used for the enhancement of images received from the ERTS for the Arizona geology mapping experiment. This system contains flexible capabilities for reading and repairing MSS digital tape images, for geometric corrections and interpicture registration, for various enhancements and analyses of the data, and for display of the images in black and white and color.

  18. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in the Houston area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Using clustering techniques, several large lakes in Texas have been accurately delineated in computer printout graymaps. It was also found that small bodies of water (one to two acres in size) could be detected by searching for small reflectance values in the infrared data. A graymap printout of a lake described a shore outline that was not consistent with available maps. Field examination revealed that the actual level of the lake was below that for which the map was drawn. The current lake configuration agrees in shape and relative size with the ERTS-1 data printout. Water turbidity causes reflectance changes which are detectable in ERTS-1 band 7 data. A comparison has been made of the Monterey Bay, California area using 1971 aerial color infrared photography and a 1972 ERTS-1 band 7 infrared image. This comparison revealed that some event has occurred to impound a significant amount of water in the area since the infrared photography was taken. Data values in the ERTS-1 infrared image exhibit detectable changes in brightness at inflow points, where high turbidity would be present. Researchers had not expected to detect water turbidity patterns in band 7 (800 to 1100 nanometers).

  19. Environmental surveys in Alaska based upon ERTS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Alaskan applications of ERTS data are summarized. Areas discussed are: (1) land use; (2) archaeology; (3) vegetation mapping; (4) ice reporting and mapping; (5) permafrost; (6) mineral and oil exploration; (7) geological surveys; (8) seismology; (9) geological faults and structures; (10) hydrology and water resources; (11) glaciology; (12) water circulation in Cook Inlet; and (13) fish and mammal populations.

  20. Variability in Soil Moisture in a Temperate Deciduous Forest Using Electrical Resistivity and Throughfall Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Y.; Van Dam, R. L.; Jayawickreme, D.

    2013-12-01

    In deciduous forests, soil moisture is an important driver of energy and carbon cycling, as well as ecosystem dynamics. The amount and distribution of soil moisture also influences soil microbial activity, nutrient fluxes, and groundwater recharge. Consequently, accurate characterization of interactions and interdependencies between vegetation and soil moisture is critical to forecast water resources and ecosystem health in a changing climate. Such relationships and processes are nevertheless difficult to measure, both in time and space because of our limited ability to monitor the subsurface at necessary scales and frequencies. Several recent studies have shown that electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), using an array of minimally invasive surface electrodes, is a promising method for in-situ soil moisture monitoring. To this point, however, only few studies have used ERT to investigate spatial variability of soil moisture in temperate deciduous forests and to explore any links between soil water and above ground ecosystem variables. In our study in a central Michigan (USA) maple forest during the 2012 growing season, we combined ERT with detailed vegetation surveys and throughfall measurements to obtain better insight into spatial variations in rainwater input and soil water patterns. Resistivity data were collected on a weekly basis along an array of 84 electrodes with a spacing of 1.5 m. The inversion results were temperature corrected, converted to soil moisture, and differenced to obtain 2D images of soil moisture changes. The throughfall data were obtained using a novel method based on dissolution of plaster-of-paris tablets that were positioned below funnels, at 19 locations in the forest. Our results show that: 1) resistivity changes spatially with vegetation distribution, 2) in-season temporal changes in resistivity are related to plant characteristics, in particular to tree count and basal area, and 3) our low-budget throughfall method was capable of

  1. 3D Characterization and Time-Lapse Imaging of the Desiccation Treatability Test at the Hanford BC-Cribs and Trenches Site using High Performance Computing applied to Electrical Resistivity Imaging - 12271

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Tim; Greenwood, Jason; Strickland, Chris; Truex, Mike; Freedman, Vicky; Chronister, Glen; Rucker, Dale

    2012-07-01

    Contaminated vadose zone materials are a potential source of long-term groundwater contamination at many sites across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Deep vadose zone contamination presents a particularly challenging remedial problem due to the difficultly of locating contaminants and the expense of access and ex situ treatment. In situ remediation techniques, whereby remedial amendments must be delivered to contaminated soils, have been identified as a potential alternative. However, amendment delivery is typically uncertain and post delivery remedial performance is often not well understood due to limited information available from sparsely spaced boreholes. Recent advancements in electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) are being used to address these challenges at the Hanford site by providing remote, three-dimensional images of contaminant distribution and four-dimensional (three spatial dimensions plus the time dimension) images of in-situ vadose zone remediation processes. These capabilities were recently demonstrated with a large scale surface characterization effort and during a smaller scale desiccation treatability test at the Hanford BC-Cribs area. The results of these efforts demonstrate the utility of leveraging high-performance computing resources to process ERT data for 3D reconnaissance mapping of subsurface contaminants and for detailed 3D monitoring of vadose zone remediation efforts. Two examples of ERT imaging at a former waste disposal facility have been demonstrated at different scales; a large scale reconnaissance survey spanning many hundreds of meters and a detailed monitoring application spanning a few tens of meters. Although ERT is applicable at many scales, resolution is generally governed by proximity to electrodes. For instance, the BCCT reconnaissance survey demonstrated herein lost resolution with depth (i.e. away from surface electrodes), and was unable to detect a high conductivity anomaly at approximately 75 m below

  2. Hydrogeological and geophysical study for deeper groundwater resource in quartzitic hard rock ridge region from 2D resistivity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dewashish; Rao, V. Ananda; Sarma, V. S.

    2014-04-01

    Electrical resistivity method is a versatile and economical technique for groundwater prospecting in different geological settings due to wide spectrum of resistivity compared to other geophysical parameters. Exploration and exploitation of groundwater, a vital and precious resource, is a challenging task in hard rock, which exhibits inherent heterogeneity. In the present study, two-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Tomography (2D-ERT) technique using two different arrays, viz., pole-dipole and pole-pole, were deployed to look into high signal strength data in a tectonically disturbed hard rock ridge region for groundwater. Four selected sites were investigated. 2D subsurface resistivity tomography data were collected using Syscal Pro Switch-10 channel system and covered a 2 km long profile in a tough terrain. The hydrogeological interpretation based on resistivity models reveal the water horizons trap within the clayey sand and weathered/fractured quartzite formations. Aquifer resistivity lies between ˜3-35 and 100-200 Ωm. The results of the resistivity models decipher potential aquifer lying between 40 and 88 m depth, nevertheless, it corroborates with the static water level measurements in the area of study. The advantage of using pole-pole in conjunction with the pole-dipole array is well appreciated and proved worth which gives clear insight of the aquifer extent, variability and their dimension from shallow to deeper strata from the hydrogeological perspective in the present geological context.

  3. Modelling the electrical resistivity response to CO2 plumes generated in a laboratory, cylindrical sandbox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremer, T.; Maineult, A. J.; Binley, A.; Vieira, C.; Zamora, M.

    2012-12-01

    CO2 capture and storage into deep geological formations is one of the main solutions proposed to reduce the concentration of anthropic CO2 in the atmosphere. The monitoring of injection sites is a crucial issue to assess for the long term viability of CO2 storage. With the intention of detecting potential leakages, we are investigating the possibility of using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) techniques to detect CO2 transfers in the shallow sub-surface. ERT measurements were performed during a CO2 injection in a cylindrical tank filled with Fontainebleau sand and saturated with water. Several measurements protocols were tested. The inversion of the resistances measured with the software R3T (Binley and Kemna (2005)) clearly showed that the CO2 injection induces significant changes in the resistivity distribution of the medium, and that ERT has a promising potential for the detection and survey of CO2 transfers through unconsolidated saturated media. We modeled this experiment using Matlab by building a 3D cellular automaton that describes the CO2 spreading, following the geometric and stochastic approach described by Selker et al. (2007). The CO2 circulation is described as independents, circular and continuous gas channels whose horizontal spread depends on a Gaussian probability law. From the channel distribution we define the corresponding gas concentration distribution and calculate the resistivity of the medium by applying Archie's law for unsaturated conditions. The forward modelling was performed with the software R3T to convert the resistivity distribution into resistances values, each corresponding to one of the electrode arrays used in the experimental measurements. Modelled and measured resistances show a good correlation, except for the electrode arrays located at the top or the bottom of the tank. We improved the precision of the model by considering the effects due to CO2 dissolution in the water which increases the conductivity of the

  4. Assessing clogging processes caused by biofilm growth and organic particle accumulation in constructed wetlands using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoub, Himi; Tapias, Josefina C.; Lovera, Raúl; Rivero, Lluís; Font, Xavier; Casas, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Constructed wetlands for removing pollutants from wastewater in small communities are growing rapidly in many regions of the world. The advantages over conventional mechanical sanitation systems, where land availability is not a limiting factor, are low energy requirements, easy operation and maintenance, low sludge production and cost-effectivity. Nevertheless, with time the cleaning process can result in gradual clogging of the porous layer by suspended solids, bacterial film, chemical precipitates and compaction. The clogging development causes decrease of hydraulic conductivity, reduced oxygen supply and further leads to a rapid decrease of the treatment performance. As the investment involved in reversing clogging can represent a substantial fraction of the cost of a new system it is essential to assess in advance the evolution of clogging process and detect potential failures in the system. Since there is a lack of experiences for monitoring the functionality of constructed wetlands time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography studies have been conducted at horizontal sub-surface flow municipal wastewater treatment wetlands of Catalonia (Spain). The results of this research show that electrical resistivity tomography can be a very useful technique for assessing the extent of silting up processes that clog the subsurface flow constructed wetlands through the gravel layer. In the unsaturated zone, the electrical resistivity is greater at the end of the filter, since the pores contains air which is dielectric, while at the beginning of the filter the resistivity is lower because the electrical conduction of organic matter around the mineral grains. Conversely, in the saturated zone, the electrical resistivity is lower at the end of the filter, since pores contain a higher proportion of high ionic conductivity wastewater, while at the beginning of the filter the electrical resistivity is higher because of the lower porosity due to the clogging process.

  5. Hydrostratigraphy of a Sand Aquifer from Combined ERT and GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadimitrios, K. S.; Ferris, G.; Bank, C.

    2015-12-01

    Overlapping resistivity and ground-penetrating radar transects were collected on a shallow sand aquifer. The study area covers about 150 by 150 m, and the water table depth in that area ranges from as shallow as 30 cm to over 2m. Electric resistivity tomography shows layers of resistances which we relate to the vadose zone (above 1200 Ohm.m), the saturated zone (approx. 300 Ohm.m), and underlying aquitard (above 1200 Ohm.m, made of glacial till). The resistivity sections fail to capture the topography of the sand-till boundary seen in collected radargrams (e.g., from 80 to 120 ns over a 30 m horizontal distance). Converting radar travel times to thickness of the aquifer requires knowledge of water table depth as well as radar velocity in both the saturated and unsaturated sands. Water table depth can be taken from resistivity pseudosections as well as local piezometers. Radar velocities can be estimated based on the properties of the local sand and assuming 100% saturation. In merging the results from the two datasets we are able to map local hydrostratigraphy and aquifer geometry.

  6. Internal Structure of Periglacial Landforms: Assessment using 3D Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmert, Adrian; Kneisel, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence of internal heterogeneities within periglacial landforms (e.g. frost table topography or varying ice content) is in most cases not inferable from the surface. Hence, to develop an enhanced understanding of the interaction between surface and subsurface processes, it is necessary to analyse the internal structure of different periglacial landforms and landform elements. The assessment of the internal structure is provided by the application of three-dimensional Electrical Resistivity Imaging (ERI). ERI is the technique of merging datum points from several parallel and perpendicular performed two-dimensional ERT (Electrical Resistivity Tomography) measurements and inverting the data set with a 3D inversion algorithm (sometimes also referred to as quasi-3D ERT). The application of this method has proven to be a valuable tool for mapping the spatial extent of isolated permafrost bodies and associated subsurface conditions. In this contribution, we present results from four ERI measurements, carried out in summer 2014 at different investigation sites in the Swiss Alps: Three measurements were performed on pebbly rockglaciers of different size and topographical position and one measurement was performed on a solifluction slope. Each of the 3D survey grids consists of 17 to 32 single 2D ERT surveys (Dipol-Dipol or Wenner-Schlumberger array) and covers an area of between 6000 m² and 7000 m², depending on the specific survey grid set-up. The inversions of the data sets were performed using the two different inversion algorithms of the software products "RES3DINV" and "BERT" (Boundless Electrical Resistivity Tomography) for a comparative analysis and to further support the geomorphological interpretation of the geophysical models. Each of the resulting resistivity models shows strong small-scale spatial heterogeneities between the investigated landforms but also within landform elements. For the investigated rockglacier sites, these structures include

  7. Variogram-based inversion of time-lapse electrical resistivity data: development and application to a thermal tracing experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Thomas; Nguyen, Frédéric

    2015-04-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) has become a popular imaging methodology in a broad range of applications given its large sensitivity to subsurface parameters and its relative simplicity to implement. More particularly, time-lapse ERT is now increasingly used for monitoring purposes in many contexts such as water content, permafrost, landslide, seawater intrusion, solute transport or heat transport experiments. Specific inversion schemes have been developed for time-lapse data sets. However, in contrast with static inversions for which many techniques including geostatistical, minimum support or structural inversion are commonly applied, most of the methodologies for time-lapse inversion still rely on non-physically based spatial and/or temporal smoothing of the parameters or parameter changes. In this work, we propose a time-lapse ERT inversion scheme based on the difference inversion scheme. We replace the standard smoothness-constraint regularization operator by the parameter change covariance matrix. The objective function can be expressed as ψdiff(Δm ) = ||Wd [d - d0 + f(m0)- f(m )]||2 + λ ||||C-Δ0m.5Δm ||||2 where Wd is the data weighting matrix, d and d0 are the data sets corresponding to the considered time-step and to the background, f() is the forward operator, m and m0 are the models corresponding to the considered time-step and to the background, Δm is the parameter change (resistivity), CΔm is the parameter change covariance matrix and λ the regularization parameter. This operator takes into account the correlation between changes in resistivity at different locations through a variogram computed using independent data (e.g., electromagnetic logs). It may vary for subsequent time-steps if the correlation length is time-dependent. The methodology is first validated and compared to the standard smoothness-constraint inversion using a synthetic benchmark simulating the injection of a conductive tracer into a homogeneous aquifer inducing

  8. Geologic and mineral and water resources investigations in western Colorado using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, D. H., Jr. (Compiler)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geologic interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery is dependent on recognition of the distribution, continuity, trend, and geometry of key surface features. In the examination of ERTS-1 imagery, lithology must be interpreted largely from the geomorphic expression of the terrain. ERTS-1 imagery is extremely useful in detecting local structures. Most mapped structures are topographically-expressed. Consequently, ERTS-1 imagery acquired during mid-winter, when the solar illumination angle is low, provides the largest amount of structural information. Stereoscopic analyses of ERTS-1 images significantly aid geologic interpretation. Positive transparencies of ERTS-1 images (1:1,000,000) commonly contain more geologic information than can be adequately annotated during geologic interpretation.

