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Sample records for resistant hypertension htn

  1. Renal sympathetic denervation after Symplicity HTN-3 and therapeutic drug monitoring in severe hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula M.; Larstorp, Anne C.; Kjeldsen, Sverre E.; Persu, Alexandre; Jin, Yu; Staessen, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has been and is still proposed as a new treatment modality in patients with apparently treatment resistant hypertension (TRH), a condition defined as persistent blood pressure elevation despite prescription of at least 3 antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. However, the large fall in blood pressure after RDN reported in the first randomized study, Symplicity HTN-2 and multiple observational studies has not been confirmed in five subsequent prospective randomized studies and may be largely explained by non-specific effects such as improvement of drug adherence in initially poorly adherent patients (the Hawthorne effect), placebo effect and regression to the mean. The overall blood-pressure lowering effect of RDN seems rather limited and the characteristics of true responders are largely unknown. Accordingly, RDN is not ready for clinical practice. In most patients with apparently TRH, drug monitoring and improvement of drug adherence may prove more effective and cost-beneficial to achieve blood pressure control. In the meantime, research should aim at identifying characteristics of those patients with truly TRH who may respond to RDN. PMID:25709581

  2. Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doroszko, Adrian; Janus, Agnieszka; Szahidewicz-Krupska, Ewa; Mazur, Grzegorz; Derkacz, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a severe medical condition which is estimated to appear in 9-18% of hypertensive patients. Due to higher cardiovascular risk, this disorder requires special diagnosis and treatment. The heterogeneous etiology, risk factors and comorbidities of resistant hypertension stand in need of sophisticated evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and select the best therapeutic options, which should consider lifestyle modifications as well as pharmacological and interventional treatment. After having excluded pseudohypertension, inappropriate blood pressure measurement and control as well as the white coat effect, suspicion of resistant hypertension requires an analysis of drugs which the hypertensive patient is treated with. According to one definition - ineffective treatment with 3 or more antihypertensive drugs including diuretics makes it possible to diagnose resistant hypertension. A multidrug therapy including angiotensin - converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, beta blockers, diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to be effective in resistant hypertension treatment. Nevertheless, optional, innovative therapies, e.g. a renal denervation or baroreflex activation, may create a novel pathway of blood pressure lowering procedures. The right diagnosis of this disease needs to eliminate the secondary causes of resistant hypertension e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, atherosclerosis and renal or hormonal disorders. This paper briefly summarizes the identification of the causes of resistant hypertension and therapeutic strategies, which may contribute to the proper diagnosis and an improvement of the long term management of resistant hypertension. PMID:26935512

  3. Clinical Features of Obstructive Sleep Apnea That Determine Its High Prevalence in Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyun Jin; Cho, Yang-Je; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Kim, Da Hee; Kim, Ha Yan; Choi, Ji In; Lee, Jeung-Gweon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Resistant hypertension (HTN) occurs in 15-20% of treated hypertensive patients, and 70-80% of resistant hypertensive patients have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The characteristics of resistant HTN that predispose patients to OSA have not been reported. Therefore, we aimed to determine the clinical, laboratory, and polysomnographic features of resistant HTN that are significantly associated with OSA. Materials and Methods Hypertensive patients (n=475) who underwent portable polysomnography were enrolled. The patients were categorized into controlled (n=410) and resistant HTN (n=65) groups. The risk factors for the occurrence of OSA in controlled and resistant hypertensive patients were compared, and independent risk factors that are associated with OSA were analyzed. Results Out of 475 patients, 359 (75.6%) were diagnosed with OSA. The prevalence of OSA in resistant HTN was 87.7%, which was significantly higher than that in controlled HTN (73.7%). Age, body mass index, neck circumference, waist circumference, and hip circumference were significantly higher in OSA. However, stepwise multivariate analyses revealed that resistant HTN was not an independent risk factor of OSA. Conclusion The higher prevalence and severity of OSA in resistant HTN may be due to the association of risk factors that are common to both conditions. PMID:26256968

  4. [Resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2008-04-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as a persistent blood pressure over 140/90 mmHg despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic, is unusual. The diagnosis requires ruling out initially pseudoresistance and a lack of compliance with treatment. Ambulatory blood pressure recording allow the recognition of white coat hypertension. When there is a clinical or laboratory suspicion, secondary causes of hypertension should be discarded. Excessive salt intake, the presence of concomitant diseases such as diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, obesity, and psychiatric conditions such as panic attacks, anxiety and depression, should also be sought. The presence of target organ damage requires a more aggressive treatment of hypertension. Recent clinical studies indicate that the administration of aldosterone antagonists as a fourth therapeutic line provides significant additional blood pressure reduction, when added to previous antihypertensive regimens in subjects with resistant hypertension. The possible blood pressure lowering effects of prolonged electrical activation of carotid baroreceptors is under investigation. PMID:18769797

  5. Eudoxos: An HTN within the HTN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomos, N.; Dimitrakopoulos, I.

    2008-03-01

    ``Eudoxos'' Observatories administered from mount Ainos, Kefallinia island, Greece, target in becoming a multi-telescope, multi-site observational complex. This article presents the self-similarity aspect of the Observatories, as an internal Heterogeneous Telescope Network structure (HTN) within the actual HTN. It proposes an architecture which allows for re-use of the HTN protocol and the Remote Telescope Markup Language (RTML) in the internal HTN, describes the status of work so far and the technologies used for the development of the various software components.

  6. The maize disease resistance gene Htn1 against northern corn leaf blight encodes a wall-associated receptor-like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hurni, Severine; Scheuermann, Daniela; Krattinger, Simon G.; Kessel, Bettina; Wicker, Thomas; Herren, Gerhard; Fitze, Mirjam N.; Breen, James; Presterl, Thomas; Ouzunova, Milena; Keller, Beat

    2015-01-01

    Northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) caused by the hemibiotrophic fungus Exserohilum turcicum is an important foliar disease of maize that is mainly controlled by growing resistant maize cultivars. The Htn1 locus confers quantitative and partial NCLB resistance by delaying the onset of lesion formation. Htn1 represents an important source of genetic resistance that was originally introduced from a Mexican landrace into modern maize breeding lines in the 1970s. Using a high-resolution map-based cloning approach, we delimited Htn1 to a 131.7-kb physical interval on chromosome 8 that contained three candidate genes encoding two wall-associated receptor-like kinases (ZmWAK-RLK1 and ZmWAK-RLK2) and one wall-associated receptor-like protein (ZmWAK-RLP1). TILLING (targeting induced local lesions in genomes) mutants in ZmWAK-RLK1 were more susceptible to NCLB than wild-type plants, both in greenhouse experiments and in the field. ZmWAK-RLK1 contains a nonarginine-aspartate (non-RD) kinase domain, typically found in plant innate immune receptors. Sequence comparison showed that the extracellular domain of ZmWAK-RLK1 is highly diverse between different maize genotypes. Furthermore, an alternative splice variant resulting in a truncated protein was present at higher frequency in the susceptible parents of the mapping populations compared with in the resistant parents. Hence, the quantitative Htn1 disease resistance in maize is encoded by an unusual innate immune receptor with an extracellular wall-associated kinase domain. These results further highlight the importance of this protein family in resistance to adapted pathogens. PMID:26124097

  7. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension: yes.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, Enrico; Alrashdi, Yahya; Schillaci, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic overactivity may have a role in triggering and maintaining resistant hypertension, and catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) has emerged as a promising treatment in refractory hypertension. Recently, the results of the Symplicity HTN-3, the first randomized, sham-controlled trial, failed to confirm the previously reported BP-lowering effects of RDN, although definitive conclusions cannot be drawn due to a number of study limitations. Consequently, although some centers halted their RDN programs, research continues and both the concept of denervation and treatment strategies are being redefined. A new generation of sham-controlled trials is currently underway with the aim of detecting which patients are expected to achieve the most beneficial effect from RDN. In this article, we examine the current data on RDN and discuss some insights and future opportunities. PMID:26970989

  8. Resistant hypertension - an update.

    PubMed

    Pasha, K; Towhiduzzaman, M; Manwar, A; Jahan, M U

    2015-04-01

    Patients with hypertension are increasing in Bangladesh. Among these patients a growing number of patients are having resistant hypertension faced by both primary care physicians and specialists. There is no data regarding prevalence of resistant hypertension in Bangladesh, but clinical trials abroad suggests that it is not rare, involving perhaps 20% to 30% of study participants. Cardiovascular risk is undoubtedly increased in such patients and the condition is often complicated by multiple other cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, sleep apnea, diabetes, and chronic kidney disease. Resistant hypertension is almost always multifactorial in etiology. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors contributing to treatment resistance; diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension; and use of effective multi drug regimens. Studies of resistant hypertension are limited by the high cardiovascular risk of patients within this subgroup, which generally precludes safe withdrawal of medications; presence of multiple disease processes and their associated medical therapies, which confound interpretation of study results. Therefore we should concentrate on expanding our knowledge of the causes of resistant hypertension which will allow for more effective prevention and/or treatment which is essential to improve long-term clinical management of this condition. PMID:26007281

  9. Resistant hypertension and chronotherapy.

    PubMed

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-04-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing's syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient's history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of "non-dipper" hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  10. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  11. Percutaneous renal denervation and the second generation EnligHTN System.

    PubMed

    Chokka, R G; Delacroix, S; Psaltis, P J; Anavekar, N S; Worthley, S G

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension remains a major public health burden despite the plethora of therapeutic agents available for this disorder, compelling innovation of alternate therapies including interventional approaches where necessary. The kidney is a major player in the pathophysiology of this disease with increased sympathetic activity being the key factor in the initiation and maintenance of drug resistant hypertension in many patients. Thus renal denervation targeted at decreasing sympathetic drive is becoming the apparent choice in carefully selected patients with resistant hypertension who have exhausted all medical options. The Symplicity and EnligHTN trials using first and second generation catheters respectively have demonstrated that renal sympathetic denervation results in significant blood pressure reduction. The initial renal denervation catheter used in the Symplicity trial was a single electrode system. Refinement of this process has led to the EnligHTN catheter's design. This is a multielectrode self-expanding nitinol basket that allows the positioning of the thermal injury pattern to be pre-specified and in theory lead to better positioning of the lesions. We present a review of the premise behind renal artery denervation, discuss the data and early technologies focusing on the characteristics and utility of the first multielectrode renal denervation device, the EnligHTN renal denervation catheter. PMID:24500220

  12. Treating resistant hypertension with new devices.

    PubMed

    Wienemann, H; Meincke, F; Kaiser, L; Heeger, C H; Bergmann, M W

    2014-06-01

    Arterial hypertension is a frequent, chronic disease, which is one of the main risk factor for cardiovascular and renal diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, hypertensive heart disease, stroke as well as cardiac arrhythmias. In the clinical setting it remains challenging to accomplish the thresholds of guideline blood pressure (BP) levels now defined as office based BP to be below <140 mmHg. Patients on three or more antihypertensive drugs, with systolic BP values above ≥160 mmHg (≥150 mmHg for patients with type 2 diabetes) are classified as having resistant hypertension. In the past six years the development of interventional sympathetic renal artery denervation (RDN) opened a new treatment option targeting the afferent and efferent sympathetic nerves of the kidney to reduce BP. A large variety of devices are available on the market. Newly developed devices try to focus on new strategies such as ultrasound or irrigated catheters, which might reduce the post-procedural complications and increase the success rate. The first generation SymplicityTM device (Medtronic, Palo Alto, CA, USA) was shown to be safe, with side effects rarely occurring. Clinical trials demonstrate that this procedure is successful in about 70% of patients. However current data from Simplicity HTN-3 with 25% african-americans and a massive BP-lowering effect in the control "sham" group was not able to find a significant effect in the overall patient cohort. Possibly devices which allow to safely destroy sympathetic renal innervation more efficiently might allow for a higher responder rate. Irrigated RDN and ultrasound devices could deliver more energy to deeper tissue levels. This article provides an overview of currently available data on devices. PMID:24831759

  13. Development and Validation of a Clinical and Computerised Decision Support System for Management of Hypertension (DSS-HTN) at a Primary Health Care (PHC) Setting

    PubMed Central

    Anchala, Raghupathy; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Franco, Oscar H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension remains the top global cause of disease burden. Decision support systems (DSS) could provide an adequate and cost-effective means to improve the management of hypertension at a primary health care (PHC) level in a developing country, nevertheless evidence on this regard is rather limited. Methods Development of DSS software was based on an algorithmic approach for (a) evaluation of a hypertensive patient, (b) risk stratification (c) drug management and (d) lifestyle interventions, based on Indian guidelines for hypertension II (2007). The beta testing of DSS software involved a feedback from the end users of the system on the contents of the user interface. Software validation and piloting was done in field, wherein the virtual recommendations and advice given by the DSS were compared with two independent experts (government doctors from the non-participating PHC centers). Results The overall percent agreement between the DSS and independent experts among 60 hypertensives on drug management was 85% (95% CI: 83.61 - 85.25). The kappa statistic for overall agreement for drug management was 0.659 (95% CI: 0.457 - 0.862) indicating a substantial degree of agreement beyond chance at an alpha fixed at 0.05 with 80% power. Receiver operator curve (ROC) showed a good accuracy for the DSS, wherein, the area under curve (AUC) was 0.848 (95% CI: 0.741 - 0.948). Sensitivity and specificity of the DSS were 83.33 and 85.71% respectively when compared with independent experts. Conclusion A point of care, pilot tested and validated DSS for management of hypertension has been developed in a resource constrained low and middle income setting and could contribute to improved management of hypertension at a primary health care level. PMID:24223984

  14. [Resistant hypertension : What is it?].

    PubMed

    Luft, F C

    2015-03-01

    When blood pressure is poorly controlled despite treatment with a diuretic and two antihypertensive drugs at adequate doses, the hypertension is termed resistant. The prevalence of resistant hypertension is increasing. Once pseudo-resistance due to poor compliance, secondary forms of hypertension, and massive salt consumption have been excluded, some authorities maintain that blood pressure can be invariably lowered using minoxidil or mineralocorticoid receptor blockade. I also adhered to this belief until we encountered a patient who despite treatment with seven antihypertensive agents, electrical carotid sinus stimulation, and catheter-based renal denervation continued to exhibit extraordinarily high blood pressure values. I am now convinced that resistant hypertension does indeed exist. The prevalence of such patients can be substantially reduced by means of a thorough history and physical examination, determining drug serum concentrations, and excluding secondary causes. PMID:25668441

  15. [Position paper on the results of Symplicity HTN-3 trial. Grupo de estudio de la hipertensión arterial resistente].

    PubMed

    Azpiri-López, José Ramón; Assad-Morell, José Luis; Ponce de León-Martínez, Enrique; Monreal-Puente, Rogelio; Dávila-Bortoni, Adrián; Vázquez-Díaz, Luis Alberto; Treviño-Frutos, Ramón Javier; Barrera-Oranday, Félix; Del Angel-Soto, Juan Gustavo; Martínez, José Guadalupe; Arellano-Torres, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Renal artery denervation has shown to be an effective treatment for resistant hypertension. Symplicity HTN 1 and 2 trials showed in small and uncontrolled groups, significant systolic blood pressure reductions down to 30 mm Hg. Symplicity HTN-3, a double blind, randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial shaded this initial enthusiasm. Surprisingly, their results showed that renal denervation has a similar effect to placebo. Pre-specified subgroup analysis showed that non-black race individuals, younger than 65 years and with normal renal function, had a statistically significant systolic blood pressure decrease. This manuscript critically appraises the Symplicity HTN-3 trial, proposing possible explanations for the results. Also declares our group position and future actions regarding renal denervation. PMID:25700579

  16. [PREDICTORS OF RESISTANT ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION].

    PubMed

    Lazutkina, A Y; Gorbunov, V V

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports results of 6 year prospective observation of 7959 members of locomotive crews engaged at the Transbaikal Railways. The study aimed to estimate the probability and time of development of resistant arterial hypertension under effect of predictors of this disease. The data obtained are of value for diagnostic, prophylactic, and therapeutic practice. PMID:27522725

  17. Resistant Hypertension Workup and Approach to Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Makris, Anastasios; Seferou, Maria; Papadopoulos, Dimitris P.

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above the patient's goal despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive agents from different classes at optimal doses, one of which should ideally be a diuretic. Evaluation of patients with resistive hypertension should first confirm that they have true resistant hypertension by ruling out or correcting factors associated with pseudoresistance such as white coat hypertension, suboptimal blood pressure measurement technique, poor adherence to prescribed medication, suboptimal dosing of antihypertensive agents or inappropriate combinations, the white coat effect, and clinical inertia. Management includes lifestyle and dietary modification, elimination of medications contributing to resistance, and evaluation of potential secondary causes of hypertension. Pharmacological treatment should be tailored to the patient's profile and focus on the causative pathway of resistance. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension despite receiving an optimal therapy are candidates for newer interventional therapies such as carotid baroreceptor stimulation and renal denervation. PMID:21234416

  18. Renal denervation for the management of resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Vassiliou, Vassilis; Patel, Ketna; Howard, James P; Di Mario, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) as a therapy for patients with resistant hypertension has attracted great interest. The majority of studies in this field have demonstrated impressive reductions in blood pressure (BP). However, these trials were not randomized or sham-controlled and hence, the findings may have been overinflated due to trial biases. SYMPLICITY HTN-3 was the first randomized controlled trial to use a blinded sham-control and ambulatory BP monitoring. A surprise to many was that this study was neutral. Possible reasons for this neutrality include the fact that RSD may not be effective at lowering BP in man, RSD was not performed adequately due to limited operator experience, patients’ adherence with their anti-hypertensive drugs may have changed during the trial period, and perhaps the intervention only works in certain subgroups that are yet to be identified. Future studies seeking to demonstrate efficacy of RSD should be designed as randomized blinded sham-controlled trials. The efficacy of RSD is in doubt, but many feel that its safety has been established through the thousands of patients in whom the procedure has been performed. Over 90% of these data, however, are for the Symplicity™ system and rarely extend beyond 12 months of follow-up. Long-term safety cannot be assumed with RSD and nor should it be assumed that if one catheter system is safe then all are. We hope that in the near future, with the benefit of well-designed clinical trials, the role of renal denervation in the management of hypertension will be established. PMID:26672761

  19. Resistant and Refractory Hypertension: Antihypertensive Treatment Resistance vs Treatment Failure.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Mohammed; Dudenbostel, Tanja; Calhoun, David A

    2016-05-01

    Resistant or difficult to treat hypertension is defined as high blood pressure that remains uncontrolled with 3 or more different antihypertensive medications, including a diuretic. Recent definitions also include controlled blood pressure with use of 4 or more medications as also being resistant to treatment. Recently, refractory hypertension, an extreme phenotype of antihypertensive treatment failure has been defined as hypertension uncontrolled with use of 5 or more antihypertensive agents, including a long-acting thiazide diuretic and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. Patients with resistant vs refractory hypertension share similar characteristics and comorbidities, including obesity, African American race, female sex, diabetes, coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, and obstructive sleep apnea. Patients with refractory vs resistant hypertension tend to be younger and are more likely to have been diagnosed with congestive heart failure. Refractory hypertension might also differ from resistant hypertension in terms of underlying cause. Preliminary evidence suggests that refractory hypertension is more likely to be neurogenic in etiology (ie, heightened sympathetic tone), vs a volume-dependent hypertension that is more characteristic of resistant hypertension in general. PMID:26514749

  20. Renal sympathetic denervation in therapy resistant hypertension - pathophysiological aspects and predictors for treatment success

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Karl; Rommel, Karl Philipp; Okon, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard; Lurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Many forms of human hypertension are associated with an increased systemic sympathetic activity. Especially the renal sympathetic nervous system has been found to play a prominent role in this context. Therefore, catheter-interventional renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has been established as a treatment for patients suffering from therapy resistant hypertension in the past decade. The initial enthusiasm for this treatment was markedly dampened by the results of the Symplicity-HTN-3 trial, although the transferability of the results into clinical practice to date appears to be questionable. In contrast to the extensive use of RDN in treating hypertensive patients within or without clinical trial settings over the past years, its effects on the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underlying therapy resistant hypertension are only partly understood and are part of ongoing research. Effects of RDN have been described on many levels in human trials: From altered systemic sympathetic activity across cardiac and metabolic alterations down to changes in renal function. Most of these changes could sustainably change long-term morbidity and mortality of the treated patients, even if blood pressure remains unchanged. Furthermore, a number of promising predictors for a successful treatment with RDN have been identified recently and further trials are ongoing. This will certainly help to improve the preselection of potential candidates for RDN and thereby optimize treatment outcomes. This review summarizes important pathophysiologic effects of renal denervation and illustrates the currently known predictors for therapy success. PMID:27621771

  1. Renal sympathetic denervation in therapy resistant hypertension - pathophysiological aspects and predictors for treatment success.

    PubMed

    Fengler, Karl; Rommel, Karl Philipp; Okon, Thomas; Schuler, Gerhard; Lurz, Philipp

    2016-08-26

    Many forms of human hypertension are associated with an increased systemic sympathetic activity. Especially the renal sympathetic nervous system has been found to play a prominent role in this context. Therefore, catheter-interventional renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) has been established as a treatment for patients suffering from therapy resistant hypertension in the past decade. The initial enthusiasm for this treatment was markedly dampened by the results of the Symplicity-HTN-3 trial, although the transferability of the results into clinical practice to date appears to be questionable. In contrast to the extensive use of RDN in treating hypertensive patients within or without clinical trial settings over the past years, its effects on the complex pathophysiological mechanisms underlying therapy resistant hypertension are only partly understood and are part of ongoing research. Effects of RDN have been described on many levels in human trials: From altered systemic sympathetic activity across cardiac and metabolic alterations down to changes in renal function. Most of these changes could sustainably change long-term morbidity and mortality of the treated patients, even if blood pressure remains unchanged. Furthermore, a number of promising predictors for a successful treatment with RDN have been identified recently and further trials are ongoing. This will certainly help to improve the preselection of potential candidates for RDN and thereby optimize treatment outcomes. This review summarizes important pathophysiologic effects of renal denervation and illustrates the currently known predictors for therapy success. PMID:27621771

  2. Non-interventional management of resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Doumas, Michael; Tsioufis, Costas; Faselis, Charles; Lazaridis, Antonios; Grassos, Haris; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most popular fields of research in modern medicine due to its high prevalence and its major impact on cardiovascular risk and consequently on global health. Indeed, about one third of individuals worldwide has hypertension and is under increased long-term risk of myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. On the other hand, resistant hypertension, the “uncontrollable” part of arterial hypertension despite appropriate therapy, comprises a much greater menace since long-standing, high levels of blood pressure along with concomitant debilitating entities such as chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus create a prominent high cardiovascular risk milieu. However, despite the alarming consequences, resistant hypertension and its effective management still have not received proper scientific attention. Aspects like the exact prevalence and prognosis are yet to be clarified. In an effort to manage patients with resistant hypertension appropriately, clinical doctors are still racking their brains in order to find the best therapeutic algorithm and surmount the substantial difficulties in controlling this clinical entity. This review aims to shed light on the effective management of resistant hypertension and provide practical recommendations for clinicians dealing with such patients. PMID:25349652

  3. Novel strategies for treatment of resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Judd, Eric K; Oparil, Suzanne

    2013-12-01

    Resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure (BP) remaining above goal despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive medications at maximally tolerated doses (one ideally being a diuretic) or BP that requires 4 or more agents to achieve control, occurs in a substantial proportion (>10%) of treated hypertensive patients. Refractory hypertension is a recently described subset of resistant hypertension that cannot be controlled with maximal medical therapy (⩾5 antihypertensive medications of different classes at maximal tolerated doses). Patients with resistant or refractory hypertension are at increased cardiovascular risk and comprise the target population for novel antihypertensive treatments. Device-based interventions, including carotid baroreceptor activation and renal denervation, reduce sympathetic nervous system activity and have effectively reduced BP in early clinical trials of resistant hypertension. Renal denervation interrupts afferent and efferent renal nerve signaling by delivering radiofrequency energy, other forms of energy, or norepinephrine-depleting pharmaceuticals through catheters in the renal arteries. Renal denervation has the advantage of not requiring general anesthesia, surgical intervention, or device implantation and has been evaluated extensively in observational proof-of-principle studies and larger randomized controlled trials. It has been shown to be safe and effective in reducing clinic BP, indices of sympathetic nervous system activity, and a variety of hypertension-related comorbidities. These include impaired glucose metabolism/insulin resistance, end-stage renal disease, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiac hypertrophy, heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias. This article reviews the strengths, limitations, and future applications of novel device-based treatment, particularly renal denervation, for resistant hypertension and its comorbidities. PMID:25028641

  4. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension: no.

    PubMed

    Taddei, Stefano; Dal Canto, Elisa; Bruno, Rosa Maria

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, catheter-based radiofrequency denervation of the renal arteries (RDN) has emerged as a potential treatment for resistant hypertension. Though initial non-randomized and randomized small studies demonstrate large reductions in office blood pressure, RDN superiority to conventional treatment is not confirmed either by randomized controlled trials or by large international registries. Increasing evidence supports the hypothesis that a rational pharmacological therapeutic scheme is equally or more effective; this approach, together with an intervention aimed at increasing patient's compliance with treatment, might solve most of the cases of refractory hypertension. Thus, based on current evidence, renal denervation should not be routinely used to treat resistant hypertension. Though the possibility that RDN might be useful in other subsets of hypertensive patients exists, it has never been proven. Thus, its use should be limited to extreme situations, when all other possible treatments have failed. PMID:27001888

  5. Is there an association between the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and severity and control of hypertension? The REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke study.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hemal; Gamboa, Christopher M; Safford, Monika M; Soliman, Elsayad Z; Glasser, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    The association of atrial fibrillation (AF) with the severity and control of hypertension (HTN) remains unclear. We analyzed data from the national biracial cohort of REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke study. The AF prevalence ratios were estimated and full multivariable adjustment included demographics, risk factors, medication adherence, HTN duration, and antihypertensive medication classes. Of the 30,018 study participants (8.6% with AF), 4386 had normotension (4.3% with AF), 5916 had prehypertension (4.3 with AF%), 12,294 had controlled HTN (11.2% with AF), 5587 had uncontrolled HTN (8.1% with AF), 547 had controlled apparent treatment-resistant hypertension (aTRH) (19.2% with AF), and 1288 had uncontrolled aTRH (15.5% with AF). Compared with normotension, the AF prevalence ratios for prehypertension, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH, and uncontrolled aTRH groups in fully adjusted model were 1.01 (95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.21), 1.42 (1.18, 1.71), 1.37 (1.14, 1.65), 1.17 (0.86, 1.58), and 1.42 (1.10, 1.84), respectively (P < .001). The prevalence of AF was similar among persons with HTN regardless of blood pressure level and antihypertensive treatment resistance. PMID:27324843

  6. Physiologic Tailoring of Treatment in Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spence, J. David

    2010-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a major opportunity for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Despite widespread dissemination of consensus guidelines, most patients are uncontrolled with approaches that assume that all patients are the same. Causes of resistant hypertension include 1) non-compliance 2) consumption of substances that aggravate hypertension (such as salt, alcohol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, licorice, decongestants) and 3) secondary hypertension. Selecting the appropriate therapy for a patient depends on finding the cause of the hypertension. Once rare causes have been eliminated (such as pheochromocytoma, licorice, adult coarctation of the aorta), the cause will usually be found by intelligent interpretation (in the light of medications then being taken) of plasma renin and aldosterone. If stimulated renin is low and the aldosterone is high, the problem is primary aldosteronism, and the best treatment is usually aldosterone antagonists (spironolactone or eplerenone; high-dose amiloride for men where eplerenone is not available). If the renin is high, with secondary hyperaldosteronism, the best treatment is angiotensin receptor blockers or aliskiren. If the renin and aldosterone are both low the problem is over-activity of renal sodium channels and the treatment is amiloride. This approach is particularly important in patients of African origin, who are more likely to have low-renin hypertension. PMID:21532778

  7. Common Secondary Causes of Resistant Hypertension and Rational for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Faselis, Charles; Doumas, Michael; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure despite the use of three antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic, in optimal doses. Treatment resistance can be attributed to poor adherence to antihypertensive drugs, excessive salt intake, physician inertia, inappropriate or inadequate medication, and secondary hypertension. Drug-induced hypertension, obstructive sleep apnoea, primary aldosteronism, and chronic kidney disease represent the most common secondary causes of resistant hypertension. Several drugs can induce or exacerbate pre-existing hypertension, with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs being the most common due to their wide use. Obstructive sleep apnoea and primary aldosteronism are frequently encountered in patients with resistant hypertension and require expert management. Hypertension is commonly found in patients with chronic kidney disease and is frequently resistant to treatment, while the management of renovascular hypertension remains controversial. A step-by-step approach of patients with resistant hypertension is proposed at the end of this review paper. PMID:21423678

  8. Role of the Kidneys in Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Khawaja, Z.; Wilcox, C. S.

    2011-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is a failure to achieve goal BP (<140/90 mm Hg for the overall population and <130/80 mm Hg for those with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease) in a patient who adheres to maximum tolerated doses of 3 antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic. The kidneys play a critical role in long-term regulation of blood pressure. Blunted pressure natriuresis, with resultant increase in extracellular fluid volume, is an important cause of resistant hypertension. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, increased renal sympathetic nervous system activity and increased sodium reabsorption are important renal mechanisms. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of lifestyle factors or drugs contributing to treatment resistance, diagnosis and appropriate treatment of secondary causes of hypertension, use of effective multidrug regimens and optimization of diuretic therapy. Since inappropriate renal salt retention underlies most cases of drug-resistant hypertension, the therapeutic focus should be on improving salt depleting therapy by assessing and, if necessary, reducing dietary salt intake, optimizing diuretic therapy, and adding a mineralocorticoid antagonist if there are no contraindications. PMID:21461391

  9. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Rodrigo Vanerson Passos; Souza, Michel Kendy; Passos, Clévia Santos; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Simoes, Herbert Gustavo; Prestes, Jonato; Boim, Mirian Aparecida; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Franco, Maria do Carmo Pinho; Moraes, Milton Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH). Objective This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing), performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC), on blood pressure (BP) and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with SH. Methods Fifteen male SHR [206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBP)] and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP) were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY) and SHR (SED-SHR); RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC); and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC). Systolic BP and heart rate (HR) were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05), whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p < 0.05). There was a decrease in HR only for the RT1 group (p < 0.05). There was a higher increase in strength in the RT2 (140%; p < 0.05) group as compared with RT1 (11%; p > 0.05). Conclusions Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength. PMID:26840054

  10. Resistant Hypertension in Nondialysis Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stanzione, Giovanna; Conte, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as blood pressure (BP) that remains above the target of less than 140/90 mmHg in the general population and 130/80 mmHg in people with diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease (CKD) in spite of the use of at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs including a diuretic or as BP that reaches the target by means of four or more drugs. In CKD, RH is a common condition due to a combination of factors including sodium retention, increased activity of the renin-angiotensin system, and enhanced activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Before defining the hypertensive patient as resistant it is mandatory to exclude the so-called “pseudoresistance.” This condition, which refers to the apparent failure to reach BP target in spite of an appropriate antihypertensive treatment, is mainly caused by white coat hypertension that is prevalent (30%) in CKD patients. Recently we have demonstrated that “true” RH represents an independent risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes in CKD patients. PMID:23710342

  11. Illusions of truths in the Symplicity HTN-3 trial: generic design strengths but neuroscience failings.

    PubMed

    Esler, Murray

    2014-08-01

    The Achilles heel in catheter-based studies of renal denervation for severe hypertension is the almost universal failure to apply a confirmatory test for renal denervation. When renal denervation efficacy was assessed, using measurements of the spillover of norepinephrine from the renal sympathetic nerves to plasma, the only test validated to this point, denervation was found to be incomplete and nonuniform between patients. It is probable that the degree of denervation has typically been suboptimal in renal denervation trials. This criticism applies with special force to the Symplicity HTN-3 trial, where the proceduralists, although expert interventional cardiologists, had no prior experience with the renal denervation technique. Their learning curve fell during the trial, a shortcoming accentuated by the fact that one-third of operators performed one procedure only. Recently presented results from the Symplicity HTN-3 trialists confirm that renal denervation was not effectively or consistently achieved in the trial. PMID:25151320

  12. Prevalence of obstructive airway disease by spirometric indices in non-smoker subjects with IHD and HTN

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Virendra C.; Pujari, Bhupal N.; Patil, Harsha V.; Munjal, Amit; Agrawal, Vaibhav

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have found that there is a strong association between ischemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertension (HTN) with spirometric indices. Aims: To study the prevalence of obstructive airway disease (OAD) in non-smoker subjects with IHD and HTN and to compare them with healthy population. Settings and Design: This was a prospective, case–control, and observational study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 100 patients (cases) (n = 100) admitted in medicine department were recruited for this study. Controls (n = 100) were apparently healthy age- and sex-matched without HTN and IHD, recruited from March 2007 to July 2008. All eligible subjects were subjected to spirometric examination on a turbine-based spirometer (MIR spirolab-II) according to ATS/ERS guidelines. Forced expiratory volume/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) ratio <70% was used to make a diagnosis of OAD. Statistical Analysis Used: All analyses were carried out using Statistical Software Package for Social Sciences trial version (SPSS 10 version). Results: Out of 100 cases, 18 were with FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (OAD) and 82 had >70% FEV1/FVC ratio. Out of 100 controls, 2 were with FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (OAD) and 98 had >70% FEV1/FVC ratio. Eleven patients out of 66 from the case population with HTN had FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (Odds ratio 8.044). Prevalence of OAD in the hypertensive individuals was 16.66%. Twelve patients out of 62 from the case population with IHD had FEV1/FVC ratio <70% (Odds ratio of 9.333). Prevalence of OAD in the IHD individuals was 19.35%. In multiple correlation results for case population, when pulmonary function test variables were correlated with various dependant (age) and independent variables [HTN, IHD, height, weight, body mass index (BMI)], they were significantly reduced (P = 0.00017). In multivariate analysis (MANOVA), spirometric variables like FEV1, FEV1/FVC%, FVC, forced expiratory flow (FEF) 25–75%, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared with

  13. The relationships of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Ping; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Lin, Jen-Jyn; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension, blood pressure variation, and resistant hypertension have close relations to sleep apnea, which lead to target organ damage, including the kidney. The complex relationships between sleep apnea and blood pressure cause their interactions with chronic kidney disease ambiguous. The aim of the study was to elucidate the separate and joint effects of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease. A cross-sectional study was done to see the associations of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension with chronic kidney disease in 998 subjects underwent overnight polysomnography without device-therapy or surgery for their sleep-disordered breathing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the severity of SA, hypertension stage, resistant hypertension, and their joint effects on CKD. The multivariable relative odds (95% CI) of chronic kidney disease for the aged (age ≥65 years), severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension were 3.96 (2.57-6.09) (P < 0.001), 2.28 (1.13-4.58) (P < 0.05), 3.55 (1.70-7.42) (P < 0.001), and 9.42 (4.22-21.02) (P < 0.001), respectively. In subgroups analysis, the multivariable relative odds ratio of chronic kidney disease was highest in patients with both resistant hypertension and severe sleep apnea [13.42 (4.74-38.03)] (P < 0.001). Severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Patients with both severe sleep apnea and resistant hypertension have the highest risks. PMID:27281098

  14. The relationships of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chih-Ping; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hang, Liang-Wen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Lin, Jen-Jyn; Chou, Che-Yi; Tsai, Jeffrey J.P.; Ko, Po-Yen; Chang, Chiz-Tzung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension, blood pressure variation, and resistant hypertension have close relations to sleep apnea, which lead to target organ damage, including the kidney. The complex relationships between sleep apnea and blood pressure cause their interactions with chronic kidney disease ambiguous. The aim of the study was to elucidate the separate and joint effects of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension on chronic kidney disease. A cross-sectional study was done to see the associations of sleep apnea, hypertension, and resistant hypertension with chronic kidney disease in 998 subjects underwent overnight polysomnography without device-therapy or surgery for their sleep-disordered breathing. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyze the severity of SA, hypertension stage, resistant hypertension, and their joint effects on CKD. The multivariable relative odds (95% CI) of chronic kidney disease for the aged (age ≥65 years), severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension were 3.96 (2.57–6.09) (P < 0.001), 2.28 (1.13–4.58) (P < 0.05), 3.55 (1.70–7.42) (P < 0.001), and 9.42 (4.22–21.02) (P < 0.001), respectively. In subgroups analysis, the multivariable relative odds ratio of chronic kidney disease was highest in patients with both resistant hypertension and severe sleep apnea [13.42 (4.74–38.03)] (P < 0.001). Severe sleep apnea, stage III hypertension, and resistant hypertension are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease. Patients with both severe sleep apnea and resistant hypertension have the highest risks. PMID:27281098

  15. Resistant hypertension: an approach to management in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Yaxley, Julian P.; Thambar, Sam V.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is widely encountered in family medicine. Despite its prevalence, many patients have uncontrolled or difficult-to-control blood pressure. Resistant hypertension is defined as hypertension that is poorly responsive to treatment and requires the use of multiple medications to achieve acceptable blood pressure ranges. It may be a consequence of secondary hypertension or have no identifiable cause. Resistant hypertension is important to recognise because it places patients at risk of end-organ damage. Primary care physicians should be aware of the therapeutic approach for hypertension when traditional therapy fails. This article aims to familiarise readers with the evaluation and management of resistant hypertension by outlining the most recent evidence-based treatment options. PMID:25949966

  16. Neural modulation for hypertension and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Smith, S; Rossignol, P; Willis, S; Zannad, F; Mentz, R; Pocock, S; Bisognano, J; Nadim, Y; Geller, N; Ruble, S; Linde, C

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and heart failure (HF) have a significant global impact on health, and lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Despite recent advances in pharmacologic and device therapy for these conditions, there is a need for additional treatment modalities. Patients with sub-optimally treated HTN have increased risk for stroke, renal failure and heart failure. The outcome of HF patients remains poor despite modern pharmacological therapy and with established device therapies such as CRT and ICDs. Therefore, the potential role of neuromodulation via renal denervation, baro-reflex modulation and vagal stimulation for the treatment of resistant HTN and HF is being explored. In this manuscript, we review current evidence for neuromodulation in relation to established drug and device therapies and how these therapies may be synergistic in achieving therapy goals in patients with treatment resistant HTN and heart failure. We describe lessons learned from recent neuromodulation trials and outline strategies to improve the potential for success in future trials. This review is based on discussions between scientists, clinical trialists, and regulatory representatives at the 11th annual CardioVascular Clinical Trialist Forum in Washington, DC on December 5-7, 2014. PMID:27085120

  17. Resistant hypertension in office practice: a clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Siyam, Fadi; Brietzke, Stephen A; Sowers, James R

    2010-11-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure uncontrolled to guideline levels despite the use of ≥3 antihypertensive medications. When evaluating patients with resistant hypertension, it is important to consider issues such as blood pressure measurement technique, lifestyle, other comorbid conditions and medications, and the white coat effect. To this point, potential contributing factors include obstructive sleep apnea, excess alcohol intake, and use of blood pressure-elevating medications, such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, sympathomimetics, certain anorexic agents, and oral contraceptives. Secondary causes of hypertension are common in patients with resistant hypertension and appropriate screening tests should be performed as suggested by signs, symptoms, and laboratory abnormalities. In this regard, there is increasing evidence that hyperaldosteronism is common in the resistant hypertensive patient group. Pharmacologic therapy in patients with resistant hypertension is centered on drug combinations that have different mechanisms of action, including diuretics, which are essential in maximizing antihypertensive effects. The role of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists is expanding, especially in patients with the metabolic syndrome, where aldosterone excess is increasingly recognized as an etiology of resistant hypertension. Finally, when appropriate, specialist referral may be necessary to appropriately assess and treat these patients. PMID:21068532

  18. Dynamic resistance training decreases sympathetic tone in hypertensive ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Shimojo, G L; Palma, R K; Brito, J O; Sanches, I C; Irigoyen, M C; De Angelis, K

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistance exercise training on hemodynamics and cardiac autonomic control in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats. Female rats were divided into 4 groups: sedentary control (SC), sedentary hypertensive (SH), sedentary hypertensive ovariectomized (SHO), and resistance-trained hypertensive ovariectomized (RTHO). Resistance exercise training was performed on a vertical ladder (5 days/week, 8 weeks) at 40-60% maximal load. Direct arterial pressure was recorded. Vagal and sympathetic tones were measured by heart rate (HR) responses to methylatropine (3 mg/kg, iv) and propranolol (4 mg/kg, iv). Ovariectomy resulted in additional increases in blood pressure in hypertensive rats and was associated with decreased vagal tone. Resistance exercise trained rats had lower mean arterial pressure than untrained rats (RTHO: 159±2.2 vs SHO: 177±3.4 mmHg), as well as resting bradycardia (RTHO: 332±9.0 vs SHO: 356±5 bpm). Sympathetic tone was also lower in the trained group. Moreover, sympathetic tone was positively correlated with resting HR (r=0.7, P<0.05). The additional arterial pressure increase in hypertensive rats caused by ovarian hormone deprivation was attenuated by moderate-intensity dynamic resistance training. This benefit may be associated with resting bradycardia and reduced cardiac sympathetic tone after training, which suggests potential benefits of resistance exercise for the management of hypertension after ovarian hormone deprivation. PMID:25831206

  19. Drug Development for Hypertension: Do We Need Another Antihypertensive Agent for Resistant Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Pimenta, Eduardo; Calhoun, David A

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of resistant hypertension is seemingly much lower than had been reported in early studies. Recent analyses suggest that <5 % of treated hypertensive patients remain uncontrolled if fully adherent to an optimized antihypertensive treatment. However, these patients do have increased cardiovascular risk and need effective therapeutic approaches. Drug development is a high-risk, complex, lengthy, and very expensive process. In this article, we discuss the factors that should be considered in the process of developing a new agent for treatment of resistant hypertension. PMID:26949263

  20. Drug therapy for the patient with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Donazzan, Luca; Ewen, Sebastian; Papademetriou, Vasilios; Linicus, Yvonne; Linz, Dominik; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    2015-03-01

    Resistant hypertension is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above targets despite treatment with at least three antihypertensive drugs in adequate dose and combination. Nonadherence is a frequent cause of uncontrolled hypertension and can be improved by providing fixed dose (of two or three agents) single pill combination. Triple combination of the most widely used antihypertensive agents (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system antagonists, calcium channel blockers and diuretics) is a safe and effective therapy. Fourth line therapy is the use of an aldosterone antagonist. Renal denervation and baroreceptor stimulation can be considered in patients who remained uncontrolled despite optimal medical therapy. PMID:25760878

  1. Ascending Aorta Elastography After Kawasaki Disease Compared to Systemic Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nandlall, Ian; Maurice, Roch L; Fournier, Anne; Merouani, Aïcha; Dahdah, Nagib

    2015-10-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis, classically affecting large- and medium-size arteries. The coronary arteries draw most of the clinical attention, whereas few studies have taken interest in the ascending aorta. Using a proprietary imaging-based mechanical biomarker (ImBioMark), we sought to determine aortic stiffness in KD compared to systemic hypertension (HTN) and healthy children. We evaluated parasternal long-axis views focused on the ascending aorta in 20 controls, 12 KD, and 8 HTN as a comparative clinical model of vascular stiffness. We calculated systolic and diastolic aortic wall strain with ImBioMark. Strain was tested for normality against height, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure in normal subjects. Strain from KD and HTN was normalized (Z score) accordingly. Z score comparisons were performed using nonparametric statistics. Age was similar between KD and HTN (9.1 ± 5.3 and 9.9 ± 5.3 years old; p = NS). Systolic and diastolic strain values were normally distributed against height, systolic blood pressure, and diastolic blood pressure in healthy subjects. HTN subjects had abnormal systolic and diastolic strain values (p < 0.0001). Whereas KD subjects had normal diastolic strain, systolic strain was significantly lower (p < 0.001), and systolic strain was intermediate between controls and HTN. There were no significant differences in aortic strain among KD, however, according to the presence of coronary artery aneurysms. Despite normal blood pressure, the ascending aorta in KD exhibits reduced strain during systole. This may reflect in situ rigidity of the aorta. The normal diastolic strain in KD may, in contrast, reflect normal peripheral vascular resistance. PMID:25921428

  2. Carotid Baroreceptor Stimulation and Arteriovenous Shunts for Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paivanas, Nicholas; Bisognano, John D; Gassler, John P

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacologic therapy for hypertension is effective for the majority of patients with hypertension, but there is a subset of the population with treatment-resistant hypertension who cannot achieve their blood pressure goal despite taking multiple medications. Since these patients are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease and end-organ damage, additional therapies must be considered. This review discusses several novel interventional therapies-including baroreflex activation therapy, baroreceptor stenting, and creation of an arteriovenous shunt-that may provide alternative options for blood pressure control in those with treatment-resistant hypertension. All of these therapies remain investigational, and each has its own strengths and weaknesses that will be critical to assess as they come to market. PMID:27057291

  3. Current Status of Renal Denervation in Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Briasoulis, Alexander; Bakris, George L

    2016-11-01

    Over the past 7 years, prospective cohorts and small randomized controlled studies showed that renal denervation therapy (RDN) in patients with resistant hypertension is safe but associated with variable effects on BP which are not substantially better than medical therapy alone. The failure of the most rigorously designed randomized sham-control study, SYMPLICITY HTN-3, to meet the efficacy endpoints has raised several methodological concerns. However, recently reported studies and ongoing trials with improved procedural characteristics, identification of patients with true treatment-resistant hypertension on appropriate antihypertensive regimens further explore potential benefits of RDN. The scope of this review is to summarize evidence from currently completed studies on RDN and discuss future perspectives of RDN therapy in patients with resistant hypertension. PMID:27614466

  4. Initial Experience with Renal Denervation for the Treatment of Resistant Hypertension - The Utility of Novel Anesthetics and Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy (MIBG)

    PubMed Central

    Ziakas, Antonios; Petroglou, Dimitrios; Moralidis, Efstratios; Tsioufis, Konstantinos; Doumas, Mihalis; Argiriadou, Elena; Savopoulos, Christos; Hadjimiltiades, Stavros; Stiliadis, Ioannis; Kouparanis, Antonios; Katranas, Sotirios; Lillis, Leonidas; Koutsakis, Athanasios; Karvounis, Haralambos

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Symplicity-HTN 3 trial failed to show significant difference in blood pressure (BP) lowering between patients undergoing catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) and the sham-procedure arm of the study. However, there is still optimism about the role of RDN in the treatment of resistant hypertension, because identification of patients with increased sympathetic activity thus being good RDN responders, improvements in the RDN procedure and new technology RDN catheters are all expected to lead to better RDN results. We present our initial experience with RDN for the treatment of resistant hypertension, and the utility of novel anesthetics and cardiac 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy (123I-MIBG). Methods and Results: Seven patients with resistant hypertension underwent RDN and were followed up for 6 months. MIBG was performed before RDN, in order to estimate sympathetic activity and predict the response to RDN. All patients were sedated with dexmedetomidine and remifentanil during RDN. All patients tolerated the procedure well, were hemodynamically stable and their peri-procedural pain was effectively controlled. A median of 7.6 ± 2.1 and 6 ± 1.4 ablations were delivered in the right and left renal artery respectively, making an average of 6.8 burns per artery. No peri-procedural or late complications - adverse events (local or systematic) occurred. At 6 months, mean reduction in office BP was -26.0/-16.3 mmHg (p=0.004/p=0.02), while mean reduction in ambulatory BP was -12.3/-9.2 mmHg (p=0.118/p=0.045). One patient (14.3%) was a non-responder. None of the cardiac 123I-MIBG imaging indexes(early and late heart-to-mediastinum (H/M) count density ratio, washout rate (WR) of the tracer from the myocardium) were different between responders and non-responders. Conclusion: Patients with resistant hypertension who underwent RDN in our department had a significant reduction in BP 6 months after the intervention. 123I-MIBG was not useful in predicting

  5. Assessment of Mean Platelet Volume in Patients with Resistant Hypertension, Controlled Hypertension and Normotensives

    PubMed Central

    Surgit, Ozgur; Pusuroglu, Hamdi; Erturk, Mehmet; Akgul, Ozgur; Buturak, Ali; Akkaya, Emre; Gul, Mehmet; Uygur, Begum; Yazan, Serkan; Eksik, Abdurrahman

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Patients with resistant hypertension are at increased risk for cardiovascular events. Mean platelet volume (MPV) is an accepted biomarker of platelet activation and considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to determine whether MPV levels are higher in resistant hypertensive (RHTN) patients than in controlled hypertensive (CHTN) patients and healthy normotensive controls. Materials and Methods: 279 consecutive patients were included in this study. Patients were divided into three groups: Resistant hypertension patient group [n=78; mean age 56.8±9.8; 42 males (53.8%)]; controlled hypertension patient group [n=121; mean age 54.1±9.6; 49 males (40.5%)]; and normotensive control group [n=80; mean age 49.8±8.5; 34 males (42.5%)]. Physical examination, laboratory work-up, and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) were performed in all participants. Results: The mean platelet volume levels were significantly higher in RHTN group than in the CHTN and normotensive groups (p<0.001). In correlation analysis office systolic and diastolic blood pressure was positively correlated with MPV. Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that MPV, as an important indicator of platelet activation, was statistically higher in RHTN patients than in CHTN and in normotensive subjects. Elevated MPV levels may help to determine a high risk group for atherosclerosis in RHTN patients. PMID:26180490

  6. Treatment of sunitinib-induced hypertension in solid tumor by nitric oxide donors.

    PubMed

    León-Mateos, L; Mosquera, J; Antón Aparicio, L

    2015-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor (VEGFR) are overexpressed in the majority of renal cell carcinomas. This characteristic has supported the rationale of targeting VEGF-driven tumour vascularization, especially in clear cell RCC. VEGF-inhibiting strategies include the use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (sunitinib, axitinib, pazopanib, and sorafenib) and neutralizing antibodies such as bevacizumab. Hypertension (HTN) is one of the most common adverse effects of angiogenesis inhibitors. HTN observed in clinical trials appears to correlate with the potency of VEGF kinase inhibitor against VEGFR-2: agents with higher potency are associated with a higher incidence of HTN. Although the exact mechanism by tyrosine kinase inhibitors induce HTN has not yet been completely clarified, two key hypotheses have been postulated. First, some studies have pointed to a VEGF inhibitors-induced decrease in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, that can result in vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. VEGF, mediated by PI3K/Akt and MAPK pathway, upregulates the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme leading to up-regulation of NO production. So inhibition of signaling through the VEGF pathway would lead to a decrease in NO production, resulting in an increase in vascular resistance and blood pressure. Secondly a decrease in the number of microvascular endothelial cells and subsequent depletion of normal microvessel density (rarefaction) occurs upon VEGF signaling inhibition. NO donors could be successfully used not only for the treatment of developed angiogenesis-inhibitor-induced hypertension but also for preventive effects. PMID:26386874

  7. Management of patients with resistant hypertension: current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nilay; Calhoun, David A; Dudenbostel, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is an increasingly common clinical problem that is often heterogeneous in etiology, risk factors, and comorbidities. It is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure on optimal doses of three antihypertensive agents, ideally one being a diuretic. The definition also includes controlled hypertension with use of four or more antihypertensive agents. Recent observational studies have advanced the characterization of patients with RHTN. Patients with RHTN have higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality compared with patients with more easily controlled hypertension. Secondary causes of hypertension, including obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renovascular disease, are common in patients with RHTN and often coexist in the same patient. In addition, RHTN is often complicated by metabolic abnormalities. Patients with RHTN require a thorough evaluation to confirm the diagnosis and optimize treatment, which typically includes a combination of lifestyle adjustments, and pharmacologic and interventional treatment. Combination therapy including a diuretic, a long-acting calcium channel blocker, an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, a beta blocker, and a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist where warranted is the classic regimen for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists like spironolactone or eplerenone have been shown to be efficacious in patients with RHTN, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and primary aldosteronism. Novel interventional therapies, including baroreflex activation and renal denervation, have shown that both of these methods may be used to lower blood pressure safely, thereby providing exciting and promising new options to treat RHTN. PMID:24231917

  8. African Americans’ Perceptions of Adherence to Medications and Lifestyle Changes Prescribed to Treat Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M.; McSweeney, Jean C.; Stewart, Katharine E.; Cleves, Mario A.; Price, Elvin T.; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    More than 80 million Americans have hypertension (HTN), and African Americans (AAs) are disproportionately affected. AAs also have lower rates of adherence to HTN treatment. It is important to understand AAs’ perceptions of adherence to develop effective interventions. The aim of this study is to examine AAs’ perceptions of adherence to medications and lifestyle changes prescribed to treat HTN. In this qualitative study, we used purposive sampling to recruit Southern AAs with HTN aged 21 and older from a free, faith-based clinic. We recorded individual, in-person interviews about perceptions related to adherence to treatment of HTN and analyzed verbatim transcripts using content analysis and constant comparison. We also conducted medical record audits. Twenty-nine AAs participated (52% female, 38% were <50 years of age, 52% had taken anti-HTN medications for ≥5 years). Audits indicated that 65% had uncontrolled HTN during the previous year. Two main themes included causes of HTN and ways to improve blood pressure. Perceived causes of HTN included diet, stress, unhealthy actions, genes, and obesity. Ways to improve HTN included using cultural treatments “passed down,” increasing exercise, reducing stress, and losing weight. Many reported using home remedies to control HTN, including drinking pickle juice. More than half of this sample had uncontrolled HTN. They identified influences of culture on perceptions of adherence including causes and treatment of HTN, and possibly detrimental home remedies. It is imperative that clinicians identify culturally appropriate interventions for this high-risk group. PMID:27148469

  9. Hypertension Management and Microvascular Insulin Resistance in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Seung-Hyun; Cao, Wenhong; Liu, Zhenqi

    2011-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is in essence a vascular disease and is frequently associated with hypertension, macrovascular events, and microvascular complications. Microvascular dysfunction, including impaired recruitment and capillary rarefaction, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Microvascular insulin resistance and renin-angiotensin system upregulation are present in diabetes, and each contributes to the development of hypertension and microvascular dysfunction. In the insulin-sensitive state, insulin increases microvascular perfusion by increasing endothelial nitric oxide production, but this effect is abolished by insulin resistance. Angiotensin II, acting via the type 1 receptors, induces inflammation and oxidative stress, leading to impaired insulin signaling, reduced nitric oxide availability, and vasoconstriction. Conversely, it acts on the type 2 receptors to cause vasodilatation. Because substrate and hormonal exchanges occur in the microvasculature, antihypertensive agents targeted to improve microvascular insulin sensitivity and function may have beneficial effects beyond their capacity to lower blood pressure in patients with diabetes. PMID:20582734

  10. Patients with sleep apnoea and resistant hypertension at increased risk of heart disease.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    People with resistant hypertension are more likely to experience sleep apnoea than those with nonresistant hypertension, increasing the risk of ischaemic heart events and congestive heart failure, new study results suggests. PMID:27484541

  11. COMPARATIVE MICROARRAY EXPRESSION ANALYSIS OF SELECTED CANCER RELEVANT GENES IN HYPERTENSIVE RESISTANT VERSUS SUSCEPTIBLE RODENT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypertension and cancer are prevalent diseases. Epidemiological studies suggest that hypertension may increase the long term risk of cancer. Identification of resistance and/or susceptibility genes using rodent models could provide important insights into the management and treat...

  12. Baroreflex stimulation: A novel treatment option for resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Navaneethan, Sankar D; Lohmeier, Thomas E.; Bisognano, John D

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major public health problem in both developing and developed countries. Despite the increasing awareness of hypertension and its implications among patients and the treating physicians, the prevalence of resistant hypertension remains high and expected to increase. Many patients fail to reach their target blood pressure despite the wide availability of several antihypertensive agents and the continued recommendation of dietary and lifestyle modifications. Stimulation of the carotid sinus results in lowering of blood pressure by initiating the baroreflex and, in so doing, reducing sympathetic tone and increasing renal excretory function, in part, by exerting inhibitory effects on renin secretion. . Recent evidence from experimental studies suggests that the baroreflex may be more important in the setting of chronic hypertension than originally believed. In early phase clinical trials that did not include control arms, implantation of a baroreflex stimulator yielded a sustained decrease in blood pressure. An ongoing larger clinical trial with appropriate control arms is further exploring the safety and efficacy of the device. This article describes the history and potential mechanisms of action of this device including its extensive pre-clinical development and movement to human clinical trials. PMID:20409946

  13. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels

    PubMed Central

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A.; Shaikh, Amir Y.; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  14. Atrial Fibrillation and Hypertension: Mechanistic, Epidemiologic, and Treatment Parallels.

    PubMed

    Ogunsua, Adedotun A; Shaikh, Amir Y; Ahmed, Mohamed; McManus, David D

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an increasingly prevalent condition and the most common sustained arrhythmia encountered in ambulatory and hospital practice. Several clinical risk factors for AF include age, sex, valvular heart disease, obesity, sleep apnea, heart failure, and hypertension (HTN). Of all the risk factors, HTN is the most commonly encountered condition in patients with incident AF. Hypertension is associated with a 1.8-fold increase in the risk of developing new-onset AF and a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of progression to permanent AF. Hypertension predisposes to cardiac structural changes that influence the development of AF such as atrial remodeling. The renin angiotensin aldosterone system has been demonstrated to be a common mechanistic link in the pathogenesis of HTN and AF. Importantly, HTN is one of the few modifiable AF risk factors, and guideline-directed management of HTN may reduce the incidence of AF. PMID:27057292

  15. South African hypertension practice guideline 2014

    PubMed Central

    Seedat, YK; Rayner, BL; Veriava, Yosuf

    2014-01-01

    Summary Outcomes Extensive data from many randomised, controlled trials have shown the benefit of treating hypertension (HTN). The target blood pressure (BP) for antihypertensive management is systolic < 140 mmHg and diastolic < 90 mmHg, with minimal or no drug side effects. Lower targets are no longer recommended. The reduction of BP in the elderly should be achieved gradually over one month. Co-existent cardiovascular (CV) risk factors should also be controlled. Benefits Reduction in risk of stroke, cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease and coronary artery disease. Recommendations Correct BP measurement procedure is described. Evaluation of cardiovascular risk factors and recommendations for antihypertensive therapy are stipulated. Lifestyle modification and patient education are cornerstones of management. The major indications, precautions and contra-indications are listed for each antihypertensive drug recommended. Drug therapy for the patient with uncomplicated HTN is either mono- or combination therapy with a low-dose diuretic, calcium channel blocker (CCB) and an ACE inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB). Combination therapy should be considered ab initio if the BP is ≥ 160/100 mmHg. In black patients, either a diuretic and/or a CCB is recommended initially because the response rate is better compared to an ACEI. In resistant hypertension, add an alpha-blocker, spironolactone, vasodilator or β-blocker. Validity The guideline was developed by the Southern African Hypertension Society 2014©. PMID:25629715

  16. Chinese herbal medicine for resistant hypertension: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Li, Xiaoke; Zhang, Yuqing; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to summarise the current evidence from randomised control trials (RCTs) concerning treatment of patients with resistant hypertension with Chinese herbal medicine (CHM). Design Seven databases, including the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, CNKI, VIP, CBM and Wanfang, were systematically searched from their inception to March 2014 for RCTs investigating treatment of resistant hypertension in which CHM was used either as a monotherapy or in combination with conventional medicine versus placebo, no intervention or conventional medicine. Results Five trials containing 446 hypertensive patients were identified. The methodological quality of most trials was evaluated as generally low. All included trials compared CHM plus antihypertensive drugs with antihypertensive drugs alone for resistant hypertension. Formulations of CHM included tablet, decoction and injection. It was found that, compared with antihypertensive drugs alone, CHM (tablet) plus antihypertensive drugs resulted in clinically, but not statistically, significant reductions in systolic blood pressure (SBP; weighted mean difference (WMD)=−10.32 mm Hg; 95% CI −21.10 to 0.46; p=0.06) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP; WMD=−3.30 mm Hg; 95% CI −7.66 to 1.06; p=0.14). CHM (decoction) plus antihypertensive drugs also produced a clinically meaningful, but not statistically significant, reduction in SBP (WMD=−12.56 mm Hg; 95% CI −26.83 to 1.71; p=0.08), and did significantly decrease DBP (WMD=−7.89 mm Hg; 95% CI −11.74 to −4.04; p<0.0001). There were no significant differences in SBP (WMD=−3.50 mm Hg; 95% CI −8.95 to 1.95; p=0.21) and DBP (WMD=1.00 mm Hg; 95% CI −1.39 to 3.39; p=0.41) between CHM (injection) plus the antihypertensive drugs group and antihypertensive drugs alone. The safety of CHM remained uncertain. Conclusions No definite conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of CHM for resistant hypertension could be drawn. More

  17. Hypertension management in patients with vascular disease: An update.

    PubMed

    Kohlman-Trigoboff, Debra

    2016-09-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. About 80 million U.S. adults (33%) have HTN. Of these individuals, approximately 77% use antihypertensive medication, however, only 54% have controlled HTN. Studies have demonstrated that patients whose blood pressures are controlled achieve a minimum of 50% reduction in cardiovascular events compared to similar patients with poorly controlled blood pressure. This article will define HTN and its consequences. Diagnostic evaluation and evidence-based treatment guidelines for HTN to include lifestyle modifications and pharmacotherapy will be discussed. Finally, this article will examine why the treatment of HTN can prevent the development and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis in vascular disease. PMID:27568315

  18. Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Hypertension, and Their Additive Effects on Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Mario Francesco; Zito, Annapaola; Carratù, Pierluigi; Falcone, Vito Antonio; Bega, Elioda; Scicchitano, Pietro; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Resta, Onofrio

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims. It is widely accepted that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is independently associated with atherosclerosis. Similar to OSA, hypertension (HTN) is a condition associated with atherosclerosis. However, to date, the impact of the simultaneous presence of OSA and HTN on the risk of atherosclerosis has not been extensively studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consequences of the coexistence of OSA and HTN on carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and on inflammatory markers of atherosclerosis (such as interleukin- [IL-] 6 and pentraxin- [PTX-] 3). Methods. The study design allowed us to define 4 groups: (1) controls (n = 30); (2) OSA patients without HTN (n = 30); (3) HTN patients without OSA (n = 30); (4) patients with OSA and HTN (n = 30). In the morning after portable monitoring (between 7 am and 8 am), blood samples were collected, and carotid IMT was measured. Results. Carotid IMT, IL-6, and PTX-3 in OSA normotensive patients and in non-OSA HTN subjects were significantly higher compared to control subjects; in addition, in OSA hypertensive patients they were significantly increased compared to OSA normotensive, non-OSA HTN, or control subjects. Conclusions. OSA and HTN have an additive role in the progression of carotid atherosclerosis and in blood levels of inflammatory markers for atherosclerosis, such as interleukin-6 and pentraxin-3. PMID:26697221

  19. Cardiac autonomic responses after resistance exercise in treated hypertensive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Trevizani, Gabriela A.; Peçanha, Tiago; Nasario-Junior, Olivassé; Vianna, Jeferson M.; Silva, Lilian P.; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and to compare heart rate variability (HRV) after resistance exercise (RE) in treated hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Nine hypertensive men [HT: 58.0 ± 7.7 years, systolic blood pressure (SBP) = 133.6 ± 6.5 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) = 87.3 ± 8.1 mmHg; under antihypertensive treatment] and 11 normotensive men (NT: 57.1 ± 6.0 years, SBP = 127 ± 8.5 mmHg, DBP = 82.7 ± 5.5 mmHg) performed a single session of RE (2 sets of 15–20 repetitions, 50% of 1 RM, 120 s interval between sets/exercise) for the following exercises: leg extension, leg press, leg curl, bench press, seated row, triceps push-down, seated calf flexion, seated arm curl. HRV was assessed at resting and during 10 min of recovery period by calculating time (SDNN, RMSSD, pNN50) and frequency domain (LF, HF, LF/HF) indices. Mean values of HRV indices were reduced in the post-exercise period compared to the resting period (HT: lnHF: 4.7 ± 1.4 vs. 2.4 ± 1.2 ms2; NT: lnHF: 4.8 ± 1.5 vs. 2.2 ± 1.1 ms2, p < 0.01). However, there was no group vs. time interaction in this response (p = 0.8). The results indicate that HRV is equally suppressed after RE in normotensive and hypertensive individuals. These findings suggest that a single session of RE does not bring additional cardiac autonomic stress to treated hypertensive subjects. PMID:26441677

  20. Insulin resistance in young, lean male subjects with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Penesova, A; Cizmarova, E; Belan, V; Blazicek, P; Imrich, R; Vlcek, M; Vigas, M; Selko, D; Koska, J; Radikova, Z

    2011-06-01

    Impaired insulin action, frequently found in essential hypertension (HT), is modified by other factors, such as higher age, accumulation of body fat, dyslipidaemia, impaired glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. In addition, antihypertensive and insulin-sensitizing medication itself may significantly affect cardiovascular and metabolic milieu. The aim of this study was to assess insulin sensitivity, acute insulin response, lipidaemic status and the adipokines' concentrations with regard to abdominal fat distribution in young, lean male subjects with treatment-naïve essential HT and in matched healthy normotensive (NT) subjects. We studied 27 HT patients (age: 19.9±0.6 years; body mass index (BMI): 22.9±0.5 kg m(-2)) and 15 NT controls (age: 22.3±1.0 years; BMI: 23.7±0.6 kg m(-2)). The subjects underwent an oral and an intravenous glucose tolerance test (OGTT, IVGTT) on separate days in random order. Higher fasting insulin (P<0.001), non-esterified fatty acids (P<0.05) and plasminogen activator inhibitor factor 1 concentrations (P<0.05) were found in HT patients when compared with NT patients. Despite comparable anthropometric parameters and body fat distribution assessed by magnetic resonance imaging in both groups, newly diagnosed untreated young hypertensive male subjects showed decreased insulin sensitivity, augmented insulin response to both oral and intravenous glucose load (P<0.01; P<0.05 respectively) and 'higher still normal' 2-h plasma glucose levels during OGTT. Untreated, young, lean hypertensive male subjects, with distribution of abdominal adipose tissue and lipid profile comparable with their healthy NT matched counterparts, showed considerable signs of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia. We hypothesize that insulin resistance is the initial feature, which is influenced by several environmental factors, and HT is one of their common consequences. PMID:20631738

  1. Patient Cases 2. A Patient with Apparent Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Carlos

    2015-07-01

    True treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined by specific criteria and a failure to response to initial therapy options does not necessarily mean that a patient has TRH. In this case, a 44-year-old male was discharged on a fixed combination of valsartan/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ) 160/125 mg/day after presenting to the emergency room with paraesthesia of the upper left limb and recording a blood pressure (BP) of 190/110 mmHg. The patient had a number of other cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and was determined to be at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and of CV death. Carvedilol and atorvastatin were added, but 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) showed persistent hypertension. After specialist assessment, the patient's antihypertensive regimen was switched to a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan/HCTZ in the morning and a fixed-dose combination of olmesartan/amlodipine in the evening. Repeat ABPM 6 weeks later showed better BP control then previous ABPM. PMID:26072255

  2. Predictors of uncontrolled hypertension in the Stroke Belt.

    PubMed

    Dave, Gaurav J; Bibeau, Daniel L; Schulz, Mark R; Aronson, Robert E; Ivanov, Louise L; Black, Adina; Spann, Lapronda

    2013-08-01

    Inadequate control of high systolic blood pressure in older adults has been largely attributable to poor control of overall hypertension (HTN). The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) guidelines emphasize the importance of controlling isolated systolic HTN in older adults. The study examined demographics, self-reported health information, and clinical measures as predictors of uncontrolled HTN among individuals taking antihypertensive medications. The Community Initiative to Eliminate Stroke, a stroke risk factor screening and prevention project, collected data in two North Carolina counties. Statistical modeling of predictors included odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression analyses. Of the 2663 participants, 43.5% and 22.8% had uncontrolled systolic and diastolic HTN, respectively. African Americans were more likely to have uncontrolled systolic (60%) or diastolic HTN (70.9%) compared with whites (40% and 29.1%, respectively). Participants 55 years and older were more likely to have uncontrolled systolic HTN compared with younger individuals. Regression analyses showed that race (OR, 1.239; P=.00), age (OR, 1.683; P=.00), and nonadherence with medications (OR, 2.593; P=.00) were significant predictors of uncontrolled systolic HTN. Future interventions should focus on improving management of isolated systolic HTN in older adults and African Americans to increase overall control of HTN. PMID:23889718

  3. A novel management program for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chun-Song; Han, Ya-Ling; Ge, Jun-Bo; Liu, Yan-Na; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Tkebuchava, Tengiz

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe a comprehensive management program for hypertension (HTN), based on the experience of leading cardiovascular centers in China. This comprehensive approach, adhering to a number of core principles, includes diagnosis and therapeutic interventions. Therapeutic management includes lifestyle changes, risk factor management and pharmacological intervention and should allow reliable lowering blood pressure (BP). Additional paragraphs discuss the relationship between paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF), and HTN. PMID:26331115

  4. Elastic constants of Si from HtN Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Henry; Karimi, M.; Matolyak, J.; Kaplan, T.; Mostoller, M.