  9. 3-D Resistivity Tomography for Cliff Stability Study at the D-Day Pointe du Hoc Historic Site in Normandy, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udphuay, S.; Everett, M. E.; Guenther, T.; Warden, R. R.

    2007-12-01

    The D-Day invasion site at Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, France is one of the most important World War II battlefields. The site remains today a valuable historic cultural resource. However the site is vulnerable to cliff collapses that could endanger the observation post building and U.S. Ranger memorial located just landward of the sea stack, and an anti-aircraft gun emplacement, Col. Rudder's command post, located on the cliff edge about 200 m east of the observation post. A 3-D resistivity tomography incorporating extreme topography is used in this study to provide a detailed site stability assessment with special attention to these two buildings. Multi-electrode resistivity measurements were made across the cliff face and along the top of the cliff around the two at-risk buildings to map major subsurface fracture zones and void spaces that could indicate possible accumulations and pathways of groundwater. The ingress of acidic groundwater through the underlying carbonate formations enlarges pre-existing tectonic fractures via limestone dissolution and weakens the overall structural integrity of the cliff. The achieved 3-D resistivity tomograms provide diagnostic subsurface resistivity distributions. Resistive zones associated with subsurface void spaces have been located. These void spaces constitute a stability geohazard as they become significant drainage routes during and after periods of heavy rainfalls.

  10. Corrections of surface fissure effect on apparent resistivity measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gance, J.; Sailhac, P.; Malet, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a useful tool to detect and track water flow paths in the subsoil. However, measurements are strongly affected by subsurface heterogeneities such as fissures of different sizes and genesis (shrinking-swelling, macropores and deformation). In this work, we focus on surface fissures characterized by dimensions lower than the interelectrode spacing and correct their effect on apparent resistivity pseudo-sections by incorporating fissure geometry in the topography. We show that fissures with depths greater than 0.10 times the interelectrode spacing for a dipole-dipole array and equal to 0.16 for the gradient array and the Wenner-Schlumberger arrays create significant anomalies (greater than 5 per cent) in the pseudo-section. Surface fissure widths and dip angles have little effect with respect to the fissure depths which can increase the apparent resistivity up to 200 per cent. The clogging of the fissures with water or soil material decreases the anomaly effect linearly with the percentage of filling. The correction of apparent resistivity values is possible for relatively simple fissure geometries and only requires a manual survey of the surface fissures. It allows to improve the quality of the inverted resistivity section by mitigating the inversion artefacts and therefore a better interpretation.

  11. Exploration for fossil and nuclear fuels from orbital altitudes. [results of ERTS program for oil exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, N. M.

    1974-01-01

    Results from the ERTS program pertinent to exploration for oil, gas, and uranium are discussed. A review of achievements in relevant geological studies from ERTS, and a survey of accomplishments oriented towards exploration for energy sources are presented along with an evaluation of the prospects and limitations of the space platform approach to fuel exploration, and an examination of continuing programs designed to prove out the use of ERTS and other space system in exploring for fuel resources.

  12. Mapping of soil banks using ERTS-1 pictures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, M. U.; Kantner, D. A.; Antalovich, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) pictures of different wavelengths (MSS 4,5,6,7) were used in the study of two strip mine areas in southeastern Ohio. The first area was near Piedmont Lake and the second area was near New Lexington. Prints were examined under a binocular microscope and the gray tone was correlated with the actual ground conditions at several sites. For the New Lexington area, color infrared pictures taken at an elevation of 18,000 feet were also used for correlation with the ERTS-1 imagery. The results indicate that MSS 5 and 7 are most useful in defining the stripped land and show that the hydrological and soil characteristics are remarkably different than the surrounding lands.

  13. Land use of northern megalopolis from ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The preliminary map of land use of Rhode Island is believed to be the first urban-type land use map ever made from satellite imagery, and its preparation a significant scientific result for ERTS-1. Eight categories of land use were differentiated at a scale of 1:250,000 including 3 categories of residential area: single family and multiple/mixed urban types, plus a residential and open space rural one. This compares favorably with RB-57 mapping experience in which, mapping at 1:120,000 from photography taken from 60,000 feet, 11 basic categories of land use were discriminated. From ERTS, the urban cores of cities down to 7,000 population, and commercial and industrial sites down to 800 feet square, were consistently discriminated.

  14. Interpretation of Pennsylvania agricultural land use from ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Wilson, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. To study the complex agricultural patterns in Pennsylvania, a portion of an ERTS scene was selected for detailed analysis. Various photographic products were made and were found to be only of limited value. This necessitated the digital processing of the ERTS data. Using an unsupervised classification procedure, it was possible to delineate the following categories: (1) forest land with a northern aspect, (2) forest land with a southern aspect, (3) valley trees, (4) wheat, (5) corn, (6) alfalfa, grass, pasture, (7) disturbed land, (8) builtup land, (9) strip mines, and (10) water. These land use categories were delineated at a scale of approximately 1:20,000 on the line printer output. Land use delineations were also made using the General Electric IMAGE 100 interactive analysis system.

  15. Mapping Atlantic coastal marshlands, Maryland, Georgia, using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R.; Carter, V. L.; Mcginness, J. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Eastern coastal marshes are the most extensive and productive in the United States. A relatively low cost, moderately accurate method is needed to map these areas for management and protection. Groundbased and low-altitude aircraft methods for mapping are time-consuming and quite expensive. The launch of NASA's Earth Resources Technology Satellite has provided an opportunity to test the feasibility of mapping wetlands using small scale imagery. The test sites selected were in Chesapeake Bay, Maryland, and Ossabaw Island, Georgia. Results of the investigation indicate that the following may be ascertained from ERTS imagery, enlarged to 1:250,000: (1) upper wetland boundary; (2) drainage pattern in the wetland; (3) plant communities; (4) ditching activities associated with agriculture; and (5) lagooning for water-side home development. Conclusions are that ERTS will be an excellent tool for many types of coastal wetland mapping.

  16. Arctic and subarctic environmental analyses utilizing ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M. (Principal Investigator); Mckim, H. L.; Gatto, L. W.; Haugen, R. K.; Crowder, W. K.; Slaughter, C. W.; Marlar, T. L.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery provides a means of distinguishing and monitoring estuarine surface water circulation patterns and changes in the relative sediment load of discharging rivers on a regional basis. Physical boundaries mapped from ERTS-1 imagery in combination with ground truth obtained from existing small scale maps and other sources resulted in improved and more detailed maps of permafrost terrain and vegetation for the same area. Snowpack cover within a research watershed has been analyzed and compared to ground data. Large river icings along the proposed Alaska pipeline route from Prudhoe Bay to the Brooks Range have been monitored. Sea ice deformation and drift northeast of Point Barrow, Alaska have been measured during a four day period in March and shore-fast ice accumulation and ablation along the west coast of Alaska have been mapped for the spring and early summer seasons.

  17. ERTS-1: Automated land-use mapping in lake watersheds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, P. E. (Principal Investigator); Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L. E.; Smith, V. E.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 computer compatible tapes were used as a basis to generate land use maps in lake watersheds in southeastern Michigan. These maps, generated on a repetitive basis, provide information essential to governmental agencies concerned with planning and control of lake eutrophication. The ERTS mapping products included geometrically current land use map overlays at 1:250,000 and 1:48,000 scale and area measurement printouts. The printouts provide, within the watershed boundaries and by land use category, a quantitative measure of the amount of land, in square kilometers and acres. This quantitative measure of land use in watersheds is essential to the development and application of deterministic models, which compute nutrient flows into lakes and establish lake eutrophication rates.

  18. Application of ERTS-1 Imagery to Flood Inundation Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallberg, G. R.; Hoyer, B. E.; Rango, A.

    1973-01-01

    Ground data and a variety of low-altitude multispectral imagery were acquired for the East Nishnabotna River on September 14 and 15. This successful effort concluded that a near-visible infrared sensor could map inundated areas in late summer for at least three days after flood recession. ERTS-1 multispectral scanner subsystem (MSS) imagery of the area was obtained on September 18 and 19. Analysis of MSS imagery by IGSRSL, USGS, and NASA reinforced the conclusions of the low-altitude study while increasing the time period critical for imagery acquisition to at least 7 days following flood recession. The capability of satellite imagery to map late summer flooding at a scale of 1:250,000 is exhibited by the agreement of interpreted flood boundaries obtained from ERTS-1 imagery to boundaries mapped by low-altitude imagery and ground methods.

  19. Semi-automatic crop inventory from sequential ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. W.; Coleman, V. B.

    1973-01-01

    The detection of a newly introduced crop into the Imperial (California) Valley by sequential ERTS-1 imagery is proving that individual crop types can be identified by remote sensing techniques. Initial results have provided an extremely useful product for water agencies. A system for the identification of field conditions enables the production of a statistical summary within two to three days of receipt of the ERTS-1 imagery. The summary indicates the total acreage of producing crops and irrigated planted crops currently demanding water and further indicates freshly plowed fields that will be demanding water in the near future. Relating the field conditions to the crop calendar of the region by means of computer techniques will provide specific crop identification for the 8000 plus fields.

  20. ERTS-1 - Teaching us a new way to see.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercanti, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    The ERTS-1 payload is discussed, giving attention to three television cameras, which view the same area in three different spectral bands. The payload includes also a multispectral scanner subsystem and a data collection system which collects information from some 150 remote, unattended, instrumented ground platforms. Many government agencies use ERTS-1 data as integral parts of their ongoing programs. Through its EROS program, the Interior Department represents the largest single recipient and user agency of data obtained from NASA aircraft and spacecraft designed to gather repetitive information related to a wide variety of earth-science and natural-resources disciplines. Questions of environmental impact are considered together with applications in agriculture, forestry, marine resources, geography, and the survey of water resources.

  1. A summary of ERTS data applications in Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. M.; Belon, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS has proven to be an exceedingly useful tool for the preparation of urgently needed resource surveys in Alaska. For this reason the wide utilization of ERTS data by federal, state and industrial agencies in Alaska is increasingly directed toward the solution of operational problems in resource inventories, environmental surveys, and land use planning. Examples of some applications are discussed in connection with surveys of potential agricultural lands; mapping of predicted archaeological sites; permafrost terrain and aufeis mapping; snow melt enhancement from Prudhoe Bay roads; geologic interpretations correlated ith possible new petroleum fields, with earthquake activity, and with plate tectonic motion along the Denali fault system; hydrology in monitoring surging glaciers and the break-up characteristics of the Chena River watershed; sea-ice morphology correlated with marine mammal distribution; and coastal sediment plume circulation patterns.

  2. Land use of northern megalopolis from ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, R. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A color-coded urban-type land use map of the three northern megalopolitan states of Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island has been completed from ERTS-1 images. A computer data bank containing 11 categories of land use for the entire area by 1/4-square-kilometer cells is 80% completed. When completed, the data bank will permit the investigation to proceed to brief analytical studies for completion of the study.

  3. Application of NASA ERTS-1 satellite imagery in coastal studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magoon, O. T.; Berg, D. W. (Principal Investigator); Hallermeier, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Review of ERTS-1 imagery indicates that it contains information of great value in coastal engineering studies. A brief introduction is given to the methods by which imagery is generated, and examples of its application to coastal engineering. Specific applications discussed include study of the movement of coastal and nearshore sediment-laden water masses and information for planning and construction in remote areas of the world.

  4. Delineation of major soil associations using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. L.; Bodenheimer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    The delineation of a major soil association in the loess region of Obion County has been accomplished using ERTS-1 imagery. Channel 7 provides the clearest differentiation. The separation of other smaller soil associations in an intensive row crop agricultural area is somewhat more difficult. Soil differentiation has been accomplished visually as well as electronically using a scanning microdensitometer. Lower altitude aircraft imagery permits a more refined soil association identification and where imagery is of sufficient scale, even individual soils may be identified.

  5. Densitometry of ERTS-1 imagery to access vegetation change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashley, M. D.; Rea, J.

    1974-01-01

    Density measurements of ERTS-1 multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery can be used to evaluate phenological changes in vegetation. It was found that the density ratios for MSS bands 5 and 7 best characterize vegetation change. The ratio increases with vegetative progression and decreases with vegetative recession. The use of a densitometer aperture as small as 0.4 mm does not adversely affect the accuracy of readings on forest sites.

  6. Environmental monitoring via the ERTS-1 Data Collection System.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Painter, J. E.; Seitner, J. E.

    1973-01-01

    The Data Collection System (DCS) provides users with near real-time environmental data from earth-based sensors relayed via the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1) to Goddard Space Flight Center. Data is received at Goddard at least twice per day from each sensor and distributed to users (who operate the sensors and transmitters) by mail and teletype. Data collection platforms are discussed together with DCS equipment and the ground receiving and processing equipment.

  7. Facilitating the exploitation of ERTS imagery using snow enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator); Martin, K. R.; Amato, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. New fracture detail within New England test area has been interpreted from ERTS-1 images. Comparative analysis of snow-free imagery (1096-15065 and 1096-15072) has demonstrated that MSS bands 5 and 7 supply the greatest amount of geological fracture detail. Interpretation of the first snow-covered ERTS-1 images (1132-15074 and 1168-15065) in correlation with ground snow depth data indicates that a heavy blanket of snow (less than 9 inches) accentuates major structural features while a light dusting (greater than 1 inch) accentuates more subtle topographic expressions. Snow cover was found to accentuate drainage patterns which are indicative of lithological and/or structural variations. Snow cover provided added enhancement for viewing and detecting topographically expressed fractures and faults. A recent field investigation was conducted within the New England test area to field check lineaments observed from analysis of ERTS-1 imagery, collect snow depth readings, and obtain structural joint readings at key locations in the test area.

  8. ERTS imagery applied to Alaskan coastal problems. [surface water circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burbank, D. C.; Burns, J. J.

    1974-01-01

    Along the Alaska coast, surface water circulation is relatively easy to study with ERTS imagery. Highly turbid river water, sea ice, and fluvial ice have proven to be excellent tracers of the surface waters. Sea truth studies in the Gulf of Alaska, Cook Inlet, Bristol Bay, and the Bering Strait area have established the reliability of these tracers. ERTS imagery in the MSS 4 and 5 bands is particularly useful for observing lower concentrations of suspended sediment, while MSS 6 data is best for the most concentrated plumes. Ice features are most clearly seen on MSS 7 imagery; fracture patterns and the movement of specific floes can be used to map circulation in the winter when runoff is restricted, if appropriate allowance is made for wind influence. Current patterns interpreted from satellite data are only two-dimensional, but since most biological activity and pollution are concentrated near the surface, the information developed can be of direct utility. Details of Alaska inshore circulation of importance to coastal engineering, navigation, pollution studies, and fisheries development have been clarified with satellite data. ERTS has made possible the analysis of circulation in many parts of the Alaskan coast.

  9. Combining human and computer interpretation capabilities to analyze ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    The human photointerpreter and the computer have complementary capabilities that are exploited in a computer-based data analysis system developed at the Forestry Remote Sensing Laboratory, University of California. This system is designed to optimize the process of extracting resource information from ERTS images. The human has the ability to quickly delineate gross differences in land classes, such as wildland, urban, and agriculture on appropriate ERTS images, and to further break these gross classes into meaningful subclasses. The computer, however, can more efficiently analyze point-by-point spectral information and localized textural information which can result in a much more detailed agricultural or wildland classification based on species composition and/or plant association. These human and computer capabilities have been integrated through the use of an inexpensive small scale computer dedicated to the interactive preprocessing of the human inputs and the display of raw ERTS images and computer classified images. The small computer is linked to a large scale computer system wherein the bulk of the statistical work and the automatic point-by-point classification is done.

  10. ERTS-1 data applications to Minnesota forest land use classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sizer, J. E. (Principal Investigator); Eller, R. G.; Meyer, M. P.; Ulliman, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Color-combined ERTS-1 MSS spectral slices were analyzed to determine the maximum (repeatable) level of meaningful forest resource classification data visually attainable by skilled forest photointerpreters for the following purposes: (1) periodic updating of the Minnesota Land Management Information System (MLMIS) statewide computerized land use data bank, and (2) to provide first-stage forest resources survey data for large area forest land management planning. Controlled tests were made of two forest classification schemes by experienced professional foresters with special photointerpretation training and experience. The test results indicate it is possible to discriminate the MLMIS forest class from the MLMIS nonforest classes, but that it is not possible, under average circumstances, to further stratify the forest classification into species components with any degree of reliability with ERTS-1 imagery. An ongoing test of the resulting classification scheme involves the interpretation, and mapping, of the south half of Itasca County, Minnesota, with ERTS-1 imagery. This map is undergoing field checking by on the ground field cooperators, whose evaluation will be completed in the fall of 1973.

  11. Analysis of ERT data of geoelectrical permafrost monitoring on Hoher Sonnblick (Austrian Central Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiler, Stefan; Schöner, Wolfgang; Reisenhofer, Stefan; Ottowitz, David; Jochum, Birgit; Kim, Jung-Ho; Hoyer, Stefan; Supper, Robert; Heinrich, Georg

    2016-04-01

    In the Alps infrastructure facilities such as roads, routes or buildings are affected by the changes of permafrost, which often cause enormous reparation costs. Investigation on degradation of Alpine Permafrost in the last decade has increased, however, the understanding of the permafrost changes inducing its atmospheric forcing processes is still insufficient. Within the project ATMOperm the application of the geoelectrical method to estimate thawing layer thickness for mountain permafrost is investigated near the highest meteorological observatory of Austria on the Hoher Sonnblick. Therefore, it is necessary to further optimize the transformation of ERT data to thermal changes in the subsurface. Based on an innovative time lapse inversion routine for ERT data (Kim J.-H. et al 2013) a newly developed data analysis software tool developed by Kim Jung-Ho (KIGAM) in cooperation with the Geophysics group of the Geological Survey of Austria allows the statistical analysis of the entire sample set of each and every data point measured by the geoelectrical monitoring instrument. This gives on the one hand of course an enhanced opportunity to separate between „good" and „bad" data points in order to assess the quality of measurements. On the other hand, the results of the statistical analysis define the impact of every single data point on the inversion routine. The interpretation of the inversion results will be supplemented by temperature logs from selected boreholes along the ERT profile as well as climatic parameters. KIM J.-H., SUPPER R., TSOURLOS P. and YI M.-J.: Four-dimensional inversion of resistivity monitoring data through Lp norm minimizations. - Geophysical Journal International, 195(3), 1640-1656, 2013. Doi: 10.1093/gji/ggt324. (No OA) Acknowledgments: The geoelectrical monitoring on Hoher Sonnblick has been installed and is operated in the frame of the project ATMOperm (Atmosphere - permafrost relationship in the Austrian Alps - atmospheric extreme

  12. An interdisciplinary analysis of ERTS data for Colorado mountain environments using ADP techniques. An early analysis of ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M.; Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator); Goodrick, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The principal problem encountered has been the lack of good quality, small scale baseline photography for the test areas. Analysis of the ERTS-1 data for the San Juan Site will emphasize development of a preliminary spectral classification defining grass cover categories, and then selection of subframes for intensive investigation of the forestry, geologic, and hydrologic properties of the area. Primary work has been devoted to the selection and digitization of areas for topographic modeling, and compilation of ground based data maps necessary for computer analysis. Study effort has emphasized: geomorphic features; macro-vegetation; micro-vegetation; snow-hydrology; insect/disease damage; and blow-down. Analysis of a frame of the Lake Texoma area indicates a great deal of potential in the analysis and interpretation of ERTS imagery. Preliminary results of investigations of geologic, forest, range, cropland, and water resources of the area are summarized.

  13. Artic and subarctic environmental analyses utilizing ERTS-1 imagery. Cold regions environmental analysis based on ERTS-1 imagery (preprint)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. M. (Principal Investigator); Haugen, R. K.; Gatto, L. W.; Slaughter, C. W.; Marlar, T. L.; Mckim, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. An overriding problem in arctic and subarctic environmental research has been the absence of long-term observational data and the sparseness of geographical coverage of existing data. A first look report is presented on the use of ERTS-1 imagery as a major tool in two large area environmental studies: (1) investigation of sedimentation and other nearshore marine processes in Cook Inlet, Alaska; and (2) a regional study of permafrost regimes in the discontinuous permafrost zone of Alaska. These studies incorporate ground truth acquisition techniques that are probably similar to most ERTS investigations. Studies of oceanographic processes in Cook Inlet will be focused on seasonal changes in nearshore bathymetry, tidal and major current circulation patterns, and coastal sedimentation processes, applicable to navigation, construction, and maintenance of harbors. Analyses will be made of the regional permafrost distribution and regimes in the Upper Koyukuk-Kobuk River area located in NW Alaska.

  14. Using High-Resolution, Surface Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography to Characterize and Monitor Subsurface Hydrological Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, A. L.; Baker, G. S.; Hubbard, S. S.; Gasperikova, E.; Gaines, D. P.; Watson, D. B.; Jardine, P.

    2008-12-01

    The application of surface time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (TLERT) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Field Research Center (ORNL FRC) site is being used to monitor contaminant plume migration, assess contaminant response to remediation, and characterize the subsurface processes associated with natural episodic, seasonal, and annual recharge. A majority of the migration pathways governing the transportation of the mixed-waste contaminant plume occur in the high-permeability transition-zones of the underlying saprolite and more competent shale bedrock. It is known that transportation mechanisms along these conduits are influenced by natural recharge, especially severe storm events, but the degree of importance is unknown. The fast and efficient collection of datasets ideal for observing the dynamics and effects of groundwater recharge on the overall hydrology is accomplished using a permanently installed AGI SuperSting R8/IP system with 112 surface-based electrodes having 0.75m spacing and an overall line length of 84m. The north-south oriented profile borders the primary source of preferential recharge--an unlined drainage ditch and permeable fill material--and runs perpendicular to both the direction of ground water flow and the strike of the structural bedding in the underlying rock. With an observed imaging depth of 15-20m, intense and multifaceted surveying has imaged the transient perched water table and likely preferential flowpaths, as well as permit the detailed monitoring of temporal and spatial variations. The surface profile traverses wellbores where electrodes are also permanently installed and a multi-level sampler well that is used to provide hydrogeochemical measurements. While TLERT is known to be a useful tool for this type of problem and many studies have examined the most effective and efficient methodology for data acquisition, they have not sufficiently been able to identify or observe the subsurface processes associated with

  15. Assessment of the Efficiency of Consolidation Treatment through Injections of Expanding Resins by Geotechnical Tests and 3D Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Apuani, T.; Giani, G. P.; d'Attoli, M.; Fischanger, F.; Morelli, G.; Ranieri, G.; Santarato, G.

    2015-01-01

    The design and execution of consolidation treatment of settled foundations by means of injection of polyurethane expanding resins require a proper investigation of the state of the foundation soil, in order to better identify anomalies responsible for the instability. To monitor the injection process, a procedure has been developed, which involves, in combination with traditional geotechnical tests, the application of a noninvasive, geophysical technique based on the electrical resistivity, which is strongly sensitive to presence of water or voids. Three-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography is a useful tool to produce effective 3D images of the foundation soils before, during, and after the injections. The achieved information allows designing the consolidation scheme and monitoring its effects on the treated volumes in real time. To better understand the complex processes induced by the treatment and to learn how variations of resistivity accompany increase of stiffness, an experiment was carried out in a full-scale test site. Injections of polyurethane expanding resin were performed as in real worksite conditions. Results confirm that the experimented approach by means of 3D resistivity imaging allows a reliable procedure of consolidation, and geotechnical tests demonstrate the increase of mechanical stiffness. PMID:26167521

  16. The use of capacitive resistivity imaging (CRI) for monitoring laboratory experiments simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuras, O.; Uhlemann, S.; Krautblatter, M.; Murton, J.; Haslam, E.; Wilkinson, P.; Meldrum, P.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the impact on bedrock properties of permafrost degradation as a result of climate change is of major interest in a number of areas, including the assessment of rising instability of high-altitude mountain rock walls. The remote sensing of rock walls with the primary aim of monitoring the spatial and temporal behaviour of rock temperature (and thus permafrost distribution) is an emerging field of research for geohazard mitigation where geophysical tomography has the potential to make a significant and lasting contribution. Recent work has shown that temperature-calibrated Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) using galvanic sensors is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime, yet the use of galvanic sensors can impose practical limitations on field measurements. In this study, we evaluate the use of Capacitive Resistivity Imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements across permanently installed multi-sensor arrays, in order to emulate well-established ERT methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen soils or rocks. Numerical simulation of multi-sensor CRI measurements on the rock samples under a quasi-static electromagnetic regime allowed us initially to validate our measurement concept and prototype CRI instrumentation. We have subsequently applied CRI as well as conventional ERT to controlled long-term experiments in the Permafrost Laboratory at the University of Sussex, simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock. Water-saturated samples of limestone and chalk (450 mm high, 300 mm × 300 mm wide) of varying porosity are being monitored. The lower half of each sample is maintained at temperatures below 0°C (simulating permafrost) and the upper half is cycled above and below 0°C (simulating seasonal thawing and freezing of the overlying active layer). Samples are instrumented with both capacitive and

  17. An ECT/ERT dual-modality sensor for oil-water two-phase flow measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Pitao; Wang, Huaxiang; Sun, Benyuan; Cui, Ziqiang; Huang, Wenrui

    2014-04-11

    This paper presents a new sensor for ECT/ERT dual-modality system which can simultaneously obtain the permittivity and conductivity of the materials in the pipeline. Quasi-static electromagnetic fields are produced by the inner electrodes array sensor of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system. The results of simulation show that the data of permittivity and conductivity can be simultaneously obtained from the same measurement electrode and the fusion of two kinds of data may improve the quality of the reconstructed images. For uniform oil-water mixtures, the performance of designed dual-modality sensor for measuring the various oil fractions has been tested on representative data and the results of experiments show that the designed sensor broadens the measurement range compared to single modality.

  18. Use of areal snow cover measurements from ERTS-1 imagery in snowmelt-runoff relationships in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aul, J. S.; Ffolliott, P. F.

    1975-01-01

    Methods of interpreting ERTS-1 imagery to measure areal snow cover were analyzed. Relationship of areal snow cover and runoff were among the objectives in this study of ERTS-1 imagery use for forecasting snowmelt-runoff relationships.

  19. Comparison of soil thickness in a zero-order basin in the Oregon Coast Range using a soil probe and electrical resistivity tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morse, Michael S.; Lu, Ning; Godt, Jonathan W.; Revil, André; Coe, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate estimation of the soil thickness distribution in steepland drainage basins is essential for understanding ecosystem and subsurface response to infiltration. One important aspect of this characterization is assessing the heavy and antecedent rainfall conditions that lead to shallow landsliding. In this paper, we investigate the direct current (DC) resistivity method as a tool for quickly estimating soil thickness over a steep (33–40°) zero-order basin in the Oregon Coast Range, a landslide prone region. Point measurements throughout the basin showed bedrock depths between 0.55 and 3.2 m. Resistivity of soil and bedrock samples collected from the site was measured for degrees of saturation between 40 and 92%. Resistivity of the soil was typically higher than that of the bedrock for degrees of saturation lower than 70%. Results from the laboratory measurements and point-depth measurements were used in a numerical model to evaluate the resistivity contrast at the soil-bedrock interface. A decreasing-with-depth resistivity contrast was apparent at the interface in the modeling results. At the field site, three transects were surveyed where coincident ground truth measurements of bedrock depth were available, to test the accuracy of the method. The same decreasing-with-depth resistivity trend that was apparent in the model was also present in the survey data. The resistivity contour of between 1,000 and 2,000 Ωm that marked the top of the contrast was our interpreted bedrock depth in the survey data. Kriged depth-to-bedrock maps were created from both the field-measured ground truth obtained with a soil probe and interpreted depths from the resistivity tomography, and these were compared for accuracy graphically. Depths were interpolated as far as 16.5 m laterally from the resistivity survey lines with root mean squared error (RMSE) = 27 cm between the measured and interpreted depth at those locations. Using several transects and analysis of the subsurface

  20. Analysis study of multispectral data, ERTS-A, from an area in West Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geomorphic features related to a known porphyry copper deposit at Saindak, western Chagai District, Pakistan, are easily distinguished on ERTS-1 images. New geologic information from the images was used in conjunction with known geology to evaluate one previously known prospect area and to suggest two additional ones, but no new prospects were recognized on the basis of the images alone. The study also showed that Saindak-type deposits are not likely to be present in some extensive areas of the Chagai District. The Saindak deposit is in an area of relatively easily eroded folded sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The deposit is characterized by an elongate zone of easily eroded sulfide-rich rock surrounded by a resistant rim of hornfels and propylitically altered rock. Both this rim and the central sulfide-rich valley are conspicuous features on the images. Swarms of dikes are probably useful for distinguishing real rims from other resistant rock types, but there is no expression of them on the image, although they are easily seen on aerial photographs of the Saindak rim. The investigation showed that a rim like that at Saindak does not form if regional metamorphism has increased the resistance of the country rock to erosion, as in the Pakistan-Iran border region northwest of Saindak.