    1997-03-01

    A simple and efficient way of calculating the elastic constants (C_ij) of silicon as a function of temperature is still lacking. A method that has proven to be useful in the calculation of C_ij is EhN molecular dynamics (MD). EhN MD was successfully applied by Ray et al.(J. Ray, Comput. Phys. Rep. 8, 109 (1988).) to the Stillinger-Weber (SW) Si potential at three temperatures. However, the calculation of C_ij using EhN MD requires a knowledge of the second derivatives of the potential, which can be difficult to evaluate for some potential models. Another technique is HtN MD, where H is the enthalpy, t is the tension, and N is the number of particles, which has been applied with less success to Si by Ray et al.. The appeal of the HtN ensemble is that the strain fluctuations are related to the C_ij through a very simple relationship and that the second derivatives are not needed. A recent study of C_ij for a Lennard-Jones potential using HtN MC and HtN MD indicated a much faster covergence rate for HtN MC over its MD counterpart. We calculate C_ij for the SW Si potential using HtN MC with the same conditions as those used by Ray et al. in doing EhN MD and compare the convergence of the two methods.

  5. Probable Levofloxacin-associated Secondary Intracranial Hypertension in a Child With Multidrug-resistant Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    van der Laan, Louvina E; Schaaf, H Simon; Solomons, Regan; Willemse, Marianne; Mohamed, Nabil; Baboolal, Sandika O; Hesseling, Anneke C; van Toorn, Ronald; Garcia-Prats, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a key component of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment. We describe the first reported case of probable levofloxacin-associated intracranial hypertension in a 6-year-old girl with pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The case highlights the potential risk of secondary intracranial hypertension in multidrug-resistant tuberculosis patients who require prolonged fluoroquinolone therapy and the need for ophthalmologic screening in children with suggestive signs and symptoms. PMID:26974890

  6. Renal artery bilateral arteriosclerosis cause of resistant hypertension in hemodialysed patients.

    PubMed

    Niculae, Andrei; Peride, Ileana; Marinescu-Paninopol, Adriana; Vrabie, Camelia Doina; Ginghină, Octav; Jecan, Cristian Radu; Bratu, Ovidiu Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 57-year-old hemodialysed male patient known with severe hypertension resistant to six classes of hypotensive medication, in maximal doses, correlated with increased ultrafiltration during the hemodialysis session. In this case, bilateral nephrectomy was performed as final treatment option for malignant hypertension, and histopathological examination of both kidneys emphasized arteriosclerosis lesions. The results consisted in better hypertension management, with a reduction in both the number and doses of antihypertensive drugs. PMID:27516040

  7. Pre-treatment considerations in childhood hypertension due to chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Olowu, Wasiu Adekunle

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension (HTN) develops very early in childhood chronic kidney disease (CKD). It is linked with rapid progression of kidney disease, increased morbidity and mortality hence the imperative to start anti-hypertensive medication when blood pressure (BP) is persistently > 90(th) percentile for age, gender, and height in non-dialyzing hypertensive children with CKD. HTN pathomechanism in CKD is multifactorial and complexly interwoven. The patient with CKD-associated HTN needs to be carefully evaluated for co-morbidities that frequently alter the course of the disease as successful treatment of HTN in CKD goes beyond life style modification and anti-hypertensive therapy alone. Chronic anaemia, volume overload, endothelial dysfunction, arterial media calcification, and metabolic derangements like secondary hyperparathyroidism, hyperphosphataemia, and calcitriol deficiency are a few co-morbidities that may cause or worsen HTN in CKD. It is important to know if the HTN is caused or made worse by the toxic effects of medications like erythropoietin, cyclosporine, tacrolimus, corticosteroids and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Poor treatment response may be due to any of these co-morbidities and medications. A satisfactory hypertensive CKD outcome, therefore, depends very much on identifying and managing these co-morbid conditions and HTN promoting medications promptly and appropriately. This review attempts to point attention to factors that may affect successful treatment of the hypertensive CKD child and how to attain the desired therapeutic BP target. PMID:26558187

  8. Renal denervation in treatment-resistant essential hypertension. A randomized, SHAM-controlled, double-blinded 24-h blood pressure-based trial

    PubMed Central

    Mathiassen, Ole N.; Vase, Henrik; Bech, Jesper N.; Christensen, Kent L.; Buus, Niels H.; Schroeder, Anne P.; Lederballe, Ole; Rickers, Hans; Kampmann, Ulla; Poulsen, Per L.; Hansen, Klavs W.; B⊘tker, Hans E.; Peters, Christian D.; Engholm, Morten; Bertelsen, Jannik B.; Lassen, Jens F.; Langfeldt, Sten; Andersen, Gratien; Pedersen, Erling B.; Kaltoft, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Background: Renal denervation (RDN), treating resistant hypertension, has, in open trial design, been shown to lower blood pressure (BP) dramatically, but this was primarily with respect to office BP. Method: We conducted a SHAM-controlled, double-blind, randomized, single-center trial to establish efficacy data based on 24-h ambulatory BP measurements (ABPM). Inclusion criteria were daytime systolic ABPM at least 145 mmHg following 1 month of stable medication and 2 weeks of compliance registration. All RDN procedures were carried out by an experienced operator using the unipolar Medtronic Flex catheter (Medtronic, Santa Rosa, California, USA). Results: We randomized 69 patients with treatment-resistant hypertension to RDN (n = 36) or SHAM (n = 33). Groups were well balanced at baseline. Mean baseline daytime systolic ABPM was 159 ± 12 mmHg (RDN) and 159 ± 14 mmHg (SHAM). Groups had similar reductions in daytime systolic ABPM compared with baseline at 3 months [−6.2 ± 18.8 mmHg (RDN) vs. −6.0 ± 13.5 mmHg (SHAM)] and at 6 months [−6.1 ± 18.9 mmHg (RDN) vs. −4.3 ± 15.1 mmHg (SHAM)]. Mean usage of antihypertensive medication (daily defined doses) at 3 months was equal [6.8 ± 2.7 (RDN) vs. 7.0 ± 2.5 (SHAM)]. RDN performed at a single center and by a high-volume operator reduced ABPM to the same level as SHAM treatment and thus confirms the result of the HTN3 trial. Conclusion: Further, clinical use of RDN for treatment of resistant hypertension should await positive results from double-blinded, SHAM-controlled trials with multipolar ablation catheters or novel denervation techniques. PMID:27228432

  9. Renal denervation for human hypertension: is there a future?

    PubMed

    Izzo, Joseph L; Tobe, Sheldon W

    2016-05-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a permissive, if not primary causal role in the genesis and maintenance of human essential hypertension. Excessive sympathetic nervous system activity in man is most apparent in early forms of hypertension (prehypertension and white-coat type). Renal nerves are of particular interest because of their roles in modulating the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and renal sodium excretion. Renal denervation substantially ameliorates the development of hypertension in animal models such as renovascular, spontaneously hypertensive, and steroid-induced hypertension in rats and aortic coarctation in dogs. In man, catheter ablation of renal nerves has been undertaken in the late phases of hypertension; in a rigorously controlled trial in resistant hypertension (SYMPLICITY HTN-3), renal denervation did not reduce blood pressure over the long term. Is this because renal denervation is more appropriate to prevent than treat late-stage hypertension? Are there anatomical or technical barriers yet to be overcome in the procedure? These and other issues are addressed by two experts in this issue of the controversies series: Deepak L. Bhatt and Murray Epstein. PMID:27049792

  10. Link between insulin resistance and hypertension: What is the evidence from evolutionary biology?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming-Sheng; Wang, Aimei; Yu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hypertension are considered as prototypical "diseases of civilization" that are manifested in the modern environment as plentiful food and sedentary life. The human propensity for insulin resistance and hypertension is a product, at least in part, of our evolutionary history. Adaptation to ancient lifestyle characterized by a low sodium, low-calorie food supply and physical stress to injury response has driven our evolution to shape and preserve a thrifty genotype, which is favorite with energy-saving and sodium conservation. As our civilization evolved, a sedentary lifestyle and sodium- and energy-rich diet, the thrifty genotype is no longer advantageous, and may be maladaptive to disease phenotype, such as hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance syndrome. This article reviews human evolution and the impact of the modern environment on hypertension and insulin resistance. PMID:24485020

  11. Link between insulin resistance and hypertension: What is the evidence from evolutionary biology?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hypertension are considered as prototypical “diseases of civilization” that are manifested in the modern environment as plentiful food and sedentary life. The human propensity for insulin resistance and hypertension is a product, at least in part, of our evolutionary history. Adaptation to ancient lifestyle characterized by a low sodium, low-calorie food supply and physical stress to injury response has driven our evolution to shape and preserve a thrifty genotype, which is favorite with energy-saving and sodium conservation. As our civilization evolved, a sedentary lifestyle and sodium- and energy-rich diet, the thrifty genotype is no longer advantageous, and may be maladaptive to disease phenotype, such as hypertension, obesity and insulin resistance syndrome. This article reviews human evolution and the impact of the modern environment on hypertension and insulin resistance. PMID:24485020

  12. Kidney Function Decline and Apparent Treatment-Resistant Hypertension in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kaboré, Jean; Metzger, Marie; Helmer, Catherine; Berr, Claudine; Tzourio, Christophe; Massy, Ziad A.; Stengel, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Background Cross-sectional studies show a strong association between chronic kidney disease and apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, but the longitudinal association of the rate of kidney function decline with the risk of resistant hypertension is unknown. Methods The population-based Three-City included 8,695 participants older than 65 years, 4265 of them treated for hypertension. We estimated the odds ratios (OR) of new-onset apparent treatment-resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure ≥ 140/90 mmHg despite use of 3 antihypertensive drug classes or ≥ 4 classes regardless of blood pressure, associated with the mean estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) level and its rate of decline over 4 years, compared with both controlled hypertension and uncontrolled nonresistant hypertension with ≤ 2 drugs. GFR was estimated with three different equations. Results Baseline prevalence of apparent treatment-resistant hypertension and of controlled and uncontrolled nonresistant hypertension, were 6.5%, 62.3% and 31.2%, respectively. During follow-up, 162 participants developed apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. Mean eGFR decline with the MDRD equation was 1.5±2.9 mL/min/1.73 m² per year: 27.7% of the participants had an eGFR ≥3 and 10.1% ≥ 5 mL/min/1.73 m² per year. After adjusting for age, sex, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular history, the ORs for new-onset apparent treatment-resistant hypertension associated with a mean eGFR level, per 15 mL/min/1.73m² drop, were 1.23 [95% confidence interval 0.91–1.64] compared to controlled hypertension and 1.10 [0.83–1.45] compared to uncontrolled nonresistant hypertension; ORs associated with a decline rate ≥ 3 mL/min/1.73m² per year were 1.89 [1.09–3.29] and 1.99 [1.19–3.35], respectively. Similar results were obtained when we estimated GFR with the CKDEPI and the BIS1 equations. ORs tended to be higher for an eGFR decline rate ≥ 5 mL/min/1.73m² per year. Conclusion The speed of

  13. Vascular reactivity of rabbit isolated renal and femoral resistance arteries in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Khammy, Makhala M; Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2016-02-15

    In rabbits with cellophane renal wrap hypertension, hindquarter and total vascular resistance changes to pressor and depressor agents are amplified compared to those of normotensive rabbits. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro pharmacodynamics of hypertensive and normotensive rabbit small artery segments isolated from the renal and hindquarter vascular beds. Using wire myography, the full range (Emax) and sensitivity (EC50) to a range of agonists of segments of renal interlobar (≈ 600 µm i.d.), renal arcuate (≈ 250 µm i.d.) and deep femoral branch (≈ 250 µm i.d.) arteries were assessed under normalised conditions of passive tension. Interlobar arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive (EC50) than those from normotensive rabbits to noradrenaline (6-fold), methoxamine (3-fold) and angiotensin II (3-fold). Arcuate artery reactivity was largely unaffected by hypertension. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits had enhanced sensitivity only to noradrenaline (2-fold) and methoxamine (4-fold). Sensitivity to relaxation by acetylcholine was unaffected by hypertension in all arteries. Deep femoral arteries from hypertensive rabbits were more sensitive to sodium nitroprusside than normotensive counterparts. Adenosine caused little relaxation in renal arteries, but full relaxation in deep femoral arteries, unaltered by hypertension. This study found substantial heterogeneity in the pharmacodynamic profile of vessels isolated from different vascular beds and between arterial segments within the kidney. These profiles were differentially affected by hypertension suggesting that hypertension per se is not a resultant of general vascular dysfunction. PMID:26806799

  14. Resistant arterial hypertension: association with syncronous kidney cancer and adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Pittavini, Loretta; De Gaetano, Andrea; Solano, Giuseppe; Losito, Attilio

    2010-01-01

    The coexistence of renal cancer and adrenal adenoma is rare. We report the case of a 60-year-old patient with synchronous hypernephroma and adrenal adenoma. The patient presented with resistant hypertension, high plasma renin activity and aldosterone and target organ damage. Removal of the affected kidney cured the hypertension and normalized the plasma renin activity (PRA) and circulating aldosterone. This suggests that the coexistence of kidney cancer and adrenal adenoma may be a curable cause of resistant hypertension. The potential mechanisms accounting for the lack of suppression of PRA are discussed. PMID:20383873

  15. A cross-sectional study to evaluate the associations between hypertension and osteoporosis in Chinese postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Keqin; Shi, Haiming; Tang, Zihui

    2015-01-01

    Background: This relationship between hypertension (HTN) and osteoporosis (OP) is not well documented among the population in China. The study sought to study the relationship between HTN and OP in Chinese postmenopausal women. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 1878 Chinese postmenopausal women with an average age of 62.38 years. OP was diagnosed by standardized quantitative ultrasound at the calcaneus and HTN was defined by blood pressure data and/or the use of antihypertensive medication. The relationship for OP and HTN were calculated using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: The prevalence of OP was 28.17% in the postmenopausal women, and there was a significant difference in the prevalence of OP between the two groups according to HTN (P value = 0.003). Univariate analysis demonstrates a positive correlation between HTN and OP. After adjustment for relevant potential confounding factors, multivariate logistic regression analyses detected significant associations between HTN and OP (P value = 0.096). In participants with HTN, the OR for OP was 1.209 (95% CI: 0.967-1.513). Conclusion: The prevalence of OP was more frequent in Chinese postmenopausal women with HTN, and HTN was independently and significantly associated with OP. PMID:26885054

  16. The spectrum of gastric pathology in portal hypertension-An endoscopic and pathologic study of 550 cases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Changqing; Chen, Chien-Huan; Liu, Ta-Chiang

    2016-08-01

    One of the main tasks for pathologists when evaluating gastric biopsies from patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is to examine whether there is increased mucosal vasculature as suggested by endoscopy. However, the full spectrum of pathology findings in patients with portal hypertension (pHTN) is largely unknown. We systematically characterized the endoscopic and pathologic features in gastric biopsies from pHTN patients (study group) and compared with those from patients without pHTN (control group). The study group consisted of 550 consecutive surveillance esophagogastroduodenoscopic (EGD) biopsies, whereas the control group included 281 consecutive EGD biopsies for a variety of indications. As expected, the endoscopic prevalence of PHG was 28%, among which two-thirds showed corresponding histopathologic evidence of increased vasculature. However, non-Helicobacter pylori gastritis was the most common finding in pHTN patients on histology (40%). In addition, hyperplastic polyp was also more common in pHTN patients than in controls (6% vs 3%; P=0.0314). In contrast, pathology findings of nonspecific reactive changes (29% vs 51%; P<0.0001), proton pump inhibitor-related changes (16% vs 30%; P<0.0001), and malignancy (1% vs 3%; P=0.0138) were less common in pHTN patients. Our results show a spectrum of gastric endoscopic and pathologic findings in pHTN patients. The predominant gastric pathology in pHTN patients may be associated with pHTN-induced gastric microcirculation impairment. PMID:27461830

  17. Intermittent electrical stimulation of the right cervical vagus nerve in salt-sensitive hypertensive rats: effects on blood pressure, arrhythmias, and ventricular electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Annoni, Elizabeth M; Xie, Xueyi; Lee, Steven W; Libbus, Imad; KenKnight, Bruce H; Osborn, John W; Tolkacheva, Elena G

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is the single greatest risk factor for potentially fatal cardiovascular diseases. One cause of HTN is inappropriately increased sympathetic nervous system activity, suggesting that restoring the autonomic nervous balance may be an effective means of HTN treatment. Here, we studied the potential of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) to treat chronic HTN and cardiac arrhythmias through stimulation of the right cervical vagus nerve in hypertensive rats. Dahl salt-sensitive rats (n = 12) were given a high salt diet to induce HTN. After 6 weeks, rats were randomized into two groups: HTN-Sham and HTN-VNS, in which VNS was provided to HTN-VNS group for 4 weeks. In vivo blood pressure and electrocardiogram activities were monitored continuously by an implantable telemetry system. After 10 weeks, rats were euthanized and their hearts were extracted for ex vivo electrophysiological studies using high-resolution optical mapping. Six weeks of high salt diet significantly increased both mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure, demonstrating successful induction of HTN in all rats. After 4 weeks of VNS treatment, the increase in MAP and the number of arrhythmia episodes in HTN-VNS rats was significantly attenuated when compared to those observed in HTN-Sham rats. VNS treatment also induced changes in electrophysiological properties of the heart, such as reduction in action potential duration (APD) during rapid drive pacing, slope of APD restitution, spatial dispersion of APD, and increase in conduction velocity of impulse propagation. Overall, these results provide further evidence for the therapeutic efficacy of VNS in HTN and HTN-related heart diseases. PMID:26265746

  18. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, S; Calhoun, D A

    1989-03-01

    An estimated 58 million Americans are at increased risk of morbidity and premature death due to high blood pressure (BP) and require some type of therapy or systematic monitoring. This article focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of hypertension, new approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of secondary hypertension, and current views of the most appropriate nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic therapy for essential hypertension. In view of the extremely high prevalence of the disorder, emphasis is placed on efficient and cost-effective strategies for diagnosing and managing the hypertensive patient. Recent evidence indicates that nonpharmacologic therapy, including dietary potassium and calcium supplements, reduction of salt intake, weight loss for the obese patient, regular exercise, a diet high in fiber and low in cholesterol and saturated fats, smoking cessation, and moderation of alcohol consumption produces significant sustained reductions in BP while reducing overall cardiovascular risk. Accordingly, nonpharmacologic antihypertensive therapy should be included in the treatment of all hypertensive patients. In persons with mild hypertension, nonpharmacologic approaches may adequately reduce BP, thereby avoiding the expense and potential side effects of drug therapy. In patients with more severe hypertension, nonpharmacologic therapy, used in conjunction with pharmacologic therapy, can reduce the dosage of antihypertensive medications necessary for BP control. Patients treated with nonpharmacologic therapy only should be followed closely, and if BP control is not satisfactory, drug therapy should be added. The large number of drugs available for use in hypertension treatment, coupled with our rapidly expanding knowledge of the pathophysiology of hypertension and of the adverse effects of these drugs in individual patient groups, make it possible to individualize antihypertensive treatment. When used as monotherapy, most agents

  19. Impact of obesity and insulin-resistance on cirrhosis and portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Berzigotti, Annalisa; Abraldes, Juan G

    2013-10-01

    Obesity is sharply rising worldwide and is increasingly recognized in patients with cirrhosis. This review summarizes the available data documenting a detrimental role of obesity and insulin-resistance on the risk of appearance of clinical events in patients with cirrhosis. Molecular pathways explaining the harmful effect of obesity and insulin resistance in the natural history of cirrhosis are largely unknown. Increasing knowledge of mechanisms leading to white adipose tissue dysfunction on one side, and to portal hypertension on the other side, allow hypothesizing that a link between the pathophysiology of obesity, insulin resistance and portal hypertension in cirrhosis exists. Mechanisms likely involved in this interplay are discussed in this article. PMID:23731977

  20. Obesity-related hypertension: is there a role for selective leptin resistance?

    PubMed

    Correia, Marcelo L G; Haynes, William G

    2004-06-01

    Obesity is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, in particular for hypertension. Serum leptin levels and sympathetic nerve activity are both increased in obesity. Leptin has been demonstrated to increase sympathetic nerve activity. Thus, leptin-dependent sympathoactivation might contribute to obesity-related hypertension. However, leptin resistance occurs in obesity. One possibility is that leptin resistance is selective to the metabolic effects of leptin, sparing its sympathoexcitatory actions. In this article, we review experimental evidence supporting the novel concept of selective leptin resistance. We also discuss the sympathetic actions of leptin that are relevant to blood pressure modulation and potential mechanisms of leptin resistance. Disruption of leptin intracellular signaling pathways and resistance of specific leptin-responsive neural networks provide theoretic models of selective leptin resistance. However, most information about leptin-sympathetic actions and leptin-resistance mechanisms derive from in vitro and animal studies. Future research in humans is widely awaited. PMID:15128477

  1. Resistant Hypertension and the Pivotal Role for Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists: A Clinical Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Murray; Duprez, Daniel A

    2016-07-01

    True resistant hypertension must be distinguished from apparent resistant hypertension, of which important causes include medication nonadherence, illicit drug use, and alcoholism. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring should be considered to rule out white coat hypertension. The pathogenesis is multifactorial, but the 2 pivotal factors include volume excess and the myriad effects of aldosterone. Aldosterone increases vascular tone because of endothelial dysfunction and enhances the pressor response to catecholamines. It also plays a crucial role in vascular remodeling of small and large arteries. Aldosterone also promotes collagen synthesis, which leads to increased arterial stiffness and elevation of blood pressure. Because aldosterone has been demonstrated to modulate baroreflex resetting, in cases of severe hypertension, there would be fewer compensatory mechanisms available to offset the blood pressure elevation. PMID:26899747

  2. Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Poulter, Neil R; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Caulfield, Mark

    2015-08-22

    Raised blood pressure is the biggest single contributor to the global burden of disease and to global mortality. The numbers of people affected and the prevalence of high blood pressure worldwide are expected to increase over the next decade. Preventive strategies are therefore urgently needed, especially in less developed countries, and management of hypertension must be optimised. Genetic advances in some rare causes of hypertension have been made lately, but the aggregate effect on blood pressure of all the genetic loci identified to date is small. Hence, intervention on key environmental determinants and effective implementation of trial-based therapies are needed. Three-drug combinations can control hypertension in about 90% of patients but only if resources allow identification of patients and drug delivery is affordable. Furthermore, assessment of optimal drug therapy for each ethnic group is needed. PMID:25832858

  3. Natriuretic peptide resistance of mesenteric arteries in spontaneous hypertensive rat is alleviated by exercise.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, B; Su, X-L; Tie, R; Chang, P; Zhang, X-C; Wang, J-B; Zhao, G; Zhu, M-Z; Zhang, H-F; Chen, B-Y

    2016-06-20

    Proximal resistance vessels, such as the mesenteric arteries, contribute substantially to the peripheral resistance. The reactivity of resistance vessels to vasoactive substance like natriuretic peptides plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. In current study, we investigated the reactivity of mesenteric arteries to atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a well known vasodilating factor, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), as well as the effects of exercise training on it. As a result, ANP-induced vasorelaxation was attenuated in SHR with significantly increased phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), and decreased cGMP/ANP ratio, compared with WKY rats as control. Intriguingly, the decreased reactivity to ANP in SHR was markedly reversed by exercise training. In addition, ANP resistance of in vitro mesenteric arteries was diminished by sildenafil a potent selective inhibitor of PDE5. In conclusion, ANP resistance occurs in resistance vessels of SHR, suggesting predisposition to hypertension, which can be reversed by exercise. PMID:26447511

  4. Vascular Aging: Lessons From Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Feber, Janusz; Ruzicka, Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in children is associated with early vascular aging (EVA) and underlying immunologic-metabolic abnormalities and accelerated biological maturation. Morphologic and functional vascular changes underlying EVA and HTN in children resemble those seen in the elderly including but not limited to an increase in intima-media thickness (IMT) and arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. Although progeria syndrome leading to EVA and the development of clinically manifested cardiovascular (CV) disease in the second decade of life is a rare hereditary disorder, primary HTN, which is also associated with EVA, is much more common (reported in up to 10% in adolescents). EVA associated with HTN in children leads to the premature development of target organ injury in childhood and CV events in early adulthood. Limited evidence from prospective observational studies in children and adolescents indicates that early lifestyle measures (low salt/low sugar intake and exercise) or pharmacologic treatment of HTN, or both, partially reverses morphologic and functional changes underlying EVA such as an increase in carotid IMT and pulse wave velocity, a decrease in flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery, and an increase in oxidative stress and visceral fat. Future mechanistic and therapeutic clinical trials are desirable to assess the mechanisms and treatment strategies of EVA in the context of HTN in children and their effect on CV events in early adulthood. PMID:27040097

  5. Device-Based Therapy for Drug-Resistant Hypertension: An Update.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Nader, Mark; Arunagiri, Kousalya; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2016-08-01

    Drug-resistant hypertension (RH) remains a significant and common cardiovascular risk despite the availability of multiple potent antihypertensive medications. Uncontrolled resistant hypertension contributes substantially to excessive cardiovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. Clinical and experimental evidence suggest that sympathetic nervous system over-activity is the main culprit for the development and maintenance of drug-resistant hypertension. Both medical and interventional strategies, targeting the sympathetic over-activation, have been designed in patients with hypertension over the past few decades. Minimally invasive, catheter-based, renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) and carotid baroreceptor activation therapy (BAT) have been extensively evaluated in patients with RH in clinical trials. Current trial outcomes, though at times impressive, have been mostly uncontrolled trials in need of validation. Device-based therapy for drug-resistant hypertension has the potential to provide alternative treatment options to certain groups of patients who are refractory or intolerant to current antihypertensive medications. However, more research is needed to prove its efficacy in both animal models and in humans. In this article, we will review the evidence from recent renal denervation, carotid baroreceptor stimulation therapy, and newly emerged central arteriovenous anastomosis trials to pinpoint the weak links, and speculate on potential alternative approaches. PMID:27402013

  6. Untreated newly diagnosed essential hypertension is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in a population of a hypertensive center

    PubMed Central

    Michopoulos, Spyros; Chouzouri, Vasiliki I; Manios, Efstathios D; Grapsa, Eirini; Antoniou, Zoi; Papadimitriou, Christos A; Zakopoulos, Nikolaos; Dimopoulos, Athanasios-Meletios

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Recent studies have demonstrated that hypertension (HTN) is associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in treated hypertensive patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between newly diagnosed essential HTN and NAFLD in untreated hypertensive patients. Patients and methods A consecutive series of 240 subjects (143 hypertensives and 97 normotensives), aged 30–80 years, without diabetes mellitus were enrolled in the study. Subjects with 24-hour systolic blood pressure (SBP) values ≥130 mmHg and/or diastolic BP values ≥80 mmHg were defined as hypertensives. NAFLD was defined as the presence of liver hyperechogenicity on ultrasound. Results Body mass index (P=0.002) and essential HTN (P=0.016) were independently associated with NAFLD in the multivariate logistic regression model. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that morning SBP (P=0.044) was independently associated with NAFLD. Conclusion Untreated, newly diagnosed essential HTN is independently associated with NAFLD. Ambulatory BP monitoring could be used for the diagnosis of essential HTN in patients with NAFLD. PMID:26834493

  7. Renal denervation of the native kidneys for drug-resistant hypertension after kidney transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dobrowolski, Linn C.; Bemelman, Frederike J.; ten Berge, Ineke J.M.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Reekers, Jim A.; Krediet, C.T. Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong rationale for renal denervation (RDN) of the native kidneys in kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant hypertension. We present a patient with a stable graft function, who underwent RDN for posttransplant therapy-resistant hypertension (24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) 143/89 mmHg, while compliantly using five different antihypertensive agents). After RDN, BP measurements and orthostatic complaints required withdrawal of two antihypertensive agents and halving a third. At 6 months, ABPM was 134/84 mmHg and allograft function remained unchanged. This case calls for designing well-designed prospective studies on RDN in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25713714

  8. Renal denervation of the native kidneys for drug-resistant hypertension after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Linn C; Bemelman, Frederike J; Ten Berge, Ineke J M; van den Born, Bert-Jan H; Reekers, Jim A; Krediet, C T Paul

    2015-02-01

    There is a strong rationale for renal denervation (RDN) of the native kidneys in kidney transplant recipients with treatment-resistant hypertension. We present a patient with a stable graft function, who underwent RDN for posttransplant therapy-resistant hypertension (24-h ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) 143/89 mmHg, while compliantly using five different antihypertensive agents). After RDN, BP measurements and orthostatic complaints required withdrawal of two antihypertensive agents and halving a third. At 6 months, ABPM was 134/84 mmHg and allograft function remained unchanged. This case calls for designing well-designed prospective studies on RDN in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:25713714

  9. Catheter-based radiofrequency renal-nerve ablation in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Azizi, M; Steichen, O; Frank, M; Bobrie, G; Plouin, P-F; Sapoval, M

    2012-03-01

    This review aims to describe the role and the results of catheter-based renal nerve ablation for the treatment of resistant hypertension. Despite the availability of multiple classes of orally active antihypertensive treatments, resistant hypertension remains an important public health issue in 2012 due to its prevalence and association with target-organ damage and poor prognosis. The failure of purely pharmacological approaches to treat resistant hypertension has stimulated interest in invasive device-based treatments based on old concepts. In the absence of orally active antihypertensive agents, patients with severe and complicated hypertension were widely treated by surgical denervation of the kidney until the 1960s, but this approach was associated with a high incidence of severe adverse events and a high mortality rate. A new catheter system using radiofrequency energy has been developed, allowing an endovascular approach to renal denervation and providing patients with resistant hypertension with a new therapeutic option that is less invasive than surgery and can be performed rapidly under local anaesthesia. To date, this technique has been evaluated only in open-label trials including small numbers of highly selected resistant hypertensive patients with suitable renal artery anatomy. The available evidence suggests a favourable blood pressure-lowering effect in the short term (6 months) and a low incidence of immediate local and endovascular complications. This follow-up period is, however, too short for the detection of rare or late-onset adverse events. For the time being, the benefit/risk ratio of this technique remains to be evaluated, precluding its uncontrolled and widespread use in routine practice. PMID:22237510

  10. Determinants of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in patients with resistant hypertension: RESIST-POL study.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Klisiewicz, Anna; Florczak, Elżbieta; Rybicka, Justyna; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Hoffman, Piotr

    2015-08-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy, especially concentric hypertrophy, has been shown to be an independent factor of cardiovascular diseases in patients with hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and/or metabolic syndrome (MS) are common in patients with resistant hypertension (RHTN). The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with concentric hypertrophy in patients with RHTN. Data from 155 patients (92M, 63F) was analyzed. All patients underwent a thorough examination including: biochemical evaluations, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, polysomnography and echocardiography. MS was defined by The Adult Treatment Panel III. Clinically significant OSA was defined as apnea/hypopnea index (AHI)>15 events per hour. Left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and relative wall thickness (RWT) were calculated. Four types of LV geometry were distinguished based on the LVMI and RWT. Patients were divided into four groups based on the LV geometric patterns: group 1 (normal geometry) (n=38, 24.4%); group 2 (concentric remodeling) (n=40, 25.8%); group 3 (eccentric hypertrophy) (n=26, 16.8%); and group 4 (concentric hypertrophy) (n=51, 33%). MS was found in 64% and OSA (AHI>15) in 43.2% of patients. Factors independently associated with concentric hypertrophy were: age (OR-1.51; 95% CI-1.00-2.27; P<0.04), OSA>15 events per hour (OR-2.73; 95% CI-1.26-5.93; P=0.01) and nighttime systolic blood pressure (SBP) (OR-1.69; 95% CI-1.32-2.17; P=0.0001). Concentric hypertrophy was the most common type of left ventricular disorder in patients with RHTN. Nighttime SBP and clinically significant OSA were independently associated with concentric hypertrophy in patients with RHTN. PMID:25787038

  11. Rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses to static handgrip in older hypertensive adults.

    PubMed

    Greaney, J L; Edwards, D G; Fadel, P J; Farquhar, W B

    2015-07-01

    Exaggerated pressor and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responses have been reported during static handgrip in hypertensive (HTN) adults. Recent work suggests that such responses may occur much more rapidly in HTN patients; however, this has not been extensively studied. Thus, we examined the blood pressure (BP) and MSNA responses at the immediate onset of muscle contraction and tested the hypothesis that older HTN adults would exhibit rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses compared with normotensive (NTN) adults. Heart rate (HR), BP (Finometer) and MSNA (peroneal microneurography) were retrospectively analyzed in 15 HTN (62 ± 1 years; resting BP 153 ± 3/91 ± 5 mm Hg) and 23 age-matched NTN (60 ± 1 years; resting BP 112 ± 1/67 ± 2 mm Hg) subjects during the first 30 s of static handgrip at 30 and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). HTN adults demonstrated exaggerated increases in mean BP during the first 10 s of both 30% (NTN: Δ1 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ7 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) and 40% (NTN: Δ2 ± 1 vs HTN: Δ8 ± 2 mm Hg; P < 0.05) intensity handgrip. Likewise, HTN adults exhibited atypical increases in MSNA within 10 s. Increases in HR were also greater in HTN adults at 10 s of 30% MVC handgrip, although not at 40% MVC. There were no group differences in 10 s pressor or sympathetic responses to a cold pressor test, suggesting no differences in generalized sympathetic responsiveness. Thus, static handgrip evokes rapid onset pressor and sympathetic responses in older HTN adults. These findings suggest that older HTN adults likely have greater cardiovascular risk even during short duration activities of daily living that contain an isometric component. PMID:25471615

  12. Prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Matar, Dany; Frangieh, Antonio H; Abouassi, Samah; Bteich, Fernand; Saleh, Aline; Salame, Elie; Kassab, Roland; Azar, Rabih R

    2015-05-01

    The prevalence and factors related to hypertension (HTN) treatment and control are well investigated in the Western world but remain poorly understood in the Middle East and in middle-income countries such as Lebanon. In order to measure the prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control rates of HTN in Lebanon, the authors measured blood pressure (BP) in 1697 adults. The prevalence of optimal BP (<120/80 mm Hg) was 33% and that of pre-HTN (BP ≥120/80 mm Hg but <140/90 mm Hg) was 30%. The prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control (among treated hypertensive) rates of HTN were 36.9%, 53%, 48.9%, and 54.2%, respectively. Overall, only 27% of patients with HTN had their BP under control. Awareness was the most important predictor of treatment. No predictor of control could be identified. The authors concluded that HTN is prevalent in Lebanon and its overall control is low. Improving awareness is the most important target for intervention. PMID:25619545

  13. Clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of Hispanic hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Patrick T; Krim, Selim R; Lavie, Carl J; Ventura, Hector O

    2014-01-01

    Hispanics are the largest and fastest-growing minority population in the United States, currently comprising about 16.3% (52 million) of the total population. With an increased prevalence of metabolic risk factors in this population, the rate of uncontrolled hypertension (HTN) in Hispanics significantly exceeds the rates observed among non-Hispanic blacks and whites. Unfortunately, data on HTN in Hispanics remains limited due to the under-representation of Hispanics in clinical trials; with most of the data primarily restricted to observational and retrospective subgroup analyses. This article aims to review the available data on prevalence, awareness and control of HTN, risk factors and some of the challenges unique to the Hispanics population. We also discuss treatment strategies derived from large HTN trials that included Hispanics. PMID:25537632

  14. Renal sympathetic nerve ablation for treatment-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Krum, Henry; Schlaich, Markus; Sobotka, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for increased cardiovascular events with accelerated sympathetic nerve activity implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of disease. Blood pressure is not adequately controlled in many patients, despite the availability of effective pharmacotherapy. Novel procedure- as well as device-based strategies, such as percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, have been developed to improve blood pressure in these refractory patients. Renal sympathetic denervation not only reduces blood pressure but also renal as well as systemic sympathetic nerve activity in such patients. The reduction in blood pressure appears to be sustained over 3 years after the procedure, which suggests absence of re-innervation of renal sympathetic nerves. Safety appears to be adequate. This approach may also have potential in other disorders associated with enhanced sympathetic nerve activity such as congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome. This review will focus on the current status of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, clinical efficacy and safety outcomes and prospects beyond refractory hypertension. PMID:23819768

  15. Blood pressure effects of CPAP in nonresistant and resistant hypertension associated with OSA: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Feldstein, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a rather common chronic disorder, associated with increased prevalence of hypertension. The pathophysiological mechanisms for hypertension in OSA are at least in part linked to intermittent hypoxia developed during nightly hypopneas and apneas. Hypoxemia stimulates sympathetic overactivity, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. However, it appears that intermittent hypoxemia is not the only factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. Supplemental oxygen therapy that improved oxyhemoglobin saturation to similar levels to those achieved with CPAP treatment did not reduce BP. In this scenario, it could be proposed that hypoxemia acts as a trigger of sympathetic overdrive, which when set is the main factor in the development of hypertension in OSA. This review appraises evidence provided by randomized controlled trials on the BP-lowering effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment of OSA patients with nonresistant and resistant hypertension. It suggests that CPAP treatment is more effective in treating resistant hypertension than nonresistant hypertension. A possible explanation is that sympathetic overactivity and altered vascular reactivity in OSA could be more severe in resistant hypertension than in nonresistant hypertension. An intricate interaction among compliance, adherence, and their interaction with demographic characteristics, genetic factors, and comorbidities of the population included might explain the differences found between trials on their influence over the antihypertensive effectiveness of CPAP. Further long-term trials are needed in hypertensive OSA patients to assess whether CPAP treatment in OSA patients consistently restores physiological nocturnal BP fall and adjusts resting and circadian heart rate. PMID:27159803

  16. Post-resistance exercise hemodynamic and autonomic responses: Comparison between normotensive and hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, A C C; Sousa, J C S; Cavalli, A A P; Silva, N D; Costa, L A R; Tobaldini, E; Montano, N; Silva, G V; Ortega, K; Mion, D; Tinucci, T; Forjaz, C L M

    2015-08-01

    To compare post-resistance exercise hypotension (PREH) and its mechanisms in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, 14 normotensives and 12 hypertensives underwent two experimental sessions: control (rest) and exercise (seven exercises, three sets, 50% of one repetition maximum). Hemodynamic and autonomic clinic measurements were taken before (Pre) and at two moments post-interventions (Post 1: between 30 and 60 min; Post 2: after 7 h). Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was monitored for 24 h. At Post 1, exercise decreased systolic BP similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (-8 ± 2 vs -13 ± 2 mmHg, P > 0.05), whereas diastolic BP decreased more in hypertensives (-4 ± 1 vs -9 ± 1 mmHg, P < 0.05). Cardiac output and systemic vascular resistance did not change in normotensives and hypertensives (0.0 ± 0.3 vs 0.0 ± 0.3 L/min; -1 ± 1 vs -2 ± 2 U, P > 0.05). After exercise, heart rate (+13 ± 3 vs +13 ± 2 bpm) and its variability (low- to high-frequency components ratio, 1.9 ± 0.4 vs +1.4 ± 0.3) increased whereas stroke volume (-14 ± 5 vs -11 ± 5 mL) decreased similarly in normotensives and hypertensives (all, P > 0.05). At Post 2, all variables returned to pre-intervention, and ambulatory data were similar between sessions. Thus, a session of resistance exercise promoted PREH in normotensives and hypertensives. Although this PREH was greater in hypertensives, it did not last during the ambulatory period, which limits its clinical relevance. In addition, the mechanisms of PREH were similar in hypertensives and normotensives. PMID:24981630

  17. Incident ESRD and Treatment-Resistant Hypertension: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Rikki M.; Calhoun, David A.; Bell, Emmy K.; Bowling, C. Barrett; Gutiérrez, Orlando M.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Lackland, Daniel T.; Oparil, Suzanne; McClellan, William; Warnock, David G.; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that treatment-resistant hypertension is common and increasing in prevalence among US adults. While hypertension is a risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD), few data are available on the association between treatment-resistant hypertension and ESRD risk. Study Design Prospective cohort study. Setting & Participants We analyzed data from 9,974 Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) Study participants treated for hypertension without ESRD at baseline. Predictor Treatment-resistant hypertension was defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) with concurrent use of 3 antihypertensive medication classes including a diuretic or use of ≥4 antihypertensive medication classes including a diuretic regardless of BP level. Outcome Incident ESRD was identified by linkage of REGARDS Study participants with the US Renal Data System. Measurements During a baseline in-home study visit, BP was measured twice and classes of antihypertensive medication being taken were determined by pill bottle inspection. Results Over a median follow-up of 6.4 years, there were 152 incident cases of ESRD (110 ESRD cases among 2,147 with treatment-resistant hypertension and 42 ESRD cases among 7,827 without treatment-resistant hypertension). The incidence of ESRD per 1,000 person-years for hypertensive participants with and without treatment-resistant hypertension was 8.86 (95% CI, 7.35–10.68) and 0.88 (95% CI, 0.65–1.19), respectively. After multivariable adjustment, the HR for ESRD comparing hypertensive participants with versus without treatment-resistant hypertension was 6.32 (95% CI, 4.30–9.30). Of the participants who developed incident ESRD during follow-up, 72% had treatment-resistant hypertension at baseline. Limitations BP, eGFR, and albuminuria assessed at a single time point. Conclusions Individuals with treatment-resistant hypertension are at increased risk for ESRD. Appropriate clinical management strategies are

  18. Endothelium-derived Relaxing Factors of Small Resistance Arteries in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Endothelium-derived relaxing factors (EDRFs), including nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin (PGI2), and endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF), play pivotal roles in regulating vascular tone. Reduced EDRFs cause impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, or endothelial dysfunction. Impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in response to acetylcholine (ACh) is consistently observed in conduit vessels in human patients and experimental animal models of hypertension. Because small resistance arteries are known to produce more than one type of EDRF, the mechanism(s) mediating endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in small resistance arteries may be different from that observed in conduit vessels under hypertensive conditions, where vasorelaxation is mainly dependent on NO. EDHF has been described as one of the principal mediators of endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in small resistance arteries in normotensive animals. Furthermore, EDHF appears to become the predominant endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation pathway when the endothelial NO synthase (NOS3)/NO pathway is absent, as in NOS3-knockout mice, whereas some studies have shown that the EDHF pathway is dysfunctional in experimental models of hypertension. This article reviews our current knowledge regarding EDRFs in small arteries under normotensive and hypertensive conditions. PMID:25343007

  19. [Management of resistant hypertension. Expert consensus statement from the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology].

    PubMed

    Denolle, Thierry; Chamontin, Bernard; Doll, Gérard; Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Girerd, Xavier; Herpin, Daniel; Vaïsse, Bernard; Villeneuve, Frédéric; Halimi, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-01

    To improve the management of resistant hypertension, the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology, has published a set of eleven recommendations. The primary objective is to provide the most up-to-date information, based on the strongest scientific rationale and which is easily applicable to daily clinical practice for health professionals working within the French health system. Resistant hypertension is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) both on office measurements and confirmed by out-of-office measurements despite a therapeutic strategy comprising appropriate lifestyle and dietary measures and the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents including a thiazide diuretic, a renin-angiotensin system blocker (ARB or ACEI) and a calcium channel blocker, for at least four weeks, at optimal doses. Treatment compliance must be closely monitored, as most factors that are likely to affect treatment resistance (excessive dietary salt intake, alcohol, depression and drug interactions, or vasopressors). If the diagnosis of resistant hypertension is confirmed, the patient should be referred to a hypertension specialist to screen for potential target organ damage and secondary causes of hypertension. The recommended treatment regimen is a combination therapy comprising four treatment classes, including spironolactone (12.5 to 25mg/day). In the event of a contraindication or a non-response to spironolactone, or if adverse effects occur, a β-blocker, an α-blocker, or a centrally acting antihypertensive drug should be prescribed. Because renal denervation is still undergoing assessment for the treatment of hypertension, this technique should only be prescribed by a specialist hypertension clinic. PMID:25459067

  20. Microvascular resistance in essential hypertension and flowmetry as a diagnostic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukjanov, Valdimir F.

    2001-08-01

    New Doppler-Laser flowmetry diagnostic test of functional condition of microcirculation was worked out of find precapillar and postcapillar resistance. Flowmetry was used to measure vasomotion and blood flow after arterial compression, decompression and venous hyperemia were held. Patients of essential hypertension were examined with the help of Doppler-Laser Flowmetry, optical photometry (540 nm). Precapillar resistance included next basis parameters: vasomotion with high frequency (10-16 per/min) and low amplitude, latent time after decompression, large postocclusive reactive hyperemia, absent venous hyperemia. Postcapillar resistance included next basis parameters: vasomotion with low frequency (4-8 per/min) and high amplitude, paradoxical hyperemia in arterial compression, little or absent postocclusive reactive hyperemia, large venous hyperemia. This test-method was applied to select patogenetic treatment of essential hypertension.

  1. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4(-/-) mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4(-/-) mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  2. Resistin Induces Hypertension and Insulin Resistance in Mice via a TLR4-Dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yun; Lu, Linfang; Hu, Youtao; Li, Qiang; An, Chaoqiang; Yu, Xiaolan; Shu, Le; Chen, Ao; Niu, Congcong; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, an adipokine involved in insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes, has recently been reported to play a role in cardiovascular events. However, its effect on blood pressure (BP) and the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we showed that resistin induces hypertension and IR in wild type (WT) mice, but not in tlr4−/− mice. Resistin upregulated angiotensinogen (Agt) expression in WT mice, whereas it had no effect on tlr4−/− mice, or in mice treated with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril. Real-time PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation further confirmed that resistin activates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) via the TLR4/P65/Agt pathway. This finding suggested an essential role of resistin in linking IR and hypertension, which may offer a novel target in clinic on the study of the association between diabetes and hypertension. PMID:26917360

  3. Renal Denervation for Treating Resistant Hypertension: Current Evidence and Future Insights from a Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Castro Torres, Y.; Katholi, Richard E.

    2013-01-01

    Adequate blood pressure control represents an important goal for all physicians due to the complications of hypertension which reduce patients' quality of life. A new interventional strategy to reduce blood pressure has been developed for patients with resistant hypertension. Catheter-based renal denervation has demonstrated excellent results in recent investigations associated with few side effects. With the growing diffusion of this technique worldwide, some medical societies have published consensus statements to guide physicians how to best apply this procedure. Questions remain to be answered such as the long-term durability of renal denervation, the efficacy in patients with other sympathetically mediated diseases, and whether renal denervation would benefit patients with stage 1 hypertension. PMID:24369496

  4. Burden and predictors of hypertension in India: results of SEEK (Screening and Early Evaluation of Kidney Disease) study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is one of the major causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The objective of the study was to investigate the burden and predictors of HTN in India. Methods 6120 subjects participated in the Screening and Early Evaluation of Kidney disease (SEEK), a community-based screening program in 53 camps in 13 representative geographic locations in India. Of these, 5929 had recorded blood pressure (BP) measurements. Potential predictors of HTN were collected using a structured questionnaire for SEEK study. Results HTN was observed in 43.5% of our cohort. After adjusting for center variation (p < 0.0001), predictors of a higher prevalence of HTN were older age ≥40 years (p < 0.0001), BMI of ≥ 23 Kg/M2 (p < 0.0004), larger waist circumference (p < 0.0001), working in sedentary occupation (p < 0.0001), having diabetes mellitus (p < 0.0001), having proteinuria (p < 0.0016), and increased serum creatinine (p < 0.0001). High school/some college education (p = 0.0016), versus less than 9th grade education, was related with lower prevalence of HTN. Of note, proteinuria and CKD were observed in 19% and 23.5% of HTN subjects. About half (54%) of the hypertensive subjects were aware of their hypertension status. Conclusions HTN was common in this cohort from India. Older age, BMI ≥ 23 Kg/M2, waist circumference, sedentary occupation, education less, diabetes mellitus, presence of proteinuria, and raised serum creatinine were significant predictors of hypertension. Our data suggest that HTN is a major public health problem in India with low awareness, and requires aggressive community-based screening and education to improve health. PMID:24602391

  5. 2016 European Society of Hypertension guidelines for the management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lurbe, Empar; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Dominiczak, Anna; Erdine, Serap; Hirth, Asle; Invitti, Cecilia; Litwin, Mieczyslaw; Mancia, Giuseppe; Pall, Denes; Rascher, Wolfgang; Redon, Josep; Schaefer, Franz; Seeman, Tomas; Sinha, Manish; Stabouli, Stella; Webb, Nicholas J; Wühl, Elke; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    Increasing prevalence of hypertension (HTN) in children and adolescents has become a significant public health issue driving a considerable amount of research. Aspects discussed in this document include advances in the definition of HTN in 16 year or older, clinical significance of isolated systolic HTN in youth, the importance of out of office and central blood pressure measurement, new risk factors for HTN, methods to assess vascular phenotypes, clustering of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment strategies among others. The recommendations of the present document synthesize a considerable amount of scientific data and clinical experience and represent the best clinical wisdom upon which physicians, nurses and families should base their decisions. In addition, as they call attention to the burden of HTN in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, these guidelines should encourage public policy makers to develop a global effort to improve identification and treatment of high blood pressure among children and adolescents. PMID:27467768

  6. Impact of Adiposity on Incident Hypertension Is Modified by Insulin Resistance in Adults: Longitudinal Observation From the Bogalusa Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Shengxu; Li, Ying; Liu, Yaozhong; Fernandez, Camilo; Harville, Emily; Bazzano, Lydia; He, Jiang; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Adiposity and insulin resistance are closely associated with hypertension. This study aims to investigate whether the association between adiposity and hypertension is modified by insulin resistance. The cohort consisted of 1624 middle-aged normotensive black and white adults aged 18 to 43 years at baseline who followed for 16 years on average. Overweight/obesity at baseline was defined as body mass index (BMI) ≥25, and insulin resistance was measured using homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Prevalence of incident hypertension was compared between the insulin-sensitive adiposity and insulin-resistant adiposity groups. The prevalence of incident hypertension was higher in the insulin-resistant adiposity than in the insulin-sensitive adiposity group (32.1% versus 22.1%, P<0.001). In multivariable logistic analyses, adjusted for baseline age, race, sex, follow-up years, and smoking, baseline insulin-resistant obesity was associated with incident hypertension (odds ratio, 1.9; P=0.008). Odds ratios did not differ between blacks and whites (P=0.238). Of note, the odds ratios of BMI associated with hypertension significantly increased with increasing quartiles of baseline homeostasis model assessment (odds ratio, 1.3, 1.1, 1.5, and 2.5 in quartiles I, II, III, and IV, respectively; P=0.006 for trend). Slopes of increasing follow-up blood pressure with baseline BMI, measured as regression coefficients (β), were significantly greater in insulin-resistant than in insulin-sensitive individuals (β=0.74 versus β=0.35 for systolic blood pressure, P=0.004 for difference; β=0.51 versus β=0.23 for diastolic blood pressure, P=0.001 for difference). These findings suggest that insulin resistance has a synergistic effect on the obesity-hypertension association in young adults, indicating that the role of adiposity in the development of hypertension is modified by insulin resistance. PMID:26573703

  7. Muscular Strength and Incident Hypertension in Normotensive and Prehypertensive Men

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Sui, Xuemei; Colabianchi, Natalie; Hussey, Jim; Blair, Steven N.

    2009-01-01

    The protective effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) on hypertension (HTN) are well known; however, the association between muscular strength and incidence of HTN has yet to be examined. Purpose This study evaluated the strength-HTN association with and without accounting for CRF. Methods Participants were 4147 men (20–82 years) in the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study for whom an age-specific composite muscular strength score was computed from measures of a 1-repetition maximal leg and a 1-repetition maximal bench press. CRF was quantified by maximal treadmill exercise test time in minutes. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals of incident HTN events according to exposure categories. Results During a mean follow-up of 19 years, there were 503 incident HTN cases. Multivariable-adjusted (excluding CRF) HRs of hypertension in normotensive men comparing middle and high strength thirds to the lowest third were not significant at 1.17 and 0.84, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted (excluding CRF) HRs of hypertension in baseline prehypertensive men comparing middle and high strength thirds to the lowest third were significant at 0.73 and 0.72 (p=.01 each), respectively. The association between muscular strength and incidence of HTN in baseline prehypertensive men was no longer significant after control for CRF (p=.26). Conclusions The study indicated that middle and high levels of muscular strength were associated with a reduced risk of HTN in prehypertensive men only. However, this relationship was no longer significant after controlling for CRF. PMID:19927030

  8. Transpulmonary pressure gradient verifies pulmonary hypertension is initiated by increased arterial resistance in broilers.

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, A G; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2008-01-01

    Previous hemodynamic evaluations demonstrated that pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is higher in broilers that are susceptible to pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS, ascites) than in broilers that are resistant to PHS. We compared key pulmonary hemodynamic parameters in broilers from PHS-susceptible and PHS-resistant lines (selected for 12 generations under hypobaric hypoxia) and in broilers from a relaxed (control) line. In experiment 1 the PAP was measured in male broilers in which a flow probe positioned on one pulmonary artery permitted the determination of cardiac output and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR). The PAP and relative PVR were higher in susceptible broilers than in relaxed and resistant broilers, whereas absolute and relative cardiac output did not differ between lines. In experiment 2 male and female broilers from the 3 lines were catheterized to measure pressures in the wing vein, right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery, and pulmonary veins (WP, wedge pressure). The transpulmonary pressure gradient (TPG) was calculated as (PAP-WP), with PAP quantifying precapillary pressure and WP approximating postcapillary pulmonary venous pressure. When compared with resistant and relaxed broilers, PAP values in susceptible broilers were > or =10 mmHg higher, TPG values were > or =8 mmHg higher, and WP values were < or =2 mmHg higher, regardless of sex. The combined hemodynamic criteria (elevated PAP and PVR combined with a proportionally elevated TPG) demonstrate that susceptibility to PHS can be attributed primarily to pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with increased precapillary (arteriole) resistance rather than to pulmonary venous hypertension caused by elevated postcapillary (venous and left atrial) resistance. PMID:18079461

  9. Diurnal blood pressure pattern and development of prehypertension or hypertension in young adults: the CARDIA study

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Anthony J.; Zhu, Sha; Hinderliter, Alan L.; Shimbo, Daichi; Person, Sharina D.; Jacobs, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Nondippers (people whose sleep systolic blood pressure (SBP) fails to decrease >10% from daytime SBP) have increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The prevalence of nondipping in younger adults has not been well-studied, nor has its value for predicting hypertension. We examined the prevalence of nondipping in a sub-study of the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) Study. We used Cox regression to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) conferred by nondipping for incident prehypertension or hypertension (preHTN/HTN) over 15 years. Of the 264 non-hypertensive participants at baseline, 118 (45%) were nondippers. Blacks were more likely than Whites to be nondippers (52% vs 33%, p=0.004). The incidence rate of preHTN/HTN was 29.2/1000 person-years among dippers and 36.2/1000 person-years among nondippers. Compared to those in the lowest quartile of nighttime to daytime SBP, those in the highest quartile were more likely to develop preHTN/HTN (HR 1.61; p =0.06), but this relationship was attenuated after adjustment (HR 1.34; p =0.27). Our results demonstrate that nondipping is common in young, nonhypertensive adults, and is more common in Blacks than Whites. Nondipping might predate a meaningful clinically detected increase in BP in some people, but more research in larger study samples is needed. PMID:21269909

  10. Perceptions of family history and genetic testing and feasibility of pedigree development among African Americans with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Pettey, Christina M; McSweeney, Jean C; Stewart, Katharine E; Price, Elvin T; Cleves, Mario A; Heo, Seongkum; Souder, Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Background Pedigree development, family history, and genetic testing are thought to be useful in improving outcomes of chronic illnesses such as hypertension (HTN). However, the clinical utility of pedigree development is still unknown. Further, little is known about African Americans’ (AAs’) perceptions of family history and genetic testing. Aims This study examined the feasibility of developing pedigrees for AAs with HTN and explored perceptions of family history and genetic research among AAs with HTN. Methods The US Surgeon General’s My Family Health Portrait was administered, and 30–60 minute in-person individual interviews were conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze pedigree data. Interview transcripts were analyzed with content analysis and constant comparison. Results Twenty-nine AAs with HTN were recruited from one free clinic (15 women, 14 men; mean age 49 years, SD 9.6). Twenty-six (90%) reported their family history in sufficient detail to develop a pedigree. Perceptions of family history included knowledge of HTN in the family, culturally influenced family teaching about HTN, and response to family history of HTN. Most participants agreed to future genetic testing and DNA collection because they wanted to help others; some said they needed more information and others expressed a concern for privacy. Conclusion The majority of AAs in this sample possessed extensive knowledge of HTN within their family and were able to develop a three generation pedigree with assistance. The majority were willing to participate in future genetic research. PMID:25322748

  11. Resistant Hypertension due to Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Male: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Hossein; Memaryan, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Roxana; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) is a sporadic non-atherosclerotic disease. FMD has been established in nearly every arterial bed. However, the most frequent arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. Disease presentation may vary broadly, depending upon the arterial bed complication and the severity of illness. Hypertension, particularly resistant type, headache and dizziness are the most common presentations. String of beads appearance in angiographic views due to post-stenotic aneurysms is the characteristic view. It is most commonly described in young aged females; but in rare male cases has also been reported. Moreover, balloon angioplasty is standard and effective therapy for FMD. We present a young 28-year-old man who was referred for evaluation of resistant hypertension for nearly 3 years without comprehensive workup. The patient underwent renal artery angiography which confirmed beading narrowing of the right renal artery with significant stenosis at mid portion compatible with FMD; and balloon angioplasty was done. This case highlights that FMD should be kept in mind as a rare cause of resistant hypertension in young males; although it is most common in young females.

  12. Resistant Hypertension due to Fibromuscular Dysplasia in a Young Male: A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Hossein; Khaheshi, Isa; Memaryan, Mehdi; Sadeghi, Roxana; Naderian, Mohammadreza

    2016-06-01

    Fibromuscular Dysplasia (FMD) is a sporadic non-atherosclerotic disease. FMD has been established in nearly every arterial bed. However, the most frequent arteries affected are the renal and carotid arteries. Disease presentation may vary broadly, depending upon the arterial bed complication and the severity of illness. Hypertension, particularly resistant type, headache and dizziness are the most common presentations. String of beads appearance in angiographic views due to post-stenotic aneurysms is the characteristic view. It is most commonly described in young aged females; but in rare male cases has also been reported. Moreover, balloon angioplasty is standard and effective therapy for FMD. We present a young 28-year-old man who was referred for evaluation of resistant hypertension for nearly 3 years without comprehensive workup. The patient underwent renal artery angiography which confirmed beading narrowing of the right renal artery with significant stenosis at mid portion compatible with FMD; and balloon angioplasty was done. This case highlights that FMD should be kept in mind as a rare cause of resistant hypertension in young males; although it is most common in young females. PMID:27504335

  13. Relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance in hypertensives.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaum, David; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Koch, Edouard; Paques, Michel; Cluzel, Philippe; Redheuil, Alban; Girerd, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Microvascular remodeling and large artery stiffness are key determinants of cardiovascular hemodynamics and can now be studied with new non-invasive methods. Our objective was to study the relationships between retinal arteriole anatomy and aortic geometry and function and peripheral resistance (total peripheral resistance (TPR)) in hypertensives. In 80 subjects (age 52±13 years; 53% males; including 23 normotensives and 57 hypertensives, among which 29 were uncontrolled hypertensives), we used: (1) the new non-invasive RTX1 adaptive optics (AO) camera (Imagine Eyes, Orsay, France) to measure the wall-to-lumen ratio (WLR) on retinal microvasculature; (2) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging to assess aortic stiffness, geometry and cardiac output; and (3) the validated SphymoCor Xcel device to measure central blood pressure (BP) and carotido-femoral pulse wave velocity (Cf-PWV). TPR was calculated as the central mean BP/cardiac output ratio. WLR and TPR were significantly higher and aortic distensibility was significantly lower in hypertensives. Aortic dilation and arch elongation were found in uncontrolled hypertensives. In the univariate analysis, WLR was positively correlated with central BP (P<0.001), TPR (P<0.001) and Cf-PWV (P<0.05), and it was negatively correlated with aortic distensibility (P=0.003); however, it was not correlated with age or cardiovascular risk factors. The multivariate analysis indicated that WLR was associated with TPR (P=0.002) independent of age, BMI, gender, antihypertensive treatments, aortic diameter and central SBP. As expected, age was the major correlate of ascending aorta distensibility and Cf-PWV. New non-invasive vascular imaging methods are complementary for the detection of the deleterious effects of aging or high BP on large and small arteries. AO examination could represent a useful tool for the study and follow-up of microvasculature anatomical changes. PMID:27009576

  14. Management of Hypertension in CKD: Beyond the Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Eric; Calhoun, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and CKD are closely associated with an intermingled cause and effect relationship. Blood pressure (BP) typically rises with declines in kidney function, and sustained elevations in BP hasten progression of kidney disease. This review addresses current management issues in HTN in patients with CKD including altered circadian rhythm of BP, timing of antihypertensive medication dosing, BP targets, diagnostic challenges in evaluating secondary forms of HTN, and the role of salt restriction in CKD. HTN in patients with CKD is often accompanied by a decrease in the kidney’s ability to remove salt. Addressing this salt sensitivity is critical for the management of HTN in CKD. In addition to the well-established use of an ACEI or angiotensin receptor blocker, dietary salt restriction and appropriate diuretic therapy make up the mainstay of HTN treatment in patients with CKD. Bedtime dosing of antihypertensive medications can restore nocturnal dips in BP, and future clinical practice guidelines may recommend bedtime dosing of 1 or more antihypertensive medications in patients with CKD. PMID:25704348

  15. Alcohol-induced hypertension: an important healthcare target in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Collart, F; de Timary, P; Dom, G; Dor, B D; Duprez, D; Lengelé, J-P; Matthys, F; Peuskens, H; Rehm, J; Stärkel, P

    2015-12-01

    Excessive alcohol intake is one of the leading causes of premature death in Europe and particularly in Belgium. Belgian people are consuming more alcohol per year than the European average. It is well established that excessive alcohol consumption is a significant predictor of the development of hypertension (HTN). Two million adults in Belgium suffer from HTN and this number will increase to three million by 2025. Less than 50% of Belgian people treated for HTN are well-controlled. Alcohol reduction in patients with HTN can significantly lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. After reviewing the epidemiology of HTN and alcohol disorders in Belgium, this paper will focus on the rationale for alcohol screening and brief intervention in primary care. It will also describe the barriers to alcohol screening, and what could be the benefits of alcohol screening for our healthcare system. The authors believe that early identification through alcohol screening and brief intervention in general practice can help to improve the management of patients with HTN, to reach the targets of the WHO Global Action Plan, i.e., a 25% relative reduction in the risk of premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes or chronic respiratory diseases. They are also convinced that this would allow achieving major healthcare savings. PMID:26135944

  16. Mice lacking macrophage 12/15-lipoxygenase are resistant to experimental hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cepura, Cody; Magier, Devora; Siangjong, Lawan; Gauthier, Kathryn M.; Campbell, William B.

    2012-01-01

    In mouse arteries, Alox15 [leukocyte-type 12/15-lipoxygenase (LO)] is assumed to regulate vascular function by metabolizing arachidonic acid (AA) to dilator eicosanoids that mediate the endothelium-dependent relaxations to AA and acetylcholine (ACh). We used Alox15−/− mice, made by targeted disruption of the Alox15 gene, to characterize its role in the regulation of blood pressure and vascular tone. Systolic blood pressures did not differ between wild-type (WT) and Alox15−/− mice between 8–12 wk of age, but Alox15−/− mice exhibited resistance toward both NG-nitro-l-arginine-methyl ester (l-NAME)- and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/high-salt-induced hypertension. ACh relaxed mesenteric arteries and abdominal aortas of WT and Alox15−/− mice to an identical extent. The LO inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid attenuated the ACh relaxations by 35% in arteries from both WT and Alox15−/− mice. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of [14C]AA metabolites in aorta and peritoneal macrophages (PM) revealed differences. Unlike PM, aorta tissue did not produce detectable amounts of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid. Although Alox15 mRNA was detected in aorta, high-resolution gel electrophoresis with immunodetection revealed no Alox15 protein expression. Unlike aorta, Alox15 protein was detected in PM, intestine, fat, lung, spleen, and skin from WT, but not Alox15−/−, mice. Injection of WT PM, a primary source of Alox15 protein, into Alox15−/− mice abolished their resistance toward l-NAME-induced hypertension. On the other hand, WT mice acquired resistance to l-NAME-induced hypertension after depletion of macrophages by clodronate injection. These studies indicate that Alox15 is involved in development of experimental hypertension by altering macrophage functions but not via synthesis of the vasoactive LO metabolites in mouse arteries. PMID:22467300

  17. A content analysis of smartphone-based applications for hypertension management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nilay; Khunger, Monica; Gupta, Arjun; Garg, Neetika

    2015-02-01

    Smartphone-based medical applications (apps) can facilitate self-management of hypertension (HTN). The content and consumer interaction metrics of HTN-related apps are unknown. In this cross-sectional study to ascertain the content of medical apps designed for HTN management, we queried Google Play and Apple iTunes using the search terms "hypertension" and "high blood pressure." The top 107 apps were analyzed. Major app functionalities including tracking (for blood pressure [BP], pulse, weight, body mass index), medical device (to measure pulse or BP), general information on HTN, and medication adherence tools were recorded along with consumer engagement parameters. Data were collected from May 28 to May 30, 2014. A total of 72% of the apps had tracking function, 22% had tools to enhance medication adherence, 37% contained general information on HTN, and 8% contained information on Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet. These data showed that a majority of apps for HTN are designed primarily for health management functions. However, 14% of Google Android apps could transform the smartphone into a medical device to measure BP. None of these apps employed the use of a BP cuff or had any documentation of validation against a gold standard. Only 3% of the apps were developed by healthcare agencies such as universities or professional organizations. In regression models. the medical device function was highly predictive of greater number of downloads (odds ratio, 97.08; P < .001) and positive consumer reviews (Incidence rate ratios, 1204.39; P < .001). A large majority of medical apps designed for HTN serve health management functions such as tracking blood pressure, weight, or body mass index. Consumers have a strong tendency to download and favorably rate apps that are advertised to measure blood pressure and heart rate, despite a lack of validation for these apps. There is a need for greater oversight in medical app development for HTN, especially

  18. Hypertension and abnormal fat distribution but not insulin resistance in mice with P465L PPARγ

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Kim, Hyo-Jeong; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hagaman, John R.; Kim, Jason K.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2004-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ), the molecular target of a class of insulin sensitizers, regulates adipocyte differentiation and lipid metabolism. A dominant negative P467L mutation in the ligand-binding domain of PPARγ in humans is associated with severe insulin resistance and hypertension. Homozygous mice with the equivalent P465L mutation die in utero. Heterozygous mice grow normally and have normal total adipose tissue weight. However, they have reduced interscapular brown adipose tissue and intra-abdominal fat mass, and increased extra-abdominal subcutaneous fat, compared with wild-type mice. They have normal plasma glucose levels and insulin sensitivity, and increased glucose tolerance. However, during high-fat feeding, their plasma insulin levels are mildly elevated in association with a significant increase in pancreatic islet mass. They are hypertensive, and expression of the angiotensinogen gene is increased in their subcutaneous adipose tissues. The effects of P465L on blood pressure, fat distribution, and insulin sensitivity are the same in both male and female mice regardless of diet and age. Thus the P465L mutation alone is sufficient to cause abnormal fat distribution and hypertension but not insulin resistance in mice. These results provide genetic evidence for a critical role for PPARγ in blood pressure regulation that is not dependent on altered insulin sensitivity. PMID:15254591

  19. Adherence to medication and drug monitoring in apparent treatment-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Eskås, Per Anders; Heimark, Sondre; Eek Mariampillai, Julian; Larstorp, Anne Cecilie K; Fadl Elmula, Fadl Elmula M; Høieggen, Aud

    2016-08-01

    Poor drug adherence is one of the main reasons for the failure to achieve treatment targets in hypertensive patients. In patients who receive pharmacological treatment, assessment of drug adherence is of the utmost importance. The aim of this review is to present an update of the methods available to reveal and monitor non-adherence in patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. Methods for monitoring adherence are divided into indirect and direct methods. The indirect methods are mainly based on self-reported adherence and can easily be manipulated by the patient. Directly observed therapy and therapeutic drug monitoring are examples of direct methods. There are limitations and advantages to all of the methods, and because of the patient's ability to manipulate the outcome of indirect methods, direct methods should be preferred. Therapeutic drug monitoring and directly observed therapy with subsequent ambulatory blood pressure measurement are considered to be reliable methods and should be used more in the routine assessment of patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension. PMID:26729283

  20. [Ambulatory 24-hour blood pressure monitoring in patients with resistant hypertension].

    PubMed

    Sznajderman, M; Popławska, W; Cybulska, I; Niegowska, J; Makowiecka-Cieśla, M; Baranowski, R

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the usefulness of 24-hour blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) monitoring in patients with "resistant" hypertension. 30 patients (44.1 +/- 9.9 years) with diastolic BP 100 mm Hg or more in spite of treatment with three or more antihypertensive drugs were studied. Ambulatory recording of BP and HR was performed by means of Del Mar Avionics monitoring system 9000. Mean recording time was 21.5 hours and mean number of measurements during one recording--56.7. Mean ambulatory systolic and diastolic BP values were significantly lower than mean value of three casual measurements (146.0 +/- 24.6 vs 171.5 +/- 21.2 mm Hg for systolic and 97.2 +/- 11.3 vs 110.4 +/- 7.5 mm Hg for diastolic BP p less than 0.01) In 14 (46.6%) systolic BP and in 10 patients (33.3%) diastolic BP were normal. The patients with normal and abnormal ambulatory BP recordings did not differ in regard to age and mean clinic BP levels. However, patients with abnormal ambulatory BP recordings were more often overweight and showed a greater frequency of left ventricular hypertrophy and family history of hypertension and its complications. The results of the study show that ambulatory BP monitoring may be of value in assessing the response to antihypertensive treatment in patients with so called resistant hypertension as judged on the basis of clinic pressure. PMID:2074634

  1. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Therapy in Resistant Hypertension: Time to Implement Guidelines!

    PubMed Central

    Maiolino, Giuseppe; Azzolini, Matteo; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of anti-hypertensive medications with increasing efficacy up to 50% of hypertensive patients have blood pressure levels (BP) not at the goals set by international societies. Some of these patients are either not optimally treated or are non-adherent to the prescribed drugs. However, a proportion, despite adequate treatment, have resistant hypertension (RH), which represents an important problem in that it is associated to an excess risk of cardiovascular events. Notwithstanding a complex pathogenesis, an abundance of data suggests a key contribution for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in RH, thus fostering a potential role for its antagonists in RH. Based on these premises randomized clinical trials aimed at testing the efficacy of MR antagonists (MRAs) in RH patients have been completed. Overall, they demonstrated the efficacy of MRAs in reducing BP and surrogate markers of target organ damage, such as microalbuminuria, either compared to placebo or to other drugs. In summary, owing to the key role of the MR in the pathogenesis of RH and on the proven efficacy of MRAs we advocate their inclusion as an essential component of therapy in patients with presumed RH. Conversely, we propose that RH should be diagnosed only in patients whose BP values show to be resistant to an up-titrated dose of these drugs. PMID:26664875

  2. Serum Concentrations of Endothelin-1 and Matrix Metalloproteinases-2, -9 in Pre-Hypertensive and Hypertensive Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kostov, Krasimir; Blazhev, Alexander; Atanasova, Milena; Dimitrova, Anelia

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is one of the most potent vasoconstrictors known to date. While its plasma or serum concentrations are elevated in some forms of experimental and human hypertension, this is not a consistent finding in all forms of hypertension. Matrix metalloproteinases -2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9), which degrade collagen type IV of the vascular basement membrane, are responsible for vascular remodeling, inflammation, and atherosclerotic complications, including in type 2 diabetes (T2D). In our study, we compared concentrations of ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive (PHTN) and hypertensive (HTN) T2D patients with those of healthy normotensive controls (N). ET-1, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were measured by ELISA. Concentrations of ET-1 in PHTN and N were very similar, while those in HTN were significantly higher. Concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in PHTN and HTN were also significantly higher compared to N. An interesting result in our study is that concentrations of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in HTN were lower compared to PHTN. In conclusion, we showed that increased production of ET-1 in patients with T2D can lead to long-lasting increases in blood pressure (BP) and clinical manifestation of hypertension. We also demonstrated that increased levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in pre-hypertensive and hypertensive patients with T2D mainly reflect the early vascular changes in extracellular matrix (ECM) turnover. PMID:27490532

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Diagnosing Primary Aldosteronism in Patients With Resistant Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Alejandro; Chung, Oliver; Raza, Fayez; Pandey, Ambarish; Brinker, Stephanie; Arbique, Debbie; Price, Angela; Lotan, Yair; Das, Sandeep R; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-09-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is present in up to 20% of patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH). Investigation for PA in patients with TRH is recommended by current guidelines after medication nonadherence is excluded. Studies using therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) have shown that >50% of patients with TRH are nonadherent to their prescribed antihypertensive medications. However, the relationship between the prevalence of PA and medication adherence as confirmed by TDM has not been previously assessed. A retrospective analysis from a hypertension referral clinic showed that prevalence of PA in adherent patients with TRH by TDM was significantly higher than in nonadherent patients (28% vs 8%, P<.05). Furthermore, cost analysis showed that TDM-guided PA screening was $590.69 less expensive per patient, with minimal impact on the diagnostic accuracy. These data support a TDM-guided PA screening approach as a cost-saving strategy compared with routine PA screening for TRH. PMID:25917401

  4. [Effects of rilmenidine on rats made insulin resistant and hypertensive by a high fructose diet].

    PubMed

    Berthault, M F; Morin, J; Dubar, M; Ktorza, A; Ferré, P; Pénicaud, L

    1996-08-01

    This study was aimed to determine the effects of rilmenidine, an hypertensive drug, in an animal model of hypertension associated with insulin resistance, i.e. rats fed on a high fructose diet. Wistar rats were fed during four weeks either on a standard diet (S) or on a high fructose diet (F, 34.5% de fructose). In half of the F groups, rilmenidine (1 mg/kg/day) was added to the drinking water during the two last weeks of the diet (FR). Arterial blood pressure as well as insulin efficiency were determined at the end of the four weeks. Body weight gain was higher in F than in S rats (66 +/- 8 g versus 45 +/- 8 g; p < 0.05), this was prevented by rilmenidine treatment (32 +/- 2 g). Arterial systolic blood pressure was increased in F rats (162 +/- 2 vs 155 +/- 2 mmHg; p < 0.05), rilmenidine brought this value back to normal (149 +/- 3 mmHg). During the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp, glucose utilization was lower (10 +/- 1 vs 14 +/- 1.5 mg/min/kg; p < 0.05) and hepatic glucose production higher (1 +/- 0.01 vs 0 mg/min/kg; p < 0.01) in F than in S rats. These changes in insulin action were totally abolished by rilmenidine. These data demonstrate that rilmenidine can ameliorate the deleterious effects of a high fructose diet, i.e. weight gain, hypertension and resistance to the effects of insulin Rilmenidine could represent a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of hypertension associated with metabolic disorders such as syndrom X and obesity. PMID:8949387

  5. Diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for resistant arterial hypertension--focus on countries with emerging economies.

    PubMed

    Zhanatbekova, A K; Karazhanova, L K; Begalina, A M; Filipova, S

    2014-01-01

    Arterial hypertensionis an important worldwide health problem. Its relevance relates both to the high incidence and prevalence in all adult communities and to the high risk of serious and potentially fatal cardiovascular events due to hypertension. Resistant hypertension is defined as a blood pressure (BP) remaining above goal (>140/90 mm Hg) despite the use of at least 3 optimally dosed antihypertensive drugs from different classes, with one of the drugs being a diuretic. The exact prevalence of RH is unknown, but it is generally estimated at 10-20% of hypertensive patients. The aim of this review article is to address several important issues: (1) How to diagnose true RH ? (2) What is the optimal state-of-art management of RH in the light of the most recent scientific evidence and what is the role of various medical specialties in this process ? (3) Are there any country specific issues related to diagnosing and treating of RH in Kazakhstan and if so, how to tackle them ?Long-lasting resistant hypertension increases by 50-80% the risk of major cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke) and end-organ damage. (heart failure, vascular dementia, chronic kidney disease). Adherence to well chosen therapy is the key factor in achieving blood pressure control and this must be based on adequate patient education and universal access to drug therapy. Thus, early recognition and appropriate management of RH must be among the top priorities of all public health initiatives to reduce the burden of cardiovascular diseases (Tab. 2, Fig. 1, Ref. 31). PMID:24836409

  6. Disulfiram-Induced Reversible Hypertension: A Prospective Case Series and Review of The Literature

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Ramdurg, Santosh I.; Bairy, Bhavya K.

    2014-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) is one of the recommended aids in the management of selected patients with alcohol dependence. Hypertension (HTN) as an adverse effect of DSF therapy is less understood. In our prospective case series of 7 subjects with co-morbid alcohol and nicotine dependence, a temporal, dose-dependent, and reversible grade 1-3 HTN within 1-6 weeks of initiation of DSF therapy (125-500 mg/day) with no other detectable causes of HTN was noted. Challenges and strategies surrounding diagnosis and treatment along with mean change and percentage rise in blood pressure are described. Literature review and clinical description of case series may suggest neurobiological role in its causation. HTN may be a clinically significant, dose-dependent, and reversible adverse effect of DSF therapy, especially in co-morbid alcohol and nicotine-dependent patients. Awareness amongst clinicians may render better health care delivery to subjects with alcohol dependence. PMID:25336781

  7. Acute Response to Unilateral Unipolar Electrical Carotid Sinus Stimulation in Patients With Resistant Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Heusser, Karsten; Tank, Jens; Brinkmann, Julia; Menne, Jan; Kaufeld, Jessica; Linnenweber-Held, Silvia; Beige, Joachim; Wilhelmi, Mathias; Diedrich, André; Haller, Hermann; Jordan, Jens

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral bipolar electric carotid sinus stimulation acutely reduced muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension but is no longer available. The second-generation device uses a smaller unilateral unipolar disk electrode to reduce invasiveness while saving battery life. We hypothesized that the second-generation device acutely lowers BP and MSNA in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. Eighteen treatment-resistant hypertensive patients (9 women/9 men; 53±11 years; 33±5 kg/m(2)) on stable medications have been included in the study. We monitored finger and brachial BP, heart rate, and MSNA. Without stimulation, BP was 165±31/91±18 mm Hg, heart rate was 75±17 bpm, and MSNA was 48±14 bursts per minute. Acute stimulation with intensities producing side effects that were tolerable in the short term elicited interindividually variable changes in systolic BP (-16.9±15.0 mm Hg; range, 0.0 to -40.8 mm Hg; P=0.002), heart rate (-3.6±3.6 bpm; P=0.004), and MSNA (-2.0±5.8 bursts per minute; P=0.375). Stimulation intensities had to be lowered in 12 patients to avoid side effects at the expense of efficacy (systolic BP, -6.3±7.0 mm Hg; range, 2.8 to -14.5 mm Hg; P=0.028 and heart rate, -1.5±2.3 bpm; P=0.078; comparison against responses with side effects). Reductions in diastolic BP and MSNA (total activity) were correlated (r(2)=0.329; P=0.025). In our patient cohort, unilateral unipolar electric baroreflex stimulation acutely lowered BP. However, side effects may limit efficacy. The approach should be tested in a controlled comparative study. PMID:26831195

  8. The Association between ESR and CRP and Systemic Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Omar, Hesham R; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Campos, Micheal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The association between the level of systemic inflammation and systemic hypertension (sHTN) among subjects with sarcoidosis has not been previously explored. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the relation between the level of systemic inflammation in sarcoidosis, measured by various serum inflammatory markers, and sHTN. Results. Among a total of 108 cases with sarcoidosis (mean age: 53.4 years, 76.9% females), 55 (50.9%) had sHTN and 53 (49.1%) were normotensive. ESR was highly associated with sHTN. The patients with sHTN had higher mean ESR levels compared with normotensives (48.8 ± 35 versus 23.2 ± 27 mm/hr, resp.; P = 0.001). ROC curve analysis for ESR revealed an AUC value of 0.795 (95% CI: 0.692-0.897; P = 0.0001). With regard to CRP, there was a trend towards higher mean values in sHTN group (3.4 versus 1.7 mg/L; P = 0.067) and significantly higher prevalence of sHTN in the highest CRP quartile compared to the lowest one (69.6% versus 30%; OR 4.95; P = 0.017). ROC curve analysis for CRP revealed an AUC value of 0.644 (95% CI: 0.518-0.769; P = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, ESR and the CRP remained independent predictors for sHTN among subjects with sarcoidosis. Conclusion. Systemic inflammation is associated with the presence of sHTN in sarcoidosis. PMID:27433355

  9. The Association between ESR and CRP and Systemic Hypertension in Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Mirsaeidi, Mehdi; Omar, Hesham R.; Ebrahimi, Golnaz; Campos, Micheal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The association between the level of systemic inflammation and systemic hypertension (sHTN) among subjects with sarcoidosis has not been previously explored. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted to investigate the relation between the level of systemic inflammation in sarcoidosis, measured by various serum inflammatory markers, and sHTN. Results. Among a total of 108 cases with sarcoidosis (mean age: 53.4 years, 76.9% females), 55 (50.9%) had sHTN and 53 (49.1%) were normotensive. ESR was highly associated with sHTN. The patients with sHTN had higher mean ESR levels compared with normotensives (48.8 ± 35 versus 23.2 ± 27 mm/hr, resp.; P = 0.001). ROC curve analysis for ESR revealed an AUC value of 0.795 (95% CI: 0.692–0.897; P = 0.0001). With regard to CRP, there was a trend towards higher mean values in sHTN group (3.4 versus 1.7 mg/L; P = 0.067) and significantly higher prevalence of sHTN in the highest CRP quartile compared to the lowest one (69.6% versus 30%; OR 4.95; P = 0.017). ROC curve analysis for CRP revealed an AUC value of 0.644 (95% CI: 0.518–0.769; P = 0.03). On multivariate analysis, ESR and the CRP remained independent predictors for sHTN among subjects with sarcoidosis. Conclusion. Systemic inflammation is associated with the presence of sHTN in sarcoidosis. PMID:27433355

  10. Refractory and resistant hypertension: characteristics and differences observed in a specialized clinic.

    PubMed

    Modolo, Rodrigo; de Faria, Ana Paula; Sabbatini, Andréa Rodrigues; Barbaro, Natália Ruggeri; Ritter, Alessandra M V; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-05-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) despite the use of ≥3 anti-hypertensive drugs, or controlled requiring use of ≥4 drugs. Recently, a new definition for an extreme phenotype of RH (uncontrolled BP using at least five drugs) has emerged-the refractory hypertension (RfH). Although characteristics of RH are well established, little is known about this newly described subgroup. For this work, 116 subjects with RH were enrolled from a specialized clinic and divided into RH (n = 80) and RfH (n = 36). Subjects were submitted to echocardiography, 24-hour ambulatory BP measurement and biochemical analyses. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that: (1) white-coat effect (odds ratio [OR], 3.23; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-9.27; P = .03), (2) black race (OR, 6.67; 95% CI, 1.99-16.16; P < .001), and (3) left ventricular mass index (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.03; P = .04) were independent predictors of refractoriness. In conclusion, RfH and RH present different patient characteristics, and these phenotypic aspects can be useful for better understanding this harder-to-treat subgroup. PMID:25979412

  11. Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Cavalcante, Paula Andréa M; Rica, Roberta L; Evangelista, Alexandre L; Serra, Andrey J; Figueira, Aylton; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Kilgore, Lon; Baker, Julien S; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2015-01-01

    Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: -11%±1.0% and 80%: -13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: -12%±5.5% and 80%: -12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: -15%±2.1% and 80%: -17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session. PMID:26425078

  12. Effects of exercise intensity on postexercise hypotension after resistance training session in overweight hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcante, Paula Andréa M; Rica, Roberta L; Evangelista, Alexandre L; Serra, Andrey J; Figueira, Aylton; Pontes, Francisco Luciano; Kilgore, Lon; Baker, Julien S; Bocalini, Danilo S

    2015-01-01

    Among all nonpharmacological treatments, aerobic or resistance training (RT) has been indicated as a significantly important strategy to control hypertension. However, postexercise hypotension responses after intensity alterations in RT are not yet fully understood. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes of differing intensities of RT on hypertensive older women. Twenty hypertensive older women participated voluntarily in this study. After a maximum voluntary contraction test (one repetition maximum) and determination of 40% and 80% experimental loads, the protocol (3 sets/90″ interset rest) was performed in a single session with the following exercises: leg press, leg extension, leg curl, chest press, elbow flexion, elbow extension, upper back row, and abdominal flexion. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were evaluated at rest, during exercise peak, and after 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes of exercise and compared to the control. Both experimental loads were effective (P<0.01) in promoting postexercise systolic hypotension (mmHg) compared to controls, after 30, 45, and 60 minutes, respectively, at 40% (113±2, 112±4, and 110±3 mmHg) and 80% (111±3, 111±4, and 110±4 mmHg). Both procedures promoted hypotension with similar systolic blood pressures (40%: −11%±1.0% and 80%: −13%±0.5%), mean arterial blood pressures (40%: −12%±5.5% and 80%: −12%±3.4%), and rate-pressure products (40%: −15%±2.1% and 80%: −17%±2.4%) compared to control measures (systolic blood pressure: 1%±1%, mean arterial blood pressure:\\ 0.6%±1.5%, rate-pressure product: 0.33%±1.1%). No differences were found in diastolic blood pressure and heart rate measures. In conclusion, hypertensive older women exhibit postexercise hypotension independently of exercise intensity without expressed cardiovascular overload during the session. PMID:26425078

  13. Cumulative Association of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Severity and Short Sleep Duration with the Risk for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Priou, Pascaline; Le Vaillant, Marc; Meslier, Nicole; Paris, Audrey; Pigeanne, Thierry; Nguyen, Xuan-Lan; Alizon, Claire; Bizieux-Thaminy, Acya; Leclair-Visonneau, Laurene; Humeau, Marie-Pierre; Gagnadoux, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and short sleep duration are individually associated with an increased risk for hypertension (HTN). The aim of this multicenter cross-sectional study was to test the hypothesis of a cumulative association of OSA severity and short sleep duration with the risk for prevalent HTN. Among 1,499 patients undergoing polysomnography for suspected OSA, 410 (27.3%) previously diagnosed as hypertensive and taking antihypertensive medication were considered as having HTN. Patients with total sleep time (TST) <6 h were considered to be short sleepers. Logistic regression procedures were performed to determine the independent association of HTN with OSA and sleep duration. Considering normal sleepers (TST ≥6 h) without OSA as the reference group, the odds ratio (OR) (95% confidence intervals) for having HTN was 2.51 (1.35–4.68) in normal sleepers with OSA and 4.37 (2.18–8.78) in short sleepers with OSA after adjustment for age, gender, obesity, diabetes, depression, current smoking, use of thyroid hormones, daytime sleepiness, poor sleep complaint, time in bed, sleep architecture and fragmentation, and study site. The risk for HTN appeared to present a cumulative association with OSA severity and short sleep duration (p<0.0001 for linear trend). The higher risk for HTN was observed in short sleepers with severe OSA (AHI ≥30) (OR, 4.29 [2.03–9.07]). In patients investigated for suspected OSA, sleep-disordered breathing severity and short sleep duration have a cumulative association with the risk for prevalent HTN. Further studies are required to determine whether interventions to optimize sleep may contribute to lower BP in patients with OSA. PMID:25531468

  14. A practical approach for measurement of antihypertensive medication adherence in patients with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Corrêa, Nathália Batista; de Faria, Ana Paula; Ritter, Alessandra M V; Sabbatini, Andrea Rodrigues; Almeida, Aurélio; Brunelli, Veridiana; Calhoun, David A; Moreno, Heitor; Modolo, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    Confirmation of medication adherence is a challenge in clinical practice and essential for the accurate diagnosis of resistant hypertension. Although it is well established that drug adherence is critical for controlling blood pressure, there are still difficulties applying a simple, inexpensive, and reliable assessment of adherence in the clinical setting. We aimed to test a simple method to assess adherence in resistant hypertensive (RH) patients. A pilot study with normotensives or mild/moderate hypertensive subjects was performed to provide a fluorescence cutoff point for adherence. After that, 21 patients referred to the Resistant Hypertension Clinic had triamterene prescribed and were monitored for a 30-day period. We conducted two unannounced randomly selected home visits for urine collection to test drug intake that day. Office, home and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, biochemical data, and the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were systematically acquired. According to adherence indicated by urine fluorescence, subjects were divided into adherent and nonadherent groups. We found 57% of nonadherence. No differences were found between groups regarding baseline characteristics or prescribed medications; Kappa's test showed concordance between adherence through MMAS-8 items and fluorescence (kappa = 0.61; 95% confidence interval: 0.28-0.94; P = .005). Nonadherent patients had higher office (81 ± 11 vs. 73 ± 6 mm Hg, P = .03), 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (75 ± 9 vs. 66 ± 7 mm Hg, P = .01), and home blood pressure measurement (77 ± 9 vs. 67 ± 8 mm Hg, P = .01) diastolic blood pressure than their counterparts. Nonadherence to antihypertensive therapy is high in patients with RH, even when assessed in clinics specialized in this condition. Fluorometry to detect a drug in the urine of RH patients is safe, easy, and reliable method to assess adherence. PMID:27161936

  15. Resistant hypertension with adrenal nodule: are we removing the right gland?

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N; Tabasum, Arshiya; Rao Bondugulapati, L N; Parker, Danny; Baglioni, Piero; Okosieme, Onyebuchi E; Scott Coombes, David

    2015-01-01

    Summary Resistant hypertension is often difficult to treat and may be associated with underlying primary aldosteronism (PA). We describe the case of an elderly gentleman who presented with severe and resistant hypertension and was found to have a left adrenal incidentaloma during evaluation but had aldosterone excess secondary to unilateral adrenal hyperplasia (UAH) of the contralateral gland, which needed surgical intervention. A 65-year-old gentleman was evaluated for uncontrolled high blood pressure (BP) in spite of taking four antihypertensive medications. The high BP was confirmed on a 24-h ambulatory reading, and further biochemical evaluation showed an elevated serum aldosterone renin ratio (ARR) (1577 pmol/l per ng per ml per h). Radiological evaluation showed an adrenal nodule (15 mm) in the left adrenal gland but an adrenal vein sampling demonstrated a lateralization towards the opposite site favouring the right adrenal to be the source of excess aldosterone. A laparoscopic right adrenalectomy was performed and the histology of the gland confirmed nodular hyperplasia. Following surgery, the patient's BP improved remarkably although he remained on antihypertensives and under regular endocrine follow-up. PA remains the most common form of secondary and difficult-to-treat hypertension. Investigations may reveal incidental adrenal lesions, which may not be the actual source of excess aldosterone, but UAH may be a contributor and may coexist and amenable to surgical treatment. An adrenal vein sampling should be undertaken for correct lateralization of the source, otherwise a correctable diagnosis may be missed and the incorrect adrenal gland may be removed. Learning points Severe and resistant hypertension can often be associated with underlying PA. ARR is an excellent screening tool in patients with suspected PA. Lateralization with adrenal venous sampling is essential to isolate the source and differentiate between unilateral and bilateral causes of

  16. New drug therapies interfering with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system for resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Monge, Matthieu; Lorthioir, Aurélien; Bobrie, Guillaume; Azizi, Michel

    2013-12-01

    There is a persistent need for the development of new antihypertensive drugs, because the control of blood pressure is still not achievable in a significant proportion of hypertensive patients. Since the approval in 2007 of aliskiren, no other new antihypertensive based on new mechanism(s) of action have been approved. In fact, the development of promising novel drugs has been stopped for safety, efficacy or marketing reasons. Despite these difficulties, the pipeline is not dry and different new antihypertensive strategies targeting the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone pathway, are in clinical development stage. The dual angiotensin II receptor-neprilysin inhibitor LCZ696, a single molecule synthetized by cocrystallisation of valsartan and the neprilysin inhibitor prodrug AHU377 is in development for resistant hypertension and for heart failure. Daglutril is a dual neprylisin-endothelin converting enzyme inhibitor which was shown to decrease BP in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. Aldosterone synthase inhibitors and the third and fourth generation non-steroidal dihydropyridine based mineralocorticoid receptors blockers are new ways to target the multiple noxious effects of aldosterone in the kidney, vessels and heart. Centrally acting aminopeptidase A inhibitors block brain angiotensin III formation, one of the main effector peptides of the brain renin angiotensin system. However, a long time will be still necessary to evaluate extensively the efficacy and safety of these new approaches. In the mean time, using appropriate and personalized daily doses of available drugs, decreasing physician inertia, improving treatment adherence, improving access to healthcare and reducing treatment costs remain major objectives to reduce the incidence of resistant hypertension. PMID:24222656

  17. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, A A; Faria, T de O; Ribeiro Júnior, R F; Costa, G P; Marchezini, B; Silveira, E A; Angeli, J K; Stefanon, I; Vassallo, D V; Lizardo, J H

    2015-09-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  18. A single resistance exercise session improves myocardial contractility in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, A.A.; Faria, T. de O.; Ribeiro, R.F.; Costa, G.P.; Marchezini, B.; Silveira, E.A.; Angeli, J.K.; Stefanon, I.; Vassallo, D.V.; Lizardo, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Resistance training evokes myocardial adaptation; however, the effects of a single resistance exercise session on cardiac performance are poorly understood or investigated. This study aimed to investigate the effects of a single resistance exercise session on the myocardial contractility of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male 3-month-old SHRs were divided into two groups: control (Ct) and exercise (Ex). Control animals were submitted to sham exercise. Blood pressure was measured in conscious rats before the exercise session to confirm the presence of arterial hypertension. Ten minutes after the exercise session, the animals were anesthetized and killed, and the hearts were removed. Cardiac contractility was evaluated in the whole heart by the Langendorff technique and by isometric contractions of isolated left ventricular papillary muscles. SERCA2a, phospholamban (PLB), and phosphorylated PLB expression were investigated by Western blot. Exercise increased force development of isolated papillary muscles (Ex=1.0±0.1 g/mg vs Ct=0.63±0.2 g/mg, P<0.05). Post-rest contraction was greater in the exercised animals (Ex=4.1±0.4% vs Ct=1.7±0.2%, P<0.05). Papillary muscles of exercised animals developed greater force under increasing isoproterenol concentrations (P<0.05). In the isolated heart, exercise increased left ventricular isovolumetric systolic pressure (LVISP; Δ +39 mmHg; P<0.05) from baseline conditions. Hearts from the exercised rats presented a greater response to increasing diastolic pressure. Positive inotropic intervention to calcium and isoproterenol resulted in greater LVISP in exercised animals (P<0.05). The results demonstrated that a single resistance exercise session improved myocardial contractility in SHRs. PMID:26176315

  19. Narrative Review: The Emerging Clinical Implications of the Role of Aldosterone in the Metabolic Syndrome and Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sowers, James R.; Whaley-Connell, Adam; Epstein, Murray

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease is increasing in developed countries. Obesity, insulin resistance, and hypertension commonly cluster with other risk factors for cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease to form the metabolic syndrome. Emerging evidence supports a paradigm shift in our understanding of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system and in aldosterone's ability to promote insulin resistance and participate in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome and resistant hypertension. Recent data suggest that excess circulating aldosterone promotes the development of both disorders by impairing insulin metabolic signaling and endothelial function, which in turn leads to insulin resistance and cardiovascular and renal structural and functional abnormalities. Indeed, hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired pancreatic β-cell function, skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity, and elevated production of proinflammatory adipokines from adipose tissue, which results in systemic inflammation and impaired glucose tolerance. Accumulating evidence indicates that the cardiovascular and renal abnormalities associated with insulin resistance are mediated in part by aldosterone acting on the mineralocorticoid receptor. Although we have known that mineralocorticoid receptor blockade attenuates cardiovascular and renal injury, only recently have we learned that mineralocorticoid receptor blockade improves pancreatic insulin release, insulin-mediated glucose utilization, and endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation. In summary, aldosterone excess has detrimental metabolic effects that contribute to the metabolic syndrome and endothelial dysfunction, which in turn contribute to the development of resistant hypertension as well as cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease. PMID:19487712

  20. Protein disulfide isomerase expression increases in resistance arteries during hypertension development. Effects on Nox1 NADPH oxidase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Androwiki, Aline C. D.; Camargo, Lívia de Lucca; Sartoretto, Simone; Couto, Gisele K.; Ribeiro, Izabela M. R.; Veríssimo-Filho, Sidney; Rossoni, Luciana V.; Lopes, Lucia R.

    2015-01-01

    NADPH oxidases derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in vascular function and remodeling in hypertension through redox signaling processes. Previous studies demonstrated that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) regulates Nox1 expression and ROS generation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells. However, the role of PDI in conductance and resistance arteries during hypertension development remains unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate PDI expression and NADPH oxidase dependent ROS generation during hypertension development. Mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) and thoracic aorta were isolated from 6, 8, and 12 week-old spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and Wistar rats. ROS production (dihydroethidium fluorescence), PDI (WB, imunofluorescence), Nox1 and NOX4 (RT-PCR) expression were evaluated. Results show a progressive increase in ROS generation in MRA and aorta from 8 to 12 week-old SHR. This effect was associated with a concomitant increase in PDI and Nox1 expression only in MRA. Therefore, suggesting a positive correlation between PDI and Nox1 expression during the development of hypertension in MRA. In order to investigate if this effect was due to an increase in arterial blood pressure, pre hypertensive SHR were treated with losartan (20 mg/kg/day for 30 days), an AT1 receptor antagonist. Losartan decreased blood pressure and ROS generation in both vascular beds. However, only in SHR MRA losartan treatment lowered PDI and Nox1 expression to control levels. In MRA PDI inhibition (bacitracin, 0.5 mM) decreased Ang II redox signaling (p-ERK 1/2). Altogether, our results suggest that PDI plays a role in triggering oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction in resistance but not in conductance arteries, increasing Nox1 expression and activity. Therefore, PDI could be a new player in oxidative stress and functional alterations in resistance arteries during the establishment of hypertension. PMID:25870854

  1. Doppler laser flowmetry test of the functional condition of precapillar and postcapillar resistance in essential hypertensive patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukjanov, Valdimir F.

    2000-04-01

    243 patient of essential hypertension were examined with the help of Doppler-Laser Flowmetry, optical photometry. Flowmetry was used to measure vasomotion and blood flow after arterial compression, decompression and venous hyperemia were held. New Doppler-Laser flowmetry diagnostic test of functional condition of microcirculation was worked out of find precapillary and postcapillar resistance. Precapillary resistance included next basis parameters: vasomotion with high frequency and low amplitude, latent time after decompression, large postocclusive reactive hyperemia, absent venous hyperemia. Postcapillar amplitude, little or absent postocclusive reactive hyperemia, large venous hyperemia. This test-method was applied to select pathogenetic treatment of essential hypertension.

  2. Effects of Nocturnal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Resistant Hypertension and Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Dernaika, Tarek A.; Kinasewitz, Gary T.; Tawk, Maroun M.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: To examine the long-term effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on blood pressure (BP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and resistant hypertension. Methods: Study subjects were 98 patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and hypertension who had 3 or more documented daytime BP measurements taken within 3 months of enrollment and every 3 months after CPAP initiation for 1 year. Resistant hypertension was defined as daytime BP of at least 140 mm Hg systolic or 90 mm Hg diastolic, despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive medications. Patients in the resistant hypertension group (n = 42) were compared with subjects with controlled hypertension (n = 56). Results: Mean difference in mean arterial pressure was −5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] −2.0 to −8.7 mm Hg; p = 0.03) in the resistant group and −0.8 mm Hg (95% CI −2.9 to 3.3 mm Hg; p = 0.53) in patients with controlled BP at the end of follow up period. CPAP permitted de-escalation of antihypertensive treatment in 71% of subjects with resistant hypertension but did not significantly alter the antihypertensive regimen in the controlled group. Multivariate regression analysis showed that baseline BP (odds ratio 5.4, 95% CI 2.3 to 8.9; p = 0.01) and diuretic therapy (odds ratio = 3.2, 95% CI 1.8 to 6.1; p = 0.02), but not apnea-hypopnea index or hours of CPAP use, were independently associated with a decrease in mean arterial pressure after 12 months of CPAP therapy. Conclusion: In this observational study, CPAP was associated with different effects on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients with sleep apnea. A beneficial response to CPAP therapy was found mainly in subjects with the most severe hypertensive disease. Citation: Dernaika TA; Kinasewitz GT; Tawk MM. Effects of nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2009;5(2):103–107. PMID

  3. 20-HETE induces remodeling of renal resistance arteries independent of blood pressure elevation in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yan; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Garcia, Victor; Dimitrova, Irina; Weidenhammer, Adam; Joseph, Gregory; Zhang, Frank; Manthati, Vijay L; Falck, John R; Capdevila, Jorge H; Schwartzman, Michal L

    2013-09-01

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a cytochrome P-450 (Cyp)-derived arachidonic acid metabolite that has been shown to increase smooth muscle contractions and proliferation, stimulate endothelial dysfunction and activation, and promote hypertension. We examined if 20-HETE contributes to microvascular remodeling in hypertension. In Sprague-Dawley rats, administration of the 20-HETE biosynthesis inhibitor HET0016 or the 20-HETE antagonist N-20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) prevented 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in blood pressure as well as abrogated DHT-induced increases in the media-to-lumen ratio (M/L), media thickness, and collagen IV deposition in renal interlobar arteries. Reserpine prevented blood pressure elevation in DHT-treated rats but did not affect microvascular remodeling (M/L, media thickness, and collagen deposition); under these conditions, treatment with the 20-HETE antagonist attenuated microvascular remodeling, suggesting that 20-HETE contributes to DHT-induced vascular remodeling independent of blood pressure elevation. In Cyp4a14(-/-) mice, which display androgen-driven and 20-HETE-dependent hypertension, treatment with the 20-HETE antagonist abolished remodeling of renal resistance arteries measured as media thickness (24 ± 1 vs. 15 ± 1 μm) and M/L (0.29 ± 0.03 vs. 0.17 ± 0.01). Moreover, in Cyp4a12 transgenic mice in which the expression of Cyp4a12-20-HETE synthase is driven by a tetracycline-sensitive promoter, treatment with doxycycline resulted in blood pressure elevation (140 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 5 mmHg) and a significant increase in remodeling of renal resistance arteries (media thickness: 23 ± 1 vs. 16 ± 1 μm; M/L: 0.39 ± 0.04 vs. 0.23 ± 0.02); these increases were abrogated by cotreatment with 20-HEDE. This study demonstrated that 20-HETE is a key regulator of microvascular remodeling in hypertension; its effect is independent of blood pressure elevation and androgen levels. PMID

  4. 20-HETE induces remodeling of renal resistance arteries independent of blood pressure elevation in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Wu, Cheng-Chia; Garcia, Victor; Dimitrova, Irina; Weidenhammer, Adam; Joseph, Gregory; Zhang, Frank; Manthati, Vijay L.; Falck, John R.; Capdevila, Jorge H.

    2013-01-01

    20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) is a cytochrome P-450 (Cyp)-derived arachidonic acid metabolite that has been shown to increase smooth muscle contractions and proliferation, stimulate endothelial dysfunction and activation, and promote hypertension. We examined if 20-HETE contributes to microvascular remodeling in hypertension. In Sprague-Dawley rats, administration of the 20-HETE biosynthesis inhibitor HET0016 or the 20-HETE antagonist N-20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) prevented 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-induced increases in blood pressure as well as abrogated DHT-induced increases in the media-to-lumen ratio (M/L), media thickness, and collagen IV deposition in renal interlobar arteries. Reserpine prevented blood pressure elevation in DHT-treated rats but did not affect microvascular remodeling (M/L, media thickness, and collagen deposition); under these conditions, treatment with the 20-HETE antagonist attenuated microvascular remodeling, suggesting that 20-HETE contributes to DHT-induced vascular remodeling independent of blood pressure elevation. In Cyp4a14−/− mice, which display androgen-driven and 20-HETE-dependent hypertension, treatment with the 20-HETE antagonist abolished remodeling of renal resistance arteries measured as media thickness (24 ± 1 vs. 15 ± 1 μm) and M/L (0.29 ± 0.03 vs. 0.17 ± 0.01). Moreover, in Cyp4a12 transgenic mice in which the expression of Cyp4a12–20-HETE synthase is driven by a tetracycline-sensitive promoter, treatment with doxycycline resulted in blood pressure elevation (140 ± 4 vs. 92 ± 5 mmHg) and a significant increase in remodeling of renal resistance arteries (media thickness: 23 ± 1 vs. 16 ± 1 μm; M/L: 0.39 ± 0.04 vs. 0.23 ± 0.02); these increases were abrogated by cotreatment with 20-HEDE. This study demonstrated that 20-HETE is a key regulator of microvascular remodeling in hypertension; its effect is independent of blood pressure elevation and androgen levels. PMID

  5. Anti-VEGF Anticancer Drugs: Mind the Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Katsi, Vasiliki; Zerdes, Ioannis; Manolakou, Stavroula; Makris, Thomas; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Kallikazaros, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of therapies that inhibit tumor angiogenesis and particularly target to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) (VEGF inhibitors/VEGFi) have revolutionized the treatment of various cancer types. Although their clinical benefit can be optimal for cancer-affected patients, the safety of these targeted agents is of special concern especially for longer-term adjuvant or maintenance treatment. Importantly, VEGFi therapy has been significantly associated with hypertension (HTN) as an adverse effect and therefore the control of blood pressure (BP) after the administration of these drugs remains a challenging matter to be faced. The aim of this review is to summarize studies which investigate the association of VEGFi agents with HTN manifestation and the possible risks associated with this complication. Additionally, given that the optimal management of HTN caused by VEGFi remains obscure, this review will focus on prevention strategies including BP monitoring plans and propose potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:26123049

  6. Endothelin-1 exacerbates development of hypertension and atherosclerosis in modest insulin resistant syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yan-Jie; Juan, Chi-Chang; Kwok, Ching-Fai; Hsu, Yung-Pei; Shih, Kuang-Chung; Chen, Chin-Chang; Ho, Low-Tone

    2015-05-08

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as potent vasoconstrictor, by virtue of its mitogenic effects, and may deteriorate the process of hypertension and atherosclerosis by aggravating hyperplasia and migration in VSMCs. Our previous study demonstrated that insulin infusion caused sequential induction of hyperinsulinemia, hyperendothelinemia, insulin resistance, and then hypertension in rats. However, the underlying mechanism of ET-1 interfere insulin signaling in VSMCs remains unclear. To characterize insulin signaling during modest insulin resistant syndrome, we established and monitored rats by feeding high fructose-diet (HFD) until high blood pressure and modest insulin resistance occurred. To explore the role of ET-1/ET{sub A}R during insulin resistance, ET{sub A}R expression, ET-1 binding, and insulin signaling were investigated in the HFD-fed rats and cultured A-10 VSMCs. Results showed that high blood pressure, tunica medial wall thickening, plasma ET-1 and insulin, and accompanied with modest insulin resistance without overweight and hyperglycemia occurred in early-stage HFD-fed rats. In the endothelium-denuded aorta from HFD-fed rats, ET{sub A}R expression, but not ET{sub B}R, and ET-1 binding in aorta were increased. Moreover, decreasing of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation and increasing of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation were observed in aorta during modest insulin resistance. Interestingly, in ET-1 pretreated VSMCs, the increment of insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation was decreased whereas the increment of insulin-induced ERK phosphorylation was increased. In addition, insulin potentiated ET-1-induced VSMCs migration and proliferation due to increasing ET-1 binding. ETAR antagonist reversed effects of ET-1 on insulin-induced signaling and VSMCs migration and proliferation. In summary, modest insulin resistance syndrome accompanied with hyperinsulinemia leading to the potentiation on ET-1-induced actions in aortic VSMCs. ET-1 via ET{sub A}R pathway

  7. Importance of the Hispanic heritage regarding diagnosis and management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    López-Candales, Angel

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a very prevalent and growing clinical problem that is not always promptly diagnosed and ∼6% of U.S. adults remain undiagnosed. Though numerous risk factors have been linked to the development of HTN, ethnicity has traditionally been simply considered as a significant risk among non-Hispanic Blacks. However, emerging data seems to suggest that Hispanics, the largest and fastest-growing minority in the U.S.A., might have rates of uncontrolled HTN that significantly exceeds the rates observed for non-Hispanic whites. Unfortunately, paucity of a significant Hispanic representation in major clinical trials has raised significant healthcare concerns regarding our true understanding of the meaning of HTN and associated cardiovascular consequences among this ethnic group. Consequently, there is urgency not only in having a better understanding of HTN among Hispanics, but also to examine the potential factors that may play a role in regulating the expression of HTN and its associated cardiovascular manifestations in this ethnic group. PMID:26154444

  8. Gene expression responses of threespine stickleback to salinity: implications for salt-sensitive hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Smith, Kerri J.; Zeng, Yong; Ji, Guoli; Connon, Richard; Fangue, Nann A.; Cai, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent success with genome-wide association studies (GWAS), identifying hypertension (HTN)-susceptibility loci in the general population remains difficult. Here, we present a novel strategy to address this challenge by studying salinity adaptation in the threespine stickleback, a fish species with diverse salt-handling ecotypes. We acclimated native freshwater (FW) and anadromous saltwater (SW) threespine sticklebacks to fresh, brackish, and sea water for 30 days, and applied RNA sequencing to determine the gene expression in fish kidneys. We identified 1844 salt-responsive genes that were differentially expressed between FW sticklebacks acclimated to different salinities and/or between SW and FW sticklebacks acclimated to full-strength sea water. Significant overlap between stickleback salt-responsive genes and human genes implicated in HTN was detected (P < 10−7, hypergeometric test), suggesting a possible similarity in genetic mechanisms of salt handling between threespine sticklebacks and humans. The overlapping genes included a newly discovered HTN gene—MAP3K15, whose expression in FW stickleback kidneys decreases with salinity. These also included genes located in the GWAS loci such as AGTRAP-PLOD1 and CYP1A1-ULK3, which contain multiple potentially causative genes contributing to HTN susceptibility that need to be prioritized for study. Taken together, we show that stickleback salt-responsive genes provide valuable information facilitating the identification of human HTN genes. Thus, threespine sticklebacks may be used as a model, complementary to existing animal models, in human HTN research. PMID:25309574

  9. Gene expression responses of threespine stickleback to salinity: implications for salt-sensitive hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Smith, Kerri J; Zeng, Yong; Ji, Guoli; Connon, Richard; Fangue, Nann A; Cai, James J

    2014-01-01

    Despite recent success with genome-wide association studies (GWAS), identifying hypertension (HTN)-susceptibility loci in the general population remains difficult. Here, we present a novel strategy to address this challenge by studying salinity adaptation in the threespine stickleback, a fish species with diverse salt-handling ecotypes. We acclimated native freshwater (FW) and anadromous saltwater (SW) threespine sticklebacks to fresh, brackish, and sea water for 30 days, and applied RNA sequencing to determine the gene expression in fish kidneys. We identified 1844 salt-responsive genes that were differentially expressed between FW sticklebacks acclimated to different salinities and/or between SW and FW sticklebacks acclimated to full-strength sea water. Significant overlap between stickleback salt-responsive genes and human genes implicated in HTN was detected (P < 10(-7), hypergeometric test), suggesting a possible similarity in genetic mechanisms of salt handling between threespine sticklebacks and humans. The overlapping genes included a newly discovered HTN gene-MAP3K15, whose expression in FW stickleback kidneys decreases with salinity. These also included genes located in the GWAS loci such as AGTRAP-PLOD1 and CYP1A1-ULK3, which contain multiple potentially causative genes contributing to HTN susceptibility that need to be prioritized for study. Taken together, we show that stickleback salt-responsive genes provide valuable information facilitating the identification of human HTN genes. Thus, threespine sticklebacks may be used as a model, complementary to existing animal models, in human HTN research. PMID:25309574

  10. Attenuated muscle metaboreflex-induced pressor response during postexercise muscle ischemia in renovascular hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Spranger, Marty D.; Kaur, Jasdeep; Sala-Mercado, Javier A.; Machado, Tiago M.; Krishnan, Abhinav C.; Alvarez, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, muscle metaboreflex activation (MMA; induced via partial hindlimb ischemia) markedly increases mean arterial pressure (MAP), and MAP is sustained when the ischemia is maintained following the cessation of exercise (postexercise muscle ischemia, PEMI). We previously reported that the sustained pressor response during PEMI in normal individuals is driven by a sustained increase in cardiac output (CO) with no peripheral vasoconstriction. However, we have recently shown that the rise in CO with MMA is significantly blunted in hypertension (HTN). The mechanisms sustaining the pressor response during PEMI in HTN are unknown. In six chronically instrumented canines, hemodynamic responses were observed during rest, mild exercise (3.2 km/h), MMA, and PEMI in the same animals before and after the induction of HTN [Goldblatt two kidney, one clip (2K1C)]. In controls, MAP, CO and HR increased with MMA (+52 ± 6 mmHg, +2.1 ± 0.3 l/min, and +37 ± 7 beats per minute). After induction of HTN, MAP at rest increased from 97 ± 3 to 130 ± 4 mmHg, and the metaboreflex responses were markedly attenuated (+32 ± 5 mmHg, +0.6 ± 0.2 l/min, and +11 ± 3 bpm). During PEMI in HTN, HR and CO were not sustained, and MAP fell to normal recovery levels. We conclude that the attenuated metaboreflex-induced HR, CO, and MAP responses are not sustained during PEMI in HTN. PMID:25632024

  11. Electrical carotid sinus stimulation: chances and challenges in the management of treatment resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chobanyan-Jürgens, Kristine; Jordan, Jens

    2015-09-01

    Treatment resistant arterial hypertension is associated with excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Electrical carotid sinus stimulators engaging baroreflex afferent activity have been developed for such patients. Indeed, baroreflex mechanisms contribute to long-term blood pressure control by governing efferent sympathetic and parasympathetic activity. The first-generation carotid sinus stimulator applying bilateral bipolar stimulation reduced blood pressure in a controlled clinical trial but nevertheless failed to meet the primary efficacy endpoint. The second-generation device utilizes smaller unilateral unipolar electrodes, thus decreasing invasiveness of the implantation while saving battery. An uncontrolled clinical study suggested improvement in blood pressure with the second-generation device. We hope that these findings as well as preliminary observations suggesting cardiovascular and renal organ protection with electrical carotid sinus stimulation will be confirmed in properly controlled clinical trials. Meanwhile, we should find ways to better identify patients who are most likely to benefit from electrical carotid sinus stimulation. PMID:26208917

  12. Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Sympathetic Nerve Traffic after Renal Denervation in Patients with Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Trevano, Fosca Quarti; Spaziani, Domenico; Scalise, Filippo; Auguadro, Carla; Pizzini, Patrizia; Tripepi, Giovanni; D’Arrigo, Graziella; Mallamaci, Francesca; Mancia, Giuseppe; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The plasma concentration of the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) associates with sympathetic activity in patients with CKD, but the driver of this association is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this longitudinal study (follow-up: 2 weeks–6 months), repeated measurements over time of muscle sympathetic nerve activity corrected (MSNAC), plasma levels of ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and BP and heart rate were performed in 14 patients with drug-resistant hypertension who underwent bilateral renal denervation (enrolled in 2013 and followed-up until February 2014). Stability of ADMA, SDMA, BP, and MSNAC over time (6 months) was assessed in two historical control groups of patients maintained on stable antihypertensive treatment. Results Time-integrated changes in MSNAC after renal denervation ranged from –40.6% to 10% (average, –15.1%), and these changes were strongly associated with the corresponding changes in plasma ADMA (r= 0.62, P=0.02) and SDMA (r=0.72, P=0.004). Changes in MSNAC went along with simultaneous changes in standardized systolic (r=0.65, P=0.01) and diastolic BP (r=0.61, P=0.02). In the historical control groups, no change in ADMA, SDMA, BP, and MSNAC levels was recorded during a 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In patients with resistant hypertension, changes in sympathetic activity after renal denervation associate with simultaneous changes in plasma levels of the two major endogenous methylarginines, ADMA and SDMA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system exerts an important role in modulating circulating levels of ADMA and SDMA in this condition. PMID:26138262

  13. Hypertension resistance polymorphisms in ROMK (Kir1.1) alter channel function by different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Fang, Liang; Li, Dimin; Welling, Paul A

    2010-12-01

    The renal outer medullary K(+) (ROMK) channel plays a critical role in renal sodium handling. Recent genome sequencing efforts in the Framingham Heart Study offspring cohort (Ji W, Foo JN, O'Roak BJ, Zhao H, Larson MG, Simon DB, Newton-Cheh C, State MW, Levy D, and Lifton RP. Nat Genet 40: 592-599, 2008) recently revealed an association between suspected loss-of-function polymorphisms in the ROMK channel and resistance to hypertension, suggesting that ROMK activity may also be a determinant of blood pressure control in the general population. Here we examine whether these sequence variants do, in fact, alter ROMK channel function and explore the mechanisms. As assessed by two-microelectrode voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes, 3/5 of the variants (R193P, H251Y, and T313FS) displayed an almost complete attenuation of whole cell ROMK channel activity. Surface antibody binding measurements of external epitope-tagged channels and analysis of glycosylation-state maturation revealed that these variants prevent channel expression at the plasmalemma, likely as a consequence of retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. The other variants (P166S, R169H) had no obvious effects on the basal channel activity or surface expression but, instead, conferred a gain in regulated-inhibitory gating. As assessed in giant excised patch-clamp studies, apparent phosphotidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) binding affinity of the variants was reduced, causing channels to be more susceptible to inhibition upon PIP(2) depletion. Unlike the protein product of the major ROMK allele, these two variants are sensitive to the inhibitory affects of a G protein-coupled receptor, which stimulates PIP(2) hydrolysis. In summary, we have found that hypertension resistance sequence variants inhibit ROMK channel function by different mechanisms, providing new insights into the role of the channel in the maintenance of blood pressure. PMID:20926634

  14. The effects of renal denervation on resistant hypertension patients: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojuan; Wu, Nie; Yan, Wenjuan; Zhou, Chunya; Guo, Hua

    2016-08-01

    We carried out this meta-analysis to assess the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on resistant hypertension patients. According to the collaborative review group search strategy, we searched MEDLINE (1996 to 2015.10); EBCO (1996 to 2015.10) and CNKI. A meta-analysis was carried out using RevMan 5.0. We identified 11 reports that fulfilled the inclusion criteria for our review. Controlled trials reporting systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure in RDN, and control groups at the 6-month follow-up in patients with resistant hypertension were systematically reviewed. Pooled analysis of all 11 included studies showed significant reductions in SBP (weighted mean difference -13.9 mmHg, 95% confidence interval -21.17 to -6.63, P=0.00025, I=93%) and diastolic blood pressure (weighted mean difference -4.41 mmHg, 95% confidence interval -6.95 to -1.88, P=0.004, I=90%) compared with the control group at the 6-month follow-up. Six controlled trials reported specific values of ambulatory SBP that showed no significant difference between two groups. It has also been found that RDN has benefits in protecting cardiac and renal function compared with the control group without increasing adverse events. In conclusion, this meta-analysis shows that RDN is superior to the control group in lowering office blood pressure rather than ambulatory SBP, and might have other potential benefits to protect heart and renal function. PMID:26901340

  15. Overweight, air and noise pollution: Universal risk factors for pediatric pre-hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kelishadi, Roya; Poursafa, Parinaz; Keramatian, Kasra

    2011-01-01

    Pediatric pre-hypertension (pre-HTN) has a complex multifactorial etiology. Although most cases are secondary to other disorders, a substantial number of children and adolescents have primary or essential HTN and pre-HTN. The gene-gene and gene-environment interactions should be considered in this context. The strong relationship of pre-HTN with environmental factors such as air pollution, noise pollution and passive smoking and obesity suggest that its prevalence will be escalating. Exposure to ambient particulate matters may increase blood pressure (BP) within hours to days. The underlying biologic pathways include autonomic nervous system imbalance and arterial vascular dysfunction or vasoconstriction because of systemic oxidative stress and inflammation. Likewise, tobacco smoke exposure of pregnant mothers increases systolic BP of their offspring in early infancy. Parental smoking also independently affects systolic BP among healthy preschool children. Noise exposure, notably in night, is associated with catecholamine secretion, increased BP and a pre-HTN state even in pre-school age children. Excess weight is associated with dysfunction of the adipose tissue, consisting of enlarged hypertrophied adipocytes, increased infiltration by macrophages and variations in secretion of adipokines and free fatty acids. These changes would result in chronic vascular inflammation, oxidative stress, activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and sympathetic response, and ultimately to pre-HTN from childhood. Prevention and control of the modifiable risk factors of pre-HTN from prenatal period can have long-term health impact on primordial and primary prevention of chronic non-communicable diseases. This review presents a general view on the diagnosis, prevalence and etiology of pre-HTN along with practical measures for its prevention and control. PMID:22973395

  16. Hypertension: an unstudied potential risk factor for adverse outcomes during continuous flow ventricular assist device support.

    PubMed

    Wasson, Lauren T; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P; Demmer, Ryan T; Colombo, Paolo C

    2015-05-01

    In end-stage heart failure, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) represent an exciting new frontier in which post-device implantation survival approaches that of heart transplant. However, expansion of this technology is still limited by complications that impact morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is essential to identify and optimize modifiable predictors of poor outcomes. One such predictor may be hypertension (HTN). Not only may chronic HTN as a traditional cardiovascular risk factor be present during long-term LVAD support, but HTN may also contribute to device malfunction or device-associated complications. Although current guidelines identify blood pressure (BP) control as important to outpatient continuous flow (CF) LVAD management, there is no evidence base to support these guidelines. Indeed, our comprehensive literature search did not identify any studies that evaluated post-device implantation HTN as a potential predictor of adverse CF-LVAD outcomes. HTN among CF-LVAD patients is likely a relatively unstudied factor because of difficulties using standard noninvasive techniques to measure BP in the setting of reduced pulsatile flow. Fortunately, recent research has elucidated the meaning of Doppler BP measurements and validated a slow-cuff deflation system for BP measurements in the setting of CF-LVAD support. Therefore, CF-LVAD researchers and clinicians may (1) consider potential mechanisms relating HTN to poor outcomes, (2) realize that HTN management is a stated goal despite scarce evidence, and (3) utilize the new reliable and valid methods for outpatient BP measurement that make research and management possible. It is critical and now feasible that research on HTN in the CF-LVAD patient population move forward. PMID:25283767

  17. Potential Risk Factors Associated With Vascular Diseases in Patients Receiving Treatment for Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunjung; Park, Joonhong; Chae, Hyojin; Lee, Gun Dong; Lee, Sang Yoon; Lee, Jong Min; Oh, Yong-Seog

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently, the hypertension (HTN) patients undergo appropriate medical treatment, and traditional risk factors are highly controlled. Therefore, potential risk factors of atherosclerotic vascular diseases (AVD) and venous thromboembolisms (VTE) in HTN should be reconsidered. We investigated thrombophilic genetic mutations and existing biomarkers for AVD or VTE in HTN patients receiving treatment. Methods A total of 183 patients were enrolled: AVD with HTN (group A, n=45), VTE with HTN (group B, n=62), and HTN patients without any vascular diseases (group C, n=76). The lipid profile, homocysteine (Hcy) levels, D-dimers, fibrinogen, antithrombin, lupus anticoagulant, and anti-cardiolipin antibody (aCL) were evaluated. Prothrombin G20210A, Factor V G1691A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T and A1298C were analyzed. Results All patients revealed wild type prothrombin G20210A and Factor V G1691A polymorphisms. The frequency of MTHFR polymorphisms was 677CT (n=84, 45.9%); 677TT (n=46, 25.1%); 1298AC (n=46, 25.1%); and 1298CC (n=2, 1.1%). The MTHFR 677TT genotype tended to increase the odds ratio (OR) to AVD events in HTN patients (OR 2.648, confidence interval 0.982-7.143, P=0.05). The group A demonstrated significantly higher Hcy levels (P=0.009), fibrinogen (P=0.004), and platelet counts (P=0.04) than group C. Group B had significantly higher levels of D-dimers (P=0.0001), platelet count (P=0.0002), and aCL (P=0.02) frequency than group C. Conclusions The MTHFR 677TT genotype and Hcy level could be potential risk factors associated with development of AVD in HTN patients receiving treatment. D-dimer and aCL might be useful to estimate the occurrence of VTE in them. PMID:26915609

  18. The Role of Hyperglycemia and Insulin Resistance in the Development and Progression of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grinnan, Daniel; Farr, Grant; Fox, Adam; Sweeney, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disorder which often leads to right ventricular failure and death. While the existing classification system for pulmonary hypertension does not account for the impact of diabetes mellitus, evidence is emerging that suggests that diabetes is associated with pulmonary hypertension and that diabetes modifies the course of pulmonary hypertension. There is also growing radiographic, hemodynamic, biochemical, and pathologic data supporting an association between diabetes and pulmonary hypertension. More robust epidemiologic studies are needed to confirm an association between diabetes and pulmonary hypertension and to show that diabetes is a disease modifier in pulmonary hypertension. In addition, evaluating the effects of glucose control in animals with pulmonary hypertension and diabetes (as well as in humans) is warranted. PMID:27376089

  19. Association Between Hypertension, Menopause, and Cognition in Women.

    PubMed

    Zilberman, Judith M; Cerezo, Gustavo H; Del Sueldo, Mildren; Fernandez-Pérez, Cristina; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Vicario, Augusto

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the cognitive state in women and its relation to menopause and hypertension (HTN). The authors included 1034 women aged 47.13±15.71 years. The prevalence of HTN was 47.1%, with 67.8% of patients treated and 48.6% controlled. Cognitive impairment was higher among hypertensive menopausal (mini-Boston Naming Test: 7.4±3.1 vs 8.5±2.4, P<.001; Clock-Drawing Test: 5.2±2 vs 5.6±1.6, P<.01). Using logistic regression adjusted by age and education level, statistical differences were found in the results from the mini-Boston Naming Test between menopausal hypertensive vs menopausal normotensive women (odds ratio, 1.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.06-2.07; P=.021), and no difference between nonmenopausal hypertensive vs menopausal normotensive women (odds ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-1.57; P=.697). The P interaction between both groups was significant (P=.038). The possibility of alteration in cortical functions in menopausal hypertensive woman showed a relative increment of 48% (P=.021). The association between HTN and menopause increases the possibility of compromising the semantic memory by 50%. PMID:26252810

  20. Undiagnosed hypertensive participants demonstrate the largest blood pressure improvements from a community based lifestyle intervention: implications for addressing the silent hypertension epidemic

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: It is important to understand effective strategies to reach and treat individuals who lack awareness of or have uncontrolled hypertension (HTN). The objectives of this secondary analysis from a community-based participatory research initiative, HUB City Steps, were to quantify the pre...