  1. Utilizing ERTS imagery to detect plant diseases and nutrient deficiencies, soil types and soil moisture levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. L. (Principal Investigator); Sewell, J. I.; Hilty, J. W.; Rennie, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The delineation of soil associations and detection of drainage patterns, erosion and sedimentation through the use of ERTS-1 imagery are shown. Corn blight and corn virus could not be detected from ERTS-1 and detection of forest composition was at a very low probability.

  2. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina. [forested wetlands, water management, and land use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J., III

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been used to study forested wetlands, dynamic processes off Coastal North Carolina, and land use patterns in the Wilmington, North Carolina area. The thrust of the investigation is still involvement of state and regional agencies in the use of ERTS-1 imagery in solving some of their day-to-day problems.

  3. Shallow subsurface imaging of the Piano di Pezza active normal fault (central Italy) by high-resolution refraction and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villani, Fabio; Tulliani, Valerio; Fierro, Elisa; Sapia, Vincenzo; Civico, Riccardo

    2015-04-01

    The Piano di Pezza fault is the north-westernmost segment of the >20 km long Ovindoli-Pezza active normal fault-system (central Italy). Although existing paleoseismic data document high vertical Holocene slip rates (~1 mm/yr) and a remarkable seismogenic potential of this fault, its subsurface setting and Pleistocene cumulative displacement are still poorly known. We investigated for the first time by means of high-resolution seismic and electrical resistivity tomography coupled with time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) measurements the shallow subsurface of a key section of the Piano di Pezza fault. Our surveys cross a ~5 m-high fault scarp that was generated by repeated surface-rupturing earthquakes displacing some Late Holocene alluvial fans. We provide 2-D Vp and resistivity images which clearly show significant details of the fault structure and the geometry of the shallow basin infill material down to 50 m depth. We can estimate the dip (~50°) and the Holocene vertical displacement of the master fault (~10 m). We also recognize in the hangingwall some low-velocity/low-resistivity regions that we relate to packages of colluvial wedges derived from scarp degradation, which may represent the record of several paleo-earthquakes older than the Late Holocene events previously recognized by paleoseismic trenching. Conversely, due to the limited investigation depth of seismic and electrical tomography, the estimation of the cumulative amount of Pleistocene throw is hampered. Therefore, to increase the depth of investigation, we performed 7 TDEM measurements along the electrical profile using a 50 m loop size both in central and offset configuration. The recovered 1-D resistivity models show a good match with 2-D resistivity images in the near surface. Moreover, TDEM inversion results indicate that in the hangingwall, ~200 m away from the surface fault trace, the carbonate pre-Quaternary basement may be found at ~90-100 m depth. The combined approach of electrical and

  4. Time-lapse capacitive resistivity imaging: a new technology concept for the monitoring of permafrost

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuras, O.; Krautblatter, M.; Murton, J.; Haslam, E.; Wilkinson, P.; Meldrum, P.

    2011-12-01

    We have investigated and sought to prove a new technology concept for the non-invasive volumetric imaging and routine temporal monitoring of the thermal state of permafrost, a key indicator of global climate change. Capacitive Resistivity Imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements across permanently installed multi-sensor arrays is applied in order to emulate Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen soils or rocks. Recent work has shown that temperature-calibrated ERT using galvanic sensors is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime. However, our own laboratory experiments on rock samples under simulated permafrost conditions have equally demonstrated that galvanic electrodes experience large variations in contact resistances between sensors and the host material as the active layer freezes and thaws, leading to a rapid deterioration of data quality over time. As the presence of systematic but uncontrolled sensor noise will reduce the value of time-lapse ERT datasets for monitoring permafrost, the use of galvanic sensors will invariably impose practical limitations on field measurements. The capacitive methodology we are presenting here overcomes this problem and provides a roadmap for making stable resistance measurements with permanently installed sensors over time. We report on our experience with designing, building, testing and validating a functional prototype time-lapse CRI measurement system. The practical system architecture draws upon conceptual ideas incorporated in existing, field-scale CRI instrumentation designed by BGS; however, the use of dense capacitive sensor networks at the laboratory scale and the need for collecting tomographic imaging data across multiple sensors in an automated fashion required a novel technical approach. Our research has applied 4D CRI as well as

  5. Land use mapping and change detection using ERTS imagery in Montgomery County, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilms, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of using remotely sensed data from ERTS-1 for mapping land use and detecting land use change was investigated. Land use information was gathered from 1964 air photo mosaics and from 1972 ERTS data. The 1964 data provided the basis for comparison with ERTS-1 imagery. From this comparison, urban sprawl was quite evident for the city of Montgomery. A significant trend from forestland to agricultural was also discovered. The development of main traffic arteries between 1964 and 1972 was a vital factor in the development of some of the urban centers. Even though certain problems in interpreting and correlating land use data from ERTS imagery were encountered, it has been demonstrated that remotely sensed data from ERTS is useful for inventorying land use and detecting land use change.

  6. Mapping coastal vegetation, land use and environmental impact from ERTS-1. [Delaware Bay area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Vegetation map overlays at a scale of 1:24,000 compiled by multispectral analysis from NASA aircraft imagery for all of Delaware's wetlands are being used as ground truth for ERTS-1 mapping and by state agencies for wetlands management. Six major vegetation species were discriminated and mapped, including percentages of minor species. Analogue enhancements of wetlands vegetation and dredge-fill operations have been produced using General Electric's GEMS data processing and ERTS-1 false color composites. Digital, thematic land use, and vegetation mapping of entire Delaware Bay area is in progress using Bendix Corporation's Earth Resources Data System and ERTS-1 digital tapes. Statistical evaluation of target-group selection reliability has been completed. Three papers have been published on ERTS-1 coastal vegetation and land use. Local and state officials are participating in the ERTS-1 program as co-investigators.

  7. Preparation of urban land use inventories by machine-processing of ERTS MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, W.; Mausel, P. E.; Wenner, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    Spectral classes of urban phenomena identified from ERTS multispectral scanner data in Milwaukee included Surburban, Inner City, Industry, Grassy (open area), Road, Wooded Suburb, Water, Cloud, and Shadow. The Milwaukee spectral class statistics were used to classify the Chicago area, within the same ERTS frame, and similar results were achieved. In another ERTS frame, Marion County (Indianapolis) data were classified into similar classes. The Marion County ERTS study was supported by a land use classification of an area near downtown Indianapolis that utilized 12-band MSS data collected by aircraft from 3000 feet. The results of the ERTS analyses suggest that satellite data will be a useful tool for the urban planner for monitoring urban land use.

  8. Preparation of urban land use inventories by machine processing of ERTS MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, W.; Mausel, P. E.; Wenner, K. A.

    1973-01-01

    Spectral classes of urban phenomena identified from Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) multispectral scanner data in Milwaukee included suburban inner city, industry, grassy (open area), road, wooded suburb, water cloud, and shadow. The Milwaukee spectral class statistics were used to classify the Chicago area, within the same ERTS frame, and similar results were achieved. In another ERTS frame, Marion County (Indianapolis) data were classified into similar classes. The Marion County ERTS study was supported by a land use classification of an area near downtown Indianapolis that utilized 12-band MSS data collected by aircraft from 3000 feet. The results of the ERTS analyses suggest that satellite data will be a useful tool for the urban planner for monitoring urban land use.

  9. Geologic hypotheses of Lake Tanganyika region, Zaire, drawn from ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolyce, U.; Ilunga, S.

    1974-01-01

    Based on initial work in the Lake Tanganyika area of eastern Zaire, it has been concluded that ERTS imagery is extremely useful for reconnaissance level geologic mapping and analysis in this region of the humid tropics. In particular, ERTS imagery has proven useful for recognizing and mapping regional structural units, for recognizing major structural features, and for arriving at some preliminary hypotheses about the mineral potential of the area. Results so far indicate that ERTS imagery can make a major contribution to the development of the mineral resources of the country. Research has concentrated on applications of ERTS imagery in the field of cartography, geology, forestry, hydrology and agriculture. For the work in geology, a test site was chosen in eastern Zaire on the shore of Lake Tanganyika in the vicinity of the Lukuga River. This area was selected because of its varied geology and the existence of two frames of cloud-free ERTS imagery.

  10. Non-stationarity of electrical resistivity and soil moisture relationship in heterogeneous soil system: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michot, D.; Thomas, Z.; Adam, I.

    2015-09-01

    Root uptake is the most decisive key in water transfer involving soil and vegetation. It depends on water availability which can be evaluated by punctual measurements. Additionally, surface geophysical methods such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) provide larger spatial scales. This paper focuses on investigating temporal and spatial soil moisture changes, along a toposequence crossed by a hedgerow, using ERT and punctual measurements. 10 ERT were performed over the studied period for a 28 m long transect and compared to matric potential and groundwater level measurements. Soil Volumetric Water Content (VWC) was predicted using two methods (i) from ER using Waxman and Smits model (ii) and from matric potential using experimental retention curve fitted by Van Genuchten model. Probability Density Functions (Pdfs) of our set of data show that the largest change, in mean values of ER as well as matric potential, was observed in the topsoil layer. We then analyzed the consistency between ER and punctual measurements in this layer by extracting the arrays in the junction between ER grids and punctual measurements. Pdfs of ER maps at each monitoring time (from T01 to T10) were also calculated to select the more contrasted distributions corresponding to the wettest (T06) and driest states (T10). Results of ER were consistent with matric potential measurements with two different behaviors for locations inside and outside the root zone. A strong correlation (r = 0.9) between VWC values from Waxman and Smits model and those obtained from retention curve was observed outside the root zone. The heterogeneous soil system inside the root zone shows a different pattern in this relationship. The shift in the relationship between ER and soil moisture for the locations outside and inside the root zone highlights the non-stationarity in heterogeneous soil system. Such systems were actually related to the high hedgerow root density and also to a particular topographical

  11. Skylab S192 data evaluation: Comparisons with ERTS-1 results. [classification results using ERTS-1 and Skylab MSS data over Holt County, Nebraska agricultural area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, C. Y.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The Skylab S192 data was evaluated by: (1) comparing the classification results using S192 and ERTS-1 data over the Holt County, Nebraska agricultural study area, and (2) investigating the impact of signal-to-noise ratio on classification accuracies using registered S192 and ERTS-1 data. Results indicate: (1) The classification accuracy obtained on S192 data using its best subset of four bands can be expected to be as high as that on ERTS-1 data. (2) When a subset of four S192 bands that are spectrally similar to the ERTS-1 bands was used for classification, an obvious deterioration in the classification accuracy was observed with respect to the ERTS-1 results. (3) The thermal bands 13 and 14 as well as the near IR bands were found to be relatively important in the classification of agricultural data. Although bands 11 and 12 were highly correlated, both were invariably included in the best subsets of the band sizes, four and beyond, according to the divergence criterion. (4) The differentiation of corn from popcorn was difficult on both S192 and ERTS-1 data acquired at an early summer date. (5) The results on both sets of data indicate that it was relatively easy to differentiate grass from any other class.

  12. An ERTS-1 investigation for Lake Ontario and its basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polcyn, F. C.; Falconer, A. (Principal Investigator); Wagner, T. W.; Rebel, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Methods of manual, semi-automatic, and automatic (computer) data processing were evaluated, as were the requirements for spatial physiographic and limnological information. The coupling of specially processed ERTS data with simulation models of the watershed precipitation/runoff process provides potential for water resources management. Optimal and full use of the data requires a mix of data processing and analysis techniques, including single band editing, two band ratios, and multiband combinations. A combination of maximum likelihood ratio and near-IR/red band ratio processing was found to be particularly useful.

  13. Geology and forestry classification from ERTS-1 digital data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, R. D.; Herzog, J. H.

    1975-01-01

    Computer classifications into seven and ten classes of two areas in central Oregon of interest to geology and forestry demonstrate the extraction of information from ERTS-1 data. The area around Newberry Caldera was classified into basalt, rhyolite obsidian, pumice flats, Newberry pumice, ponderosa pine, lodgepole pine, and water classes. The area around Mt. Washington was classified into two basalts, three forest, two clearcut, burn, snow, and water classes. Both also include an unclassified category. Significant details that cannot be extracted from photographic reconstitutions of the data emerge from these classifications, such as moraine locations and paleowind directions. Spectral signatures for the various rocks are comparable to those published elsewhere.

  14. Engineering analysis of ERTS data for southeast Asian agriculture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydt, H. L.; Mcnair, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The present program focuses on rice because of its importance world-wide as a food. Specifically, the focus is on rice fields in the Philippines. Two primary program objectives are: (1) to establish the feasibility of extracting from ERTS imagery the areas where rice is grown, and (2) to determine those measurements on the imagery which enable the assessment of crop condition. Achieving these objectives with procedures which can be cost-effective can lead the way toward yield prediction, irrigation system management, and similar functions which are known to be important needs in Southeast Asia.

  15. Multidisciplinary applications of ERTS and Skylab data in Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C.; Pincura, P. G.; Meier, C. J.; Garrett, G. B.; Herd, L. O.; Dowdy, J. M.; Anderson, D. M.; Wukelic, G. E.; Stephan, J. G.; Smail, H. E.

    1974-01-01

    Experimental studies of ERTS-1 and Skylab earth resources data, in combination with correlative aircraft and on-site data, for environmental quality, land use, and resource management applications in Ohio show several areas of operational promise. Prime data use candidates demonstrated to date include definition and enforcement of surface mining (all minerals) legislation; Lake Erie modeling/management; land use classification and mapping studies at state, regional, and localized levels; and resources' inventories particularly of forested areas on both regional (multicounty) and localized scales.