  1. Longitudinal association of dairy consumption with the changes in blood pressure and the risk of incident hypertension: the Framingham Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huifen; Fox, Caroline S; Troy, Lisa M; Mckeown, Nicola M; Jacques, Paul F

    2015-12-14

    We aimed to examine the longitudinal association of dairy consumption with the changes in blood pressure (BP) and the risk of incident hypertension (HTN) among adults. This study included 2636 Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort members who participated in the 5th through 8th examinations (1991-2008) and were free of HTN at their first examination during the follow-up. Data collected at each examination included dietary intake (by a validated FFQ), BP (following standardised procedures) and anti-hypertensive medication use (by physician-elicited self-report). HTN was defined as systolic BP (SBP)≥140 mmHg, or diastolic BP (DBP)≥90 mmHg or anti-hypertensive medication use. We used repeated-measure and discrete-time hazard regressions to examine the associations of dairy consumption with the annualised BP change (n 2075) and incident HTN (n 2340; cases=1026), respectively. Covariates included demographic, lifestyle, overall diet quality, metabolic factors and medication use. Greater intakes of total dairy foods, total low-fat/fat-free dairy foods, low-fat/skimmed milk and yoghurt were associated with smaller annualised increments in SBP and a lower risk of projected HTN incidence. However, with the exception of total dairy foods and yoghurt, these inverse associations with HTN risk were attenuated as the follow-up time increased. For yoghurt, each additional serving was associated with 6 (95 % CI 1, 10) % reduced risk of incident HTN. Total dairy and total low-fat/fat-free dairy intakes were found to be inversely related to changes in DBP. Dairy consumption, as part of a nutritious and energy-balanced diet pattern, may benefit BP control and prevent or delay the onset of HTN. PMID:26395861

  2. Mineralocorticoid hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vishal

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension affects about 10 – 25% of the population and is an important risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. The renin-angiotensin system is frequently implicated in the pathophysiology of hypertension, be it primary or secondary. The prevalence of primary aldosteronism increases with the severity of hypertension, from 2% in patients with grade 1 hypertension to 20% among resistant hypertensives. Mineralcorticoid hypertension includes a spectrum of disorders ranging from renin-producing pathologies (renin-secreting tumors, malignant hypertension, coarctation of aorta), aldosterone-producing pathologies (primary aldosteronism – Conns syndrome, familial hyperaldosteronism 1, 2, and 3), non-aldosterone mineralocorticoid producing pathologies (apparent mineralocorticoid excess syndrome, Liddle syndrome, deoxycorticosterone-secreting tumors, ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormones (ACTH) syndrome, congenitalvadrenal hyperplasia), and drugs with mineraocorticoid activity (locorice, carbenoxole therapy) to glucocorticoid receptor resistance syndromes. Clinical presentation includes hypertension with varying severity, hypokalemia, and alkalosis. Ratio of plasma aldosterone concentraion to plasma renin activity remains the best screening tool. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling is the best diagnostic test coupled with a CT scan. Treatment is either surgical (adrenelectomy) for unilateral adrenal disease versus medical therapy for idiopathic, ambiguous, or bilateral disease. Medical therapy focuses on blood pressure control and correction of hypokalemia using a combination of anti-hypertensives (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, or angiotensin receptor blockers) and potassium-raising therapies (mineralcorticoid receptor antagonist or potassium sparing diuretics). Direct aldosterone synthetase antagonists represent a promising future therapy. PMID:22145132

  3. Prevention And Treatment of Hypertension With Algorithm-based therapy (PATHWAY) number 2: protocol for a randomised crossover trial to determine optimal treatment for drug-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan; MacDonald, Thomas M; Caulfield, Mark; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; McInnes, Gordon; Sever, Peter; Webb, David J; Salsbury, Jackie; Morant, Steve; Ford, Ian; Brown, Morris J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Resistant hypertension is inadequately controlled blood pressure (BP) despite treatment with at least three BP-lowering drugs. A popular hypothesis is that resistant hypertension is due to excessive Na+-retention, and that ‘further diuretic therapy’ will be superior to alternative add-on drugs. Methods and analysis Placebo-controlled, random crossover study of fourth-line treatment when added to standard (A+C+D) triple drug therapy: ACE inhibitor or Angiotensin receptor blocker (A) +Calcium channel blocker (C)+Diuretic (D). Patients (aged 18–79 years) with clinical systolic BP≥140 mm Hg (135 mm Hg in diabetics) and Home BP Monitoring (HBPM) systolic BP average ≥130 mm Hg on treatment for at least 3 months with maximum tolerated doses of A+C+D are randomised to four consecutive randomly allocated 12-week treatment cycles with an α-blocker, β-blocker, spironolactone and placebo. The hierarchical coprimary end point is the difference in HBPM average systolic BP between (in order) spironolactone and placebo, spironolactone and the average of the other two active drugs, spironolactone and each of the other two drugs. A key secondary outcome is to determine whether plasma renin predicts the BP response to the different drugs. A sample size of 346 (allowing 15% dropouts) will confer 90% power to detect a 3 mm Hg HBPM average systolic BP difference between any two drugs. The study can also detect a 6 mm Hg difference in HBPM average systolic BP between each patient's best and second-best drug predicted by tertile of plasma renin. Ethics and dissemination The study was initiated in May 2009 and results are expected in 2015. These will provide RCT evidence to support future guideline recommendations for optimal drug treatment of resistant hypertension. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02369081, EUDract number: 2008-007149-30. PMID:26253568

  4. The Rising Burden of Diabetes and Hypertension in Southeast Asian and African Regions: Need for Effective Strategies for Prevention and Control in Primary Health Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Viswanathan; Seedat, Yackoob K.; Pradeepa, Rajendra

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To review the available literature on burden of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) and its coexistence in Southeast Asian (SEA) and the African (AFR) regions and to suggest strategies to improve DM and HTN prevention and control in primary health care (PHC) in the two regions. Methods. A systematic review of the papers published on DM, HTN, and prevention/control of chronic diseases in SEA and AFR regions between 1980 and December 2012 was included. Results. In the year 2011, SEA region had the second largest number of people with DM (71.4 million), while the AFR region had the smallest number (14.7 million). Screening studies identified high proportions (>50%) of individuals with previously undiagnosed HTN and DM in both of the SEA and AFR regions. Studies from both regions have shown that DM and HTN coexist in type 2 DM ranging from 20.6% in India to 78.4% in Thailand in the SEA region and ranging from 9.7% in Nigeria to 70.4% in Morocco in the AFR region. There is evidence that by lifestyle modification both DM and HTN can be prevented. Conclusion. To meet the twin challenge of DM and HTN in developing countries, PHCs will have to be strengthened with a concerted and multipronged effort to provide promotive, preventive, curative, and rehabilitative services. PMID:23573413

  5. Altered reactivity of resistance vasculature contributes to hypertension in elastin insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Knutsen, Russell H.; Kozel, Beth A.; Dietrich, Hans H.; Blumer, Kendall J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2014-01-01

    Elastin (Eln) insufficiency in mice and humans is associated with hypertension and altered structure and mechanical properties of large arteries. However, it is not known to what extent functional or structural changes in resistance arteries contribute to the elevated blood pressure that is characteristic of Eln insufficiency. Here, we investigated how Eln insufficiency affects the structure and function of the resistance vasculature. A functional profile of resistance vasculature in Eln+/− mice was generated by assessing small mesenteric artery (MA) contractile and vasodilatory responses to vasoactive agents. We found that Eln haploinsufficiency had a modest effect on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction, whereas ANG II-evoked vasoconstriction was markedly increased. Blockade of ANG II type 2 receptors with PD-123319 or modulation of Rho kinase activity with the inhibitor Y-27632 attenuated the augmented vasoconstriction, whereas acute Y-27632 administration normalized blood pressure in Eln+/− mice. Sodium nitroprusside- and isoproterenol-induced vasodilatation were normal, whereas ACh-induced vasodilatation was severely impaired in Eln+/− MAs. Histologically, the number of smooth muscle layers did not change in Eln+/− MAs; however, an additional discontinuous layer of Eln appeared between the smooth muscle layers that was absent in wild-type arteries. We conclude that high blood pressure arising from Eln insufficiency is due partly to permanent changes in vascular tone as a result of increased sensitivity of the resistance vasculature to circulating ANG II and to impaired vasodilatory mechanisms arising from endothelial dysfunction characterized by impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilatation. Eln insufficiency causes augmented ANG II-induced vasoconstriction in part through a novel mechanism that facilitates contraction evoked by ANG II type 2 receptors and altered G protein signaling. PMID:24414067

  6. Hypertension: An Unstudied Potential Risk Factor for Adverse Outcomes during Continuous Flow Ventricular Assist Device Support

    PubMed Central

    Wasson, Lauren T.; Yuzefpolskaya, Melana; Wakabayashi, Michiyori; Takayama, Hiroo; Naka, Yoshifumi; Uriel, Nir; Jorde, Ulrich P.; Demmer, Ryan T.; Colombo, Paolo C.

    2014-01-01

    In end-stage heart failure, left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) represent an exciting new frontier in which post-device-implantation survival approaches that of heart transplant. However, expansion of this technology is still limited by complications that impact morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is essential to identify and optimize modifiable predictors of poor outcomes. One such predictor may be hypertension (HTN). Not only may chronic HTN as a traditional cardiovascular risk factor be present during long-term LVAD support, but HTN may also contribute to device malfunction or device-associated complications. Although current guidelines identify blood pressure (BP) control as important to outpatient continuous flow (CF) LVAD management, there is no evidence base to support these guidelines. Indeed, our comprehensive literature search did not identify any studies that evaluated post-device-implantation HTN as a potential predictor of adverse CF-LVAD outcomes. Hypertension among CF-LVAD patients is likely a relatively unstudied factor because of difficulties using standard non-invasive techniques to measure BP in the setting of reduced pulsatile flow. Fortunately, recent research has elucidated the meaning of Doppler BP measurements and validated a slow-deflation cuff system for BP measurements in the setting of CF-LVAD support. Therefore, CF-LVAD researchers and clinicians may i) consider potential mechanisms relating HTN to poor outcomes, ii) realize that HTN management is a stated goal despite scarce evidence, and iii) utilize the new reliable and valid methods for outpatient BP measurement that make research and management possible. It is critical and now feasible that research on HTN in the CF-LVAD patient population move forward. PMID:25283767

  7. Text Messaging to Improve Hypertension Medication Adherence in African Americans: BPMED Intervention Development and Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Artinian, Nancy T; Schwiebert, Loren; Yarandi, Hossein; Levy, Phillip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertension (HTN) is a major public health concern in the United States, with almost 78 million Americans age 20 years and over suffering from the condition. Moreover, HTN is a key risk factor for health disease and stroke. African Americans disproportionately shoulder the burdens of HTN, with greater prevalence, disease severity, earlier onset, and more HTN-related complications than age-matched whites. Medication adherence for the treatment of HTN is poor, with estimates indicating that only about half of hypertensive patients are adherent to prescribed medication regimens. Although no single intervention for improving medication adherence has emerged as superior to others, text message medication reminders have the potential to help improve medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN as mobile phone adoption is very high in this population. Objective The purpose of this two-phased study was to develop (Phase I) and test in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (Phase II) a text message system, BPMED, to improve the quality of medication management through increasing medication adherence in African Americans with uncontrolled HTN. Methods In Phase I, we recruited 16 target end-users from a primary care clinic, to assist in the development of BPMED through participating in one of three focus groups. Focus groups sought to gain patient perspectives on HTN, medication adherence, mobile phone use, and the use of text messaging to support medication adherence. Potential intervention designs were presented to participants, and feedback on the designs was solicited. In Phase II, we conducted two pilot RCTs to determine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of BPMED in primary care and emergency department settings. Both pilot studies recruited approximately 60 participants, who were randomized equally between usual care and the BPMED intervention. Results Although data collection is now complete, data analysis from the

  8. Young Women with a Long Past of Resistant Hypertension Cured after Surgery of Severe Bilateral Ostial Renal Artery Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Simonnet, Blandine; Deharo, Pierre; Rouabah, Karim; Silhol, François; Soler, Raphael; Bartoli, Jean Michel; Lévrier, Olivier; Bartoli, Michel Alain; Magnan, Pierre Edouard; Sarlon-Bartoli, Gabrielle

    2016-07-01

    Fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD) is an underdiagnosed disease which can affect young people and with poor prognosis such as dissection or aneurysm rupture if unknown. This case illustrates a multi-vessel FMD with symptomatic severe bilateral ostial renal artery stenosis and intracranial aneurysms. One of the original features is a very late delay to diagnosis with 23 years between onset of hypertension and renal stenosis diagnosis, particularly due to lower quality of initial CT scan with milder and uncommon abnormalities. The experiment neuroradiologist had suspected the diagnosis of renal FMD because she developed intracranial aneurysms and he confirmed this diagnosis with an artery renal contrast injection during an intracranial angiogram Because of very tight and short stenosis, surgery was chosen for treatment and permitted the cure of hypertension, with normal home blood pressure after 6 months. Several particularities of FMD were presented in this case: important delay diagnosis due to rare lesion and lower sensitivity of CT in this form, the possibility to perform an angiography in high suspicion of FMD, poor prognosis risk with intracranial aneurisms and premature birth child, and the choice for surgery with cure of hypertension. We thought that hypertension etiologic evaluation must be repeated in case of resistant hypertension in young patients, particularly when they developed intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27174348

  9. Relationship between renal resistive index and early target organ damage in patients with never-treated essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Florczak, Elzbieta; Januszewicz, Magdalena; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Michałowska, Ilona; Kabat, Marek; Rywik, Tomasz; Rynkun, Dariusz; Zieliński, Tomasz; Kuśmierczyk-Droszcz, Beata; Pregowska-Chwała, Barbara; Kowalewski, Grzegorz; Hoffman, Piotr

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate renal resistive index (RI) value in never treated hypertensive patients in relation to ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM) values and early target organ damage. The study included 318 subjects: 223 patients with never treated essential hypertension (mean age 37.1 years) and 95 normotensive healthy subjects (mean age 37.9 years). ABPM, echocardiography and carotid and renal arteries duplex color Doppler examinations were performed. RI values in patients with never treated essential hypertension were no different from the normotensive control group (0.59 +/- 0.05 vs 0.59 +/- 0.05; NS). In the untreated patients RI correlated significantly with 24-h pulse pressure (r=0.234; p<0.01) and ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) values (r=0.274; p<0.001), intima-media thickness (IMT) (r=0.249; p<0.001), E'/A' (rho= -0.279; p<0.001) and relative wall thickness (RWT; r=0.185; p<0.01). In the multivariate stepwise analysis, RI values correlated independently with carotid IMT (beta=0.272; p=0.020) and 24-h AASI values (beta=0.305; p=0.009). In normotensive healthy controls, significant independent correlation between RI and carotid IMT and 24-h AASI values were also found. Our study may indicate limited value of RI in differentiating patients with uncomplicated hypertension with healthy controls. Renal resistive values were independently correlated with carotid IMT and AASI. These may suggest that renal vascular resistance is related to two markers for cardiovascular events both in the hypertensive and normotensive subjects. PMID:19353412

  10. Hypertension and overall survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients treated with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Österlund, P; Soveri, L-M; Isoniemi, H; Poussa, T; Alanko, T; Bono, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertension (HTN) is a common toxicity of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) antibody treatment. It may be a marker of VEGF signalling pathway inhibition and therefore represent a cancer biomarker in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients treated with chemotherapy and bevacizumab. Methods: A total of 101 consecutive patients with mCRC were treated with standard chemotherapy combined with bevacizumab at dose of 2.5 mg kg−1 per week in a single centre. The median follow-up time of the patients alive was 64 months. Blood pressure was measured before each bevacizumab infusion, and HTN was graded according to common toxicity criteria for adverse events version 3.0. Results: Overall, 57 patients (56%) developed ⩾grade 1 HTN (median blood pressure 168/97 mm Hg), whereas 44 (44%) remained normotensive when treated with bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy regimen. Overall response rate was higher among patients with HTN (30 vs 20% P=0.025). Hypertension was associated with improved progression-free survival (10.5 vs 5.3 months; P=0.008) and overall survival (25.8 vs 11.7 months; P<0.001), and development of HTN within 3 months had an independent, prognostic influence in a multivariate landmark survival analysis together with other known mCRC prognostic factors (P=0.007). There was no association between HTN and development of thromboembolic complications. Conclusion: Hypertension may predict outcome of bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy in mCRC. These data require confirmation in prospective studies including pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic analyses. PMID:21304526

  11. Physician-pharmacist collaboration versus usual care for treatment-resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven M; Carris, Nicholas W; Dietrich, Eric; Gums, John G; Uribe, Liz; Coffey, Christopher S; Gums, Tyler H; Carter, Barry L

    2016-04-01

    Team-based care has been recommended for patients with treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH), but its efficacy in this setting is unknown. We compared a physician-pharmacist collaborative model (PPCM) to usual care in patients with TRH participating in the Collaboration Among Pharmacists and Physicians To Improve Outcomes Now study. At baseline, 169 patients (27% of Collaboration Among Pharmacists and Physicians To Improve Outcomes Now patients) had TRH: 111 received the PPCM intervention and 58 received usual care. Baseline characteristics were similar between treatment arms. After 9 months, adjusted mean systolic blood pressure was reduced by 7 mm Hg more with PPCM intervention than usual care (P = .036). Blood pressure control was 34.2% with PPCM versus 25.9% with usual care (adjusted odds ratio, 1.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-11.2). These findings suggest that team-based care in the primary care setting may be effective for TRH. Additional research is needed regarding the long-term impact of these models and to identify patients most likely to benefit from team-based interventions. PMID:26852290

  12. Increased pulse pressure is associated with left atrial enlargement in resistant hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Armario, Pedro; Oliveras, Anna; Hernández-Del-Rey, Raquel; Suárez, Carmen; Martell, Nieves; Ruilope, Luis M; De La Sierra, Alejandro

    2013-02-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) is frequently associated with a high prevalence of target organ damage, which impairs the prognosis of these patients. Considering cardiac alterations in RH, most attention has been devoted to left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), but data concerning left atrial enlargement (LAE) is less known. This cross-sectional study assessed the factors associated with LAE, with special focus on blood pressure (BP) estimates obtained by ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM), in 250 patients with RH, aged 64 ± 11 years. LAE and LVH were observed in 10.0% (95% CI 6.3-13.7) and 57.1% (95% CI 50.8-63.5) of patients, respectively. Compared with patients with normal atrium size, those exhibiting LAE were older, more frequently women, had elevated pulse pressure (PP) measured both at the office and by ABPM, and showed higher prevalence of LVH (83% vs 54%; p = 0.016). In a logistic regression analysis, adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, left ventricular mass index and BP pressure estimates, night-time PP was independently associated with LAE (OR for 5 mmHg = 1.28, 95% CI 1.24-1.32; p = 0.001). In conclusion, besides classical determinants of LAE, such as age and LVH, an elevated night-time PP was independently associated with LAE in patients with RH. PMID:23305454

  13. Deregulation of adipokines related to target organ damage on resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, A R; Faria, A P; Barbaro, N R; Gordo, W M; Modolo, R G P; Pinho, C; Fontana, V; Moreno, H

    2014-06-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) includes patients with controlled blood pressure (BP) (CRHTN) and uncontrolled BP (UCRHTN). In fact, RHTN patients are more likely to have target organ damage (TOD), and resistin, leptin and adiponectin may affect BP control in these subjects. We assessed the relationship between adipokines levels and arterial stiffness, left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and microalbuminuria (MA). This cross-sectional study included CRHTN (n=51) and UCRHTN (n=38) patients for evaluating body mass index, ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, plasma adiponectin, leptin and resistin concentrations, pulse wave velocity (PWV), MA and echocardiography. Leptin and resistin levels were higher in UCRHTN, whereas adiponectin levels were lower in this same subgroup. Similarly, arterial stiffness, LVH and MA were higher in UCRHTN subgroup. Adiponectin levels negatively correlated with PWV (r=-0.42, P<0.01), and MA (r=-0.48, P<0.01) only in UCRHTN. Leptin was positively correlated with PWV (r=0.37, P=0.02) in UCRHTN subgroup, whereas resistin was not correlated with TOD in both subgroups. Adiponectin is associated with arterial stiffness and renal injury in UCRHTN patients, whereas leptin is associated with arterial stiffness in the same subgroup. Taken together, our results showed that those adipokines may contribute to vascular and renal damage in UCRHTN patients. PMID:24284384

  14. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  15. [Hormonal profile and participation of nitric oxide in salt-sensitive and salt-resistant essential arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, P; Moreno, V G; Cornejo, M; Vargas, J C; García-Barroso, C; Velasco, G; Almaraz, M

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cardiovascular events and end-organ damage occur more frequently in patients with salt-sensitive essential hypertension (SH) than in salt-resistant essential hypertension (RH). Nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in regulating the pressure-natriuresis relationship. Therefore impaired NO synthesis may produce or aggravate salt-sensitive hypertension. This study was conducted to determine the hormonal levels and nitric oxide metabolites in hypertensive patients. 25 patients underwent salt sensitivity testing. 24 h ambulatory blood pressure was recorded after a 5-day period on low salt diet (20 mEq/d) and after a 5-day period on a high salt diet (200 mEq/d). Subjects showing > or = 10 mmHg increase in mean BP when changing from low to high dietary salt intake were classified as salt sensitive and as salt resistant when the BP changes were < 10 mmHg. Based on BP recordings 13 patients were characterised as white coat hypertension (WC), 13 patients as salt resistant (SR) and 12 as salt sensitive (SS). A significative relationship was seen between plasma glucose-insulin concentration and body mass index. The ventricular mass index was similar in SS and SR patients. The plasma uric acid, triglicerides and PAI-I were elevated in SS compared with SR, and control group (C). During low sodium intake, plasma renin and aldosterone were decreased in SS compared with SR, and C. No differences in plasma catecholamines or their changes with intake sodium modifications were seen among the patients. During high sodium intake urinary NO excretion increased in SR (38 +/- 9 vs 18 +/- 2 mg/g creat), and C (24 +/- 2 vs 16 +/- 3 mg/g creat) (p < 0.01) but not in SS patients (21 +/- 3 vs 26 +/- 4 mg/g creat). The NO excretion changes showed negative correlation with BP changes (r = 0.49, p < 0.01). During low sodium intake, SR and SS patients showed a normal nocturnal decrease of BP (dippers). During high sodium intake SS patients became non-dippers. Our

  16. Eligibility for Renal Denervation: Anatomical Classification and Results in Essential Resistant Hypertension

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Takuya Pellerin, Olivier; Savard, Sébastien; Curis, Emmanuel; Monge, Matthieu; Frank, Michael; Bobrie, Guillaume; Yamaguchi, Masato; Sugimoto, Koji; Plouin, Pierre-François; Azizi, Michel; Sapoval, Marc

    2015-02-15

    PurposeTo classify the renal artery (RA) anatomy based on specific requirements for endovascular renal artery denervation (RDN) in patients with drug-resistant hypertension (RH).Materials and MethodsThe RA anatomy of 122 consecutive RH patients was evaluated by computed tomography angiography and classified as two types: A (main RA ≥20 mm in length and ≥4.0 mm in diameter) or B (main RA <20 mm in length or main RA <4.0 mm in diameter). The A type included three subtypes: A1 (without accessory RAs), A2 (with accessory RAs <3.0 mm in diameter), and A3 (with accessory RAs ≥3.0 mm in diameter]. A1 and A2 types were eligible for RDN with the Simplicity Flex catheter. Type B included twi subtypes based on the main RA length and diameter. Patients were accordingly classified into three eligibility categories: complete (CE; both RAs were eligible), partial (PE; one eligible RA), and noneligibility (NE; no eligible RA).ResultsBilateral A1 type was the most prevalent and was observed in 48.4 % of the patients followed by the A1/A2 type (18 %). CE, PE, and NE were observed in 69.7, 22.9, and 7.4 % of patients, respectively. The prevalence of accessory RAs was 41 %.ConclusionsOf RH patients, 30.3 % were not eligible for bilateral RDN with the current Simplicity Flex catheter. This classification provides the basis for standardized reporting to allow for pooling of results of larger patient cohorts in the future.

  17. The role of norepinephrine and insulin resistance in an early stage of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Penesova, Adela; Radikova, Zofia; Cizmarova, Eva; Kvetnanský, Richard; Blazicek, Pavel; Vlcek, Miroslav; Koska, Juraj; Vigas, Milan

    2008-12-01

    The interrelationship between activity of sympathetic nervous system and metabolic risk factors in youth with hypertension (HT) has been poorly studied. The aim of our present study was to assess the interrelationship between metabolic risk factors, such as insulin resistance, concentration of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1, and catecholamines in an early stage of HT onset. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed in 17 young males with early-diagnosed nontreated HT grade 1 and 16 gender-, age-, and BMI-matched normotensive controls. Concentrations of glucose, insulin, epinephrine, norepinephrine, PAI-1, and plasma renin activity (PRA) were determined in venous plasma. Insulin sensitivity indices (ISIs) proposed by Cederholm, Matsuda, and Gutt were calculated. HT had higher baseline levels of norepinephrine, insulin (P= 0.02), and PAI-1 (P= 0.04). ISIs were lower in HT subjects (P < 0.001). Baseline concentrations of epinephrine were negatively associated with HDL cholesterol (r=-0.415, P= 0.02), ISI Matsuda (r=-0.361, P= 0.04), ISI Cederholm (r=-0.354, P= 0.04), and ISI Gutt (r=-0.429, P= 0.01), and positively with PRA (r= 0.609, P < 0.0001). Positive association was found between baseline concentrations of norepinephrine and PAI-1 (r= 0.418, P= 0.02). The sympathetic overactivity, which occurs in the early stage of HT may contribute to reduced insulin sensitivity even in young patients and intensify the undesirable development of metabolic cardiovascular risk factors and progress of the disease. PMID:19120146

  18. Mechanisms of lead-induced hypertension and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2008-01-01

    Lead is a ubiquitous environmental toxin that is capable of causing numerous acute and chronic illnesses. Population studies have demonstrated a link between lead exposure and subsequent development of hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular disease. In vivo and in vitro studies have shown that chronic lead exposure causes HTN and cardiovascular disease by promoting oxidative stress, limiting nitric oxide availability, impairing nitric oxide signaling, augmenting adrenergic activity, increasing endothelin production, altering the renin-angiotensin system, raising vasoconstrictor prostaglandins, lowering vasodilator prostaglandins, promoting inflammation, disturbing vascular smooth muscle Ca2+ signaling, diminishing endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation, and modifying the vascular response to vasoactive agonists. Moreover, lead has been shown to cause endothelial injury, impede endothelial repair, inhibit angiogenesis, reduce endothelial cell growth, suppress proteoglycan production, stimulate vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and phenotypic transformation, reduce tissue plasminogen activator, and raise plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 production. Via these and other actions, lead exposure causes HTN and promotes arteriosclerosis, atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, studies performed in experimental animals, isolated tissues, and cultured cells have provided compelling evidence that chronic exposure to low levels of lead can cause HTN, endothelial injury/dysfunction, arteriosclerosis, and cardiovascular disease. More importantly, these studies have elucidated the cellular and molecular mechanisms of lead's action on cardiovascular/renal systems, a task that is impossible to accomplish using clinical and epidemiological investigations alone. PMID:18567711

  19. Revelations about carotid body function through its pathological role in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Paton, Julian F R; Ratcliffe, Laura; Hering, Dagmara; Wolf, Jacek; Sobotka, Paul A; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2013-08-01

    Much recent attention has been given to the carotid body because of its potential role in cardiovascular disease states. One disease, neurogenic hypertension, characterised by excessive sympathetic activity, appears dependent on carotid body activity that may or may not be accompanied by sleep-disordered breathing. Herein, we review recent literature suggesting that the carotid body acquires tonicity in hypertension. We predict that carotid glomectomy will be a powerful way to temper excessive sympathetic discharge in diseases such as hypertension. We propose a model to explain that signalling from the 'hypertensive' carotid body is tonic, and hypothesise that there will be a sub-population of glomus cells that channel separately into reflex pathways controlling sympathetic motor outflows. PMID:23828147

  20. A high-density admixture scan in 1,670 African Americans with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Deo, Rahul C; Patterson, Nick; Tandon, Arti; McDonald, Gavin J; Haiman, Christopher A; Ardlie, Kristin; Henderson, Brian E; Henderson, Sean O; Reich, David

    2007-11-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a devastating disease with a higher incidence in African Americans than European Americans, inspiring searches for genetic variants that contribute to this difference. We report the results of a large-scale admixture scan for genes contributing HTN risk, in which we screened 1,670 African Americans with HTN and 387 control individuals for regions of the genome with elevated proportion of African or European ancestry. No loci were identified that were significantly associated with HTN. We also searched for evidence of an admixture signal at 40 candidate genes and eight previously reported linkage peaks, but none appears to contribute substantially to the differential HTN risk between African and European Americans. Finally, we observed nominal association at one of the loci detected in the admixture scan of Zhu et al. 2005 (p = 0.016 at 6q24.3 correcting for four hypotheses tested), although we caution that the significance is marginal and the estimated odds ratio of 1.19 per African allele is less than what would be expected from the original report; thus, further work is needed to follow up this locus. PMID:18020707

  1. A High-Density Admixture Scan in 1,670 African Americans with Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Rahul C; Patterson, Nick; Tandon, Arti; McDonald, Gavin J; Haiman, Christopher A; Ardlie, Kristin; Henderson, Brian E; Henderson, Sean O; Reich, David

    2007-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a devastating disease with a higher incidence in African Americans than European Americans, inspiring searches for genetic variants that contribute to this difference. We report the results of a large-scale admixture scan for genes contributing HTN risk, in which we screened 1,670 African Americans with HTN and 387 control individuals for regions of the genome with elevated proportion of African or European ancestry. No loci were identified that were significantly associated with HTN. We also searched for evidence of an admixture signal at 40 candidate genes and eight previously reported linkage peaks, but none appears to contribute substantially to the differential HTN risk between African and European Americans. Finally, we observed nominal association at one of the loci detected in the admixture scan of Zhu et al. 2005 (p = 0.016 at 6q24.3 correcting for four hypotheses tested), although we caution that the significance is marginal and the estimated odds ratio of 1.19 per African allele is less than what would be expected from the original report; thus, further work is needed to follow up this locus. PMID:18020707

  2. Differences in fat and sodium intake across hypertension subgroups in the Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living (MCHL) Nutrition Intervention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to examine differences between self-reported intakes of sodium, trans-fat, and total fat among hypertension (HTN) subgroups of participants in Mississippi Communities for Healthy Living nutrition education intervention. Dietary intake was measured using a food frequenc...

  3. Modulation of aldosterone levels by -344 C/T CYP11B2 polymorphism and spironolactone use in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Vanessa; de Faria, Ana Paula Cabral; Barbaro, Natália Ruggeri; Sabbatini, Andréa Rodrigues; Modolo, Rodrigo; Lacchini, Riccardo; Moreno, Heitor

    2014-03-01

    Interindividual variability in plasma aldosterone levels comprises environmental and genetic sources. Increased aldosterone levels have been associated with higher risk of hypertension and target-organ damage related to hypertension. Aldosterone excess and intravascular volume expansion are implicated in pathophysiology of resistant hypertension (RH). We sought to investigate whether -344 C/T polymorphism (rs1799998) in aldosterone synthase gene (CYP11B2) is associated with plasma aldosterone levels in patients with resistant hypertension. Sixty-two patients with resistant hypertension were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Genotypes were obtained by allelic discrimination assay using real time polymerase chain reaction. Multivariable linear regression was used to identify whether TT genotype was a predictor of aldosterone levels. No differences in clinical and laboratorial parameters were found among genotype groups. We found an additive effect of the T allele on plasma aldosterone concentration in RH. Also, there was higher aldosterone levels in TT homozygous under use of spironolactone compared with C carriers and compared with TT subjects who was not under use of spironolactone. TT genotype and the use of spironolactone were significant predictors of aldosterone levels in RH subjects. Plasma aldosterone concentration is significantly associated with -344 C/T CYP11B2 polymorphism and with the treatment with spironolactone in resistant hypertensive subjects. PMID:24388430

  4. Pulmonary artery dilation indicates severe obstructive sleep apnea in patients with resistant hypertension: the Resist-POL Study.

    PubMed

    Dobrowolski, Piotr; Florczak, Elżbieta; Klisiewicz, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Rybicka, Justyna; Śliwiński, Paweł; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Hoffman, Piotr

    2016-04-29

    INTRODUCTION The effect of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) on right ventricular (RV) function and pulmonary circulation parameters is unclear. OBJECTIVES The aim of this study was to determine whether newly diagnosed OSA and its severity has any impact on RV performance and echocardiographic parameters of pulmonary circulation in patients with true resistant hypertension. PATIENTS AND METHODS The study included 155 patients (93 men and 62 women; mean age, 47.5 ±10 years). The apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), end-diastolic and end-systolic area of the right ventricle, main pulmonary artery diameter (MPAd) at diastole, acceleration time (AccT), tricuspid annular systolic velocity wave, and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion were evaluated. RESULTS Patients were divided into 4 groups: without OSA (AHI <5; n = 43), with mild OSA (AHI = 5-15; n = 45), moderate OSA (AHI = 15-30; n = 27), and severe OSA (AHI >30; n = 40). There were no differences in RV systolic function between the groups. Patients with severe OSA had a wider MPAd (26.0 ±2.6 vs 23.1 ±3.7 mm; P <0.0001) and shorter AccT (114.2 ±15.7 vs 133.4 ±22.1 ms; P <0.001) in comparison with patients without OSA. The cut-off for the best predictive value of severe OSA was an MPAd of 25 mm or higher with a sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 78.9%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for severe OSA in relation to an MPAd of 25 mm or higher was 0.766 (95% confidence interval, 0.673-0.859; P <0.0001). Factors independently associated with an MPAd of 25 mm or higher were severe OSA and nighttime diastolic blood pressure levels. CONCLUSIONS Our study showed a relationship between pulmonary artery dilation and the presence of newly diagnosed severe OSA. Among the parameters studied, an MPAd of 25 mm or higher turned out to be the most useful parameter in identifying patients with severe OSA. PMID:27129085

  5. Public Health, Hypertension, and the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Brody, Aaron; Janke, Alex; Sharma, Vineet; Levy, Phillip

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is the most common cardiovascular disease worldwide and is associated with severe long-term morbidity when not treated appropriately. Despite this, blood pressure (BP) control remains suboptimal, particularly among underserved populations and those who rely on emergency departments (EDs) as a source of primary care. ED providers encounter patients with severely elevated BP daily, and yet adherence to minimal standards of BP reassessment and referral to outpatient medical care, as recommended by the American College of Emergency Physicians, is limited. Barriers such as provider knowledge deficits, resource constraints, and negative attitudes towards patients who utilize EDs for nonurgent complaints are compounded by perceptions of HTN as a condition that can only be addressed in a primary care setting to contribute to this. Efforts to reduce this gap must go beyond government mandates to address systemic issues including access to care and payment models to encourage health promotion. Additionally, individual physician behavior can be shifted through targeted education, financial incentives, and the accumulation of high-quality evidence to encourage more proactive approaches to the management of uncontrolled HTN in the ED. PMID:27165429

  6. Quality of Life, Depression, and Healthcare Resource Utilization among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and Concomitant Hypertension and Obesity: A Prospective Survey

    PubMed Central

    Green, Andrew J.; Bazata, Debbra D.; Fox, Kathleen M.; Grandy, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Background. This study compared quality of life, depression, and healthcare resource utilization among adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and comorbid hypertension (HTN) and obesity with those of adults reporting T2DM alone. Methods. Respondents to the US SHIELD survey self-reported their height, weight, comorbid conditions, hospitalizations, and outpatient visits and completed the Short Form-12 (SF-12) and Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Respondents reporting T2DM and HTN and obesity (body mass index, BMI, ≥30 kg/m2) were compared with a T2DM-alone group. Results. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity (n = 1292) had significantly lower SF-12 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores (37.3 and 50.9, resp.) than T2DM-alone respondents (n = 349) (45.8 and 53.5, resp., P < 0.0001). Mean PHQ-9 scores were significantly higher among T2DM respondents with comorbid HTN and obesity (5.0 versus 2.5, P < 0.0001), indicating greater depression burden. Respondents with T2DM, HTN, and obesity had significantly more resource utilization with respect to physician visits and emergency room visits but not hospitalizations than respondents with T2DM alone (P = 0.03). Conclusions. SHIELD respondents with comorbid conditions of T2DM, HTN, and obesity reported greater healthcare resource utilization, more depression symptoms, and lower quality of life than the T2DM-alone group. PMID:22762006

  7. Effect of aerobic training and aerobic and resistance training on the inflammatory status of hypertensive older adults.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandra G; Bonardi, José M T; Campos, Giulliard O; Bertani, Rodrigo F; Scher, Luria M L; Louzada-Junior, Paulo; Moriguti, Júlio C; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Lima, Nereida K C

    2015-08-01

    There is a relationship between high levels of inflammatory markers and low adhesion to the practice of physical activity in the older population. The objective of the present study was to compare the effect of two types of exercise programs, i.e., aerobic training and aerobic plus resistance training on the plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) of elderly hypertensive subjects. Hypertensive older volunteers in use of antihypertensive drugs were randomized to three groups: aerobic group (AG), resistance and aerobic group (RAG) and control group (CG). Training lasted 10 weeks, with sessions held three times a week. Blood samples were collected before training and 24 h after completion of the 30 sessions for the determination of serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels. Body mass index was obtained before and after 10 weeks. After intervention, BMI values were lower in AG and RAG compared to CG (p < 0.001), IL-6 was reduced in AG compared to CG (p = 0.04), and TNF-α levels were lower only in RAG compared to CG (p = 0.01). Concluding, both types of training were effective in reducing BMI values in hypertensive older subjects. Aerobic exercise produced the reduction of plasma IL-6 levels. However, the combination of aerobic and resistance exercise, which would be more indicated for the prevention of loss of functionality with aging, showed lower TNF-α mediator after training than control group and a greater fall of TNF-α levels associated to higher BMI reduction. PMID:25567682

  8. Ocular Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: J Kevin ...

  9. Spironolactone versus sympathetic renal denervation to treat true resistant hypertension: results from the DENERVHTA study – a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Oliveras, Anna; Armario, Pedro; Clarà, Albert; Sans-Atxer, Laia; Vázquez, Susana; Pascual, Julio; De la Sierra, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Both renal denervation (RDN) and spironolactone have been proposed for the treatment of resistant hypertension. However, they have not been compared in a randomized clinical trial. We aimed to compare the efficacy of spironolactone versus RDN in patients with resistant hypertension. Methods: A total of 24 patients with office SBP at least 150 mmHg and 24-h SBP at least 140 mmHg despite receiving at least three full-dose antihypertensive drugs, one a diuretic, but without aldosterone antagonists, were randomized to receive RDN or spironolactone (50 mg) as add-on therapy. Primary endpoint was change in 24-h SBP at 6 months. Comparisons between treatment groups were performed using generalized linear models adjusted by age, sex, and baseline values. Results: Spironolactone was more effective than RDN in reducing 24-h SBP and 24-h DBP: mean baseline-adjusted differences between the two groups were −17.9 mmHg (95%CI −30.9 to −4.9); P = 0.010 and −6.6 mmHg (95%CI −12.9 to −0.3); P = 0.041, for 24-h SBP and 24-h DBP, respectively. As regards changes in office blood pressure, mean baseline-adjusted differences between the two groups were −12.1 mmHg (95%CI −29.1 to 5.1); P = 0.158 and of −5.3 mmHg (95%CI −16.3 to 5.8); P = 0.332, for office SBP and office DBP, respectively. Otherwise, the decrease of estimated glomerular filtration rate was greater in the spironolactone group; mean baseline-adjusted difference between the two groups was −10.7 ml/min per 1.73 m2 (95%CI −20.1 to −1.4); P = 0.027. Conclusion: We conclude that spironolactone is more effective than RDN to reduce 24-h SBP and 24-h DBP in patients with resistant hypertension. Therefore, spironolactone should be the fourth antihypertensive drug to prescribe if deemed well tolerated’ in all patients with resistant hypertension before considering RDN. PMID:27327441

  10. Hypertension: empirical evidence and implications in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Makridakis, Spyros; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure (HBP) or hypertension (HTN) is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Despite this fact, there is widespread agreement that the treatment of HBP, over the last half century, has been a great achievement. However, after the release of the new Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure-8 (JNC-8) guidelines, there have been heated debates with regard to what are the most evidence-based blood pressure goals. While JNC-8 claims that the goal blood pressure for otherwise healthy patients with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140–159 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure ≥90–99 mm Hg) should be <140/90 mm Hg; a recent Cochrane meta-analysis is in direct conflict with these recommendations. Indeed, a 2012 Cochrane meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence that treating otherwise healthy mild hypertension patients with antihypertensive therapy will reduce CV events or mortality. Additionally, the Cochrane meta-analysis showed that antihypertensive therapy was associated with a significant increase in withdrawal due to adverse events. Thus, the current evidence in the literature does not support the goals set by the JNC-8 guidelines. In this review we discussed the strengths and limitations of both lines of evidence and why it takes an evidence-based medication to reduce CV events/mortality (eg, how a goal blood pressure is achieved is more important than getting to the goal). As medications inherently cause side effects and come at a cost to the patient, the practice of evidence-based medicine becomes exceedingly important. Although the majority of HTN studies claim great advantages by lowering HBP, this review finds severe conflicts in the findings among the various HTN studies, as well as serious epistemological, methodological and statistical problems that cast doubt to such claims. PMID:25332797

  11. Hypertension: empirical evidence and implications in 2014.

    PubMed

    Makridakis, Spyros; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2014-01-01

    High blood pressure (HBP) or hypertension (HTN) is one of the leading causes of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Despite this fact, there is widespread agreement that the treatment of HBP, over the last half century, has been a great achievement. However, after the release of the new Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure-8 (JNC-8) guidelines, there have been heated debates with regard to what are the most evidence-based blood pressure goals. While JNC-8 claims that the goal blood pressure for otherwise healthy patients with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure ≥140-159 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure ≥90-99 mm Hg) should be <140/90 mm Hg; a recent Cochrane meta-analysis is in direct conflict with these recommendations. Indeed, a 2012 Cochrane meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence that treating otherwise healthy mild hypertension patients with antihypertensive therapy will reduce CV events or mortality. Additionally, the Cochrane meta-analysis showed that antihypertensive therapy was associated with a significant increase in withdrawal due to adverse events. Thus, the current evidence in the literature does not support the goals set by the JNC-8 guidelines. In this review we discussed the strengths and limitations of both lines of evidence and why it takes an evidence-based medication to reduce CV events/mortality (eg, how a goal blood pressure is achieved is more important than getting to the goal). As medications inherently cause side effects and come at a cost to the patient, the practice of evidence-based medicine becomes exceedingly important. Although the majority of HTN studies claim great advantages by lowering HBP, this review finds severe conflicts in the findings among the various HTN studies, as well as serious epistemological, methodological and statistical problems that cast doubt to such claims. PMID:25332797

  12. Effects of established blood pressure loci on blood pressure values and hypertension risk in an Algerian population sample.

    PubMed

    Lardjam-Hetraf, S A; Mediene-Benchekor, S; Ouhaibi-Djellouli, H; Meroufel, D N; Boulenouar, H; Hermant, X; Hamani-Medjaoui, I; Saidi-Mehtar, N; Amouyel, P; Houti, L; Goumidi, L; Meirhaeghe, A

    2015-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies and subsequent replication studies have pinpointed 29 genetic variants associated with blood pressure (BP). None of these studies included North African populations. We therefore looked at whether or not these genetic variants modulated BP and hypertension (HTN) risk in an Algerian population sample. Twenty-nine single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in a representative sample of 787 subjects from the InSulino-résistance à ORan (ISOR) study (378 men and 409 women aged between 30 and 64 years and recruited from within the city of Oran, Algeria). Genetic variants were considered both individually and when combined as genetic predisposition scores (GPSs) for systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP) and HTN risk. The SNPs in CYP1A1-ULK3, HFE and SH2B3 were significantly associated with BP and/or HTN. The SBP-GPS, DBP-GPS and HTN-GPS were associated with higher levels of DBP (+0.24 mm Hg P=0.05, +0.23 mm Hg P = 0.05 and +0.26 mm Hg P = 0.03, respectively). Moreover, the three GPSs tended to be associated with a 6% higher risk of HTN. Our study is the first to show that some of the BP loci validated in subjects of European descent were associated (either individually or when combined as GPSs) with BP traits and/or the HTN risk in an Algerian population, but to a lesser extent than in European populations. Although larger studies and meta-analyses of North African populations are needed to confirm the present results, our data contribute to a better understanding of genetic susceptibility to HTN. PMID:25231511

  13. Hypoadiponectinemia and aldosterone excess are associated with lack of blood pressure control in subjects with resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Ana P C; Demacq, Caroline; Figueiredo, Valéria N; Moraes, Carolina H; Santos, Rodrigo C; Sabbatini, Andréa R; Barbaro, Natália R; Boer-Martins, Leandro; Fontana, Vanessa; Moreno, Heitor

    2013-12-01

    Obesity, arterial stiffness and high aldosterone levels can interact to cause resistant hypertension (RHTN). Lower adiponectin (APN) levels may be significantly associated with hypertension. However, the importance of hypoadiponectinemia as a complicating factor in the lack of blood pressure (BP) control in individuals with RHTN has not been demonstrated. Ninety-six RHTN patients were classified into uncontrolled (UCRHTN, n = 44) and controlled (CRHTN, n = 52) subgroups. Their APN and aldosterone levels, office and ambulatory BP (ABPM) measurements, endothelium-dependent brachial artery responses (flow-mediated dilation (FMD)), left ventricular mass index (LVMI) and pulse wave velocity (PWV) were evaluated. The UCRHTN subgroup had increased aldosterone levels, as well as higher LVMI and PWV. In addition, lower APN levels and impaired FMD response were found in this subgroup. The brachial and ABPM pulse pressures were inversely associated with the APN levels (r = -0.45, P = 0.002; r = -0.33, P = 0.03, respectively), as were the aldosterone levels and the PWV (r = -0.38, P = 0.01; r = -0.36, P = 0.02, respectively) in UCRHTN patients. The PWV was only significantly influenced by the APN level in the UCRHTN subgroup in the multivariate regression analysis. None of the correlations mentioned above were observed in the CRHTN subgroup. Hypoadiponectinemia and high aldosterone levels may therefore be implicated in resistance to antihypertensive therapy related to arterial stiffness. PMID:23966059

  14. Prevalence of Optimal Treatment Regimens in Patients with Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension Based on Office BP in a Community-Based Practice Network

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Brent M.; Zhao, Yumin; Li, Jiexiang; Brzezinski, W. Adam; Todoran, Thomas M.; Brook, Robert D.; Calhoun, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Hypertensive patients with clinic blood pressure (BP) uncontrolled on ≥3 antihypertensive medications, i.e., apparent treatment resistant hypertension (aTRH) comprise ~28%–30% of all uncontrolled patients in the U.S. However, the proportion receiving these medications in optimal doses is unknown; aTRH is used, since treatment adherence, BP measurement artifacts, and optimal therapy were not available in electronic record data from our >200 community-based clinics Outpatient QUuality Improvement Network (OQUIN). This study sought to define the proportion of uncontrolled hypertensives with aTRH on optimal regimens and clinical factors associated with optimal therapy. During 2007–2010, 468,877 hypertensive patients met inclusion criteria. BP <140/<90 defined control. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess variables independently associated with ‘optimal therapy’ (prescription of diuretic and ≥2 other BP medications at ≥50% of maximum recommended hypertension doses). Among 468,877 hypertensives, 147,635 (31.5%) were uncontrolled; among uncontrolled hypertensives, 44,684 were prescribed ≥3 BP medications (30.3%) of which 22,189 (15.0%) were prescribed ‘optimal’ therapy. Clinical factors independently associated with optimal BP therapy included black race (OR 1.40 [95% CI 1.32–1.49]), chronic kidney disease (1.31 [1.25–1.38]) diabetes (1.30 [1.24–1.37]), and coronary heart disease risk equivalent status (1.29 [1.14–1.46]). Clinicians more often prescribe optimal therapy for aTRH when cardiovascular risk is greater and treatment goals lower. Approximately one in seven of all uncontrolled hypertensives and one in two with uncontrolled aTRH are prescribed ≥3 BP medications in optimal regimens. Prescribing more optimal pharmacotherapy, for uncontrolled hypertensives including aTRH, confirmed with out-of-office BP, could improve hypertension control. PMID:23918752

  15. Prevalence of optimal treatment regimens in patients with apparent treatment-resistant hypertension based on office blood pressure in a community-based practice network.

    PubMed

    Egan, Brent M; Zhao, Yumin; Li, Jiexiang; Brzezinski, W Adam; Todoran, Thomas M; Brook, Robert D; Calhoun, David A

    2013-10-01

    Hypertensive patients with clinical blood pressure (BP) uncontrolled on ≥3 antihypertensive medications (ie, apparent treatment-resistant hypertension [aTRH]) comprise ≈28% to 30% of all uncontrolled patients in the United States. However, the proportion receiving these medications in optimal doses is unknown; aTRH is used because treatment adherence and measurement artifacts were not available in electronic record data from our >200 community-based clinics Outpatient Quality Improvement Network. This study sought to define the proportion of uncontrolled hypertensives with aTRH on optimal regimens and clinical factors associated with optimal therapy. During 2007-2010, 468 877 hypertensive patients met inclusion criteria. BP <140/<90 mm Hg defined control. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess variables independently associated with optimal therapy (prescription of diuretic and ≥2 other BP medications at ≥50% of maximum recommended hypertension doses). Among 468 877 hypertensives, 147 635 (31.5%) were uncontrolled; among uncontrolled hypertensives, 44 684 were prescribed ≥3 BP medications (30.3%), of whom 22 189 (15.0%) were prescribed optimal therapy. Clinical factors independently associated with optimal BP therapy included black race (odds ratio, 1.40 [95% confidence interval, 1.32-1.49]), chronic kidney disease (1.31 [1.25-1.38]), diabetes mellitus (1.30 [1.24-1.37]), and coronary heart disease risk equivalent status (1.29 [1.14-1.46]). Clinicians more often prescribe optimal therapy for aTRH when cardiovascular risk is greater and treatment goals lower. Approximately 1 in 7 of all uncontrolled hypertensives and 1 in 2 with uncontrolled aTRH are prescribed ≥3 BP medications in optimal regimens. Prescribing more optimal pharmacotherapy for uncontrolled hypertensives including aTRH, confirmed with out-of-office BP, could improve hypertension control. PMID:23918752

  16. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring: a useful tool to diagnose hypertension and supervise it's treatment.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, B; Dhungel, S; Pahari, S K

    2008-06-01

    Automatic ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for the diagnosis and treatment ofhypertension(HTN) is not common in Nepal. The purpose of this study is to evaluate various characteristics of hypertensive patients undergoing ABPM before starting antihypertensive treatment and evaluate the adequacy of the blood pressure (BP) control during antihypertensive treatment. ABPM was performed in 108 consecutive patients attending the hypertension clinic of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital from 1st March 2005 to 30th April 2007 with DynaPulse 5000A (version 3.20q ) for approximately 24 hours. Male female ratio was 59:49 and age (mean +/- SD) was 47.8 +/- 16.4 years. The maximum use of ABPM (25.9%) was noted in the age group of 40-49 years. Body mass index was 25.7 +/- 3.8. Diabetes was noted in 13% patients. Maximum use of ABPM was observed in Newar ethnic group (56.5%). ABPM was used for the diagnosis of HTN in 62.0% patients and for follow up in 38.0% patients. Severe HTN was seen in approximately half (47.2%) of the hypertensive patients. Majority of the patients (88.0%) had dipper type of HTN. Beta-blocker (35.6%), ACE inhibitor/Losartan (31.1%) and calcium channel antagonist (26.7%) were the usual antihypertensive agents used. Single antihypertensive agent was used in the majority of patients (64.1%). In a small number of patients (42, 38.9%) undergoing ABPM during antihypertensive therapy, the adequacy of control of HTN was very poor. PMID:18828435

  17. Longitudinal association of dairy consumption with the changes in blood pressure and the risk of incident hypertension: the Framingham Heart Study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We aimed to examine the longitudinal association of dairy consumption with the changes in blood pressure (BP) and the risk of incident hypertension (HTN) among adults. This study included 2636 Framingham Heart Study Offspring Cohort members who participated in the 5th through 8th examinations (1991-...

  18. Thrombospondin-1 null mice are resistant to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and objective Chronic hypoxia induces pulmonary hypertension in mice. Smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening characterize the vasculature of these animals. Thrombospondin-1 null (TSP-1-/-) mice spontaneously develop pulmonary smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and medial thickening. In addition, TSP-1 produced by the pulmonary endothelium inhibits pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell growth. Based on these observations we sought to describe the pulmonary vascular changes in TSP-1-/- mice exposed to chronic hypoxia. Methods We exposed TSP-1-/- and wild type (WT) mice to a fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) of 0.1 for up to six weeks. Pulmonary vascular remodeling was evaluated using tissue morphometrics. Additionally, right ventricle systolic pressures (RVSP) and right ventricular hypertrophy by right ventricle/left ventricle + septum ratios (RV/LV+S) were measured to evaluate pulmonary hypertensive changes. Finally, acute pulmonary vasoconstriction response in both TSP-1-/- and WT mice was evaluated by acute hypoxia and U-46619 (a prostaglandin F2 analog) response. Results In hypoxia, TSP-1-/- mice had significantly lower RVSP, RV/LV+S ratios and less pulmonary vascular remodeling when compared to WT mice. TSP-1-/- mice also had significantly lower RVSP in response to acute pulmonary vasoconstriction challenges than their WT counterparts. Conclusion TSP-1-/- mice had diminished pulmonary vasoconstriction response and were less responsive to hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension than their wild type counterparts. This observation suggests that TSP-1 could play an active role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension associated with hypoxia. PMID:20441584

  19. Renal resistive index and cardiovascular and renal outcomes in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Doi, Yohei; Iwashima, Yoshio; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Kamide, Kei; Hayashi, Shin-ichirou; Kubota, Yoshinori; Nakamura, Satoko; Horio, Takeshi; Kawano, Yuhei

    2012-09-01

    Increased renal restive index (RI) measured using Doppler ultrasonography has been shown to correlate with the degree of renal impairment in hypertensive patients. We investigated the prognostic role of RI in cardiovascular and renal outcomes. A total of 426 essential hypertensive subjects (mean age, 63 years; 50% female) with no previous cardiovascular disease were included in this study. Renal segmental arterial RI was measured by duplex Doppler ultrasonography. During follow-up (mean, 3.1 years), 57 participants developed the primary composite end points including cardiovascular and renal outcomes. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, RI was an independent predictor of worse outcome in total subjects (hazard ratio, 1.71 for 1 SD increase), as well as in patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) (hazard ratio, 2.11 for 1 SD increase; P<0.01, respectively). When divided into 4 groups based on the respective sex-specific median levels of RI in the eGFR ≥60 and eGFR <60 mL/min per 1.73 m(2) groups, the group with eGFR <60 and high RI (male ≥0.73, female ≥0.72) had a significantly poorer event-free survival rate (χ(2)=126.4; P<0.01), and the adjusted hazard ratio by multivariate Cox regression analysis was 9.58 (95% CI, 3.26-32.89; P<0.01). In conclusion, impairment of renal hemodynamics evaluated by increased RI is associated with an increased risk of primary composite end points, and the combination of high RI and low eGFR is a powerful predictor of these diseases in essential hypertension. In hypertensive patients with chronic kidney disease, RI evaluation may complement predictors of cardiovascular and renal outcomes. PMID:22824987

  20. Effect of eplerenone on the severity of obstructive sleep apnea and arterial stiffness in patients with resistant arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Krasińska, Beata; Miazga, Angelika; Cofta, Szczepan; Szczepaniak-Chicheł, Ludwina; Trafas, Tomasz; Krasiński, Zbigniew; Pawlaczyk-Gabriel, Katarzyna; Tykarski, Andrzej

    2016-05-27

    INTRODUCTION    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is considered to be one of the major causes of resistant arterial hypertension (RAH). Apnea episodes cause hypoxia, which triggers the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. This leads to water retention and swelling in the neck region, exacerbating OSA symptoms. It is assumed that the use of eplerenone may reduce the swelling and thus alleviate the severity of OSA. OBJECTIVES    We aimed to prospectively assess the impact of eplerenone on the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH. PATIENTS AND METHODS    The study included 31 patients with RAH and OSA. The exclusion criteria were as follows: secondary hypertension, myocardial infarction, stroke 6 months prior to the study, congestive heart failure, chronic kidney failure, alcohol or drug addiction, and active cancer. In all patients, the following tests were performed: blood pressure (BP) measurement (traditionally and using ambulatory BP measuring [ABPM]), applanation tonometry, polysomnography, and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) calculation. The tests were done before and after 3 months of eplerenone therapy. Patients received 50 mg of oral eplerenone daily, along with other hypertensive drugs. RESULTS    The mean age of participants was 57.76 ±6.16 years. After 3 months of eplerenone therapy, we observed a significant reduction in the AHI, neck circumference, BP, aortic pulse wave, and arterial wall stiffness. There were significant correlations between the AHI and mean BP measured by ABPM and between the AHI and arterial stiffness parameters. CONCLUSIONS    Our results provide evidence for the clinical significance of eplerenone, not only as an antihypertensive medication but also as a drug that may reduce the severity of OSA and arterial stiffness in patients with RAH and OSA. PMID:27230560

  1. Comparative effectiveness research in the “real” world: Lessons learned in a study of treatment-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Laken, Marilyn A.; Dawson, Rosalind; Engelman, Otis; Lovelace, Oscar; Way, Charles; Egan, Brent M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Comparative effectiveness research (CER) is vital to translate new efficacious diagnostic and therapeutic approaches into effectiveness in usual clinical practice settings. Studying the practice environment in which effectiveness protocols are implemented is necessary to identify the complex challenges that can limit translation of evidence. These issues were addressed in our NHLBI-funded R34, “Controlling Blood Pressure in Treatment-Resistant Hypertension (TRH): A Pilot Study”. Methods Qualitative methods were used in this cluster (clinic)-randomized, 4-arm pilot study of TRH in 8 diverse, community-based practices including: (i) Focus group discussions with practice staff and physicians (ii) conference calls with physicians (iii) discussions with research coordinators. Sources were summarized and analyzed by content analysis. Results Data segregated into categories representing facilitators of and barriers to research. Key facilitators included: (i) early success in controlling challenging TRH patients (ii), and (iii) reimbursement for study time and expenses. Barriers included: (i) time-consuming regulatory requirements (ii) limited training and research experience of some study coordinators and (iii) reluctance of some physicians to refer to Hypertension Specialists. Conclusions Qualitative assessment is valuable for identifying facilitators and barriers to CER. This information is important in designing and implementing CER to accelerate translation of clinical efficacy into effectiveness. PMID:23321408

  2. [Portopulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Halank, M; Miehlke, S; Kolditz, M; Hoeffken, G

    2005-07-01

    Patients with portal hypertension may develop pulmonary complications such as hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) or portopulmonary hypertension (PPHT). PPHT is defined as elevated pulmonary pressure, elevated pulmonary vascular resistance, a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure, and portal hypertension in the absence of other known causes pulmonary hypertension. Various factors such as hyperdynamic circulation, volume overload, and circulating vasoactive mediators are suspected to be involved in the pathogenesis of PPHT. The prognosis of patients with severe PPHT is significantly reduced due to the risk of right heart failure. In patients with moderate to severe PPHT liver transplantation is associated with a significantly increased mortality. The chief symptom of PPHT may be dyspnoe in the presence of typical histomorphological alterations comparable with idiopathic pulmonary hypertension. Continuous intravenous application of prostacyclin is currently regarded as the treatment of choice for patients with severe PPHT. Inhaled prostacyclin or its analogue iloprost or oral treatment with the endothelin-receptor antagonist bosentan may be promising alternatives which should be further investigated in randomized controlled trials. PMID:16001350

  3. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Michael S.; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60–100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  4. Potassium Intake, Bioavailability, Hypertension, and Glucose Control.

    PubMed

    Stone, Michael S; Martyn, Lisa; Weaver, Connie M

    2016-01-01

    Potassium is an essential nutrient. It is the most abundant cation in intracellular fluid where it plays a key role in maintaining cell function. The gradient of potassium across the cell membrane determines cellular membrane potential, which is maintained in large part by the ubiquitous ion channel the sodium-potassium (Na+-K+) ATPase pump. Approximately 90% of potassium consumed (60-100 mEq) is lost in the urine, with the other 10% excreted in the stool, and a very small amount lost in sweat. Little is known about the bioavailability of potassium, especially from dietary sources. Less is understood on how bioavailability may affect health outcomes. Hypertension (HTN) is the leading cause of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and a major financial burden ($50.6 billion) to the US public health system, and has a significant impact on all-cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. The relationship between increased potassium supplementation and a decrease in HTN is relatively well understood, but the effect of increased potassium intake from dietary sources on blood pressure overall is less clear. In addition, treatment options for hypertensive individuals (e.g., thiazide diuretics) may further compound chronic disease risk via impairments in potassium utilization and glucose control. Understanding potassium bioavailability from various sources may help to reveal how specific compounds and tissues influence potassium movement, and further the understanding of its role in health. PMID:27455317

  5. Differential effects of age on large artery stiffness and minimal vascular resistance in normotensive and mildly hypertensive individuals.

    PubMed

    Svendsen, Morten B; Khatir, Dinah S; Peters, Christian D; Christensen, Kent L; Buus, Niels H

    2015-09-01

    Large artery stiffness and small artery structural changes are both cardiovascular risk factors. Arterial stiffness increases with age and blood pressure (BP), but it is unclear in which way large artery pulse wave velocity (PWV) and peripheral vascular resistance are related and whether age has any influence. In a cross-sectional study, PWV and forearm minimum vascular resistance (Rmin ) was compared with emphasis on the impact of age. Normotensive (n = 53) and untreated hypertensive (n = 23) subjects were included based on 24-h BP measurements. Age ranged from 21 to 79 years with an even distribution from each age decade. PWV was assessed using tonometry. Forearm Rmin was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography at maximal vasodilatation induced by 10 min of ischaemia in combination with skin heating and hand grip exercise. In both normotensive and hypertensive subjects, PWV correlated significantly with age and BP. Based on median age, both groups were assigned into two equally large subgroups. Normotensive older (66 ± 7 years) and younger (35 ± 10 years) persons had different carotid-femoral PWV (7.9 ± 1.8 versus 5.7 ± 0.9 m/s, P<0.01), but similar Rmin values (3.7 ± 0.9 versus 3.6 ± 1.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml). Hypertensive older (63 ± 6 years) and younger (40 ± 10 years) also had different PWV (8.0 ± 1.5 versus 6.7 ± 1.1 m/s, P<0.05), but the older had lower Rmin (3.1 ± 0.8 versus 4.7 ± 2.2 mmHg/ml/min/100 ml, P<0.05). In a regression analysis adjusting for age, BP, gender and heart rate, no correlation was seen between PWV and Rmin . The data suggest that age differentially affects PWV and Rmin and that BP can increase in older persons without affecting Rmin . PMID:24863666

  6. IMPACT OF A SERIOUS GAME FOR HEALTH ON CHRONIC DISEASE SELF-MANAGEMENT: PRELIMINARY EFFICACY AMONG COMMUNITY DWELLING ADULTS WITH HYPERTENSION.

    PubMed

    Hickman, Ronald L; Clochesy, John M; Pinto, Melissa D; Burant, Christopher; Pignatiello, Grant

    2015-01-01

    Most Americans will acquire a chronic disease during their lifetime. One of the most prevalent chronic diseases that affect Americans is hypertension (HTN). Despite the known comorbidities and increased mortality rate associated with uncontrolled HTN, most community dwelling adults with HTN do not have sufficient blood pressure control Therefore, the aim of this article is to report the preliminary efficacy of a serious game for health to enhance blood pressure control among community dwelling adults with HTN. A nonprobability sample of 116 community dwelling adults with HTN participated in this nonblinded, randomized controlled trial. Participants were randomly assigned to: (1) an intervention arm that consisted of four exposures to a serious game for health known as eSMART-HD; or (2) an attentional control arm that compromised of four exposures to screen-based HTN education. The primary outcome measure for this trial was blood pressure reduction over a four month observational period. In this study, baseline characteristics and blood pressure measurements were similar between participants in each study arm. There was no significant between-group difference in blood pressure reduction over time. However, there were significant within-group reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures across time among favoring participants exposed to eSMART-HD. This study establishes the preliminary efficacy of eSMART-HD that can be easily administered to community dwelling adults and facilitate clinically significant reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Future studies should assess the influential components of this promising serious game for health (eSMART-HD) combined with medication management in larger and more diverse samples of community dwelling adults with HTN. PMID:26442364

  7. The Acute Effect of Resistance Exercise with Blood Flow Restriction with Hemodynamic Variables on Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Joamira P.; Silva, Eliney D.; Silva, Julio C. G.; Souza, Thiago S. P.; Lima, Eloíse O.; Guerra, Ialuska; Sousa, Maria S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and the heart rate (HR) before, during and after training at moderate intensity (MI, 50%-1RM) and at low intensity with blood flow restriction (LIBFR). In a randomized controlled trial study, 14 subjects (average age 45±9,9 years) performed one of the exercise protocols during two separate visits to the laboratory. SBP, DBP and HR measurements were collected prior to the start of the set and 15, 30, 45 and 60 minutes after knee extension exercises. Repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to identify significant variables (2 × 5; group × time). The results demonstrated a significant reduction in SBP in the LIBFR group. These results provide evidence that strength training performed acutely alters hemodynamic variables. However, training with blood flow restriction is more efficient in reducing blood pressure in hypertensive individuals than training with moderate intensity. PMID:25713647

  8. Single-pill triple-combination therapy: an alternative to multiple-drug treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chrysant, Steven G

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension (HTN) affects an estimated 76.4 million US adults. Despite improvements in blood pressure (BP) control rates and the availability of effective antihypertensive agents, only 50% of these individuals achieve BP control. It is now recognized that many patients will require ≥ 2 antihypertensive agents to achieve BP control. Both the current US and reappraisal of the 2007 European guidelines include dual-combination regimens among recommended treatments for initial HTN therapy. For patients requiring 3 drugs, the combination of agents with complementary mechanisms of action (ie, renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blocker, calcium channel blocker, and diuretic) has been recognized as rational and effective. Three single-pill triple-drug combinations have recently been approved for use in HTN in the United States: valsartan (VAL)/amlodipine (AML)/hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ); olmesartan medoxomil (OM)/AML/HCTZ; and aliskiren (ALI)/VAL/HCTZ. Triple-combination regimens have resulted in a greater proportion of patients achieving BP control compared with dual-combination regimens, with significantly lower BP levels documented after only 2 weeks at maximum doses. Single-pill combinations offer convenience to address barriers to BP control such as poor adherence to therapy and therapeutic inertia. Additional benefits of combining antihypertensive agents from different classes include improved efficacy, safety, and reduction of cardiovascular risk. In patients with essential HTN for whom dual therapy is inadequate, single-pill triple-drug therapy can offer a simplified and effective treatment strategy. PMID:22104451

  9. The Role of Hypertension in Race-Ethnic Disparities in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Balfour, Pelbreton C.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.

    2015-01-01

    Race-ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) have persisted in the USA over the past few decades. Hypertension (HTN) is a significant contributor to CVD, including coronary heart disease, stroke, end-stage kidney disease and overall mortality and race-ethnic disparities in longevity. Additionally, both non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) and Hispanic adults have been known to have higher prevalence of poorly controlled blood pressure compared to non-Hispanic whites (NHWs). Addressing these disparities has been a focus of programs such as the Million Hearts initiative. This review will provide an update of available data on HTN in various race-ethnic groups, including awareness, treatment, and control and note the recent progress in HTN control across all race/ethnic groups. We will also discuss the recent 2014 U.S. HTN guideline that has led to debate regarding the potential impact of BP goals in older persons on worsening CVD disparities, with disproportionate effects on women and NHBs. PMID:26401192

  10. Inadequate Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Patients Referred for Cardiac Stress Test.

    PubMed

    Mousa, Tarek M; Akinseye, Oluwaseun A; Kerwin, Todd C

    2015-09-01

    The current study examined the degree of blood pressure (BP) control and incidence of myocardial ischemia in hypertensive patients (n=2039) referred for cardiac stress test. Patients were categorized into well-controlled (<140/90 mm Hg), poorly controlled (140-160/90-100 mm Hg), and very poorly controlled (>160/100 mm Hg) groups according to their resting BP. The mean age[±standard error of the mean] of the patients was 68±13 years, and 885 (43.4%) were men. The prevalence of well-controlled hypertension (HTN) was 47.2%, poorly controlled HTN was 29.5%, and very poorly controlled HTN was 23.3%. Evidence of ischemia was seen in 19.8% and 19.3% of the well-controlled and poorly controlled groups, respectively. The very poorly controlled group had the lowest incidence of ischemia (14.3%) (P<.05) compared with the other two groups. Symptoms that mimic ischemic heart disease in hypertensive patients may be partly explained by poorly controlled BP. Quality of care might be improved by optimally controlling BP in patients with angina symptoms prior to ordering diagnostic testing associated with radiation exposure and cost. PMID:26011137

  11. Retrospective morphometric study of the suitability of renal arteries for renal denervation according to the Symplicity HTN2 trial criteria

    PubMed Central

    Schönherr, Elisabeth; Rehwald, Rafael; Nasseri, Parinaz; Luger, Anna K; Grams, Astrid E; Kerschbaum, Julia; Rehder, Peter; Petersen, Johannes; Glodny, Bernhard

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to describe the renal arteries of humans in vivo, as precisely as possible, and to formulate an expected value for the exclusion of renal denervation due to the anatomical situation based on the criteria of the Symplicity HTN trials. Design and setting In a retrospective cohort study, the renal arteries of 126 patients (57 women, 69 men, mean age 60±17.2 years (CI 57.7 to 63.6)) were segmented semiautomatically from high-contrast CT angiographies. Results Among the 300 renal arteries, there were three arteries with fibromuscular dysplasia and one with ostial renal artery stenosis. The first left renal artery was shorter than the right (34±11.4 mm (CI 32 to 36) vs 45.9±15 mm (CI 43.2 to 48.6); p<0.0001), but had a slightly larger diameter (5.2±1.4 mm (CI 4.9 to 5.4) vs 4.9±1.2 mm (CI 4.6 to 5.1); p>0.05). The first left renal arteries were 1.1±0.4 mm (CI 0.9 to 1.3), and the first right renal arteries were 0.3±0.6 mm (CI 0.1 to 0.5) thinner in women than in men (p<0.05). Ostial funnels were up to 14 mm long. The cross-sections were elliptical, more pronounced on the right side (p<0.05). In 23 cases (18.3%), the main artery was shorter than 2 cm; in 43 cases (34.1%), the diameter was not >4 mm. Some 46% of the patients, or 58.7% when variants and diseases were taken into consideration, were theoretically not suitable for denervation. Conclusions Based on these precise measurements, the anatomical situation as a reason for ruling out denervation appears to be significantly more common than previously suspected. Since this can be the cause of the failure of treatment in some cases, further development of catheters or direct percutaneous approaches may improve success rates. PMID:26729385

  12. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Iftikhar, Imran H.; Valentine, Christopher W.; Bittencourt, Lia R.A.; Cohen, Debbie L.; Fedson, Annette C.; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Penzel, Thomas; Phillips, Craig L.; Yu-sheng, Lin; Pack, Allan I.; Magalang, Ulysses J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To systematically analyze the studies that have examined the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressure (BP) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods Design – meta-analysis of observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) indexed in PubMed and Ovid (All Journals@Ovid). participants: individuals with resistant hypertension and OSA; interventions – CPAP treatment. Results A total of six studies met the inclusion criteria for preintervention to postintervention analyses. The pooled estimates of mean changes after CPAP treatment for the ambulatory (24-h) SBP and DBP from six studies were −7.21 mmHg [95% confidence interval (CI): −9.04 to −5.38; P <0.001; I2 58%) and −4.99 mmHg (95% CI: −6.01 to −3.96; P <0.001; I2 31%), respectively. The pooled estimate of the ambulatory SBP and DBP from the four RCTs showed a mean net change of −6.74 mmHg [95% CI: −9.98 to −3.49; P <0.001; I2 61%] and −5.94 mmHg (95% CI: −9.40 to −2.47; P =0.001; I2 76%), respectively, in favor of the CPAP group. Conclusion The pooled estimate shows a favorable reduction of BP with CPAP treatment in patients with resistant hypertension and OSA. The effects sizes are larger than those previously reported in patients with OSA without resistant hypertension. PMID:25243523

  13. Diagnosis of Clinically Significant Portal Hypertension in Patients with Cirrhosis: Splenic Arterial Resistive Index versus Liver Stiffness Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chul-Min; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lim, Sanghyeok; Kim, Yongsoo; Kim, Jinoo; Kim, Tae Yeob; Sohn, Joo Hyun

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the present study is to compare the diagnostic accuracy of the splenic arterial resistive index (SARI) with that of liver stiffness measurement (LSM) for identifying patients with clinically significant portal hypertension (CSPH). We included 47 patients (M:F = 37:10) who underwent Doppler ultrasonography, LSM and hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) on the same day. We investigated whether the SARI and LSM were correlated with the HVPG, and compared area under the curve (AUC) values for the abilities of SARI and LSM to diagnose CSPH. We also performed a sub-group analysis. The SARI and LSM were all moderately correlated with HVPG overall in patients. The AUC of SARI and LSM were 0.873 and 0.745, respectively. In patients without splenomegaly, SARI was strongly correlated with HVPG (r = 0.830), but LSM was moderately correlated with HVPG (r = 0.601). The AUC was also higher for SARI than for LSM. Therefore, SARI is potentially an excellent non-invasive measurement method for diagnosing CSPH, especially those without splenomegaly. PMID:27045219

  14. Role of heme oxygenase in modulating endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Porteri, Enzo; Rodella, Luigi F; Rezzani, Rita; Rizzoni, Damiano; Paiardi, Silvia; de Ciuceis, Carolina; Boari, Gianluca E M; Foglio, Eleonora; Favero, Gaia; Rizzardi, Nicola; Platto, Caterina; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico

    2009-10-01

    It has been proposed that endothelial dysfunction is due to the excessive degradation of nitric oxide (NO) by oxidative stress. The enzyme heme-oxygenase (HO) seems to exert a protective effect on oxidative stress in the vasculature, both in animal models and in humans. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of inhibition or activation of HO on endothelial function in mesenteric small resistance arteries of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Six SHR were treated with cobalt protoporphyrin IX 50 mg/Kg (CoPP), an activator of HO; six SHR with stannous mesoporphyrin 30 mg/Kg (SnMP), an inhibitor of HO, and six SHR with saline. As controls, six Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were treated with CoPP, six WKY with SnMP, and six WKY with saline. Drugs were injected in the peritoneum once a week for 2 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was measured (tail cuff method) before and after treatment. Mesenteric small resistance arteries were mounted on a micromyograph. Endothelial function was evaluated as a cumulative concentration-response curve to acetylcholine (ACH), before and after preincubation with N(G)-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA, inhibitor of NO synthase), and to bradykinin (BK). In SHR treatment with CoPP, improved ACH-and BK-induced vasodilatation (ANOVA p < 0.001) and this improvement was abolished by L-NMMA (ANOVA p < 0.001). SnMP was devoid of effects on endothelial function. In WKY, both activation and inhibition of HO did not substantially affect endothelium-mediated vasodilatation. The stimulation of HO seems to induce an improvement of endothelial dysfunction in SHR by possibly reducing oxidative stress and increasing NO availability. PMID:19886854

  15. Renal sympathetic denervation: effect on ambulatory blood pressure and blood pressure variability in patients with treatment-resistant hypertension. The ReShape CV-risk study.

    PubMed

    Miroslawska, A; Solbu, M; Skjølsvik, E; Toft, I; Steigen, T K

    2016-03-01

    Renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) represents a potential treatment option for highly selected patients with resistant arterial hypertension. In this open label study, we aimed to investigate the response of blood pressure (BP) and short-term BP variability (BPV) to RDN 6 months after procedure. We defined treatment-resistant hypertension as office systolic BP>140 mm Hg, despite maximum tolerated doses of ⩾4 antihypertensive drugs, including a diuretic. In addition, daytime systolic ambulatory blood pressure (ABPM) >135 mm Hg was required after witnessed intake of antihypertensive drugs. Bilateral RDN was performed with the Symplicity Catheter System (n=23). The mean systolic office BP and ABPM fell from 162±20 mm Hg to 139±19 mm Hg (P<0.001) and from 154±20 mm Hg to 144±16 mm Hg (P<0.038), respectively. In addition, we observed a significant reduction in diastolic office BP and ABPM. The current study also demonstrated a significant decrease of both systolic and diastolic average real variability, weighted standard deviation (s.d.) as well as conventional s.d. of mean and daytime BP, but not of s.d. of nighttime BP. RDN after witnessed intake of ⩾4 antihypertensive drugs reduced both office BP and ABPM at 6 months in patients with truly resistant hypertension. Also BPV improved, possibly reflecting an additional effect from intervening on the sympathetic nerve system. PMID:26134621

  16. Prevalence of Hypertension in HIV/AIDS Patients on Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) Compared with HAART-Naïve Patients at the Limbe Regional Hospital, Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Dimala, Christian Akem; Atashili, Julius; Mbuagbaw, Josephine C.; Wilfred, Akam; Monekosso, Gottlieb L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has greatly reduced the morbidity and mortality of HIV/AIDS patients but has also been associated with increased metabolic complications and cardiovascular diseases. Data on the association between HAART and hypertension (HTN) in Africa are scarce. Objectives Primarily to compare the prevalence of HTN in HIV/AIDS patients on HAART and HAART-naïve patients in Limbe, Cameroon; and secondarily to assess other socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with HTN in this population. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Limbe Regional Hospital HIV treatment center between April and June 2013, involving 200 HIV/AIDS patients (100 on first-line HAART regimens for at least 12 months matched by age and sex to 100 HAART-naïve patients). HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure (BP) ≥ 140 mmHg and/or diastolic BP ≥ 90 mmHg. Results The prevalence of HTN in patients on HAART was twice (38%; 95% CI: 28.5–48.3) that of the HAART-naïve patients (19%; 95% CI, 11.8–28.1), p = 0.003. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, smoking, family history of HTN, and BMI-defined overweight, HAART was associated with HTN, the adjusted odds ratio of the HAART-treated versus HAART-naïve group was 2.20 (95% CI: 1.07–4.52), p = 0.032. HTN was associated with older age and male gender, in the HAART group and with BMI-defined overweight in the HAART-naïve group. Conclusion The prevalence of hypertension in HIV/AIDS patients in Limbe stands out to be elevated, higher in patients on HAART compared to those not on treatment. Blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors should be routinely monitored. Other factors such as diet, weight control and physical exercise should also be considered. PMID:26862763

  17. Association of Renal Resistive Index, Renal Pulsatility Index, Systemic Hypertension, and Albuminuria with Survival in Dogs with Pituitary-Dependent Hyperadrenocorticism

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hung-Yin; Lien, Yu-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    An increased renal resistive index (RI) and albuminuria are markers of target organ damage secondary to systemic hypertension. This study evaluated associations between systemic blood pressure (SBP), renal RI, pulsatility index (PI), and albuminuria in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH). Predictors of overall mortality were investigated. Twenty client-owned dogs with PDH and 20 clinically healthy client-owned dogs as matched controls were included. Incidence rates of systemic hypertension (SBP ≥ 160 mmHg), albuminuria, and increased renal RI (≥ 0.70) and PI (≥ 1.45) in the control group were 5%, 0%, 5%, and 0%, respectively, compared to 35%, 40%, 50%, and 35%, respectively, in the PDH group (P = 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P = 0.001, resp.). No association between systemic hypertension, renal RI, renal PI, and albuminuria was observed. PDH was the only predictor of albuminuria and increased renal RI. Survival was not affected by increased renal PI, systemic hypertension, or albuminuria. Increased renal RI (≥ 0.70) was the only predictor of overall mortality in dogs with PDH. PMID:27340403

  18. [Secondary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  19. Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chronic Hepatitis C Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD NOTE: This is ... Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension Portal hypertension is abnormally high blood pressure in ...

  20. Ferulic acid, a natural polyphenol, alleviates insulin resistance and hypertension in fructose fed rats: Effect on endothelial-dependent relaxation.

    PubMed

    El-Bassossy, Hany; Badawy, Dina; Neamatallah, Thikryat; Fahmy, Ahmed

    2016-07-25

    Ferulic acid (FER) is a polyphenolic compound contained in various types of fruits. It has a substantial therapeutic effect inhibitory activity against aldose reductase (AR) inhibition. In this study, we examined the effect of FER on fructose-fed rats in comparison to a standard AR inhibitor, zopolrestat (ZOP). We determined the protective role of FER against metabolic syndrome by examining serum insulin/Glucose levels, triglycerides (TGs), cholesterol and advanced glycation end product (AGE) in rats supplied with 10% fructose drinking water. In addition, blood pressure, vascular reactivity of isolated thoracic aortas and acetylcholine-induced NO were all evaluated to estimate the cardiovascular complications of metabolic syndrome (MetS) associated with fructose feeding. Animals were randomly divided into four groups: control, (+10% fructose, Fru), zopolrestat-treated fructose fed (Fru-zop) and ferulic acid-treated fructose fed rats (Fru-Fer). After 12 weeks of FER treatment, we found significant reduction in both hyperinsulinemia and elevated diastolic blood pressure associated with fructose-fed to levels comparable to those achieved with ZOP. Both FER and ZOP significantly augmented the impaired relaxation associated with fructose-fed, whereas neither showed any significant effect on the developed vasoconstriction. Isolated aortas from fructose-fed rats incubated with either FER or ZOP, reinstated normal relaxation response to acetylcholine (ACh). Furthermore, isolated aortas showed attenuated nitric oxide (NO) production following the addition of (ACh), while both FER and ZOP restored normal induction of NO. Taken together, the current study shows that, FER alleviated insulin resistance and hypertension associated with metabolic syndrome compared to the standard AR inhibitor (ZOP). This potential protective effect is at least mediated by restoring endothelial relaxation. PMID:27287418

  1. Socio-Economic Status of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes and Hypertension Attending the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, North-West Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okoduwa, Stanley Irobekhian Reuben; Umar, Ismaila Alhaji; Ibrahim, Sani; Bello, Fatima; Ndidi, Uche Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) and Type 2 diabetes (T2D) are lifestyle interrelated diseases of global significance. Interestingly, the prevalence of these diseases in Africa and indeed Nigeria seems to be on the increase. This study, therefore, investigated the socioeconomic status (based on income, education and occupational activity) of 400 subjects (52% female and 48% male) aged 20 years and above who were sampled randomly among the newly diagnosed HTN and/or T2D cases at the Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria, North-West Nigeria. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect information from the subjects. From the result obtained, most of the respondents who live in towns or city suffer from either HTN or T2D while more town dwellers (28%) suffer from a combination of both diseases. It was also discovered that most respondents who suffer from HTN and from a combination of HTN and T2D belong to the old generation (60-79 years). There is higher prevalence rate of diabetes among the respondents who had no formal education or attended only basic Arabic schools. Most respondents who earn good income (₦50,000-₦100,000 and above ₦100,000) suffer HTN, T2D and a combination of both diseases. Those engaged in heavy occupational activities had the lowest prevalence of the disease compared with those of light or moderate occupational activities. These data will be found useful in planning intervention healthcare preventive programs especially on public enlightenment workshops and seminars to educate the populace on the importance of lifestyle modification, healthy diet and regular exercises. PMID:25560354

  2. Using a Web-Based Approach to Assess Test-Retest Reliability of the "Hypertension Self-Care Profile" Tool in an Asian Population: A Validation Study.

    PubMed

    Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Lua, Yi Hui Adela; Hong, Liyue; Bong, Huey Shin Shirley; Yeo, Ling Sui Jocelyn; Tsang, Li Ping Marianne; Ong, Kai Zhi; Wong, Sook Wai Samantha; Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2016-03-01

    Essential hypertension often requires affected patients to self-manage their condition most of the time. Besides seeking regular medical review of their life-long condition to detect vascular complications, patients have to maintain healthy lifestyles in between physician consultations via diet and physical activity, and to take their medications according to their prescriptions. Their self-management ability is influenced by their self-efficacy capacity, which can be assessed using questionnaire-based tools. The "Hypertension Self-Care Profile" (HTN-SCP) is 1 such questionnaire assessing self-efficacy in the domains of "behavior," "motivation," and "self-efficacy." This study aims to determine the test-retest reliability of HTN-SCP in an English-literate Asian population using a web-based approach. Multiethnic Asian patients, aged 40 years and older, with essential hypertension were recruited from a typical public primary care clinic in Singapore. The investigators guided the patients to fill up the web-based 60-item HTN-SCP in English using a tablet or smartphone on the first visit and refilled the instrument 2 weeks later in the retest. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were evaluated using Cronbach's Alpha and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), respectively. The t test was used to determine the relationship between the overall HTN-SCP scores of the patients and their self-reported self-management activities. A total of 160 patients completed the HTN-SCP during the initial test, from which 71 test-retest responses were completed. No floor or ceiling effect was found for the scores for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's Alpha coefficients were 0.857, 0.948, and 0.931 for "behavior," "motivation," and "self-efficacy" domains respectively, indicating high internal consistency. The item-total correlation ranges for the 3 scales were from 0.105 to 0.656 for Behavior, 0.401 to 0.808 for Motivation, 0.349 to 0.789 for Self-efficacy. The corresponding

  3. Evaluation and Treatment of Essential Hypertension During Short Duration Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossum, Alfred C.; Baisden, Dennis L.

    2000-01-01

    During the last four decades of manned space flight, two individuals have successfully flown in space with the preflight diagnosis of essential hypertension (HTN). Treatment of this disease process in the astronaut population warrants special consideration particularly when selecting medication for a mission. A retrospective review of data offers two different clinical scenarios involving the treatment, or lack thereof, for essential hypertension during space flight. Case I; A Caucasian quinquagenerian diagnosed with HTN one year prior to the mission obtained flight certification after a negative diagnostic workup. The patient was placed on a diuretic. Preflight isolated blood pressure (BP) measurements averaged 138/102. Inflight, the patient electively declined medication. A 36-hour BP monitor revealed an average value of 124/87. Postflight, BP measurements returned to preflight BP values. Case II: A Caucasian quatrogenerian diagnosed with HTN 6 months prior to launch completed flight training after a negative diagnostic workup. The patient was placed on an ACE inhibiter. Preflight BP measurements averaged 130/80. Inflight, isolated BP measurements were considerably less. Normotensive values were obtained postflight. In both cases, BP values inflight were lower than pre or postflight values. Yelle et al has confirmed similar findings in the normotensive astronaut population. Spaceflight may result in fluid shifting, mild dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, orthostatic hypotension, and increased heart rates. Based on these factors, certain classes of antihypertensive agents such as vasodilators, beta-blockers, and diuretics are excluded from consideration as a primary therapeutic modality. To date, Ace Inhibitors are viewed as the more acceptable drug of choice during spaceflight. Newer classes of drugs may also provide additional choices. Presently, astronauts developing uncomplicated HTN may continue their careers when treated with the appropriate class of

  4. UHPLC-MS/MS method with protein precipitation extraction for the simultaneous quantification of ten antihypertensive drugs in human plasma from resistant hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    De Nicolò, Amedeo; Avataneo, Valeria; Rabbia, Franco; Bonifacio, Gabriele; Cusato, Jessica; Tomasello, Cristina; Perlo, Elisa; Mulatero, Paolo; Veglio, Franco; Di Perri, Giovanni; D'Avolio, Antonio

    2016-09-10

    Today the management of resistant hypertension is a critical health problem: the main difficulty on this field is the discrimination of cases of poor therapeutic adherence from cases of real resistance. This gives rise to the need of high throughput and reliable quantification methods for the Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of antihypertensive drugs. The aim of this work was the development and validation of a UHPLC-Tandem mass spectrometry assay for this application and its use in plasma from patients with resistant hypertension. The novelty of this method resides in the ability to simultaneously quantify a wide panel of antihypertensive drugs: amlodipine, atenolol, clonidine, chlortalidone, doxazosin, hydrochlorothiazide, nifedipine, olmesartan, ramipril and telmisartan. Moreover, this method stands out for its simplicity and cheapness, resulting feasible for clinical routine. Both standards and quality controls were prepared in human plasma. After the addition of internal standard, each sample underwent protein precipitation with acetonitrile and was then dried. Extracts were resuspended in water:acetonitrile 90:10 (0.05% formic acid) and then injected into the chromatographic system. Chromatographic separation was performed on an Acquity(®) UPLC HSS T3 1.8μm 2.1×150mm column, with a gradient of water and acetonitrile, both added with 0.05% formic acid. Accuracy, intra-day and inter-day precision fitted FDA guidelines for all analytes, while matrix effects and recoveries resulted stable between samples for each analyte. Finally, we tested this method by monitoring plasma concentrations in 22 hypertensive patients with good results. This simple analytical method could represent a useful tool for the management of antihypertensive therapy. PMID:27497654

  5. Gastrointestinal Intervention Ameliorates High Blood Pressure Through Antagonizing Overdrive of the Sympathetic Nerve in Hypertensive Patients and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hexuan; Pu, Yunfei; Chen, Jing; Tong, Weidong; Cui, Yuanting; Sun, Fang; Zheng, Zhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Tao; Meng, Changyuan; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the hypothesis that the favorable effects of gastrointestinal (GI) intervention on hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular (CV) disturbances are mediated by antagonizing overdrive of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Methods and Results Hypertensive patients with metabolic disturbances underwent laparoscopic Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass surgery, and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) underwent RYGB or sham surgery. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), endothelium‐dependent flow‐mediated dilation, and anthropometric as well as laboratory parameters were measured at baseline and during follow‐up. Changes of BP and HR in response to cold stress, renal sympathetic nervous activity (RSNA), vasoconstriction induced by electrical field stimulation, microinjection of nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and CV function and structure were examined in SHRs with or without surgery. Compared with baseline, BP and HR were significantly reduced in both hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and rats. Impaired endothelial‐dependent vasodilatation and metabolic disturbances in hypertensive patients were also ameliorated after surgery. CV disturbances were reversed by surgery in SHRs. Under acute cold exposure, the variations in BP and HR were smaller in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHRs. RSNA and vasoconstriction induced by perivascular nerve stimulation as well as NTS‐mediated changes of BP were decreased in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHR. Weight loss did not affect BP and RSNA in sham SHRs. Conclusions GI intervention ameliorates HTN in both hypertensive patients and rats by inhibiting overdrive of the SNS. Therefore, targeting gastrointestine could be a novel strategy to treat HTN with metabolic disturbances. PMID:25240055

  6. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  7. A Young Lady with Hypertension - Rare Presentation of a Common Disease.

    PubMed

    Rafi Ud Din; Qadir, Abdul

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension is a common finding in patients with renal impairment but it is frequently difficult to establish if one feature is the cause or the effect of the other. Even rarer is the identification of an underlying cause for hypertension or renal failure in such patients. We present a case of hypertension in a young lady as part of nephritic syndrome due to HCV associated essential mixed cryoglobulinemia. She presented with difficult to control hypertension and deranged renal functions. On detailed evaluation, she was found to have nephritic syndrome as part of essential mixed cryoglobulinemia. She tested positive for HCV RNA and underwent treatment with combination of standard interferon and ribavirin. All her symptoms were relieved with this treatment, HTN subsided and renal function tests returned to normal values. Her HCV RNA was negative at the end of treatment as well as 6 months later; confirming a sustained virological response. PMID:25933457

  8. Predictive role of renal resistive index for clinical outcome after revascularization in hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis: a monocentric observational study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study evaluated the predictive value of renal resistive index (RI) for renal function and blood pressure (BP) outcome in hypertensive patients with unilateral atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis submitted to successful revascularization. Methods In 158 hypertensive patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis RI was acquired. Twelve months after revascularization, they were classified on the basis of renal function and BP outcome as benefit (BP < 140/90 mmHg or diastolic BP reduction > 15 mmHg with the same of reduced drugs; decrease in glomerular filtration rate > 20%), or failure. Results Regarding renal function outcome, RI in the stenotic and in the contralateral kidney were significantly higher in patients with failure (n = 20) than in those with benefit (0.72 ± 0.11 vs 0.61 ± 0.11 and 0.76 ± 0.08 vs 0.66 ± 0.09, p < 0.05). Among different cutpoints generated, RI in the contralateral kidney >0.73 provided the largest area under the curve (0.77), and the highest sensitivity (80%) and specificity (72%). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, RI in the contralateral kidney >0.73 was an independent predictor of a failure in renal function outcome. Regarding BP outcome, patients with no benefit from revascularization (n = 60) had similar RI in the stenotic and contralateral kidney (p = ns), but presented higher pulse pressure, albuminuria and hypertension duration in comparison to patients with improved BP control. Conclusions RI in the contralateral kidney is an independent predictor of renal function outcome after successful revascularization in hypertensive patients with unilateral atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis, whereas it is not able to predict blood pressure outcome. PMID:24555729

  9. Study of depression among a sample of hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Al Madany, Adel Mohammed; Hassan, Fawzy Hamed; Al-Nabawy, Ali Abdel Fattah; Ramadan, Mohammed Elsayed Mohammed; Ismail, Abd-Allah Ahmed Abd-Allah

    2015-04-01

    Hypertension is one of the commonest diseases worldwide. Hypertension (HTN) or high blood pressure, sometimes called arterial hypertension, is a chronic medical condition, which elevated blood pressure in the arteries. This forces the heart to work harder than normal to circulate blood via the blood vessels. Blood pressure is summarized by two measurements, systolic and diastolic, which depend on between beats (diastole). Normal blood pressure at rest is within the range of 100-140 mmHg systolic (top reading) high blood pressure is said to be present if it is persistently at or above 140/90 mmHg of cases are categorized as primary hypertension that means high blood pressure with no obvious underlying medical cause. Updated studies reported associations between depressive symptoms and hypertensive patients. Depression may be an independent diagnosis, it is also possible that depressive symptoms are secondary to chronic illnesses and their associated complex medication regimens, regardless of the diagnosis being primary or secondary, prior reports have demonstrated that depressive symptoms are associated with inadequate blood pressure control and complications of hypertension. PMID:26012236

  10. The Effects of Catheter-Based Radiofrequency Renal Denervation on Renal Function and Renal Artery Structure in Patients With Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Yang, Kan; Jiang, Feng-Lin; Zeng, Li-Xiong; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Wang, Xiao-Yan

    2014-01-01

    There are no clinical studies on the effects of catheter-based radiofrequency renal denervation (RDN) on renal artery structure using 64-detector computed tomography (CT). A total of 39 patients with resistant hypertension received RDN and 38 patients received drug treatment. Mean systolic pressure and diastolic pressure in the RDN group decreased after 1, 3, 6, and 12 months of procedure (P<.05) and urinary protein level significantly decreased after 6 and 12 months (P<.05). The diameter, length, and sectional area of the renal artery; number of cases of atherosclerosis; and plaque burden of 64-detector CT renal arteriography did not change at 12 months of follow-up (P<.05), whereas the plaque burden increased significantly in the control group (P<.05). RDN significantly and persistently reduced blood pressure and decreased urinary protein excretion rate in patients with resistant hypertension and did not exhibit any adverse effect on renal function and renal artery structure. PMID:25039997

  11. Arginine vasopressin is an ideal drug after cardiac surgery for the management of low systemic vascular resistant hypotension concomitant with pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Tayama, Eiki; Ueda, Tomohiro; Shojima, Takahiro; Akasu, Koji; Oda, Takeshi; Fukunaga, Shuji; Akashi, Hidetoshi; Aoyagi, Shigeaki

    2007-12-01

    Low systemic vascular resistance (SVR) hypotension concomitant with pulmonary hypertension (PH) is difficult to manage postoperatively because they are often catecholamine-resistant. So, we applied arginine vasopressin (AVP), which is a potent vasoconstrictor in a specific condition, for post-cardiotomy refractory low SVR hypotension concomitant with PH. We treated nine cases of postoperative refractory vasodilatory hypotension concomitant with PH even after conventional treatment that included nitric oxide inhalation and/or intraaortic balloon pump. AVP was administrated with 0.05 approximately 0.1 U/min intravenously. After AVP administration, the mean systemic arterial pressure increased from 47.3+/-9.5 to 76.5+/-12.2 mmHg (P<0.01) and SVR increased from 488.1+/-92.7 to 1188+/-87 dynes x s x cm(-5) (P<0.01). Fortunately, even though the cardiac index decreased, it remained in a normal range. Alteration in the PVR was not significant, but the Pp/Ps became somewhat lower (0.66+/-0.2 to 0.47+/-0.16, P<0.01). AVP increased the urine output and improved oxygenation. AVP improved systemic circulation (increased systemic blood pressure with maintaining cardiac output) without deterioration of pulmonary hypertension. AVP is an ideal drug for treating refractory low SVR hypotension concomitant with PH. But its indication must be limited. PMID:17704123

  12. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... Renal artery stenosis is a narrowing or blockage of the arteries that supply blood to the kidneys. The most ...

  13. Hypertension - overview

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    If left untreated, hypertension can lead to the thickening of arterial walls causing its lumen, or blood passage way, to narrow in diameter. ... the narrowed arterial openings. In addition, people with hypertension may be more susceptible to stroke.

  14. Renovascular hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Renal hypertension; Hypertension - renovascular; Renal artery occlusion; Stenosis - renal artery; Renal artery stenosis ... blood pressure to rise. Risk factors for atherosclerosis: High blood pressure Smoking Diabetes High cholesterol Heavy alcohol use Cocaine ...

  15. Effect of Brahmyadi Churna (Brahmi, Shankhapushpi, Jatamansi, Jyotishmati, Vacha, Ashwagandha) and tablet Shilajatu in essential hypertension: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Arshiya; Umar, Dilshad; Farhan, Mohammed; Basheer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is one among the fiery health problems of the present era. Since it does not cause symptoms usually for many years until a vital organ is damaged. The present study was carried out on 40 patients of essential HTN with Brahmyadi Churna and tablet Shilajatu for a period of 1 month with milk as Anupana. Observation was done before the treatment, 3 mid test assessments on 7(th), 14(th), and 21(st) day, posttest assessment was done on 30(th) day. Intervention revealed that 19 had marked improvement, 14 had moderate improvement, 5 had mild improvement, and no improvement was noticed in 2 individuals. Reduction in blood pressure was observed markedly with P < 0.000. PMID:26605154

  16. Effect of Brahmyadi Churna (Brahmi, Shankhapushpi, Jatamansi, Jyotishmati, Vacha, Ashwagandha) and tablet Shilajatu in essential hypertension: An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Arshiya; Umar, Dilshad; Farhan, Mohammed; Basheer, Bahija; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is one among the fiery health problems of the present era. Since it does not cause symptoms usually for many years until a vital organ is damaged. The present study was carried out on 40 patients of essential HTN with Brahmyadi Churna and tablet Shilajatu for a period of 1 month with milk as Anupana. Observation was done before the treatment, 3 mid test assessments on 7th, 14th, and 21st day, posttest assessment was done on 30th day. Intervention revealed that 19 had marked improvement, 14 had moderate improvement, 5 had mild improvement, and no improvement was noticed in 2 individuals. Reduction in blood pressure was observed markedly with P < 0.000. PMID:26605154

  17. Are video sharing web sites a useful source of information on hypertension?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nilay; Pandey, Ambarish; Venkatraman, Anand; Garg, Neetika

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a prevalent and growing public health problem in the United States and worldwide. Video sharing Web sites such as YouTube could potentially influence patient behaviors via properties of interpersonal and mass media communication. We conducted this cross-sectional study to assess the accuracy and content of YouTube videos on HTN and understand how viewers interact with this online information. We analyzed 209 videos (31.57 hours) of which 63% were classified as useful, 33% as misleading, and 4% represented patient's personal experiences. Number of views per day and "likes" were significantly lower for useful videos. Approximately half the misleading videos contained product advertisements, 70% advocated unproven alternative treatments, and 91% targeted patients. Viewer engagement (number of views) was a poor predictor of usefulness and/or content whereas source of upload, and target audiences were good predictors of usefulness and/or content. Videos uploaded by university channels and/or professional organizations that targeted physicians had a 99.4% (P < .001) probability of being useful whereas videos uploaded by individuals with unknown credentials that targeted patients had a 21.2% (P < .001) probability of being useful. A majority of HTN-related videos on YouTube are useful. Viewer engagement is significantly higher with videos that contain misleading and/or erroneous information in comparison to videos that contain useful information. PMID:25064770

  18. Secondary hypertension in adults

    PubMed Central

    Puar, Troy Hai Kiat; Mok, Yingjuan; Debajyoti, Roy; Khoo, Joan; How, Choon How; Ng, Alvin Kok Heong

    2016-01-01

    Secondary hypertension occurs in a significant proportion of adult patients (~10%). In young patients, renal causes (glomerulonephritis) and coarctation of the aorta should be considered. In older patients, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnoea and renal artery stenosis are more prevalent than previously thought. Primary aldosteronism can be screened by taking morning aldosterone and renin levels, and should be considered in patients with severe, resistant or hypokalaemia-associated hypertension. Symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea should be sought. Worsening of renal function after starting an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor suggests the possibility of renal artery stenosis. Recognition, diagnosis and treatment of secondary causes of hypertension lead to good clinical outcomes and the possible reversal of end-organ damage, in addition to blood pressure control. As most patients with hypertension are managed at the primary care level, it is important for primary care physicians to recognise these conditions and refer patients appropriately. PMID:27211205

  19. APOL1 Risk Alleles are Associated with More Severe Arteriosclerosis in Renal Resistance Vessels with Aging and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hughson, Michael D; Hoy, Wendy E; Mott, Susan A; Puelles, Victor G; Bertram, John F; Winkler, Cheryl L; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-01-01

    The increased risk of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) among hypertensive African Americans is partly related to APOL1 allele variants. Hypertension-associated arterionephrosclerosis consists of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis. The initial glomerulosclerosis, attributed to preglomerular arteriosclerosis and ischemia, consists of focal global glomerulosclerosis (FGGS), but in biopsy studies, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) is found with progression to ESKD, particularly in African Americans. This is a study of arterionephrosclerosis in successfully APOL1 genotyped autopsy kidney tissue of 159 African Americans (61 no risk alleles, 68 one risk allele, 30 two risk alleles) and 135 whites aged 18–89 years from a general population with no clinical renal disease. Glomerulosclerosis was nearly exclusively FGGS with only three subjects having FSGS-like lesions that were unrelated to APOL1 risk status. For both races, in multivariable analysis, the dependent variables of arteriosclerosis, glomerulosclerosis, and cortical fibrosis were all significantly related to the independent variables of older age (P < 0.001) and hypertension (P < 0.001). A relationship between APOL1 genotype and arteriosclerosis was apparent only after 35 years of age when, for any level of elevated blood pressure, more severe arteriosclerosis was found in the interlobular arteries of 14 subjects with two APOL1 risk alleles when compared to African Americans with none (n = 37, P = 0.02) or one risk alleles (n = 35, P = 0.02). With the limitation of the small number of subjects contributing to the positive results, the findings imply that APOL1 risk alleles recessively augment small vessel arteriosclerosis in conjunction with age and hypertension. FSGS was not a significant finding, indicating that in the early stages of arterionephrosclerosis, the primary pathologic influence of APOL1 genotype is vascular rather than glomerular.

  20. Purinergic contraction of the rat vas deferens in L-NAME-induced hypertension: effect of sildenafil.

    PubMed

    Gur, Serap; Sikka, Suresh C; Knight, Gillian E; Burnstock, Geoffrey; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2010-05-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a risk factor for erectile dysfunction, but its effect on vas deferens (VD) contractility and the ejaculatory response has not been delineated. NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, was used for induction of nitric oxide (NO)-deficient HTN. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of L-NAME-induced HTN on rat VD contractility and to determine whether sildenafil affects VD contractility. A total of 36 male rats were divided into (1) control, (2) L-NAME-HTN, (3) sildenafil treated L-NAME-HTN groups. Group 2 was treated with L-NAME (40 mg kg(-1) per day) in drinking water for 4 weeks. Group 3 received sildenafil (1.5 mg kg(-1) per day, by oral gavage) concomitantly with L-NAME. The prostatic portion of the VD was subjected to electrical field stimulation (EFS, 1-20 Hz), and the P2X(1) agonist alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-meATP, 100 micromol L(-1)-1 micromol L(-1)) and the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (Phe, 100 micromol L(-1)-1 mmol L(-1)) were used to construct concentration-response curves. These experiments were repeated in the presence of P2X receptor antagonist, pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS, 30 micromol L(-1)). VD contractions in response to EFS, alpha,beta-meATP and Phe were significantly enhanced by L-NAME. Sildenafil treatment in the L-NAME group improved the contractile response of VD to EFS (20 Hz). In the presence of PPADS, the enhanced contractile response of VD to EFS and alpha,beta-meATP in hypertensive rats was reversed. In the rat model of chronic NO depletion, the purinergic and adrenergic components and EFS affect VD contractility. The VD contractile response may be mediated more by the purinergic system than the adrenergic system, and sildenafil may alter the ejaculatory response in men with PE. PMID:20305675

  1. [Childhood hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takemura, Tsukasa

    2015-11-01

    For accurate diagnosis of childhood hypertension, selection of appropriate manchette size according to the child age and the circumstantial size of upper limb is essentially important. In addition, except for the emergency case of hypertension, repeated measurement of blood pressure would be desirable in several weeks interval. Recently, childhood hypertension might be closely related to the abnormality of maternal gestational period caused by the strict diet and the maternal smoking. Developmental Origins of Health and Disease(DOHaD) theory is now highlighted in the pathogenesis of adulthood hypertension. To prevent hypertension of small-for-date baby in later phase of life, maternal education for child nursing should be conducted. In children, secondary hypertension caused by renal, endocrinologic, or malignant disease is predominant rather than idiopathic hypertension. PMID:26619664

  2. Community-Based Participatory Research Approaches for Hypertension Control and Prevention in Churches

    PubMed Central

    Dodani, Sunita

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular (CV), cerebrovascular, and renal diseases and disproportionately affects African Americans (AAs). It has been shown that promoting the adoption of healthy lifestyles, ones that involve best practices of diet and exercise and abundant expert support, can, in a healthcare setting, reduce the incidence of hypertension in those who are at high risk. In this paper, we will examine whether similar programs are effective in the AA church-community-based participatory research settings, outside of the healthcare arena. If successful, these church-based approaches may be applied successfully to reduce the incidence and consequences of hypertension in large communities with potentially huge impact on public health. PMID:21747975

  3. Role of natural herbs in the treatment of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tabassum, Nahida; Ahmad, Feroz

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is the medical term for high blood pressure. It is dangerous because it makes the heart work too hard and contributes to atherosclerosis (hardening of arteries), besides increasing the risk of heart disease and stroke. HTN can also lead to other conditions such as congestive heart failure, kidney disease, and blindness. Conventional antihypertensives are usually associated with many side effects. About 75 to 80% of the world population use herbal medicines, mainly in developing countries, for primary health care because of their better acceptability with human body and lesser side effects. In the last three decades, a lot of concerted efforts have been channeled into researching the local plants with hypotensive and antihypertensive therapeutic values. The hypotensive and antihypertensive effects of some of these medicinal plants have been validated and others disproved. However, ayurvedic knowledge needs to be coupled with modern medicine and more scientific research needs to be done to verify the effectiveness, and elucidate the safety profile of such herbal remedies for their antihypertensive potential. PMID:22096316

  4. Malignant hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2009:chap 89. Read More Acute kidney failure Alertness - decreased Angina Heart attack Preeclampsia Pulmonary edema Renovascular hypertension Seizures Stroke Update ...

  5. Limiting collagen turnover via collagenase-resistance attenuates right ventricular dysfunction and fibrosis in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Golob, Mark J; Wang, Zhijie; Prostrollo, Anthony J; Hacker, Timothy A; Chesler, Naomi C

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe form of pulmonary hypertension in which right ventricular (RV) afterload is increased and death typically occurs due to decompensated RV hypertrophy and failure. Collagen accumulation has been implicated in pulmonary artery remodeling, but how it affects RV performance remains unclear. Here, we sought to identify the role of collagen turnover, defined as the balance between collagen synthesis and degradation, in RV structure and function in PAH To do so, we exposed mutant (Col1a1(R/R)) mice, in which collagen type I degradation is impaired such that collagen turnover is reduced, and wild-type (Col1a1(+/+)) littermates to 14 days of chronic hypoxia combined with SUGEN treatment (HySu) to recapitulate characteristics of clinical PAH RV structure and function were measured by echocardiography, RV catheterization, and histology. Despite comparable increases in RV systolic pressure (Col1a1(+/+): 46 ± 2 mmHg; Col1a1(R/R): 47 ± 3 mmHg), the impaired collagen degradation in Col1a1(R/R) mice resulted in no RV collagen accumulation, limited RV hypertrophy, and maintained right ventricular-pulmonary vascular coupling with HySu exposure. The preservation of cardiac function in the mutant mice indicates a beneficial role of limited collagen turnover via impaired degradation in RV remodeling in response to chronic pressure overload. Our results suggest novel treatments that reduce collagen turnover may offer a new therapeutic strategy for PAH patients. PMID:27252252

  6. Carbon Monoxide Prevents Hypertension and Proteinuria in an Adenovirus sFlt-1 Preeclampsia-Like Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Venditti, Carolina C.; Casselman, Richard; Young, Iain; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Smith, Graeme N.

    2014-01-01

    Preeclampsia (PE) remains a leading cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. Smoking cigarettes is associated with a decreased incidence of PE. Based on this observation and previous work, we hypothesize that women who smoke have a lower risk of developing PE because of elevated levels of carbon monoxide (CO) in their blood. The objective of this study was to determine if low-dose CO in ambient air could attenuate the late pregnancy hypertension (HTN) and proteinuria in the Adenovirus (Ad) sFlt-1 PE-like mouse model. Continuous low-dose CO treatment (250 ppm) was started on E10.5 and maintained until E17.5. Compared to control and Ad empty vector, AdsFlt-1 mice displayed late- gestation HTN (E14.5–17.5) (P<0.05), proteinuria (P<0.05) and reduced Bowman's space which were all prevented with CO treatment. Use of the Ad (with/without sFlt-1) or CO had no effect (p>0.05) on litter size, fetal resorption numbers and fetal or placental weights. This study shows that treatment with CO can prevent HTN and proteinuria in a mouse model of PE. It provides a possible mechanism for the reduced incidence of PE in smoking women, and supports the possibility of using CO as a future treatment for PE. PMID:25202912

  7. β-Blockers in hypertension, diabetes, heart failure and acute myocardial infarction: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J; Fares, Hassan; Niazi, Asfandyar K; Chatterjee, Saurav; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Cerrato, Enrico; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Lavie, Carl J; Bell, David S; O'Keefe, James H

    2015-01-01

    β-Blockers (BBs) are an essential class of cardiovascular medications for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF). However, a large body of data indicates that BBs should not be used as first-line therapy for hypertension (HTN). Additionally, new data have questioned the role of BBs in the treatment of stable coronary heart disease (CHD). However, these trials mainly tested the non-vasodilating β1 selective BBs (atenolol and metoprolol) which are still the most commonly prescribed BBs in the USA. Newer generation BBs, such as the vasodilating BBs carvedilol and nebivolol, have been shown not only to be better tolerated than non-vasodilating BBs, but also these agents do not increase the risk of diabetes mellitus (DM), atherogenic dyslipidaemia or weight gain. Moreover, carvedilol has the most evidence for reducing morbidity and mortality in patients with HF and those who have experienced an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). This review discusses the cornerstone clinical trials that have tested BBs in the settings of HTN, HF and AMI. Large randomised trials in the settings of HTN, DM and stable CHD are still needed to establish the role of BBs in these diseases, as well as to determine whether vasodilating BBs are exempt from the disadvantages of non-vasodilating BBs. PMID:25821584

  8. Pulmonary hypertension triggered by lipopolysaccharide in ascites-susceptible and -resistant broilers is not amplified by aminoguanidine, a specific inhibitor of inducible nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Bowen, O T; Erf, G F; Anthony, N B; Wideman, R F

    2006-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a potent pulmonary vasodilator that modulates the pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary hypertension (PH) triggered by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in broilers. The amplitude and duration of the LPS-induced PH are markedly enhanced following pretreatment with N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), which inhibits NO synthesis by both the constitutive (endothelial) and inducible (inflammatory) forms of nitric oxide synthase (eNOS and iNOS, respectively). In the present study L-NAME and the selective iNOS inhibitor aminoguanidine (AG) were administered to differentiate between iNOS and eNOS as the primary source of NO that attenuates the pulmonary vascular response to LPS. Clinically healthy male progeny from ascites-susceptible and ascites-resistant lines were anesthetized, and their pulmonary artery was cannulated. The initial pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) was recorded, then the broilers either remained untreated (control group) or were injected i.v. with AG. Ten minutes later all birds received an i.v. injection of LPS, followed 40 min later by an i.v. injection of L-NAME. When compared with untreated controls, AG neither increased the baseline PAP nor did it increase or prolong the PH response to LPS. The ascites-susceptible broilers maintained a higher PAP than the ascites-resistant broilers throughout the experiment, and the ascites-resistant broilers exhibited greater relative increases in PAP in response to LPS than did the ascites-susceptible broilers. Within 40 min after the LPS injection, PAP subsided to a level that did not differ from the respective preinjection value for each line. Injecting L-NAME reversed the decline in PAP, and within 5 min PAP returned to hypertensive levels approaching the maximum peak PH response to LPS. The absence of any impact of AG coupled with the profound response to L-NAME indicates that NO synthesized by eNOS rather than iNOS likely modulated the acute (within 1 h) PH elicited by

  9. Prevalence and Prognostic Significance of Apparent Treatment Resistant Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease: Report From the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Thomas, George; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Hsiang-Yu; Anderson, Amanda H; Appel, Lawrence J; Bodana, Shirisha; Brecklin, Carolyn S; Drawz, Paul; Flack, John M; Miller, Edgar R; Steigerwalt, Susan P; Townsend, Raymond R; Weir, Matthew R; Wright, Jackson T; Rahman, Mahboob

    2016-02-01

    The association between apparent treatment resistant hypertension (ATRH) and clinical outcomes is not well studied in chronic kidney disease. We analyzed data on 3367 hypertensive participants in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) to determine prevalence, associations, and clinical outcomes of ATRH in nondialysis chronic kidney disease patients. ATRH was defined as blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg on ≥3 antihypertensives, or use of ≥4 antihypertensives with blood pressure at goal at baseline visit. Prevalence of ATRH was 40.4%. Older age, male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and higher body mass index were independently associated with higher odds of having ATRH. Participants with ATRH had a higher risk of clinical events than participants without ATRH-composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, congestive heart failure (CHF), and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], 1.38 [1.22-1.56]); renal events (1.28 [1.11-1.46]); CHF (1.66 [1.38-2.00]); and all-cause mortality (1.24 [1.06-1.45]). The subset of participants with ATRH and blood pressure at goal on ≥4 medications also had higher risk for composite of myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, CHF, and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval], (1.30 [1.12-1.51]) and CHF (1.59 [1.28-1.99]) than those without ATRH. ATRH was associated with significantly higher risk for CHF and renal events only among those with estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). Our findings show that ATRH is common and associated with high risk of adverse outcomes in a cohort of patients with chronic kidney disease. This underscores the need for early identification and management of patients with ATRH and chronic kidney disease. PMID:26711738

  10. Adiponectin -11377C/G and +276G/T polymorphisms affect adiponectin levels but do not modify responsiveness to therapy in resistant hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Faria, Ana Paula C; Modolo, Rodrigo; Sabbatini, Andréa R; Barbaro, Natália R; Corrêa, Nathália B; Brunelli, Veridiana; Tanus-Santos, José E; Fontana, Vanessa; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-07-01

    Resistant hypertension (RHTN) is a multifactorial and polygenic disease, frequently associated with obesity. Low plasma adiponectin levels, a hormone produced by the adipose tissue, were associated with RHTN. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) -11377C/G (rs266729) and +276G/T (rs1501299) in ADIPOQ (adiponectin gene) were associated with hypertension. This study evaluated the association between two SNPs (-11377C/G and +276G/T) and adiponectin levels in RHTN. This study comprised 109 patients with RHTN genotyped for both polymorphisms. A cross-sectional study was designed to compare features of CC homozygous versus G allele carriers for -11377C/G and GG homozygous versus T allele carriers for +276G/T. Office and ambulatory BP measurements were similar among genotypes subgroups in both SNPs as well as the markers of target organ damage (arterial stiffness, left ventricular mass index and microalbuminuria). Adiponectin concentrations were significantly higher in CC compared to G carrier for -11377C/G (CC:7.0 (4.0-10.2) versus G allele:5.5 (2.5-7.9), p = 0.04) and lower in GG compared to T carrier for +276G/T (GG:5.3 (2.3-7.7) versus T allele:7.1 (3.6-10.5), p = 0.04). Adjusting for systolic ambulatory BP, body mass index, age, gender, race and presence of type 2 diabetes, multiple linear regression analyses revealed that the minor alleles G (β-coefficient= -0.14, SE=0.07, p = 0.03) and T (β-coefficient=0.12, SE=0.06, p = 0.04) were independent predictors of adiponectin. The -11377C/G and +276G/T SNPs in ADIPOQ were associated with adiponectin levels in RHTN individuals. PMID:25546819

  11. Prevalence of Prehypertension and Hypertension in a Nationally Representative Sample of Iranian Children and Adolescents: The CASPIAN-IV Study

    PubMed Central

    Fallah, Zahra; Qorbani, Mostafa; Motlagh, Mohammad Esmaeil; Heshmat, Ramin; Ardalan, Gelayol; Kelishadi, Roya

    2014-01-01

    Background: The global health burden has faced toward non-communicable diseases (NCDs). It is suggested that adulthood blood pressure (BP) is tracked from childhood. This study aims to evaluate the mean BP and the prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension in the Iranian pediatric population. Methods: In a national survey as the 4th phase of Childhood and Adolescence Surveillance and Prevention of Adult Non-communicable diseases study and through random multistage cluster sampling, a national sample of Iranian school students, aged 6-18 years, were recruited. Data gathered by means of modified World Health Organization Global school-based student health survey questionnaire, a weight disorders determinants questionnaire and anthropometric and BP measurements. Prehypertension (HTN) was defined as BP equal or greater than 90th age and sex specific percentile or ≥120/80 mmHg and HTN was defined as BP ≥95th percentile. Results: A total of 13486 students entered the study (49.2% girls, 75.6% urban). Mean age of participants was 11.47 ± 3.36 years. A total rate of 4.17% (3.84-4.52 95% CI) for high systolic BP (SBP), 4.33% (3.99-4.68) for high diastolic BP (DBP) and 6.88% (6.45-7.32) for high SBP and/or DBP was depicted. Conclusions: The prevalence rate of high BP (pre-HTN together with HTN) is substantially high in this population. It is needed to study the causative situations and implement relevant interventions. PMID:24791193

  12. Spironolactone versus placebo, bisoprolol, and doxazosin to determine the optimal treatment for drug-resistant hypertension (PATHWAY-2): a randomised, double-blind, crossover trial

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bryan; MacDonald, Thomas M; Morant, Steve; Webb, David J; Sever, Peter; McInnes, Gordon; Ford, Ian; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Caulfield, Mark J; Salsbury, Jackie; Mackenzie, Isla; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Brown, Morris J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Optimal drug treatment for patients with resistant hypertension is undefined. We aimed to test the hypotheses that resistant hypertension is most often caused by excessive sodium retention, and that spironolactone would therefore be superior to non-diuretic add-on drugs at lowering blood pressure. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial, we enrolled patients aged 18–79 years with seated clinic systolic blood pressure 140 mm Hg or greater (or ≥135 mm Hg for patients with diabetes) and home systolic blood pressure (18 readings over 4 days) 130 mm Hg or greater, despite treatment for at least 3 months with maximally tolerated doses of three drugs, from 12 secondary and two primary care sites in the UK. Patients rotated, in a preassigned, randomised order, through 12 weeks of once daily treatment with each of spironolactone (25–50 mg), bisoprolol (5–10 mg), doxazosin modified release (4–8 mg), and placebo, in addition to their baseline blood pressure drugs. Random assignment was done via a central computer system. Investigators and patients were masked to the identity of drugs, and to their sequence allocation. The dose was doubled after 6 weeks of each cycle. The hierarchical primary endpoints were the difference in averaged home systolic blood pressure between spironolactone and placebo, followed (if significant) by the difference in home systolic blood pressure between spironolactone and the average of the other two active drugs, followed by the difference in home systolic blood pressure between spironolactone and each of the other two drugs. Analysis was by intention to treat. The trial is registered with EudraCT number 2008-007149-30, and ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02369081. Findings Between May 15, 2009, and July 8, 2014, we screened 436 patients, of whom 335 were randomly assigned. After 21 were excluded, 285 patients received spironolactone, 282 doxazosin, 285 bisoprolol, and 274 placebo; 230 patients

  13. Hypertensive crisis.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, E B; Escalante, C

    1989-07-01

    Hypertensive crisis is an acute emergency requiring aggressive management. Its incidence has decreased in recent years but still is prevalent in the medical community. From review of past and present treatment regimens, the following recommendations can be considered. (1) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated CHF, sodium nitroprusside is still an excellent agent. It has a rapid onset of action and blood pressure can be easily titrated. Nitroglycerin is also another agent that can be used in this situation. (2) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated aortic dissection, trimethophan camsylate is the preferred agent. An alternative choice is the combination of nitroprusside and labetalol. (3) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated myocardial ischemia, an excellent choice is nitroglycerin. Labetalol also should be considered in this situation. (4) In the treatment of hypertension during pregnancy, hydralazine is still a good choice. Labetalol has also been shown to be efficacious. (5) In the treatment of malignant hypertension with associated cerebral ischemia, the following drugs should be considered: nitroprusside, nitroglycerin, and labetalol. The most important attribute of these agents is that they are nonsedating and rapid in onset. (6) In the treatment of postoperative hypertension the choices best suited are labetalol, enalapril, nitroprusside, and nitroglycerin. These agents are rapid in onset and all can be administered intravenously. PMID:2670090

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  15. Hypertension screening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  16. Aldosterone alters the participation of endothelial factors in noradrenaline vasoconstriction differently in resistance arteries from normotensive and hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Fabiano E; Blanco-Rivero, Javier; Avendaño, María Soledad; Sastre, Esther; Yela, Rubén; Velázquez, Kyra; Salaíces, Mercedes; Balfagón, Gloria

    2011-03-11

    This study analyzed the effect of aldosterone (0.05mg/kg per day, 3 weeks) on vasoconstriction induced by noradrenaline in mesenteric resistance arteries from WKY rats and SHR. Contraction to noradrenaline was measured in mesenteric resistance arteries from untreated and aldosterone-treatedrats from both strains. Participation of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide anions, thromboxane A(2) (TxA(2)) and prostacyclin in this response was determined. 6-keto-prostaglandin (PG)F1alpha and thromboxane B(2) (TxB(2)) releases were determined by enzyme immunoassay. NO and superoxide anion release were also determined by fluorescence and chemiluminiscence, respectively. Aldosterone did not modify noradrenaline-induced contraction in either strain. In mesenteric resistance arteries from both aldosterone-treated groups, endothelium removal or preincubation with NO synthesis inhibitor L-NAME increased the noradrenaline-induced contraction, while incubation with the superoxide anion scavenger tempol decreased it. Preincubation with either the COX-1/2 or COX-2 inhibitor (indomethacin and NS-398, respectively) decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals, while this response was not modified by COX-1 inhibitor SC-560. TxA(2) synthesis inhibitor (furegrelate), or TxA2 receptor antagonist (SQ 29 548) also decreased the noradrenaline contraction in aldosterone-treated animals. In untreated SHR, but not WKY rats, this response was increased by L-NAME, and reduced by tempol, indomethacin, NS-398 or SQ 29 548. Aldosterone treatment did not modify NO or TxB(2) release, but it did increase superoxide anion and 6-keto-PGF(1alpha) release in mesenteric resistance arteries from both strains. In conclusion, chronic aldosterone treatment reduces smooth muscle contraction to alpha-adrenergic stimuli, producing a new balance in the release of endothelium-derived prostanoids and NO. PMID:21262224

  17. [Hypertensive retinopathy].

    PubMed

    Genevois, Olivier; Paques, Michel

    2010-01-20

    Acute hypertensive retinopathy should be distinguished from retinal arteriolosclerosis. The presence of microvascular abnormalities in the ocular fundus increases the risk of heart and/or brain attack. At the clinical level, the current classification of chronic hypertensive retinopathy is based on the long-term risk of stroke. In research, a great number of studies are focused on the predictive value of retinal vascular diameters related to the general micro- and macrovascular disease. PMID:20222306

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Newman, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The modern era in cardiopulmonary medicine began in the 1940s, when Cournand and Richards pioneered right-heart catheterization. Until that time, no direct measurement of central vascular pressure had been performed in humans. Right-heart catheterization ignited an explosion of insights into function and dysfunction of the pulmonary circulation, cardiac performance, ventilation–perfusion relationships, lung–heart interactions, valvular function, and congenital heart disease. It marked the beginnings of angiocardiography with its diagnostic implications for diseases of the left heart and peripheral circulation. Pulmonary hypertension was discovered to be the consequence of a large variety of diseases that either raised pressure downstream of the pulmonary capillaries, induced vasoconstriction, increased blood flow to the lung, or obstructed the pulmonary vessels, either by embolism or in situ fibrosis. Hypoxic vasoconstriction was found to be a major cause of acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension, and surprising vasoreactivity of the pulmonary vascular bed was discovered to be present in many cases of severe pulmonary hypertension, initially in mitral stenosis. Diseases as disparate as scleroderma, cystic fibrosis, kyphoscoliosis, sleep apnea, and sickle cell disease were found to have shared consequences in the pulmonary circulation. Some of the achievements of Cournand and Richards and their scientific descendents are discussed in this article, including success in the diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, and management of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:15994464

  19. Systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2007-04-01

    Hypertension is a growing public health problem worldwide. Only 37% of American hypertensives currently have their blood pressures controlled. Hypertension is traditionally diagnosed in the medical office, but both home and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can help. Lifestyle modifications are recommended for everyone who has higher than "normal" blood pressure (<120/80 mm Hg). Voluminous clinical trial data support beginning drug therapy with low-dose chlorthalidone, unless the patient has a specific indication for a different drug. Additional drugs (typically in the sequence, angiotensin converting-enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, calcium antagonist, beta-blocker, alpha-blocker, aldosterone antagonist, direct vasodilator, and centrally acting alpha(2)-agonist) can be added to achieve the blood pressure goal (usually <140/90 mm Hg, but <130/80 mm Hg for diabetics and those with chronic kidney disease). Special circumstances exist for treatment of hypertension in pregnancy, in childhood, in the elderly, and in both extremes of blood pressure (pre-hypertension or hypertensive emergencies). PMID:17398315

  20. Non-invasive estimation of pulmonary vascular resistance in patients of pulmonary hypertension in congenital heart disease with unobstructed pulmonary flow

    PubMed Central

    Pande, Arindam; Sarkar, Achyut; Ahmed, Imran; Naveen Chandra, GS; Patil, Shailesh Kumar; Kundu, Chanchal Kumar; Arora, Rahul; Samanta, Ajanta

    2014-01-01

    Context: Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is a critical and essential parameter during the assessment and selection of modality of treatment in patients with congenital heart disease accompanied by pulmonary arterial hypertension. Aim: The present study was planned to evaluate non-invasive echocardiographic parameters to assess pulmonary vascular resistance. Settings and Design: This prospective observational study included 44 patients admitted in the cardiology and pediatric cardiology ward of our institution for diagnostic or pre-operative catheter based evaluation of pulmonary arterial pressure and PVR. Materials and Methods: Detailed echocardiographic evaluation was carried out including tricuspid regurgitation velocity (TRV) and velocity time integral of the right-ventricular outflow tract (VTIRVOT). These parameters were correlated with catheter-based measurements of PVR. Results: The TRV/VTIRVOT ratio correlated well with PVR measured at catheterization (PVRcath) (r = 0.896, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.816 to 0.9423, P < 0.001). Using the Bland-Altman analysis, PVR measurements derived from Doppler data showed satisfactory limits of agreement with catheterization estimated PVR. For a PVR of 6 Wood units (WU), a TRV/VTIRVOT value of 0.14 provided a sensitivity of 96.67% and a specificity of 92.86% (area under the curve 0.963, 95% confidence interval 0.858 to 0.997) and for PVR of 8 WU a TRV/VTIRVOT value of 0.17 provided a sensitivity of 79.17% and a specificity of 95% (area under the curve 0. 0.923, 95% confidence interval 0.801 to 0.982). Conclusions: Doppler-derived ratio of TRV/VTIRVOT is a simple, non-invasive index, which can be used to estimate PVR. PMID:24987253

  1. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Caroline; Montani, David; Savale, Laurent; Sitbon, Olivier; Parent, Florence; Seferian, Andrei; Bulifon, Sophie; Fadel, Elie; Mercier, Olaf; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Dartevelle, Philippe; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Jaïs, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) characterized by the persistence of thromboembolic obstructing the pulmonary arteries as an organized tissue and the presence of a variable small vessel arteriopathy. The consequence is an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting in progressive right heart failure. CTEPH is classified as group IV pulmonary hypertension according to the WHO classification of pulmonary hypertension. CTEPH is defined as precapillary pulmonary hypertension (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥ 25 mmHg with a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg) associated with mismatched perfusion defects on ventilation-perfusion lung scan and signs of chronic thromboembolic disease on computed tomography pulmonary angiogram and/or conventional pulmonary angiography, in a patient who received at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation. CTEPH as a direct consequence of symptomatic pulmonary embolism (PE) is rare, and a significant number of CTEPH cases develop in the absence of history of PE. Thus, CTEPH should be considered in any patient with unexplained PH. Splenectomy, chronic inflammatory conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease, indwelling catheters and cardiac pacemakers have been identified as associated conditions increasing the risk of CTEPH. Ventilation-perfusion scan (V/Q) is the best test available for establishing the thromboembolic nature of PH. When CTEPH is suspected, patients should be referred to expert centres where pulmonary angiography, right heart catheterization and high-resolution CT scan will be performed to confirm the diagnosis and to assess the operability. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA) remains the gold standard treatment for CTEPH when organized thrombi involve the main, lobar or segmental arteries. This operation should only be performed by experienced surgeons in specialized centres. For inoperable patients, current ESC/ERS guidelines for the

  2. Hypertensive emergencies.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C

    1995-11-01

    Hypertensive emergencies are uncommon and physiologically diverse. Consequently, it is difficult for most physicians to develop a familiarity with all the different hypertensive crises and with all drugs available for treating them (Table 4). Clinicians should not agonize over which is the perfect therapeutic agent for a particular emergency, but instead, they should focus on scrupulous monitoring and familiarize themselves with a few agents that will serve in most situations. Generally, these agents will be sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerin. Vigilant neurologic monitoring is mandatory in all hypertensive emergencies. The early symptoms and signs of cerebral hypoperfusion can be vague and subtle, but if recognized, serious complications of therapy can be avoided. Remember, the patient may still be hypertensive. Avoid acute (during the first hour) reductions in MAP of more than 20% whenever possible; subsequent reductions should be gradual. In patients known to have markedly elevated ICP and who need acute reductions in their BP, serious consideration should be given to direct monitoring of the ICP so that CPP can be maintained within safe limits. In general, oral agents should not be used for the treatment of hypertensive emergencies. Intravenous Labetalol and intravenous nicardipine are not suitable for general use in hypertensive emergencies. In special situations (e.g., perioperative hypertension and subarachnoid hemorrhage), however, they may be employed. Their role may expand with further study. Trimethaphan may be superior to nitroprusside for hypertension complicated by elevated ICP or cerebral dysfunction. Realistically, most physicians will continue to use nitroprusside. Intense neurologic monitoring is more important than the specific agent used. Nitroglycerin is the agent of choice for acute ischemic heart disease complicated by severe hypertension; if it fails, use nitroprusside. For aortic dissection, the combination of nitroprusside and IV

  3. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  4. The evaluation and treatment of endocrine forms of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Alejandro; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2014-09-01

    Endocrine hypertension is an important secondary form of hypertension, identified in between 5% and 10% of general hypertensive population. Primary aldosteronism is the most common cause of endocrine hypertension, accounting for 1%-10% in uncomplicated hypertension and 7%-20% in resistant hypertension. Other less common causes of endocrine hypertension include Cushing syndrome, pheochromocytoma, thyroid disorders, and hyperparathyroidism. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and the use of appropriate screening tests based on clinical presentation. Failure to make proper diagnosis may lead to catastrophic complications or irreversible hypertensive target organ damage. Accordingly, patients who are suspected to have endocrine hypertension should be referred to endocrinologists or hypertension specialists who are familiar with management of the specific endocrine disorders. PMID:25119722

  5. Diagnosing hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Gelfer, Mark; Dawes, Martin; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Padwal, Raj; Cloutier, Lyne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To highlight the 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP) recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension. Quality of evidence A systematic search was performed current to August 2014 by a Cochrane Collaboration librarian using the MEDLINE and PubMed databases. The search results were critically appraised by the CHEP subcommittee on blood pressure (BP) measurement and diagnosis, and evidence-based recommendations were presented to the CHEP Central Review Committee for independent review and grading. Finally, the findings and recommendations were presented to the Recommendations Task Force for discussion, debate, approval, and voting. The main recommendations are based on level II evidence. Main message Based on the most recent evidence, CHEP has made 4 recommendations in 2 broad categories for 2015 to improve BP measurement and the way hypertension is diagnosed. A strong recommendation is made to use electronic BP measurement in the office setting to replace auscultatory BP measurement. For patients with elevated office readings, CHEP is recommending early use of out-of-office BP measurement, preferably ambulatory BP measurement, in order to identify early in the process those patients with white-coat hypertension. Conclusion Improvements in diagnostic accuracy are critical to optimizing hypertension management in Canada. The annual updates provided by CHEP ensure that practitioners have up-to-date evidence-based information to inform practice. PMID:26564654

  6. Carvedilol in hypertension treatment

    PubMed Central

    Stafylas, Panagiotis C; Sarafidis, Pantelis A

    2008-01-01

    Although β-blockers have been previously shown to effectively reduce blood pressure (BP) and have been used for hypertension treatment for over 40 years, their effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients remains controversial and its use in uncomplicated hypertension is currently under debate. However, data on the above field derive mainly from studies which were conducted with older agents, such as atenolol and metoprolol, while considerable pharamacokinetic and pharmacodynamic heterogeneity is present within the class of β-blockers. Carvedilol, a vasodilating non-cardioselective β-blocker, is a compound that seems to give the opportunity to the clinician to use a cardioprotective agent without the concerning hemodynamic and metabolic actions of traditional β-blocker therapy. In contrast with conventional β-blockers, carvedilol maintains cardiac output, has a less extended effect on heart rate and reduces BP by decreasing vascular resistance. Further, several studies has shown that carvedilol has a beneficial or at least neutral effect on metabolic parameters, such as glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism, suggesting that they could be used in subjects with the metabolic syndrome or diabetes without negative consequences. This article summarizes the distinct pharmacologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic properties of carvedilol in relation to conventional β-blockers, attempting to examine the potential use of this agent for hypertension treatment. PMID:18629377

  7. [Rare forms of hypertension : From pheochromocytoma to vasculitis].