  16. Automatic interpretation of ERTS data for forest management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirvida, L.; Johnson, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Automatic stratification of forested land from ERTS-1 data provides a valuable tool for resource management. The results are useful for wood product yield estimates, recreation and wild life management, forest inventory and forest condition monitoring. Automatic procedures based on both multi-spectral and spatial features are evaluated. With five classes, training and testing on the same samples, classification accuracy of 74% was achieved using the MSS multispectral features. When adding texture computed from 8 x 8 arrays, classification accuracy of 99% was obtained.

  17. Combined spectral and spatial processing of ERTS imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1974-01-01

    A general procedure is presented for extracting textural properties of blocks of image data. These features are calculated in the spatial domain, taking into account the statistical nature of texture. The procedure is based on the assumption that the texture information in an image is contained in the overall or 'average' spatial relationship which the gray tones in the image have to one another. The spatial gray-tone dependence matrix is discussed together with the spectral features used in the study and the land use classification studies conducted. The results of the study show the usefulness of using both spectral and textural characteristics of ERTS multispectral scanner data for developing classification procedures.

  18. Automated strip mine and reclamation mapping from ERTS. [Ohio coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pettyjohn, W. A.; Rogers, R. H.; Reed, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    In response to the urgent need for a faster and more economical means of generating strip mine and reclamation maps, a study was conducted to evaluate the suitability of using ERTS computer compatible tape for automatic mapping. The procedure uses computer target spectral recognition techniques as a basis for classification. The area encompassed by this investigation includes five counties in eastern Ohio that comprise nearly 7,500 square kilometers (3,000 square miles). The counties have been disrupted by coal mining since the early 1800's, and strip mining has been practiced in all of them. The environmental effects of strip mining are also discussed.

  19. Lake eutrophication as indicated by ERTS satellite imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherz, J. P.; Van Domelen, J. F.; Holtje, K.; Johnson, W.

    1975-01-01

    Light reflectance from water in the laboratory always correlates to the water quality parameter of turbidity. This turbidity is caused by suspended solids in the water and for a particular type of material there is a good correlation between the weight of these suspended solids and turbidity. However, this correlation is different for different types of material. When this suspended material is living green matter as in an eutrophic lake, the changes in reflectance can be detected as changes in brightness on a particular aerial image. Two test sites have shown that there is indeed a good correlation between the brightness on an ERTS image and lake eutrophication.

  20. Natural resources inventory and monitoring in Oregon with ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, G. H.; Paine, D. P.; Poulton, C. E.; Lawrence, R. D.; Sherzog, J. H.; Murray, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multidiscipline team interpretation of ERTS satellite and highflight imagery is providing resource and land use information needed for land use planning in Oregon. A coordinated inventory of geology, soil-landscapes, forest and range vegetation, and land use for Crook County, illustrates the value of this approach for broad area and state planning. Other applications include mapping fault zones, inventory of forest clearcut areas, location of forest insect damage, and monitoring irrigation development. Computer classification is being developed for use in conjunction with visual interpretation.

  1. Facilitating the exploitation of ERTS imagery using snow enhancement techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wobber, F. J. (Principal Investigator); Martin, K. R.; Sheffield, C.; Russell, O.; Amato, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. EarthSat has established an effective mail-based method for obtaining timely ground truth (snow depth) information over an extensive area. The method is both efficient and inexpensive compared with the cost of a similarly scaled direct field checking effort. Additional geological information has been acquired which is not shown in geological maps in the area. Excellent quality snow-free ERTS-1 transparencies of the test areas have been received and are being analyzed.

  2. Combined spectral and spatial processing of ERTS imagery data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Shanmugam, K. S.

    1973-01-01

    A procedure for extracting a set of textural features for ERTS-1 MSS data is presented. The textural features were combined with a set of spectral features and were used to develop a classification algorithm for identifying the land use categories of blocks of digital MSS data. The classification algorithm was derived from a training set of 314 blocks and tested on a set of 310 blocks. The overall accuracy of the classifier was found to be 83.5% on seven land use categories.

  3. Quantitative water quality with ERTS-1. [Kansas water resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L.; Mccauley, J. R.; James, G. W.; Magnuson, L. M.; Marzolf, G. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analyses of ERTS-1 MSS computer compatible tapes of reservoir scenes in Kansas along with ground truth show that MSS bands and band ratios can be used for reliable prediction of suspended loads up to at least 900 ppm. The major reservoirs in Kansas, as well as in other Great Plains states, are playing increasingly important roles in flood control, recreation, agriculture, and urban water supply. Satellite imagery is proving useful for acquiring timely low cost water quality data required for optimum management of these fresh water resources.

  4. ERTS-C (Landsat 3) cryogenic heat pipe experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, P. J.; Kroliczek, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    A flight experiment designed to demonstrate current cryogenic heat pipe technology was defined and evaluated. The experiment package developed is specifically configured for flight aboard an ERTS type spacecraft. Two types of heat pipes were included as part of the experiment package: a transporter heat pipe and a thermal diode heat pipe. Each was tested in various operating modes. Performance data obtained from the experiment are applicable to the design of cryogenic systems for detector cooling, including applications where periodic high cooler temperatures are experienced as a result of cyclic energy inputs.

  5. Combining indoors thermo-hygric survey, thermal imaging and Electrical Resistivity Tomography through GIS for the characterization of moisture in historic buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Garcia-Morales, Soledad; Lopez-Gonzalez, Laura; Ortiz de Cosca, Raquel Otero

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents the results of the combination, through a GIS, of environmental indoors thermo-hygric parameters and Electrical Resistivity Tomography in the hermit of "Humilladero", a small historic building in the city of Avila (Spain). The Hermit of "humilladero" was built 1548 - 1550 and it underwent several refurbishment works throughout its history until the present day. The hermit is formed by two rooms and a basement: The hermit per se, a sacristy which was added at a later stage towards the east of the hermit and the basement excavated under the sacristy in 1990. The south wall is nowadays half buried by the adjacent street pavement and a staircase attached to the east wall. The walls are built with granite ashlars and the whole building displays severe moisture-related damage, including granular disaggregation of mortars and some ashlars. The most affected areas are the ones buried under the street towards the south and the staircase towards the east where liquid water appears from time to time due to infiltrations through the ground. A mesh of thermo-hygric measurements of the indoors environment of the hermit was carried out to detect the humidity focal points, in addition to Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Infrared thermography on the walls. All these data was uploaded to a GIS (ArcGIS) together with a photogrammetric model of the decayed areas. The combination of the information in the GIS improved decay maps and allowed a better diagnosis of the building moisture distribution and causes. Research funded by Geomateriales 2 S2013/MIT-2914 and CEI Moncloa (UPM, UCM, CSIC) through a PICATA contract and the equipment from RedLAbPAt Network

  6. On the Pitfalls and Limitations of Applying Petrophysical Models to Geophysical Tomograms: Examples in Cross-Borehole Radar and Electrical-Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.; Binley, A. M.

    2004-05-01

    Geophysical field data have traditionally provided qualitative information on aquifer structure for hydrogeologic characterization; however, there is increasing interest in the application of petrophysical models to convert geophysical tomograms of electrical resistivity or radar velocity, for example, to hydrologic parameters, such as permeability, porosity, water content, and (or) salinity. Unfortunately, application of theoretical or empirical petrophysical models may be inappropriate in many situations, given the limited and variable resolution of tomographic estimates. The resolution of tomograms is a function of (1) the measurement physics, for example, electrical conduction or electromagnetic wave propagation; (2) the parameterization and regularization used for inversion; (3) measurement error; and (4) the length scale of heterogeneity. We present a framework to predict how core-scale relations between geophysical properties and hydrologic parameters break down in the inversion, which produces smoothly-varying pixel-scale estimates. Our approach upscales the core-scale relationship to the pixel-scale based on the model resolution matrix from the inversion, random field averaging, and spatial statistics of the geophysical property. In synthetic examples, we use the approach to evaluate the utility of tomograms for quantitative hydrologic estimation, in light of their resolution-dependent limitations. Comparison of examples for cross-borehole electrical resistivity tomography and radar tomography demonstrates the role of the measurement physics on the spatially-variable pixel-scale relationships between geophysical estimates and hydrologic parameters of interest. The goals of this work are to (1) raise awareness of the limitations of geophysical data, (2) provide a framework to improve survey design and assess tomograms for hydrologic estimation, and (3) promote additional research to improve the links between geophysical and hydrogeologic characterization.

  7. Mapping a Pristine Glaciofluvial Aquifer on the Canadian Shield Using Ground-Penetrating Radar and Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, L. W.; Shirokova, V.; Bank, C.

    2013-12-01

    Our study aims to construct a 3D structural model of an unconfined pristine aquifer in Laurentian Hills, Ontario, Canada. The stratigraphy of the study site, which covers about 5400 square meters, features reworked glaciofluvial sands and glacial till on top of Canadian Shield bedrock. A network of 25 existing piezometers provides ground-truth. We used two types of geophysical surveys to map the water table and the aquifer basin. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) collected 40 profiles over distances up to 140 meters using 200MHz and 400MHz antennas with a survey wheel. The collected radargrams show a distinct reflective layer, which can be mapped to outcrops of glacial till within the area. This impermeable interface forms the aquitard. Depths of the subsurface features were calculated using hyperbolic fits on the radargrams in Matlab by determining wave velocity then converting measured two-way-time to depth. Electrical resistivity was used to determine the water table elevations because the unconfined water table did not reflect the radar waves. 20 resistivity profiles were collected in the same area using Wenner-Alpha and dipole-dipole arrays with both 24 and 48 electrodes and for 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 and 2.0 meter spacing. The inverted resistivity models show low resistivity values (<1000 Ohm.m) below 2 to 5 meter depths and higher resistivity values (2000-6000 Ohm.m) above 1 to 2 meter depths. These contrasting resistivity values correspond to saturated and wet sand (lower resistivity) to dry sand (higher resistivity); a correlation we could verify with several bore-hole logs. The water table is marked on the resistivity profiles as a steep resistivity gradient, and the depth can be added to the comprehensive 3D model. This model also incorporates hydrogeological characteristics and geochemical anomalies found within the aquifer. Ongoing seasonal and annual monitoring of the aquifer using geophysical methods will bring a fourth dimension to our understanding of this

  8. Analysis study of multispectral data, ERTS-A, from an area in West Pakistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Geomorphic features related to a known porphyry copper deposit at Saindak, western Chagai District, Pakistan, are easily distinguished on ERTS-1 images. No new prospecting sites were recognized on the basis of the images alone, but new information from the images was used in conjunction with known geology to evaluate two previously known speculative areas and to suggest one additional one. The study showed that Saindak-type deposits are less likely in some extensive areas of the Chagai District than formerly believed. The Saindak deposit is in an area of relatively soft folded sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The deposit is characterized by a linear zone of easily eroded sulfide-rich rock surrounded by a resistant rim of hornfels and propylitically altered rock. Both this rim and the central sulfide-rich valley are conspicuous features on the images. Swarms of dikes are probably useful for distinguishing real rims from other resistant rock types, but there is no expression of them on the image, although they are easily seen on aerial photographs of the Saindak rim. During field mapping, patches of strong red and yellow hue related to the mineral natrojarosite were noted in the central valley. Attempts to detect a color anomaly using simple false color composites were not successful.

  9. Estimate of winter wheat yield from ERTS-1. [southwest Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A.; Williams, D. W.

    1974-01-01

    A model for estimating wheat yield per acre has been applied to acreage estimates derived from ERTS-1 imagery to project the 1973 wheat yields for a ten county area in southwest Kansas. The results (41.04 million bushels) are within 3 per cent of the preharvest estimates for the same area prepared by the USDA Statistical Reporting Service (39.91 million bushels). The projection from ERTS data is based on a visual enumeration of all detectable wheat fields in the study area and was completed while the harvest was in progress. Visual identification of winter wheat is readily achieved by using a temporal sequence of images (band 5 for Sept.-Oct.; band 5 for Dec.-Jan.; and band 5 and 7 for March-April). Identification can be improved by stratifying the project area into subregions having more or less homogeneous agricultural practices and crop mixes. By doing this, small changes in the spectral appearance of wheat related to soil type, irrigation, etc. can be accounted for. The interpretation rules developed by visual analysis can be automated for rapid computer surveys.

  10. Snow cover surveys in Alaska from ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, C. S.

    1973-01-01

    September and October ERTS scenes have been analyzed to delineate snow cover patterns in northern Alaska's Brooks Range and on Mt. Wrangell, and active volcano in South Central Alaska. ERTS images demonstrate that the snow on the northern foothills of the Brooks Range are significantly more affected by katabatic wind action than are the southern foothills. Aufeis deposits along arctic rivers also can be identified in late summer. A survey of such aufeis deposits could identify additional summertime sources of fresh water supplies. Images of Mt. Wrangell permit monitoring of the interaction between volcanic heat and the mass balance of glaciers that exist on active volcanoes. Temporal changes in the areas of bare rock on the rim of the caldera on the summit reveal significant melting of new snow from an extensive storm on August 18. Digital analysis of data from subsequent passes over the summit on September 7, 23 and 24 revealed considerable bare rock exposed by melting, which is virtually impossible from solar heating at this altitude and date.

  11. Pollution detection in Lake Champlain using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, A. O. (Principal Investigator); Henson, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A major waste water discharge plume generated by a large paper mill along the New York shore of Lake Champlain was visually detected on ERTS-1 imagery. The plume is best displayed in 9.5 inch positive transparencies of MSS bands 4 and 5. Observation of the magnitude and extent of this plume is feasible, under magnification of 4 times. The chemical parameters of this plume have been documented by limnological studies. An enhancement technique useful for documenting the presence of waste water discharge plumes in Lake Champlain utilizes Polaroid MP-3 copy camera equipment and Spectral Data Corporation's multispectral viewer. The 9.5 inch, ERTS-1, positive transparency is enlarged using the Polaroid MP-3 copy camera to produce an enlarged lantern slide size positive transparency. These are projected through the multispectral viewer for enhancement and the scene is viewed directly on the screen or copied by an additional photographic step. The technique is simple and produces rapid results.