    PubMed

    Haller, H; Limbourg, F; Schmidt, B M; Menne, J

    2015-03-01

    Secondary hypertension affects only 5-10 % of hypertensive patients. Screening is expensive and time-consuming and should be performed only in patients for whom there is a high clinical suspicion of secondary hypertension. Clinical signs of secondary forms of hypertension are new-onset hypertension in patients without other risk factors (i.e., family history, obesity, etc.), sudden increase of blood pressure (BP) in a previously stable patient, increased BP in prepubertal children, resistant hypertension, and severe hypertension or hypertensive emergencies. In adults, renal parenchymal and vascular diseases as well as obstructive sleep apnea are the most common causes of secondary hypertension. Medication-induced hypertension and non-adherence to medication have to be ruled out. Of the endocrine causes associated with hypertension, primary aldosteronism is the most common. Other endocrine causes of hypertension such as thyroid disease (hypo- or hyperthyroidism), hypercortisolism (Cushing's syndrome), hyperparathyroidism, and pheochromocytoma are rare. Monogenetic forms of hypertension are mostly of tubular origin and associated with alterations in mineralocorticoid handling or signaling. Rare causes of hypertension also include inflammatory vascular disease. Acute forms of vasculitis may present as "malignant" hypertension with associated thrombotic microangiopathy and organ damage/failure. It is important to diagnose these rare forms of hypertension in order to prevent acute organ damage in these patients or unnecessary invasive treatment strategies. PMID:25700646

  8. High-Intensity Resistance Exercise Promotes Postexercise Hypotension Greater than Moderate Intensity and Affects Cardiac Autonomic Responses in Women Who Are Hypertensive.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Brito, Aline; Brasileiro-Santos, Maria do S; Coutinho de Oliveira, Caio V; Sarmento da Nóbrega, Thereza K; Lúcia de Moraes Forjaz, Cláudia; da Cruz Santos, Amilton

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity resistance exercise (RE) sessions on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), cardiac autonomic modulation, and forearm blood flow (FBF). Sixteen trained hypertensive women (n = 16, 56 ± 3 years) completed the following 3 experimental sessions: control (CS), RE at 50% (EX50%), and RE at 80% (EX80%) of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). Both EX50% and EX80% comprised a set of 10 repetitions of 10 exercises, with an interval of 90 seconds between exercises. Measurements were taken preintervention and postintervention (at 10, 30, 50, 70, and 90 minutes of recovery). Reductions in systolic/diastolic BP after exercise were greater in EX80% (largest declines, -29 ± 4/-14 ± 5 mm Hg) than EX50% (largest declines, -18 ± 6/-8 ± 5 mm Hg, p ≤ 0.05). Heart rate and cardiac sympathovagal balance (LF/HF) increased more in relation to pre-exercise values in EX80% than EX50% (largest increases 96 ± 3 vs. 90 ± 4 b·min, LF/HF = 1.77 ± 0.25 vs. 1.40 ± 0.20, respectively, p ≤ 0.05). Increases in FBF and hyperemia was also higher in EX80% than EX50% compared with pre-exercise (4.97 ± 0.28 vs. 4.36 ± 0.27 ml·min·100 ml and 5.90 ± 0.20 vs. 5.38 ± 0.25 ml·min·100 ml; p ≤ 0.05, respectively). These results suggest that RE of higher intensity promoted greater postexercise hypotension accompanied by greater increases in FBF, vasodilator response, HR, and cardiac sympathovagal balance. PMID:25992658

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging guided catheterisation for assessment of pulmonary vascular resistance: in vivo validation and clinical application in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kuehne, T; Yilmaz, S; Schulze-Neick, I; Wellnhofer, E; Ewert, P; Nagel, E; Lange, P

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To validate in vivo a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) method for measurement of pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and subsequently to apply this technique to patients with pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Methods and results: PVR was assessed from velocity encoded cine MRI derived pulmonary artery (PA) flow volumes and simultaneously determined invasive PA pressures. For pressure measurements flow directed catheters were guided under magnetic resonance fluoroscopy at 1.5 T into the PA. In preliminary validation studies (eight swine) PVR was determined with the thermodilution technique and compared with PVR obtained by MRI (0.9 (0.5) v 1.1 (0.3) Wood units·m2, p  =  0.7). Bland-Altman test showed agreement between both methods. Inter-examination variability was high for thermodilution (6.2 (2.2)%) but low for MRI measurements (2.1 (0.3)%). After validation, the MRI method was applied in 10 patients with PHT and five controls. In patients with PHT PVR was measured at baseline and during inhalation of nitric oxide. Compared with the control group, PVR was significantly increased in the PHT group (1.2 (0.8) v 13.1 (5.6) Wood units·m2, p < 0.001) but decreased significantly to 10.3 (4.6) Wood units·m2 during inhalation of nitric oxide (p < 0.05). Inter-examination variability of MRI derived PVR measurements was 2.6 (0.6)%. In all experiments (in vivo and clinical) flow directed catheters were guided successfully into the PA under MRI control. Conclusions: Guidance of flow directed catheters into the PA is feasible under MRI control. PVR can be determined with high measurement precision with the proposed MRI technique, which is a promising tool to assess PVR in the clinical setting. PMID:16020598

  10. Pulmonary Vascular Input Impedance is a Combined Measure of Pulmonary Vascular Resistance and Stiffness and Predicts Clinical Outcomes Better than PVR Alone in Pediatric Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Kendall S.; Lee, Po-Feng; Lanning, Craig J.; Ivy, D. Dunbar; Kirby, K. Scott; Claussen, Lori R.; Chan, K. Chen; Shandas, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is the current standard for evaluating reactivity in children with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). However, PVR measures only the mean component of right ventricular afterload and neglects pulsatile effects. We recently developed and validated an method to measure pulmonary vascular input impedance, which revealed excellent correlation between the zero-harmonic impedance value and PVR, and suggested a correlation between higher harmonic impedance values and pulmonary vascular stiffness (PVS). Here we show that input impedance can be measured routinely and easily in the catheterization laboratory, that impedance provides PVR and PVS from a single measurement, and that impedance is a better predictor of disease outcomes compared to PVR. Methods Pressure and velocity waveforms within the main PA were measured during right-heart catheterization of patients with normal PA hemodynamics (n=14) and those with PAH undergoing reactivity evaluation (49 subjects; 95 conditions). A correction factor needed to transform velocity into flow was obtained by calibrating against cardiac output. Input impedance was obtained off-line by dividing Fourier-transformed pressure and flow waveforms. Results Exceptional correlation was found between the indexed zero harmonic of impedance and indexed PVR (y=1.095·x+1.381, R2=0.9620). Additionally, the modulus sum of the first two harmonics of impedance was found to best correlate with indexed pulse pressure over stroke volume (PP/SV) (y=13.39·x-0.8058, R2=0.7962). Amongst a subset of PAH patients (n=25), cumulative logistic regression between outcomes to total indexed impedance was better (RL2=0.4012) than between outcomes and indexed PVR (RL2=0.3131). Conclusions Input impedance can be consistently and easily obtained from PW Doppler and a single catheter pressure measurement, provides comprehensive characterization of the main components of RV afterload, and better predicts patient

  11. Risk Factors and Mediators of the Vascular Dysfunction Associated with Hypertension in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Stephanie J.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with significant hemodynamic changes and vasodilation in the uterine and systemic circulation in order to meet the metabolic demands of the mother and developing fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy (HTN-Preg) and preeclampsia (PE) are major complications and life-threatening conditions to both the mother and fetus. PE is precipitated by various genetic, dietary and environmental factors. Although the initiating events of PE are unclear, inadequate invasion of cytotrophoblasts into the uterine artery is thought to reduce uteroplacental perfusion pressure and lead to placental ischemia/hypoxia. Placental hypoxia induces the release of biologically active factors such as growth factor inhibitors, anti-angiogenic proteins, inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-inducible factors, and antibodies to vascular angiotensin II receptor. These bioactive factors affect the production/activity of various vascular mediators in the endothelium, smooth muscle and extracellular matrix, leading to severe vasoconstriction and HTN. As an endothelial cell disorder, PE is associated with decreased vasodilator mediators such as nitric oxide, prostacyclin and hyperpolarizing factor and increased vasoconstrictor mediators such as endothelin, angiotensin II and thromboxane A2. PE also involves enhanced mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction including intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), and [Ca2+]i sensitization pathways such as protein kinase C, Rho-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Changes in extracellular matrix composition and matrix metalloproteases activity also promote vascular remodeling and further vasoconstriction in the uterine and systemic circulation. Characterization of the predisposing risk factors, the biologically active factors, and the vascular mediators associated with PE holds the promise for early detection, and should help design specific genetic and pharmacological tools for the management

  12. Good knowledge about hypertension is linked to better control of hypertension; A multicentre cross sectional study in Karachi, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background According to the National Health survey only 3% of the population has controlled hypertension. This study was designed to elucidate the knowledge about hypertension in hypertensive patients at three tertiary care centers in Karachi. Secondly we sought to compare the knowledge of those with uncontrolled hypertension and controlled hypertension. Methods It was a cross-sectional study conducted at The Aga Khan University hospital (AKUH), Ziauddin Hospital (ZH) and Civil hospital, Karachi (CHK. All diagnosed Hypertensive patients (both inpatients and outpatients) coming to a tertiary care hospital in Pakistan aged > 18 years were included. Patients were categorized into 2 groups: controlled and uncontrolled hypertension based on their initial BP readings on presentation Uncontrolled Hypertension was defined as average BP ≥ 140/90 mm Hg in patients on treatment. Controlled Hypertension (HTN) was defined as average BP <140/90 mm Hg in patients on treatment. Standardized methods were used to record BP in the sitting position. Knowledge was recorded as a15 item question. Primary outcome was knowledge about hypertension. Results A total of 650 participants were approached and consented 447 were found eligible. 284(63.5%) were from Aga Khan University, 101(22.6) from Dow University of health sciences and 62(13.9) were from Ziauddin University. Mean (SD) age of participants was 57.7(12) years, 50.1(224) were men. Controlled hypertension was present in 323(72.3) and uncontrolled hypertension was present in 124(27.4). The total mean (SD) Knowledge score was 20.97(4.93) out of a maximum score of 38. On comparison of questions related to knowledge between uncontrolled and controlled hypertension, there was statistically significant different in; meaning of hypertension (p <0.001), target SBP(p0.001), target DBP(p 0.001), importance of SBP versus DBP, improvement of health with lowering of blood pressure (p 0.002), high blood pressure being asymptomatic (p <0

  13. Early onset of hypertension and serum electrolyte changes as potential predictive factors of activity in advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib: results from a retrospective analysis of the HCC-AVR group

    PubMed Central

    Gardini, Andrea Casadei; Scarpi, Emanuela; Marisi, Giorgia; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Donati, Gabriele; Giampalma, Emanuela; Faloppi, Luca; Scartozzi, Mario; Silvestris, Nicola; Bisulli, Marcello; Corbelli, Jody; Gardini, Andrea; Barba, Giuliano La; Veneroni, Luigi; Tamberi, Stefano; Cascinu, Stefano; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is frequently associated with the use of angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and appears to be a generalized effect of this class of agent. We investigated the phenomenon in 61 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) receiving sorafenib. Blood pressure and plasma electrolytes were measured on days 1 and 15 of the treatment. Patients with sorafenib-induced HTN had a better outcome than those without HTN (disease control rate: 63.4% vs. 17.2% (p=0.001); progression-free survival 6.0 months (95% CI 3.2-10.1) vs. 2.5 months (95% CI 1.9-2.6) (p<0.001) and overall survival 14.6 months (95% CI9.7-19.0) vs. 3.9 months (95% CI 3.1-8.7) (p=0.003). Sodium levels were generally higher on day 15 than at baseline (+2.38, p<0.0001) in the group of responders (+4.95, p <0.0001) compared to patients who progressed (PD) (+0.28, p=0.607). In contrast, potassium was lower on day 14 (−0.30, p=0.0008) in the responder group (−0.58, p=0.003) than in those with progressive disease (−0.06, p=0.500). The early onset of hypertension is associated with improved clinical outcome in HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Our data are suggestive of an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in patients with advanced disease who developed HTN during sorafenib treatment. PMID:26893366

  14. Early onset of hypertension and serum electrolyte changes as potential predictive factors of activity in advanced HCC patients treated with sorafenib: results from a retrospective analysis of the HCC-AVR group.

    PubMed

    Casadei Gardini, Andrea; Scarpi, Emanuela; Marisi, Giorgia; Foschi, Francesco Giuseppe; Donati, Gabriele; Giampalma, Emanuela; Faloppi, Luca; Scartozzi, Mario; Silvestris, Nicola; Bisulli, Marcello; Corbelli, Jody; Gardini, Andrea; La Barba, Giuliano; Veneroni, Luigi; Tamberi, Stefano; Cascinu, Stefano; Frassineti, Giovanni Luca

    2016-03-22

    Hypertension (HTN) is frequently associated with the use of angiogenesis inhibitors targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway and appears to be a generalized effect of this class of agent. We investigated the phenomenon in 61 patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) receiving sorafenib. Blood pressure and plasma electrolytes were measured on days 1 and 15 of the treatment. Patients with sorafenib-induced HTN had a better outcome than those without HTN (disease control rate: 63.4% vs. 17.2% (p=0.001); progression-free survival 6.0 months (95% CI 3.2-10.1) vs. 2.5 months (95% CI 1.9-2.6) (p<0.001) and overall survival 14.6 months (95% CI9.7-19.0) vs. 3.9 months (95% CI 3.1-8.7) (p=0.003). Sodium levels were generally higher on day 15 than at baseline (+2.38, p<0.0001) in the group of responders (+4.95, p <0.0001) compared to patients who progressed (PD) (+0.28, p=0.607). In contrast, potassium was lower on day 14 (-0.30, p=0.0008) in the responder group (-0.58, p=0.003) than in those with progressive disease (-0.06, p=0.500). The early onset of hypertension is associated with improved clinical outcome in HCC patients treated with sorafenib. Our data are suggestive of an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in patients with advanced disease who developed HTN during sorafenib treatment. PMID:26893366

  15. Research and Development of Information and Communication Technology-based Home Blood Pressure Monitoring from Morning to Nocturnal Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi; Tomitani, Naoko; Matsumoto, Yuri; Hamasaki, Haruna; Okawara, Yukie; Kondo, Maiko; Nozue, Ryoko; Yamagata, Hiromi; Okura, Ayako; Hoshide, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Asians have specific characteristics of hypertension (HTN) and its relationship with cardiovascular disease. The morning surge in blood pressure (BP) in Asians is more extended, and the association slope between higher BP and the risk for cardiovascular events is steeper in this population than in whites. Thus, 24-hour BP control including at night and in the morning is especially important for Asian patients with HTN. There are 3 components of "perfect 24-hour BP control": the 24-hour BP level, adequate dipping of nocturnal BP (dipper type), and adequate BP variability such as the morning BP surge. The morning BP-guided approach using home BP monitoring (HBPM) is the first step toward perfect 24-hour BP control. After controlling morning HTN, nocturnal HTN is the second target. We have been developing HBPM that can measure nocturnal BP. First, we developed a semiautomatic HBPM device with the function of automatic fixed-interval BP measurement during sleep. In the J-HOP (Japan Morning Surge Home Blood Pressure) study, the largest nationwide home BP cohort, we successfully measured nocturnal home BP using this device with data memory, 3 times during sleep (2, 3, and 4 am), and found that nocturnal home BP is significantly correlated with organ damage independently of office and morning BP values. The second advance was the development of trigger nocturnal BP (TNP) monitoring with an added trigger function that initiates BP measurements when oxygen desaturation falls below a variable threshold continuously monitored by pulse oximetry. TNP can detect the specific nocturnal BP surges triggered by hypoxic episodes in patients with sleep apnea syndrome. We also added the lowest heart rate-trigger function to TNP to detect the "basal nocturnal BP," which is determined by the circulating volume and structural cardiovascular system without any increase in sympathetic tonus. This double TNP is a novel concept for evaluating the pathogenic pressor mechanism of nocturnal BP

  16. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have it, the blood ... heart has to work harder to pump the blood through. Over time, your heart weakens and ... of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  17. Portopulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yong; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2016-07-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) refers to the condition that pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) occur in the stetting of portal hypertension. The development of PoPH is thought to be independent of the severity of portal hypertension or the etiology or severity of liver disease. PoPH results from excessive vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling, and proliferative and thrombotic events within the pulmonary circulation that lead to progressive right ventricular failure and ultimately to death. Untreated PoPH is associated with a poor prognosis. As PoPH is frequently asymptomatic or symptoms are generally non-specific, patients should be actively screened for the presence of PoPH. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography is a useful non-invasive screening tool, but a definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic confirmation by right heart catheterization. Despite a dearth of randomized, prospective data, an ever-expanding clinical experience shows that patients with PoPH benefit from therapy with PAH-specific medications including with endothelin receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and/or prostanoids. Due to high perioperative mortality, transplantation should be avoided in those patients who have severe PoPH that is refractory to medical therapy. PMID:27002212

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anticoagulants (blood-thinning medicine) Calcium channel blockers Diuretics (water pills) Digoxin Your doctor will decide what type of medicine is right for you. In some cases, people who have pulmonary hypertension need surgical treatment. Surgical treatment options include a lung transplant and ...

  19. Hypertensive leucocytosis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumari, Rolinda; Laishram, Deben; Thiyam, Joshna; Javan, Ng

    2013-04-01

    There are studies showing association of high WBC count with the higher incidence of hypertension though a few are done in the Indian population. The present study was conducted with the view to find any significant increase in total leucocyte count and differential leucocyte count in hypertensive patient Twenty-seven hypertensives with 12 males and 15 females and 27 age and sex matched control subjects (normotensive) were studied. Hypertension was defined when the systolic BP > or = 140 mmHg or diastolic BP > or = 90 mmHg or history of taking antihypertensive medicine. Three blood pressure recordings at an interval of 2 minutes were taken after the patient was made to sit for 30 minutes with a standard mercury sphygmomanometer in the left arm. The disappearance of sound was used for diastolic blood pressure. Blood was drawn into EDTA containing vials. Two separate counts were performed: First for total leucocyte count (TLC) and second for determination of percentage of polymorphonuclear cells. For the TLC, 0.5 part of blood mixed with 10 part of Turk's fluid followed by counting of leucocyte in a counting chamber under light microscope. The percentage of polymorphonuclear leucocyte was performed on a slide after making the slide and staining it with Leishman's stain. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was performed using Wintrobe's methods. The first 1 hour reading on the Wintrobe's tube was taken for analysis. The total leucocyte count (TLC) for the study group as compared to the controls were 7413.70 +/- 735.45 cells/cmm and 5236.30 +/- 528.77 cells/ cmm which was statistically significant. The mean percentage neutrophils were 62.04 +/- 4.99 for study group and 53.00 +/- 3.44 for the controls; the mean percentage lymphocytes for the study group and the controls were 34.37 +/- 4.55 and 39.11 +/- 4.40 respectively. Both the mean percentage neutrophils and lymphocytes showed significant differences. The mean erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) also showed

  20. Current perspectives on combination therapy in the management of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Mallat, Samir G; Itani, Houssam S; Tanios, Bassem Y

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a worldwide health problem and a major preventable risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) events. Achieving an optimal blood pressure (BP) target for patients with HTN will often require more than one BP-lowering drug. Combination therapy is not only needed, but also confers many advantages such as better efficacy and a better tolerability. A better compliance and simplicity of treatment is noted with the single-pill combination (SPC). In addition, for those patients who do not achieve BP target when receiving dual combinations, triple SPCs are now available, and their efficacy and safety have been tested in large clinical trials. BP-lowering drugs used in combination therapy should have complementary mechanisms of action, leading to an additive BP-lowering effect and improvement in overall tolerability, achieved by decreasing the incidence of adverse effects. On the basis of large, outcome-driven trials, preferred dual combinations include an angiotensin receptor antagonist (ARB) or an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) combined with a calcium channel blocker (CCB), or an ARB or ACEI combined with a diuretic. Acceptable dual combinations include a direct rennin inhibitor (DRI) and a CCB, a DRI and a diuretic, a beta-blocker and a diuretic, a CCB and a diuretic, a CCB and a beta-blocker, a dihydropyridine CCB and a non-dihydropyridine CCB, and a thiazide diuretic combined with a potassium-sparing diuretic. Some combinations are not recommended and may even be harmful, such as dual renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibition. Currently available triple SPCs combine a renin angiotensin aldosterone system inhibitor with a CCB and a diuretic. Combination therapy as an initial approach is advocated in patients with a systolic BP more than 20 mmHg and/or a diastolic BP more than 10 mmHg above target and in patients with high CV risk. In addition, using SPCs has been stressed and favored in recent international guidelines. Recently

  1. Contrast stress echocardiography in hypertensive heart disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with atherosclerosis and cardiac and vascular structural and functional changes. Myocardial ischemia may arise in hypertension independent of coronary artery disease through an interaction between several pathophysiological mechanisms, including left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness and reduced coronary flow reserve associated with microvascular disease and endothelial dysfunction. The present case report demonstrates how contrast stress echocardiography can be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia in a hypertensive patient with angina pectoris but without significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The myocardial ischemia was due to severe resistant hypertension complicated with concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and increased arterial stiffness. PMID:22093163

  2. Hemorheology in complicated hypertension.

    PubMed

    Cicco, G; Vicenti, P; Stingi, G D; Tarallo; Pirrelli, A

    1999-01-01

    During essential and secondary arterial hypertension it is possible to observe changes in microcirculation perfusion associated with a reduction in tissue oxygenation due in part to hemorheological changes such as an increase in blood viscosity or the formation of the red blood cell "rouleaux" which favour an increase in peripheral resistance and can cause or worsen arterial hypertension. We studied 21 healthy subjects (11 male and 10 female aged 42 +/- 4) and 26 hypertensive subjects (14 male and 12 female aged 49 +/- 3). The patients were non smokers and non suffering from respiratory or haemathological pathologies. They were not undergoing antihypertensive or vasodilatory pharmaceutical treatment. The patients suffered from mild hypertension (II WHO) with Peripheral Occlusive Arterial Disease (POAD II "a" acc. to Leriche-Fontaine class.). The patients showed an increase in cholesterolaemia (6.42 +/- 0.81 mmol/l) and trygliceridaemia (2.73 +/- 0.09 mmol/l) at an average level. The patients were studied in standard conditions with a constant temperature of 22 degrees C. We measured SBP, DBP, MBP, and the HR. We also measured the elongation index (EI) (with shear stress range 0.30 to 30 pascals) using LORCA, acc. to Hardeman method (1994), in order to study the erythrocyte deformability and aggregation kinetics in dynamic condition. To evaluate deformability in static conditions we calculated the Erythrocyte Morphologic Index (EMI), acc. to Forconi method, via the bowl/discocyte ratio (for 100 red blood cells fixed in glutaraldehyde at 0.3% and observed with an optical microscope under immersion in glycerol). Peripheral oxygenation was taken transcutaneously (TcpO2). To establish the level of vascular disease we used the Regional Perfusion Index (RPI = TcpO2 foot/TcpO2 subclavean) and doppler guided Winsor Index (WI). The Student "t" test and linear regression were used for the statistical analysis. Our data confirm a reduction in peripheral tissue oxygenation in

  3. Using a Web-Based Approach to Assess Test–Retest Reliability of the “Hypertension Self-Care Profile” Tool in an Asian Population

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Yi Ling Eileen; Lua, Yi Hui Adela; Hong, Liyue; Bong, Huey Shin Shirley; Yeo, Ling Sui Jocelyn; Tsang, Li Ping Marianne; Ong, Kai Zhi; Wong, Sook Wai Samantha; Tan, Ngiap Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Essential hypertension often requires affected patients to self-manage their condition most of the time. Besides seeking regular medical review of their life-long condition to detect vascular complications, patients have to maintain healthy lifestyles in between physician consultations via diet and physical activity, and to take their medications according to their prescriptions. Their self-management ability is influenced by their self-efficacy capacity, which can be assessed using questionnaire-based tools. The “Hypertension Self-Care Profile” (HTN-SCP) is 1 such questionnaire assessing self-efficacy in the domains of “behavior,” “motivation,” and “self-efficacy.” This study aims to determine the test–retest reliability of HTN-SCP in an English-literate Asian population using a web-based approach. Multiethnic Asian patients, aged 40 years and older, with essential hypertension were recruited from a typical public primary care clinic in Singapore. The investigators guided the patients to fill up the web-based 60-item HTN-SCP in English using a tablet or smartphone on the first visit and refilled the instrument 2 weeks later in the retest. Internal consistency and test–retest reliability were evaluated using Cronbach's Alpha and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC), respectively. The t test was used to determine the relationship between the overall HTN-SCP scores of the patients and their self-reported self-management activities. A total of 160 patients completed the HTN-SCP during the initial test, from which 71 test–retest responses were completed. No floor or ceiling effect was found for the scores for the 3 subscales. Cronbach's Alpha coefficients were 0.857, 0.948, and 0.931 for “behavior,” “motivation,” and “self-efficacy” domains respectively, indicating high internal consistency. The item-total correlation ranges for the 3 scales were from 0.105 to 0.656 for Behavior, 0.401 to 0.808 for Motivation, 0.349 to 0

  4. Generic Medications and Blood Pressure Control in Diabetic Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Doyle M.; Letter, Abraham J.; Howard, George; Howard, Virginia J.; Safford, Monika M.; Prince, Valerie; Muntner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate temporal improvements in blood pressure (BP) control in subjects with diabetes and policy changes regarding generic antihypertensives. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In a cross-sectional study we used logistic regression models to investigate the temporal relationship between access to generic antihypertensive medications and BP control (<130/80 mmHg) in 5,375 subjects (mean age, 66 ± 9 years; 61% African American) with diabetes and hypertension (HTN) enrolled in the national Results from the REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) cohort study between 2003 and 2007. At enrollment, BP was measured and medications in the home determined by medication label review by a trained professional. Generic antihypertensive medication status was ascertained from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. RESULTS The percentage of subjects accessing generically available antihypertensive medications increased significantly from 66% in 2003 to 81% in 2007 (P < 0.0001), and the odds of achieving a BP <130/80 mmHg in 2007 was 66% higher (odds ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.30–2.10]) than in 2003. Nevertheless, <50% of participants achieved this goal. African American race, male sex, limited income, and medication nonadherence were significant predictors of inadequate BP control. There was no significant relationship between access to generic antihypertensives and BP control when other demographic factors were included in the model (0.98 [0.96–1.00]). CONCLUSIONS Among African American and white subjects with HTN and diabetes, BP control remained inadequate relative to published guidelines, and racial disparities persisted. Although access to generic antihypertensives increased, this was not independently associated with improved BP control, suggesting that poor BP control is multifactorial. PMID:23150284

  5. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    Salako, Babatunde L.; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Cooper, Richard S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH), isolated systolic hypertension (ISH), isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH), and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH). Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5%) and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7%) were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2%) was higher among males (P = 0.048). Female subjects were more obese (P < 0.0001) and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations. PMID:25389499

  6. Management of a child with pulmonary arterial hypertension presenting with systemic hypertension.

    PubMed

    Flores, Saul; Daily, Joshua; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Cash, Michelle C; Hirsch, Russel

    2016-02-01

    We describe the course and management of a 12-year-old girl with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension who initially presented with severe systemic hypertension. Successful therapy included pulmonary vasodilators and an atrial septostomy, while ensuring adequate maintenance of her systemic vascular resistance to maintain cardiac output. Clear understanding of the physiology and judicious medical management in patients with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension using extreme compensatory mechanisms is vitally important. PMID:26082002

  7. Pulmonary hypertension caused by pulmonary venous hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The effect of pulmonary venous hypertension (PVH) on the pulmonary circulation is extraordinarily variable, ranging from no impact on pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) to a marked increase. The reasons for this are unknown. Both acutely reversible pulmonary vasoconstriction and pathological remodeling (especially medial hypertrophy and intimal hyperplasia) account for increased PVR when present. The mechanisms involved in vasoconstriction and remodeling are not clearly defined, but increased wall stress, especially in small pulmonary arteries, presumably plays an important role. Myogenic contraction may account for increased vascular tone and also indirectly stimulate remodeling of the vessel wall. Increased wall stress may also directly cause smooth muscle growth, migration, and intimal hyperplasia. Even long-standing and severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) usually abates with elimination of PVH, but PVH-PH is an important clinical problem, especially because PVH due to left ventricular noncompliance lacks definitive therapy. The role of targeted PH therapy in patients with PVH-PH is unclear at this time. Most prospective studies indicate that these medications are not helpful or worse, but there is ample reason to think that a subset of patients with PVH-PH may benefit from phosphodiesterase inhibitors or other agents. A different approach to evaluating possible pharmacologic therapy for PVH-PH may be required to better define its possible utility. PMID:25610595

  8. Noninvasive assessment of elevated pulmonary vascular resistance in children with pulmonary hypertension secondary to congenital heart disease: A comparative study between five different Doppler indices

    PubMed Central

    Roushdy, Alaa Mahmoud; Ragab, Iman; Abd el Raouf, Wessam

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) is an important hemodynamic parameter in patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Noninvasive estimation of PVR represents an attractive alternative to invasive measurements. Methods The study included 175 patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to CHD. All patients underwent full echocardiographic study and invasive hemodynamic measurements. The study population was then subdivided into four subgroups. Each of the following Doppler indices was measured in one of these four subgroups: peak tricuspid regurgitant velocity (TRV), the ratio of the TRV to the velocity time integral of the right ventricular outflow tract (TRV/TVIRVOT), peak velocity of tricuspid annular systolic motion (TSm), heart rate corrected acceleration time and infliction time of the proximal left pulmonary artery (ATc, InTc). The data obtained was correlated with invasive PVR measurement. An ROC curve analysis was done to generate cutoff points with the highest balanced sensitivity and specificity to predict PVR > 6WU/m2. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were compared with each other to determine the most reliable cutoff point in predicting elevated PVR > 6WU/m2. Results There was a significant correlation between both the TRV and TSm and invasive measurement of PVR (r = −0.511, 0.387 and P value = 0.0002, 0.006 respectively). The TSm and TRV cutoff values were the most reliable to predict elevated PVR > 6 WU/m2. A TSm cutoff value of ⩽16.16 cm/s provided the best balanced sensitivity (85.7%) and specificity (66.7%) to determine PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. A cutoff value less than 7.62 cm/s had 100% specificity to predict PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. A TRV cutoff value of >3.96 m/s provided the best balanced sensitivity (66.7%) and specificity (100%) to determine PVRCATH > 6 WU/m2. Both TRV and TSm had the highest area under the ROC curve among the 5 DOPPLER indices studied. Conclusion Prediction of elevated

  9. [Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Zonzin, Pietro; Vizza, Carmine Dario; Favretto, Giuseppe

    2003-10-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is due to unresolved or recurrent pulmonary embolism. In the United States the estimated prevalence is 0.1-0.5% among survived patients with pulmonary embolism. The survival rate at 5 years was 30% among patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure > 40 mmHg at the time of diagnosis and only 10% among those with a value > 50 mmHg. The interval between the onset of disturbances and the diagnosis may be as long as 3 years. Doppler echocardiography permits to establish the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension. Radionuclide scanning determines whether pulmonary hypertension has a thromboembolic basis. Right heart catheterization and pulmonary angiography are performed in order to establish the extension and the accessibility to surgery of thrombi and to rule out other causes. The surgical treatment is thromboendarterectomy. A dramatic reduction in the pulmonary vascular resistance can be achieved; corresponding improvements in the NYHA class--from class III or IV before surgery to class I-II after surgery--are usually observed. Patients who are not considered candidates for thromboendarterectomy may be considered candidates for lung transplantation. PMID:14664293

  10. Organizational factors associated with readiness to implement and translate a primary care based telemedicine behavioral program to improve blood pressure control: the HTN-IMPROVE study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypertension is prevalent and often sub-optimally controlled; however, interventions to improve blood pressure control have had limited success. Objectives Through implementation of an evidence-based nurse-delivered self-management phone intervention to facilitate hypertension management within large complex health systems, we sought to answer the following questions: What is the level of organizational readiness to implement the intervention? What are the specific facilitators, barriers, and contextual factors that may affect organizational readiness to change? Study design Each intervention site from three separate Veterans Integrated Service Networks (VISNs), which represent 21 geographic regions across the US, agreed to enroll 500 participants over a year with at least 0.5 full time equivalent employees of nursing time. Our mixed methods approach used a priori semi-structured interviews conducted with stakeholders (n = 27) including nurses, physicians, administrators, and information technology (IT) professionals between 2010 and 2011. Researchers iteratively identified facilitators and barriers of organizational readiness to change (ORC) and implementation. Additionally, an ORC survey was conducted with the stakeholders who were (n = 102) preparing for program implementation. Results Key ORC facilitators included stakeholder buy-in and improving hypertension. Positive organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: other similar programs that support buy-in, adequate staff, and alignment with the existing site environment; improved patient outcomes; is positive for the professional nurse role, and is evidence-based; understanding of the intervention; IT infrastructure and support, and utilization of existing equipment and space. The primary ORC barrier was unclear long-term commitment of nursing. Negative organizational characteristics likely to impact ORC included: added workload, competition with existing programs

  11. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout ... is too high, it is called pulmonary hypertension (PH). How the pressure in the right side of ...

  12. Hypertension and Spina Bifida

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Hypertension A disease that often goes undetected. What is hypertension? Hypertension, also called high blood pressure , is a condition in which the arteries of ...

  13. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) begins with inflammation and changes in the ... different types of PH. Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may have no known cause, or the ...

  14. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  15. HNF1 AND HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Dmitrieva, Renata I.; Hinojos, Cruz A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braun, Michael C.; Fornage, Myriam; Doris, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension in SHR is associated with renal redox stress and we hypothesized that nephropathy arises in SHR-A3 from altered capacity to mitigate redox stress compared with nephropathy-resistant SHR lines. We measured renal expression of redox genes in distinct lines of the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR-A3, SHR-B2, SHR-C) and the normotensive WKY strain. The SHR lines differ in either resisting (SHR-B2, SHR-C) or experiencing hypertensive nephropathy (SHR-A3). Immediately prior to the emergence of hypertensive renal injury expression of redox genes in SHR-A3 was profoundly altered compared with the injury-resistant SHR lines and WKY. This change appeared to arise in anti-oxidant genes where 16 of 28 were expressed at 34.3% of the level in the reference strain (WKY). No such change was observed in the injury-resistant SHR lines. We analyzed occurrence of transcription factor matrices (TFM) in the promoters of the down-regulated antioxidant genes. In these genes, the HNF1 TFM was found to be nearly twice as likely to be present and the overall frequency of HNF1 sites was nearly 5 times higher, compared with HNF1 TFMs in anti-oxidant genes that were not down-regulated. We identified 35 other (non-redox) renal genes regulated by HNF1. These were also significantly down-regulated in SHR-A3, but not in SHR-B2 or SHR-C. Finally, expression of genes that comprise HNF1 (Tcf1, Tcf2 and Dcoh) was also down-regulated in SHR-A3. The present experiments uncover a major change in transcriptional control by HNF1 that affects redox and other genes and precedes emergence of hypertensive renal injury. PMID:18443232

  16. Role of testosterone in resistance to development of stress-related vascular diseases in male and female organisms: models of hypertension and ulcer bleeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semyachkina-Glushkovskaya, O.; Pavlov, A.; Semyachkin-Glushkovskiy, I.; Zinchenko, E.; Kassim, M.; Al-Fatle, F.; Al Hassani, L.; Ulanova, M.; Gekaluk, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we discuss a relationship between stress-induced formation of hypertension and ulcer bleeding and the level of serum testosterone in female and male rats. We show that the secretion of testosterone is an important sign of severity of stress-induced damages of vascular homeostasis in males but not in females.

  17. Prevention of increases in blood pressure and left ventricular mass and remodeling of resistance arteries in young New Zealand genetically hypertensive rats: the effects of chronic treatment with valsartan, enalapril and felodipine.

    PubMed

    Ledingham, J M; Phelan, E L; Cross, M A; Laverty, R

    2000-01-01

    The relative efficacy of three antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of further elevation of blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular structural remodeling in 4-week-old genetically hypertensive (GH) rats was studied by means of two complementary methods, stereology and myography. Four to 10-week-old GH rats were treated with valsartan (10 mg/kg/day), enalapril (10 mg/kg/day) or felodipine (30 mg/kg/day). Untreated GH and normotensive control rats of Wistar origin served as controls. Tail-cuff systolic SBP was measured weekly and left ventricular (LV) mass determined at the end of the experiment. Mesenteric resistance arteries (MRA) were either fixed by perfusion, embedded in Technovit and sections stained for stereological analysis, or mounted on a wire myograph for structural and functional measurements. BP and LV mass were significantly reduced by all drugs; decreases in BP and LV mass were smaller after felodipine treatment. Valsartan and enalapril caused a decrease in BP to normotensive control values. Felodipine kept BP at the 4-week level and prevented further rise with age. Valsartan caused hypotrophic outward remodeling of MRA, enalapril eutrophic outward remodeling and felodipine hypotrophic remodeling. Myograph measurements showed remodeling of the same order. While all drugs lowered the media/lumen ratio in GH to normal, the outward remodeling after valsartan and enalapril indicates that valsartan and enalapril might be more effective in reversing the inward remodeling of resistance arteries found in essential hypertension. PMID:10754398

  18. Essential Hypertension vs. Secondary Hypertension Among Children

    PubMed Central

    Banker, Ashish; Shete, Sanjay; Hashmi, Syed Sharukh; Tyson, John E.; Barratt, Michelle S.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.; Milewicz, Diane M.; Boerwinkle, Eric

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim was to determine the proportions and correlates of essential hypertension among children in a tertiary pediatric hypertension clinic. METHODS We evaluated 423 consecutive children and collected demographic and clinical history by retrospective chart review. RESULTS We identified 275 (65%) hypertensive children (blood pressure >95th percentile per the “Fourth Report on the Diagnosis, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents”) from 423 children referred to the clinic for history of elevated blood pressure. The remainder of the patients had normotension (11%), white coat hypertension (11%), prehypertension (10%), and pending diagnosis (3%). Among the 275 hypertensive children, 43% (n = 119; boys = 56%; median age = 12 years; range = 3–17 years) had essential hypertension and 57% (n = 156; boys = 66%; median age = 9 years; range = 0.08–19 years) had secondary hypertension. When compared with those with secondary hypertension, those with essential hypertension had a significantly older age at diagnosis (P = 0.0002), stronger family history of hypertension (94% vs. 68%; P < 0.0001), and lower prevalence of preterm birth (20% vs. 46%; P < 0.001). There was a bimodal distribution of age of diagnosis in those with secondary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS The phenotype of essential hypertension can present as early as 3 years of age and is the predominant form of hypertension in children after age of 6 years. Among children with hypertension, those with essential hypertension present at an older age, have a stronger family history of hypertension, and have lower prevalence of preterm birth. PMID:24842390

  19. [Hypertensive emergencies and urgencies].

    PubMed

    Reingardiene, Dagmara

    2005-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common medical problems affecting approximately 1 billion individuals worldwide. Severe hypertension that is a potentially life-threatening condition refers to a hypertensive crisis. Severe hypertension is further classified into hypertensive emergencies or hypertensive urgencies. Hypertensive emergency refers to a severe hypertension that is associated with new or progressive end-organ damage. In these clinical situations, blood pressure should be reduced immediately to prevent or minimize organ dysfunction. Hypertensive urgency refers to severe hypertension without evidence of new or worsening end-organ injury. Blood pressure can be lowered less rapidly in this condition. In this review article it is discussed about clinical assessment of patients under these conditions, evaluating neurological, cardiovascular, renal end-organ damage; how much blood pressure should be lowered, which medication should be used to lower blood pressure, treating hypertensive emergencies and urgencies; and management of specific conditions (acute intracranial events, acute left ventricular dysfunction etc). PMID:15998994

  20. Community Perceptions of Community Health Workers (CHWs) and Their Roles in Management for HIV, Tuberculosis and Hypertension in Western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Koech, Beatrice; Kamene, Regina; Akinyi, Jackie

    2016-01-01

    Given shortages of health care providers and a rise in the number of people living with both communicable and non-communicable diseases, Community Health Workers (CHWs) are increasingly incorporated into health care programs. We sought to explore community perceptions of CHWs including perceptions of their roles in chronic disease management as part of the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare Program (AMPATH) in western Kenya. In depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted between July 2012 and August 2013. Study participants were purposively sampled from three AMPATH sites: Chulaimbo, Teso and Turbo, and included patients within the AMPATH program receiving HIV, tuberculosis (TB), and hypertension (HTN) care, as well as caregivers of children with HIV, community leaders, and health care workers. Participants were asked to describe their perceptions of AMPATH CHWs, including identifying the various roles they play in engagement in care for chronic diseases including HIV, TB and HTN. Data was coded and various themes were identified. We organized the concepts and themes generated using the Andersen-Newman Framework of Health Services Utilization and considering CHWs as a potential enabling resource. A total of 207 participants including 110 individuals living with HIV (n = 50), TB (n = 39), or HTN (n = 21); 24 caregivers; 10 community leaders; and 34 healthcare providers participated. Participants identified several roles for CHWs including promoting primary care, encouraging testing, providing education and facilitating engagement in care. While various facilitating aspects of CHWs were uncovered, several barriers of CHW care were raised, including issues with training and confidentiality. Suggested resources to help CHWs improve their services were also described. Our findings suggest that CHWs can act as catalysts and role models by empowering members of their communities with increased knowledge and support. PMID:26901854

  1. New therapies for arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Rubattu, Speranza; Volpe, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is the most common chronic disease in developed countries and it is the leading risk factor for stroke, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and peripheral artery disease. Its prevalence appears to be about 30-45% of the general population. Recent European guidelines estimate that up to 15-20% of the hypertensive patients are not controlled on a dual antihypertensive combination and they require three or more different antihypertensive drug classes to achieve adequate blood pressure control. The guidelines confirmed that diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are suitable for the initiation and maintenance of antihypertensive treatment, either as monotherapy or in combination therapy. Very few antihypertensive agents have reached the market over the last few years, but no new therapeutic class has really emerged. The long-term adherence to cardiovascular drugs is still low in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the issue of compliance is persistently high in hypertension, despite the fixed-dose combination therapy. As a consequence, a cohort of high-risk hypertensive population, represented by patients affected by refractory and resistant hypertension, can be identified. Therefore, the need of controlling BP in high-risk patients may be addressed, in part, by the development of new drugs, devices and procedures that are designed to treat hypertension and comorbidities. In this review we will comprehensively discuss the current literature on recent therapeutic advances in hypertension, including both medical therapy and interventional procedures. PMID:26730462

  2. Evaluation of Effectiveness and Cost‐Effectiveness of a Clinical Decision Support System in Managing Hypertension in Resource Constrained Primary Health Care Settings: Results From a Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anchala, Raghupathy; Kaptoge, Stephen; Pant, Hira; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Franco, Oscar H.; Prabhakaran, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized control trials from the developed world report that clinical decision support systems (DSS) could provide an effective means to improve the management of hypertension (HTN). However, evidence from developing countries in this regard is rather limited, and there is a need to assess the impact of a clinical DSS on managing HTN in primary health care center (PHC) settings. Methods and Results We performed a cluster randomized trial to test the effectiveness and cost‐effectiveness of a clinical DSS among Indian adult hypertensive patients (between 35 and 64 years of age), wherein 16 PHC clusters from a district of Telangana state, India, were randomized to receive either a DSS or a chart‐based support (CBS) system. Each intervention arm had 8 PHC clusters, with a mean of 102 hypertensive patients per cluster (n=845 in DSS and 783 in CBS groups). Mean change in systolic blood pressure (SBP) from baseline to 12 months was the primary endpoint. The mean difference in SBP change from baseline between the DSS and CBS at the 12th month of follow‐up, adjusted for age, sex, height, waist, body mass index, alcohol consumption, vegetable intake, pickle intake, and baseline differences in blood pressure, was −6.59 mm Hg (95% confidence interval: −12.18 to −1.42; P=0.021). The cost‐effective ratio for CBS and DSS groups was $96.01 and $36.57 per mm of SBP reduction, respectively. Conclusion Clinical DSS are effective and cost‐effective in the management of HTN in resource‐constrained PHC settings. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.ctri.nic.in. Unique identifier: CTRI/2012/03/002476. PMID:25559011

  3. Vascular smooth muscle in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Winquist, R J; Webb, R C; Bohr, D F

    1982-06-01

    The cause of the elevated arterial pressure in most forms of hypertension is an increase in total peripheral resistance. This brief review is directed toward an assessment of recent investigations contributing information about the factors responsible for this increased vascular resistance. Structural abnormalities in the vasculature that characterize the hypertensive process are 1) changes in the vascular media, 2) rarefication of the resistance vessels, and 3) lesions of the intimal vascular surface. These abnormalities are mainly the result of an adaptive process and are secondary to the increase in wall stress and/or to pathological damage to cellular components in the vessel wall. Functional alterations in the vascular smooth muscle are described as changes in agonist-smooth muscle interaction or plasma membrane permeability. These types of changes appear to play a primary, initiating role in the elevation of vascular resistance of hypertension. These alterations are not the result of an increase in wall stress and they often precede the development of high blood pressure. The functional changes are initiated by abnormal function of neurogenic, humoral, and/or myogenic changes that alter vascular smooth muscle activity. PMID:6282652

  4. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders. PMID:26600442

  5. Device-based Therapy for Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ng, Fu L; Saxena, Manish; Mahfoud, Felix; Pathak, Atul; Lobo, Melvin D

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension continues to be a major contributor to global morbidity and mortality, fuelled by an abundance of patients with uncontrolled blood pressure despite the multitude of pharmacological options available. This may occur as a consequence of true resistant hypertension, through an inability to tolerate current pharmacological therapies, or non-adherence to antihypertensive medication. In recent years, there has been a rapid expansion of device-based therapies proposed as novel non-pharmacological approaches to treating resistant hypertension. In this review, we discuss seven novel devices-renal nerve denervation, baroreflex activation therapy, carotid body ablation, central iliac arteriovenous anastomosis, deep brain stimulation, median nerve stimulation, and vagal nerve stimulation. We highlight how the devices differ, the varying degrees of evidence available to date and upcoming trials. This review also considers the possible factors that may enable appropriate device selection for different hypertension phenotypes. PMID:27370788

  6. Mechanisms of obesity-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Vasilios; Stabouli, Stella; Papakatsika, Sofia; Rizos, Zoe; Parati, Gianfranco

    2010-05-01

    The relationship between obesity and hypertension is well established both in children and adults. The mechanisms through which obesity directly causes hypertension are still an area of research. Activation of the sympathetic nervous system has been considered to have an important function in the pathogenesis of obesity-related hypertension. The arterial-pressure control mechanism of diuresis and natriuresis, according to the principle of infinite feedback gain, seems to be shifted toward higher blood-pressure levels in obese individuals. During the early phases of obesity, primary sodium retention exists as a result of increase in renal tubular reabsorption. Extracellular-fluid volume is expanded and the kidney-fluid apparatus is resetted to a hypertensive level, consistent with a model of hypertension because of volume overload. Plasma renin activity, angiotensinogen, angiotensin II and aldosterone values display significant increase during obesity. Insulin resistance and inflammation may promote an altered profile of vascular function and consequently hypertension. Leptin and other neuropeptides are possible links between obesity and the development of hypertension. Obesity should be considered as a chronic medical condition, which is likely to require long-term treatment. Understanding of the mechanisms associated with obesity-related hypertension is essential for successful treatment strategies. PMID:20442753

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    PubMed Central

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Yuan, Carol; Oropello, John; Manasia, Anthony; Kohli-Seth, Roopa; Benjamin, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases. PMID:22848817

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnancy: critical care management.

    PubMed

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M; Yuan, Carol; Oropello, John; Manasia, Anthony; Kohli-Seth, Roopa; Benjamin, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30-56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Imaging workup may have undesirable radiation exposure. Pulmonary artery catheter remains the gold standard for diagnosing pulmonary hypertension, although its use in the intensive care unit for other conditions has slowly fallen out of favor. Goal-directed bedside echocardiogram and lung ultrasonography provide attractive alternatives. Basic principles of managing pulmonary hypertension with right ventricular failure are maintaining right ventricular function and reducing pulmonary vascular resistance. Fluid resuscitation and various vasopressors are used with caution. Pulmonary-hypertension-targeted therapies have been utilized in pregnant women with understanding of their safety profile. Mainstay therapy for pulmonary embolism is anticoagulation, and the treatment for amniotic fluid embolism remains supportive care. Multidisciplinary team approach is crucial to achieving successful outcomes in these difficult cases. PMID:22848817

  9. Association of Baseline Depressive Symptoms with Prevalent and Incident Pre-Hypertension and Hypertension in Postmenopausal Hispanic Women: Results from the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Zambrana, Ruth E.; López, Lenny; Dinwiddie, Gniesha Y.; Ray, Roberta M.; Eaton, Charles B.; Phillips, Lawrence S.; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and depressive symptoms are risk factors for hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Hispanic women have higher rates of depressive symptoms compared to other racial/ethnic groups yet few studies have investigated its association with incident prehypertension and hypertension among postmenopausal Hispanic women. This study aims to assess if an association exists between baseline depression and incident hypertension at 3 years follow-up among postmenopausal Hispanic women. Methods Prospective cohort study, Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), included 4,680 Hispanic women who participated in the observational and clinical trial studies at baseline and at third-year follow-up. Baseline current depressive symptoms and past depression history were measured as well as important correlates of depression—social support, optimism, life events and caregiving. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate prevalent and incident prehypertension and hypertension in relation to depressive symptoms. Results Prevalence of current baseline depression ranged from 26% to 28% by hypertension category and education moderated these rates. In age-adjusted models, women with depression were more likely to be hypertensive (OR = 1.25; 95% CI 1.04–1.51), although results were attenuated when adjusting for covariates. Depression at baseline in normotensive Hispanic women was associated with incident hypertension at year 3 follow-up (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.10–2.74) after adjustment for insurance and behavioral factors. However, further adjustment for clinical covariates attenuated the association. Analyses of psychosocial variables correlated with depression but did not alter findings. Low rates of antidepressant medication usage were also reported. Conclusions In the largest longitudinal study to date of older Hispanic women which included physiologic, behavioral and psychosocial moderators of depression, there was no association between baseline

  10. The role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bogaert, Yolanda E; Linas, Stuart

    2009-02-01

    The rapid rise in the incidence and prevalence of obesity and the concomitant increase in the incidence and prevalence of hypertension have fueled investigation into the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of hypertension. The genetic background that predisposes obese individuals to hypertension is being elucidated, and the importance of adipose tissue as an endocrine organ in the pathogenesis of hypertension is increasingly being recognized. Visceral adipose tissue is critical in the production of pathologic cytokines that are thought to mediate obesity-induced hypertension. Changes in the types and levels of adipocytokines that result from the accumulation of aberrant adipose tissue directly leads to alterations in systemic vascular resistance, sodium retention and sympathetic nervous system activity. Key changes in adipocytokine levels seen in obesity-induced hypertension include increased leptin and adiponectin levels. Another important mechanism in obesity-induced hypertension is the generation of angiotensin II and direct stimulation of aldosterone production. The increased sympathetic nervous system activity seen in obesity-associated hypertension leads to increased renal sodium retention and increased systemic vascular resistance. Increased systemic vascular resistance can also occur directly in obese individuals through vascular fibrosis and lipid deposition. Obesity should no longer be simply considered as a marker of cardiovascular risk but should be regarded as an important and primary contributor to the pathophysiology of hypertension. PMID:19107106

  11. Hypertension and aging.

    PubMed

    Buford, Thomas W

    2016-03-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent condition with numerous health risks, and the incidence of hypertension is greatest among older adults. Traditional discussions of hypertension have largely focused on the risks for cardiovascular disease and associated events. However, there are a number of collateral effects, including risks for dementia, physical disability, and falls/fractures which are increasingly garnering attention in the hypertension literature. Several key mechanisms - including inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction - are common to biologic aging and hypertension development and appear to have key mechanistic roles in the development of the cardiovascular and collateral risks of late-life hypertension. The objective of the present review is to highlight the multi-dimensional risks of hypertension among older adults and discuss potential strategies for treatment and future areas of research for improving overall care for older adults with hypertension. PMID:26835847

  12. Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Cirrhosis and Portal Hypertension Overview What is cirrhosis? In people who have ... lead to coma and death. What is portal hypertension? Normally, blood is carried to the liver by ...

  13. HEALS Hypertension Control Program: Training Church Members as Program Leaders

    PubMed Central

    Dodani, Sunita; Beayler, Irmatine; Lewis, Jennifer; Sowders, Lindsey A

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Health disparities related to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including stroke have remained higher in the African-Americans (AAs) than in other populations. HEALS is a faith-based hypertension (HTN) control program modified according to AA community needs, and delivered by the church-lay members called church health advisors (CHAs). This study examined the feasibility and acceptability of training CHAs as HEALS program leaders. Design: Four CHAs completed a 10-hour HEALS program training workshop at the Church, conducted by the nutrition experts. Workshop was evaluated by CHAs on their level of satisfaction, clarity of contents covered and comfort in delivery the program to the church congregation. Results: The overall six main HEALS curriculum components were completed. Workshop was highly evaluated by CHAs on length of training, balance between content and skills development, and level of satisfaction with program delivery. Conclusion: Church-based culturally modified health promotion interventions conducted by the community lay members may be a way to reduce health disparities in ethnic minorities. PMID:25685245

  14. Depression in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, V; Parikh, G J; Srinivasan, V

    1983-10-01

    168 patients attending hypertension clinic were randomly selected for the study. They were thoroughly investigated using E.C.G., X-ray chest, Urine analysis, Blood sugar, Blood urea, Serum cholesterol, Serum K, Serum Na, Scrum creatinine and Uric acid level. Detailed psychiatric case history and mental examination was carried out. Beck Rating Scale was used to measure the depression. 25% of hypertensive subjects exhibited depressive features and their mean score in Beck Rating scale is 21.76. The mean score of non-depressives is 4.46. All patients were receiving methyl dopa.25 mg. twice or thrice daily with thiazide diuretic. No significant difference in the incidence of depression with the duration of medication was observed.The hypertension was classified into mild, moderate and severe depending on the diastolic pressure. Depression was more frequent in severe hypertensives but not to the statistically significant level.Further hypertensives were classified into:1. Hypertension without organ involvement2. Hypertension with LVH only3. Hypertension with additional organ involvement4. Malignant hypertensionDepression was significantly more frequent in hypertensives with complications and also hypertensives in whom the B.P. remained uncontrolled. As all the patients were on the same drug, the drug effect is common to all; hence, the higher incidence of depression in hypertensives with complications is due to the limitation and distress caused by the illness. PMID:21847301

  15. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Hickey, Kathleen T; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. METHODS: Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. RESULTS: Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. CONCLUSION: A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  16. The Utility of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring for Detecting Silent Arrhythmias and Clarifying Symptom Mechanism in an Urban Elderly Population with Heart Failure and Hypertension: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathleen T.; Reiffel, James; Sciacca, Robert R.; Whang, William; Biviano, Angelo; Baumeister, Maurita; Castillo, Carmen; Talathothi, Jyothi; Garan, Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Background Atrial and ventriclar tachyarrhythmias, as well as bradyarrhythmias, in the elderly with heart failure (HF) and/or hypertension (HTN) have been well documented. However, the frequency of these arrhythmias, whether silent or symptomatic, and their association with subsequent cardiac events has not been well defined in patients 65 years or older with HF and other cardiovascular risk factors. Objective To assess the value of 2 weeks of remote, transtelephonic cardiac monitoring for detecting arrhythmias in an elderly, urban population living with HF. Methods Fifty-four patients with a history of systolic HF and/or HTN were consented and enrolled. All wore an auto triggered cardiac loop monitor for 2 weeks that captures EKG data and both silent and symptomatic arrhythmias were recorded. Results Mean age was 73 ± 6 years with 59% of subjects were females, 74% Hispanic, 22% black, and 4% white/other. All patients had HF and 94% had HTN. From the cardiac monitoring, 72% demonstrated ectopic atrial and ventricular activity, and 1 paroxysmal episode of atrial fibrillation was documented. In addition, 3 subjects had significant non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, and 4 individuals had severe bradycardia recorded on cardiac monitoring. These 7 individuals underwent placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) or pacemaker based on the documented arrhythmias which may have otherwise gone undetected. Conclusion A substantial proportion of patients exhibited cardiac arrhythmias. Future morbidity was prevented because of the detection of arrhythmias on monitoring that led to specific therapies such as pacemaker or ICD implantation which otherwise may not have been implemented. PMID:20798788

  17. Post-operative hypertension, a surrogate marker of the graft function and predictor of survival in living donor liver transplant recipients: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Tandon, Manish; Singh, Anshuman; Saluja, Vandana; Dubey, Gaurav; Pandey, Vijay Kant; Pandey, Chandra Kant; Karna, Sunaina Tejpal; Singh, Shweta A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: De novo hypertension (HTN) in liver transplantation recipients is a known entity. We investigated haemodynamic behaviour after a liver transplant to see if it can predict survival to discharge from the hospital. Methods: electronic records of Haemodynamic parameters and laboratory investigations of 95 patients of living donor liver transplant (LDLT) were retrospectively analysed. Results: Twenty-three patients were operated for acute liver failure (ALF) and 72 patients for chronic liver disease (CLD). Eight patients of CLD and four of ALF did not survive. CLD patients had statistically significant rise in systolic blood pressure from the post-operative day (POD) 1 to POD 4 and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) from POD 3 to POD 6. Heart rate (HR) significantly decreased from POD 3 to POD 5. Haemodynamic parameters returned to baseline values within 20 days. Diastolic HTN had a positive predictive value of 100% for survival with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Systolic HTN had a positive predictive value of 100% for survival (sensitivity-89%, specificity-100%). ALF patients had a significant decrease in HR from POD 2 to POD 10. Bradycardia (HR ≤60/min) had a positive predictive value of 100% for survival with a sensitivity of 45% and 58% in CLD and ALF, respectively, with a specificity of 100% in both the groups. Non-survivors had no significant change in haemodynamics. In CLD group, International Normalised Ratio had statistically significant, strong negative correlation with DBP. Conclusion: Haemodynamic pattern of recovery may be used for predicting survival to discharge after LDLT. PMID:27512161

  18. Purinergic dysregulation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Visovatti, Scott H; Hyman, Matthew C; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Kanthi, Yogendra; Robichaud, Patrick; Wang, Jintao; Petrovic-Djergovic, Danica; Rattan, Rahul; Burant, Charles F; Pinsky, David J

    2016-07-01

    Despite the fact that nucleotides and adenosine help regulate vascular tone through purinergic signaling pathways, little is known regarding their contributions to the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension, a condition characterized by elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and remodeling. Even less is known about the potential role that alterations in CD39 (ENTPD1), the ectonucleotidase responsible for the conversion of the nucleotides ATP and ADP to AMP, may play in pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this study we identified decreased CD39 expression on the pulmonary endothelium of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. We next determined the effects of CD39 gene deletion in mice exposed to normoxia or normobaric hypoxia (10% oxygen). Compared with controls, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice were found to have a markedly elevated ATP-to-adenosine ratio, higher pulmonary arterial pressures, more right ventricular hypertrophy, more arterial medial hypertrophy, and a pro-thrombotic phenotype. In addition, hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice exhibited a marked increase in lung P2X1 receptors. Systemic reconstitution of ATPase and ADPase enzymatic activities through continuous administration of apyrase decreased pulmonary arterial pressures in hypoxic CD39(-/-) mice to levels found in hypoxic CD39(+/+) controls. Treatment with NF279, a potent and selective P2X1 receptor antagonist, lowered pulmonary arterial pressures even further. Our study is the first to implicate decreased CD39 and resultant alterations in circulating purinergic signaling ligands and cognate receptors in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Reconstitution and receptor blocking experiments suggest that phosphohydrolysis of purinergic nucleotide tri- and diphosphates, or blocking of the P2X1 receptor could serve as treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27208163

  19. An approach to the young hypertensive patient.

    PubMed

    Mangena, P; Saban, S; Hlabyago, K E; Rayner, B

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of death worldwide. Globally and locally there has been an increase in hypertension in children, adolescents and young adults<40 years of age. In South Africa, the first decade of the millennium saw a doubling of the prevalence rate among adolescents and young adults aged 15-24 years. This increase suggests that an explosion of cerebrovascular disease, cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease can be expected in the forthcoming decades. A large part of the increased prevalence can be attributed to lifestyle factors such as diet and physical inactivity, which lead to overweight and obesity. The majority (>90%) of young patients will have essential or primary hypertension, while only a minority (<10%) will have secondary hypertension. We do not recommend an extensive workup for all newly diagnosed young hypertensives, as has been the practice in the past. We propose a rational approach that comprises a history to identify risk factors, an examination that establishes the presence of target-organ damage and identifies clues suggesting secondary hypertension, and a limited set of basic investigations. More specialised tests should be performed only where there is a clinical suspicion that a secondary cause for hypertension exists. There have been no randomised clinical trials on the treatment of hypertension in young patients. Expert opinion advises an initial emphasis on lifestyle modification. This can comprise a diet with reduced salt and refined carbohydrate intake, an exercise programme and management of substance abuse issues. Failure of lifestyle measures or the presence of target-organ damage should prompt the clinician to initiate pharmacotherapy. We recommend referral to a specialist practitioner in cases of resistant hypertension, where there is severe target-organ damage and when a secondary cause is suspected. PMID:26933708

  20. Characteristics of the patients referred to a Hypertension Unit between 1989 and 2003.

    PubMed

    Leotta, G; Rabbia, F; Canadè, A; Testa, E; Papotti, G; Mulatero, P; Veglio, F

    2008-02-01

    The level of blood pressure, the type of antihypertensive treatment and the prevalence of resistant hypertension at the first examination were evaluated in 6254 patients referred to a hospital Hypertension Unit from 1989 to 2003. From 1989-1993 to 1999-2003, we observed a reduced prevalence of grade 2 and grade 3 hypertension, and an increase in the prevalence of grade 1 hypertension, the proportion of treated subjects, the average number of antihypertensive drugs per patient and the prevalence of resistant hypertension. PMID:17855800

  1. Lifestyle changes and surgical treatment for hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Duran-Salgado, Montserrat B; Rubio-Guerra, Alberto F

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major cardiovascular risk factor that increases morbidity and mortality in the elderly because, numerous factors contribute to development and progression of hypertension in elderly patients, including excessive salt intakes, obesity, physical inactivity and stress. Hypertension treatment usually results in a combination of both, pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic measures. These latter are an essential part of treatment and cannot be replaced by the medication. Non pharmacologic management known as lifestyle modifications has a pivotal role in non-hypertensive and hypertensive individuals. In case of non-hypertensive or pre-hypertensive patients it can prevent hypertension development and in hypertensive people it has the capacity to lower blood pressure levels as well as modify cardiovascular complications. Older people tend more often to treatment resistance so it is increasingly necessary to have other therapeutic resources for patients with difficult control of disease. Minimally invasive techniques are developing that might improve the course of the disease and prevent its complications by a more extended time.In this chapter, we will review components of nonpharmacological treatment of hypertension focusing on the geriatric patient. PMID:25761105

  2. Severe and refractory hypertension in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Cuadra, René H; White, William B

    2016-06-01

    Refractory hypertension in a young person is an uncommon clinical problem, but one that may be referred to hypertension specialists. Factitious hypertension is fortunately quite rare but should be considered when evaluating patients who are refractory to numerous classes of antihypertensive therapies and have failed to achieve control despite input from multiple providers. A 19-year-old woman was referred to us after failing to achieve blood pressure control by a primary physician and two subspecialists in nephrology and hypertension; she also had numerous emergency department visits for symptomatic and severe hypertension. Exhaustive diagnostic testing for secondary causes and witnessed medication dosing in an outpatient setting was unrevealing. Subsequent inpatient admission demonstrated normalization of BPs with small doses of intravenous antihypertensive agents. During the hospitalization, she was observed "pocketing" her oral medications in the buccal folds and then discarding them in a trash container. Confrontation by psychiatrists and the hypertension specialists led to the admission that she had learned to start and stop beta-blockers and clonidine to induce severe, rebound hypertension. Factitious and induced hypertension is a rare cause of resistant or refractory hypertension. Nevertheless, hypertension specialists should suspect the diagnosis when there is a history of visits to multiple institutions and physicians, negative secondary workup, absence of overt target organ damage, history of psychiatric illness, and employment in the medical field. PMID:27160032

  3. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Tsapenko, Mykola V; Tsapenko, Arseniy V; Comfere, Thomas BO; Mour, Girish K; Mankad, Sunil V; Gajic, Ognjen

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV) pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in combinations with other agents, and must be individualized based on patient response. PMID:19183752

  4. Hypertensive urgency: an important aetiology of rebound hypertension.

    PubMed

    Malaty, John; Malaty, Irene A

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old African-American man with a history of hypertension, end-stage kidney disease (on haemodialysis) and previous cocaine misuse presented to the emergency room with a sudden onset of severe headache and diaphoresis without other neurological or cardiovascular signs/symptoms. He checked his blood pressure at home and found it to be 230/130. It did not improve despite taking two serial doses of oral clonidine 0.3 mg. Evaluation with head CT and lumbar puncture demonstrated no acute intracranial process, such as subarachnoid haemorrhage. These symptoms started after he took Libido-Max, an over-the-counter supplement for erectile dysfunction. This supplement includes yohimbine, an α-2 antagonist, which counteracts the effects of oral clonidine, one of his routine antihypertensive medications. This led to rebound hypertension and made his hypertensive urgency resistant to oral clonidine. He was successfully treated with intravenous labetalol and his symptoms quickly resolved after lowering of his blood pressure. PMID:25336552

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Jentzer, Jacob C; Mathier, Michael A

    2016-07-01

    Pulmonary hypertension occurs as the result of disease processes increasing pressure within the pulmonary circulation, eventually leading to right ventricular failure. Patients may become critically ill from complications of pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular failure or may develop pulmonary hypertension as the result of critical illness. Diagnostic testing should evaluate for common causes such as left heart failure, hypoxemic lung disease and pulmonary embolism. Relatively few patients with pulmonary hypertension encountered in clinical practice require specific pharmacologic treatment of pulmonary hypertension targeting the pulmonary vasculature. Management of right ventricular failure involves optimization of preload, maintenance of systemic blood pressure and augmentation of inotropy to restore systemic perfusion. Selected patients may require pharmacologic therapy to reduce right ventricular afterload by directly targeting the pulmonary vasculature, but only after excluding elevated left heart filling pressures and confirming increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Critically-ill patients with pulmonary hypertension remain at high risk of adverse outcomes, requiring a diligent and thoughtful approach to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25944777

  6. Reaching for Health Equity and Social Justice in Baltimore: The Evolution of an Academic-Community Partnership and Conceptual Framework to Address Hypertension Disparities.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Lisa A; Purnell, Tanjala S; Ibe, Chidinma A; Halbert, Jennifer P; Bone, Lee R; Carson, Kathryn A; Hickman, Debra; Simmons, Michelle; Vachon, Ann; Robb, Inez; Martin-Daniels, Michelle; Dietz, Katherine B; Golden, Sherita Hill; Crews, Deidra C; Hill-Briggs, Felicia; Marsteller, Jill A; Boulware, L Ebony; Miller, Edgar R Iii; Levine, David M

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular health disparities persist despite decades of recognition and the availability of evidence-based clinical and public health interventions. Racial and ethnic minorities and adults in urban and low-income communities are high-risk groups for uncontrolled hypertension (HTN), a major contributor to cardiovascular health disparities, in part due to inequitable social structures and economic systems that negatively impact daily environments and risk behaviors. This commentary presents the Johns Hopkins Center to Eliminate Cardiovascular Health Disparities as a case study for highlighting the evolution of an academic-community partnership to overcome HTN disparities. Key elements of the iterative development process of a Community Advisory Board (CAB) are summarized, and major CAB activities and engagement with the Baltimore community are highlighted. Using a conceptual framework adapted from O'Mara-Eves and colleagues, the authors discuss how different population groups and needs, motivations, types and intensity of community participation, contextual factors, and actions have shaped the Center's approach to stakeholder engagement in research and community outreach efforts to achieve health equity. PMID:27440977

  7. Beta-3 adrenergic agonists reduce pulmonary vascular resistance and improve right ventricular performance in a porcine model of chronic pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, Ana; Pereda, Daniel; García-Lunar, Inés; Sanz-Rosa, David; Fernández-Jiménez, Rodrigo; García-Prieto, Jaime; Nuño-Ayala, Mario; Sierra, Federico; Santiago, Evelyn; Sandoval, Elena; Campelos, Paula; Agüero, Jaume; Pizarro, Gonzalo; Peinado, Víctor I; Fernández-Friera, Leticia; García-Ruiz, José M; Barberá, Joan A; Castellá, Manuel; Sabaté, Manel; Fuster, Valentín; Ibañez, Borja

    2016-07-01

    Beta-3 adrenergic receptor (β3AR) agonists have been shown to produce vasodilation and prevention of ventricular remodeling in different conditions. Given that these biological functions are critical in pulmonary hypertension (PH), we aimed to demonstrate a beneficial effect of β3AR agonists in PH. An experimental study in pigs (n = 34) with chronic PH created by pulmonary vein banding was designed to evaluate the acute hemodynamic effect and the long-term effect of β3AR agonists on hemodynamics, vascular remodeling and RV performance in chronic PH. Ex vivo human experiments were performed to explore the expression of β3AR mRNA and the vasodilator response of β3AR agonists in pulmonary arteries. Single intravenous administration of the β3AR agonist BRL37344 produced a significant acute reduction in PVR, and two-weeks treatment with two different β3AR selective agonists, intravenous BRL37344 or oral mirabegron, resulted in a significant reduction in PVR (median of -2.0 Wood units/m(2) for BRL37344 vs. +1.5 for vehicle, p = 0.04; and -1.8 Wood units/m(2) for mirabegron vs. +1.6 for vehicle, p = 0.002) associated with a significant improvement in magnetic resonance-measured RV performance. Histological markers of pulmonary vascular proliferation (p27 and Ki67) were significantly attenuated in β3AR agonists-treated pigs. β3AR was expressed in human pulmonary arteries and β3AR agonists produced vasodilatation. β3AR agonists produced a significant reduction in PVR and improved RV performance in experimental PH, emerging as a potential novel approach for treating patients with chronic PH. PMID:27328822

  8. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Sivananthan, Mauran

    2016-01-01

    Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate. PMID:27403366

  9. Pediatric endocrine hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Bhavani, Nisha

    2011-01-01

    Endocrine causes of hypertension are rare in children and screening for endocrine hypertension in children should be carried out only after ruling out renal and renovascular causes. Excess levels and/or action of mineralocorticoids associated with low renin levels lead to childhood hypertension and this can be caused by various conditions which are discussed in detail in the article. Childhood pheochromocytomas are being increasingly diagnosed because of the improved application of genetic testing for familial syndromes associated with pheochromocytomas. Adolescents with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) can also have hypertension associated with their obese phenotype. PMID:22145140

  10. Hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Vadhera, Rakesh B; Simon, Michelle

    2014-12-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy complicate 7% to 10% of pregnancies and are among the major causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Recently American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Taskforce on Hypertension during Pregnancy modified the diagnosis and management of hypertension in pregnancy, recommending prompt diagnosis, admission, close monitoring, and treatment. They strive to decrease maternal mortality and systemic complications. Labetalol, hydralazine, or nifedipine are considered first-line treatment, and either can be used to stabilize the patient with similar outcomes. Definite treatment is delivery of the fetus and should be considered based on the etiology of the hypertensive crisis and gestational age. PMID:25314092

  11. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed? Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... To Look for the Underlying Cause of Pulmonary Hypertension PH has many causes, so many tests may ...

  12. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  13. Hypertension in the military patient.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Alys; Holdsworth, D A; D'Arcy, J; Bailey, K; Casadei, B

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension and hypertension-related diseases are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A diagnosis of hypertension can have serious occupational implications for military personnel. This article examines the diagnosis and management of hypertension in military personnel, in the context of current international standards. We consider the consequences of hypertension in the military environment and potential military-specific issues relating to hypertension. PMID:26253125

  14. Portopulmonary Hypertension and Liver Transplant: Recent Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Cosarderelioglu, Caglar; Cosar, Arif M; Gurakar, Merve; Pustavoitau, Aliaksei; Russell, Stuart D; Dagher, Nabil N; Gurakar, Ahmet

    2016-04-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension is one of the main pulmonary conditions affecting patients with liver disease and/or portal hypertension. Other conditions include hepatopulmonary syndrome and hepatic hydrothorax. Portopulmonary hypertension is caused by pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased pulmonary vascular resistance. It develops as a result of portal hypertension with or without liver disease and is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality. However, portopulmonary hypertension is usually asymptomatic; the most common symptoms are dyspnea, fatigue, and peripheral edema. All liver transplant candidates should be screened for potential portopulmonary hypertension because its coexistence can affect survival rates after transplant. All patients with cirrhosis who present with dyspnea should also be screened. Transthoracic echocardiography is a noni nvasive, useful method for screening, but right heart-sided catheterization remains the criterion standard for diagnosis. Portopulmonary hypertension carries a poor prognosis without liver transplant, and its severe form is considered to be a contraindication for liver transplant. Treating patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension-specific therapies before liver transplant for moderate and severe portopulmonary hypertension appears to be beneficial. PMID:27015528

  15. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More What is Pulmonary Hypertension? Updated:Aug 12,2014 Is pulmonary hypertension different ... content was last reviewed on 08/04/2014. High Blood Pressure • Home • About High Blood Pressure (HBP) Introduction What ...

  16. Hypertension and cognitive function.

    PubMed

    Paglieri, Cristina; Bisbocci, Daniela; Caserta, Mimma; Rabbia, Franco; Bertello, Chiara; Canadè, Antonella; Veglio, Franco

    2008-11-01

    Arterial hypertension, cerebrovascular disease, and dementia are related pathologies. This paper has reviewed comparatively the incidence of arterial hypertension and adult-onset dementia disorders. Hypertension is associated with cerebrovascular disease, which is in turn associated with dementia. It is the most important modifiable risk factor for stroke, which is a recognized cause of vascular dementia. In terms of pathophysiology of hypertensive brain damage, several hypotheses were developed, such as that vascular alterations induced by hypertension can induce lacunar or cortical infarcts and leucoaraiosis, that hypertension is responsible for cerebrovascular disease and acts into the contest of a pre-existing subclinic Alzheimer's disease (AD), that hypertension determines neurobiologic alterations (such as beta-amyloid accumulation) resulting in neuropathologic damage, and that aging and cerebrovascular risk factors act together to cause cerebral capillary degeneration, mitochondrial disruption, reduced glucose oxidation, and reduced ATP synthesis. The consequence of these alterations are neuronal death and dementia. Macroscopic results of these mechanisms are the so-called white matter lesions (WML), the significance of which is analyzed. Increasing clinical evidence suggests a close relationship between the reduction of elevated blood pressure and countering of both vascular dementia and AD. Antihypertensive treatment probably influences cognitive performances and prevents cognitive function alterations and the development of dementia. It is therefore important to evaluate as soon as possible cognitive functions of hypertensive patients. PMID:19021021

  17. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  18. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  19. Hypertension in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Lionakis, Nikolaos; Mendrinos, Dimitrios; Sanidas, Elias; Favatas, Georgios; Georgopoulou, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The elderly are the most rapidly growing population group in the world. Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. The risk of coronary artery disease, stroke, congestive heart disease, chronic kidney insufficiency and dementia is also increased in this subgroup of hypertensives. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to cardiovascular specialists and other practioners. During the last years and before the findings of the Systolic Hypertension in Europe Trial were published, the general medical opinion considered not to decrease blood pressure values similarly to other younger patients, in order to avoid possible ischemic events and poor oxygenation of the organs (brain, heart, kidney). The aim of this review article is to highlight the importance of treating hypertension in aged population in order to improve their quality of life and lower the incidence of the cardiovascular complications. PMID:22655162

  20. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  1. Hypertension in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Naing, Cho; Yeoh, Peng Nam; Wai, Victor Nyunt; Win, Ni Ni; Kuan, Lai Pei; Aung, Kyan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine trends in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension in Malaysia and to assess the relationship between socioeconomic determinants and prevalence of hypertension in Malaysia. The distribution of hypertension in Malaysia was assessed based on available data in 3 National Health and Morbidity Surveys (NHMSs) and 1 large scale non-NHMS during the period of 1996 to 2011. Summary statistics was used to characterize the included surveys. Differences in prevalence, awareness, and control of hypertension between any 2 surveys were expressed as ratios. To assess the independent associations between the predictors and the outcome variables, regression analyses were employed with prevalence of hypertension as an outcome variable. Overall, there was a rising trend in the prevalence of hypertension in adults ≥30 years: 32.9% (30%–35.8%) in 1996, 42.6% (37.5%–43.5%) in 2006, and 43.5% (40.4%–46.6%) in 2011. There were significant increase of 32% from 1996 to 2011 (P < 0.001) and of 29% from 1996 to 2006 (P < 0.05), but only a small change of 1% from 2006 to 2011 (P = 0.6). For population ≥18 years, only a 1% increase in prevalence of hypertension occurred from the 2006 NHMS (32.2%) to the 2011 NHMS (32.7%) (P = 0.25). A relative increase of 13% occurred in those with primary education (P < 0.001) and a 15% increase was seen in those with secondary education (P < 0.001). The rate of increase in the prevalence of hypertension in the population with income level RM 3000–3999 was the highest (18%) during this period. In general, the older age group had higher prevalence of hypertension in the 2006 and 2011 NHMSs. The prevalence peaked at 74.1% among population aged 65 to 69 years in the 2011 NHMS. Both the proportion of awareness and the control of hypertension in Malaysia improved from 1996 to 2006. A change in the control of hypertension was 13% higher in women than in men. The findings suggest that

  2. An update on the role of adipokines in arterial stiffness and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Andréa R; Fontana, Vanessa; Laurent, Stephane; Moreno, Heitor

    2015-03-01

    Adipokines are hormones produced by adipocytes and have been involved in multiple pathologic pathways, including inflammatory and cardiovascular complications in essential hypertension. Arterial stiffness is a frequent vascular complication that represents increased cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. Adipokines, such as adiponectin, leptin and resistin, might be implicated in hypertension, as well as in vascular alterations associated with this condition. Arterial stiffness has proven to be a predictor of cardiovascular events. Obesity and target-organ damage such as arterial stiffness are features associated with hypertension. This review aims to update the association between adipokines and arterial stiffness in essential and resistant hypertension (RHTN). PMID:25502905

  3. Pulmonary hypertension in patients with Martorell hypertensive leg ulcer: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Martorell hypertensive ischemic leg ulcer (Martorell ulcer) is characterized by distinct alterations in the arteriolar wall of subcutaneous vessels, leading to progressive narrowing of the vascular lumen and increase of vascular resistance. These changes are similar to the alterations observed in pulmonary arterioles in patients with chronic pulmonary hypertension (PH). This study was aimed to assess an association between the two disorders. Methods In this case–control study, 14 patients with Martorell ulcer were clinically assessed for the presence of pulmonary hypertension using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography. Data from patients were compared to 28 matched hypertensive controls. Results Systolic pulmonary arterial pressure (sPAP) in patients with Martorell ulcer was significantly higher than in the control group (33.8 ± 16.9 vs 25.3 ± 6.5 mmHg, p = 0.023); the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 31% (5/14) in patients and 7% (2/28) in controls (p = 0.031). No differences were seen in left heart size and function between patients and controls. Conclusion This study provides first evidence that subcutaneous arteriolosclerosis, the hallmark of Martorell ulcer, is associated with PH. These findings suggest that patients with Martorell leg ulcer might be at significant risk to develop elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. Patients with leg ulcers who present with dyspnea should be evaluated by echocardiography for the presence of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:22686459

  4. Update in Hypertension Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mankin, Leonard A

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of early mortality in the world, and reduction of blood pressure can help to reduce that burden. There is an enormous and ever-expanding body of literature on hypertension, with a 2016 Medline search for hypertension retrieving more than 113,000 publications. Recent guidelines from major societies have been published, and often present conflicting recommendations based on the same data. Using a question-and-answer format, this article reviews some of the recent developments and opinions on management of blood pressure and provides practical suggestions for management in the clinical arena. PMID:27235610

  5. Perioperative hypertension management

    PubMed Central

    Varon, Joseph; Marik, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    Perioperative hypertension is commonly encountered in patients that undergo surgery. While attempts have been made to standardize the method to characterize the intraoperative hemodynamics, these methods still vary widely. In addition, there is a lack of consensus concerning treatment thresholds and appropriate therapeutic targets, making absolute recommendations about treatment difficult. Nevertheless, perioperative hypertension requires careful management. When treatment is necessary, therapy should be individualized for the patient. This paper reviews the pharmacologic agents and strategies commonly used in the management of perioperative hypertension. PMID:18827911

  6. Lung Disease and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Imaizumi, Yuki; Eguchi, Kazuo; Kario, Kazuomi

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients are at a high risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. Airflow limitation is a predictor of future risks of hypertension and cardiovascular events. COPD is now understood as a systemic inflammatory disease, with the focus on inflammation of the lungs. An association between inflammation and sympathetic overactivity has also been reported. In this article, we review the association between chronic lung disease and the risks of hypertension, cardiovascular morbidity, the underlying mechanisms, and the therapeutic approach to hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in patients with lung diseases. PMID:26587450

  7. Hypertension in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Sachtleben, Thomas; Fields, Karl B

    2003-04-01

    Athletes with hypertension are frequently encountered in clinical settings and during preparticipation examinations. This common condition merits special attention in athletes, as they have particular physiologic and sport-specific demands. Awareness of the pressor response to both isometric and isotonic exercise is valuable in managing hypertensive athletes. Recommendations regarding physical activity in hypertensive patients and clearance for sports participation among competitive athletes are reviewed. Nonpharmacologic measures and the use of customary antihypertensives in athletes is essential. However, knowledge of side-effect profiles and possible negative effects on exercise tolerance guide appropriate medication choices. PMID:12831663

  8. Hypothalamic signaling mechanisms in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impact blood pressure in multiple disease states that evoke hypertension. This review highlights recent advances that have identified novel signal transduction mechanisms within multiple hypothalamic nuclei (e.g., paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus) acting to drive the pathophysiology of hypertension in neurogenic hypertension, angiotensin II hypertension, salt-sensitive hypertension, chronic intermittent hypoxia, and obesity-induced hypertension. Increased understanding of hypothalamic activity in hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets for future therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension. PMID:25860531

  9. Portal hypertension as portrayed by marked hepatosplenomegaly: case report

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, R.A.

    1987-12-01

    The liver is vulnerable to as host of disease processes, including portal hypertension. This is a severe hepatic condition in which the liver is subject to numerous imbalances: increased hepatic blood flow, increased portal vein pressure due to extrahepatic portal vein obstruction, and/or increases in hepatic blood flow resistance. Although many diseases states may be responsible for the development of portal hypertension, it is most commonly associated with moderately severe or advanced cirrhosis. Advanced, untreated portal hypertension may cause additional complications such as hepatosplenomegaly, gastrointestinal bleeding, and ascites.

  10. Pulmonary arteriovenous malformation in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arun; Gulati, Gurpreet S; Parakh, Neeraj; Aggarwal, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a morbid condition associated with complications such as hemoptysis, right heart failure, paradoxical embolism, and even death. There is no known association of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension with pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. Possible hypothesis for this association is an increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to the compensatory formation of pulmonary arteriovenous malformation. We present one such case presenting with hemoptysis that was managed with endovascular treatment. PMID:27413264

  11. Exercise and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharman, James E; La Gerche, Andre; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the benefits of regular exercise is irrefutable and increasing physical activity levels should be a major goal at all levels of health care. People with hypertension are less physically active than those without hypertension and there is strong evidence supporting the blood pressure-lowering ability of regular exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals. This narrative review discusses evidence relating to exercise and cardiovascular (CV) risk in people with hypertension. Comparisons between aerobic, dynamic resistance, and static resistance exercise have been made along with the merit of different exercise volumes. High-intensity interval training and isometric resistance training appear to have strong CV protective effects, but with limited data in hypertensive people, more work is needed in this area. Screening recommendations, exercise prescriptions, and special considerations are provided as a guide to decrease CV risk among hypertensive people who exercise or wish to begin. It is recommended that hypertensive individuals should aim to perform moderate intensity aerobic exercise activity for at least 30 minutes on most (preferably all) days of the week in addition to resistance exercises on 2-3 days/week. Professionals with expertise in exercise prescription may provide additional benefit to patients with high CV risk or in whom more intense exercise training is planned. Despite lay and media perceptions, CV events associated with exercise are rare and the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the risks. In summary, current evidence supports the assertion of exercise being a cornerstone therapy in reducing CV risk and in the prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension. PMID:25305061

  12. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure: pathophysiology and diagnosis. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Victor RG. Arterial hypertension. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil Medicine . 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  13. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure to live. Without it, blood can't flow through our bodies and carry oxygen to our vital organs. But when blood pressure gets too high — a condition called hypertension — it can lead to ...

  14. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  15. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood pressure with the development of a practical method to measure it. Physicians began to note associations between hypertension and risk of heart failure, stroke, and kidney failure. Although scientists had yet to prove that lowering blood pressure ...

  16. [Laboratory Medicine Learned Through Research on the Pathogenesis of Hypertension].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hakuo

    2015-05-01

    Laboratory tests used in clinical practice to assess hypertension include a differential diagnosis, the assessment of complications, and detection of adverse events with medication, which cover a variety of fields of laboratory medicine. I learned laboratory medicine through basic and clinical studies on the pathogenesis of hypertension, and summarized those findings and my interpretations. Basic research using animal models points to a causal role of the central nervous system in essential hypertension; however, since clinical research is technically difficult to perform, this connection has not been confirmed in humans. Recently, renal nerve ablation in humans proved to continuously decrease the blood pressure in the presence of resistant hypertension. Furthermore, when electrical stimulation was continuously applied to the carotid baroreceptor nerve of human adults, their blood pressure lowered. These findings promoted the concept that the central nervous system may actually be involved in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension, which is closely associated with excess sodium intake. We demonstrated that endogenous digitalis plays a key role in hypertension associated with excess sodium intake via sympathetic activation in rats. An increased sodium concentration inside the brain activates epithelial sodium channels and the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the brain. Aldosterone releases ouabain from neurons in the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus. Angiotensin II and aldosterone of peripheral origin reach the brain to augment sympathetic outflow. Collectively essential hypertension associated with excess sodium intake and obesity, renovascular hypertension, and primary aldosteronism and pseudoaldosteronism are all suggested to have a common cause originating from the central nervous system. PMID:26524901

  17. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD: results from the ASPIRE registry.

    PubMed

    Hurdman, Judith; Condliffe, Robin; Elliot, Charlie A; Swift, Andrew; Rajaram, Smitha; Davies, Christine; Hill, Catherine; Hamilton, Neil; Armstrong, Iain J; Billings, Catherine; Pollard, Lauren; Wild, Jim M; Lawrie, Allan; Lawson, Rod; Sabroe, Ian; Kiely, David G

    2013-06-01

    The phenotype and outcome of severe pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is described in small numbers, and predictors of survival are unknown. Data was retrieved for 101 consecutive, treatment-naïve cases of pulmonary hypertension in COPD. Mean ± SD follow-up was 2.3 ± 1.9 years. 59 patients with COPD and severe pulmonary hypertension, defined by catheter mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥40 mmHg, had significantly lower carbon monoxide diffusion, less severe airflow obstruction but not significantly different emphysema scores on computed tomography compared to 42 patients with mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. 1- and 3-year survival for severe pulmonary hypertension, at 70% and 33%, respectively, was inferior to 83% and 55%, respectively, for mild-moderate pulmonary hypertension. Mixed venous oxygen saturation, carbon monoxide diffusion, World Health Organization functional class and age, but not severity of airflow obstruction, were independent predictors of outcome. Compassionate treatment with targeted therapies in 43 patients with severe pulmonary hypertension was not associated with a survival benefit, although improvement in functional class and/or fall in pulmonary vascular resistance >20% following treatment identified patients with improved survival. Standard prognostic markers in COPD have limited value in patients with pulmonary hypertension. This study identifies variables that predict outcome in this phenotype. Despite poor prognosis, our data suggest that further evaluation of targeted therapies is warranted. PMID:23018917

  18. Cost of hypertension treatment.

    PubMed

    Odell, T W; Gregory, M C

    1995-12-01

    A retrospective analysis was conducted of the cost of hypertension care at one internal medicine clinic, looking at the cost of office visits, laboratory tests, and medications. Cost of hypertension care was $947 the first year of treatment, $575 the second year, and $420 per year thereafter. Drug costs were the major determinant of cost of care, comprising 80% of the total cost of treatment after the first year of therapy. PMID:8770721

  19. Hypertensive emergencies of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Alexander, James M; Wilson, Karen L

    2013-03-01

    Hypertension is commonly encountered in pregnancy and has both maternal and fetal effects. Acute hypertensive crisis most commonly occurs in severe preeclampsia and is associated with maternal stroke, cardiopulmonary decompensation, fetal decompensation due to decreased uterine perfusion, abruption, and stillbirth. Immediate stabilization of the mother including the use of intervenous antihypertensives is required and often delivery is indicated. With appropriate management, maternal and fetal outcomes can be excellent. PMID:23466139

  20. New approaches in the treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oparil, Suzanne; Schmieder, Roland E

    2015-03-13

    Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death, and lowering blood pressure with antihypertensive drugs reduces target organ damage and prevents cardiovascular disease outcomes. Despite a plethora of available treatment options, a substantial portion of the hypertensive population has uncontrolled blood pressure. The unmet need of controlling blood pressure in this population may be addressed, in part, by developing new drugs and devices/procedures to treat hypertension and its comorbidities. In this Compendium Review, we discuss new drugs and interventional treatments that are undergoing preclinical or clinical testing for hypertension treatment. New drug classes, eg, inhibitors of vasopeptidases, aldosterone synthase and soluble epoxide hydrolase, agonists of natriuretic peptide A and vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor 2, and a novel mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist are in phase II/III of development, while inhibitors of aminopeptidase A, dopamine β-hydroxylase, and the intestinal Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 3, agonists of components of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2/angiotensin(1-7)/Mas receptor axis and vaccines directed toward angiotensin II and its type 1 receptor are in phase I or preclinical development. The two main interventional approaches, transcatheter renal denervation and baroreflex activation therapy, are used in clinical practice for severe treatment resistant hypertension in some countries. Renal denervation is also being evaluated for treatment of various comorbidities, eg, chronic heart failure, cardiac arrhythmias and chronic renal failure. Novel interventional approaches in early development include carotid body ablation and arteriovenous fistula placement. Importantly, none of these novel drug or device treatments has been shown to prevent cardiovascular disease outcomes or death in hypertensive patients. PMID:25767291

  1. Circulatory effects of stress in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Andrén, L; Hansson, L

    1981-01-01

    Hemodynamics and plasma catecholamines were studied during mental arithmetics and cold pressor test in thirteen patients with essential hypertension. Blood pressure was significantly increased by both forms of "stress". Cold pressor test caused a significant increase in total peripheral resistance, while mental arithmetics increased heart rate and cardiac output significantly. Thus, different forms of "stress" can increase blood pressure by totally different hemodynamic mechanisms. Acute cardioselective and non-selective beta-receptor blockade did not affect the hemodynamic reaction pattern during cold pressor test. The increase in heart rate and cardiac output during mental arithmetics was blocked by non-selective but not with cardioselective beta-blockade. Both beta-blockers were, however, inefficient in preventing the blood pressure elevation induced by mental arithmetics. Plasma noradrenalin was significantly increased during mental arithmetics after both cardioselective and non-selective beta-blockade compared to placebo. During cold pressor test there was a significant increase in noradrenalin only after non-selective beta-blockade. Adrenalin in plasma was significantly increased only during mental arithmetics after cardioselective beta-blockade. The pathogenesis of essential hypertension is complex and still not fully understood. Both hereditary (1) and environmental factors such as salt intake (2) and stress (3,4,5) are probably of importance as risk factors for essential hypertension. Animal studies have shown that different forms of stress can produce permanent hypertension due to structural changes in the resistance vessels (6). Against this background we decided to investigate acute hemodynamic effects of two well-defined types of "stress", e.g. mental arithmetics and cold pressor test in patients with essential hypertension and to study if the hemodynamic reactions could be modified by cardioselective and non-selective beta-receptor blockade

  2. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Mark, Tomer M.; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  3. Anticoagulation in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jeffrey C; Pugliese, Steven C; Fox, Daniel L; Badesch, David B

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by molecular and pathologic alteration to the pulmonary circulation, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular failure, and eventual death. Pharmacologic treatment of PAH consists of use of a multitude of pulmonary vasodilators, sometimes in combination. PAH has been associated with increased thrombosis and disrupted coagulation and fibrinolysis, making anticoagulation an attractive and frequently employed therapeutic modality. Observational studies have provided some insight into the therapeutic potential of anticoagulation in idiopathic PAH, but there is a distinct lack of well-controlled prospective trials. Due to the conflicting evidence, there is a large amount of heterogeneity in the application of therapeutic anticoagulation in PAH and further well-controlled prospective trials are needed to clarify its role in treating PAH. PMID:27137522

  4. Pulmonary hypertension complicating multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Udhay; Mark, Tomer M; Niesvizky, Ruben; Sobol, Irina

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an infrequently reported complication of multiple myeloma (MM). PH has been more commonly associated with amyloidosis, myeloproliferative diseases, and the POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, monoclonal protein, skin changes) syndrome. PH in MM is typically mild to moderate and may be secondary to a variety of conditions, which include left ventricular dysfunction, high-output cardiac failure, chronic kidney disease, treatment-related toxicities, and precapillary involvement. We describe 3 patients with MM and severe PH. Each patient underwent right heart catheterization. All patients demonstrated elevated pulmonary pressures, transpulmonary gradients, and pulmonary vascular resistance. Each patient was ultimately treated with pulmonary vasodilator therapy with improvement in cardiopulmonary symptoms. Additional studies are needed to define the prevalence, prognosis, and pathogenesis of PH in this complex population and to help clarify who may benefit from targeted PH therapy. PMID:26401262

  5. [Hypertensive crisis in kidney patients].

    PubMed

    Scrivano, Jacopo; Giuliani, Anna; Pettorini, Laura; Punzo, Giorgio; Mene', Paolo; Pirozzi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The classification and management of hypertensive crisis have been recently reviewed in the context of both European and American guidelines. The key points for proper blood pressure control in severe arterial hypertension are: 1 - Distinction between urgent intervention and emergencies 2 - Choice of the best drug(s) 3 - Choice of the correct route of administration. In patients with renal disease, beside the common causes of hypertension/ hypertensive crises, kidney-specific causes should be taken into account such as renal parenchymal hypertension, renovascular hypertension, sclerodermic crises, and preeclampsia. PMID:22028263

  6. Validation of the Persian Version of the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) in Iranian Hypertensive Patients.

    PubMed

    Moharamzad, Yashar; Saadat, Habibollah; Nakhjavan Shahraki, Babak; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Morisky, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was assessed in a sample of Iranian hypertensive patients. In this multi-center study which lasted from August to October 2014, a total of 200 patients who were suffering from hypertension (HTN) and were taking anti-hypertensive medication(s) were included. The cases were accessed through private and university health centers in the cities of Tehran, Karaj, Kermanshah, and Bafgh in Iran and were interviewed face-to-face by the research team. The validated Persian translation of the MMAS-8 was provided by the owner of this scale. This scale contains 7 questions with "Yes" or "No" response choices and an additional Likert-type question (totally 8 questions). The total score ranges from 0 to 8 with higher scores reflecting better medication adherence. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.57 (±1.86). There were 108 (54%), 62 (31%), and 30 (15%) patients in the low, moderate, and high adherence groups. Internal consistency was acceptable with an overall Cronbach's ? coefficient of 0.697 and test-retest reliability showed good reproducibility (r= 0.940); P< 0.001. Overall score of the MMAS-8 was significantly correlated with systolic BP (r= - 0.306) and diastolic BP (r= - 0.279) with P< 0.001 for both BP measurements. The Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between adherence level and BP control (P= 0.016). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the scale were 92.8%, 22.3%, 52.9%, and 76.7%, respectively. The Persian version of the MMAS had acceptable reliability and validity in Iranian hypertensive patients. This scale can be used as a standard and reliable tool in future studies to determine medication adherence of Persian-speaking patients with chronic conditions. PMID:25946926

  7. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension. PMID:24609799

  8. Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Neelam; Negi, Neha; Aggarwal, Aakash; Bodh, Vijay; Dhiman, Radha K.

    2014-01-01

    Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage. Risks of variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation increase many fold during pregnancy. Optimal management revolves round managing the portal hypertension and its complications. Thus management of such cases requires multi-speciality approach involving obstetricians experienced in dealing with high risk cases, hepatologists, anesthetists and neonatologists. With advancement in medical field, pregnancy is not contra-indicated in these women, as was previously believed. This article focuses on the different aspects of pregnancy with portal hypertension with special emphasis on specific cause wise treatment options to decrease the variceal bleed and hepatic decompensation. Based on extensive review of literature, management from pre-conceptional period to postpartum is outlined in order to have optimal maternal and perinatal outcomes. PMID:25755552

  9. The current treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Kenneth Scott

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular hypertension in general is a progressive, nearly always fatal condition that until recently has had very few treatment options. Our understanding of the pulmonary vascular disease process has opened the window to earlier screening techniques, diagnosis, and treatment options. However, all current treatment options are complex and expensive and therefore require clinical support strategies often necessitating specialized pulmonary hypertension treatment centers. Whether idiopathic or secondary, pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by the deregulated proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells and intimal smooth muscle cells, both resistant to cellular apoptosis. Early recognition of such disregulation may lead to earlier diagnosis and treatment and thus alteration in the disease process. Screening of high-risk populations such as those with connective tissue disorders, HIV disease, congenital heart disease, portal hypertension, and those exposed to certain drugs and toxins such as methamphetamines and the diet drugs Dexfenfluramine and Fenfluramine is of utmost importance. Similarly, early symptom recognition in these high-risk groups is essential to earlier diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20073161

  10. Stress and hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Mustacchi, P.

    1990-01-01

    In susceptible persons emotional stress results in immediate sympathetic stimulation, with a vasomotor response that results in a high-output state and elevated blood pressure; the vasopressor response seems to be transient. There seems to be no longitudinal epidemiologic validation of the attractive hypothesis that transiently elevated blood pressures are the prelude to fixed hypertension, however. The acquisition of hypertension by populations abandoning their traditional mode of living has been attributed to the sociocultural stress inherent in westernization, but these studies usually have not taken into account concomitants of this type of acculturation, such as dietary changes and increased body weight. The inverse relationship of blood pressure levels to education could explain the development of hypertension when aspiration to upward mobility is thwarted. The severity of perceived occupational stress relates inversely to blood pressure, suggesting that familiarity with a job renders the demands made by the work environment more predictable and less threatening in terms of vasopressor response. PMID:2219875

  11. Hypertension and cerebrovascular damage.

    PubMed

    Veglio, Franco; Paglieri, Cristina; Rabbia, Franco; Bisbocci, Daniela; Bergui, Mauro; Cerrato, Paolo

    2009-08-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable factor for cerebrovascular disease. Stroke and dementia are growing health problems that have considerable social and economical consequences. Hypertension causes brain lesions by several mechanisms predisposing to lacunar infarctions, leucoaraiosis, and white matter changes as well as to intracerebral haemorrhages. These parenchymal damages determine evident or silent neurological alterations that often precede the onset of cognitive decline. It is important to recognize cerebrovascular disease and, above all, to correlate typical lesions to hypertension. Antihypertensive therapy has shown clinical benefits in primary and secondary prevention of stroke. These drugs represent important instruments against cerebrovascular disease but their effects on cognition are still matter of debate. Cerebral parenchymal and functional damages have to be considered together to make medical intervention more incisive. PMID:19100549

  12. Hypertension and sleep: overview of a tight relationship.

    PubMed

    Pepin, Jean-Louis; Borel, Anne-Laure; Tamisier, Renaud; Baguet, Jean-Philippe; Levy, Patrick; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Autonomic cardiovascular control changes across sleep stages. Thus, blood pressure (BP), heart rate and peripheral vascular resistance progressively decrease in non-rapid eye movement sleep. Any deterioration in sleep quality or quantity may be associated with an increase in nocturnal BP which could participate in the development or poor control of hypertension. In the present report, sleep problems/disorders, which impact either the quality or quantity of sleep, are reviewed for their interaction with BP regulation and their potential association with prevalent or incident hypertension. Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, sleep duration/deprivation, insomnia, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy are successively reviewed. Obstructive sleep apnea is clearly associated with the development of hypertension that is only slightly reduced by continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Shorter and longer sleep durations are associated with prevalent or incident hypertension but age, gender, environmental exposures and ethnic differences are clear confounders. Insomnia with objective short sleep duration, restless legs syndrome and narcolepsy may impact BP control, needing additional studies to establish their impact in the development of permanent hypertension. Addressing sleep disorders or sleep habits seems a relevant issue when considering the risk of developing hypertension or the control of pre-existent hypertension. Combined sleep problems may have potential synergistic deleterious effects. PMID:24846771

  13. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertensive End-Organ Damage

    PubMed Central

    McMaster, William G.; Kirabo, Annet; Madhur, Meena S.; Harrison, David G.

    2015-01-01

    For more than 50 years, it has been recognized that immunity contributes to hypertension. Recent data have defined an important role of T cells and various T cell-derived cytokines in several models of experimental hypertension. These studies have shown that stimuli like angiotensin II, DOCA-salt and excessive catecholamines lead to formation of effector like T cells that infiltrate the kidney and perivascular regions of both large arteries and arterioles. There is also accumulation of monocyte/macrophages in these regions. Cytokines released from these cells, including IL-17, IFN-γ, TNFα and IL-6 promote both renal and vascular dysfunction and damage, leading to enhanced sodium retention and increased systemic vascular resistance. The renal effects of these cytokines remain to be fully defined, but include enhanced formation of angiotensinogen, increased sodium reabsorption and increased renal fibrosis. Very recent experiments have defined a link between oxidative stress and immune activation in hypertension. These have shown that hypertension is associated with formation of reactive oxygen species in dendritic cells that lead to formation of gamma ketoaldehydes, or isoketals. These rapidly adduct to protein lysines and are presented by dendritic cells as neoantigens that activate T cells and promote hypertension. Thus, cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system contribute to end-organ damage and dysfunction in hypertension. Therapeutic interventions to reduce activation of these cells may prove beneficial in reducing end-organ damage and preventing consequences of hypertension including myocardial infarction, heart failure, renal failure and stroke. PMID:25767287

  14. Perspectives on research in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seedat, Y K

    2009-01-01

    This is a review of my published research on hypertension over 45 years on the three main racial groups residing in KwaZulu-Natal and its main city Durban. These three groups are blacks - mainly Zulu, whites and Indians. The research focused mainly on epidemiology, determinants of the aetiology of hypertension, clinical features, varying responses to hypotensive agents among the racial groups, complications that result from hypertension and the control of hypertension. PMID:19287815

  15. Association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Moreira, L B; Gus, M; Nunes, G; Gonçalves, C B C; Martins, J; Wiehe, M; Fuchs, F D

    2009-06-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is an emerging sex-specific risk factor for cardiovascular disease and may lead to more severe hypertension after pregnancy. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of pregnancy-related hypertension among patients referred to a hypertension clinic and its association with the severity of hypertension and evidence of end-organ damage. In this cross-sectional study, women with hypertension were submitted to a systematic clinical evaluation. The occurrence of pregnancy-related hypertension was investigated by questionnaire. The association between pregnancy-related hypertension and severity of hypertension (stage 2 according to Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC VII)) and end-organ damage was assessed in a logistic regression model. The mean age, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and body mass index (BMI) of the 768 women examined were 51.6+/-12.7 years, 158.2+/-26.6 mm Hg, 93.8+/-14.3 mm Hg and 29.4+/-5.6 kg/m(2), respectively. The proportion of women with pregnancy-related hypertension was 32.9%. It was significantly associated with hypertension at stage 2 (OR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.14-2.24; P=0.01) after controlling for confounders. The occurrence of a pregnancy-related hypertension was not associated with evidence of optic fundi abnormalities, left ventricular hypertrophy or abnormalities in kidney function. In conclusion, pregnancy-related hypertension is frequent in women referred to a hypertension clinic, and is associated with severe hypertension but not with evidence of end-organ damage. PMID:19020534

  16. The Comorbidities of Diabetes and Hypertension: Mechanisms and Approach to Target Organ Protection

    PubMed Central

    Long, Amanda N.; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Up to 75% of adults with diabetes also have hypertension, and patients with hypertension alone often show evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, hypertension and diabetes are common, intertwined conditions that share a significant overlap in underlying risk factors (including ethnicity, familial, dyslipidemia, and lifestyle determinants) and complications. These complications include microvascular and macrovascular disorders. The macrovascular complications, which are well recognized in patients with longstanding diabetes or hypertension, include coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, congestive heart failure, and peripheral vascular disease. Although microvascular complications (retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy) are conventionally linked to hyperglycemia, studies have shown that hypertension constitutes an important risk factor, especially for nephropathy. The familial predisposition to diabetes and hypertension appears to be polygenic in origin, which militates against the feasibility of a “gene therapy” approach to the control or prevention of these conditions. On the other hand, the shared lifestyle factors in the etiology of hypertension and diabetes provide ample opportunity for nonpharmacological intervention. Thus, the initial approach to the management of both diabetes and hypertension must emphasize weight control, physical activity, and dietary modification. Interestingly, lifestyle intervention is remarkably effective in the primary prevention of diabetes and hypertension. These principles also are pertinent to the prevention of downstream macrovascular complications of the two disorders. In addition to lifestyle modification, most patients will require specific medications to achieve national treatment goals for hypertension and diabetes. Management of hyperglycemia, hypertension, dyslipidemia and the underlying hypercoagulable and proinflammatory states requires the use of multiple medications in combination. PMID:21466619

  17. Anti-Resorptive Activity of Anti-Hypertensive Agent ACEi in Older Men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rianon, Nahid; Edwards, BeJier; Nhonthachit, Phetsamong; Messick, Amanda; Gagel, Robert; Smith, Scott M.

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is associated with bone loss due to activation of the renin- angiotensin system (RAS) which in turn affects bone turnover. Animal studies have shown decreased bone resorption (up to 19%) and increased bone mass (up to 2%) following treatment with RAStargeted antihypertensive medications (e.g., angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, ACEi). Cross-sectional human studies have documented greater femoral neck BMD in older hypertensive men and women treated with ACEi compared to those not-treated with ACEi (nor other RAS-targeted medications). These findings raise the potential for ACEi use in preventing, or at a minimum slowing bone loss due to age or even microgravity. Based on this, we conducted a cohort study to investigate if ACEi treatment would decrease bone resorption in humans. We investigated changes in serum CTX and P1NP in 10 hypertensive men (45 years or older) treated with (N=5) without (N=5) exposure to ACEi for 3-months. Lisinopril was the ACEi used, and dose was adjusted as deemed appropriate by the attending physicians. Participants did not have any known skeletal health problem and were not exposed to any bisphosphonates or hydrochlorothiazides. A small sample size prevented detailed statistical analysis and hence, we present a preliminary descriptive report of our findings. Participants' age was 57+/-7 years (mean +/-SD), baseline body mass index was 27+/-5 kg/sq m, serum concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D was 66+/-17 nmol/L and parathyroid hormone was 30+/-13 pg/ml. After Lisinopril treatment, men demonstrated a 10% decrease in the bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and 5% decrease in formation marker procollagen type 1 amino-terminal pro-peptide (P1NP). On the contrary, serum CTX increased 41% and P1NP increased 10% in those who were not treated with ACEi. This is the first human study to report reduction in bone resorptive activity following ACEi treatment for hypertension in older men. Our results indicates

  18. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    PubMed

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  19. Gender Differences in Hypertension and Hypertension Awareness Among Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    EVERETT, BETHANY; ZAJACOVA, ANNA

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health. PMID:25879259

  20. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Baradaran, Azar; Nasri, Hamid; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented. PMID:25097610

  1. Hypertension in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Aglony, Marlene; Acevedo, Monica; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2009-12-01

    In adults, hypertension has long been perceived as a public health problem. By contrast, its impact in childhood is far less appreciated. In fact, quite often, high blood pressure in children is not even diagnosed. Blood pressure is a vital sign that is routinely obtained during a physical examination of adults, but only very seldom in children. The diagnosis of hypertension in children is complicated because 'normal' blood pressure values vary with age, sex and height. As a consequence, almost 75% of the cases of arterial hypertension and 90% of the cases of prehypertension in children and adolescents are currently undiagnosed. Furthermore, adolescence hypertension is increasing in prevalence as the prevalence of pediatric obesity has increased. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a useful method for risk evaluation in adolescents. In addition to being viewed as an important cardiovascular risk factor in adolescents, elevated blood pressure should prompt a thorough search for other modifiable risk factors that, if treated, might reduce teenagers' risk of developing cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Thus, assessing blood pressure values in children represents one of the most important measurable markers of cardiovascular risk later in life and a major step in preventive medicine. PMID:19954321

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... En Español Who is at risk? How is high blood pressure treated? Understanding your blood pressure: What do the ...

  3. Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Souza, Rogerio; Jardim, Carlos; Humbert, Marc

    2013-10-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), formerly called primary pulmonary hypertension, is a rare disease (incidence and prevalence rates of approximately one and six cases per million inhabitants, respectively) with different clinical phenotypes. A group of diverse conditions manifest pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and share similar pathological and/or clinical findings with IPAH. By definition, IPAH is diagnosed only after alternative diagnoses have been ruled out. Extensive investigation is needed to determine if PAH is associated with thyroid diseases, infectious diseases, autoimmune conditions, exposure to certain drugs (particularly anorexigens), certain genetic mutations, and so on. The presence of genetic abnormalities and risk factors (such as specific drug exposures) reinforces the "multiple hit" concept for the development of pulmonary hypertension. Fortunately, within the past two decades, therapeutic options have become available for IPAH, resulting in improved survival and clinical outcomes. At least seven different compounds have been registered for PAH treatment. However, even with aggressive PAH-specific therapy, mortality rates remain high (∼40% at 5 years). Given the high mortality rates, the use of combinations of agents that work by different pathways has been advocated (either as "add-on" therapy or initial "up front" therapy). Further, new therapeutic agents and treatment strategies are on the near horizon, aiming to further improve survival from the remarkable progress already seen. PMID:24037625

  4. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... upper arm. Then they listen to your blood flow with a stethoscope. High blood pressure (also called hypertension) occurs when your ... is not a good idea if you have high blood pressure during pregnancy. Your body needs salt to keep up the flow of fluid in your body, so you need ...

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a clot in question.

    PubMed

    Patel, Bhavin; Pakala, Aneesh; Aronson, Willard; Magharyous, Hany; Brown, Brent

    2014-07-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a group of disorders characterized by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance leading to right heart failure and premature death. We present an unusual case of PAH diagnosed initially as Idiopathic PAH (IPAH) after secondary causes were excluded which was successfully managed for a number of years with vasodilators and anticoagulation. Over the months after stopping anticoagulation (because of recurring small bowel hemorrhaging) patient developed progressive findings of right heart failure, which failed to respond to escalating doses of prostacyclin. The patient died and an autopsy revealed the surprising finding of extensive organized central pulmonary artery thrombi as is seen in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). We discuss the question of whether these thrombi are generally embolic or develop in situ and recommend that clinicians have a high index of suspicion for central thrombi in patients with IPAH were anticoagulation is contraindicated. PMID:25223151

  6. [Pathophysiology of portal hypertension, what's new?].

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2010-09-01

    Portal hypertension (PHT) is associated with changes in the intrahepatic, systemic and portosystemic collateral circulations. Alteration in vasoreactivity (vasodilation and vasoconstriction) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of PHT by contributing to increased intrahepatic resistance, hyperdynamic circulation and the expansion of the collateral circulation. PHT is also importantly characterized by changes in vascular structure; termed vascular remodeling, which is an adaptive response of the vessel wall that occurs in response to chronic changes in the environment such as shear stress. Angiogenesis, the sprouting of new blood vessels, also occurs in PHT, especially in the expansion of the portosystemic collateral circulation. These complementary processes of vasoreactivity, vascular remodeling and angiogenesis represent important targets in the research for the treatment of portal hypertension. PMID:20847603

  7. Diagnosis and Management of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Houtchens, Jeanne; Martin, Douglas; Klinger, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disease, which requires a high index of suspicion to diagnose when patients initially present. Initial symptoms can be nonspecific and include complaints such as fatigue and mild dyspnea. Once the disease is suspected, echocardiography is used to estimate the pulmonary arterial (PA) pressure and to exclude secondary causes of elevated PA pressures such as left heart disease. Right heart catheterization with vasodilator challenge is critical to the proper assessment of pulmonary hemodynamics and to determine whether patients are likely to benefit from vasodilator therapy. Pathologically, the disease is characterized by deleterious remodeling of the distal pulmonary arterial and arteriolar circulation, which results in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. In the last fifteen years, medications from three different classes have been approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. These include the prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists, and phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. PMID:21941650

  8. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    PubMed

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment. PMID:19124418

  9. Cognitive function in hypertensive children.

    PubMed

    Lande, Marc B; Kupferman, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    Young hypertensive adults demonstrate decreased performance on neurocognitive testing compared with that of normotensive controls. There is emerging, preliminary evidence that children with hypertension also manifest cognitive differences when compared to normotensive controls. These preliminary studies consist mostly of database and single-center studies that focus primarily on differences in neurocognitive test performance and differences in cerebrovascular reactivity between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Lessons from the literature on cognition in adult hypertensives and experience from the preliminary studies in children informed the design of a current, multicenter, ongoing study of cognition in children with primary hypertension. PMID:25432900

  10. Prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes and pre-diabetes among hypertensive patients attending Kiambu district Hospital, Kenya: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Meme, Nkatha; Amwayi, Samuel; Nganga, Ziporrah; Buregyeya, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Hypertension (HTN) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are two common non-communicable diseases (NCDs) that are closely linked: one cannot be properly managed without attention to the other. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetic and pre-diabetic states that is abnormal glucose regulation (AGR) and factors associated with it among hypertensive patients in Kiambu Hospital, Kenya. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from February 2014 to April 2014. Hypertensive patients aged ≥18 attending the out-patient medical clinic were included in the study. Pregnant and known diabetic patients were excluded. Data was collected on socio-demographics, behavior, and anthropometrics. Diabetes status was based on a Glycated Haemoglobin (HbA1C) classification of ≥6.5% for diabetes, 6.0-6.4% for pre-diabetes and ≤6.0% for normal. AGR was the dependable variable and included two diabetic categories; diabetes and pre-diabetes. Results We enrolled 334 patients into the study: the mean age was 59 years (Standard deviation= 14.3). Of these patients 254 (76%) were women. Thirty two percent (107/334; 32%) were found to have AGR, with 14% (46) having un-diagnosed DM and 18%(61) with pre-diabetes. Factors associated with AGR were age ≥45 (OR = 3.23; 95% CI 1.37 ≥ 7.62), basal metabolic index (BMI) ≥ 25 Kg/m2 (OR= 3.13; 95% CI 1.53 - 6.41), low formal education (primary/none)(OR= 2; 95%CI 1.08 - 3.56) and family history of DM (OR = 2.19; 95%CI 1.16 - 4.15). Conclusion There was a high prevalence of undiagnosed AGR among hypertensive patients. This highlights the need to regularly screen for AGR among hypertensive patients as recommended by WHO. PMID:26966482

  11. [Surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Mercier, Olaf; Fadel, Elie; Mussot, Sacha; Fabre, Dominique; Ladurie, François-Leroy; Angel, Claude; Brenot, Philippe; Riou, Jean-Yves; Bourkaib, Riad; Lehouerou, Daniel; Musat, Andy; Stephan, François; Rohnean, Adéla; Jaïs, Xavier; Humbert, Marc; Sitbon, Olivier; Simonneau, Gérald; Dartevelle, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is a rare but underdiagnosed disease. The development of imaging played a crucial role for the screening and the decision of operability over the past few years. Indeed, chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension is the only type of pulmonary hypertension with a potential curative treatment: pulmonary endarterectomy. It is a complexe surgical procedure performed under cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest. The aim of the procedure is to completely remove the scar tissue inside the pulmonary arteries down to the segmental and sub-segmental levels. Compared to lung transplantation, which carries a postoperative mortality of 15-20% and a 5-year survival of 50%, pulmonary endarterectomy is a curative treatment with a postoperative mortality of less than 3%. However, lung transplantation remains an option for young patients with inoperable distal disease or after pulmonary endarterectomy failure. Considering that medical history of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism is lacking in 25 to 50%, the diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension remains challenging. The lung V/Q scan is useful for the diagnosis showing ventilation and perfusion mismatches. Lesions located at the level of the pulmonary artery, the lobar or segmental arteries may be accessible to surgical removal. The pulmonary angiogram with the lateral view and the pulmonary CT scan help to determine the level of the intravascular lesions. If there is a correlation between the vascular obstruction assessed by imaging and the pulmonary resistance, pulmonary endarterectomy carries a postoperative mortality of less than 3% and has a high rate of success. If the surgery is performed at a later stage of the disease, pulmonary arteriolitis developed mainly in unobstructed territories and participated in the elevated vascular resistance. At this stage, postoperative risk is higher. PMID:25154908

  12. Renal sympathetic denervation for the treatment of refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leong, Kui Toh Gerard; Walton, Antony; Krum, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Resistant hypertension poses significant health concerns. There are strong demands for new and safe therapies to control resistant hypertension while addressing its common causes, specifically poor compliance to lifelong polypharmacy, lifestyle modifications, and physician inertia. The sympathetic nervous system plays a significant pathophysiological role in hypertension. Surgical sympathectomy for blood pressure reduction is an old but extremely efficacious therapeutic concept, now abandoned with the dawn of a safer contemporary pharmacology era. Recently, clinical studies have revealed promising results for safe and sustained blood pressure reduction with percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. This is a novel, minimally invasive, device-based therapy, specifically targeting and ablating the renal artery nerves with radiofrequency waves without permanent implantation. There are also reported additional benefits in related comorbidities, such as impaired glucose metabolism, renal impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and others. This review focuses on how selective renal sympathetic denervation works, its present and potential therapeutic indications, and its future directions. PMID:24422574

  13. Pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders: pulmonary vascular disease: the global perspective.

    PubMed

    Machado, Roberto F; Gladwin, Mark T

    2010-06-01

    The inherited hemoglobin disorders sickle cell disease and thalassemia are the most common monogenetic disorders worldwide. Pulmonary hypertension is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in adult patients with sickle cell disease and thalassemia, and hemolytic disorders are potentially among the most common causes of pulmonary hypertension. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension in hemolytic disorders is likely multifactorial, including hemolysis, impaired nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, chronic hypoxemia, chronic thromboembolic disease, chronic liver disease, and asplenia. In contrast to patients with traditional forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension, patients with hemolytic disorders have a mild-to-moderate degree of elevation in mean pulmonary pressures, with mild elevations in pulmonary vascular resistance. The hemodynamic etiology of pulmonary hypertension in these patients is multifactorial and includes pulmonary arterial hypertension, pulmonary venous hypertension, and pulmonary hypertension secondary to a hyperdynamic state. Currently, there are limited data on the effects of any specific treatment modality for pulmonary hypertension in patients with hemolytic disorders. It is likely that maximization of treatment of the primary hemoglobinopathy in all patients and treatment with selective pulmonary vasodilators and antiproliferative agents in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension would be beneficial. However, there is still a major need for large multinational trials of novel therapies for this patient population. PMID:20522578

  14. Diagnosing and Managing Primary Aldosteronism in Hypertensive Patients: a Case-Based Approach.

    PubMed

    Carey, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism with a prevalence of 8 % of hypertension and 20 % of pharmacologically resistant hypertension is the most common secondary cause of hypertension. Yet, the diagnosis is missed in the vast majority of patients. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for primary aldosteronism in patients with sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) ≥150/100 mmHg if possible prior to initiation of antihypertensive therapy, and in patients with resistant hypertension, spontaneous or diuretic-induced hypokalemia, adrenal incidentaloma, obstructive sleep apnea, a family history of early onset of hypertension or cerebrovascular accident

  15. Hypertension: the missing WNKs.

    PubMed

    Dbouk, Hashem A; Huang, Chou-Long; Cobb, Melanie H

    2016-07-01

    The With no Lysine [K] (WNK) family of enzymes are central in the regulation of blood pressure. WNKs have been implicated in hereditary hypertension disorders, mainly through control of the activity and levels of ion cotransporters and channels. Actions of WNKs in the kidney have been heavily investigated, and recent studies have provided insight into not only the regulation of these enzymes but also how mutations in WNKs and their interacting partners contribute to hypertensive disorders. Defining the roles of WNKs in the cardiovascular system will provide clues about additional mechanisms by which WNKs can regulate blood pressure. This review summarizes recent developments in the regulation of the WNK signaling cascade and its role in regulation of blood pressure. PMID:27009339

  16. Hypertension in perspective

    PubMed Central

    Terpstra, W.F.; Zijlstra, F.

    2005-01-01

    Decisions about the management of hypertensive patients should not be based on the level of blood pressure alone, but also on the presence of other risk factors, target organ damage and cardiovascular and renal disease. The results of echocardiography and carotid ultrasonography aids in the stratification of absolute cardiovascular risk as recently advocated by the guidelines of the European Society of Hypertension 2003. Therefore, the detection of target organ damage by ultrasound techniques allows an accurate identification of high-risk patients. Cardiovascular risk stratification only based on a simple routine work-up can often underestimate overall risk, thus leading to a potentially inadequate therapeutic management especially of low-medium risk patients. PMID:25696486

  17. [Hypertensive Disorders in Pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Middeke, Martin

    2016-09-01

    In pregnancy, both mother and fetus benefit from blood pressure in normal ranges. There is discrepancy in the normenclature and thresholds for classification of hypertension in pregnancy and for initiation of antihypertensive treatment in different international guidelines. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure values that are associated with normal outcome are notably lower than any recommended treatment threshold in pregnancy. Tight blood pressure control under 85 mmHg diastolic is save and significantly prevents severe maternal hypertension as could be demonstrated in CHIPS. Close blood pressure monitoring comprising modern methods and devices including telemonitoring allows early recognition of risk developments and optimal guidance of antihypertensive therapy starting early in pregnancy. Only a few pharmacological substances are suitable for antihypertensive treatment in pregnancy. PMID:27598915

  18. An update on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies.

    PubMed

    Muiesan, Maria Lorenza; Salvetti, Massimo; Amadoro, Valentina; di Somma, Salvatore; Perlini, Stefano; Semplicini, Andrea; Borghi, Claudio; Volpe, Massimo; Saba, Pier Sergio; Cameli, Matteo; Ciccone, Marco Matteo; Maiello, Maria; Modesti, Pietro Amedeo; Novo, Salvatore; Palmiero, Pasquale; Scicchitano, Pietro; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Pedrinelli, Roberto

    2015-05-01

    Severe acute arterial hypertension is usually defined as 'hypertensive crisis', although 'hypertensive emergencies' or 'hypertensive urgencies', as suggested by the Joint National Committee and the European Society of Hypertension, have completely different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.The prevalence and demographics of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies have changed over the last four decades, but hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are still associated with significant morbidity and mortality.Different scientific societies have repeatedly produced up-to-date guidelines; however, the treatment of hypertensive emergencies and urgencies is still inappropriate, with potential clinical implications.This review focuses on hypertensive emergencies and urgencies management and treatment, as suggested by recent data. PMID:25575271

  19. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  20. Drug Treatment of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Douglas R.