  12. Relevance of ERTS to the State of Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A significant result was the fabrication of an image transfer and comparison device. To avoid problems and high costs encountered in manual drafting methods, Battelle staff members have fabricated an inexpensive, yet effective, technique for transferring ERTS-1 analysis displays from the Spatial Data 32-Color Viewer to maps and/or aircraft imagery. In brief, the image transfer-comparison device consists of a 2-way mirror which functions similar to a zoom transfer scope. However, the device permits multiuser viewing and real time photographic recording (35-mm and Polaroid) of enhanced ERTS-1 imagery superimposed over maps and aircraft photography. Thirty-five mm, 70 mm, and 4 in. x 5 in. photographs are taken of 80% of the TV screen of the Spatial Data Density Slicing Viewer. The resulting black and white and color imagery is then used in transparent overlays, viewgraphs, 35-mm and 70-mm transparencies, and paper prints for reports and publications. Annotations can be added on the TV screen or on the finished product.

  13. Analysis of ERTS-1 linear features in New York State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isachsen, Y. W. (Principal Investigator); Fakundiny, R. H.; Forster, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. All ERTS-1 linears confirmed to date have topographic expression although they may appear as featureless tonal linears on the imagery. A bias is unavoidably introduced against any linears which may parallel raster lines, lithological trends, or the azimuth of solar illumination. Ground study of ERTS-1 topographic lineaments in the Adirondacks indicates: outcrops along linears are even more rare than expected, fault breccias are found along some NNE lineaments, chloritization and slickensiding without brecciation characterize one EW lineament whereas closely-spaced jointing plus a zone of plastic shear define another. Field work in the Catskills suggests that the prominent new NNE lineaments may be surface manifestations of normal faulting in the basement, and that it may become possible to map major joint sets over extensive plateau regions directly on the imagery. Fall and winter images each display some unique linears, and long linears on the fall image commonly appear as aligned segments on the winter scene. A computer-processed color composite image permitted the extraction or additional information on the shaded side of mountains.

  14. Pollution monitoring in Lake Champlain using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lind, A. O. (Principal Investigator); Henson, E. B.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Band 4 imagery of April 7 and 25 show contrasting pollution effects due to seasonal and discharge variations. The pollution plume emanating from the International Paper Co. mill just north of Fort Ticonderoga was first detected on October 10 ERTS-1 imagery and now has been documented during spring high lake level conditions. The plume was observed extending further to the north and east than under low water conditions of October 10. This northward extension reflects a stronger northward current flow expected in the turbid southern leg of Lake Champlain. The extensive plume of April 25 represents full plant operation while the April 5 scene shows some plume traces directly over the submerged diffuser, discharge pipe representing minimal discharge during weekend plant operation. The ERTS-1 documentation will be used in developing a model of plume behavior under varying environmental conditions and will hopefully serve to assist in a major resource decision pending at U.S. Supreme Court level.

  15. Seasonal ERT monitoring of subsurface processes connected to freezing, thawing, snow accumulation and melt cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzeminska, Dominika; Starkloff, Torsten; Bloem, Esther; Stolte, Jannes

    2016-04-01

    For a better understanding of processes that influence snowmelt infiltration and runoff, and their consequences on soil erosion during spring periods, we established a long-term winter-spring ERT transect in the Gryteland catchment (Norway). The ERT transect is 71 m long, with 1 m spacing between the electrodes. It covers a depression with a north and south facing slope. The readings are collected once a week and, if needed, after a sudden change in weather conditions. Additionally, the soil transect is equipped with six TDR profiles, which register soil moisture and soil temperature every thirty minutes, at five depths (5, 10, 20, 30, 40 cm), for quantifying the ERT readings. The measurements performed during winter 2014/2015 gave promising results and showed the potential of ERT monitoring for understanding the soil thermal and hydraulic processes occurring during a winter and early spring. Moreover, there are visible differences in temporal trends and spatial variations in observed ERT patterns on the opposite facing slopes, which are of special interest. With the on-going experiment, we are aiming to understand the reoccurrence of the observed processes as well as to quantify soil moisture patterns. Herein, we would like to present the preliminary result of two ERT experiments (2014/2015 and 2015/2016) and discuss the advantages and limitations of our experiments. Moreover, we would like to stimulate the discussion about the potential of ERT for spatial and temporal monitoring of soil hydraulic and thermal processes and indirect measurements of soil water content.

  16. Real-time 4D ERT monitoring of river water intrusion into a former nuclear disposal site using a transient warping-mesh water table boundary (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.; Hammond, G. E.; Versteeg, R. J.; Zachara, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford 300 Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington, USA, is the site of former research and uranium fuel rod fabrication facilities. Waste disposal practices at site included discharging between 33 and 59 metric tons of uranium over a 40 year period into shallow infiltration galleries, resulting in persistent uranium contamination within the vadose and saturated zones. Uranium transport from the vadose zone to the saturated zone is intimately linked with water table fluctuations and river water intrusion driven by upstream dam operations. As river stage increases, the water table rises into the vadose zone and mobilizes contaminated pore water. At the same time, river water moves inland into the aquifer, and river water chemistry facilitates further mobilization by enabling uranium desorption from contaminated sediments. As river stage decreases, flow moves toward the river, ultimately discharging contaminated water at the river bed. River water specific conductance at the 300 Area varies around 0.018 S/m whereas groundwater specific conductance varies around 0.043 S/m. This contrast provides the opportunity to monitor groundwater/river water interaction by imaging changes in bulk conductivity within the saturated zone using time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography. Previous efforts have demonstrated this capability, but have also shown that disconnecting regularization constraints at the water table is critical for obtaining meaningful time-lapse images. Because the water table moves with time, the regularization constraints must also be transient to accommodate the water table boundary. This was previously accomplished with 2D time-lapse ERT imaging by using a finely discretized computational mesh within the water table interval, enabling a relatively smooth water table to be defined without modifying the mesh. However, in 3D this approach requires a computational mesh with an untenable number of elements. In order to

  17. Applications of ERTS-1 data to landscape change in eastern Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehder, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The analysis of landscape change in eastern Tennessee from ERTS-1 data is being derived from three avenues of experimentation and analysis: (1) a multi-stage sampling procedure utilizing ground and aircraft imagery for ground truth and control; (2) a densitometric and computer analytical experiment for the analysis of gray tone signatures and comparisons for landscape change detection and monitoring; and (3) an ERTS image enhancement procedure for the detection and analysis of photomorphic regions. Significant results include: maps of strip mining changes and forest inventory, watershed identification and delimitation, and agricultural regions derived from spring plowing patterns appearing on the ERTS-1 imagery.

  18. Application of ERTS imagery to geologic mapping in the volcanic terrane of northwest Wyoming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breckenridge, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 image interpretations in the Yellowstone/Absaroka volcanic province indicate that the ERTS-1 imagery can be successfully employed in mapping large-scale structures and gross lithologic differences within the volcanic rocks. The volcanic rocks are readily separable from the sedimentary and crystalline rocks but the various volcanic units are seldom distinguishable unless they exhibit a characteristic morphology. Color anomalies were detected on the ERTS-1 imagery and found to be related to zones of alteration and mineralization. High altitude aircraft imagery provided a means of checking and improving the interpretations.

  19. Fracture mapping and strip mine inventory in the Midwest by using ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wier, C. W.; Wobber, F. J.; Russell, O. R.; Amato, R. V.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of the ERTS-1 imagery and high-altitude infrared photography indicates that useful fracture data can be obtained in Indiana and Illinois despite a glacial till cover. ERTS MSS bands 5 and 7 have proven most useful for fracture mapping in coal-bearing rocks in this region. Preliminary results suggest a reasonable correlation between image-detected fractures and mine roof-fall accidents. Information related to surface mined land, such as disturbed area, water bodies, and kind of reclamation, has been derived from the analysis of ERTS imagery.

  20. Forestry, geology and hydrological investigations from ERTS-1 imagery in two areas of Ecuador, South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, N. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. In the Oriente area, well-drained forests containing commercially valuable hardwoods can be recognized confidently and delineated quickly on the ERTS imagery. In the tropical rainforest, ERTS can provide an abundance of inferential information about large scale geologic structures. ERTS imagery is better than normal aerial photography for recognizing linears. The imagery is particularly useful for updating maps of the distributary system of the Guagas River Basin and of any other river with a similarly rapid changing channel pattern.

  1. Relevance of ERTS-1 to the State of Ohio. [environmental monitoring and resources management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweet, D. C.; Pincura, P. G.; Wukelic, G. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. During the first year of project effort the ability of ERTS-1 imagery to be used for mapping and inventorying strip-mined areas in southeastern Ohio, the potential of using ERTS-1 imagery in water quality and coastal zone management in the Lake Erie region, and the extent that ERTS-1 imagery could contribute to localized (metropolitan/urban), multicounty, and overall state land use needs were experimentally demonstrated and reported as significant project results.

  2. Determine utility of ERTS-1 to detect and monitor area strip mining and reclamation. [southeastern Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, R. H. (Principal Investigator); Pettyjohn, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Computer techniques were applied to process ERTS tapes acquired over coal mining operations in southeastern Ohio on 21 August 1972 and 3 September 1973. ERTS products obtained included geometrically correct map overlays showing stripped earth, partially reclaimed earth, water, and natural vegetation. Computer-generated tables listing the area covered by each land-water category in square kilometers and acres were produced. By comparing these mapping products, the study demonstrates the capability of ERTS to monitor changes in the extent of stripping, success of reclamation, and the secondary effects of mining on the environment.

  3. Applications of ERTS imagery to mappings sediments of the Twin Cities Metropolitan area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppe, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    ERTS images were compared to surficial geologic maps, prepared through traditional field studies. Lithologic boundaries, bedrock outcrops, bedrock structures, and geomorphologic features were examined. An area southeast of the Twin Cities, located chiefly in northern Dakota County was studied, as well as the New Brighton 15-minute quadrangle located in portions of Ramsey and Anoka Counties. Visual comparison of geologic maps and ERTS imagery demonstrated the limitations of this approach to geological investigations. Bedrock outcrops and bedrock structure in the metropolitan area do not appear on ERTS imagery. However, certain glacial sediments can be identified and are potentially mappable. Certain geomorphological features were also discernable.

  4. Geographic applications of ERTS-1 imagery to rural landscape change in eastern Tennessee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehder, J. B. (Principal Investigator); Omalley, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. A multistage sampling experiment was conducted using low (10,000') and high (60,000') altitude aircraft imagery in comparison with orbital (560 miles) ERTS imagery. Although the aircraft data provide detailed landscape observations similar to ground truth data, they cover relatively small areas per image frame for irregular static slices of time. By comparison, ERTS provides repetitive observations in a regional perspective for broad areal coverage. Microdensitometric and computer techniques are being used to analyze the ERTS imagery for gray tone signatures, comparisons, and ultimately for landscape change detection.

  5. Preliminary analysis of ERTS-relayed water resources data in the Delaware River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of ERTS-DCS data from water-resources stations in the Delaware River Basin indicates that the Data-Collection System is performing well. Data-Collections Platforms have been successfully interfaced with five stream-gaging station and three ground-water observation wells and are being interfaced with 12 water-quality monitors in the basin. Data are being relayed during four or five ERTS orbital passes per day, which is within the design specifications of the ERTS-DCS.

  6. An interdisciplinary analysis of ERTS data for Colorado mountain environments using ADP techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffer, R. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. Research efforts have been placed on: (1) location, acquisition, and preparation of baseline information necessary for the computer analysis, and (2) refinement of techniques for analysis of MSS data obtained from ERTS-1. Analysis of the first frame of data collected by the ERTS-1 multispectral scanner system over the Lake Texoma area has proven very valuable for determining the best procedures to follow in working with and analyzing ERTS data. Progress on the following projects is described: (1) cover type mapping; (2) geomorphology; and hydrologic feature surveys.

  7. Electrical resistivity and Seismic Refraction Tomography to Detect Heavy Metals Pathways in the Tailings of the Abandoned Mine of Zeïda, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekayir, A.; Lachhab, A.; Rouai, M.; Benyassine, E. M.; Boujamaoui, M.; Parisot, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The abandoned mine Zeïda (Pb) located at the center of the High Moulouya watershed is believed to have produced a total of 640,000 tons of concentrated Pb within 14 years of activities (1972-1985). Today, the mine has been abandoned with one of the largest tailings pits in Morocco without supervision and concern of environmental impacts. Several studies have shown the existence of high levels of heavy metals (Pb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Co, Cd and Ni) in samples (water and soil) taken from and around the tailings (Laghlimi et al, 2014, Benyassine et al, 2013, Iavarzzo, 2012, Makhoukh et al, 2011, Baghdad et al, 2008, Bouabdli et al, 2005). In this study, several electrical and seismic tomography profiles were taken to explore the thickness of the tailings and the potential pathways of contaminants to the aquifer. Because heavy metals were found in the surrounding areas of the tailings, there are concerns about their seepage into the groundwater aquifer. A total of 6 electric resistivity profiles together with another 16 seismic refraction profiles were completed over the 3 major mining waste piles to study this contamination. Analysis of both electric and seismic tomography profiles showed: 1) the thickness of tailings range from few cm to above 20m depending on where the survey was performed, 2) the contamination pathways of heavy metal pollutants occur predominantly right above the thickest areas of sandstone formation, and 3) water ponds at the surface of the tailing piles forms directly above the thickest part of the sandstone layer

  8. Cross-well 4-D resistivity tomography localizes the oil-water encroachment front during water flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Revil, A.

    2015-04-01

    The early detection of the oil-water encroachment front is of prime interest during the water flooding of an oil reservoir to maximize the production of oil and to avoid the oil-water encroachment front to come too close to production wells. We propose a new 4-D inversion approach based on the Gauss-Newton approach to invert cross-well resistance data. The goal of this study is to image the position of the oil-water encroachment front in a heterogeneous clayey sand reservoir. This approach is based on explicitly connecting the change of resistivity to the petrophysical properties controlling the position of the front (porosity and permeability) and to the saturation of the water phase through a petrophysical resistivity model accounting for bulk and surface conductivity contributions and saturation. The distributions of the permeability and porosity are also inverted using the time-lapse resistivity data in order to better reconstruct the position of the oil water encroachment front. In our synthetic test case, we get a better position of the front with the by-products of porosity and permeability inferences near the flow trajectory and close to the wells. The numerical simulations show that the position of the front is recovered well but the distribution of the recovered porosity and permeability is only fair. A comparison with a commercial code based on a classical Gauss-Newton approach with no information provided by the two-phase flow model fails to recover the position of the front. The new approach could be used for the time-lapse monitoring of various processes in both geothermal fields and oil and gas reservoirs using a combination of geophysical methods.