    1991-01-01

    Hypertension is an important contributor to cardiovascular disease, which accounts for about half of all deaths in Western societies. Proper control of elevated blood pressure is therefore important. Support has grown for an approach to care in which antihypertensive drug therapy is individually tailored for each patient. Management strategy based on this approach is discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of the various antihypertensive agents are reviewed. PMID:21229011

  1. Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Oudiz, Ronald J

    2016-08-01

    The classification of pulmonary hypertension (PH) is an attempt to define subtypes of PH based on clinical presentation, underlying physiology, and treatment implications. Five groups of PH have been defined, and the classification scheme has been refined over the years to guide clinicians in the diagnosis and management of PH. Understanding the classification of PH is paramount before embarking on a work-up of patients with PH or suspected PH because treatment and outcome can vary greatly. PMID:27443133

  2. Endothelial dysfunction in hypertension: the role of arginase.

    PubMed

    Michell, Danielle L; Andrews, Karen L; Chin-Dusting, Jaye P F

    2011-01-01

    Essential hypertension is the leading risk factor for mortality worldwide, accountable for 13% of deaths globally. Despite numerous therapies available uncontrolled hypertension is still very prevalent today and a large subset are shown to have treatment resistant hypertension. Several cardiovascular diseases including hypertension result in endothelial dysfunction and inflammation. Once thought of as a passive barrier between blood flow and tissue the endothelium is now considered a main hub for maintaining vascular tone, structure and haemostasis. Several pathways occur in the endothelium that can result in dysfunction and altered vascular stasis. Such pathways include the impairment of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO), increases in pro-inflammatory pathways such as ROS (reactive oxygen species) production and also recent reports suggest that the enzyme arginase, associated with the L-arginine-urea cycle, may be an important factor that is increased in hypertension. These pathways may offer alternative mechanisms to treat the complications associated with hypertension rather than the conventional therapies that aim to lower blood pressure. PMID:21622244

  3. Obesity-induced hypertension: interaction of neurohumoral and renal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hall, John E; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E

    2015-03-13

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65% to 75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include (1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, (2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and (3) increased sympathetic nervous system activity. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is likely due, in part, to renal compression, as well as sympathetic nervous system activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for sympathetic nervous system activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but may require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus, and inflammation. Unless effective antiobesity drugs are developed, the effect of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  4. OBESITY-INDUCED HYPERTENSION: INTERACTION OF NEUROHUMORAL AND RENAL MECHANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John E.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; da Silva, Alexandre A.; Wang, Zhen; Hall, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Excess weight gain, especially when associated with increased visceral adiposity, is a major cause of hypertension, accounting for 65–75% of the risk for human primary (essential) hypertension. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption impairs pressure natriuresis and plays an important role in initiating obesity hypertension. The mediators of abnormal kidney function and increased blood pressure during development of obesity hypertension include 1) physical compression of the kidneys by fat in and around the kidneys, 2) activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), and 3) increased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Activation of the RAAS system is likely due, in part, to renal compression as well as SNS activation. However, obesity also causes mineralocorticoid receptor activation independent of aldosterone or angiotensin II. The mechanisms for SNS activation in obesity have not been fully elucidated but appear to require leptin and activation of the brain melanocortin system. With prolonged obesity and development of target organ injury, especially renal injury, obesity-associated hypertension becomes more difficult to control, often requiring multiple antihypertensive drugs and treatment of other risk factors, including dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and diabetes, and inflammation. Unless effective anti-obesity drugs are developed, the impact of obesity on hypertension and related cardiovascular, renal and metabolic disorders is likely to become even more important in the future as the prevalence of obesity continues to increase. PMID:25767285

  5. Portal hypertensive enteropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Cohen, Robert; Chawla, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a condition that describes the pathologic changes and mucosal abnormalities observed in the small intestine of patients with portal hypertension. This entity is being increasingly recognized and better understood over the past decade due to increased accessibility of the small intestine made possible by the introduction of video capsule endoscopy and deep enteroscopy. Though challenged by its diverse endoscopic appearance, multiple scoring systems have been proposed to classify the endoscopic presentation and grade its severity. Endoscopic findings can be broadly categorized into vascular and non-vascular lesions with many subtypes of both categories. Clinical manifestations of PHE can range from asymptomatic incidental findings to fatal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Classic endoscopic findings in the setting of portal hypertension may lead to a prompt diagnosis. Occasionally histopathology and cross sectional imaging like computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in establishing a diagnosis. Management of overt bleeding requires multidisciplinary approach involving hepatologists, endoscopists, surgeons, and interventional radiologists. Adequate resuscitation, reduction of portal pressure, and endoscopic therapeutic intervention remain the main principles of the initial treatment. This article reviews the existing evidence on PHE with emphasis on its classification, diagnosis, clinical manifestations, endoscopic appearance, pathological findings, and clinical management. A new schematic management of ectopic variceal bleed is also proposed. PMID:25729469

  6. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Coope, J

    1987-08-01

    Hypertension is a common finding in patients aged over 60 years, but the following questions need answering. How dangerous is it? Will lowering the blood pressure reduce the attendant risks? What is the 'cost' of such treatment in terms of side effects, drug-induced disease and health service finance? Two recently completed trials throw light on these problems: EWPHE (European Working Party on Hypertension in the Elderly), a European study based on hospital-clinic attenders, using a diuretic backed up with methyldopa; and HEP (randomized trial of treatment of Hypertension in Elderly Patients in Primary Care), based on general-practice screening in England and Wales using atenolol and bendrofluazide. The results of these trials were compared and the findings were broadly similar in the two studies. Some of the differences may be due to the different selection of patients. It is concluded that elderly patients with sustained blood pressures greater or equal to 170/90 mmHg would benefit from treatment by substantial reduction of stroke. Diuretics or beta-blockers, alone or together, are acceptable treatments in elderly subjects. PMID:3312529

  7. Hypertension in Chronic Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ihm, Chun-Gyoo

    2015-12-01

    Chronic glomerulonephritis (GN), which includes focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and proliferative forms of GN such as IgA nephropathy, increases the risk of hypertension. Hypertension in chronic GN is primarily volume dependent, and this increase in blood volume is not related to the deterioration of renal function. Patients with chronic GN become salt sensitive as renal damage including arteriolosclerosis progresses and the consequent renal ischemia causes the stimulation of the intrarenal renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system(RAAS). Overactivity of the sympathetic nervous system also contributes to hypertension in chronic GN. According to the KDIGO guideline, the available evidence indicates that the target BP should be ≤140mmHg systolic and ≤90mmHg diastolic in chronic kidney disease patients without albuminuria. In most patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/24 h (i.e., those with both micro-and macroalbuminuria), a lower target of ≤130mmHg systolic and ≤80mmHg diastolic is suggested. The use of agents that block the RAAS system is recommended or suggested in all patients with an albumin excretion rate of ≥30mg/ 24 h. The combination of a RAAS blockade with a calcium channel blocker and a diuretic may be effective in attaining the target BP, and in reducing the amount of urinary protein excretion in patients with chronic GN. PMID:26848302

  8. Management of hypertension emergencies.

    PubMed

    Elliott, William J

    2003-12-01

    Although they have become less common, hypertensive emergencies occur with an incidence of approximately 1 to 2/100,000 people per year. Our knowledge about this problem, its pathophysiology, risk factors, and appropriate treatment options has expanded during the past decade. A hypertensive emergency can be declared when an elevated blood pressure is associated with acute target-organ damage. Rapid evaluation and treatment (typically with an intravenously administered agent) should be instituted, usually in an intensive care unit setting, and the patient should be observed carefully during acute blood-pressure lowering. When properly treated, the prognosis for these patients is not nearly as dismal as it was more than 60 years ago, and the initial level of function of target organs (brain, heart, kidneys) is more indicative of an emergency than the actual level of blood pressure. Therapeutic options include the time-tested sodium nitroprusside (which has toxic metabolic products and is contraindicated in pregnancy, tobacco amblyopia, and Leber's optic atrophy); fenoldopam mesylate; and nicardipine. When properly treated, "malignant hypertension" need be considered malignant no longer. PMID:14594569

  9. Managing hypertension by polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Arroyo, Salvador; Camps, Jordi; Menendez, Javier A; Joven, Jorge

    2015-06-01

    Some polyphenols, obtained from plants of broad use, induce a favorable endothelial response in hypertension and beneficial effects in the management of other metabolic cardiovascular risks. Previous studies in our laboratories using the calyces of Hibiscus sabdariffa as a source of polyphenols show that significant effects on hypertension are noticeable in humans only when provided in high amounts. Available data are suggestive in animal models and ex vivo experiments, but data in humans are difficult to acquire. Additionally, and despite the low bioavailability of polyphenols, intervention studies provide evidence for the protective effects of secondary plant metabolites. Assumptions on public health benefits are limited by the lack of scientific knowledge, robust data derived from large randomized clinical trials, and an accurate assessment of the bioactive components provided by common foodstuff. Because it is likely that clinical effects are the result of multiple interactions among different polyphenols rather than the isolated action of unique compounds, to provide polyphenol-rich botanical extracts as dietary supplements is a suggestive option. Unfortunately, the lack of patent perspectives for the pharmaceutical industries and the high cost of production and release for alimentary industries will hamper the performance of the necessary clinical trials. Here we briefly discuss whether and how such limitations may complicate the extensive use of plant-derived products in the management of hypertension and which steps are the necessary to deal with the predictable complexity in a possible clinical practice. PMID:25714729

  10. Hypertension in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Robles, Nicolas R; Macias, Juan F

    2015-01-01

    Data collected over a 30-year period have demonstrated the increasing prevalence of hypertension with age. Aging is an inevitable part of life and brings along two inconvenient events: physiologic decline and disease state. High blood pressure (HBP) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. It is a significant and often asymptomatic chronic disease, which requires optimal control and persistent adherence to prescribed medication to reduce the risks of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal disease. Hypertension in the elderly patients represents a management dilemma to geriatric and cardiovascular specialists and other practitioners. Furthermore, with the wide adoption of multiple drug strategies targeting subgroups of hypertensive patients with specific risk conditions to lower blood pressure (BP), difficult questions arise about how aggressive treatment of elderly patients should be. The purpose of the following chapter article is to review the pathophysiology of aging as well as the epidemiology and the clinical assessment of high blood pressure (HBP) in older people. PMID:25761101

  11. Hypersensitivity of lung vessels to catecholamines in systemic hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Guazzi, M D; Alimento, M; Fiorentini, C; Pepi, M; Polese, A

    1986-01-01

    Among patients with primary systemic hypertension pressure and arteriolar resistance in the pulmonary circulation exceed normal values and are hyper-reactive to sympathetic stimulation. A study was therefore carried out in 16 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension and nine healthy subjects to compare the pulmonary vascular reactivity to exogenous catecholamines. In the normotensive group the dose response relation to adrenaline (microgram: dyn) was 1 = -4, 2 = -9, 3 = -9, and 4 = -10 and to noradrenaline 2 = +3, 4 = /8, 6 = +4, and 8 = +3. The relations in the hypertensive subjects were 1 = +18, 2 = +42, 3 = +59, and 4 = +77 and 2 = +39, 4 = +54, 6 = +76, and 8 = +100, respectively. Group differences were highly significant. Cardiac output (blood flow through the lungs) was raised by adrenaline and reduced by noradrenaline. In either case the driving pressure across the lungs was significantly augmented in the hypertensive patients but not in the normotensive group. Both catecholamines had a vasoconstrictor effect on the pulmonary circulation as a result of vascular over-reactivity. The opposite changes in resistance between normal and hypertensive subjects produced by adrenaline suggest that a constrictor vascular hypersensitivity occurs in the pulmonary circulation with the development of systemic high blood pressure. PMID:3089490

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: The Clinical Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Potoka, Karin C.; Champion, Hunter C.; Mora, Ana L.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disorder in which endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling obstruct small pulmonary arteries, resulting in increased pulmonary vascular resistance and pulmonary pressures. This leads to reduced cardiac output, right heart failure, and ultimately death. In this review, we attempt to answer some important questions commonly asked by patients diagnosed with PAH pertaining to the disease, and aim to provide an explanation in terms of classification, diagnosis, pathophysiology, genetic etiologies, demographics, and prognostic factors. Furthermore, important molecular pathways that are central to the pathogenesis of PAH are reviewed, including nitric oxide, prostacyclin, endothelin-1, reactive oxygen species, and endothelial and smooth muscle proliferation. PMID:24951762

  13. Portal hypertension: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buob, S; Johnston, A N; Webster, C R L

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension (PH) is the result of increased vascular resistance in the portal circulation, increased portal venous blood flow, or both. In veterinary medicine, where portal pressure is seldom measured directly, the diagnosis of PH often is inferred from identification of associated complications including multiple acquired portosystemic shunts, ascites, and hepatic encephalopathy. Likewise, treatment of PH primarily is aimed at controlling these complications. The goal of this review is to provide an update on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of PH. The review draws from information in the veterinary hepatology literature, reviews, and consensus statements in human hepatology and the literature on experimental models of PH. PMID:21382073

  14. Riociguat: Something new in pulmonary hypertension therapeutics?

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Elangovan; Jena, Amrita; George, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to be a disease that is associated with woeful outcomes. The search for an ideal drug molecule for PH led to the discovery of riociguat, which is a first-in-class drug molecule that activates soluble guanylate cyclase. We conducted a systematic literature search using databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Springer, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar to gather evidence generated from published clinical trials on the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and regulatory status of riociguat. CHEST-1 and the PATENT-1 were phase-3 pivotal clinical trials that showed that riociguat was able to significantly improve the 6-min walk distance with 16 weeks of therapy as compared with the placebo arm. The drug also showed improvement in secondary outcome measures such as improvement in the pulmonary vascular resistance, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide levels, World Health Organization functional class, time to clinical worsening and Borg dyspnea score. The drug had a modest safety profile, with hypotension being the most bothersome adverse effect. These findings led to various regulatory agencies around the world granting approval for riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The entry of a new class of drug for PAH and CTEPH therapy portends some hope for patients with a disease that is traditionally linked with a poor prognosis. PMID:25709345

  15. Riociguat: Something new in pulmonary hypertension therapeutics?

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Elangovan; Jena, Amrita; George, Melvin

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) continues to be a disease that is associated with woeful outcomes. The search for an ideal drug molecule for PH led to the discovery of riociguat, which is a first-in-class drug molecule that activates soluble guanylate cyclase. We conducted a systematic literature search using databases such as PubMed, Science Direct, Springer, Cochrane Reviews and Google Scholar to gather evidence generated from published clinical trials on the efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetics and regulatory status of riociguat. CHEST-1 and the PATENT-1 were phase-3 pivotal clinical trials that showed that riociguat was able to significantly improve the 6-min walk distance with 16 weeks of therapy as compared with the placebo arm. The drug also showed improvement in secondary outcome measures such as improvement in the pulmonary vascular resistance, N-terminal pro–brain natriuretic peptide levels, World Health Organization functional class, time to clinical worsening and Borg dyspnea score. The drug had a modest safety profile, with hypotension being the most bothersome adverse effect. These findings led to various regulatory agencies around the world granting approval for riociguat for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and inoperable chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). The entry of a new class of drug for PAH and CTEPH therapy portends some hope for patients with a disease that is traditionally linked with a poor prognosis. PMID:25709345

  16. [Treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Oney, T; Weitzel, H

    1991-01-01

    Treatment of severe hypertension in pregnancy, particularly in preeclampsia and eclampsia, is a great challenge to the obstetrician and requires prompt and expert management. Application of antihypertensive agents is limited during pregnancy because of possible side effects, particularly impairment of the fetal state. The following survey present a detailed discussion on the substances suitable for treating hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy and their side effects. Despite restricted therapeutic possibilities, safe and successful treatment of severe hypertension during pregnancy can best be performed with dihydralazine and diazoxide, which achieve their effect by reducing the peripheral vascular resistance. If the blood pressure cannot be adequately reduced with these substances, treatment can be continued with sodium nitroprusside. A critical discussion is presented in this connection on drugs such as clonidine and reserpine, which reduce pressure largely by central mechanisms and should no longer be applied in pregnant patients because of serious disadvantages. Consideration is also given to the special clinical problems associated with pheochromocytomas, and a concluding discussion deals with the perspectives of antihypertensive therapy in pregnancy. PMID:2053378

  17. Relevant Issues in the Pathology and Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Stephen L.; Dorfmüller, Peter; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Guignabert, Christophe; Michelakis, Evangelos; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Schermuly, Ralph; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension continues to accelerate. However, fundamental gaps remain in our understanding of the underlying pathological changes in pulmonary arteries and veins in the different forms of this syndrome. Although pulmonary hypertension primarily affects the arteries, venous disease is increasingly recognized as an important entity. Moreover, prognosis in pulmonary hypertension is determined largely by the status of the right ventricle, rather than the levels of pulmonary artery pressures. It is increasingly clear that while vasospasm plays a role, pulmonary hypertension is an obstructive lung panvasculopathy. Disordered metabolism and mitochondrial structure, inflammation, and dysregulation of growth factors lead to a proliferative, apoptosis-resistant state. These abnormalities may be acquired, genetically mediated as a result of mutations in bone morphogenetic protein receptor (BMPR)2 or activin-like kinase (Alk)-1 or epigenetically-inherited (as a result of epigenetic silencing of genes such as superoxide dismutase 2). There is a pressing need to better understand how the pathobiology leads to severe disease in some patients versus mild pulmonary hypertension in others. Recent recognition of a potential role of acquired abnormalities of mitochondrial metabolism in the right ventricular myocytes and pulmonary vascular cells suggests new therapeutic approaches, diagnostic modalities, and biomarkers. Finally, dissection of role of pulmonary inflammation in the initiation and promotion of pulmonary hypertension has revealed a complex yet fascinating interplay with pulmonary vascular remodeling, promising to lead to novel therapeutics and diagnostics. Emerging concepts are also relevant to the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension, including a role for bone marrow and circulating progenitor cells and microRNAs. Continued interest in the interface of the genetic basis of pulmonary hypertension and cellular and molecular

  18. Pulmonary Hypertension in Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Denault, André; Deschamps, Alain; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Lambert, Jean; Perrault, Louis

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an important prognostic factor in cardiac surgery associated with increased morbidity and mortality. With the aging population and the associated increase severity of illness, the prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in cardiac surgical patients will increase. In this review, the definition of pulmonary hypertension, the mechanisms and its relationship to right ventricular dysfunction will be presented. Finally, pharmacological and non-pharmacological therapeutic and preventive approaches will be presented. PMID:21286273

  19. Effects of Dietary l-Arginine on Nitric Oxide Bioavailability in Obese Normotensive and Obese Hypertensive Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Giam, Beverly; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Head, Geoffrey A.; Kaye, David M.; Rajapakse, Niwanthi W.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity related hypertension is a major risk factor for resistant hypertension. We do not completely understand the mechanism(s) underlying the development of obesity related hypertension which hinders the development of novel treatment strategies for this condition. Data from experimental studies and small clinical trials indicate that transport of l-arginine, the substrate for nitric oxide (NO), and subsequent NO production are reduced in obesity induced hypertension. Reduced NO bioavailability can induce hypertension via multiple mechanisms. Mirmiran et al. recently analyzed data from a large population study and found that the association between dietary l-arginine and serum nitrate and nitrite was weakened in obese hypertensive subjects compared to obese normotensives. These data suggest that l-arginine dependent NO production is impaired in the former group compared to the latter which may represent a novel mechanism contributing to hypertension in the setting of obesity. PMID:27314383

  20. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications. PMID:27048353

  1. Epidemiology and Genetics of Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Taposh; Singh, Narinder Pal

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of hypertension is increasing in India as well as in the world. The average prevalence of hypertension in India is 25-30%. The median prevalence of total hypertension in 2009 was 37.6% in men and 40.1% in women in U.S. Hypertension is a major risk factor for majority of patients with cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and renal morbidity and mortality. Environmental factors as well as genetic factors account for regulation of blood pressure and its control. Understanding of genetic factor may not only help in recognising those at risk but also help in treatment. Discovering hypertension susceptibility genes would help recognizing those at risk for developing the disease before the expression of clinical symptoms. Genetic and epidemiological studies have suggested that essential hypertension is a polygenic and multifactorial disorder that results from genetic and/or environmental factors. In India awareness, treatment and control status of hypertension is low, with only half of the urban and a quarter of the rural hypertensive individuals being aware of its presence. In this review we have discussed epidemiology and genetics of hypertension, both the monogenic and polygenic forms. PMID:27608868

  2. Vascular Inflammatory Cells in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, David G.; Marvar, Paul J.; Titze, Jens M.

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients, and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease. PMID:22586409

  3. Hyperuricemia and uncontrolled hypertension in treated hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jaelim; Kim, Changsoo; Kang, Dae Ryong; Park, Jeong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Previous epidemiological studies have suggested that uric acid is an independent risk factor for incident hypertension, whereas few studies have evaluated the effect of hyperuricemia on blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. We investigated whether hyperuricemia predicts uncontrolled hypertension through a large-scale prospective cohort study with hypertensive patients treated with fimasartan in the Republic of Korea (the Kanarb–Metabolic Syndrome study). Of the 10,601 hypertensive patients who were recruited from 582 private clinics and 11 university hospitals at baseline, 7725 completed the follow-up after 3 months of fimasartan medication, and 6506 were included in the analysis after excluding those with missing values. We estimated the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months (≥130/80 mm Hg in those with diabetes or chronic renal failure and ≥140/90 mm Hg in the remaining patients) related with baseline hyperuricemia (serum uric acid ≥7 mg/dL in males ≥6 mg/dL in females) using multiple logistic regression models. Hyperuricemia increased the risk of uncontrolled hypertension after 3 months of fimasartan medication (odds ratio, 1.247; 95% confidence interval, 1.063–1.462). Males in the highest quartile of uric acid level were at a 1.322 (95% confidence interval, 1.053–1.660) times higher risk of uncontrolled hypertension in reference to the lowest quartile; the same analyses in females were not significant. Patients without metabolic syndrome had significantly higher odds of uncontrolled hypertension with hyperuricemia (odds ratio, 1.328; 95% confidence interval, 1.007–1.751). Hyperuricemia predicted uncontrolled hypertension even after 3 months of fimasartan treatment in hypertensive patients. PMID:27428212

  4. Sympathetically mediated hypertension in autonomic failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shannon, J. R.; Jordan, J.; Diedrich, A.; Pohar, B.; Black, B. K.; Robertson, D.; Biaggioni, I.; Roberton, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 50% of patients with primary autonomic failure have supine hypertension. We investigated whether this supine hypertension could be driven by residual sympathetic activity. METHODS AND RESULTS: In patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) or pure autonomic failure (PAF), we studied the effect of oral yohimbine on seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the effect of ganglionic blockade (with trimethaphan) on supine SBP and plasma catecholamine levels, and the effect of alpha(1)-adrenoreceptor blockade (phentolamine) on supine SBP. The SBP response to yohimbine was greater in patients with MSA than in those with PAF (area under the curve, 2248+/-543 versus 467+/-209 mm Hg. min; P=0.022). MSA patients with a higher supine SBP had a greater response than those with a lower supine SBP (3874+/-809 versus 785+/-189 mm Hg. min; P=0. 0017); this relationship was not seen in PAF patients. MSA patients had a marked depressor response to low infusion rates of trimethaphan; the response in PAF patients was more variable. Plasma norepinephrine decreased in both groups, but heart rate did not change in either group. At 1 mg/min, trimethaphan decreased supine SBP by 67+/-8 and 12+/-6 mm Hg in MSA and PAF patients, respectively (P<0.0001). Cardiac index and total peripheral resistance decreased in MSA patients by 33.4+/-5.8% and 40.7+/-9.5%, respectively (P=0. 0015). Patients having a depressor response to trimethaphan also had a depressor response to phentolamine. In MSA patients, the pressor response to yohimbine and the decrease in SBP with 1 mg/min trimethaphan were correlated (r=0.98; P=0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Residual sympathetic activity drives supine hypertension in MSA. It contributes to, but does not completely explain, supine hypertension in PAF.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... Primary pulmonary hypertension 2 Primary pulmonary hypertension 3 Primary pulmonary hypertension 4 ClinicalTrials.gov (1 link) ClinicalTrials.gov Scientific articles on PubMed (1 link) PubMed OMIM (4 links) ...

  6. Drugs induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Savale, Laurent; Günther, Sven; Tubert-Bitter, Pascale; Humbert, Marc; Montani, David

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a rare disorder characterized by progressive obliteration of the pulmonary microvasculature, resulting in elevated pulmonary vascular resistance and premature death. According to the current classification, PAH can be associated with exposure to certain drugs or toxins, particularly appetite suppressant drugs, such as aminorex, fenfluramine derivatives and benfluorex. These drugs have been confirmed to be risk factors for PAH and were withdrawn from the market. The supposed mechanism is an increase in serotonin levels, which was demonstrated to act as a growth factor for the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Amphetamines, phentermine and mazindol were less frequently used but are also considered as possible risk factors for PAH. Dasatinib, a dual Src/Abl kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of chronic myelogenous leukaemia was associated with cases of severe PAH, in part reversible after its withdrawal. Recently several studies raised the potential endothelial dysfunction that could be induced by interferon, and few cases of PAH have been reported with interferon therapy. Other possible risk factors for PAH include: nasal decongestants, like phenylpropanolamine, dietary supplement - L-Tryptophan, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, pergolide and other drugs that could act on 5HT2B receptors. Interestingly, PAH remains a rare complication of these drugs, suggesting possible individual susceptibility and further studies are needed to identify patients at risk of drugs induced PAH. PMID:23972547

  7. Acute hypertensive crisis in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silver, H M

    1989-05-01

    Severe pre-eclampsia is a state of acute afterload increase where compensation may be total by use of the Frank-Starling mechanism and/or increased adrenergic drive, or may be uncompensated in a patient with limited or exhausted preload reserve. As such, we are presented with a diverse group of patients and antihypertensive therapy ideally should be individualized. In reality we are dealing with a complex situation because of the presence of the fetus raising concerns about direct effects on the fetus as well as on uteroplacental blood flow. This limits our choice of agents to those with extensive use in pregnancy except in complicated or resistant cases. For these reasons, hydralazine is the antihypertensive agent of choice for treatment of acute hypertensive emergencies in pregnancy. In the complicated case other agents such as sodium nitroprusside or nitroglycerin may be more appropriate and, in these cases, hemodynamic monitoring should be performed to allow not only greater safety, but also to tailor therapy to the individual hemodynamic profile. PMID:2649760

  8. Pheochromocytoma induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Deborah

    2010-12-01

    Pheochromocytoma (Pheo) is a rare tumor that develops in the core of a chromaffin cell. This article will focus on pheochromocytoma and its affect on the heart. Because the signs and symptoms of a pheochromocytoma are those of the sympathetic nervous system, this tumor is hard to detect and might not be considered early on. In addition, there are many common deferential diagnoses that may lead to a delay of the correct diagnosis of a pheochromocytoma. Uncontrollable hypertension is one of the primary effects of pheochromocytoma. A severe increase in blood pressure (hypertensive crisis) may occur and this can be a life threatening condition that leads to stroke or arrhythmias. African-Americans are disproportionately affected by hypertension and they often go undiagnosed because of a lack of resources or access to care. This tumor is difficult to detect and its effects often mimic many other diagnoses, which often leads to this tumor being a late consideration. The long-term effects of a pheochromocytoma can lead to damage to the heart muscle, congestive heart failure (CHF), increased risk of diabetes, and even death. Nurses need to be aware of the key signs and symptoms of a pheochromocytoma, and to know when testing for this tumor what symptoms should be considered. Patients who suffer from a diagnosis of this tumor need a lot of emotional support and they must follow a strict diet and medication regimen. Nurses can play a vital role in raising awareness in our community about this tumor as well as being a patient advocate. PMID:21516925

  9. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema.

    PubMed

    Chelse, Ana B; Epstein, Leon G

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic. PMID:26933598

  10. [Chronotherapy in arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bendersky, M

    2015-01-01

    The blood pressure profile in most normo- and hypertensive subjects are currently known, as well as the impact their changes induced on the cardio- and cerebrovascular risk. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) has contributed greatly to the knowledge of this parameter. It to correct the schedule of drug administration (chronotherapy) with changes in any component of the BP profile that have better correlation with risk. These include the nocturnal decrease and the morning BP surge. Investigations in this direction are still scarce, and multicenter studies need to be conducted that can answer the true preventive impact of such modifications. PMID:26180036

  11. The Immune System in Hypertension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  12. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  13. Endocrine hypertension – Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Yashpal; Kotwal, Narendra; Menon, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing's syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing's syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease. PMID:22145133

  14. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  15. Hypertension in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mitsnefes, Mark M

    2006-06-01

    Hypertension is one of the most common health problems in the United States and a powerful independent risk factor for cardiovascular and renal disease. Until recently, the incidence of persistent hypertension in children has been low, with a range of 1% to 3%. Recent data indicate that over the last decade, however, average blood pressure levels have risen substantially among American children. Obesity and other lifestyle factors, such as physical inactivity and increased intake of high-calorie, high-salt foods, are thought to be responsible for this trend. Hypertension in children is currently recognized as an important health issue. There is increasing evidence that hypertension has its antecedents during childhood, because adult blood pressure often correlates with childhood blood pressure. Hypertension in children also is viewed as a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. PMID:16716793

  16. Homocysteine and essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Ramón; Passalacqua, Walter; Araya, Julia; Orellana, Myriam; Rivera, Gonzalo

    2003-12-01

    The authors examine the available clinical and experimental data supporting the view that homocysteine, an alternative risk factor of cardiovascular disease, may play a role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. The mechanism of this disease has not been elucidated, but it may be related to impairment of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell function. Therefore, the occurrence of endothelial dysfunction could contribute to alterations of the endothelium-dependent vasomotor regulation. Elevated homocysteinemia diminishes the vasodilation by nitric oxide, increases oxidative stress, stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, and alters the elastic properties of the vascular wall. Thus, homocysteine contributes to elevate the blood pressure. Also it is known that elevated plasma levels of homocysteine could lead to oxidant injury to the endothelium. The correction of elevated homocysteinemia by administration of vitamins B12 and B6 plus folic acid, could be a useful adjuvant therapy of hypertension. However, further controlled randomized trials are necessary to establish the efficacy and tolerability of these potentially therapeutic agents. PMID:14615465

  17. Pressed for time: the circadian clock and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fulton, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and death. The “silent” rise of blood pressure that occurs over time is largely asymptomatic. However, its impact is deafening—causing and exacerbating cardiovascular disease, end-organ damage, and death. The present article addresses recent observations from human and animal studies that provide new insights into how the circadian clock regulates blood pressure, contributes to hypertension, and ultimately evolves vascular disease. Further, the molecular components of the circadian clock and their relationship with locomotor activity, metabolic control, fluid balance, and vascular resistance are discussed with an emphasis on how these novel, circadian clock-controlled mechanisms contribute to hypertension. PMID:19679741

  18. Endocrine and Hypertensive Disorders of Potassium Regulation: Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, I. David

    2013-01-01

    The identification that primary aldosteronism is a common cause of resistant hypertension is a significant advance in our ability to care for patients with hypertension. Primary aldosteronism is common, and when unrecognized is associated with increased incidence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Identification of primary aldosteronism is based upon use of the plasma aldosterone level, plasma renin activity and the aldosterone:renin ratio (ARR). Differentiation between unilateral and bilateral autonomous adrenal aldosterone production then guides further therapy, with use of mineralocorticoid receptor blockers for those with bilateral autonomous adrenal aldosterone production and laparoscopic adrenalectomy for those with unilateral autonomous aldosterone production. In this review, we discuss in detail the pathogenesis of primary aldosteronism-induced hypertension and potassium disorders, the evaluation of the patient with suspected primary aldosteronism and the management of primary aldosteronism, both through medications and through surgery. PMID:23953804

  19. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Togănel, Rodica; Benedek, I; Suteu, Carmen; Blesneac, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Congenital heart diseases are the most common congenital malformations and account for about eight cases per 1000 births and are often associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Increased shear stress and the excess flow through the pulmonary vascular bed due to a systemic-to-pulmonary shunt lead to the development of pulmonary vascular disease and an increase in pulmonary vascular resistance. Without surgical repair approximately 30% of patients develop pulmonary vascular disease. Eisenmenger syndrome represents the extreme end of pulmonary arterial hypertension with congenital heart disease. We summarized the current therapeutic options for pulmonary arterial hypertension; conventional treatments including calcium channel blockers, anticoagulation, digitalis, diuretics, and new treatment: prostacyclin, bosentan, sildenafil, ambrisentan. Preliminary data of new therapies are encouraging with disease significantly improved natural history, but there is need for more evidence-based data. PMID:18333354

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in infancy

    PubMed Central

    Steinhorn, Robin H.

    2013-01-01

    Normal pulmonary vascular development in infancy requires maintenance of low pulmonary vascular resistance after birth, and is necessary for normal lung function and growth. The developing lung is subject to multiple genetic, pathological and/or environmental influences that can adversely affect lung adaptation, development, and growth, leading to pulmonary hypertension. New classifications of pulmonary hypertension are beginning to account for these diverse phenotypes, and or pulmonary hypertension in infants due to PPHN, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The most effective pharmacotherapeutic strategies for infants with PPHN are directed at selective reduction of PVR, and take advantage of a rapidly advancing understanding of the altered signaling pathways in the remodeled vasculature. PMID:24083892

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension: a current review of pharmacological management.

    PubMed

    Sahni, Sonu; Ojrzanowski, Marcin; Majewski, Sebastian; Talwar, Arunabh

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) is a rare and devastating disease characterized by progressive increases in pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance, which eventually leads to right ventricular failure and death. At present there is no cure for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however over the past decade targeted pharmaceutical options have become available for the treatment of PAH. Prior to evaluation for therapeutic options a definitive diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension must be made via comprehensive physical exam and definitive diagnostic testing. Screening test of choice remains echocardiography and gold standard for definitive diagnosis is right heart catheterization. Once the establishment of a diagnosis of PAH is made therapeutic options may be a possibility based on a diagnostic algorithm and disease severity of the PAH patient. There are different classes of medications available with different mechanisms of actions which net a vasodilatory effect and improve exercise tolerance, quality of life as well and survival. PMID:26693827

  2. Impact of systemic hypertension on the assessment of aortic stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kadem, L; Dumesnil, J G; Rieu, R; Durand, L-G; Garcia, D; Pibarot, P

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of systemic arterial hypertension on the indices of aortic stenosis (AS) severity. Methods: A severe supravalvar AS was created in 24 pigs. The maximum and mean pressure gradients across the stenosis were measured by Doppler echocardiography and by catheterisation. Both echocardiography and catheter data were used to calculate stenosis effective orifice area, energy loss coefficient, and peak systolic left ventricular wall stress. Measurements were taken both at normal aortic pressures and during hypertension induced by banding of the distal thoracic aorta in 14 pigs and by intravenous administration of phenylephrine in 10 pigs. Results: During hypertension, systemic arterial resistance downstream from the stenosis increased greatly (all animals: 71 (40)%), whereas total systemic arterial compliance decreased significantly (−38 (21)%). Hypertension resulted in a moderate increase in effective orifice area (29 (14)%) and energy loss coefficient (25 (17)%) and substantial decreases in catheter gradients (maximum: −40 (20)%; mean: −43 (20)%; peak to peak: −70 (23)%) and Doppler gradients (maximum: −35 (17)%; mean: −37 (16)%). In multivariate analysis, peak to peak gradient was significantly (p < 0.001) related to the energy loss coefficient, mean flow rate, and arterial compliance, whereas maximum and mean catheter gradients were related only to the energy loss coefficient and flow rate. Of major importance, maximum systolic left ventricular wall stress increased greatly during hypertension (43 (23)%). Conclusions: The severity of AS may be partially masked by the presence of coexisting hypertension. The markers of AS severity should thus be interpreted with caution in hypertensive patients and be re-evaluated when the patient is in a normotensive state. PMID:15710719

  3. Weight control in the management of hypertension. World Hypertension League.

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    This article, which includes a brief description of the mechanisms and some epidemiological findings in obesity and high blood pressure, sums up present knowledge on a complex subject and provides guidance to medical practitioners on the management of obese hypertensive patients. Weight reduction, together with drug therapy in severe and moderate hypertension, and other non-pharmacological methods and continuing observation in mild hypertension are the essential measures to be applied. In addition to the lowering of blood pressure, weight loss offers several other metabolic and haemodynamic benefits. PMID:2670295

  4. The pathophysiology of hypertension in patients with obesity.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, Vincent G; Aroor, Annayya R; Sowers, James R

    2014-06-01

    The combination of obesity and hypertension is associated with high morbidity and mortality because it leads to cardiovascular and kidney disease. Potential mechanisms linking obesity to hypertension include dietary factors, metabolic, endothelial and vascular dysfunction, neuroendocrine imbalances, sodium retention, glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. Visceral adipose tissue also becomes resistant to insulin and leptin and is the site of altered secretion of molecules and hormones such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, TNF and IL-6, which exacerbate obesity-associated cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence also suggests that the gut microbiome is important for modulating these mechanisms. Uric acid and altered incretin or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 activity further contribute to the development of hypertension in obesity. The pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension is especially relevant to premenopausal women with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus who are at high risk of developing arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. In this Review we discuss the relationship between obesity and hypertension with special emphasis on potential mechanisms and therapeutic targeting that might be used in a clinical setting. PMID:24732974

  5. [Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease and Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Sandoval Zárate, Julio; Beltrán Gámez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a common complication of congenital heart disease (CHD). Congenital cardiopathies are the most frequent congenital malformations. The prevalence in our country remains unknown, based on birthrate, it is calculated that 12,000 to 16,000 infants in our country have some cardiac malformation. In patients with an uncorrected left-to-right shunt, increased pulmonary pressure leads to vascular remodeling and endothelial dysfunction secondary to an imbalance in vasoactive mediators which promotes vasoconstriction, inflammation, thrombosis, cell proliferation, impaired apotosis and fibrosis. The progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance and increased pressures in the right heart provocated reversal of the shunt may arise with the development of Eisenmenger' syndrome the most advanced form de Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with congenital heart disease. The prevalence of Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD has fallen in developed countries in recent years that is not yet achieved in developing countries therefore diagnosed late as lack of hospital infrastructure and human resources for the care of patients with CHD. With the development of targeted medical treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension, the concept of a combined medical and interventional/surgical approach for patients with Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with CHD is a reality. We need to know the pathophysiological factors involved as well as a careful evaluation to determine the best therapeutic strategy. PMID:25650280

  6. The pathophysiology of hypertension in patients with obesity

    PubMed Central

    DeMarco, Vincent G.; Aroor, Annayya R.; Sowers, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of obesity and hypertension is associated with high morbidity and mortality because it leads to cardiovascular and kidney disease. Potential mechanisms linking obesity to hypertension include dietary factors, metabolic, endothelial and vascular dysfunction, neuroendocrine imbalances, sodium retention, glomerular hyperfiltration, proteinuria, and maladaptive immune and inflammatory responses. Visceral adipose tissue also becomes resistant to insulin and leptin and is the site of altered secretion of molecules and hormones such as adiponectin, leptin, resistin, TNF and IL-6, which exacerbate obesity-associated cardiovascular disease. Accumulating evidence also suggests that the gut microbiome is important for modulating these mechanisms. Uric acid and altered incretin or dipeptidyl peptidase 4 activity further contribute to the development of hypertension in obesity. The pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension is especially relevant to premenopausal women with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus who are at high risk of developing arterial stiffness and endothelial dysfunction. In this Review we discuss the relationship between obesity and hypertension with special emphasis on potential mechanisms and therapeutic targeting that might be used in a clinical setting. PMID:24732974

  7. Pathogenesis of essential hypertension: historical paradigms and modern insights

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Richard J.; Feig, Dan I.; Nakagawa, Takahiko; Sanchez-Lozada, L. Gabriela; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Bernardo

    2009-01-01

    Since its first identification in the late 1800s, a variety of etiologies for essential hypertension have been proposed. In this paper we review the primary proposed hypotheses in the context of both the time in which they were proposed as well as the subsequent studies performed over the years. From these various insights, we propose a current paradigm to explain the renal mechanisms underlying the hypertension epidemic today. Specifically, we propose that hypertension is initiated by agents that cause systemic and intrarenal vasoconstriction. Over time intrarenal injury develops with microvascular disease, interstitial T cell and macrophage recruitment with the induction of an autoimmune response, with local angiotensin II formation and oxidant generation. These changes maintain intrarenal vasoconstriction and hypoxia with a change in local vasoconstrictor-vasodilator balance favoring sodium retention. Both genetic and congenital (nephron number) mechanisms have profound influence on this pathway. As blood pressure rises, renal ischemia is ameliorated and sodium balance restored completely (in salt-resistant) or partially (in salt-sensitive) hypertension, but at the expense of a rightward shift in the pressure natriuresis curve and persistent hypertension. PMID:18300843

  8. Salt Sensitivity: Challenging and Controversial Phenotype of Primary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Iatrino, Rossella; Manunta, Paolo; Zagato, Laura

    2016-09-01

    Increases in life expectancy and cardiovascular adverse events in patients with hypertension highlight the need for new risk-reduction strategies to reduce the burden of degenerative diseases. Among the environmental factors, high salt consumption is currently considered the most important risk factor of hypertension. However, while high salt intake significantly raises blood pressure in some individuals, others do not show variation or even decrease their blood pressure. This heterogeneity is respectively classified as salt sensitivity and salt resistance. In this review, we propose salt sensitivity as a useful phenotype to unravel the mechanistic complexity of primary hypertension. The individual variability in blood pressure modification in response to salt intake changes derives from the combination of genetic and environmental determinants. This combination of random and non random determinants leads to the development of a personal index of sensitivity to salt. However, those genes involved in susceptibility to salt are still not completely identified, and the triggering mechanisms underlying the following development of hypertension still remain uncovered. One reason might be represented by the absence of a specific protocol, universally followed, for a standard definition of salt sensitivity. Another reason may be linked to the absence of common criteria for patient recruitment during clinical studies. Thus, the generation of a reliable approach for a proper recognition of this personal index of sensitivity to salt, and through it the identification of novel therapeutic targets for primary hypertension, should be one of the aspirations for the scientific community. PMID:27614755

  9. Baroreflex sensitivity is impaired in essential hypertensives with central obesity.

    PubMed

    Del Colle, S; Milan, A; Caserta, M; Dematteis, A; Naso, D; Mulatero, P; Rabbia, F; Veglio, F

    2007-06-01

    Recently, much interest has focussed on the potential interaction between sympathetic nervous system and global cardiovascular risk. We investigated how baroreflex sensitivity (BRS), an index of autonomic function, interacts with central obesity (CO) in an essential hypertensive (EH) population. We selected 170 EHs and 43 normotensives (NT), (median age 47.3+/-11.3 and 49.1+/-13 years, respectively). Anthropometric parameters were measured for each and BRS was evaluated by a non-invasive method using Portapres TNO. The BRS evaluation was made using the sequences method. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) and heart rate were significantly higher in EH (P<0.001 and P=0.007, respectively). BRS was significantly greater in NT (P=0.02), and was associated inversely with waist circumference (WC) (P=0.005), but not with SBP or with other metabolic risk factors. Body mass index, total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, age and WC were not significantly different between the two groups. These results were confirmed by age pounded analysis. Finally, a separate analysis of the hypertensive group with CO (n=84) demonstrated a significantly lower BRS compared with the other hypertensive patients (n=86) (P<0.001). BRS is associated with WC but not with arterial pressure values and metabolic risk factors. Hypertensive subjects with CO show an impairment of BRS. Owing to its association with abdominal fat distribution and subsequently insulin resistance, BRS could represent a further and reliable index for evaluation of global cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients. PMID:17287838

  10. Role of the adrenal cortex and sodium in the pathogenesis of human hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Genest, J.; Nowaczynski, W.; Boucher, R.; Kuchel, O.

    1978-01-01

    After 30 years of continuous research into the mechanisms of human hypertension, we summarize the results obtained by the members of the multidisciplinary research group on hypertension of the Clinical Research Institute of Montreal on the disturbances of minerlocorticoid activity in a rigorously selected group of patients with early, mild essential hypertension. We attempt to integrate these findings with those of many other groups working on other aspects of hypertensive cardiovascular diseases. On the assumption that the increased peripheral resistance responsible for hypertension results from an imbalance or a disturbance of the equilibrium between the sympathetic nervous system and norepinephrine on one hand, and the vascular tone, sensitivity and responsiveness of the arterial smooth muscle to norepinephrine and to angiotensin II on the other hand, three models that fit the experimental and clinical facts as known at present are described. PMID:343905

  11. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Vinicius Barbosa; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade

    2015-01-01

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:25742420

  12. Dermatoglyphics in hypertension: a review.

    PubMed

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Agampodi, Thilini C; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and mortality. A major medical advancement would be a better means to ascertain which persons are at higher risk for becoming hypertensive beforehand. To that end, there have been a number of studies showing that certain dermatoglyphic markers are associated with hypertension. This association could be explained if the risk toward developing hypertension later on in life is somehow connected with fetal development of dermatoglyphics. It would be highly valuable from a clinical standpoint if this conjecture could be substantiated since dermatoglyphic markers could then be used for screening out individuals who might be at an elevated risk of becoming hypertensive. The aim of this review was to search for and appraise available studies that pertain to the association between hypertension and dermatoglyphics.A systematic literature search conducted using articles from MEDLINE (PubMed), Trip, Cochran, Google scholar, and gray literature until December 2014. Of the 37 relevant publications, 17 were included in the review. The review performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement.This review showed a fairly consistent finding of an increased frequency of whorl patterns along with a higher mean total ridge count in digital dermatoglyphic results in hypertensive samples compared to controls. However, it was imperative to discuss several limitations found in the studies that could make this association as yet unsettled. PMID:26265377

  13. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Montani, David; Günther, Sven; Dorfmüller, Peter; Perros, Frédéric; Girerd, Barbara; Garcia, Gilles; Jaïs, Xavier; Savale, Laurent; Artaud-Macari, Elise; Price, Laura C; Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald; Sitbon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  15. In the clinic: hypertension.

    PubMed

    Weir, Matthew R

    2014-12-01

    This issue provides a clinical overview of Hypertension focusing on prevention, diagnosis, treatment, practice improvement, and patient information. The content of In the Clinic is drawn from the clinical information and education resources of the American College of Physicians (ACP), including ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP (Medical Knowledge and Self-Assessment Program). Annals of Internal Medicine editors develop In the Clinic from these primary sources in collaboration with the ACP's Medical Education and Publishing divisions and with the assistance of science writers and physician writers. Editorial consultants from ACP Smart Medicine and MKSAP provide expert review of the content. Readers who are interested in these primary resources for more detail can consult http://smartmedicine.acponline.org, http://mksap.acponline.org, and other resources referenced in each issue of In the Clinic. PMID:25437425

  16. Treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rajendrakumar; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Patel, Laxeshkumar; Gandhi, Kaushang; Desai, Harit; Kaul, Dhiraj; Sahgal, Sumir P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic progressive disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right ventricular failure. PAH is considered a life-threatening condition unless treated. This article provides a comprehensive review of controlled and uncontrolled trials to define the risk-benefit for different therapeutic options of this clinical disorder. Relevant published articles were identified through searches of the National Center for Biotechnology PubMed database. All therapeutic measures for PAH were discussed. Six drugs have been approved in the United States for the treatment of PAH. Extensive medical advancement has been achieved in treatment of PAH. However, none of the approved therapies have shown ability to cure the disease. New research should be performed to develop promising new therapies. PMID:22460104

  17. A novel community-based study to address disparities in hypertension and colorectal cancer: a study protocol for a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Black men have the greatest burden of premature death and disability from hypertension (HTN) in the United States, and the highest incidence and mortality from colorectal cancer (CRC). While several clinical trials have reported beneficial effects of lifestyle changes on blood pressure (BP) reduction, and improved CRC screening with patient navigation (PN), the effectiveness of these approaches in community-based settings remains understudied, particularly among Black men. Methods/design MISTER B is a two-parallel-arm randomized controlled trial that will compare the effect of a motivational interviewing tailored lifestyle intervention (MINT) versus a culturally targeted PN intervention on improvement of BP and CRC screening among black men aged ≥50 with uncontrolled HTN who are eligible for CRC screening. Approximately 480 self-identified black men will be randomly assigned to one of the two study conditions. This innovative research design allows each intervention to serve as the control for the other. Specifically, the MINT arm is the control condition for the PN arm, and vice-versa. This novel, simultaneous testing of two community-based interventions in a randomized fashion is an economical and yet rigorous strategy that also enhances the acceptability of the project. Participants will be recruited during scheduled screening events at barbershops in New York City. Trained research assistants will conduct the lifestyle intervention, while trained community health workers will deliver the PN intervention. The primary outcomes will be 1) within-patient change in systolic and diastolic BP from baseline to six months and 2) CRC screening rates at six months. Discussion This innovative study will provide a unique opportunity to test two interventions for two health disparities simultaneously in community-based settings. Our study is one of the first to test culturally targeted patient navigation for CRC screening among black men in barbershops. Thus

  18. Sick But Unaware: Hypertension in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kitae

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies between self-reported and measured hypertension pose a great risk to health because they prevent timely treatment. Analyzing the Indonesian Family Life Survey, we compared self-reported and measured hypertension to assess the extent of the misclassification of hypertension. Building on this, we estimated factors related to self-reported and measured hypertension. Our results show that different factors were involved in each case, suggesting that they are two different phenomena. More importantly, we estimated factors that increased awareness of hypertension and found that visiting a health facility was a very effective way of increasing awareness of hypertension among hypertensive patients. PMID:26652684

  19. Hyperuricemia, Cardiovascular Disease, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kuwabara, Masanari

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increase in the prevalence of hyperuricemia, and the latter has attracted attention as an adult lifestyle-associated disease, together with hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Although hyperuricemia is known to be an independent risk factor for hypertension, whether it is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease remains controversial. Recently, some small-scale interventional studies on antihyperuricemic medications showed that the latter improved angina symptoms and prevented cardiovascular disease. Here, we will mainly explain the cause of hyperuricemia and the associations between hyperuricemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease based on the latest published evidence. PMID:27195245

  20. Collateral Pathways in Portal Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Malay; Rameshbabu, Chittapuram S.

    2012-01-01

    Presence of portosystemic collateral veins (PSCV) is common in portal hypertension due to cirrhosis. Physiologically, normal portosystemic anastomoses exist which exhibit hepatofugal flow. With the development of portal hypertension, transmission of backpressure leads to increased flow in these patent normal portosystemic anastomoses. In extrahepatic portal vein obstruction collateral circulation develops in a hepatopetal direction and portoportal pathways are frequently found. The objective of this review is to illustrate the various PSCV and portoportal collateral vein pathways pertinent to portal hypertension in liver cirrhosis and EHPVO. PMID:25755456

  1. Precursors of Hypertension: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, John; Neser, William B.; Thomas, Johniene; Semenya, Kofi; Green, Donald R.

    1983-01-01

    Recent advances in hypertension therapy have been remarkable; however, much less is known about those precursors that facilitate preventive and early intervention measures. This review of the literature indicates that relevant precursors are early elevated casual systolic blood pressures, positive family history, and obesity in females. Additional predisposing or enhancing factors point to high sodium ingestion, heavy smoking, and high socioecologic stress. Evidence for a high-risk hypertensive personality is not conclusive. There is a paucity of longitudinal data on hypertension in the black population. PMID:6864814

  2. 2015 guidelines of the Taiwan Society of Cardiology and the Taiwan Hypertension Society for the management of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chern-En; Wang, Tzung-Dau; Ueng, Kwo-Chang; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Yeh, Hung-I; Chen, Chung-Yin; Wu, Yih-Jer; Tsai, Wei-Chuan; Chao, Ting-Hsing; Chen, Chen-Huan; Chu, Pao-Hsien; Chao, Chia-Lun; Liu, Ping-Yen; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Cheng, Hao-Min; Wang, Kang-Ling; Li, Yi-Heng; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Chen, Jyh-Hong; Chen, Wen-Jone; Yeh, San-Jou; Lin, Shing-Jong

    2015-01-01

    targets are <140/90 mmHg for all other patient groups, except for patients ≥80 years of age in whom a BP target of <150/90 mmHg would be optimal. For the management of hypertension, we proposed a treatment algorithm, starting with life style modification (LSM) including S-ABCDE (Sodium restriction, Alcohol limitation, Body weight reduction, Cigarette smoke cessation, Diet adaptation, and Exercise adoption). We emphasized a low-salt strategy instead of a no-salt strategy, and that excessively aggressive sodium restriction to <2.0 gram/day may be harmful. When drug therapy is considered, a strategy called "PROCEED" was suggested (Previous experience, Risk factors, Organ damage, Contraindications or unfavorable conditions, Expert's or doctor's judgment, Expenses or cost, and Delivery and compliance issue). To predict drug effects in lowering BP, we proposed the "Rule of 10" and "Rule of 5". With a standard dose of any one of the 5 major classes of anti-hypertensive agents, one can anticipate approximately a 10-mmHg decrease in systolic BP (SBP) (Rule of 10) and a 5-mmHg decrease in diastolic BP (DBP) (Rule of 5). When doses of the same drug are doubled, there is only a 2-mmHg incremental decrease in SBP and a 1-mmHg incremental decrease in DBP. Preferably, when 2 drugs with different mechanisms are to be taken together, the decrease in BP is the sum of the decrease of the individual agents (approximately 20 mmHg in SBP and 10 mmHg in DBP). Early combination therapy, especially single-pill combination (SPC), is recommended. When patient's initial treatment cannot get BP to targeted goals, we have proposed an adjustment algorithm, "AT GOALs" (Adherence, Timing of administration, Greater doses, Other classes of drugs, Alternative combination or SPC, and LSM + Laboratory tests). Treatment of hypertension in special conditions, including treatment of resistant hypertension, hypertension in women, and perioperative management of hypertension, were also mentioned. The

  3. Hyperprolactinemia as a rare cause of hypertension in chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, Kaan; Olgac, Asburce; Bayrakci, Umut; Erdogan, Ozlem; Kinik, Sibel Tulgar; Baskin, Esra

    2012-01-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with a high risk for hypertension. An individualized treatment should be initiated after the diagnosis of hypertension and underlying etiology. Many metabolic and endocrinal abnormalities are encountered in CRF. We present an 11-year-old boy with CRF developing galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia associated with α-methyldopa, defective dopaminergic control, and resistance to multi-antihypertensive therapy. Cabergoline, a dopamine receptor agonist, was effectively used in the treatment of hypertension. It is important to remember that sometimes treatment of an illness becomes the cause of this illness. PMID:22462393

  4. Renal artery embolization for managing uncontrolled hypertension in a kidney transplant candidate

    PubMed Central

    Alhamid, Naji; Alterky, Hani; Othman, Mohammad Imad

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of pre-operative bilateral renal artery embolization to control the resistant and malignant hypertension in a patient prepared for kidney transplantation. A 34-year-old man with end-stage renal disease as a result of the focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and uncontrolled hypertension that precluded the transplantation surgery and the patient's post-transplant blood pressure and the renal function remained within normal limits following the transplant for 6 months of follow-up. PMID:23984264

  5. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  6. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... http://www.ihrfoundation.org/hypertension/info/C172 Surgery Optic Nerve Fenestration When sight is at risk and drug therapy has been unsuccessful, an optic nerve fenestration (also called an optic nerve sheath ...

  7. [Personality characteristics of hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Kubej, P; Korán, M

    1989-02-01

    Essential hypertension, as well-known specialists believe, is due both to genetic and external environment factors. Apart from the steadily growing complexity of social life and various important life events, high-risk factors may also be seen in a certain way of behaviour and man's psychophysiological reactivity. Recent literature on this topic informs about some common characteristics found in the behaviour of hypertensive persons, for example: anxiety in social contacts, suppressed hostility, manifestations of perfectionism, suppression of emotions, exaggerated behavioral adaptability and defensive attitudes to stress stimuli. In accordance with literary data, the control group of hypertensive patients (N = 89) gave evidence of some identical characteristics. Their knowledge permits to carry out more specific attempts at influencing hypertension in a non-pharmacological way. PMID:2720750

  8. Controversies Among the Hypertension Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Ripley, Toni L; Baumert, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension affects 80 million people in the United States. It remains poorly controlled, with only 54% of diagnosed patients treated to blood pressure targets. Hypertension management is complex in part due to the volume of antihypertensive agents, variable patient needs and responses, and inconsistent design and outcomes from clinical trials. Therefore, trustworthy clinical practice guidelines have a key role in hypertension management. The United States experienced a 10-year gap in publication of hypertension guidelines, followed by multiple guideline publications in 2013. These guidelines led to more controversy than clarity, as there was discordance among them. This review summarizes the guidelines and clinical statements influencing the current debate in order to facilitate appropriate application. PMID:26668216

  9. A case of hypertensive urgency.

    PubMed

    Baum, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    A 41-year-old male Nepalese soldier presented to the primary care medical centre with a 1-week history of fatigue and muscle aches following a trip to Nepal. His BP was 164/98 but was otherwise normal. Four days later he presented with new symptoms of sweating and palpitations and a BP of 200/127 whereupon he was admitted to hospital with the diagnosis of hypertensive crisis. Appropriate investigation and initial management were undertaken, and he was discharged after 12 h on antihypertensive treatment. This case highlights the risk of hypertensive crisis in both diagnosed and silent hypertensive disease, and the review highlights the presentations, initial investigation and different management of hypertensive crisis. PMID:26002343

  10. Systemic hypertension and its management.

    PubMed

    Henik, R A

    1997-11-01

    The pathophysiology of hypertension in dogs and cats, the methods available to monitor blood pressure, and the signs and treatment of hypertension are reviewed. Clinical signs of hypertension are usually referable to target organ damage, most notably in ophthalmic, renal, and cardiovascular tissues, which have a rich arteriolar supply. Blood pressure should be measured in any animal with renal disease, hyperthyroidism, hyperadrenocorticism, retinal detachment or hemorrhage, hyphema, or echocardiographically determined cardiac hypertrophy. All cats with acquired cardiac murmur should also be evaluated for hypertension. Antihypertensive medication should be administered if the indirect blood pressure in cats is consistently over 170/100 mmHg, or if the indirect blood pressure in dogs is greater than 180/100 mmHg. PMID:9348634

  11. Arterial Hypertension Is Characterized by Imbalance of Pro-Angiogenic versus Anti-Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Kwieczyńska, Anna; Reiwer-Gostomska, Magdalena; Koliński, Tomasz; Molisz, Andrzej; Siebert, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease and the main risk factor for stroke, peripheral arterial disease, arterial aneurysms and kidney disease. It has been reported recently that hypertensive patients and animals are characterized by decreased density of arterioles and capillaries in the tissues, called rarefaction. Rarefaction significantly increases peripheral resistance which results in elevated blood pressure, leads to vessel damage and induction of inflammation. Therefore, we hypothesized that hypertension is associated with decreased serum concentration of physiological pro-angiogenic factors and concomitant increased production of angiogenesis inhibitors. Materials and Methods 82 patients diagnosed with hypertension and 34 healthy volunteers were recruited to the study. Flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were used to measure serum levels of the following cytokines: endostatin, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), interleukin 8 (IL-8), angiogenin, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Results Hypertensive patients were characterized by increased serum concentration of endostatin which is an anti-angiogenic factor. In addition, hypertension was associated with decreased levels of physiological pro-angiogenic mediators such as: angiogenin and bFGF. The hypertensive group was also characterized by elevated levels of CRP, VEGF and IL-8 that are the hallmarks of inflammation. Conclusions Presented results show that hypertension is characterized by imbalance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors in the background of inflammation. PMID:25951297

  12. Therapeutic applications of sildenafil citrate in the management of paediatric pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leibovitch, Leah; Matok, Ilan; Paret, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary vascular resistance and a poor prognosis. The exact underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood; however, it is hypothesised that pulmonary medial hypertrophy and endothelial dysfunction lead to impaired production of vasodilators such as nitric oxide (NO) and prostacyclin, and increased expression of vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1. The current treatment modalities for pulmonary hypertension include conventional supportive therapies and more specific pharmacological therapies that are targeted at abnormalities of endothelial function. NO and phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors induce pulmonary vasodilation by increasing intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) concentrations. Sildenafil citrate is a highly selective inhibitor of PDE5. Investigations in animal models and recent clinical case reports with some studies in the paediatric population suggest that sildenafil may be a promising agent in treating pulmonary hypertension. The effect of sildenafil on pulmonary vasculature appears to be independent of the underlying cause, thereby providing a role in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PAH associated with congenital heart disease, pulmonary hypertension secondary to lung disease or persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn. It may also be beneficial in postoperative pulmonary hypertension and in neonates who are difficult to wean from inhaled NO. It is easily administered and effective, and has minimal systemic adverse effects. Although the reported results in children with pulmonary hypertension are promising, it is an experimental drug and large-scale randomised controlled studies are required to validate the safety, efficacy and dosage in the paediatric population. PMID:17209664

  13. Use of carvedilol in hypertension: an update

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Gastone; Egan, Colin G

    2012-01-01

    β-blockers are effective antihypertensive agents and, together with diuretics, have been the cornerstone of pioneering studies showing their benefits on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as a consequence of blood pressure reduction in patients with hypertension. However, evidence from recent meta-analyses have demonstrated no benefit afforded by atenolol compared with placebo in risk of mortality, myocardial infarction, or stroke, and a higher risk of mortality and stroke with atenolol/propranolol compared with other antihypertensive drug classes. Thus, the effect of these agents on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients, especially their use in uncomplicated hypertension, has remained largely controversial. However, it is recognized that the clinical studies used in these meta-analyses were mainly based on the older second-generation β-blockers, such as atenolol and metoprolol. Actually, considerable heterogeneity in, eg, pharmacokinetic, pharmacological, and physicochemical properties exists across the different classes of β-blockers, particularly between the second-generation and newer third-generation agents. Carvedilol is a vasodilating noncardioselective third-generation β-blocker, without the negative hemodynamic and metabolic effects of traditional β-blockers, which can be used as a cardioprotective agent. Compared with conventional β-blockers, carvedilol maintains cardiac output, has a reduced prolonged effect on heart rate, and reduces blood pressure by decreasing vascular resistance. Studies have also shown that carvedilol exhibits favorable effects on metabolic parameters, eg, glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism, suggesting that it could be considered in the treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetes. The present report provides an overview of the main clinical studies concerning carvedilol administered as either monotherapy or in combination with another antihypertensive or more

  14. A Practical Approach to Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dodek, Arthur; Wilkins, Graeme

    1976-01-01

    At least ten percent of the adult population has hypertension. Detection and effective treatment of hypertension are imperative in order to prevent the cardiovascular consequences. Effective antihypertensive treatment reduces morbidity and mortality. Weight reduction and sodium restriction are important fundamentals, and diuretics are the cornerstone of drug therapy. In order to increase patient compliance, treatment should be simple and drugs given twice daily wherever possible. PMID:20469276

  15. Hypertension in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R E

    1988-05-01

    Hypertensive emergencies are now rare and are recognized by the deleterious effect on end-organs. Prompt, efficacious treatment is critical, and the current drug of choice for most episodes is sodium nitroprusside. Hypertensive urgencies are more common than are emergencies, and are distinguished by diastolic pressures greater than 115 mm Hg without end-organ dysfunction. Although there are many efficacious agents, one excellent choice is nifedipine. PMID:3280299

  16. The hidden epidemic of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grenfell, Robert; Lee, Rebecca; Stavreski, Bill; Page, Karen

    2014-04-01

    The majority of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is caused by risk factors that can be controlled, treated or modified. In terms of attributable deaths, the leading cardiovascular disease risk factor is hypertension. The Australian Health Survey results showed some startling figures-4.6 million adult Australians are hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg). Further, a fifth of the adult population experience hypertension, with more than two out of three not attaining blood pressure target levels. This is despite an estimated cost of $1 billion per annum spent on managing hypertension. It is now well recognised that the level of risk for coronary heart disease is linked to an individual's risk profile. Results indicate that many Australians have multiple risk factors, including hypertension. It could be considered that these numbers provide a proxy indicator of secondary prevention failure. Considerable attention needs to be given to the assessment of the combined risk of those with hypertension enabling effective management of identified, modifiable risk factors. We look forward to presenting the absolute risk profiles when the Australian Health Survey biometric results are released. PMID:24468162

  17. Validation of the Persian Version of the 8-Item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) in Iranian Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moharamzad, Yashar; Saadat, Habibollah; Shahraki, Babak Nakhjavan; Rai, Alireza; Saadat, Zahra; Aerab-Sheibani, Hossein; Naghizadeh, Mohammad Mehdi; Morisky, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    The reliability and validity of the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) was assessed in a sample of Iranian hypertensive patients. In this multi-center study which lasted from August to October 2014, a total of 200 patients who were suffering from hypertension (HTN) and were taking anti-hypertensive medication(s) were included. The cases were accessed through private and university health centers in the cities of Tehran, Karaj, Kermanshah, and Bafgh in Iran and were interviewed face-to-face by the research team. The validated Persian translation of the MMAS-8 was provided by the owner of this scale. This scale contains 7 questions with “Yes” or “No” response choices and an additional Likert-type question (totally 8 questions). The total score ranges from 0 to 8 with higher scores reflecting better medication adherence. Mean (±SD) overall MMAS-8 score was 5.57 (±1.86). There were 108 (54%), 62 (31%), and 30 (15%) patients in the low, moderate, and high adherence groups. Internal consistency was acceptable with an overall Cronbach’s α coefficient of 0.697 and test–retest reliability showed good reproducibility (r= 0.940); P< 0.001. Overall score of the MMAS-8 was significantly correlated with systolic BP (r= - 0.306) and diastolic BP (r= - 0.279) with P< 0.001 for both BP measurements. The Chi-square test showed a significant relationship between adherence level and BP control (P= 0.016). The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of the scale were 92.8%, 22.3%, 52.9%, and 76.7%, respectively. The Persian version of the MMAS had acceptable reliability and validity in Iranian hypertensive patients. This scale can be used as a standard and reliable tool in future studies to determine medication adherence of Persian-speaking patients with chronic conditions. PMID:25946926

  18. The Pathobiology of Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lang, Irene M; Dorfmüller, Peter; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton

    2016-07-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a late sequel of venous thromboembolism that cannot be completely reproduced in animal models. The prevalence of CTEPH in humans is estimated at roughly 17-20 per million; however, partly because up to 50% of patients with CTEPH never experience symptomatic pulmonary embolism, precise numbers on the incidence and prevalence are not known. Because CTEPH is diagnosed at a median age of 63 years in patients who often have other concomitant cardiovascular disease or lung disease, assessment of pathophysiology in patients can be challenging, We do know that CTEPH is a dual vascular disorder. Stenoses, webs, and occlusions predominate in large and medium-sized pulmonary arteries at the sites of previous pulmonary emboli. A "secondary vasculopathy" resembling the pulmonary arteriopathy encountered in other forms of pulmonary hypertension predominates in low-resistance vessels. Anastomoses between bronchial artery branches and precapillary pulmonary arterioles appear during evolution of the disease. Other acquired vascular connections between bronchial arteries and pulmonary veins may trigger venous remodeling. Current concepts regarding the pathophysiology of CTEPH include contributions of hyperactive coagulation (e.g., high coagulation factor VIII, combined coagulation defects, dysfibrinogenemias), insufficient anticoagulation, non-O blood groups, and misguided thrombus resolution (e.g., infection, inflammation, dysfunctional innate immunity, abnormal circulating phospholipids). Current research focuses on the question as to whether a genetic predisposition leads to misguided vascular healing after pulmonary thromboembolism in susceptible individuals. PMID:27571003

  19. [ESC guidelines 2015 on pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Olschewski, H; Kovacs, G

    2015-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) guidelines published in 2015 include the most important recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The classification of PH into five groups remained unchanged as compared to the previous recommendations; however, there are minor shifts within the groups. Accordingly, a distinction is made between pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), PH due to left heart disease, PH due to chronic hypoxia or lung disease, chronic thromboembolic PH and PH due to unclear or multifactorial mechanisms. The diagnosis of PH is based on right heart catheterization where PH is defined as a mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥ 25 mmHg at rest. For the definition of PAH, in addition to a pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg, a pulmonary vascular resistance > 3 Wood units is obligatory. Echocardiography is considered to be the most important non-invasive procedure within the diagnostic algorithm and for patients with collagen vascular disease. This is recommended during initial diagnostic work-up and should be followed-up annually. Several novel drugs which were approved since publication of the previous guidelines, were included in the new recommendations. For the first time there is a recommendation for a targeted drug for inoperable chronic thromboembolic PH. An important part of the guidelines is the discussion on PAH upfront combination therapy. PMID:26626554

  20. [Pulmonary hypertension: definition, diagnostic and new classification].

    PubMed

    Seferian, Andrei; Simonneau, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH): mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg on right heart catheterization at rest. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistances (PVR) >3 Wood units. Patients with compatible symptoms (exertional dyspnea, syncopes, signes of right heart failure) can show signs of PH on cardiac echography and therefore need to be investigated in search of the cause of PH. After ruling out the frequent causes of PH (left heart and chronic respiratory diseases), the V/Q lung scan is used to screen for patients with post-embolic PH, that need to be further investigated hemodynamically and radiologically in order to decide operability. For the rest of the patients, only right heart catheterization can identify patients with precapillary PH and these patients must be further evaluated (clinically, by blood samples and by imaging techniques) in order to be classified in one the PH groups of the classification. For the future the discovery of novel risk factors and understanding the mechanism involved with the already known ones represent two major points of research. PMID:25127985

  1. [Postpartum pulmonary hypertension].

    PubMed

    Escalante, Juan Pablo; Diez, Ana; Figueroa Casas, Marcelo; Lasave, Alejandro; Cursack, Guillermo; Poy, Carlos; Rodríguez, María Soledad; Galuppo, Marcela; Zapata, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) in pregnancy is a rare disorder that carries a high risk to mother and child, and as such, it is considered a contraindication to becoming pregnant. However, there are few published reports related to the diagnosis of this condition after delivery. We describe three PH cases diagnosed after their normal pregnancies and deliveries. Although the causes are unknown, several mechanisms such as hypercoagulation, placental hypoxia or amniotic fluid embolism have been considered as possible causes. It is difficult to define whether a PH diagnosed in the postpartum period, relates to an earlier asymptomatic PH period that was triggered by the physiological stress of labor or if it is a recently acquired condition. Despite the lack of data to support the absence of PH previous to pregnancy in our three patients, lack of events during this period, asymptomatic and normal deliveries, lead us to believe that they did not suffer this disease prior to pregnancy; considering that high hemodynamic demands impair a ventricle with little reserve, and its subsequent appearance at time of delivery. PMID:25637900

  2. Developmental programming and hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nuyt, Anne Monique; Alexander, Barbara T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review There is a growing body of evidence linking adverse events or exposures during early life and adult-onset diseases. After important epidemiological studies from many parts of the world, research now focuses on mechanisms of organ dysfunction and on refining the understanding of the interaction between common elements of adverse perinatal conditions, such as nutrition, oxidants, and toxins exposures. This review will focus on advances in our comprehension of developmental programming of hypertension. Recent findings Recent studies have unraveled important mechanisms of oligonephronia and impaired renal function, altered vascular function and structure as well as sympathetic regulation of the cardiovascular system. Furthermore, interactions between prenatal insults and postnatal conditions are the subject of intensive