  9. Use of ERTS-1 data: Summary report of work on ten tasks. [solving natural resources and environmental quality problems using ERTS-1 MSS data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F. J.; Polcyn, F. C.; Bryan, M. L.; Sattinger, I. J.; Malila, W. A.; Nalepka, R. F.; Wezernak, C. T.; Horvath, R.; Vincent, R. K. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Depth mapping's for a portion of Lake Michigan and at the Little Bahama Bank test site have been verified by use of navigation charts and on-site visits. A thirteen category recognition map of Yellowstone Park has been prepared. Model calculation of atmospheric effects for various altitudes have been prepared. Radar, SLAR, and ERTS-1 data for flooded areas of Monroe County, Michigan are being studied. Water bodies can be reliably recognized and mapped using maximum likelihood processing of ERTS-1 digital data. Wetland mapping has been accomplished by slicing of single band and/or ratio processing of two bands for a single observation date. Both analog and digital processing have been used to map the Lake Ontario basin using ERTS-1 data. Operating characteristic curves were developed for the proportion estimation algorithm to determine its performance in the measurement of surface water area. The signal in band MSS-5 was related to sediment content of waters by modelling approach and by relating surface measurements of water to processed ERTS data. Radiance anomalies in ERTS-1 data could be associated with the presence of oil on water in San Francisco Bay, but the anomalies were of the same order as those caused by variations in sediment concentration and tidal flushing.

  10. Electrical Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar Investigation of Presence and Extent of Hardpan Soil Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thao, S. J.; Plattner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Farming in the San Joaquin Valley in central California is often impeded by a shallow rock-hard layer of consolidated soil commonly referred to as hardpan. To be able to successfully farm, this layer, if too shallow, needs to be removed either with explosives or heavy equipment. It is therefore of great value to obtain information about depth and presence of such a layer prior to agricultural operations. We tested the applicability of electrical resistivity tomography and ground penetrating radar in hardpan detection. On our test site of known hardpan depth (from trenching) and local absence (prior dynamiting to plant trees), we successfully recovered the known edge of a hardpan layer with both methods, ERT and GPR. The clay-rich soil significantly reduced the GPR penetration depth but we still managed to map the edges at a known gap where prior dynamiting had removed the hardpan. Electrical resistivity tomography with a dipole-dipole electrode configuration showed a clear conductive layer at expected depths with a clearly visible gap at the correct location. In our data analysis and representation we only used either freely available or in-house written software.

  11. Engineering analysis of ERTS data for rice in the Philippines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnair, A. J. (Principal Investigator); Heydt, H. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Rice is an important food worldwide. Worthwhile goals, particularly for developing nations, are the capability to recognize from satellite imagery: (1) areas where rice is grown, and (2) growth status (irrigation, vigor, yield). A two-step procedure to achieve this is being investigated. Ground truth, and ERTS-1 imagery (four passes) covering 80% of a rice growth cycle for some Philippine sites, have been analyzed. One-D and three-D signature extraction, and synthesis of an initial site recognition/status algorithm have been performed. Results are encouraging. but additional passes and sites must be analyzed. Good position information for extracted data is a must.

  12. Ground control requirements for precision processing of ERTS images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burger, Thomas C.

    1973-01-01

    With the successful flight of the ERTS-1 satellite, orbital height images are available for precision processing into products such as 1:1,000,000-scale photomaps and enlargements up to 1:250,000 scale. In order to maintain positional error below 100 meters, control points for the precision processing must be carefully selected, clearly definitive on photos in both X and Y. Coordinates of selected control points measured on existing ½ and 15-minute standard maps provide sufficient accuracy for any space imaging system thus far defined. This procedure references the points to accepted horizontal and vertical datums. Maps as small as 1:250,000 scale can be used as source material for coordinates, but to maintain the desired accuracy, maps of 1:100,000 and larger scale should be used when available.

  13. Geology of Utah and Nevada by ERTS-1 imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    Repetitive ERTS-1 imagery covering Utah and Nevada is studied as an aid in structural geology, mineral exploration, and limnological and hydrological aspects. Limnological features of algal blooms and varying biological activities in Utah Lake and the Great Salt Lake are grossly evident on the imagery with more subtle details detected on the different bands. Major structural breaks, lineages, or trends are abundant throughout the area of study. The correlation of positive aeromagnetic anomalies with the trends suggests near surface intrusive bodies, not yet exposed at the surface, that can be tested for possible associated mineralization by collecting soil-gas at the surface which is analyzed for mercury that is (1) apparently associated with mineralization, (2) escapes as a vapor, and (3) can be readily measured in extremely low amounts of less than 1 ppb by absorption.

  14. Crop identification and acreage measurement utilizing ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonsteen, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    There are no author-identified significant results in this report. The microdensitometer will be used to analyze data acquired by ERTS-1 imagery. The classification programs and software packages have been acquired and are being prepared for use with the information as it is received. Photo and digital tapes have been acquired for coverage of virtually 100 percent of the test site areas. These areas are located in South Dakota, Idaho, Missouri, and Kansas. Hass 70mm color infrared, infrared, black and white high altitude aerial photography of the test sites is available. Collection of ground truth for updating the data base has been completed and a computer program written to count the number of fields and give total acres by size group for the segments in each test site. Results are given of data analysis performed on digitized data from densitometer measurements of fields of corn, sugar, beets, and alfalfa in Kansas.

  15. ERTS-1 image enhancement by optically combining density slices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapper, G. O.; Pease, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The technique of density slicing using a photographic film and its application to enhancement of ERTS-1 imagery has proved to be useful for mapping varigated areal phenomena and provides a useful supplement ot the I2S MiniAddcol viewing system. The intial experiments conducted with this film were encouraging, and indicated that this technique of density slicing using readily accessible darkroom facilities and simple darkroom procedures allows rapid, accurate, and facile interpretation of certain areal phenomena to be made from the imagery. The distribution of the tree yucca, Yucca brevifolia Jaegeriana, in the eastern Mojave Desert of Southern California and southern Nevada was used as an example to test the accuracy of the technique for mapping purposes. The distribution was mapped at a relatively high level of accuracy.

  16. ERTS-1 MSS imagery - A tool for identifying soil associations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westin, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    Soil association maps show the spatial relationships of land units developed in unique climatic, geologic, and topographic environments, and having characteristic slopes, soil depths, textures, available water capacities, permeabilities, and the like. From these characteristics of the soil, broad interpretations can be made such as how the soil is suited for various agronomic and engineering uses. ERTS-1 imagery was found to be a useful tool in the identification of soil associations since it provides a synoptic view of an 8 million acre scene, which is large enough so that the effect can be seen on soils of climate, topography, and geology. A regional view also allows soil associations to be observed over most, if not all, of their extent. This aids in selecting typical sampling sites and provides a check on the homogeniety of the associations.

  17. Use of ERTS-1 imagery in forest inventory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennie, J. C.; Birth, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The utility of ERTS-1 imagery when combined with field observations and with aircraft imagery and field observations is evaluated. Satellite imagery consisted of 9-1/2 inch black and white negatives of four multispectral scanner bands taken over Polk County, Tennessee. Aircraft imagery was obtained by a C-130 flying at 23,000 ft over the same area and provided the basis for locating ground plots for field observations. Correspondence between aircraft and satellite imagery was somewhat inaccurate due to seasonal differences in observations and lack of good photogrammetry with the data processing system used. Better correspondence was found between satellite imagery and ground observations. Ways to obtain more accurate data are discussed, and comparisons between aircraft and satellite observations are tabulated.

  18. ERTS-1 data user investigation of wetlands ecology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery (enlarged to 1:250,000) is an excellent tool by which large area coastal marshland mapping may be undertaken. If states can sacrifice some accuracy (amount unknown at this time) in placing of boundary lines, the technique may be used to do the following: (1) estimate extent of man's impact on marshes by ditching and lagooning and accelerated successional trends; (2) place boundaries between wetland and upland and hence estimate amount of coastal marshland remaining in the state; (3) distinguish among relatively large zones of various plant species including high and low growth S. alterniflora, J. roemerianus, and S. cynosuroides; and (4) estimate marsh plant species productivity when ground based information is available.

  19. Remote sensing of ocean currents using ERTS imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, G. A.

    1973-01-01

    Major ocean currents such as the Loop Current in the eastern Gulf of Mexico have surface manifestations which can be exploited for remote sensing. Surface chlorophyll-a concentrations, which contribute to the shift in color from blue to green in the open sea, were found to have high spatial variability; significantly lower concentrations were observed in the current. The cyclonic edge of the current is an accumulation zone which causes a peak in chlorophyll concentration. The dynamics also cause surface concentrations of algae, which have a high reflectance in the near infrared. Combining these observations gives rise to an edge effect which can show up as a bright lineation on multispectral imagery delimiting the current's boundary under certain environmental conditions. When high seas introduce bubbles, white caps, and foam, the reflectance is dominated by scattering rather than absorption. This has been detected in ERTS imagery and used for current location.

  20. Automatic classification of soils and vegetation with ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Preliminary results of a test of a computerized analysis method using ERTS 1 data are presented. The method consisted of a four-spectral-band supervised, maximum likelihood, Gaussian classifier with training statistics derived through a combination of clustering and manual methods. The multivariate analysis method leads to the assignment of each resolution element of the data to one of a preselected set of discrete classes. The data frame was an area over the Texas-Oklahoma border including Lake Texoma. The study suggests that multispectral scanner data coupled with machine processing shows promise for earth surface cover surveys. Futhermore, the processing time is short and consequently the costs are low; a full frame can be analyzed completely within 48 hours.

  1. Utilization of ERTS-1 data in North Carolina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welby, C. W. (Principal Investigator); Lammi, J. O.; Carson, R. J., III

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A wide range of potential uses for ERTS-1 imagery is described. Special emphasis has been placed upon studies in the Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Soil groups, water quality, and suspended sediment patterns in estuaries and offshore have been studied. A phytoplankton bloom has possibly been detected. The usefulness of the imagery in coastal landform surveys has been demonstrated as has its usefulness in monitoring developmental activity in the forests. Planners appear hesitant to use the imagery because of its small scale, but it is felt that as they become familiar with the imagery they will find it useful and time-saving for many purposes.

  2. Geologic applications of ERTS images on the Colorado Plateau, Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goetz, A. F. H.; Billingsley, F. C.; Elston, D. P.; Lucchitta, I.; Shoemaker, E. M.

    1974-01-01

    Three areas in central and northern Arizona centered on the (1) Verde Valley, (2) Coconino Plateau, and (3) Shivwits Plateau were studied using ERTS photography. Useful applications results include: (1) upgrading of the existing state geologic map of the Verde Valley region; (2) detection of long NW trending lineaments in the basalt cap SE of Flagstaff which may be favorable locations for drilling for new water supplies; (3) tracing of the Bright Angel and Butte faults to twice their previously known length and correlating the extensions with modern seismic events, showing these faults to be present-day earthquake hazards; (4) discovering and successfully drilling perched sandstone aquifers in the Kaibab Limestone on the Coconino Plateau; and (5) determining the relationship between the Shivwits lavas and the formation of the lower Grand Canyon and showing that the lavas should be an excellent aquifer, as yet untapped.

  3. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Nine projects are defined, five ERTS data applications experiments and four supporting technology tasks. The most significant applications results were achieved in the soil association mapping, earth surface feature identification, and urban land use mapping efforts. Four soil association boundaries were accurately delineated from ERTS-1 imagery. A data bank has been developed to test surface feature classifications obtained from ERTS-1 data. Preliminary forest cover classifications indicated that the number of acres estimated tended to be greater than actually existed by 25%. Urban land use analysis of ERTS-1 data indicated highly accurate classification could be obtained for many urban catagories. The wooded residential category tended to be misclassified as woods or agricultural land. Further statistical analysis revealed that these classes could be separated using sample variance.

  4. Interpretation and mapping of gypsy moth defoilation from ERTS (LANDSAT)-1 temporal composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtry, G. J.; Petersen, G. W. (Principal Investigator); Kowalik, W. S.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Photointerpretation of temporally composited color Diazo transparencies of ERTS(LANDSAT) images is a practical method for detecting and locating levels of widespread defoliation. ERTS 9 x 9 inch images are essentially orthographic and are produced at a nearly constant 1:1,000,000 scale. This allows direct superposition of scenes for temporal composites. ERTS coverage provides a sweeping 180 km (110 mile) wide view, permitting one interpreter to rapidly delineate defoliation in an area requiring days and weeks of work by aerial surveys or computerized processing. Defoliation boundaries can be located on the images within maximum errors on the order of hundreds of meters. The enhancement process is much less expensive than aerial surveys or computerized processing. Maps produced directly from interpretation are manageable working products. The 18 day periodic coverage of ERTS is not frequent enough to replace aerial survey mapping because defoliation and refoliation move as waves.

  5. Geologic and mineral and water resources investigations in western Colorado using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knepper, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Most of the geologic information in ERTS-1 imagery can be extracted from bulk processed black and white transparencies by a skilled interpreter using standard photogeologic techniques. In central and western Colorado, the detectability of lithologic contacts on ERTS-1 imagery is closely related to the time of year the imagery was acquired. Geologic structures are the most readily extractable type of geologic information contained in ERTS images. Major tectonic features and associated minor structures can be rapidly mapped, allowing the geologic setting of a large region to be quickly accessed. Trends of geologic structures in younger sedimentary appear to strongly parallel linear trends in older metamorphic and igneous basement terrain. Linears and color anomalies mapped from ERTS imagery are closely related to loci of known mineralization in the Colorado mineral belt.

  6. Impact of ERTS-1 images on management of New Jersey's coastal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, E. B.; Yunghans, R. S.; Stitt, J. A.; Mairs, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    The thrust of New Jersey's ERTS investigation is development of procedures for operational use of ERTS-1 data by the Department of Environmental Protection in the management of the State's coastal zone. Four major areas of concern were investigated: detection of land use changes in the coastal zone; monitoring of offshore waste disposal; siting of ocean outfalls; and allocation of funds for shore protection. ERTS imagery was not useful for shore protection purposes; it was of limited practical value in the evaluation of offshore waste disposal and ocean outfall siting. However, ERTS imagery shows great promise for operational detection of land use changes in the coastal zone. Some constraints for practical change detection have been identified.

  7. Utilization of ERTS data to detect plant diseases and nutrient deficiencies, soil types and moisture levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, W. L.; Sewell, J. I.; Hilty, J. W.; Rennie, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The separation of the Mississippi Delta from the Memphis Association (Loess) is clearly defined in ERTS-1 imagery covering west Tennessee and Mississippi.

  8. Applicability of ERTS to Antarctic iceberg resources. [harvesting sea ice for fresh water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hult, J. L. (Principal Investigator); Ostrander, N. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. This investigation explorers the applicability of ERTS to (1) determine the Antarctic sea ice and environmental behavior that may influence the harvesting of icebergs, and (2) monitor iceberg locations, characteristics, and evolution. Imagery has shown that the potential applicability of ERTS to the research, planning, and harvesting operations can contribute importantly to the glowing promise derived from broader scope studies for the use of Antarctic icebergs to relieve a growing global thirst for fresh water. Several years of comprehensive monitoring will be necessary to characterize sea ice and environmental behavior and iceberg evolution. Live ERTS services will assist harvesting control and claiming operations and offer a means of harmonizing entitlements of iceberg resources. The valuable ERTS services will be more cost effective than other means will be easily justified and borne by the iceberg harvesting operations.

  9. A summary of selected early results from the ERTS-1 menhaden experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, W. H. (Principal Investigator); Kemmerer, A. J.; Benigno, J. A.; Reese, G. B.; Minkler, F. C.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Imagery from ERTS-1 satellite was used in conjunction with aerial photographically-sensed menhaden distribution information, sea truth oceanographic measurements, and commercial fishing information from a 8685 square kilometer study area in the north-central portion of the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate relationships between selected oceanographic parameters and menhaden distribution, ERTS-1 imagery and menhaden distribution, and ERTS-1 imagery and oceanographic parameters. ERTS-1, MSS band 5 imagery density levels correlated with photographically detected menhaden distribution patterns and could be explained based on sea truth Secchi disc transparency and water depth measurements. These two parameters, together with surface salinity, Forel-Ule color, and chlorophyll-a also were found to correlate significantly with menhaden distribution. Eight empirical models were developed which provided menhaden distribution predictions for the study area on combinations of Secchi disc transparency, water depth, surface salinity, and Forel-Ule color measurements.

  10. Monitoring corn harvest progress from ERTS-1, southern Finney County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Comparison of ERTS-1 imagery of three dates reveals that corn harvesting is detectable by observing tonal change associated with the change from photosynthetically active plants to bare ground.

  11. Mapping soils, crops, and rangelands by machine analysis of multitemporal ERTS-1 data. [Kansas and Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, M. F.; Henderson, J. A., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 data, obtained during the period 25 August 1972 to 5 September 1973 over a range of test sites in the Central United States, have been used for identifying and mapping differences in soil patterns, species and conditions of cultivated crops, and conditions of rangelands. Multispectral scanner data from multiple ERTS passes over certain test sites have provided the opportunity to study temporal changes in the scene. Multispectral classifications delineating soils boundaries in different test sites compared well with existing soil association maps prepared by conventional means. Spectral analysis of ERTS data was used to identify, maps, and make areal measurements of wheat in western Kansas. Multispectral analysis of ERTS-1 data provided patterns in rangelands which can be related to soils differences, range management practices, and the extent of infestation of grasslands by mesquite (prosopis fuliflora) and juniper (juniperus spp.).

  12. Use of ERTS-1 images in the search for porphyry copper deposits in Pakistani Baluchistan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Geomorphic features related to a known porphyry copper deposit at Saindak, western Chagai District, Pakistan, are easily distinguished on ERTS-1 images. New geologic information from the images was used in conjunction with known geology to evaluate one previously known prospect area and to suggest two additional ones, but no new prospects were recognized on the basis of the images alone. The study also showed that Saindak-type deposits are not likely to be present in some extensive areas of the Chagai District. The Saindak deposit is in an area of relatively easily eroded folded sedimentary and volcanic rocks. The deposit is characterized by an elongate zone of easily eroded sulfide-rich rock surrounded by this rim and the central sulfide-rich valley are conspicuous features on the images. Swarms of dikes are probably useful for distinguishing real rims from other resistant rock types, but there is no expression of them on the image, although they are easily seen on aerial photographs of the Saindak rim.

  13. Investigating a damaging buried sinkhole cluster in an urban area (Zaragoza city, NE Spain) integrating multiple techniques: Geomorphological surveys, DInSAR, DEMs, GPR, ERT, and trenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonel, Domingo; Rodríguez-Tribaldos, Verónica; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Galve, Jorge Pedro; Guerrero, Jesús; Zarroca, Mario; Roqué, Carles; Linares, Rogelio; McCalpin, James P.; Acosta, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    This contribution analyses a complex sinkhole cluster buried by urban elements in the mantled evaporite karst of Zaragoza city, NE Spain, where active subsidence has caused significant economic losses (~ 0.3 million Euro). The investigation, conducted after the development of the area, has involved the application of multiple surface and subsurface techniques. A detailed map of modern surface deformation indicates two active coalescing sinkholes, whereas the interpretation of old aerial photographs reveals the presence of two additional dormant sinkholes beneath human structures that might reactivate in the near future. DInSAR (Differential Interferometry Synthetic Aperture Radar) displacement data have limited spatial coverage mainly due to high subsidence rates and surface changes (re-pavement), and the Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and trenching investigations were severely restricted by the presence of urban elements. Nonetheless, the three techniques consistently indicate that the area affected by subsidence is larger than that defined by surface deformation features. The performance of the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique was adversely affected by the presence of highly conductive and massive anthropogenic deposits, but some profiles reveal that subsidence in the central sector of one of the sinkholes is mainly accommodated by sagging. The stratigraphic and structural relationships observed in a trench dug across the topographic margin of one of the sinkholes may be alternatively interpreted by three collapse events of around 0.6 m that occurred after 290 yr BP, or by progressive fault displacement combined with episodic anthropogenic excavation and fill. Average subsidence rates of > 6.6 mm/yr and 40 mm/yr have been calculated using stratigraphic markers dated by the radiocarbon method and historical information, respectively. This case study illustrates the need of conducting thorough investigations in sinkhole areas during the pre

  14. Principles of cost-benefit analysis for ERTS experiments, volumes 1 and 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The basic elements of a cost-benefit study are discussed along with special considerations for ERTS experiments. Elements required for a complete economic analysis of ERTS are considered to be: statement of objectives, specification of assumptions, enumeration of system alternatives, benefit analysis, cost analysis nonefficiency considerations, and final system selection. A hypothetical cost-benefit example is presented with the assumed objective of an increase in remote sensing surveys of grazing lands to better utilize available forage to lower meat prices.

  15. Precision annotation of predetermined primary sampling units on ERTS-1 MSS images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanroessel, J. W.; Langley, P. G.

    1973-01-01

    Resectioning programs were developed for projecting the boundary corners of sample units, management units, and counties into U2 RC-10 and ERTS-1 MSS images. The technique used includes corrections for earth curvature, terrain elevation, and MSS distortions. The minimum standard error obtained was about 0.15 mm or 150 meters on the ground. This technique now makes it possible to include land ownership as an integral part of forest resource sampling plans using ERTS imagery.

  16. Water quality determinations in the Virgin Islands from ERTS-A data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    The characterization of water quality in terms of absolute color values, using imagery from the ERTS-A satellite, imagery from aircraft, and ground truth measurements is discussed. The establishment of photometric standards resolvable by the ERTS-A sensors, as a means of determining atmospheric effects (which generally vary on sequential overpasses) is examined. The application of these techniques is demonstrated for the harbor of Charlotte Amalie on St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, which is characterized by the presence of many poluting factors.-

  17. The use of ERTS imagery for lake classification. [turbidity due to phytoplankton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarpace, F. L.; Wade, R. E.; Fisher, L. T.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of using photographic representations of the ERTS imagery to classify lakes in the State of Wisconsin as to their trophic level was studied. Densitometric readings in band 5 of ERTS 70 mm imagery were taken for all the lakes in Wisconsin greater than 100 acres (approximately 1000 lakes). An algorithm has been developed from ground truth measurements to predict from satellite imagery an indicator of trophic status.

  18. Evaluation of commercial utility of ERTS-A imagery in structural reconnaissance for minerals and petroleum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, D. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The only area that has been analyzed to date is Area 3 where results have already been reported. However, work progressing in Area 1 and 2 seem to indicate a good correlation between lineament zones previously reported, mineralized areas and lineaments currently being picked from ERTS-1 imagery. There also appear to be many lineaments on ERTS-1 imagery in these areas which have not been reported in any other literature.

  19. Extraction of agricultural statistics from ERTS-A data of Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morain, S. A. (Principal Investigator); Williams, D. L.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Agricultural consultants have expressed substantial interest in work being conducted on center pivot irrigation and have inquired as to how ERTS-1 imagery can be used to aid those in the irrigation field. Results of the land use mapping experiment indicate that ERTS-1 imagery has major potential in regionalization. The ways in which land is utilized within these regions may then be studied more effectively than if no adequate regionalization is available.

  20. ERTS-A data as a teaching and research tool in the Department of Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grybeck, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. The ERTS-1 materials continue to be used in a number of courses including Geology of Alaska, Economic Geology, and Structural Geology. In addition, specific talks about the ERTS-1 material were given at a seminar at the Geophysical Institute, to the Geology Department, to numerous individuals, and were extensively used in a popularized talk on the Geology of Alaska to the local Historical Society.

  1. Regional geology subprogram: Geological interpretation of ERTS imagery of the occidental region of Bolivia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brockmann, C. E. (Principal Investigator); Ayllon, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Using ERTS-1 imagery, it is possible to delimit great lithological units, folds, lineaments, faults, and in lesser degree unconformities. In the morphological aspect, the images show clearly the relief necessary for geological interpretation. The ERTS-1 images are important for the preparation of the geological and tectonic map of Bolivia, on a 1:1 million scale, if conventional methods of work are used as a base.

  2. Burke County wheat feasibility study. [using ERTS 1 multispectral band scanner data taken over North Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunkel, W. A.

    1974-01-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to determine whether wheat could be distinguished from other small grain crops in a selected spring wheat growing area in Burke County, North Dakota using a maximum likelihood classification program and ERTS 1 multispectral band scanner data. ERTS 1 data scenes were selected from passes made on June 5, 1973 and June 23, 1973. The Univac 1108 computer and the LARSYS pattern recognition software package were used in performing the classification. Results of the analysis are provided.

  3. A study of the utilization of ERTS-1 data from the Wabash River Basin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landgrebe, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Preliminary acreage estimates for corn, soybeans, and other cover types made from classification of ERTS-1 data compared well with those made by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Registration of multiple frames of ERTS-1 CCT data over Lynn County, Texas and DeKalb County, Illinois was achieved to a high degree of accuracy. Spectral/temporal computer pattern recognition analysis was carried out for the first time using satellite data.

  4. Extensive summer upwelling on Lake Michigan during 1973 observed by NOAA-2 and ERTS-1 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, A. E.; Stumpf, H. G.; Hart, J. L.; Pritchard, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    Two studies are presented that utilize data from the NOAA-2 and ERTS-1 satellites. The studies are concentrated on two summer upwelling episodes in Lake Michigan when considerable contrast was observed in both surface water temperature as observed by NOAA-2 and surface water color as observed by ERTS-1. Physical, biological and chemical processes support the hypothesis that much of the observed 'whitening' is calcium carbonate precipitating as an immediate result of the upwelling.

  5. Analysis of ERTS-1 imagery and its application to evaluation of Wyoming's natural resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marrs, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A summary of the significant results of the studies completed during the July-August, 1973 period includes: (1) ERTS-1 image brightness contrasts can be related to important contrasts in rangeland and forest vegetation communities of the Laramie Basin. (2) Stereoscopic viewing is essential for correct structural interpretation in outcrop patterns in some areas. (3) Complex fracture patterns which may have exerted a controlling influence on intrusive activity in the Absaroka Mountains can be mapped from ERTS. (4) Volcanic lithologies of the Yellowstone region are often differentiated on the basis of their textures, and cannot be successfully mapped by photogeologic interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery. Ground spectral readings confirm a general lack of contrast between these lithologies in the four ERTS-1 MSS bands. (5) Major dune fields can be recognized and defined from ERTS-1 image interpretations and recognition of differences in stabilizing plant communities (some of which may be mappable from ERTS-1) yields information about migration history of the dune fields.

  6. Application of ecological, geological and oceanographic ERTS-1 imagery to Delaware's coastal resources planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Communities containing five different coastal vegetation species, developed marshlands, and fresh water impoundments have been identified in ERTS-1 images. Suspended sediment and circulation patterns in imagery from five ERTS-1 passes over Delaware Bay have been enhanced and correlated with predicted current patterns. Conclusions reached are: (1) ERTS-1 is suitable platform for observing suspended sediment patterns and water masses synoptically over large areas. (2) Suspended sediment acts as a natural tracer allowing photointerpreters to deduce gross current circulation patterns from ERTS-1 imagery. (3) Under atmospheric conditions encountered along the East Coast of the United States MSS band 5 seems to give the best representation of sediment load in upper one meter of water column. (4) In the ERTS-1 imagery the sediment patterns are delineated by three to four neighboring shades of grey. (5) Negative transparencies of the ERTS-1 images give better contrast whenever the suspended sediment tones fall within the first few steps of the grey scale. (6) Color density slicing helps delineate the suspended sediment patterns more clearly and differentiate turbidity levels.

  7. Reliable Genetic Labeling of Adult-Born Dentate Granule Cells Using Ascl1CreERT2 and GlastCreERT2 Murine Lines

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung M.; Alvarez, Diego D.

    2015-01-01

    Newly generated dentate granule cells (GCs) are relevant for input discrimination in the adult hippocampus. Yet, their precise contribution to information processing remains unclear. To address this question, it is essential to develop approaches to precisely label entire cohorts of adult-born GCs. In this work, we used genetically modified mice to allow conditional expression of tdTomato (Tom) in adult-born GCs and characterized their development and functional integration. Ascl1CreERT2;CAGfloxStopTom and GlastCreERT2;CAGfloxStopTom mice resulted in indelible expression of Tom in adult neural stem cells and their lineage upon tamoxifen induction. Whole-cell recordings were performed to measure intrinsic excitability, firing behavior, and afferent excitatory connectivity. Developing GCs were also staged by the expression of early and late neuronal markers. The slow development of adult-born GCs characterized here is consistent with previous reports using retroviral approaches that have revealed that a mature phenotype is typically achieved after 6–8 weeks. Our findings demonstrate that Ascl1CreERT2 and GlastCreERT2 mouse lines enable simple and reliable labeling of adult-born GC lineages within restricted time windows. Therefore, these mice greatly facilitate tagging new neurons and manipulat